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Sample records for aureofaciens strain tx-1

  1. [Tryptophan 7-halogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain: gene cloning and sequencing and the enzyme expression].

    PubMed

    Burd', V N; van Pee, K H

    2004-01-01

    The gene of tryptophan 7-halogenase was isolated from the Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain producing pyrrolnitrin, a chlorocontaining antibiotic, and sequenced. A high homology degree (over 95%) was established for the genes and the corresponding halogenases from P. aureofaciens ACN and P. fluorescens BL915. The tryptophan 7-halogenase gene was amplified by PCR, and the corresponding enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli cells using the pBSII SK+ vector.

  2. [The insecto-fungicidal preparation, gaupsin, isolated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens strains].

    PubMed

    Goral', V M; Lappa, N V; Goral', S V; Garagulia, A D; Kiprianova, E A; Omel'ianets, T G; Smirnov, V V

    1999-01-01

    The integrated insectofungicidal preparation Gaupsin was developed on the basis of the Pseudomonas aureofaciens strains UKM V-111, which is active against bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and UKM V-306, active against codling moth larvae. Gaupsin is an effective means for protection of orchards against moths and fungi. A method for production of Gaupsin in the liquid form with a titer of not less than 1 x 10(10) cells/ml under aeration conditions was elaborated. After spraying, the preparation remained on apple leaves for seven days. The efficiency of Gaupsin against codling moth was 88-94%. The effect of a fungal attack decreased 10 to 25-fold.

  3. [Antifungal and antiviral substances of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strains--components of gaupsin].

    PubMed

    Kiprianova, E A; Shepelevich, V V; Klochko, V V; Ostapchuk, A N; Varbanets, L D; Skokliuk, L B; Berezkina, A E; Avdeeva, L V

    2013-01-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic, 2-hydroxy-phenazine-carboxylic acid and 2-hydroxy-phenazine active against phytopathogenic fungi were detected in fermentation broth of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp.aureofaciens strains UCM B-111 and UCM B-306--components of insectofungicide biopreparation gaupsin using chromato-mass-spectrometric methods; strain B-306 produced antifungal antibiotic pyrrolnitrin together with phenazines. Supernatants of fermentation broth of P chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens B-111 and B-306 strains grown in King A medium and exopolymers preparations obtained from these supernatants using evaporation, dialysis and liophylisation were highly active against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). At a dose of 10 mg/ml they reduced TMV infectivity by 76-96%, at concentrations 1 and 0.1 mg/ml the antiviral effect was decreased to 40-62 and 14-27%, respectively. Dialysis did not influence the antiviral activity of isolated preparations. The latter contained 2-7.6 % of carbohydrates including neutral monosaccharides: fucose, mannose, galactose and glucose.

  4. Structural characterization of the O-chain polysaccharide from an environmentally beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71.

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Giuseppina; Puopolo, Gerardo; Carillo, Sara; Zoina, Astolfo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Evidente, Antonio; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2011-12-13

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 was isolated from the root of a tomato plant and it was able to control in vivo Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici responsible for the tomato crown and root rot. Recently, strain M71 was evaluated even for its efficacy in controlling Seiridium cardinale, the causal agent of bark canker of common cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.). Strain M71 ability to persist on the tomato rhizosphere and on the aerial part of cypress plants could be related to the nature of the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) present on the outer membrane and in particular to the O-specific polysaccharide. A neutral O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide from P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71. By means of compositional analyses and NMR spectroscopy, the chemical repeating unit of the polymer was identified as the following linear trisaccharide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas nitroreducens Strain TX1, Which Degrades Nonionic Surfactants and Estrogen-Like Alkylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin; Hu, Anyi; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas nitroreducens TX1 ATCC PTA-6168 was isolated from rice field drainage in Taiwan. The bacterium is of special interest because of its capability to use nonionic surfactants (alkylphenol polyethoxylates) and estrogen-like compounds (4-t-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol) as a sole carbon source. This is the first report on the genome sequence of P. nitroreducens. PMID:24482523

  6. Metabolism of Tryptophans by Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Elander, Richard P.; Mabe, James A.; Hamill, Robert H.; Gorman, Marvin

    1968-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Pseudomonas, classified as P. fluorescens biotype D or E or as P. multivorans, were examined for the production of pyrrolnitrin, an antifungal agent synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Eight strains were shown to produce pyrrolnitrin in shake-flask fermentation. Four cultures were from the multivorans taxon, and the remaining four were members of the fluorescens group. The antifungal agent produced in these strains was isolated and shown to be pyrrolnitrin by comparison with an authentic sample. The strains differed markedly with respect to the amount of pyrrolnitrin produced and in their utilization of exogenous tryptophan. Secondary metabolites, not related to pyrrolnitrin, were also examined and compared with those synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Marked differences were noted in both phenazine pigments and phenolic metabolites. The results of the study suggest that the production of pyrrolnitrin may be widespread in selected taxonomic groups of Pseudomonas. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4968963

  7. Altering the Ratio of Phenazines in Pseudomonas chlororaphis (aureofaciens) Strain 30-84: Effects on Biofilm Formation and Pathogen Inhibition▿

    PubMed Central

    Maddula, V. S. R. K.; Pierson, E. A.; Pierson, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 30-84 is a plant-beneficial bacterium that is able to control take-all disease of wheat caused by the fungal pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. The production of phenazines (PZs) by strain 30-84 is the primary mechanism of pathogen inhibition and contributes to the persistence of strain 30-84 in the rhizosphere. PZ production is regulated in part by the PhzR/PhzI quorum-sensing (QS) system. Previous flow cell analyses demonstrated that QS and PZs are involved in biofilm formation in P. chlororaphis (V. S. R. K. Maddula, Z. Zhang, E. A. Pierson, and L. S. Pierson III, Microb. Ecol. 52:289-301, 2006). P. chlororaphis produces mainly two PZs, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and 2-hydroxy-PCA (2-OH-PCA). In the present study, we examined the effect of altering the ratio of PZs produced by P. chlororaphis on biofilm formation and pathogen inhibition. As part of this study, we generated derivatives of strain 30-84 that produced only PCA or overproduced 2-OH-PCA. Using flow cell assays, we found that these PZ-altered derivatives of strain 30-84 differed from the wild type in initial attachment, mature biofilm architecture, and dispersal from biofilms. For example, increased 2-OH-PCA production promoted initial attachment and altered the three-dimensional structure of the mature biofilm relative to the wild type. Additionally, both alterations promoted thicker biofilm development and lowered dispersal rates compared to the wild type. The PZ-altered derivatives of strain 30-84 also differed in their ability to inhibit the fungal pathogen G. graminis var. tritici. Loss of 2-OH-PCA resulted in a significant reduction in the inhibition of G. graminis var. tritici. Our findings suggest that alterations in the ratios of antibiotic secondary metabolites synthesized by an organism may have complex and wide-ranging effects on its biology. PMID:18263718

  8. The biosynthesis of brominated pyrrolnitrin derivatives by Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    van Pée, K H; Salcher, O; Fischer, P; Bokel, M; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    The mutant strain ACN of Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 produces several bromo derivatives of pyrrolnitrin. Five brominated amino- and three brominated nitrophenyl pyrrole compounds could be isolated, and their structures were established by 1H NMR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The isolated amino compounds showed no biological activity; the nitro derivatives inhibited the growth of Neurospora crassa ATCC 9276, though not as effective as pyrrolnitrin itself. 2-Carboxy-4-(2-amino-3-bromophenyl)pyrrole (X) is demonstrated to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of brominated pyrrolnitrin; the biosynthetic pathway to bromo derivatives of pyrrolnitrin is discussed.

  9. Metabolism of tryptophans by Pseudomonas aureofaciens. VI. Production of pyrrolnitrin by selected Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Elander, R P; Mabe, J A; Hamill, R H; Gorman, M

    1968-05-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Pseudomonas, classified as P. fluorescens biotype D or E or as P. multivorans, were examined for the production of pyrrolnitrin, an antifungal agent synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Eight strains were shown to produce pyrrolnitrin in shake-flask fermentation. Four cultures were from the multivorans taxon, and the remaining four were members of the fluorescens group. The antifungal agent produced in these strains was isolated and shown to be pyrrolnitrin by comparison with an authentic sample. The strains differed markedly with respect to the amount of pyrrolnitrin produced and in their utilization of exogenous tryptophan. Secondary metabolites, not related to pyrrolnitrin, were also examined and compared with those synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Marked differences were noted in both phenazine pigments and phenolic metabolites. The results of the study suggest that the production of pyrrolnitrin may be widespread in selected taxonomic groups of Pseudomonas.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a mutant of Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 with an increased capacity for synthesis of pyrrolnitrin.

    PubMed

    Salcher, O; Lingens, F

    1980-06-01

    A mutant having a 30-fold increased ability to synthesize pyrrolnitrin was isolated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 after mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain also differed from the parent strain in pigmentation and in its inability to catabolize anthranilic acid and the benzene moiety of tryptophan and kynurenine.

  11. phzO, a Gene for Biosynthesis of 2-Hydroxylated Phenazine Compounds in Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Shannon M.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Bonsall, Robert F.; Thomashow, Linda S.

    2001-01-01

    Certain strains of root-colonizing fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. produce phenazines, a class of antifungal metabolites that can provide protection against various soilborne root pathogens. Despite the fact that the phenazine biosynthetic locus is highly conserved among fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., individual strains differ in the range of phenazine compounds they produce. This study focuses on the ability of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 to produce 2-hydroxyphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA) and 2-hydroxyphenazine from the common phenazine metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). P. aureofaciens 30-84 contains a novel gene located downstream from the core phenazine operon that encodes a 55-kDa aromatic monooxygenase responsible for the hydroxylation of PCA to produce 2-OH-PCA. Knowledge of the genes responsible for phenazine product specificity could ultimately reveal ways to manipulate organisms to produce multiple phenazines or novel phenazines not previously described. PMID:11114932

  12. Metabolism of tryptophan by Pseudomonas aureofaciens and its relationship to pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Salcher, O; Lingens, F

    1980-12-01

    Studies on the metabolism of tryptophan in Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 revealed different metabolic routes for the L- and D-isomer besides the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin synthesis. L-Tryptophan catabolism follows the aromatic route via anthranilic acid. Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase were induced by L-tryptophan. Kynureninase and anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase were induced by L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase was absent from a mutant strain of P. aureofaciens ATCC 19526 which produced about 30-fold increased amounts of pyrrolnitrin. The Km values of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and kynureninase did not differ substantially between the two strains. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase, 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase, tryptophanase and indolyl-3-alkane alpha-hydroxylase activities were not detected. D- and L-tryptophan were converted to indole-3-acetic acid. This additional catabolic pathway was well as tryptophan racemase activity was constitutive and present in both strains.

  13. Metabolism of Tryptophan by Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, R. L.; Elander, R. P.; Mabe, J. A.; Gorman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Exogenous tryptophan is metabolized by Pseudomonas aureofaciens to yield pyrrolnitrin [3-chloro-4-(2′-nitro-3′-chlorophenyl)-pyrrole], an antifungal agent. The ability of this culture to metabolize tryptophan analogues in a similar manner was investigated by addition of the appropriate compound to the fermentation. Tryptophan precursors and metabolites or nonphenyl-substituted tryptophans had little effect on pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis, but simple derivatives of indole inhibited the production of pyrrolnitrin. Tryptophans substituted at the 4 position decreased pyrrolnitrin production and were converted into the corresponding substituted indoles. Tryptophans substituted at the 5, 6, and 7 position with fluorine or at the 5 and 7 position with methyl yielded new pyrrolnitrin derivatives. Substitution of larger groups (such as chloro, bromo, trifluoromethyl, and methoxy) at these positions led to the formation of the intermediate, amino pyrrolnitrin [3-chloro-4-(2′-amino-3′-chlorophenyl)-pyrrole], with the appropriate new substituent. The trifluoromethyl group at the 6 position of tryptophan prevented chlorination at the 3 position of pyrrolnitrin. Images PMID:4316270

  14. Deciphering and engineering of the final step halogenase for improved chlortetracycline biosynthesis in industrial Streptomyces aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Cheng, Xueqing; Liu, Yuntian; Deng, Zixin; You, Delin

    2013-09-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) is an important member from antibiotics tetracycline (TC) family, which inhibits protein synthesis in bacteria and is widely involved in clinical therapy, animal feeds and aquaculture. Previous works have reported intricately the biosynthesis of CTC from the intermediates in random mutants of Streptomyces aureofaciens and the crucial chlorination remained unclear. We have developed the genetic manipulation in an industrial producer, in which about 15.0g/l CTC predominated along with 1.2g/l TC, and discovered that chlorination by ctcP (an FADH2-dependent halogenase gene) is the last inefficient step during CTC biosynthesis. Firstly, the ΔctcP strain accumulated about 18.9g/l "clean" TC without KBr addition and abolished the production of CTC. Subsequently, CtcP was identified to exhibit a substrate stereo-specificity to absolute TC (4S) rather than TC (4R), with low kcat of 0.51±0.01min(-1), while it could halogenate several TC analogs. Accordingly, we devised a strategy for overexpression of ctcP in S. aureofaciens and improved CTC production to a final titer of 25.9g/l. We anticipate that our work will provide a biotechnological potential of enzymatic evolution and strain engineering towards new TC derivatives in microorganisms. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proton Testing of nVidia Jetson TX1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyrwas, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Single-Event Effects (SEE) testing was conducted on the nVidia Jetson TX1 System on Chip (SOC); herein referred to as device under test (DUT). Testing was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospitals (MGH) Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center on October 16th, 2016 using 200MeV protons. This testing trip was purposed to provide a baseline assessment of the radiation susceptibility of the DUT as no previous testing had been conducted on this component.

  16. Inhibition of Chlorination in Streptomyces aureofaciens by Nitriles and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Joseph J.; Matrishin, Mary

    1973-01-01

    A number of nitriles and cyano compounds inhibited chlorination by Streptomyces aureofaciens. In most cases, this inhibition was enhanced by bromide. Methylene blue and p-amino-propiophenone reversed the inhibition to some extent. PMID:4208277

  17. AaTX1, from Androctonus australis scorpion venom: purification, synthesis and characterization in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Mlayah-Bellalouna, Saoussen; Dufour, Martial; Mabrouk, Kamel; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Carlier, Edmond; Othman, Houcemeddine; Belghazi, Maya; Tarbe, Marion; Goaillard, Jean Marc; Gigmes, Didier; Seagar, Michael; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Debanne, Dominique; Srairi-Abid, Najet

    2014-12-15

    We have purified the AaTX1 peptide from the Androctonus australis (Aa) scorpion venom, previously cloned and sequenced by Legros and collaborators in a venom gland cDNA library from Aa scorpion. AaTX1 belongs to the α-Ktx15 scorpion toxins family (αKTx15-4). Characterized members of this family share high sequence similarity and were found to block preferentially IA-type voltage-dependent K(+) currents in rat cerebellum granular cells in an irreversible way. In the current work, we studied the effects of native AaTX1 (nAaTX1) using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of IA current in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons. At 250 nM, AaTX1 induces 90% decrease in IA current amplitude. Its activity was found to be comparable to that of rAmmTX3 (αKTx15-3), which differs by only one conserved (R/K) amino acid in the 19th position suggesting that the difference between R19 and K19 in AaTX1 and AmmTX3, respectively, may not be critical for the toxins' effects. Molecular docking of both toxins with Kv4.3 channel is in agreement with experimental data and suggests the implication of the functional dyade K27-Y36 in toxin-channel interactions. Since AaTX1 is not highly abundant in Aa venom, it was synthesized as well as AmmTX3. Synthetic peptides, native AaTX1 and rAmmTX3 peptides showed qualitatively the same pharmacological activity. Overall, these data identify a new biologically active toxin that belongs to a family of peptides active on Kv4.3 channel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ15NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ34SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ13CDIC (from - 7.7‰ to - 12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was - 4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ13C = - 12.4‰). No SO42 - and δ34SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ13CDIC during DIC consumption (εC = - 7.8‰) and δ34SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN = - 12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  19. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ(15)NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ(34)SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ(13)CDIC (from -7.7‰ to -12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was -4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ(13)C=-12.4‰). No SO4(2-) and δ(34)SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ(13)CDIC during DIC consumption (εC=-7.8‰) and δ(34)SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN=-12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  20. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. TX1 on a wide range of octylphenol polyethoxylate concentrations and the formation of dicarboxylated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hsieh, Hsiao-Cheng; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. TX1, is able to use octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEO(n), or Triton X-100; average n = 9.5) as a sole carbon source. It can grow on 0.05-20% of OPEO(n) with a specific growth rate of 0.34-0.44 h(-1). High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of OPEO(n) degraded metabolites revealed that strain TX1 was able to shorten the ethoxylate chain and produce octylphenol (OP). Furthermore, formation of the short carboxylate metabolites, such as carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxylates (COPEO(n), n = 2, 3) and carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (COPEC(n), n = 2, 3) began at the log stage, while octylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (OPEC(n), n = 1-3) was formed at the stationary phase. All the short-ethoxylated metabolites, OPEO(n), OPEC(n), COPEO(n), and COPEC(n), accumulated when the cells were in the stationary phase. This study is the first to demonstrate the formation of COPEO(n) and COPEC(n) from OPEO(n) by an aerobic bacterium.

  1. The biosynthesis of the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin by Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Chang, C J; Floss, H G; Hook, D J; Mabe, J A; Manni, P E; Martin, L L; Schröder, K; Shieh, T L

    1981-05-01

    Feeding experiments with tryptophan samples labeled specifically with radioactive and stable isotopes have shown that Pseudomonas aureofaciens converts this amino acid into pyrrolnitrin in such a way that the indole nitrogen gives rise to the nitro group, the amino group becomes the pyrrole nitrogen, C-3 of the precursor side chain becomes C-3 of the antibiotic, and H-2 of the indole ring and H-alpha of the side chain give rise to H-5 and H-2 of pyrrolnitrin, respectively. Only the L-isomer of tryptophan is incorporated with retention of the alpha-hydrogen and the amino nitrogen. From the D-isomer the labels from these two positions are lost. The obvious conclusion that L-tryptophan is the more immediate precursor is, however, contradicted by the better incorporation of D- than L-tryptophan into the antibiotic. Several potential pathway intermediates were evaluated for incorporation and 4-(0-aminophenyl)-pyrrole was found to be a good precursor. The results area discussed in terms of a plausible pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis.

  2. A Venom-derived Neurotoxin, CsTx-1, from the Spider Cupiennius salei Exhibits Cytolytic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Fedorova, Irina M.; Lüscher, Benjamin P.; Kopp, Lukas S.; Trachsel, Christian; Schaller, Johann; Vu, Xuan Lan; Seebeck, Thomas; Streitberger, Kathrin; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Sigel, Erwin; Magazanik, Lev G.

    2012-01-01

    CsTx-1, the main neurotoxic acting peptide in the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei, is composed of 74 amino acid residues, exhibits an inhibitory cysteine knot motif, and is further characterized by its highly cationic charged C terminus. Venom gland cDNA library analysis predicted a prepropeptide structure for CsTx-1 precursor. In the presence of trifluoroethanol, CsTx-1 and the long C-terminal part alone (CT1-long; Gly-45–Lys-74) exhibit an α-helical structure, as determined by CD measurements. CsTx-1 and CT1-long are insecticidal toward Drosophila flies and destroys Escherichia coli SBS 363 cells. CsTx-1 causes a stable and irreversible depolarization of insect larvae muscle cells and frog neuromuscular preparations, which seem to be receptor-independent. Furthermore, this membranolytic activity could be measured for Xenopus oocytes, in which CsTx-1 and CT1-long increase ion permeability non-specifically. These results support our assumption that the membranolytic activities of CsTx-1 are caused by its C-terminal tail, CT1-long. Together, CsTx-1 exhibits two different functions; as a neurotoxin it inhibits L-type Ca2+ channels, and as a membranolytic peptide it destroys a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell membranes. Such a dualism is discussed as an important new mechanism for the evolution of spider venomous peptides. PMID:22613721

  3. Strict control of auricin production in Streptomyces aureofaciens CCM 3239 involves a feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kutas, Peter; Feckova, Lubomira; Rehakova, Alena; Novakova, Renata; Homerova, Dagmar; Mingyar, Erik; Rezuchova, Bronislava; Sevcikova, Beatrica; Kormanec, Jan

    2013-03-01

    The polyketide gene cluster aur1 is responsible for the production of the angucycline antibiotic auricin in Streptomyces aureofaciens CCM 3239. Auricin production is regulated in a complex manner involving several regulators, including a key pathway-specific positive regulator Aur1P that belongs to the family of 'atypical' response regulators. Production of auricin is induced after entry into stationary phase. However, auricin was produced in only a short time interval of several hours. We found that the decrease of auricin production was due to a strict regulation of auricin biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level by a feedback mechanism; auricin and/or its intermediate(s) inhibited binding of Aur1P to its cognate biosynthetic promoter aur1Ap and consequently stopped its activation. In addition, we also determined that synthesised auricin is unstable during growth of S. aureofaciens CCM3239 in the production medium even though purified auricin is stable for days in various organic solvents. The critical parameter affecting its stability was pH. Auricin is stable at acid pH and unstable at neutral and alkaline pH. The drop in auricin concentration was due to an increase of pH shortly after induction of auricin production during cultivation of S. aureofaciens CCM3239.

  4. A Second Quorum-Sensing System Regulates Cell Surface Properties but Not Phenazine Antibiotic Production in Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongge; Pierson, Leland S.

    2001-01-01

    The root-associated biological control bacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 produces a range of exoproducts, including protease and phenazines. Phenazine antibiotic biosynthesis by phzXYFABCD is regulated in part by the PhzR-PhzI quorum-sensing system. Mutants defective in phzR or phzI produce very low levels of phenazines but wild-type levels of exoprotease. In the present study, a second genomic region of strain 30-84 was identified that, when present in trans, increased β-galactosidase activity in a genomic phzB::lacZ reporter and partially restored phenazine production to a phzR mutant. Sequence analysis identified two adjacent genes, csaR and csaI, that encode members of the LuxR-LuxI family of regulatory proteins. No putative promoter region is present upstream of the csaI start codon and no lux box-like element was found in either the csaR promoter or the 30-bp intergenic region between csaR and csaI. Both the PhzR-PhzI and CsaR-CsaI systems are regulated by the GacS-GacA two-component regulatory system. In contrast to the multicopy effects of csaR and csaI in trans, a genomic csaR mutant (30-84R2) and a csaI mutant (30-84I2) did not exhibit altered phenazine production in vitro or in situ, indicating that the CsaR-CsaI system is not involved in phenazine regulation in strain 30-84. Both mutants also produced wild-type levels of protease. However, disruption of both csaI and phzI or both csaR and phzR eliminated both phenazine and protease production completely. Thus, the two quorum-sensing systems do not interact for phenazine regulation but do interact for protease regulation. Additionally, the CsaI N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal was not recognized by the phenazine AHL reporter 30-84I/Z but was recognized by the AHL reporters Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136(pCF240). Inactivation of csaR resulted in a smooth mucoid colony phenotype and formation of cell aggregates in broth, suggesting that CsaR is involved in

  5. Balanced Reciprocal Translocation t(X;1) in a Girl with Tall Stature and Primary Amenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Zahra; Momtaz, Hossein Emad

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations constitute one of the most important, yet uncommon, causes of primary amenorrhea and gonadal dysgenesis. Although X-autosome translocations are frequently associated with streak gonads and clinical features of the Turner syndrome, the majority of X-autosome carriers may present with a variable phenotype, developmental delay, and recognizable X-linked syndrome due to nonrandom X-inactivation. In this article, we describe a healthy 15.5-year-old girl with primary amenorrhea, gonadal dysgenesis, and tall stature without other manifestations of the Turner syndrome. Relevant clinical, biochemical, endocrinological, and cytogenetical evaluations were performed. Initial investigations revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (FSH=134 mIU/mL [normal=10–15 mIU/mL], LH=47.5 [normal=10–15 mIU/mL], and estradiol=24.3 pmol/L). On ultrasound examination of the pelvis, streak ovaries with a hypoplastic uterus were noted. Chromosome study, performed according to routine procedures, revealed an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation involving the short arm of chromosome 1(p2) and the long arm of the X chromosome (q2) in all the cells with the following karyotype: 46,X,t(1;X)(p13;q22). She was placed on hormone replacement therapy. In our patient, X-autosome translocation was associated with gonadal dysgenesis and tall stature. We conclude that t(X;1) may be associated with gonadal dysgenesis without other congenital abnormalities. To our knowledge, normal phenotype with gonadal dysgenesis and tall stature in association with t(X;1) translocation has not been previously reported. PMID:28360449

  6. N-acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated regulation of phenazine gene expression by Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D W; Gong, F; Daykin, M M; Williams, P; Pierson, L S

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is a soilborne bacterium that colonizes the wheat rhizosphere. This strain produces three phenazine antibiotics which suppress take-all disease of wheat by inhibition of the causative agent Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Phenazines also enhance survival of 30-84 within the wheat rhizosphere in competition with other organisms. Expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon is controlled by the phzR/phzI N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) response system (L. S. Pierson III et al., J. Bacterial 176:3966-3974, 1994; D. W. Wood and L. S. Pierson III, Gene 168:49-53, 1996). By using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the AHL produced by PhzI has now been identified as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (HHL). In addition, the ability of HHL to serve as an interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere has been examined by using isogenic reporter strains. Disruption of phzI reduced expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon 1,000-fold in the wheat rhizosphere. Coinoculation of an isogenic strain which produced the endogenous HHL signal restored phenazine gene expression in the phzI mutant to wild-type levels in situ. These results demonstrate that HHL is required for phenazine expression in situ and is an effective interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere. PMID:9401023

  7. Effects of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 63-28 on defense responses in soybean plants infected by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Jin; Park, Ro-Dong; Mabood, Fazli; Souleimanov, Alfred; L Smith, Donald

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the ability of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 63-28 to induce plant defense systems, including defense-related enzyme levels and expression of defense-related isoenzymes, and isoflavone production, leading to improved resistance to the phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 in soybean seedlings. Seven-dayold soybean seedlings were inoculated with P. aureofaciens 63-28, R. solani AG-4, or P. aureofaciens 63-28 plus R. solani AG-4 (P+R), or not inoculated (control). After 7 days of incubation, roots treated with R. solani AG-4 had obvious damping-off symptoms, but P+R-treated soybean plants had less disease development, indicating suppression of R. solani AG-4 in soybean seedlings. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities of R. solani AG-4-treated roots increased by 24.6% and 54.0%, respectively, compared with control roots. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities of R. solani AG-4-treated roots were increased by 75.1% and 23.6%, respectively. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in soybean roots challenged with P. aureofaciens 63-28 and P+R increased by 25.0% and 11.6%, respectively. Mn-SOD (S1 band on gel) and Fe-SOD (S2) were strongly induced in P+R-treated roots, whereas one CAT (C1) and one APX (A3) were strongly induced in R. solani AG-4- treated roots. The total isoflavone concentration in P+Rtreated shoots was 27.2% greater than the control treatment. The isoflavone yield of R. solani AG-4-treated shoots was 60.9% less than the control.

  8. Negative Cross-Communication among Wheat Rhizosphere Bacteria: Effect on Antibiotic Production by the Biological Control Bacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84

    PubMed Central

    Morello, J. E.; Pierson, E. A.; Pierson, L. S.

    2004-01-01

    Phenazine antibiotic production in the biological control bacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is regulated in part via the PhzR/PhzI N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) system. Previous work showed that a subpopulation of the wheat rhizosphere community positively affected phenazine gene expression in strain 30-84 via AHL signals (E. A. Pierson, D. W. Wood, J. A. Cannon, F. M. Blachere, and L. S. Pierson III, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 11:1078-1084, 1998). In the present work, a second subpopulation, one that negatively affected phenazine gene expression, was identified from this rhizosphere community. Strain 30-84 grown in conditioned medium (CM) from several strains produced lower levels of phenazines (1.5- to 9.3-fold) than control when grown in CM from the strain 30-84I1/I2. Growth of the phzB::lacZ reporter strain 30-84Z in this CM resulted in decreased lacZ expression (4.3- to 9.2-fold) compared to growth of the control strain in CM, indicating that inhibition of phzB occurred at the level of gene expression. Preliminary chemical and biological characterizations suggested that these signals, unlike other identified negative signals, were not extractable in ethyl acetate. Introduction of extra copies of phzR and phzI, but not phzI alone, in trans into strain 30-84Z reduced the negative effect on phzB::lacZ expression. The presence of negative-signal-producing strains in a mixture with strain 30-84 reduced strain 30-84's ability to inhibit the take-all disease pathogen in vitro. Together, the results from the previous work on the positive-signal subpopulation and the present work on the negative-signal subpopulation suggest that cross-communication among members of the rhizosphere community and strain 30-84 may control secondary metabolite production and pathogen inhibition. PMID:15128573

  9. Binding sites and actions of Tx1, a neurotoxin from the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, in guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Santos, R G; Diniz, C R; Cordeiro, M N; De Lima, M E

    1999-12-01

    Tx1, a neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer, produces tail elevation, behavioral excitation and spastic paralysis of the hind limbs after intracerebroventricular injection in mice. Since Tx1 contracts isolated guinea pig ileum, we have investigated the effect of this toxin on acetylcholine release, as well as its binding to myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea pig ileum. [125I]-Tx1 binds specifically and with high affinity (Kd = 0.36 +/- 0.02 nM) to a single, non-interacting (nH = 1.1), low capacity (Bmax 1.1 pmol/mg protein) binding site. In competition experiments using several compounds (including ion channel ligands), only PhTx2 and PhTx3 competed with [125I]-Tx1 for specific binding sites (K0.5 apparent = 7.50 x 10(-4) g/l and 1.85 x 10(-5) g/l, respectively). PhTx2 and PhTx3, fractions from P. nigriventer venom, contain toxins acting on sodium and calcium channels, respectively. However, the neurotoxin PhTx2-6, one of the isoforms found in the PhTx2 pool, did not affect [125I]-Tx1 binding. Tx1 reduced the [3H]-ACh release evoked by the PhTx2 pool by 33%, but did not affect basal or KCl-induced [3H]-ACh release. Based on these results, as well as on the homology of Tx1 with toxins acting on calcium channels (omega-Aga IA and IB) and its competition with [125I]-omega-Cono GVIA in the central nervous system, we suggest that the target site for Tx1 may be calcium channels.

  10. A potent and Kv1.3-selective analogue of the scorpion toxin HsTX1 as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. Harunur; Huq, Redwan; Tanner, Mark R.; Chhabra, Sandeep; Khoo, Keith K.; Estrada, Rosendo; Dhawan, Vikas; Chauhan, Satendra; Pennington, Michael W.; Beeton, Christine; Kuyucak, Serdar; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-03-01

    HsTX1 toxin, from the scorpion Heterometrus spinnifer, is a 34-residue, C-terminally amidated peptide cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. Here we describe new HsTX1 analogues with an Ala, Phe, Val or Abu substitution at position 14. Complexes of HsTX1 with the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.1 were created using docking and molecular dynamics simulations, then umbrella sampling simulations were performed to construct the potential of mean force (PMF) of the ligand and calculate the corresponding binding free energy for the most stable configuration. The PMF method predicted that the R14A mutation in HsTX1 would yield a > 2 kcal/mol gain for the Kv1.3/Kv1.1 selectivity free energy relative to the wild-type peptide. Functional assays confirmed the predicted selectivity gain for HsTX1[R14A] and HsTX1[R14Abu], with an affinity for Kv1.3 in the low picomolar range and a selectivity of more than 2,000-fold for Kv1.3 over Kv1.1. This remarkable potency and selectivity for Kv1.3, which is significantly up-regulated in activated effector memory cells in humans, suggest that these analogues represent valuable leads in the development of therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

  11. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed

    Savarin, P; Romi-Lebrun, R; Zinn-Justin, S; Lebrun, B; Nakajima, T; Gilquin, B; Menez, A

    1999-12-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels.

  12. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, P.; Romi-Lebrun, R.; Zinn-Justin, S.; Lebrun, B.; Nakajima, T.; Gilquin, B.; Menez, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:10631983

  13. Solution structure of GxTX-1E, a high affinity tarantula toxin interacting with voltage sensors in Kv2.1 potassium channels†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungkyu; Milescu, Mirela; Jung, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Yeon; Bae, Chan Hyung; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Ha Hyung; Swartz, Kenton J.; Kim, Jae Il

    2010-01-01

    GxTX-1E is a neurotoxin recently isolated from Plesiophrictus guangxiensis venom that inhibits the Kv2.1 channel in pancreatic β-cells. The sequence of the toxin is related to previously studied tarantula toxins that interact with the voltage sensors in Kv channels, and GxTX-1E interacts with the Kv2.1 channel with unusually high affinity, making it particularly useful for structural and mechanistic studies. Here we determined the three-dimensional solution structure of GxTX-1E using NMR spectroscopy and compared it to that of several related tarantula toxins. The molecular structure of GxTX-1E is similar to tarantula toxins that target voltage sensors in Kv channels in that it contains an ICK motif, composed of β-strands, and contains a prominent cluster of solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues surrounded by polar residues. When compared with the structure of SGTx1, a toxin for which mutagenesis data are available, the residue compositions of the two toxins are distinct in regions that are critical for activity, suggesting that their modes of binding to voltage sensors may be different. Interestingly, the structural architecture of GxTX-1E is also similar to JZTX-III, a tarantula toxin that interacts with Kv2.1 with low affinity. The most striking structural differences between GxTX-1E and JZTX-III are found in the orientation between the first and second cysteine loops and the C-terminal region of the toxins, suggesting that these regions of GxTX-1E are responsible for its high affinity. PMID:20509680

  14. Solution structure of GxTX-1E, a high-affinity tarantula toxin interacting with voltage sensors in Kv2.1 potassium channels .

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungkyu; Milescu, Mirela; Jung, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Yeon; Bae, Chan Hyung; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Ha Hyung; Swartz, Kenton J; Kim, Jae Il

    2010-06-29

    GxTX-1E is a neurotoxin recently isolated from Plesiophrictus guangxiensis venom that inhibits the Kv2.1 channel in pancreatic beta-cells. The sequence of the toxin is related to those of previously studied tarantula toxins that interact with the voltage sensors in Kv channels, and GxTX-1E interacts with the Kv2.1 channel with unusually high affinity, making it particularly useful for structural and mechanistic studies. Here we determined the three-dimensional solution structure of GxTX-1E using NMR spectroscopy and compared it to that of several related tarantula toxins. The molecular structure of GxTX-1E is similar to those of tarantula toxins that target voltage sensors in Kv channels in that it contains an ICK motif, composed of beta-strands, and contains a prominent cluster of solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues surrounded by polar residues. When compared with the structure of SGTx1, a toxin for which mutagenesis data are available, the residue compositions of the two toxins are distinct in regions that are critical for activity, suggesting that their modes of binding to voltage sensors may be different. Interestingly, the structural architecture of GxTX-1E is also similar to that of JZTX-III, a tarantula toxin that interacts with Kv2.1 with low affinity. The most striking structural differences between GxTX-1E and JZTX-III are found in the orientation between the first and second cysteine loops and the C-terminal region of the toxins, suggesting that these regions of GxTX-1E are responsible for its high affinity.

  15. Kitasatospora putterlickiae sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere soil, transfer of Streptomyces kifunensis to the genus Kitasatospora as Kitasatospora kifunensis comb. nov., and emended description of Streptomyces aureofaciens Duggar 1948.

    PubMed

    Groth, Ingrid; Schütze, Barbara; Boettcher, Theresa; Pullen, Christian B; Rodriguez, Carlos; Leistner, Eckhard; Goodfellow, Michael

    2003-11-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic position of a rhizosphere isolate that had been assigned provisionally to the genus Kitasatospora. The organism, isolate F18-98(T), was found to have chemical and morphological properties that were consistent with its classification as a Kitasatospora strain. Direct 16S rDNA sequence data confirmed the taxonomic position of the strain, following the generation of phylogenetic trees by using three treeing algorithms. The organism formed a 16S rDNA subclade with Kitasatospora azatica and Streptomyces kifunensis, but was distinguished readily from the latter by using a combination of biochemical and physiological properties. Genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain F18-98(T) should be classified in the genus Kitasatospora as a novel species, for which the name Kitasatospora putterlickiae sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain has been deposited in culture collections as strain F18-98(T) (=DSM 44665(T)=NCIMB 13932(T)). It is also proposed that Streptomyces kifunensis should be transferred to the genus Kitasatospora as Kitasatospora kifunensis comb. nov. An emended description of Streptomyces aureofaciens Duggar 1948 is also given.

  16. Identification of a Genetic Locus in Pseudomonas aureofaciens Involved in Fungal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, F. L.; Conner, A. J.; Mahanty, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    In iron-rich conditions, Pseudomonas aureofaciens PA147-2 produces an antibiotic-like compound that inhibits the growth of a plant fungal pathogen, Aphanomyces euteiches. To contribute to the potential use of PA147-2 as a biocontrol organism, we report the identification of a genetic locus important for antibiotic biosynthesis. Mutants defective for fungal inhibition (Af-) were generated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Southern hybridization of total DNAs from three Af- mutants indicated that loss of fungal inhibition was due to a single Tn5 insertion in each mutant. Restriction mapping of the mutation points showed that in two mutants the Tn5 insertions were in the same 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment and were separated by 2.1 kb. A genomic library of PA147-2 was constructed and screened by using a region of DNA flanking the Tn5 insertion in one mutant (PA109) as a probe to recover complementing cosmids. Three cosmids containing a 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment complementary to the two mutants were recovered. Allele replacement by homologous recombination with putative complementing cosmids restored one mutant to antifungal activity against A. euteiches. Southern analysis of the complemented mutants confirmed that allele replacement had occurred between cosmid DNA and Tn5. The wild-type 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment was cloned from the cosmid and complemented the two mutants to antifungal activity. An antifungal compound was isolated from PA147-2 grown on solid medium. Antifungal activity correlated to a peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Under the same growth and extraction conditions, the antifungal activity seen in PA147-2 was absent in two Af- mutants. Furthermore, absence of an antifungal compound in each mutant correlated to the absence of the wild-type “antifungal” peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Images PMID:16349166

  17. A Novel Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent 2-Keto-d-Glucose Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Kiwamu; Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Sunagawa, Naoki; Makabe, Akiko; Isobe, Kazuo; Koba, Keisuke; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Igarashi, Kiyohiko

    2015-01-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme similar to a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent sugar dehydrogenase from filamentous fungi, which belongs to new auxiliary activities (AA) family 12 in the CAZy database, was cloned from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned enzyme showed only low homology to previously characterized PQQ-dependent enzymes, and multiple-sequence alignment analysis showed that the enzyme lacks one of the three conserved arginine residues that function as PQQ-binding residues in known PQQ-dependent enzymes. The recombinant enzyme was heterologously expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system for further characterization. The UV-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrum of the oxidized form of the holoenzyme, prepared by incubating the apoenzyme with PQQ and CaCl2, revealed a broad peak at approximately 350 nm, indicating that the enzyme binds PQQ. With the addition of 2-keto-d-glucose (2KG) to the holoenzyme solution, a sharp peak appeared at 331 nm, attributed to the reduction of PQQ bound to the enzyme, whereas no effect was observed upon 2KG addition to authentic PQQ. Enzymatic assay showed that the recombinant enzyme specifically reacted with 2KG in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, such as 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, when PQQ and CaCl2 were added. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) analysis of reaction products revealed 2-keto-d-gluconic acid (2KGA) as the main product, clearly indicating that the recombinant enzyme oxidizes the C-1 position of 2KG. Therefore, the enzyme was identified as a PQQ-dependent 2KG dehydrogenase (Pa2KGDH). Considering the high substrate specificity, the physiological function of Pa2KGDH may be for production of 2KGA. PMID:25645559

  18. Chemically Defined Medium for the Accumulation of Intracellular Malate Dehydrogenase by Streptomyces aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Laluce, Cecília; Ernandes, José Roberto; Molinari, Rubens

    1987-01-01

    A chemically defined medium was developed for the production of intracellular malate dehydrogenases by Streptomyces aureofaciens NRRL-B 1286. The composition of the medium (per liter) was as follows: 50 g of starch, 4 g of ammonium sulfate, 7.32 g of l-aspartic acid, 13.8 g of MgSO4 · 7H2O, 1.7 g of K2HPO4, 0.01 g of ZnSO4 · 7H2O, 0.01 g of FeSO4 · 7H2O, 0.01 g of MnSO4 · H2O, and 0.005 g of CoSO4 · 7H2O. The pH of the medium was adjusted to 6.7 to 7.0 after sterilization. The activity of the intracellular malate dehydrogenases of the crude cell extract was greatest after 40 h of mycelium growth in a rotary shaker at 30°C. The best temperature for the enzyme reactions was approximately 35°C for NAD+ activity at pH 9.7 and 40°C for NADP+ -linked enzyme at pH 9.0. The NAD+ activity required Mg2+, and both activities were sensitive to SH-group reagents. The NADP+ -dependent activity remained completely stable, and the NAD+ -dependent activity decreased to a very low residual level after 30 min at 60°C. PMID:16347416

  19. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules.

  20. Survival of GacS/GacA Mutants of the Biological Control Bacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 in the Wheat Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Wood, Derek W.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Pierson III, Leland S.

    2002-01-01

    GacS/GacA comprises a two-component regulatory system that controls the expression of secondary metabolites required for the control of plant diseases in many pseudomonads. High mutation frequencies of gacS and gacA have been observed in liquid culture. We examined whether gacS/gacA mutants could competitively displace the wild-type populations on roots and thus pose a threat to the efficacy of biological control. The survival of a gac mutant alone and in competition with the wild type on roots was examined in the biological control strain Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84. In this bacterium, GacS/GacA controls the expression of phenazine antibiotics that are inhibitory to plant pathogenic fungi and enhance the competitive survival of the bacterium. Wheat seedlings were inoculated with strain 30-84, and bacteria were recovered from roots after 21 days in sterile or nonsterile soil to check for the presence of gacS or gacA mutants. Although no mutants were detected in the inoculum, gacS/gacA mutants were recovered from 29 out of 31 roots and comprised up to 36% of the total bacterial populations. Southern hybridization analysis of the recovered gacA mutants did not indicate a conserved mutational mechanism. Replacement series analysis on roots utilizing strain 30-84 and a gacA mutant (30-84.gacA) or a gacS mutant (30-84.A2) demonstrated that although the mutant population partially displaced the wild type in sterile soil, it did not do so in natural soil. In fact, in natural soil final rhizosphere populations of wild-type strain 30-84 starting from mixtures were at least 1.5 times larger than would be predicted from their inoculation ratio and generally were greater than or equal to the population of wild type alone despite lower inoculation rates. These results indicate that although gacS/gacA mutants survive in natural rhizosphere populations, they do not displace wild-type populations. Better survival of wild-type populations in mixtures with mutants suggests that

  1. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5.

  2. COD reduction of textile effluent in three-phase fluidized bed bioreactor using Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sur, Dharmesh H; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigated the effect of mixed cultures of Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Escherichia coli and air as gas on degradation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in three-phase inverse fluidized beds (TPIFBs) for textile effluents with initial COD of 1200 ppm (effluent 1) and 640 ppm (effluent 2). Investigators focused on the importance of different design of gas spargers of the TPIFB for checking its effect on COD reduction performance. For this purpose, four different gas spargers were fabricated for gas flow entry into bioreactor with different  % open area: Gas sparger 1 (18% open area), sparger 2 (10.42% open area), sparger 3 (8.077% open area) and sparger 4 (1.53% open area). These percentage open area decided the amount of gas flow in a unit time in batch studies, which in turn rely mainly on superficial gas velocity. The reduction in COD was measured at two different superficial gas velocity (0.00343 and 0.004068 m/s) and at two ratio of static bed height to diameter (H/D) of 0.5 and 0.25 in an aerobic mode. Textile effluent 1 resulted in 98.07% COD reduction with sparger 3 and discharged at 23.14 ppm in 28 h. Textile effluent 2 resulted in 96.5% COD reduction with sparger 2 and discharged at 22.4 ppm in 22 h. The resulting COD values of Effluent 1 and effluent 2 were in range of discharge limit and resulted at a low gas velocity of 0.00343 m/s and low H/D ratio of 0.25. The gas holdup correlation was found to be ε g = 0.0064 U g(0.98) .

  3. Single Residue Substitutions That Confer Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channel Subtype Selectivity in the NaV1.7 Inhibitory Peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Long, Jason; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Andrews, Kristin L; Poppe, Leszek; Biswas, Kaustav; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2016-03-24

    There is interest in the identification and optimization of new molecular entities selectively targeting ion channels of therapeutic relevance. Peptide toxins represent a rich source of pharmacology for ion channels, and we recently reported GpTx-1 analogs that inhibit NaV1.7, a voltage-gated sodium ion channel that is a compelling target for improved treatment of pain. Here we utilize multi-attribute positional scan (MAPS) analoging, combining high-throughput synthesis and electrophysiology, to interrogate the interaction of GpTx-1 with NaV1.7 and related NaV subtypes. After one round of MAPS analoging, we found novel substitutions at multiple residue positions not previously identified, specifically glutamic acid at positions 10 or 11 or lysine at position 18, that produce peptides with single digit nanomolar potency on NaV1.7 and 500-fold selectivity against off-target sodium channels. Docking studies with a NaV1.7 homology model and peptide NMR structure generated a model consistent with the key potency and selectivity modifications mapped in this work.

  4. Functional and pharmacological characterization of two different ASIC1a/2a heteromers reveals their sensitivity to the spider toxin PcTx1

    PubMed Central

    Joeres, Niko; Augustinowski, Katrin; Neuhof, Andreas; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) detect extracellular proton signals and are involved in synaptic transmission and pain sensation. ASIC subunits assemble into homo- and heteromeric channels composed of three subunits. Single molecule imaging revealed that heteromers composed of ASIC1a and ASIC2a, which are widely expressed in the central nervous system, have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry. It was hitherto not possible, however, to functionally differentiate these two heteromers. To have a homogenous population of ASIC1a/2a heteromers with either 2:1 or 1:2 stoichiometry, we covalently linked subunits in the desired configuration and characterized their functional properties in Xenopus oocytes. We show that the two heteromers have slightly different proton affinity, with an additional ASIC1a subunit increasing apparent affinity. Moreover, we found that zinc, which potentiates ASIC2a-containing ASICs but not homomeric ASIC1a, potentiates both heteromers. Finally, we show that PcTx1, which binds at subunit-subunit interfaces of homomeric ASIC1a, inhibits both heteromers suggesting that ASIC2a can also contribute to a PcTx1 binding site. Using this functional fingerprint, we show that rat cortical neurons predominantly express the ASIC1a/2a heteromer with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Collectively, our results reveal the contribution of individual subunits to the functional properties of ASIC1a/2a heteromers. PMID:27277303

  5. Analgesic Effects of GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 in a Mouse Model of NaV1.7-Mediated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Wingerd, Joshua S.; Winter, Zoltan; Durek, Thomas; Dekan, Zoltan; Sousa, Silmara R.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Hoffmann, Tali; Weidner, Christian; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.; Vetter, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of NaV1.7 lead to congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare condition resulting in individuals who are otherwise normal except for the inability to sense pain, making pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.7 a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain. We characterized a novel mouse model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of the scorpion toxin OD1, which is suitable for rapid in vivo profiling of NaV1.7 inhibitors. Intraplantar injection of OD1 caused spontaneous pain behaviors, which were reversed by co-injection with NaV1.7 inhibitors and significantly reduced in NaV1.7−/− mice. To validate the use of the model for profiling NaV1.7 inhibitors, we determined the NaV selectivity and tested the efficacy of the reported NaV1.7 inhibitors GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 (raxatrigine). GpTx-1 selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and was effective when co-administered with OD1, but lacked efficacy when delivered systemically. PF-04856264 state-dependently and selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and significantly reduced OD1-induced spontaneous pain when delivered locally and systemically. CNV1014802 state-dependently, but non-selectively, inhibited NaV channels and was only effective in the OD1 model when delivered systemically. Our novel model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of OD1 is thus suitable for the rapid in vivo characterization of the analgesic efficacy of NaV1.7 inhibitors. PMID:26999206

  6. Analgesic Effects of GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 in a Mouse Model of NaV1.7-Mediated Pain.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Wingerd, Joshua S; Winter, Zoltan; Durek, Thomas; Dekan, Zoltan; Sousa, Silmara R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Hoffmann, Tali; Weidner, Christian; Nassar, Mohammed A; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2016-03-17

    Loss-of-function mutations of Na(V)1.7 lead to congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare condition resulting in individuals who are otherwise normal except for the inability to sense pain, making pharmacological inhibition of Na(V)1.7 a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain. We characterized a novel mouse model of Na(V)1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of the scorpion toxin OD1, which is suitable for rapid in vivo profiling of Na(V)1.7 inhibitors. Intraplantar injection of OD1 caused spontaneous pain behaviors, which were reversed by co-injection with Na(V)1.7 inhibitors and significantly reduced in Na(V)1.7(-/-) mice. To validate the use of the model for profiling Na(V)1.7 inhibitors, we determined the Na(V) selectivity and tested the efficacy of the reported Na(V)1.7 inhibitors GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 (raxatrigine). GpTx-1 selectively inhibited Na(V)1.7 and was effective when co-administered with OD1, but lacked efficacy when delivered systemically. PF-04856264 state-dependently and selectively inhibited Na(V)1.7 and significantly reduced OD1-induced spontaneous pain when delivered locally and systemically. CNV1014802 state-dependently, but non-selectively, inhibited Na(V) channels and was only effective in the OD1 model when delivered systemically. Our novel model of Na(V)1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of OD1 is thus suitable for the rapid in vivo characterization of the analgesic efficacy of Na(V)1.7 inhibitors.

  7. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis by recombinant Escherichia coli harbouring Streptomyces aureofaciens PHB biosynthesis genes: effect of various carbon and nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Mahishi, L H; Tripathi, G; Rawal, S K

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli (ATCC:PTA-1579) harbouring poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesising genes from Streptomyces aureofaciens NRRL 2209 accumulates PHB. Effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on PHB accumulation by recombinant E. coli were studied. Among the carbon sources used glycerol, glucose, palm oil and ethanol supported PHB accumulation. No PHB accumulated in recombinant cells when sucrose or molasses were used as carbon source. Yeast extract, peptone, a combination of yeast extract and peptone, and corn steep liquor were used as nitrogen sources. The maximum PHB accumulation (60% of cell dry weight) was measured after 48 h of cell growth at 37 degrees C in a medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, and yeast extract and peptone as nitrogen sources. Scanning electron microscopy of the PHB granules isolated from recombinant E. coli revealed these to be spherical in shape with a diameter ranging from 0.11 to 0.35 pm with the mean value of 0.23 +/- 0.06 pm.

  8. In vitro biocontrol activity of halotolerant Streptomyces aureofaciens K20: A potent antagonist against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, P; Kumar, R; Yandigeri, M S

    2017-01-01

    A halotolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from salinity affected soil of Eastern Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP), Uttar Pradesh, India, was characterised for its antagonistic potential against Macrophomina phaseolina by dual-culture assay. It was shown to effectively inhibit the growth of M. phaseolina with an inhibition zone of 27 ± 1.33 mm. Further the actinobacterial strain was evaluated for its plant growth promoting (PGP) properties and its ability to produce biocontrol related extracellular enzymes viz. amylase, protease, cellulase, chitinase, gelatinase and urease. The results revealed that the actinobacterial strain had PGP potential along with positive assay for amylase, chitinase and urease. The interaction study between antagonist strain and fungal pathogen, performed by scanning electron microscopy technique revealed that the actinobacterium was able to damage fungal mycelia may be due to chitinase, establishing its role as a potential antagonist against M. phaseolina. The actinobacterial isolate was characterised by 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and was identified as Streptomyces genera. The identified gene sequence was deposited to NCBI GenBank with an accession number KP331758.

  9. Analysis of Expression of a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 on Seeds with a Mutant Carrying a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus-Ice Nucleation Reporter Gene Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G.; Hendson, Mavis; Panopoulos, Nickolas J.; Schroth, Milton N.

    1994-01-01

    A derivative of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 expressing a promoterless ice nucleation gene under the control of a phenazine biosynthesis locus was used to study the expression of a phenazine antibiotic locus (Phz) during bacterial seed colonization. Seeds of various plants were inoculated with wild-type PGS12 and a PGS12 ice nucleation-active phz:inaZ marker exchange derivative and planted in soil, and the expression of the reporter gene was monitored at different intervals for 48 h during seed germination. phz gene expression was first detected 12 h after planting, and the expression increased during the next 36-h period. Significant differences in expression of bacterial populations on different seeds were measured at 48 h. The highest expression level was recorded for wheat seeds (one ice nucleus per 4,000 cells), and the lowest expression level was recorded for cotton seeds (one ice nucleus per 12,000,000 cells). These values indicate that a small proportion of bacteria in a seed population expressed phenazine biosynthesis. Reporter gene expression levels and populations on individual seeds in a sample were lognormally distributed. There was greater variability in reporter gene expression than in population size among individual seeds in a sample. Expression on sugar beet and radish seeds was not affected by different inoculum levels or soil matric potentials of -10 and -40 J/kg; only small differences in expression on wheat and sugar beet seeds were detected when the seeds were planted in various soils. It is suggested that the nutrient level in seed exudates is the primary reason for the differences observed among seeds. The lognormal distribution of phenazine expression on seeds and the timing and difference in expression of phenazine biosynthesis on seeds have implications for the potential efficacy of biocontrol microorganisms against plant pathogens. PMID:16349467

  10. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  11. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  12. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  13. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  14. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  15. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  16. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  17. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  18. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  19. A balloon strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a unique strain measuring device which is intended to monitor the state of strain in thin balloon films during flight. The gate is bonded directly to the film without significantly altering the state of strain or stress in the wall of the balloon. Results of a model balloon inflation are presented which indicate the gage to measure strain in a deployed balloon.

  20. Balloon film strain measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the results of a flight test program in which scientific research balloon material strain was measured in order to determine stress levels. Attention is given to material strain characteristics during the inflation, launch, ascent, and flight of a natural shape, zero-pressure scientific balloon. Measurements were conducted with a simple thin film strain transducer. Thermal, meridional and circumferential strain history data for the test flight are given.

  1. Elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Materials were evaluated that could be used in manufacturing electrical resistance strain gages for static strain measurements at temperatures at or above 1273 K. Strain gage materials must have a characteristic response to strain, temperature and time that is reproducible or that varies in a predictable manner within specified limits. Several metallic alloys were evaluated, as well as a series of transition metal carbides, nitrides and silicides.

  2. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  3. Strain powered antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, John P.; Carman, Greg P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of strain powered antennas that radiate electromagnetic energy by mechanically vibrating a piezoelectric or piezomagnetic material. A closed form analytic model of electromagnetic radiation from a strain powered electrically small antenna is derived and analyzed. Fundamental scaling laws and the frequency dependence of strain powered antennas are discussed. The radiation efficiency of strain powered electrically small antennas is contrasted with a conventional electric dipole. Analytical results show that operating at the first mechanical resonance produces the most efficient strain powered radiation relative to electric dipole antennas. A resonant analysis is exploited to determine the material property space that produces efficient strain powered antennas. These results show how a properly designed strain powered antenna can radiate more efficiently than an equally sized electric dipole antenna.

  4. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  5. Strain sensor comprising a strain sensitive, two-mode optical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strain sensor uses an optical fiber including a strain sensitive portion and at least one strain insensitive portion. The strain sensitive portion is mounted on the surface of a structure at a location where a strain is desired to be measured. The strain insensitive portion(s) may be fused to the strain sensitive portion to transmit light therethrough, so that the resulting pattern may be detected to determine the amount of strain by comparison with a similar fiber not subjected to strain, or with the light pattern produced when the fiber is not under strain.

  6. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  7. Strained Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Clemens; Bohley, Christian; Schilling, Jörg; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon. PMID:28817015

  8. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  9. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  10. Chitinase producing Bt strains

    Treesearch

    Haim B. Gunner; Matthew Zimet; Sarah Berger

    1985-01-01

    Screening of 402 strains of more than 18 varieties of Bacillus thuringiensis showed chitinase to be inducible in virtually every serovar tested. Though the chitinase titre varied among strains, there was a strong correlation between enhanced lethality to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens), and an increase in...

  11. Hamstring strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... mild muscle strain or pull Grade 2 -- partial muscle tear Grade 3 -- complete muscle tear Recovery time depends on the grade of the ... be healing as expected. Alternative Names Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - ... Ali K, Leland JM. Hamstring strains and tears in the athlete. Clin Sports Med . 2012;31( ...

  12. Heat strain in cold.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu; Rissanen, Sirkka

    2006-07-01

    In spite of increased environmental cold stress, heat strain is possible also in a cold environment. The body heat balance depends on three factors: environmental thermal conditions, metabolic heat production and thermal insulation of clothing and other protective garments. As physical exercise may increase metabolic heat production from rest values by ten times or even more, the required thermal insulation of clothing may vary accordingly. However, in most outdoor work, and often in indoor cold work, too, the thermal insulation of clothing is impractical, difficult or impossible to adjust according to the changes in physical activity. This is especially true with whole body covering garments like chemical protective clothing. As a result of this imbalance, heat strain may develop. In cold all the signs of heat strain (core temperature above 38 degrees C, warm or hot thermal sensations, increased cutaneous circulation and sweating) may not be present at the same time. Heat strain in cold may be whole body heat strain or related only to torso or core temperature. Together with heat strain in torso or body core, there can be at the same time even cold strain in peripheral parts and/or superficial layers of the body. In cold environment both the preservation of insulation and facilitation of heat loss are important. Development of clothing design is still needed to allow easy adjustments of thermal insulation.

  13. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  14. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1998-01-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  15. Strain and magnetic remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1993-05-01

    Experimental data may be compatible with the hypothesis that a single direction of magnetic remanence rotates as a rigid marker with strains up to 40% shortening in coaxial, perfect flattening ( X = Y > Z). Detailed agreement with the passive line model is relatively poor for the specimens in which remanance is carried by magnetite. However, for this range of strains the differences with the passive line model (Wettstein's equation) are so slight that the latter model may be more easily employed to de-strain or restore deformed remanance to its original attitude. In the case of hematite-bearing remanences, the differences between the passive line and rigid marker model are even smaller because of the higher aspect ratios of grains of hematite. Therefore it is suggested that Wettstein's equation may be safely used to restore remanence after even higher strains, where the remanence is carried by hematite.

  16. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  17. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the joint or muscle swelling and bruising warmth and redness of the injured area difficulty moving ... looks "bent" or misshapen signs of infection (increased warmth, redness, streaks, swelling, and pain) a strain or ...

  18. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for strains. Gymnastics, tennis, rowing, golf, and other sports that require extensive gripping can ... participating in any sport or exercise. Wear protective equipment when playing. Run on even surfaces. Information on ...

  19. Photothermal strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Ahn, Joongho; Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-07-01

    Vulnerable plaques are the major cause of cardiovascular disease, but they are difficult to detect with conventional intravascular imaging techniques. Techniques are needed to identify plaque vulnerability based on the presence of lipids in plaque. Thermal strain imaging (TSI) is an imaging technique based on ultrasound (US) wave propagation speed, which varies with the medium temperature. In TSI, the strain that occurs during tissue temperature change can be used for lipid detection because it has a different tendency depending on the type of tissue. Here, we demonstrate photothermal strain imaging (pTSI) using an intravascular ultrasound catheter. pTSI is performed by slightly and selectively heating lipid using a relatively inexpensive continuous laser source. We applied a speckle-tracking algorithm to US B-mode images for strain calculations. As a result, the strain produced in porcine fat was different from the strain produced in water-bearing gelatin phantom, which made it possible to distinguish the two. This suggests that pTSI could potentially be a way of differentiating lipids in coronary artery.

  20. Strain: Fact or Fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronner, Renée

    2017-04-01

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of John Ramsay's well known textbook "Folding and Fracturing of Rocks" - ... and the 30th anniversary of the rejection of a rather less well known paper entitled "Strain: Fact or Fiction?" submitted by Renée Panozzo to the Journal of Structural Geology. The gist of the paper was simple and straight forward: it was argued that not every fabric that can be observed in deformed rocks is necessarily a measure of the amount of strain the rock incurred. A distinction was made between a general "fabric", i.e., the traceable geometry of grain boundaries, for example, and a so-called "strain fabric", i.e., the model geometry that would result from homogeneously straining an initially isotropic fabric and that would exhibit at least orthorhombic symmetry. To verify if a given fabric was indeed a strain fabric it was therefore suggested to use the SURFOR method (published by Panozzo) and to carry out a so-called strain test, i.e., a check of symmetry, before interpreting the results of a fabric analysis in terms of strain. The problem with the paper was that it was very obviously written out of frustration. The frustration came form having reviewed a number of manuscripts which tried to use the then novel SURFOR method for strain analysis without first checking if the the fabric was a indeed a "strain fabric" or not, and then blaming the SURFOR method for producing ambiguous results. As a result, the paper was not exactly well balanced and carefully thought out. It was considered "interesting but not scholarly" by one of the reviewers and down-right offensive by the second. To tell the truth, however, the paper was not formally rejected. The editor Sue Treagus strongly encouraged Panozzo to revise the paper, ... and 30 years later, I will follow her advise and offer a revised paper as a tribute to John Ramsay. To quote from the original manuscript: "We should be a little more impressed that strain works so well, and less

  1. Strain isolated ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolokan, R. P.; Brady, J. B.; Jarrabet, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are used in gas turbine engines to improve component temperature capability and cooling air efficiency. A compliant metal fiber strain isolator between a plasma sprayed ceramic coating and a metal substrate improves ceramic durability while allowing thicker coatings for better insulation. Development of strain isolated coatings has concentrated on design and fabrication of coatings and coating evaluation via thermal shock testing. In thermal shock testing, five types of failure are possible: buckling failure im compression on heat up, bimetal type failure, isothermal expansion mismatch failure, mudflat cracking during cool down, and long term fatigue. A primary failure mode for thermally cycled coatings is designated bimetal type failure. Bimetal failure is tensile failure in the ceramic near the ceramic-metal interface. One of the significant benefits of the strain isolator is an insulating layer protecting the metal substrate from heat deformation and thereby preventing bimetal type failure.

  2. Strain avalanches in plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argon, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    Plastic deformation at the mechanism level in all solids occurs in the form of discrete thermally activated individual stress relaxation events. While there are clear differences in mechanisms between dislocation mediated events in crystalline solids and by individual shear transformations in amorphous metals and semiconductors, such relaxation events interact strongly to form avalanches of strain bursts. In all cases the attendant distributions of released energy as amplitudes of acoustic emissions, or in serration amplitudes in flow stress, the levels of strain bursts are of fractal character with fractal exponents in the range from -1.5 to -2.0, having the character of phenomena of self-organized criticality, SOC. Here we examine strain avalanches in single crystals of ice, hcp metals, the jerky plastic deformations of nano-pillars of fcc and bcc metals deforming in compression, those in the plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses, all demonstrating the remarkable universality of character of plastic relaxation events.

  3. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, L.M.

    1998-06-16

    A tool and a method are disclosed for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maintaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool. 6 figs.

  4. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  5. Radio frequency strain monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor); Holben, Jr., Milford S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A radio frequency strain monitor includes a voltage controlled oscillator for generating an oscillating signal that is input into a propagation path. The propagation path is preferably bonded to the surface of a structure to be monitored and produces a propagated signal. A phase difference between the oscillating and propagated signals is detected and maintained at a substantially constant value which is preferably a multiple of 90.degree. by changing the frequency of the oscillating signal. Any change in frequency of the oscillating signal provides an indication of strain in the structure to which the propagation path is bonded.

  6. Novel B19' strain glass with large recoverable strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qianglong; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jian; Ji, Yuanchao; Ding, Xiangdong; Wang, Yu; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2017-08-01

    We report a strain glass state (B19' strain glass) in a Ni-rich TiNi shape memory alloy produced by cold rolling. As compared to previously reported strain glasses, this strain glass state has outstanding properties including quasilinear superelasticity with a large recoverable strain (˜4%), and slim hysteresis and high strength (˜1.0 GPa) over a wide temperature range (˜200 K). The existence of the B19' strain glass state is confirmed by (i) frequency dispersion of storage modulus, (ii) continuous decrease of electrical resistivity, and (iii) continuous growth of B19' nanodomains upon cooling. This study proves that the effect of defect strength on the creation of a strain glass state is in parallel to the effect of cooling rate on the creation of a structural glass, e.g., any strain crystal (i.e., martensite) can be turned into a strain glass if strong enough defects could be engineered.

  7. ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived datasets provides insights into microbial community dynamics.

  8. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  9. Strain gage barometric transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viton, P.

    1977-01-01

    A strain gage barometric transmitter for measuring the atmospheric pressure in severe environmental conditions is described. This equipment specifications are presented and its performance assessed. It is shown that this barometric sensor can measure the atmospheric pressure with a precision of 0.5 mb during a 6 month period.

  10. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  11. Balloon film strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, James L.

    In order to understand the state of stress in scientific balloons, a need exists for the measurement of film deformation in flight. The results of a flight test program are reported where material strain was measured for the first time during the inflation, launch, ascent and float of a typical natural shape, zero pressure scientific balloon.

  12. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; Yu, Xun; Blecke, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages, as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.

  13. Highly stretchable miniature strain sensor for large dynamic strain measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Yao, Shurong; Nie, Xu; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of highly stretchable strain sensor was developed to measure large strains. The sensor was based on the piezo-resistive response of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. The piezo-resistive response of CNT composite gives accurate strain measurement with high frequency response, while the ultra-soft PDMS matrix provides high flexibility and ductility for large strain measurement. Experimental results show that the CNT/PDMS sensor measures large strains (up to 8 %) with an excellent linearity and a fast frequency response. The new miniature strain sensor also exhibits much higher sensitivities than the conventional foil strain gages,more » as its gauge factor is 500 times of that of the conventional foil strain gages.« less

  14. Strain patterns and strain accumulation along plate margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of strain accumulation along plate margins in Japan, New Zealand, and the United States indicate that: (1) a typical maximum rate of secular strain accumulation is on the order of 0.3 ppm/a, (2) a substantial part of the strain accumulation process can be attributed to slip at depth on the major plate boundary faults, and (3) some plastic deformation in a zone 100 km or more in width is apparently involved in the strain accumulation process.

  15. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  16. Novel strained superjunction VDMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naugarhiya, Alok; Dubey, Shashank; Kondekar, Pravin N.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we have proposed novel strained superjunction (s-SJ) vertical double diffused MOS (VDMOS). Through channel engineering, we have introduced strain effects in s-SJ device using thin separate p-type silicon-germanium (p-SiGe) layer over silicon p-pillar. Further, we have designed process flow for the possible fabrication of s-SJ VDMOS. The proposed s-SJ devices fitted with less input capacitance (Cin) and 1.2∼3 times higher output current density than conventional SJ VDMOS. Therefore, 40% less gate charge (Qg) is required to turn-on the s-SJ VDMOS and Ron A is optimized in between 12% and 46%.

  17. Strain Gage Signal Interpretation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    blades and vanes in many engines have been collected, played back and examined. The engine types encompass GE’s stable of turbine engines from the small...aeromechanical engineer . 1.3 SUMMARY OF RESULTS Strain gage signals from vibrating rotor blades and vanes were collected, examined, classified, and generalized...turboprops, to turbojets and to the large high bypass turbofan engines . Test conditions include all the phases that are investigated

  18. Strained Ring Energetic Binders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ). PHBV was not found to have the mechanical instability problems of PBV, but was still thermally unstable (Tonset - 660C, Tmax - 1090C...DISCUSSION 4 Polybenzvalene (PBV) 4 Polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ) 6 Chain-Transfer Studies 11 CONCLUSIONS 15 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES 16 .F 4E 19 APPENDICES A...strained ring polymers similar to PBV are known. The investigation of one of these polymers, polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ), is also described in this report

  19. Strain Measurement - Unidirectional.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-20

    a ballpoint pen or a rounded piece of brass rod. If critical alignment is not necessary, gage lines may be located outside the immediate gage location...supplemented as needed by tabulated values. If the test design includes specification limits for the values, they should be included on the plots. Plots of...enough baseline before the event to allow estimation of the noise and stability. If the strain is to be correlated to specific events, the events should

  20. Symmetry in strain engineering of nanomembranes: making new strained materials.

    PubMed

    Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Scott, Shelley A; Savage, Donald E; Celler, George K; Lagally, Max G

    2011-07-26

    Strain in a material changes the lattice constant and thereby creates a material with new properties relative to the unstrained, but chemically identical, material. The ability to alter the strain (its magnitude, direction, extent, periodicity, symmetry, and nature) allows tunability of these new properties. A recent development, crystalline nanomembranes, offers a powerful platform for using and tuning strain to create materials that have unique properties, not achievable in bulk materials or with conventional processes. Nanomembranes, because of their thinness, enable elastic strain sharing, a process that introduces large amounts of strain and unique strain distributions in single-crystal materials, without exposing the material to the formation of extended defects. We provide here prescriptions for making new strained materials using crystal symmetry as the driver: we calculate the strain distributions in flat nanomembranes for two-fold and four-fold elastically symmetric materials. We show that we can controllably tune the amount of strain and the asymmetry of the strain distribution in elastically isotropic and anisotropic materials uniformly over large areas. We perform the experimental demonstration with a trilayer Si(110)/Si((1-x))Ge(x)(110)/Si(110) nanomembrane: an elastically two-fold symmetric system in which we can transfer strain that is biaxially isotropic. We are thus able to make uniformly strained materials that cannot be made any other way.

  1. Strain measurement based battery testing

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jeff Qiang; Steiber, Joe; Wall, Craig M.; Smith, Robert; Ng, Cheuk

    2017-05-23

    A method and system for strain-based estimation of the state of health of a battery, from an initial state to an aged state, is provided. A strain gauge is applied to the battery. A first strain measurement is performed on the battery, using the strain gauge, at a selected charge capacity of the battery and at the initial state of the battery. A second strain measurement is performed on the battery, using the strain gauge, at the selected charge capacity of the battery and at the aged state of the battery. The capacity degradation of the battery is estimated as the difference between the first and second strain measurements divided by the first strain measurement.

  2. Strain balanced quantum posts

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Alvarez, D.; Alen, B.; Ripalda, J. M.; Llorens, J. M.; Taboada, A. G.; Briones, F.; Roldan, M. A.; Hernandez-Saz, J.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2011-04-25

    Quantum posts are assembled by epitaxial growth of closely spaced quantum dot layers, modulating the composition of a semiconductor alloy, typically InGaAs. In contrast with most self-assembled nanostructures, the height of quantum posts can be controlled with nanometer precision, up to a maximum value limited by the accumulated stress due to the lattice mismatch. Here, we present a strain compensation technique based on the controlled incorporation of phosphorous, which substantially increases the maximum attainable quantum post height. The luminescence from the resulting nanostructures presents giant linear polarization anisotropy.

  3. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  4. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  5. Colony Dimorphism in Bradyrhizobium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester-Bradley, Rosemary; Thornton, Philip; Jones, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Ten isolates of Bradyrhizobium spp. which form two colony types were studied; the isolates originated from a range of legume species. The two colony types differed in the amount of gum formed or size or both, depending on the strain. Whole 7-day-old colonies of each type were subcultured to determine the proportion of cells which had changed to the other type. An iterative computerized procedure was used to determine the rate of switching per generation between the two types and to predict proportions reached at equilibrium for each strain. The predicted proportions of the wetter (more gummy) or larger colony type at equilibrium differed significantly between strains, ranging from 0.9999 (strain CIAT 2383) to 0.0216 (strain CIAT 2469), because some strains switched faster from dry to wet (or small to large) and others switched faster from wet to dry (or large to small). Predicted equilibrium was reached after about 140 generations in strain USDA 76. In all but one strain (CIAT 3030) the growth rate of the wetter colony type was greater than or similar to that of the drier type. The mean difference in generation time between the two colony types was 0.37 h. Doubling times calculated for either colony type after 7 days of growth on the agar surface ranged from 6.0 to 7.3 h. The formation of two persistent colony types by one strain (clonal or colony dimorphism) may be a common phenomenon among Bradyrhizobium strains. Images PMID:16347599

  6. Geodetic strain measurements in Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two new geodetic measurements of strain accumulation in the state of Washington for the interval 1972-1979 are reported. Near Seattle the average principal strain rates are 0.07 + or - 0.03 mu strain/yr N19oW and -0.13 + or - 0.02 mu strain/yr N71oE, and near Richland (south central Washington) the average principal strain rates are -0.02 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N36oW and -0.04 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N54oE. Extension is taken as positive, and the uncertainties quoted are standard deviations. A measurement of shear strain accumulation (dilation not determined) in the epoch 1914- 1966 along the north coast of Vancouver Island by the Geodetic Survey of Canada indicates a marginally significant accumulation of right-lateral shear (0.06 + or - 0.03 mu rad/yr) across the plate boundary (N40oW strike). Although there are significant differences in detail, these strain measurements are roughly consistent with a crude dislocation model that represents subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate. The observed accumulation of strain implies that large, shallow, thrust earthquakes should be expected off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. However, this conclusion is not easily reconciled with either observations of elevation change along the Washington coast or the focal mechanism solutions for shallow earthquakes in Washington. -Authors

  7. Strain Pattern in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Hajnal, David; Klix, Christian; Keim, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Investigations of strain correlations at the glass transition reveal unexpected phenomena. The shear strain fluctuations show an Eshelby-strain pattern [˜cos (4 θ ) /r2 ], characteristic of elastic response, even in liquids, at long times. We address this using a mode-coupling theory for the strain fluctuations in supercooled liquids and data from both video microscopy of a two-dimensional colloidal glass former and simulations of Brownian hard disks. We show that the long-ranged and long-lived strain signatures follow a scaling law valid close to the glass transition. For large enough viscosities, the Eshelby-strain pattern is visible even on time scales longer than the structural relaxation time τ and after the shear modulus has relaxed to zero.

  8. Casimir interaction of strained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Fialkovsky, I.; Vassilevich, D.

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the Casimir interaction of two freestanding graphene samples under uniaxial strain. Our approach fully takes retardation and dispersion into account and is based on quantum field theoretical expressions for conductivities in terms of the polarization operator. Contrary to some recent results the force shows a rather weak dependence on the realistic values of strain, changing just by a few percent in its maximum as compared to the non-strained case.

  9. Strain gage adhesives -- Operating characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, R. L.; Reese, R. T.

    1994-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the adhesives which are used to bond the strain gages to substrates. Strain gage installations include four basic parts: the gage, the adhesive used to attach the gage to the stressed surface, the coatings used to protect the gage over its service life, and the electrical circuitry and data acquisition system used to record the strains. This paper describes the operating characteristics of the adhesives. The figures developed in this paper summarize the information available on adhesives from excellent manufacturer's catalogs, texts and references, and from experiences from the SEM Western Regional Strain Gage Committee.

  10. Thermal strain imaging: a review

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Chi Hyung; Shi, Yan; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Thermal strain imaging (TSI) or temporal strain imaging is an ultrasound application that exploits the temperature dependence of sound speed to create thermal (temporal) strain images. This article provides an overview of the field of TSI for biomedical applications that have appeared in the literature over the past several years. Basic theory in thermal strain is introduced. Two major energy sources appropriate for clinical applications are discussed. Promising biomedical applications are presented throughout the paper, including non-invasive thermometry and tissue characterization. We present some of the limitations and complications of the method. The paper concludes with a discussion of competing technologies. PMID:22866235

  11. High temperature strain gage evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The structural thermal test of an advanced ramjet missile section required strain measurements as high as 922 K (1200 F). Since there is relatively little experience in the use of strain gages above the 700-755 K (800-900 F) level, a program was initiated to select and evaluate the best available gage. Candidate gages suitable for measurements up to 922 K (1200 F) were selected. This involved the determination of their operating characteristics, availability, cost, installation aspects, etc. The evaluation involved the following tests: strain as a function of load at room temperature and apparent strain as a function of temperature.

  12. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    DOEpatents

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  13. Adaptor for Measuring Principal Strains with Tuckerman Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, A E

    1943-01-01

    An adapter is described which uses three Tuckerman optical strain gages to measure the displacement of the three vortices of an equilateral triangle along lines 120 degrees apart. These displacements are substituted in well-known equations in order to compute the magnitude and direction of the principal strains. Tests of the adaptor indicate that principal strains over a gage length of 1.42 inch may be measured with a systematic error not exceeding 4 percent and a mean observational error of the order of + or minus 0.000006. The maximum observed error in strain was of the order of 0.00006. The directions of principal strains for unidirectional stress were measured with the adaptor with an average error of the order of 1 degree.

  14. Strain relaxation in nanopatterned strained silicon round pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Singh, R.; Radu, I.; Milenin, A. P.; Erfurth, W.; Reiche, M.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.; Muster, F.; Petzold, M.

    2007-01-01

    Periodic arrays of strained Si (sSi) round nanopillars were fabricated on sSi layers deposited on SiGe virtual substrates by electron-beam lithography and subsequent reactive-ion etching. The strain in the patterned sSi nanopillars was determined using high-resolution UV micro-Raman spectroscopy. The strain relaxes significantly upon nanostructuring: from 0.9% in the unpatterned sSi layer to values between 0.22% and 0.57% in the round sSi pillars with diameters from 100 up to 500nm. The strain distribution in the sSi nanopillars was analyzed by finite element (FE) modeling. The FE calculations confirm the strain relaxation after patterning, in agreement with the results obtained from Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Strained graphene Hall bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, S. P.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of strain, induced by a Gaussian bump, on the magnetic field dependent transport properties of a graphene Hall bar are investigated. The numerical simulations are performed using both classical and quantum mechanical transport theory and we found that both approaches exhibit similar characteristic features. The effects of the Gaussian bump are manifested by a decrease of the bend resistance, R B, around zero-magnetic field and the occurrence of side-peaks in R B. These features are explained as a consequence of bump-assisted scattering of electrons towards different terminals of the Hall bar. Using these features we are able to give an estimate of the size of the bump. Additional oscillations in R B are found in the quantum description that are due to the population/depopulation of Landau levels. The bump has a minor influence on the Hall resistance even for very high values of the pseudo-magnetic field. When the bump is placed outside the center of the Hall bar valley polarized electrons can be collected in the leads.

  16. Biomechanical strain of goldsmiths.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Paula Emanuela Fernandes; Teixeira, Juliana Vieira Schmidt; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    The work of the goldsmiths consists in the manufacture of jewelry. The piece, be it an earring, bracelet or necklace, is hand-assembled. This task requires precision, skill, kindness and patience. In this work, we make use of tools such as cuticle clippers and rounded tip, beads or precious stones and also pieces of metal. This type of activity requires a biomechanical stress of hands and wrists. In order to quantify the biomechanical stress, we performed a case study to measure the movements performed by an assembly of pieces of jewelry. As method for research, filming was done during assembly of parts to a paste, using a Nikon digital camera, for 1 (one) hour. The film was edited by Kinovea software, and the task was divided into cycles, each cycle corresponds to a complete object. In one cycle, there are four two movements of supination and pronation movements of the forearm. The cycle lasts approximately sixteen seconds, totaling 1800 cycles in eight hours. Despite the effort required of the wrists, the activity shows no complaints from the employees, but this fact does not mischaracterizes the ability of employees to acquire repetitive strain injuries and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  17. Hypothetical strain-free oligoradicals

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roald; Eisenstein, Odile; Balaban, Alexandru T.

    1980-01-01

    Several new classes of oligoradicals free of angle strain are suggested and examined by means of molecular orbital calculations. The collapse products of these hypothetical radicals are highly strained molecules. Various electronic strategies for the stabilization of these oligoradicals have been explored. PMID:16592882

  18. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  19. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  20. Moire strain analysis of paper

    Treesearch

    R. E. Rowlands; P. K. Beasley; D. E. Gunderson

    1983-01-01

    Efficient use of paper products involves using modern aspects of materials science and engineering mechanics. This implies the ability to determine simultaneously different components of strain at multiple locations and under static or dynamic conditions. Although measuring strains in paper has been a topic of interest for over 40 years, present capability remains...

  1. Characterization of Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; McFadden, K A; Brouwer, A M; Demczuk, W

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterize 318 Salmonella enteritidis strains that were mainly isolated from poultry and their environment in Canada. Biotype, phagetype (PT), plasmid profile (PP), hybridization with a plasmid-derived virulence sequence probe, antibiotic resistance, outer membrane proteins (OMPs), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles were determined. Relationships of these properties to one another, and their diagnostic and pathogenic significance were assessed. Biotyping indicated that failure to ferment rhamnose was sometimes useful as a marker for epidemiologically related strains. Phagetyping was the most effective method for subdividing S. enteritidis; it distinguished 12 PTs. Phagetype 13 was occasionally associated with septicemia and mortality in chickens. The strains belonged to 15 PPs. A 36 megadalton (MDa) plasmid was found in 97% of the strains. Only the 36 MDa plasmid hybridized with the probe. Seventeen percent of the strains were drug resistant; all strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Thirty-five of 36 strains possessed the same OMP profile, and 36 of 41 strains contained smooth LPS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:8358678

  2. Strain gage system evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolleris, G. W.; Mazur, H. J.; Kokoszka, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the reliability of various strain gage systems when applied to rotating compressor blades in an aircraft gas turbine engine. A survey of current technology strain gage systems was conducted to provide a basis for selecting candidate systems for evaluation. Testing and evaluation was conducted in an F 100 engine. Sixty strain gage systems of seven different designs were installed on the first and third stages of an F 100 engine fan. Nineteen strain gage failures occurred during 62 hours of engine operation, for a survival rate of 68 percent. Of the failures, 16 occurred at blade-to-disk leadwire jumps (84 percent), two at a leadwire splice (11 percent), and one at a gage splice (5 percent). Effects of erosion, temperature, G-loading, and stress levels are discussed. Results of a post-test analysis of the individual components of each strain gage system are presented.

  3. Residual strains in conduit arteries.

    PubMed

    Rachev, A; Greenwald, S E

    2003-05-01

    Residual strains and stresses are those that exist in a body when all external loads are removed. Residual strains in arteries can be characterized by the opening angle of the sector-like cross-section which arises when an unloaded ring segment is radially cut. A review of experimental methods for measuring residual strains and the main results about the variation of the opening angle with arterial localization, age, smooth muscle activity, mechanical environment and certain vascular pathologies are presented and discussed. It is shown that, in addition to their well-established ability to homogenize the stress field in the arterial wall, residual strains make arteries more compliant and thereby improve their performance as elastic reservoirs and ensure more effective local control of the arterial lumen by smooth muscle cells. Finally, evidence that, in some cases, residual strains remain in arteries even after they have been cut radially is discussed.

  4. Strain Insensitive Optical Phase Locked Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A strain sensor uses optical fibers including strain insensitive portions and a strain sensitive portion. The optical fibers form a sensitive arm of an optical phase locked loop (OPLL). The use of the OPLL allows for multimode optical fiber to be used in a strain insensitive configuration. Only strain information for the strain sensitive portion is monitored rather than the integrated strain measurements commonly made with optical fiber sensors.

  5. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  6. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  7. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  8. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  9. STRAIN LOCALIZATION IN IRRADIATED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hashimoto, Naoyuki

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature irradiation can significantly harden metallic materials and often lead to strain localization and ductility loss in deformation. This paper provides a review on the radiation effects on the deformation of metallic materials, focusing on microscopic and macroscopic strain localization phenomena. The microscopic strain localization often observed in irradiated materials are dislocation channeling and deformation twinning, in which dislocation glides are evenly distributed and well confined in the narrow bands, usually a fraction of a micron wide. Dislocation channeling is a common strain localization mechanism observed virtually in all irradiated metallic materials with ductility, while deformation twinning is an alternative localization mechanism occurring only in low stacking fault energy materials. In some high stacking fault energy materials where cross slip is easy, curved and widening channels can be formed depending on dose and stress state. Irradiation also prompts macroscopic strain localization (or plastic instability). It is shown that the plastic instability stress and true fracture stress are nearly independent of irradiation dose if there is no radiation-induced phase change or embrittlement. A newly proposed plastic instability criterion is that the metals after irradiation show necking at yield when the yield stress exceeds the dose-independent plastic instability stress. There is no evident relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic strain localizations; which is explained by the long-range back-stress hardening. It is proposed that the microscopic strain localization is a generalized phenomenon occurring at high stress.

  10. Radio Frequency (RF) strain monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor); Holben, Milford S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for measuring strain in a structure. In particular, the invention detects strain in parts per million to over ten percent along an entire length (or other dimension) of a structure measuring a few millimeters to several kilometers. By using a propagation path bonded to the structure, the invention is not limited by the signal attenuation characteristics of the structure and thus frequencies in the megahertz to gigahertz range may be used to detect strain in part per million to over ten percent with high precision.

  11. Low TCR nanocomposite strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); Chen, Ximing (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature thin film strain gage sensor capable of functioning at temperatures above 1400.degree. C. The sensor contains a substrate, a nanocomposite film comprised of an indium tin oxide alloy, zinc oxide doped with alumina or other oxide semiconductor and a refractory metal selected from the group consisting of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni, W, Ir, NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY deposited onto the substrate to form an active strain element. The strain element being responsive to an applied force.

  12. Virtual strain gage size study

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2015-09-22

    DIC is a non-linear low-pass spatial filtering operation; whether we consider the effect of the subset and shape function, the strain window used in the strain calculation, of other post-processing of the results, each decision will impact the spatial resolution, of the measurement. More fundamentally, the speckle size limits, the spatial resolution by dictating the smallest possible subset. After this decision the processing settings are controlled by the allowable noise level balanced by possible bias errors created by the data filtering. This article describes a process to determine optimum DIC software settings to determine if the peak displacements or strains are being found.

  13. Strain accumulation in quasicrystalline solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nori, Franco; Ronchetti, Marco; Elser, Veit

    1988-01-01

    The relaxation of two-dimensional quasicrystalline elastic networks when their constituent bonds are perturbed homogeneously is studied. Whereas ideal, quasi-periodic networks are stable against such perturbations, significant accumulations of strain in a class of disordered networks generated by a growth process are found. The grown networks are characterized by root mean square phason fluctuations which grow linearly with system size. The strain accumulation observed in these networks also grows linearly with system size. Finally, dependence of strain accumulation on cooling rate is found.

  14. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot. Examples are gymnastics, tennis, rowing, and golf. People who play these sports sometimes strain their ... and stretch before playing a sport. Wear protective equipment when playing. Run on flat surfaces. For More ...

  15. Magnetic Domain Strain Sensor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    static strain measurement at elevated temperatures. 2.2 Magnetic Strain Measurement Theory The initial work at GED investigated the Barkhausen effect...including large and small Barkhausen jumps. This is a wave propaga- tion phenomenon in which a magnetic wave velocity is measured. The wave velocity in a...theory explaining the phenomenon that deviates from the Barkhausen effect. Some basic concepts had to be examined to better understand magnetic phenomena

  16. PLASTICITY AND NON-LINEAR ELASTIC STRAINS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    conditions existing in plane waves in an extended medium to give the time rate of change of stress as a function of the time rate of change of strain, the stress invariants, the total strain and the plastic strain. (Author)

  17. Magnetic susceptibility, petrofabrics and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1988-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is a non-destructive technique for quantifying the average fabric of a small sample of rock. The interpretation of the magnetic fabric is not always straightforward. However, the principal directions of the magnitude ellipsoid of susceptibility commonly show orientations consistent with the kinematic interpretations of folds, shear zones and other structural features. The directions may correspond with the orientations of strained objects or with the planar-linear mineral orientations. There will usually be multiple mineralogical sources of susceptibility, often involving silicates. If the sources are known, or if the susceptibility can be attributed to a single mineral species, it may be possible to establish a correlation between the strain ellipsoid and the susceptibility ellipsoid. This correlation will be of principal directions in many instances and occasionally there may be a weak correlation of strain magnitudes as well. In other circumstances it may be possible to establish a correlation between changes in susceptibility and the strain. Nevertheless magnetic fabric studies are not routine substitutes for strain analysis. Even where information on strain is not provided, the magnetic fabrics (and subfabrics) yield a measure of the preferred crystallographic orientation or preferred dimensional orientation of the minerals that may be integrated profitably with other petrofabric data. Experimental deformation of certain synthetic aggregates indicates that directions of magnetic susceptibility spin rapidly with advancing strain, especially where the matrix grains undergo crystal-plastic deformation. In certain experiments, simple shear appears to change the intensity of magnetic fabric more effectively than pure shear. Experiments indicate also that the initial anisotropy of a rock-like material is not easily overprinted by deformation whereas field studies are equivocal.

  18. Applications of strained layer superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. L.; Laurich, B. K.; Mailhiot, C.

    1990-04-01

    Because of different band edge lineups, strain conditions, and growth orientations, various strained layer superlattice (SLS) materials can exhibit qualitatively new physical behavior in their optical properties. Two examples are given of new physical behavior in SLS: strain generated electric fields in polar growth axis superlattices and strained type 2 superlattices. In SLS, large electric fields can be generated by the piezoelectric effect. The fields are largest for SLS with a (111) growth axis; they vanish for SLS with a (100) growth axis. The strain generated electric fields strongly modify the optical properties of the superlattice. Photogenerated electron-hole pairs screen the fields leading to a large nonlinear optical response. Application of an external electric field leads to a large linear electrooptical response. The absorption edge can be either red or blue shifted. Optical studies of (100), (111), and (211) oriented GaInAs/GaAs superlattices confirm the existence of the strain generated electric fields. Small band gap semiconductors are useful for making intrinsic long wavelength infrared detectors. Arbitrarily small band gaps can be reached in the type 2 superlattice InAs/GaSb. However, for band gaps less than 0.1 eV, the layer thicknesses are large and the overlap of electron and hole wavefunctions are small. Thus, the absorption coefficient is too small for useful infrared (IR) detection. Including In in the GaSb introduces strain in he InAs/GaInSb superlattice which shifts the band edges so that small band gaps can be reached in thin layer superlattices. Good absorption at long IR wavelengths is thus achieved.

  19. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  20. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  1. A thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A device has been developed for the purpose of measuring longitudinal strain in thin polyethylene films. This paper describes the design, development, calibration, and application of this unique transducer in a variety of low temperature environments. This thin, ring-shaped device has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in a thin film. It has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with most available bridge balance, amplification, and telemetry instrumentation. This transducer has been successfully used for viscoelastic material characterization experiments in the laboratory, as well as in flight measurements of strain on the surface of scientific balloons during inflation, launch, ascent, and float.

  2. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOEpatents

    Steblay, Bernard J.

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  3. Taxonomy of oxalotrophic Methylobacterium strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Nurettin; Kato, Yuko; Yilmaz, Ferah

    2008-10-01

    Most of the oxalotrophic bacteria are facultative methylotrophs and play important ecological roles in soil fertility and cycling of elements. This study gives a detailed picture of the taxonomy and diversity of these bacteria and provides new information about the taxonomical variability within the genus Methylobacterium. Twelve mesophilic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic oxalate-oxidizing strains were included in this work that had been previously isolated from the soil and some plant tissues by the potassium oxalate enrichment method. The isolates were characterized using biochemical tests, cellular lipid profiles, spectral characteristics of carotenoid pigments, G+C content of the DNA, and 16S rDNA sequencing. The taxonomic similarities among the strains were analyzed using the simple matching ( S SM) and Jaccard ( S J) coefficients, and the UPGMA clustering algorithm. The phylogenetic position of the strains was inferred by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequences. All isolates were Gram-negative, facultatively methylotrophic, oxidase and catalase positive, and required no growth factors. Based on the results of numerical taxonomy, the strains formed four closely related clusters sharing ≥85% similarity. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences demonstrated that oxalotrophic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic strains could be identified as members of the genus Methylobacterium. Except for M. variabile and M. aquaticum, all of the Methylobacterium type strains tested had the ability of oxalate utilization. Our results indicate that the capability of oxalate utilization seems to be an uncommon trait and could be used as a valuable taxonomic criterion for differentiation of Methylobacterium species.

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189.

    PubMed

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-06-23

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. Copyright © 2016 Town et al.

  5. Thermal stability of strained nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Abraham, Douglas; Lookman, Turab; Saxena, Avadh

    2009-06-19

    Stranski-Krastanow strained islands undergo a shape anisotropy transition as they grow in size, finally evolving toward nanowires. This effect has been explained until now via simple energetic models that neglect thermodynamics. We investigate theoretically the stability of strained nanowires under thermal fluctuations of the long side. We find phase transitions from nanowires back to nanoislands as the temperature is increased and as the height of the nanostructure is raised or lowered, and we predict regions of phase coexistence. Our results are general, but explain recent data on the growth of erbium silicide on a vicinal Si surface.

  6. Characterization of strains of Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical and morphological characteristics of 104 strains of Corynebacterium bovis isolated from bovine milk samples and the C. bovis reference strain were found to be uniform. Valuable criteria for identification were presence of catalase and oxidase, production of acid from glucose and fructose and a requirement for enriched basal media. Six strains of human and three strains of bovine origin were found to be inconsistent with the reference strain. PMID:6722650

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  8. Bacteriocins and novel bacterial strains.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poultry is thought to be a significant source of Campylobacter in human disease. We evaluated anti-Campylobacter activity among 365 Bacillus and Paenibacillus isolates from poultry. One novel antagonistic Bacillus circulans and three Paenibacillus polymyxa strains were identified and further studi...

  9. Trials with a Strain Gauge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    1996-01-01

    Describes an attempt to match the goals of the practical demonstration of the use of a strain gauge and the technical applications of science and responding to student questions in early trials, while keeping within the level of electronics in advanced physics. (Author/JRH)

  10. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, B A; Forsythe, M E; Stanish, W D

    2001-02-01

    To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management.

  11. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  12. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  13. Material mechanical characterization method for multiple strains and strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmand, III, Donald L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Simunovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-19

    A specimen for measuring a material under multiple strains and strain rates. The specimen including a body having first and second ends and a gage region disposed between the first and second ends, wherein the body has a central, longitudinal axis passing through the first and second ends. The gage region includes a first gage section and a second gage section, wherein the first gage section defines a first cross-sectional area that is defined by a first plane that extends through the first gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis. The second gage section defines a second cross-sectional area that is defined by a second plane that extends through the second gage section and is perpendicular to the central, longitudinal axis and wherein the first cross-sectional area is different in size than the second cross-sectional area.

  14. High Strain, Strain Rate Behavior of PTFE/Al/W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addiss, John; Cai, Jing; Walley, Steve; Proud, William; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-06-01

    Conventional dropweight technique was modified to accommodate low amplitude signals from low strength, cold isostatically pressed energetic ``heavy'' composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)/AL/W. The fracture strength, strain and post-critical behaviour of fractured samples were measured for samples of different porosity and W grain size (the masses of each component being the same in each case). Unusual phenomenon of significantly higher strength (55 MPa) of porous composites (density 5.9 g/cc) with small tungsten particles (1 micron) in comparison with strength (32 MPa) of dense composites (7.1 g/cc) with larger tungsten particles (20 micron) was observed. This is attributed to force chains created by a network of small tungsten particles. Interrupted tests at the different level of strains revealed mechanism of fracture under dynamic compression.

  15. A NEW STRAIN OF TRANSMISSIBLE LEUCEMIA IN FOWLS (STRAIN H).

    PubMed

    Ellermann, V

    1921-03-31

    1. A new strain of fowl leucosis has been transmitted through twelve generations of fowls. 2. An increase in virulence was observed during its passage. This was shown in a shortening of the interval between inoculation and death. The increase in virulence does not affect the number of successful inoculations, which remains approximately constant in from 20 to 40 per cent of the birds employed. 3. As with former strains, the disease manifests itself in various forms; i.e., myeloid and intravascular lymphoid types. A single lymphatic case was observed. 4. In several intravascular cases a diminution in the hemolytic power of the serum was established. This phenomenon was absent in a number of myeloid cases. 5. Active immunization cannot be produced by means of the subcutaneous injection of virulent material. 6. The finding of previous experiments that the virus is filterable has been confirmed. 7. The inoculation of human leucemic material into fowls gave negative results.

  16. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  17. Modelling to very high strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, P. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Griera, A.; Evans, L. A.; Wilson, C. J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile strains in shear zones often reach extreme values, resulting in typical structures, such as winged porphyroclasts and several types of shear bands. The numerical simulation of the development of such structures has so far been inhibited by the low maximum strains that numerical models can normally achieve. Typical numerical models collapse at shear strains in the order of one to three. We have implemented a number of new functionalities in the numerical platform "Elle" (Jessell et al. 2001), which significantly increases the amount of strain that can be achieved and simultaneously reduces boundary effects that become increasingly disturbing at higher strain. Constant remeshing, while maintaining the polygonal phase regions, is the first step to avoid collapse of the finite-element grid required by finite-element solvers, such as Basil (Houseman et al. 2008). The second step is to apply a grain-growth routine to the boundaries of polygons that represent phase regions. This way, the development of sharp angles is avoided. A second advantage is that phase regions may merge or become separated (boudinage). Such topological changes are normally not possible in finite element deformation codes. The third step is the use of wrapping vertical model boundaries, with which optimal and unchanging model boundaries are maintained for the application of stress or velocity boundary conditions. The fourth step is to shift the model by a random amount in the vertical direction every time step. This way, the fixed horizontal boundary conditions are applied to different material points within the model every time step. Disturbing boundary effects are thus averaged out over the whole model and not localised to e.g. top and bottom of the model. Reduction of boundary effects has the additional advantage that model can be smaller and, therefore, numerically more efficient. Owing to the combination of these existing and new functionalities it is now possible to simulate the

  18. Virtual strain gage size study

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2015-09-22

    DIC is a non-linear low-pass spatial filtering operation; whether we consider the effect of the subset and shape function, the strain window used in the strain calculation, of other post-processing of the results, each decision will impact the spatial resolution, of the measurement. More fundamentally, the speckle size limits, the spatial resolution by dictating the smallest possible subset. After this decision the processing settings are controlled by the allowable noise level balanced by possible bias errors created by the data filtering. This article describes a process to determine optimum DIC software settings to determine if the peak displacements or strainsmore » are being found.« less

  19. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Miller, Theodore A.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schwartzkopf, Louis A.; Sanders, Steven C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  20. Strain softening in stretched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanics of DNA stretching was characterized using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By employing an anisotropic pressure control method, realistic force-extension dependences of effectively infinite DNA molecules were obtained. A coexistence of B- and S-DNA domains was observed during the overstretching transition. The simulations revealed that strain softening may occur in the process of stretching torsionally constrained DNA. The latter observation was qualitatively reconciled with available experimental data using a random-field Ising model. PMID:18851334

  1. Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terryl A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Horne, Michael R. (Inventor); Messick, Peter L. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor); Hailer, Benjamin T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A composite material includes a structural material and a shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite in response to a predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. In a second embodiment, the composite material includes a plurality of particles of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite and changes magnetic phase in response to the predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. A method of forming a composite material for sensing the predefined critical macroscopic average strain includes providing the shape-memory alloy having an austenite crystallographic phase, changing a size and shape of the shape-memory alloy to thereby form a plurality of particles, and combining the structural material and the particles at a temperature of from about 100-700.degree. C. to form the composite material.

  2. High temperature capacitive strain gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  3. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  4. Yield strain in shear banding amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Hentschel, H George E; Procaccia, Itamar

    2013-02-01

    In recent research it was found that the fundamental shear-localizing instability of amorphous solids under external strain, which eventually results in a shear band and failure, consists of a highly correlated array of Eshelby quadrupoles all having the same orientation and some density ρ. In this paper we calculate analytically the energy E(ρ,γ) associated with such highly correlated structures as a function of the density ρ and the external strain γ. We show that for strains smaller than a characteristic strain γ(Y) the total strain energy initially increases as the quadrupole density increases, but that for strains larger than γ(Y) the energy monotonically decreases with quadrupole density. We identify γ(Y) as the yield strain. Its value, derived from values of the qudrupole strength based on the atomistic model, agrees with that from the computed stress-strain curves and broadly with experimental results.

  5. Strains and Sprains Are a Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... strain at some point. Strains and sprains are common injuries, especially for kids who are very active or ... such as twisting your ankle. This kind of injury is common in sports, but also can happen any time ...

  6. Strain Monitoring of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litteken, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    , such as tensile testing, fatigue testing, and shear testing, but common measurement techniques cannot be used on fabric. Measuring strain in a material and during a test is a critical parameter for an engineer to monitor the structure during the test and correlate to an analytical model. The ability to measure strain in fabric structures is a challenge for NASA. Foil strain gauges, for example, are commonplace on metallic structures testing, but are extremely difficult to interface with a fabric substrate. New strain measuring techniques need to be developed for use with fabric structures. This paper investigates options for measuring strain in fabric structures for both ground testing and in-space structural health monitoring. It evaluates current commercially available options and outlines development work underway to build custom measurement solutions for NASA's fabric structures.

  7. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  8. Using BEEM To Probe Strains In Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. Douglas; Milliken, Autumn M.; Manion, Stephen J.; Kaiser, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) useful in determining strains in semiconductors under some conditions. More specifically, BEEM is variant of scanning tunneling microscopy and sensitive to electronic structure of probed material. In present approach, BEEM used to obtain data on those aspects of variations in electronic structures related to variations in strains. Then by use of mathematical modeling of relationships between electronic structures and strains, variations in strains deduced from BEEM data.

  9. Temperature-Compensating Inactive Strain Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal contribution to output of active gauge canceled. High-temperature strain gauges include both active gauge wires sensing strains and inactive gauge wires providing compensation for thermal contributions to gauge readings. Inactive-gauge approach to temperature compensation applicable to commercially available resistance-type strain gauges operating at temperatures up to 700 degrees F and to developmental strain gauges operating at temperatures up to 2,000 degrees F.

  10. Optical Fibers Would Sense Local Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fiber-optic transducers measure local strains. Includes lead-in and lead-out lengths producing no changes in phase shifts, plus short sensing length in which phase shift is sensitive to strain. Phase shifts in single-mode fibers vary with strains. In alternative version, multiple portions of optical fiber sensitive to strains characteristic of specific vibrational mode of object. Same principle also used with two-mode fiber.

  11. Using BEEM To Probe Strains In Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. Douglas; Milliken, Autumn M.; Manion, Stephen J.; Kaiser, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) useful in determining strains in semiconductors under some conditions. More specifically, BEEM is variant of scanning tunneling microscopy and sensitive to electronic structure of probed material. In present approach, BEEM used to obtain data on those aspects of variations in electronic structures related to variations in strains. Then by use of mathematical modeling of relationships between electronic structures and strains, variations in strains deduced from BEEM data.

  12. Piezoelectric field in strained GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wieczorek, Sebastian Maciej

    2005-11-01

    This report describes an investigation of the piezoelectric field in strained bulk GaAs. The bound charge distribution is calculated and suitable electrode configurations are proposed for (1) uniaxial and (2) biaxial strain. The screening of the piezoelectric field is studied for different impurity concentrations and sample lengths. Electric current due to the piezoelectric field is calculated for the cases of (1) fixed strain and (2) strain varying in time at a constant rate.

  13. Strain Rate Effects on Ultimate Strain of Copper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    34Dogbone" Specimen Used for Quasi-Static 5 and Intermediate Rate Tests 2 Schematic of Split Hopkinso’v Bar Apparatus 7 3a PETN Filled Tube Specimen...48 Experiment 25 Calculated Stress Components in Copper Cylinder 52 Expanded by PETN 26 Fracture of Explosively Expanded Cylindrical 54 Tube A-la...Record of Shot No. 10 73 A7b Framing Camera Record of Shot No. 10 74 A-8 Strain Versus Time for Copper Tube Expanded 75 by PETN vi

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  15. Acquisition of Dynamic Stress/Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mines, R. G.; Demonet, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Computer program enables real-time data acquisition and plotting of stress strain by small, desk top computer. Program monitors load cell and multiple-strain gages during tension or compression loading. Scan routine triggered by specified change of applied load or longitudinal strain.

  16. Job strain in physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Campo, Marc A; Weiser, Sherri; Koenig, Karen L

    2009-09-01

    Job stress has been associated with poor outcomes. In focus groups and small-sample surveys, physical therapists have reported high levels of job stress. Studies of job stress in physical therapy with larger samples are needed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the levels of psychological job demands and job control reported by physical therapists in a national sample, (2) to compare those levels with national norms, and (3) to determine whether high demands, low control, or a combination of both (job strain) increases the risk for turnover or work-related pain. This was a prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up period. Participants were randomly selected members of the American Physical Therapy Association (n=882). Exposure assessments included the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), a commonly used instrument for evaluation of the psychosocial work environment. Outcomes included job turnover and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Compared with national averages, the physical therapists reported moderate job demands and high levels of job control. About 16% of the therapists reported changing jobs during follow-up. Risk factors for turnover included high job demands, low job control, job strain, female sex, and younger age. More than one half of the therapists reported work-related pain. Risk factors for work-related pain included low job control and job strain. The JCQ measures only limited dimensions of the psychosocial work environment. All data were self-reported and subject to associated bias. Physical therapists' views of their work environments were positive, including moderate levels of demands and high levels of control. Those therapists with high levels of demands and low levels of control, however, were at increased risk for both turnover and work-related pain. Physical therapists should consider the psychosocial work environment, along with other factors, when choosing a job.

  17. Effect of strain and strain rate on residual microstructures in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.F.; Follansbee, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    Several specimens of OFE Cu were deformed in compression to study the resulting microstructures at equivalent levels of threshold stress and strain. Equiaxed, diffuse dislocation cells are more persistent in Cu when tested at strain rates exceeding 10/sup 3/ sec/sup -1/. At quasi-static strain rates, dislocation collapse into more distinct, narrow microbands occurs at lower strain levels.

  18. Radio-Frequency Strain Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogowski, Robert S.; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) strain monitor developed to measure lengths of objects. RF waveguide or cable bonded to structure monitored. Propagation of RF signal along waveguide results in phase shift proportional to length of path traveled. Impedance mismatches placed in RF cable at nodes of structure. Records mismatches and detects overall length of line and lengths of intervals between nodes. Used to detect changes in elements of large structure with single cable. Monitor has potential for many applications, including monitoring stability of such large structures as aircraft, bridges, and buildings in Earthquake zones.

  19. Tests of strain analysis by experimental deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; McArthur, J.

    1991-01-01

    The linearisation method and Robin's method of strain analysis of granular materials yield accurate strain estimates for a variety of materials deformed experimentally in pure shear. The breakdown of continuum behaviour at high pore fluid pressures causes the methods to overestimate the strain because they do not take added rigid-body rotation into account. Both methods tolerate some variation in initial shape ratio and some degree of initial preferred orientation at modest strains. Results of tests on polymict sandstone indicate that the lower than average ductility of competent clasts may be balanced against an unfavourable degree of preferred orientation to yield an improved strain estimate.

  20. Error quantification in strain mapping methods.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Elisa; Galindo, Pedro; Yáñez, Andrés; Ben, Teresa; Molina, Sergio I

    2007-10-01

    In this article a method for determining errors of the strain values when applying strain mapping techniques has been devised. This methodology starts with the generation of a thickness/defocus series of simulated high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of InAsxP1-x/InP heterostructures and the application of geometric phase. To obtain optimal defocusing conditions, a comparison of different defocus values is carried out by the calculation of the strain profile standard deviations among different specimen thicknesses. Finally, based on the analogy of real state strain to a step response, a characterization of strain mapping error near an interface is proposed.

  1. Demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages as well as a feasibility test of an optical speckle technique for strain measurement are presented. The strain gage results are reported. Ten Kanthal A-1 wire strain gages were used for low cycle fatigue strain measurements to 950 K and .002 apparent strain on a JT12D burner can in a high pressure (10 atmospheres) burner test. The procedure for use of the strain gages involved extensive precalibration and postcalibration to correct for cooling rate dependence, drift, and temperature effects. Results were repeatable within + or - .0002 to .0006 strain, with best results during fast decels from 950 K. The results agreed with analytical prediction based on an axisymmetric burner model, and results indicated a non-uniform circumferential distribution of axial strain, suggesting temperature streaking.

  2. Strain engineering of graphene: a review.

    PubMed

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-14

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called "straintronics". In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected.

  3. Fundamental understanding of piezoelectric strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Jayant; Chopra, Inderjit

    1999-06-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of piezoelectric elements as strain sensors. Strain is measured in terms of the charge generated by the element as a result of the direct piezoelectric effect. Strains from piezoceramic and piezofilm sensors are compared with strains from a conventional foil strain gage and the advantages of each type of sensor are discussed, along with their limitations. The sensors are surface bonded and are calibrated by means of a dynamic beam bending setup over a frequency range of 5 - 500 Hz. Correction factors to account for transverse strain and shear lag effects due to the bond layer are analytically derived and validated experimentally. Additionally, design of signal conditioning electronics to collect the signals from the piezoelectric sensors is addressed. The superior performance of piezoelectric sensors compared to conventional strain gages in terms of sensitivity and signal to noise ratio is demonstrated.

  4. Strain engineering of graphene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Chen; Sun, Zhimei; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Graphene has intrigued the science community by many unique properties not found in conventional materials. In particular, it is the strongest two-dimensional material ever measured, being able to sustain reversible tensile elastic strain larger than 20%, which yields an interesting possibility to tune the properties of graphene by strain and thus opens a new field called ``straintronics''. In this article, the current progress in the strain engineering of graphene is reviewed. We first summarize the strain effects on the electronic structure and Raman spectra of graphene. We then highlight the electron-phonon coupling greatly enhanced by the biaxial strain and the strong pseudomagnetic field induced by the non-uniform strain with specific distribution. Finally, the potential application of strain-engineering in the self-assembly of foreign atoms on the graphene surface is also discussed. Given the short history of graphene straintronics research, the current progress has been notable, and many further advances in this field are expected.

  5. Comparison of strains of Mycoplasma iowae.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, K R

    1984-01-01

    Comparison of biochemical test results and protein electrophoretic patterns of 21 strains of Mycoplasma iowae indicated that all were similar. Comparison of agglutination test results indicated marked within-species antigenic variation. None of 21 antigens prepared from different strains were effective in demonstrating turkey antibody against five reference strains. Examination of sera from turkeys exposed by intra-air-sac inoculation to two pathogenic strains also indicated antigenic variation. Neither the M. iowae type-strain, Iowa 695, nor the other reference strains were effective in demonstrating antibody against both strains used to expose the turkeys. These findings suggest that antigenic variation may be a major problem in effective serodiagnosis of M. iowae infections.

  6. Ignition Delay Associated with a Strained Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerk, T. J.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Ignition processes associated with two adjacent fuel-oxidizer interferences bounding a strained fuel strip are explored here using single-step activation energy asymptotics. Calculations are made for constant as well as temporally decaying strain fields. There possible models of ignition are determined: one in which the two interfaces ignite independently as diffusion flames; one in which the two interfaces ignite dependently and in which ignition occurs to form a single , premixed flame at very high strain rates before ignition is completely prevented. In contrast to a single, isolated interface in which ignition can be prevented by overmatching heat production with heat convection due to strain, ignition of a strained fuel strip can also be prevented if the finite extend of fuel is diluted by oxidizer more quickly than heat production can cause a positive feedback thermal runaway. These behaviors are dependent on the relative sizes of timescales associated with species and heat diffusion, with convection due to strain, and with the chemical reaction. The result here indicate that adjacent, strained species interfaces may ignite quite differently in nature from ignition of a single, strained intrface and that their interdependence should be considered as the interfaces are brought closer together in complex strain fields. Critical strain rates leading to complete ignition delay are found to be considerably smaller for the fuel strip than those for single interfaces as the fuel strip is made thin in comparison to diffusion and chemical length scales.

  7. Multiplicative earthquake likelihood models incorporating strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, D. A.; Christophersen, A.; Gerstenberger, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWe examine the potential for <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate variables to improve long-term earthquake likelihood models. We derive a set of multiplicative hybrid earthquake likelihood models in which cell rates in a spatially uniform baseline model are scaled using combinations of covariates derived from earthquake catalogue data, fault data, and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates for the New Zealand region. Three components of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate estimated from GPS data over the period 1991-2011 are considered: the shear, rotational and dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. The hybrid model parameters are optimised for earthquakes of M 5 and greater over the period 1987-2006 and tested on earthquakes from the period 2012-2015, which is independent of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate estimates. The shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is overall the most informative individual covariate, as indicated by Molchan error diagrams as well as multiplicative modelling. Most models including <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are significantly more informative than the best models excluding <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in both the fitting and testing period. A hybrid that combines the shear and dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates with a smoothed seismicity covariate is the most informative model in the fitting period, and a simpler model without the dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is the most informative in the testing period. These results have implications for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and can be used to improve the background model component of medium-term and short-term earthquake forecasting models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222745','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222745"><span>Distribution of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Aim Mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT) cause increasingly serious infections especially in immunosuppressive patients by direct transmission from the environment or after colonization. However, identification of these species is difficult because of the cost and difficulties in defining to species level. Identification and distribution of these species can help clinician in the choice of treatment. Materials and methods A total of 90 MOTT <span class="hlt">strains</span> obtained from four different centers were included in the study. These <span class="hlt">strains</span> were identified by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and Hsp65 genetic regions. Results Accordingly, within the 90 MOTT <span class="hlt">strains</span>, 17 different species were identified. In order of frequency, these species were M. gordonea (n = 21), M. abscessus (n = 13), M. lentiflavum (n = 9), M. fortuitum (n = 8), M. intracellulare (n = 6), M. kumamotonense (n = 6), M. neoaurum (n = 5), M. chimaera (n = 5), M. alvei (n = 5), M. peregrinum (n = 3), M. canariasense (n = 3), M. flavescens (n = 1), M. mucogenicum (n = 1), M. chelona (n = 1), M. elephantis (n = 1), M. terrae (n = 1) and M. xenopi (n = 1). Most frequently identified MOTT species according to the geographical origin were as follows: M. abscessus was the most common species either in Istanbul or Malatya regions (n = 6, n = 6, consequently). While M. kumamotonense was the most frequent species isolated from Ankara region (n = 6), M. gordonea was the most common for Samsun region (n = 14). Conclusion Our study revealed that frequency of MOTT varies depending on the number of clinical samples and that frequency of these species were affected by the newly identified species as a result of the use of novel molecular methods. In conclusion, when establishing diagnosis and treatment methods, it is important to know that infections caused by unidentified MOTT species may vary according to the regions in Turkey. The results</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25503536','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25503536"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> effects on oxygen migration in perovskites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mayeshiba, Tam; Morgan, Dane</p> <p>2015-01-28</p> <p>Fast oxygen transport materials are necessary for a range of technologies, including efficient and cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells, gas separation membranes, oxygen sensors, chemical looping devices, and memristors. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> is often proposed as a method to enhance the performance of oxygen transport materials, but the magnitude of its effect and its underlying mechanisms are not well-understood, particularly in the widely-used perovskite-structured oxygen conductors. This work reports on an ab initio prediction of <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects on migration energetics for nine perovskite systems of the form LaBO3, where B = [Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Ga]. Biaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span>, as might be easily produced in epitaxial systems, is predicted to lead to approximately linear changes in migration energy. We find that tensile biaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> reduces the oxygen vacancy migration barrier across the systems studied by an average of 66 meV per percent <span class="hlt">strain</span> for a single selected hop, with a low of 36 and a high of 89 meV decrease in migration barrier per percent <span class="hlt">strain</span> across all systems. The estimated range for the change in migration barrier within each system is ±25 meV per percent <span class="hlt">strain</span> when considering all hops. These results suggest that <span class="hlt">strain</span> can significantly impact transport in these materials, e.g., a 2% tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span> can increase the diffusion coefficient by about three orders of magnitude at 300 K (one order of magnitude at 500 °C or 773 K) for one of the most <span class="hlt">strain</span>-responsive materials calculated here (LaCrO3). We show that a simple elasticity model, which assumes only dilative or compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> in a cubic environment and a fixed migration volume, can qualitatively but not quantitatively model the <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence of the migration energy, suggesting that factors not captured by continuum elasticity play a significant role in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/892605','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/892605"><span>Determining Micromechanical <span class="hlt">Strain</span> in Nitinol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Strasberg, Matthew; /SLAC</p> <p>2006-09-27</p> <p>Nitinol is a superelastic alloy made of equal parts nickel and titanium. Due to its unique shape memory properties, nitinol is used to make medical stents, lifesaving devices used to allow blood flow in occluded arteries. Micromechanical models and even nitinol-specific finite element analysis (FEA) software are insufficient for unerringly predicting fatigue and resultant failure. Due to the sensitive nature of its application, a better understanding of nitinol on a granular scale is being pursued through X-ray diffraction techniques at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Through analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nitinol under increasing tensile loads, localized <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be calculated. We compare these results with micromechanical predictions in order to advance nitinol-relevant FEA tools. From this we hope to gain a greater understanding of how nitinol fatigues under multi-axial loads.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1723b0001D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1723b0001D"><span>Modeling competition between yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26902321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26902321"><span>Comparison of <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rosettes and Digital Image Correlation for Measuring Vertebral Body <span class="hlt">Strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gustafson, Hannah; Siegmund, Gunter; Cripton, Peter</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> gages are commonly used to measure bone <span class="hlt">strain</span>, but only provide <span class="hlt">strain</span> at a single location. Digital image correlation (DIC) is an optical technique that provides the displacement, and therefore <span class="hlt">strain</span>, over an entire region of interest on the bone surface. This study compares vertebral body <span class="hlt">strains</span> measured using <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages and DIC. The anterior surfaces of 15 cadaveric porcine vertebrae were prepared with a <span class="hlt">strain</span> rosette and a speckled paint pattern for DIC. The vertebrae were loaded in compression with a materials testing machine, and two high-resolution cameras were used to image the anterior surface of the bones. The mean noise levels for the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rosette and DIC were 1 με and 24 με, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare <span class="hlt">strain</span> from the DIC and rosette (excluding 44% of trials with some evidence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rosette failure or debonding); the mean difference ± 2 standard deviations (SDs) was -108 με ± 702 με for the minimum (compressive) principal <span class="hlt">strain</span> and -53 με ± 332 με for the maximum (tensile) principal <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Although the DIC has higher noise, it avoids the relatively high risk we observed of <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage debonding. These results can be used to develop guidelines for selecting a method to measure <span class="hlt">strain</span> on bone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3714661','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3714661"><span>Sensor for Measuring <span class="hlt">Strain</span> in Textile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mattmann, Corinne; Clemens, Frank; Tröster, Gerhard</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In this paper a stain sensor to measure large <span class="hlt">strain</span> (80%) in textiles is presented. It consists of a mixture of 50wt-% thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and 50wt-% carbon black particles and is fiber-shaped with a diameter of 0.315mm. The attachment of the sensor to the textile is realized using a silicone film. This sensor configuration was characterized using a <span class="hlt">strain</span> tester and measuring the resistance (extension-retraction cycles): It showed a linear resistance response to <span class="hlt">strain</span>, a small hysteresis, no ageing effects and a small dependance on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> velocity. The total mean error caused by all these effects was ±5.5% in <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Washing several times in a conventional washing machine did not influence the sensor properties. The paper finishes by showing an example application where 21 <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors were integrated into a catsuit. With this garment, 27 upper body postures could be recognized with an accuracy of 97%. PMID:27879904</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9891143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9891143"><span>Job <span class="hlt">Strain</span> in Shift and Daytime Workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knutsson; Nilsson</p> <p>1997-07-01</p> <p>Cross-sectional questionnaire data were used to compare the levels of job <span class="hlt">strain</span> in shift and daytime workers. Job <span class="hlt">strain</span> was measured according to Karasek's Demands/Discretion model. Four occupational groups were included: drivers, industrial workers, policemen/watchmen, and cooks. The study subjects were a random sample of 508 daytime workers and 418 shift workers. Job demand did not differentiate between shift and daytime workers, comparing groups broken down by gender and by occupation. The daytime workers reported higher levels of job <span class="hlt">strain</span> than the shift workers, and women experienced a higher level of job <span class="hlt">strain</span> than did men. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only occupational group and gender predicted job <span class="hlt">strain</span> level. Shiftwork was not significantly associated with job <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the regression model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24518385','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24518385"><span>The many shades of prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> adaptation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baskakov, Ilia V</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In several recent studies transmissible prion disease was induced in animals by inoculation with recombinant prion protein amyloid fibrils produced in vitro. Serial transmission of amyloid fibrils gave rise to a new class of prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> of synthetic origin. Gradual transformation of disease phenotypes and PrP(Sc) properties was observed during serial transmission of synthetic prions, a process that resembled the phenomenon of prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> adaptation. The current article discusses the remarkable parallels between phenomena of prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> adaptation that accompanies cross-species transmission and the evolution of synthetic prions occurring within the same host. Two alternative mechanisms underlying prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> adaptation and synthetic <span class="hlt">strain</span> evolution are discussed. The current article highlights the complexity of the prion transmission barrier and <span class="hlt">strain</span> adaptation and proposes that the phenomenon of prion adaptation is more common than previously thought.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840000339&hterms=vibrational+modes&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dvibrational%2Bmodes','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840000339&hterms=vibrational+modes&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dvibrational%2Bmodes"><span>Deriving <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Modes From Vibrational Tests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Young, J. W.; Joanides, J. C.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Measurements and theoretical analysis complement each other. Experimental acceleration and <span class="hlt">strain</span> data used to calculate coefficients of low-frequency vibrational modes of object under test. An iterative comparison of experimental and calculated <span class="hlt">strains</span> give modal model of improved accuracy that predicts <span class="hlt">strains</span> under operating conditions. Method useful in fatigue life and reliability analyses of buildings, pumps, engines, vehicles, and other systems subject to vibrations and loud noises during operation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA571154','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA571154"><span>SNIT: SNP Identification for <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Typing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Durkin S, Schneewind O, Nierman WC: Genome sequencing and analysis of Yersina pestis KIM D27, an avirulent <span class="hlt">strain</span> exempt from select agent regulation. PLoS...gener- ated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, we selected the recently published Yersinia pestis KIM D27 genome [12]. The Y. pestis D27 <span class="hlt">strain</span>...is a deriva- tive of Y. pestis KIM 10 <span class="hlt">strain</span> (accession no. NC_004088). The Y. pestis KIM D27 draft genome (accession no. ADDC00000000) was generated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TePhL..36..507B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TePhL..36..507B"><span>On inhomogeneous <span class="hlt">straining</span> in compressed sylvinite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barannikova, S. A.; Nadezhkin, M. V.; Zuev, L. B.; Zhigalkin, V. M.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Spatiotemporal distributions of local components of the distortion tensor of quasi-plastic materials—saliferous rocks (sylvinite)—have been studied under active compressive <span class="hlt">straining</span> conditions using double-exposure speckle photography techniques. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> localization patterns are presented and the features of macroscopic <span class="hlt">strain</span> inhomogeneity are considered for inelastic behavior of the material. Results obtained for the slow wave processes in deformed saliferous rocks are compared to analogous data available for ionic crystals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4700..304A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4700..304A"><span>Microminiature temperature-compensated magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arms, Steven W.; Townsend, Christopher P.</p> <p>2002-07-01</p> <p>Our objective was to demonstrate a microminiature magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge that provides both <span class="hlt">strain</span> and temperature signals without additional sensors. Iron based magnetoelastic materials were embedded within superelastic nickel/titanium (NiTi) tubing. NiTi stress was transferred to the ferrite, causing a permeability change sensed by a tiny coil. The coil/bridge was excited (70 KHz AC), synchronously demodulated, and amplified to produce a voltage output proportional to coil/ferrite impedance. A DC voltage was also applied and separately conditioned to provide an output proportional to coil resistance; this signal was used to provide thermal compensation. Controlled <span class="hlt">strains</span> were applied and 6 Hz cyclic outputs recorded simultaneously from the magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge and conventional foil <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges. The magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge tracked the foil gauge with minimal hysteresis and good linearity over 600 microstrain; repeatability was approximately 1.5 microstrain. The magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge's gauge factor was computed from delta inductance/original inductance under static <span class="hlt">strain</span> conditions. Temperatures of 25-140 deg C resulted in an uncompensated shift of 15 microstrain/deg C, and compensated shift of 1.0 microstrain/deg C. A sensitive micro-magnetoelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge was demonstrated using the same sensor to detect stress and temperature with no moving parts, high gauge factor, and good thermal stability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MsT.........54S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MsT.........54S"><span>Construction of an Optical Fiber <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sulaiman, Najwa</p> <p></p> <p>This project is focused on the construction of an optical fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge that is based on a <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge described by Butter and Hocker. Our gauge is designed to generate an interference pattern from the signals carried on two bare single-mode fibers that are fastened to an aluminum cantilever. When the cantilever experiences flexural stress, the interference pattern should change. By observing this change, it is possible to determine the <span class="hlt">strain</span> experienced by the cantilever. I describe the design and construction of our optical fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge as well as the characterization of different parts of the apparatus.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/912475','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/912475"><span>Measurement of Sorption-Induced <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A. and high-volatile bituminous coal from east-central Utah, U.S.A. using an apparatus developed jointly at the Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, U.S.A.) and Colorado School of Mines (Golden, Colorado, U.S.A.). The apparatus can be used to measure <span class="hlt">strain</span> on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> instead of the more common usage of <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges, which require larger samples and longer equilibration times. With this apparatus, we showed that the swelling and shrinkage processes were reversible and that accurate <span class="hlt">strain</span> data could be obtained in a shortened amount of time. A suite of <span class="hlt">strain</span> curves was generated for these coals using gases that included carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and various mixtures of these gases. A Langmuir-type equation was applied to satisfactorily model the <span class="hlt">strain</span> data obtained for pure gases. The sorption-induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> measured in the subbituminous coal was larger than the high-volatile bituminous coal for all gases tested over the range of pressures used in the experimentation, with the CO2-induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> for the subbituminous coal over twice as great at the bituminous coal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AcMSn..29..543X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AcMSn..29..543X"><span>Control of surface wettability via <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Zhen, Quan-Shui</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Reversible control of surface wettability has wide applications in lab-on-chip systems, tunable optical lenses, and microfluidic tools. Using a graphene sheet as a sample material and molecular dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering can serve as an effective way to control the surface wettability. The contact angles θ of water droplets on a graphene vary from 72.5° to 106° under biaxial <span class="hlt">strains</span> ranging from -10% to 10% that are applied on the graphene layer. For an intrinsic hydrophilic surface (at zero <span class="hlt">strain</span>), the variation of θ upon the applied <span class="hlt">strains</span> is more sensitive, i.e., from 0° to 74.8°. Overall the cosines of the contact angles exhibit a linear relation with respect to the <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In light of the inherent dependence of the contact angle on liquid-solid interfacial energy, we develop an analytic model to show the cos θ as a linear function of the adsorption energy E ads of a single water molecule over the substrate surface. This model agrees with our molecular dynamic results very well. Together with the linear dependence of E ads on biaxial <span class="hlt">strains</span>, we can thus understand the effect of <span class="hlt">strains</span> on the surface wettability. Thanks to the ease of reversibly applying mechanical <span class="hlt">strains</span> in micro/nano-electromechanical systems, we believe that <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering can be a promising means to achieve the reversibly control of surface wettability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15004343','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15004343"><span>Caregiver role <span class="hlt">strain</span> of older workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beitman, Candace L; Johnson, Jennifer L; Clark, Adrienne L; Highsmith, Sharon R; Burgess, Amy L; Minor, Megan C; Stir, Aimee L</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to measure role <span class="hlt">strain</span> in older adult workers who were also caregivers of frail elders according to Komarovsky's role <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory, and to determine whether different patterns of role <span class="hlt">strain</span> exist for male worker-caregivers than females. Researchers developed the Job-Caregiver Role <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Scale Survey, which was adapted from a survey that measured role <span class="hlt">strain</span> in working parents and spouses. Surveys were distributed to 11 male and 34 female older workers who were also caregivers. A factor analysis was completed, which isolated four factors of role <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Researchers named the factors time management and arrangements, health and competing role demands, low rewards, and reactions to perceptions. Role <span class="hlt">strain</span> in older adult worker-caregivers is complex and involves multiple variables. A discriminant function analysis predicted differences in the way older male and female worker-caregivers perceived role <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Use of role <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory can assist employers and occupational therapists in developing and maintaining work environments that support not only the older employee's work performance, but participation in the role of elder caregiver as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4644690','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4644690"><span>Skeletal muscle tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with <span class="hlt">strain</span> level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with <span class="hlt">strain</span> (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with <span class="hlt">strain</span> level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent at the tissue level. This <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/366503','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/366503"><span>Investigation of a noncontact <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak <span class="hlt">strain</span> in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique <span class="hlt">strain</span>-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure <span class="hlt">strain</span>. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of <span class="hlt">strain</span> level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel <span class="hlt">strain</span> level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak <span class="hlt">strain</span> in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840004375','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840004375"><span>Inflatable device for installing <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage bridges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cook, C. E.; Smith, G. E.; Monaghan, R. C. (Inventor)</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Methods and devices for installing in a tubular shaft multiple <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages are disclosed with focus on a method and a device for pneumatically forcing <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages into seated engagement with the internal surfaces of a tubular shaft in an installation of multiple <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages in a tubular shaft. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages or other electron devices are seated in a template-like component which is wrapped about a pneumatically expansible body. The component is inserted into a shaft and the body is pneumatically expanded after a suitable adhesive was applied to the surfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9061E..31R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9061E..31R"><span>Distributed <span class="hlt">strain</span> monitoring for bridges: temperature effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for <span class="hlt">strain</span> to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements due to temperature are compared to <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2631512','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2631512"><span>Differentiation of Listeria and Streptococcus <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herendi, A; Ralovich, B</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Colonial morphology of non-beta haemolytic Listeria <span class="hlt">strains</span> is frequently similar to that of non-haemolytic streptococci. Biochemical characteristics, motility, haemolysis on ox blood agar, growth on Clauberg, selective streptococcus (Si) and Mitis-Salivarius agar medium, CAMP test, serological behaviour of 16 Listeria <span class="hlt">strains</span> were studied and the results were compared with the properties of Streptococcus <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Microscopic morphology, motility and catalase activity are useful for distinguishing these <span class="hlt">strains</span>. To avoid a false diagnosis, latex-agglutination should be supplemented with the above tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160000697','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160000697"><span>Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the <span class="hlt">strain</span> is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the <span class="hlt">strain</span> using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of <span class="hlt">strain</span> using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7270427','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7270427"><span>Effective heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> index using pocket computer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kamon, E; Ryan, C</p> <p>1981-08-01</p> <p>An effective heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> index (EHSI) using a hand calculator with memory is suggested for on-site evaluation of prevailing hot ambient conditions. The inputs to the programmed calculator include dry-bulb, wet-bulb and globe temperatures, and estimates of metabolism and air movements. The index is based on a program for calculation of the total heat balance and on the efficiency of sweating. The display of information on the ambient conditions EHSI display is one of following: no <span class="hlt">strain</span>; low <span class="hlt">strain</span>; high <span class="hlt">strain</span>; or time limits of exposure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867015','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867015"><span>Optical fiber sensor technique for <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Changes in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> cause changes in the optical path length of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> experienced by the <span class="hlt">strained</span> one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate <span class="hlt">strain</span> as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being <span class="hlt">strained</span>, so that <span class="hlt">strains</span> generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes under study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70187494','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70187494"><span>Using <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates to forecast seismic hazards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Evans, Eileen</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>One essential component in forecasting seismic hazards is observing the gradual accumulation of tectonic <span class="hlt">strain</span> accumulation along faults before this <span class="hlt">strain</span> is suddenly released as earthquakes. Typically, seismic hazard models are based on geologic estimates of slip rates along faults and historical records of seismic activity, neither of which records actively accumulating <span class="hlt">strain</span>. But this <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be estimated by geodesy: the precise measurement of tiny position changes of Earth’s surface, obtained from GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), or a variety of other instruments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2705517','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2705517"><span>Lattice <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Due to an Atomic Vacancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Volumetric <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be divided into two parts: <span class="hlt">strain</span> due to bond distance change and <span class="hlt">strain</span> due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice <span class="hlt">strain</span> due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20976649','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20976649"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Murali, P.; Ramamurty, U.; Shenoy, Vijay B.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of <span class="hlt">strain</span> accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the presence of a shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic <span class="hlt">strain</span> is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000370&hterms=history+Base+data&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dhistory%2BBase%2Bdata','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000370&hterms=history+Base+data&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dhistory%2BBase%2Bdata"><span>Predictions Of Fatigue Damage From <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Histories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sire, Robert A.; Besuner, Philip M.; Toomey, Tim</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Semiempirical mathematical model of fatigue damage in stressed objects uses experimental histories of <span class="hlt">strains</span> in those objects to predict fatigue lives. Accounts for initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks on cycle-by-cycle basis. Measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> history first digitized, then converted to history of turning-point <span class="hlt">strains</span> for purposes of analysis. Data between turning points not used. When model calibrated against proper test data for each type of object characterized, its predictions of fatigue lives superior to statistical models as one based on root-mean-square <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9749560','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9749560"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> amplification in the bone mechanosensory system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cowin, S C; Weinbaum, S</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>This article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced at the membrane of an osteocyte may be amplified from the <span class="hlt">strain</span> experienced by the whole bone due to mechanical loading. These mechanisms address the question of how these mechanical load-induced small <span class="hlt">strains</span> of (typically) about 0.1% (but up to 0.5%) applied to a whole bone are amplified to <span class="hlt">strains</span> of 1% or larger at the membrane of the osteocyte buried in its lacuna in the bone matrix. The answer to this question is an important link in the mechanosensory system in bone and in relating in vitro cell studies to in vivo cellular response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2951977','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2951977"><span>Prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> interactions are highly selective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Winson, Olivia; Sigurdson, Christina J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Various misfolded and aggregated neuronal proteins commonly co-exist in neurodegenerative disease, but whether the proteins co-aggregate and alter the disease pathogenesis is unclear. Here we used mixtures of distinct prion <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which are believed to differ in conformation, to test the hypothesis that two different aggregates interact and change the disease in vivo. We tracked two prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> in mice histopathologically and biochemically, as well as by spectral analysis of plaque-bound polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), a conformation-sensitive fluorescent amyloid ligand. We found that prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> interacted in a highly selective and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific manner, with either (i) no interaction, (ii) hybrid plaque formation, or (iii) blockage of one <span class="hlt">strain</span> by a second (interference). The hybrid plaques were maintained upon further passage in vivo and each <span class="hlt">strain</span> seemed to maintain its original conformational properties, suggesting that one <span class="hlt">strain</span> served only as a scaffold for aggregation of the second <span class="hlt">strain</span>. These findings not only further our understanding of prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> interactions, but also directly demonstrate interactions that may occur in other protein aggregate mixtures. PMID:20826672</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25641620','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25641620"><span>Material approaches to stretchable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Jaeyoon; You, Insang; Shin, Sangbaie; Jeong, Unyong</p> <p>2015-04-27</p> <p>With the recent progress made in wearable electronics, devices now require high flexibility and stretchability up to large <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels (typically larger than 30 % <span class="hlt">strain</span>). Wearable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors or deformable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors have been gaining increasing research interest because of the rapid development of electronic skins and robotics and because of their biomedical applications. Conventional brittle <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors made of metals and piezoresistors are not applicable for such stretchable sensors. This Review summarizes recent advances in stretchable sensors and focuses on material aspects for high stretchability and sensitivity. It begins with a brief introduction to the Wheatstone bridge circuit of conventional resistive <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. Then, studies on the manipulation of materials are reviewed, including waved structural approaches for making metals and semiconductors stretchable, the use of liquid metals, and conductive filler/elastomer composites by using percolation among the fillers. For capacitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors, the constant conductivity of the electrode is a key factor in obtaining reliable sensors. Possible approaches to developing capacitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors are presented. This Review concludes with a discussion on the major challenges and perspectives related to stretchable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7453585','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7453585"><span>[Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces <span class="hlt">strains</span> (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aksoycan, N</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces <span class="hlt">strains</span> and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces <span class="hlt">strains</span> in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama <span class="hlt">strains</span> and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JNuM..451..264K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JNuM..451..264K"><span>True stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves of cold worked stainless steel over a large range of <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kamaya, Masayuki; Kawakubo, Masahiro</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>True stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves for cold worked stainless steel were obtained over a range of <span class="hlt">strains</span> that included a large <span class="hlt">strain</span> exceeding the <span class="hlt">strain</span> for the tensile strength (post-necking <span class="hlt">strain</span>). A specified testing method was used to obtain the stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves in air at room temperature. The testing method employed the digital image correlation (DIC) technique and iterative finite element analyses (FEA) and was referred to as IFD (Iteration FEA procedure based on DIC measurement) method. Although hourglass type specimens have been previously used for the IFD method, in this study, plate specimens with a parallel gage section were used to obtain accurate yield and tensile strengths together with the stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves. The stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves including the post-necking <span class="hlt">strain</span> were successfully obtained by the IFD method, and it was shown that the stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves for different degrees of cold work collapsed onto a single curve when the offset <span class="hlt">strain</span> was considered. It was also shown that the Swift type constitutive equation gave good regression for the true stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves including the post-necking <span class="hlt">strain</span> regardless of the degree of cold work, although the Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation showed poor fit. In the regression for the Swift type constitutive equation, the constant for power law could be assumed to be nS = 0.5.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10878089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10878089"><span>Surveillance of rotavirus <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the United States: identification of unusual <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The National Rotavirus <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Surveillance System collaborating laboratories.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Griffin, D D; Kirkwood, C D; Parashar, U D; Woods, P A; Bresee, J S; Glass, R I; Gentsch, J R</p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p>Rotavirus <span class="hlt">strains</span> from 964 fecal specimens collected from children at 11 U.S. hospital laboratories from November 1997 to March 1998 and from samples collected at 12 laboratories from November 1998 to March 1999 were typed for G and P proteins. Serotype G1 was the predominant serotype in 1997-1998 (88%), followed by G2 (6.2%), G9 (3.3%), and G3 (1.5%). This pattern was similar to that seen in 1998-1999: G1 (79%), G2 (15%), G9 (3.0%), G4 (1.6%), and G3 (0.3%). Novel P[9] <span class="hlt">strains</span> were identified in both seasons, and analysis of a 364-nucleotide fragment from gene segment 4 of one of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> demonstrated 97.3% nucleotide identity with the prototype P3[9],G3 <span class="hlt">strain</span>, AU1, isolated in Japan. This is the first report of a human AU1-like <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the United States. These results reinforce our initial findings that serotype G9 persists in the United States but has not become a predominant <span class="hlt">strain</span> and that the common serotypes G1 to G4 account for almost 90% of <span class="hlt">strains</span> in circulation. Other uncommon <span class="hlt">strains</span> exist in the United States but may have been overlooked before because of their low prevalence and the use of inadequate diagnostic tools.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950047316&hterms=Rebound&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DRebound','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950047316&hterms=Rebound&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DRebound"><span>A comparison of eastern North American seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates to glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>James, Thomas S.; Bent, Allison L.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates computed using a simple Laurentide glacial loading model are of the order of 10(exp -9) per year within the region of glaciation and extending several hundred kilometers beyond. The horizontal <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates receive approximately equal contributions from horizontal and vertical velocities, a consequence of the spherical geometry adopted for the Earth model. In the eastern United States and southeastern Canada the computed <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than an estimate of the average seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate (Anderson, 1986) and approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than predicted erosional <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates. The predicted glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are not, in general, oriented in such a way as to augment the observed state of deviatoric stress, possibly explaining why the seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are much smaller than the glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates. An exception to this may be seismically active regions in the St. Lawrence valley.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950047316&hterms=seismic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dseismic','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950047316&hterms=seismic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dseismic"><span>A comparison of eastern North American seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates to glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>James, Thomas S.; Bent, Allison L.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates computed using a simple Laurentide glacial loading model are of the order of 10(exp -9) per year within the region of glaciation and extending several hundred kilometers beyond. The horizontal <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates receive approximately equal contributions from horizontal and vertical velocities, a consequence of the spherical geometry adopted for the Earth model. In the eastern United States and southeastern Canada the computed <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than an estimate of the average seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate (Anderson, 1986) and approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than predicted erosional <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates. The predicted glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are not, in general, oriented in such a way as to augment the observed state of deviatoric stress, possibly explaining why the seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates are much smaller than the glacial rebound <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates. An exception to this may be seismically active regions in the St. Lawrence valley.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJN....1560005S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJN....1560005S"><span>Simulation and Analysis of <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Sensitivity of CNT-Based <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sapra, Gaurav; Vig, Renu; Sharma, Manu</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Carbon nanotubes (CNT) is turning out to be a replacement to all the existing traditional sensors due to their high gauge factor, multidirectional sensing capability, high flexibility, low mass density, high dynamic range and high sensitivity to <span class="hlt">strains</span> at nano and macro- scales. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of CNT-based <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors depends on number of parameters; quality and quantity of CNT used, type of polymer used, deposition and dispersion technique adopted and also on environmental conditions. Due to all these parameters, the piezoresistive behavior of CNT is diversified and it needs to be explored. This paper theoretically analyses the <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of CNT-based <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity response of CNT <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor is a result of change in total resistance of CNT network with respect to applied <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The total resistance of CNT network consists of intrinsic resistance and inter-tube resistance. It has been found that the change in intrinsic resistance under <span class="hlt">strain</span> is due to the variation of bandgap of individual, which depends on the chirality of the tube and it varies exponentially with <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The inter-tube resistance of CNT network changes nonlinearly due to change in distance between neighboring CNTs with respect to applied <span class="hlt">strain</span>. As the distance d between CNTs increases due to applied <span class="hlt">strain</span>, tunneling resistance Rtunnel increases nonlinearly in exponential manner. When the concentration of CNTs in composite is close to percolation threshold, then the change of inter-tube resistances is more dominant than intrinsic resistance. At percolation threshold, the total resistance of CNT networks changes nonlinearly and this effect of nonlinearity is due to tunneling effect. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of CNT-based <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors also varies nonlinearly with the change in temperature. For the change of temperature from -20∘C to 50∘C, there is more than 100% change in <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of CNT/polymer composite <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor. This change is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/495681','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/495681"><span>Bicrystals with <span class="hlt">strain</span> gradient effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shu, J.Y.</p> <p>1997-01-09</p> <p>Boundary between two perfectly bonded single crystals plays an important role in determining the deformation of the bicrystals. This work addresses the role of the grain boundary by considering the elevated hardening of a slip system due to a slip gradient. The slip gradients are associated with geometrically necessary dislocations and their effects become pronounced when a representative length scale of the deformation field is comparable to the dominant microstructural length scale of a material. A new rate-dependent crystal plasticity theory is presented and has been implemented within the finite element method framework. A planar bicrystal under uniform in-plane loading is studied using the new crystal theory. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> is found to be continuous but nonuniform within a boundary layer around the interface. The lattice rotation is also nonuniform within the boundary layer. The width of the layer is determined by the misorientation of the grains, the hardening of slip systems, and most importantly by the characteristic material length scales. The overall yield strength of the bicrystal is also obtained. A significant grain-size dependence of the yield strength, the Hall- Petch effect is predicted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1426..167J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1426..167J"><span>High <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate behavior of polyurea compositions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Joshi, Vasant S.; Milby, Christopher</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>High-<span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate response of three polyurea compositions with varying molecular weights has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar arrangement equipped with aluminum bars. Three polyurea compositions were synthesized from polyamines (Versalink, Air Products) with a multi-functional isocyanate (Isonate 143L, Dow Chemical). Amines with molecular weights of 1000, 650, and a blend of 250/1000 have been used in the current investigation. These materials have been tested to <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates of over 6000/s. High <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate results from these tests have shown varying trends as a function of increasing <span class="hlt">strain</span>. While higher molecular weight composition show lower yield, they do not show dominant hardening behavior at lower <span class="hlt">strain</span>. On the other hand, the blend of 250/1000 show higher load bearing capability but lower <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening effects than the 600 and 1000 molecular weight amine based materials. Results indicate that the initial increase in the modulus of the blend of 250/1000 may lead to the loss of <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening characteristics as the material is compressed to 50% <span class="hlt">strain</span>, compared to 1000 molecular weight amine based material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243376','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243376"><span>Surfactin production by <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Bacillus mojavensis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Bacillus mojavensis, RRC101 is an endophytic bacterium patented for control of fungal diseases in maize and other plants. DNA fingerprint analysis of the rep-PCR fragments of 35 B. mojavensis and 4 B. subtilis <span class="hlt">strains</span> using the Diversilab genotyping system revealed genotypic distinctive <span class="hlt">strains</span> alon...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22412602','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22412602"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> engineering in graphene by laser irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Papasimakis, N.; Mailis, S.; Huang, C. C.; Al-Saab, F.; Hewak, D. W.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z. X.</p> <p>2015-02-09</p> <p>We demonstrate that the Raman spectrum of graphene on lithium niobate can be controlled locally by continuous exposure to laser irradiation. We interpret our results in terms of changes to doping and mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> and show that our observations are consistent with light-induced gradual <span class="hlt">strain</span> relaxation in the graphene layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED208517.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED208517.pdf"><span>Fiscal <span class="hlt">Strain</span> in an Era of Retrenchment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hentschke, Guilbert; Yagielski, John</p> <p></p> <p>Preliminary results of a three-year study of fifteen school districts indicate that fiscal <span class="hlt">strain</span> results from both "intended" and "unintended" factors. The authors construct a model of fiscal <span class="hlt">strain</span> that combines budget constraints with school district decision-makers' preference functions and indifference curves. Using this model and 1976 and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28729269','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28729269"><span>Multiple Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">Strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kafka, Thomas A; Geissler, Andreas J; Vogel, Rudi F</p> <p>2017-07-20</p> <p>We report here the genome sequences of four Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> which vary in surface hydrophobicity. Bioinformatic analysis, using additional genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span>, revealed a possible correlation between the cell wall teichoic acid-type and cell surface hydrophobicity and provide the basis for consecutive analyses. Copyright © 2017 Kafka et al.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5522936','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5522936"><span>Multiple Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kafka, Thomas A.; Geissler, Andreas J.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT We report here the genome sequences of four Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> which vary in surface hydrophobicity. Bioinformatic analysis, using additional genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span>, revealed a possible correlation between the cell wall teichoic acid-type and cell surface hydrophobicity and provide the basis for consecutive analyses. PMID:28729269</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993STIN...9426568W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993STIN...9426568W"><span>Attachment techniques for high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wnuk, Steve P., Jr.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Attachment methods for making resistive <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements to 2500 F were studied. A survey of available <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages and attachment techniques was made, and the results are compiled for metal and carbon composite test materials. A theoretical analysis of <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer into a bonded <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage was made, and the important physical parameters of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer medium, the ceramic matrix, were identified. A pull tester to measure pull-out tests on commonly used <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage cements indicated that all cements tested displayed adequate strength for good <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer. Rokide flame sprayed coatings produced significantly stronger bonds than ceramic cements. An in-depth study of the flame spray process produced simplified installation procedures which also resulted in greater reliability and durability. Application procedures incorporating improvements made during this program are appended to the report. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> gages installed on carbon composites, Rene' 41, 316 stainless steel, and TZM using attachment techniques developed during this program were successfully tested to 2500 F. Photographs of installation techniques, test procedures, and graphs of the test data are included in this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=medicaid&pg=5&id=EJ1001107','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=medicaid&pg=5&id=EJ1001107"><span>Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' <span class="hlt">strain</span> and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in <span class="hlt">strain</span> among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhL..90d1114T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhL..90d1114T"><span>Tomographic reconstruction of picosecond acoustic <span class="hlt">strain</span> propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Wright, Oliver B.; Li Voti, Roberto</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>By means of an ultrafast optical technique, picosecond acoustic <span class="hlt">strain</span> pulses in a transparent medium are tomographically visualized. The authors reconstruct <span class="hlt">strain</span> pulses in Au-coated glass from time-domain reflectivity changes as a function of the optical angle of incidence, with ˜1ps temporal and ˜100nm spatial resolutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nursing+AND+care&id=EJ1001107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nursing+AND+care&id=EJ1001107"><span>Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' <span class="hlt">strain</span> and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in <span class="hlt">strain</span> among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006976','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006976"><span>Silicon stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span> activities at JPL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chen, C. P.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>In-house Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) work is described for silicon stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span>, including the study of fracture mechanics, and on the high-temperature test program in which the low-<span class="hlt">strain</span> response of silicon sheet materials above 1000 C is being measured and high temperature material property data are being determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860019923','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860019923"><span>Analysis of silicon stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dillon, O.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>In the study of stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships in silicon ribbon, numerous solutions were calculated for stresses, <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates, and dislocation densities through the use of the Sumino model. It was concluded that many cases of failure of computer solutions to converge are analytical manifestations of shear bands (Luder's band) observed in experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000068&hterms=phase+locked+loop&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dphase%2Blocked%2Bloop','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000068&hterms=phase+locked+loop&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dphase%2Blocked%2Bloop"><span>Pulsed Phase-Locked-Loop <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Heyman, J. S.; Stone, F. D.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>P2sup.L2sup. <span class="hlt">strain</span> monitor measures <span class="hlt">strain</span> by monitoring change in phase of acoustic signal that passes through stressed sample. Phase sample causes shift in frequency of VCO. As with other monitors of this type, instrument is only accurate in elastic range of material. Monitor is expected to have broad application in materials testing, structural design, fabrication and assembly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8719177','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8719177"><span>A natural vaccine candidate <span class="hlt">strain</span> against cholera.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Y Q; Qi, G M; Wang, S X; Yu, Y M; Duan, G C; Zhang, L J; Gao, S Y</p> <p>1995-12-01</p> <p>E1 Tor Vibrio cholerae (EVC) <span class="hlt">strains</span> may be classified into two kinds-epidemigenic (EEVC) <span class="hlt">strains</span> and non-epidemigenic (NEEVC) <span class="hlt">strains</span>-based on a phage-biotyping system. A large number of EEVC <span class="hlt">strains</span> have been screened for toxigenic and putative colonization attributes. One such naturally occurring <span class="hlt">strains</span> (designated IEM101) has been found which is devoid of genes encoding cholera toxin (CT), accessory cholera enterotoxin (ACE), zonula occludens toxin (ZOT), but possesses RS1 sequences and toxin-coregulated pilus A gene (icpA) although icpA is poorly expressed. It expresses type B pili but does not possess type C pili. It is an E1 Tor Ogawa <span class="hlt">strain</span> and does not cause fluid accumulation in rabbit ilcal loop tests. Active immunization of rabbits with <span class="hlt">strain</span> IEM101 elicited good protection against challenge with virulent <span class="hlt">strains</span> of V. cholerae O1. Oral administration caused no side effects in 15 human volunteers, colonized the gut for four to ten days and elicited good immune responses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011203','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011203"><span>Nanocomposite <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauges Having Small TCRs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gregory, Otto; Chen, Ximing</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Ceramic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges in which the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-sensitive electrically conductive strips made from nanocomposites of noble metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are being developed for use in gas turbine engines and other power-generation systems in which gas temperatures can exceed 1,500 F (about 816 C). In general, <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges exhibit spurious thermally induced components of response denoted apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span>. When temperature varies, a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-gauge material that has a nonzero temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) exhibits an undesired change in electrical resistance that can be mistaken for the change in resistance caused by a change in <span class="hlt">strain</span>. It would be desirable to formulate straingauge materials having TCRs as small as possible so as to minimize apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Most metals exhibit positive TCRs, while most semiconductors, including ITO, exhibit negative TCRs. The present development is based on the idea of using the negative TCR of ITO to counter the positive TCRs of noble metals and of obtaining the benefit of the ability of both ITO and noble metals to endure high temperatures. The noble metal used in this development thus far has been platinum. Combinatorial libraries of many ceramic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges containing nanocomposites of various proportions of ITO and platinum were fabricated by reactive co-sputtering from ITO and platinum targets onto alumina- and zirconia-based substrates mounted at various positions between the targets.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000207','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000207"><span>Inorganic bonding of semiconductor <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Woodruff, N. L.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Inorganic bonding materials minimize outgassing and improve electrical and mechanical properties of semiconductor <span class="hlt">strain</span>-gage transducers in high-vacuum and high-temperature operations. The two basic methods described are ceramic-glass-bonding and metallic bond formation between the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage and the substrate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=punishment+AND+child&pg=7&id=EJ808655','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=punishment+AND+child&pg=7&id=EJ808655"><span>General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory and Delinquency: Focusing on the Influences of Key <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Characteristics on Delinquency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moon, Byongook; Blurton, David; McCluskey, John D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The study examines the effects of recent, older, and chronic <span class="hlt">strains</span> and of perceived injustice of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on delinquency, sampling 777 Korean youth. Seven key <span class="hlt">strains</span> most likely leading to delinquency, some of which were often overlooked in previous research, were included, and these are family conflict, parental punishment, teachers' punishment,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23144418','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23144418"><span>Complete genome sequence of Brucella canis <span class="hlt">strain</span> 118, a <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolated from canine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gao, Guangjun; Li, Jing; Li, Tiefeng; Zhang, Zhengfang; Wang, Liping; Yuan, Xitong; Wang, Yufei; Xu, Jie; Ke, Yuehua; Huang, Liuyu; Wang, Dali; Chen, Zeliang; Xu, Xingran</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Brucella canis infects several species of animals, and canine is the preferred host. Genome sequences of <span class="hlt">strains</span> from different hosts are valuable for comparative analysis of host adaptation and microevolution. Here, we report the genome sequence of Brucella canis <span class="hlt">strain</span> 118, a <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolated from canine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/82645','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/82645"><span>On certain aspects of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate sensitivity of sheet metals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shi, M.F.; Meuleman, D.J.</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>The formability of a material depends upon the <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate hardening of the material. In this study, constitutive parameters using the power law constitutive equation are determined for six different strength steels and two aluminum alloys over different <span class="hlt">strain</span> ranges, including approximations of the postuniform elongation range. Constitutive parameters are found to be different at different <span class="hlt">strain</span> ranges. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of steels increases with <span class="hlt">strain</span> at low <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels (less than 5%) and decreases at high <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels (greater than 10%). <span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate hardening decreases with <span class="hlt">strain</span> for all steels and aluminum alloys. Uniform elongation depends only on <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening, and postuniform elongation depends only on <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate hardening. However, the total elongation depends on both <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate hardening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26649476','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26649476"><span>Mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects on black phosphorus nanoresonators.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon</p> <p>2016-01-14</p> <p>We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> on single-layer black phosphorus nanoresonators at different temperatures. We find that the resonant frequency is highly anisotropic in black phosphorus due to its intrinsic puckered configuration, and that the quality factor in the armchair direction is higher than in the zigzag direction at room temperature. The quality factors are also found to be intrinsically larger than those in graphene and MoS2 nanoresonators. The quality factors can be increased by more than a factor of two by applying tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span>, with uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the armchair direction being the most effective. However, there is an upper bound for the quality factor increase due to nonlinear effects at large <span class="hlt">strains</span>, after which the quality factor decreases. The tension induced nonlinear effect is stronger along the zigzag direction, resulting in a smaller maximum <span class="hlt">strain</span> for quality factor enhancement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhL.104g3108U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhL.104g3108U"><span>Nanoscale <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping in battery nanostructures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ulvestad, A.; Cho, H. M.; Harder, R.; Kim, J. W.; Dietze, S. H.; Fohtung, E.; Meng, Y. S.; Shpyrko, O. G.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to map the local three dimensional <span class="hlt">strain</span> inhomogeneity and electron density distribution of two individual LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ cathode nanoparticles in both ex-situ and in-situ environments. Our reconstructed images revealed a maximum <span class="hlt">strain</span> of 0.4%. We observed different variations in <span class="hlt">strain</span> inhomogeneity due to multiple competing effects. The compressive/tensile component of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> is connected to the local lithium content and, on the surface, interpreted in terms of a local Jahn-Teller distortion of Mn3+. Finally, the measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> distributions are discussed in terms of their impact on competing theoretical models of the lithiation process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24799688','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24799688"><span>Extraordinary <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening by gradient structure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T</p> <p>2014-05-20</p> <p>Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening and an obvious <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6565562','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6565562"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate effects in stress corrosion cracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)</p> <p>1990-03-01</p> <p>Slow <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow <span class="hlt">strain</span> tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that <span class="hlt">strain</span> or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040090018&hterms=Mechanosensitive+channels&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DMechanosensitive%2Bchannels','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040090018&hterms=Mechanosensitive+channels&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DMechanosensitive%2Bchannels"><span>Transduction of mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> in bone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Duncan, R. L.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> are discussed in relation to the types of <span class="hlt">strain</span> encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=250420','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=250420"><span>Facultatively Parasitic <span class="hlt">Strain</span> of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Diedrich, D. L.; Denny, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.; Conti, S. F.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (designated <span class="hlt">strain</span> UKi2) was isolated which was capable of growing either saprophytically in host-free medium or endoparasitically in Escherichia coli B/r. It was quantitatively determined that each bdellovibrio could develop in solid medium to produce a colony, and 65% of the cells in a late exponential-phase culture were capable of inducing E. coli B/r spheroplasts. A photomicrographic sequence of single E. coli spheroplasts containing bdellovibrios demonstrated that parasitically derived B. bacteriovorus UKi2 could develop saprophytically after release from the host cells. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> UKi2 appears to be morphologically quite similar to previously described obligately parasitic bdellovibrios; biochemical data on this <span class="hlt">strain</span> suggests its close relationship to some of the previously described host-independent <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Bdellovibrio. Images PMID:4908792</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392048','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392048"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> stiffening in synthetic and biopolymer networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Erk, Kendra A; Henderson, Kevin J; Shull, Kenneth R</p> <p>2010-05-10</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-stiffening behavior common to biopolymer networks is difficult to reproduce in synthetic networks. Physically associating synthetic polymer networks can be an exception to this rule and can demonstrate <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening behavior at relatively low values of <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Here, the stiffening behavior of model elastic networks of physically associating triblock copolymers is characterized by shear rheometry. Experiments demonstrate a clear correlation between network structure and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening behavior. Stiffening is accurately captured by a constitutive model with a single fitting parameter related to the midblock length. The same model is also effective for describing the stiffening of actin, collagen, and other biopolymer networks. Our synthetic polymer networks could be useful model systems for biological materials due to (1) the observed similarity in <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening behavior, which can be quantified and related to network structure, and (2) the tunable structure of the physically associating network, which can be manipulated to yield a desired response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040090018&hterms=signal+transduction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsignal%2Btransduction','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040090018&hterms=signal+transduction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsignal%2Btransduction"><span>Transduction of mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> in bone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Duncan, R. L.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> are discussed in relation to the types of <span class="hlt">strain</span> encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1857d0011H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1857d0011H"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> analyis in Banda Sea using grid <span class="hlt">strain</span> based on GPS observation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Herawati, Yola Asis; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina Anggreni; Effendi, Jony</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>Eastern Indonesia has very high deformation due to tectonic activity in triple junction area. Convergencing between plate in Eastern Indonesia trigger some microblocks. Tectonic block as one of deformation phenomenom due to the interaction of between plates can be understood by using <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> analysis shows the change of position, shape and dimension from an object. This research use 80 GPS from previous study by Koulali et al, (2015) and 7 continuous GPS in Bird's Head to calculate <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in order to find relation between tectonic activity and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in Banda Sea, and to identify block boundary. The GPS data are calculated using GAMIT/GLOBK software to obtain time series in each station. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> rates are calculated using softwae package named grid <span class="hlt">strain</span> which calculate <span class="hlt">strain</span> based on interpolation using discretized geodetic measurement resulting <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in grid system. The data distribution and algorithm in grid <span class="hlt">strain</span> influence the result of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates from grid <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The result from <span class="hlt">strain</span> calculation is in ranges -16,421×10-8 to -0,194×10-8 for shortening parameter and 1,653×10-8 to 18,92×10-8 for extension parameter. From <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis known that <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates can identify tectonic activity but not accurately for block boundary. Banda Block, Timor Block, and Bird's Head Block has different <span class="hlt">strain</span> pattern especially in their boundary. Timor and eastern part of Banda Block dominated by shortening according to the back arc located in there, meanwhile western part of Banda Block and mostly of Bird's Head dominated by very low shortening according to collision between Eurasia and Australia Plates. For further analysis need some additional data such as density of GPS sites, sesimicity, and gravity data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1810513Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1810513Q"><span>Micro-scale <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping technique: a tool to quantify <span class="hlt">strain</span> partitioning during creep deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Zimmerman, Mark; Evans, Brian; Kohlstedt, David</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Several deformation mechanisms interact to accommodate plastic deformation. Quantifying the contribution of each to the total <span class="hlt">strain</span> is necessary for establishing a better link between observed microstructures and mechanical data, as well as to allow more confident extrapolation from laboratory to natural conditions. In this contribution, we present the experimental and computational technique involved in micro-scale <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping (MSSM). The MSSM technique relies on analyzing the relative displacement of initially regularly spaced markers after deformation. We present several microfabrication techniques that permit us to pattern various rocks with micrometric and nanometric metal markers, as well as the challenges faced in working at high temperatures and pressures. A Hough transform algorithm was used to detect the markers and automate as much as possible the <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis. The von Mises <span class="hlt">strain</span> is calculated for a set of n-points and their relative displacements, which allow us to map the <span class="hlt">strain</span> at different length scales. We applied the MSSM technique to study <span class="hlt">strain</span> partitioning during deformation creep of Carrara marble and San Carlos olivine at a confining pressure, Pc, of 300 MPa and homologous temperatures of 0.3 to 0.6. We measured the local <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> heterogeneity produced during creep deformation of split cylinders of Carrara marble under conventional triaxial loading to inelastic <span class="hlt">strains</span> of 11 to 36% at a <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate of 3x10-5s-1, Pc = 300 MPa and 400o < T <700oC. We conclude that the evolution of deformation structures in marble takes place over a substantial interval in <span class="hlt">strain</span> and that the duration of this interval depends on <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, temperature, and pressure. Our first results on <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping of olivine deformed at T = 1150oC and Pc = 300 MPa demonstrate promise for characterizing intragranular <span class="hlt">strain</span> and better defining the contribution of grain boundary sliding to the total <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19201435','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19201435"><span>Principal component analysis of shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Hao; Varghese, Tomy</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>Shear stresses are always present during quasi-static <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging, since tissue slippage occurs along the lateral and elevational directions during an axial deformation. Shear stress components along the axial deformation axes add to the axial deformation while perpendicular components introduce both lateral and elevational rigid motion and deformation artifacts into the estimated axial and lateral <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor images. A clear understanding of these artifacts introduced into the normal and shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor images with shear deformations is essential. In addition, signal processing techniques for improved depiction of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> distribution is required. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of artifacts introduced due to lateral shear deformations on the normal <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensors estimated by varying the lateral shear angle during an axial deformation. Shear <span class="hlt">strains</span> are quantified using the lateral shear angle during the applied deformation. Simulation and experimental validation using uniformly elastic and single inclusion phantoms were performed. Variations in the elastographic signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios for axial deformations ranging from 0% to 5%, and for lateral deformations ranging from 0 to 5 degrees were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the first and second principal component <span class="hlt">strain</span> images provide higher signal-to-noise ratios of 20 dB with simulations and 10 dB under experimental conditions and contrast-to-noise ratio levels that are at least 20 dB higher when compared to the axial and lateral <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor images, when only lateral shear deformations are applied. For small axial deformations, the lateral shear deformations significantly reduces <span class="hlt">strain</span> image quality, however the first principal component provides about a 1-2dB improvement over the axial <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor image. Lateral shear deformations also significantly increase the noise level in the axial and lateral <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor images with larger axial deformations</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18830403','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18830403"><span>Amerindian Helicobacter pylori <span class="hlt">strains</span> go extinct, as european <span class="hlt">strains</span> expand their host range.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Domínguez-Bello, Maria G; Pérez, Maria E; Bortolini, Maria C; Salzano, Francisco M; Pericchi, Luis R; Zambrano-Guzmán, Orlisbeth; Linz, Bodo</p> <p>2008-10-02</p> <p>We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori <span class="hlt">strains</span> would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes) of 131 <span class="hlt">strains</span>: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all <span class="hlt">strains</span> that had been cultured from Africans were African <span class="hlt">strains</span> (hpAfrica1), all from Spanish were European (hpEurope) and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed <span class="hlt">strains</span>: hspAmerind and hpEurope <span class="hlt">strains</span> had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori <span class="hlt">strains</span> were hspAmerind. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination). The lower genetic structure in hpEurope <span class="hlt">strains</span> is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian <span class="hlt">strains</span> might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian <span class="hlt">strains</span> may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2551748','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2551748"><span>Amerindian Helicobacter pylori <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Go Extinct, as European <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Expand Their Host Range</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Domínguez-Bello, Maria G.; Pérez, Maria E.; Bortolini, Maria C.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Pericchi, Luis R.; Zambrano-Guzmán, Orlisbeth; Linz, Bodo</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori <span class="hlt">strains</span> would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes) of 131 <span class="hlt">strains</span>: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all <span class="hlt">strains</span> that had been cultured from Africans were African <span class="hlt">strains</span> (hpAfrica1), all from Spanish were European (hpEurope) and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed <span class="hlt">strains</span>: hspAmerind and hpEurope <span class="hlt">strains</span> had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori <span class="hlt">strains</span> were hspAmerind. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination). The lower genetic structure in hpEurope <span class="hlt">strains</span> is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian <span class="hlt">strains</span> might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian <span class="hlt">strains</span> may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts. PMID:18830403</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28049090','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28049090"><span>New regime in the mechanical behavior of skin: <span class="hlt">strain</span>-softening occurring before <span class="hlt">strain</span>-hardening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nicolle, S; Decorps, J; Fromy, B; Palierne, J-F</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>We report linear and non-linear shear tests on rat skin, evidencing a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-softening regime, from 1% to 50% <span class="hlt">strain</span>, followed by a strong <span class="hlt">strain</span>-hardening regime, leading to a 'deck chair-shaped' stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curve. The <span class="hlt">strain</span>-softening regime was never reported as such in the literature, possibly mistaken for the linear regime in experiments starting above 1% deformation. The time-dependent response is akin to that of a gel, with a power-law frequency-dependent dynamic shear modulus ranging from ~5.6kPa to ~10kPa between 0.1Hz and 10Hz. We present an analytical non-linear viscoelastic model that accounts for both time-dependent and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent features of the skin. This eight-parameter model extends the one we proposed for parenchymatous organs by including <span class="hlt">strain</span>-softening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008IJMPB..22.1255K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008IJMPB..22.1255K"><span>Dynamic Tensile Properties of Iron and Steels for a Wide Range of <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rates and <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kojima, Nobusato; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Terumi; Mimura, Koji; Tanimura, Shinji</p> <p></p> <p>The tensile stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves of iron and a variety of steels, covering a wide range of strength level, over a wide <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate range on the order of 10-3 ~ 103 s-1, were obtained systematically by using the Sensing Block Type High Speed Material Testing System (SBTS, Saginomiya). Through intensive analysis of these results, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate sensitivity of the flow stress for the large <span class="hlt">strain</span> region, including the viscous term at high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates, the true fracture strength and the true fracture <span class="hlt">strain</span> were cleared for the material group of the ferrous metals. These systematical data may be useful to develop a practical constitutive model for computer codes, including a fracture criterion for simulations of the dynamic behavior in crash worthiness studies and of work-pieces subjected to dynamic plastic working for a wide <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030102','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030102"><span>Anisotropic <span class="hlt">strain</span> enhanced hydrogen solubility in bcc metals: the independence on the sign of <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Hong-Bo; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong; Liu, Feng</p> <p>2012-09-28</p> <p>When an impurity is doped in a solid, it inevitably induces a local stress, tending to expand or contract the lattice. Consequently, <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be applied to change the solubility of impurity in a solid. Generally, the solubility responds to <span class="hlt">strain</span> "monotonically," increasing (decreasing) with the tensile (compressive) <span class="hlt">strain</span> if the impurity induces a compressive stress or vice versa. Using first-principles calculations, however, we discovered that the H solubility can be enhanced by anisotropic <span class="hlt">strain</span> in some bcc metals, almost independent of the sign of <span class="hlt">strain</span>. This anomalous behavior is found to be caused by a continuous change of H location induced by anisotropic <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Our finding suggests a cascading effect of H bubble formation in bcc metals: the H solution leads to H bubble formation that induces anisotropic <span class="hlt">strain</span> that in turn enhances H solubility to further facilitate bubble growth.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770049578&hterms=wrench+materials&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dwrench%2Bmaterials','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770049578&hterms=wrench+materials&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dwrench%2Bmaterials"><span>A CW ultrasonic bolt-<span class="hlt">strain</span> monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Heyman, J. S.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>There exists a need for a relatively inexpensive system for measuring <span class="hlt">strain</span> in bolts. The torque wrench is one technique for <span class="hlt">straining</span> bolts which has been widely applied. Unfortunately, friction in the bolt threads and between the nut and the work tend to make such a simple system inaccurate. In practice, a torque wrench is unacceptable for many situations where <span class="hlt">strain</span> is critical. In this article, an ultrasonic technique is described which can indicate changes in bolt <span class="hlt">strain</span> to better than one part in 10,000. The technique is based on the one-dimensional propagating-ultrasonic-wave model and uses a new ultrasonic instrument called a Reflection Oscillator Ultrasonic Spectrometer which is a closed-loop feedback marginal-oscillator system that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the bolt. The instrument indicates a shift in the bolt resonance frequency due to elongation and changes in velocity of sound due to <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Data are presented comparing a standard torque wrench to the ultrasonic monitor for different measured stresses on the bolt as well as for different bolt conditions. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> instrument can be used to monitor changing stresses, to measure material properties and may be applied as a <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage or load cell.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20999337','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20999337"><span>Pressure effects on nonpremixed <span class="hlt">strained</span> flames</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pons, Laetitia; Darabiha, Nasser; Candel, Sebastien</p> <p>2008-01-15</p> <p>This article deals with the effect of pressure on the structure and consumption rate of nonpremixed <span class="hlt">strained</span> flames. An analysis based on the fast chemistry limit indicates that the flame thickness is inversely proportional to the square root of pressure and that the flame structure may be described in terms of a similarity variable that scales like the product of pressure and the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate to the power 1/2. This scaling rule also applies to flames submitted to a time-variable <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate provided that the frequencies characterizing these changes are low compared to the mean <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate. It is also confirmed that reactants consumption rates per unit flame surface vary like the square root of pressure and that this rule holds for time-variable <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates of arbitrary nature. Complex chemistry calculations carried out over a broad range of operating pressures indicate that the pressure dependences deduced analytically are remarkably accurate and can be used for a broad range of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates, excluding values in the near vicinity of extinction conditions, where finite rate chemistry effects become important and influence the flame response to pressure. Thus, it appears that the pressure exponent characterizing the heat release rate in nonpremixed <span class="hlt">strained</span> flames is essentially constant and equal to 1/2. This exponent is independent of finite rate chemistry effects, except when conditions are close to extinction. (author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007IJMSp.259..140K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007IJMSp.259..140K"><span>Specific identification of Bacillus anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krishnamurthy, Thaiya; Deshpande, Samir; Hewel, Johannes; Liu, Hongbin; Wick, Charles H.; Yates, John R., III</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Accurate identification of human pathogens is the initial vital step in treating the civilian terrorism victims and military personnel afflicted in biological threat situations. We have applied a powerful multi-dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) along with newly generated software termed Profiler to identify the sequences of specific proteins observed for few <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Bacillus anthracis, a human pathogen. Software termed Profiler was created to initially screen the MudPIT data of B. anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span> and establish the observed proteins specific for its <span class="hlt">strains</span>. A database was also generated using Profiler containing marker proteins of B. anthracis and its <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which in turn could be used for detecting the organism and its corresponding <span class="hlt">strains</span> in samples. Analysis of the unknowns by our methodology, combining MudPIT and Profiler, led to the accurate identification of the anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span> present in samples. Thus, a new approach for the identification of B. anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span> in unknown samples, based on the molecular mass and sequences of marker proteins, has been ascertained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28773023','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28773023"><span>Ultra High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Nanoindentation Testing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sudharshan Phani, Pardhasaradhi; Oliver, Warren Carl</p> <p>2017-06-17</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate dependence of indentation hardness has been widely used to study time-dependent plasticity. However, the currently available techniques limit the range of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates that can be achieved during indentation testing. Recent advances in electronics have enabled nanomechanical measurements with very low noise levels (sub nanometer) at fast time constants (20 µs) and high data acquisition rates (100 KHz). These capabilities open the doors for a wide range of ultra-fast nanomechanical testing, for instance, indentation testing at very high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. With an accurate dynamic model and an instrument with fast time constants, step load tests can be performed which enable access to indentation <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates approaching ballistic levels (i.e., 4000 1/s). A novel indentation based testing technique involving a combination of step load and constant load and hold tests that enables measurement of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate dependence of hardness spanning over seven orders of magnitude in <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is presented. A simple analysis is used to calculate the equivalent uniaxial response from indentation data and compared to the conventional uniaxial data for commercial purity aluminum. Excellent agreement is found between the indentation and uniaxial data over several orders of magnitude of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26865336','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26865336"><span>Antimicrobial activity of lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> against uropathogens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shim, Yoon Hee; Lee, Seung Joo; Lee, Jung Won</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>The use of lactobacillus probiotics has been proposed as an alternative to prophylactic antibiotics for preventing urinary tract infection (UTI) in the era of antibiotic resistance. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> against uropathogens, was evaluated and compared with that of antibiotics. To evaluate inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against uropathogens, six lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> (L. gasseri, L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. paracasei, L. acidophilus) and four representative uropathogens of infantile UTI (extended-spectrum beta-lactamase [ESBL](-) Escherichia coli, ESBL(+) E. coli, Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus fecalis) were selected. Lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strain</span> in vitro inhibition of each uropathogen was evaluated on MRS agar well diffusion assay and compared with that of commercial antibiotic discs. Average inhibitory zone for each of the six lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> against the four uropathogens showed slightly different but consistent inhibition (inhibitory zone diameter, 10.5-20.0 mm). This was different to that of the antibiotic discs, which had a wider range of inhibition (inhibitory zone diameter, <6.0-27.5 mm) depending on the uropathogen resistance pattern. The inhibitory zone of the six lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> was between that of sensitive and resistant antibiotics (P < 0.05). Lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> had similar moderate antimicrobial activities against uropathogens. Further research is needed to ascertain the <span class="hlt">strains</span> with the best probiotic potential. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PMB....51.5245T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PMB....51.5245T"><span>Resolution of axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> elastography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan</p> <p>2006-10-01</p> <p>The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the <span class="hlt">strain</span> value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> profile oriented at 45° to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45° orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4631365','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4631365"><span>Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Competition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Multiple Listeria monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strains</span> can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strain</span> can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of <span class="hlt">strain</span> competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span>, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other <span class="hlt">strains</span> and two weak competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which were outcompeted by other <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span> was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In all tested combinations, the less invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span> was outcompeted by the higher invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strain</span> in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential. PMID:26529510</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26529510','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26529510"><span>Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Competition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zilelidou, Evangelia A; Rychli, Kathrin; Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Multiple Listeria monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strains</span> can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strain</span> can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of <span class="hlt">strain</span> competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span>, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other <span class="hlt">strains</span> and two weak competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which were outcompeted by other <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span> was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In all tested combinations, the less invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span> was outcompeted by the higher invasive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes <span class="hlt">strain</span> in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.5736Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.5736Q"><span>Heterogeneity of inelastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> during creep of Carrara marble: Microscale <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Evans, Brian</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We combined the split cylinder technique with microfabrication technology to observe <span class="hlt">strain</span> heterogeneities that were produced during high-pressure transient creep of Carrara marble. Samples were patterned with a custom-designed grid of markers spaced 10 µm apart and containing an embedded coordinate system. The microscale <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement (MSSM) technique described here allowed us to analyze the local <span class="hlt">strain</span> distribution with unprecedented detail over large regions. The description of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> field is a function of the area over which <span class="hlt">strain</span> is being computed. The scale at which the <span class="hlt">strain</span> field can be considered homogeneous can provide insight into the deformation processes taking place. At 400-500°C, when twinning production is prolific, we observe highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> bands that span several grains. One possible cause for the multigrain bands is the need to relieve <span class="hlt">strain</span> incompatibilities that result when twins impinge on neighboring grains. At 600-700°C, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> fields are still quite heterogeneous, and local <span class="hlt">strain</span> varies substantially within grains and near grain boundaries, but the multigrain slip bands are not present. Deformation is concentrated in much smaller areas within grains and along some grain boundaries. The disappearance of the multigrain slip bands occurs when the deformation conditions allow additional slip systems to be activated. At 600°C, when the total <span class="hlt">strain</span> is varied from 0.11 to 0.36, the spatial scale of the heterogeneity does not vary, but there are increases in the standard deviation of the distribution of local <span class="hlt">strains</span> normalized by the total <span class="hlt">strain</span>; thus, we conclude that the microstructure does not achieve a steady state in this <span class="hlt">strain</span> interval.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27829542','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27829542"><span>Development of intra-<span class="hlt">strain</span> self-cloning procedure for breeding baker's yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nakagawa, Youji; Ogihara, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Chisato; Yamamura, Hideki; Iimura, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Masayuki</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Previously reported self-cloning procedures for breeding of industrial yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> require DNA from other <span class="hlt">strains</span>, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis. Therefore, we aimed to construct a self-cloning baker's yeast <span class="hlt">strain</span> that exhibits freeze tolerance via an improved self-cloning procedure. We first disrupted the URA3 gene of a prototrophic baker's yeast <span class="hlt">strain</span> without the use of any marker gene, resulting in a Δura3 homozygous disruptant. Then, the URA3 gene of the parental baker's yeast <span class="hlt">strain</span> was used as a selection marker to introduce the constitutive TDH3 promoter upstream of the PDE2 gene encoding high-affinity cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This self-cloning procedure was performed without using DNA from other Saccharomyces cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span>, plasmid DNA, or mutagenesis and was therefore designated an intra-<span class="hlt">strain</span> self-cloning procedure. Using this self-cloning procedure, we succeeded in producing self-cloning baker's yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> that harbor the TDH3p-PDE2 gene heterozygously and homozygously, designated TDH3p-PDE2 hetero and TDH3p-PDE2 homo <span class="hlt">strains</span>, respectively. These self-cloning <span class="hlt">strains</span> expressed much higher levels of PDE2 mRNA than the parental <span class="hlt">strain</span> and exhibited higher viability after freeze stress, as well as higher fermentation ability in frozen dough, when compared with the parental <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The TDH3p-PDE2 homo <span class="hlt">strain</span> was genetically more stable than the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero <span class="hlt">strain</span>. These results indicate that both heterozygous and homozygous <span class="hlt">strains</span> of self-cloning PDE2-overexpressing freeze-tolerant <span class="hlt">strains</span> of industrial baker's yeast can be prepared using the intra-<span class="hlt">strain</span> self-cloning procedure, and, from a practical viewpoint, the TDH3p-PDE2 homo <span class="hlt">strain</span> constructed in this study is preferable to the TDH3p-PDE2 hetero <span class="hlt">strain</span> for frozen dough baking. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10888638','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10888638"><span>Genetic diversity among Lassa virus <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bowen, M D; Rollin, P E; Ksiazek, T G; Hustad, H L; Bausch, D G; Demby, A H; Bajani, M D; Peters, C J; Nichol, S T</p> <p>2000-08-01</p> <p>The arenavirus Lassa virus causes Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever that is endemic in the countries of Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea and perhaps elsewhere in West Africa. To determine the degree of genetic diversity among Lassa virus <span class="hlt">strains</span>, partial nucleoprotein (NP) gene sequences were obtained from 54 <span class="hlt">strains</span> and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Lassa viruses comprise four lineages, three of which are found in Nigeria and the fourth in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Overall <span class="hlt">strain</span> variation in the partial NP gene sequence was found to be as high as 27% at the nucleotide level and 15% at the amino acid level. Genetic distance among Lassa <span class="hlt">strains</span> was found to correlate with geographic distance rather than time, and no evidence of a "molecular clock" was found. A method for amplifying and cloning full-length arenavirus S RNAs was developed and used to obtain the complete NP and glycoprotein gene (GP1 and GP2) sequences for two representative Nigerian <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Lassa virus. Comparison of full-length gene sequences for four Lassa virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> representing the four lineages showed that the NP gene (up to 23.8% nucleotide difference and 12.0% amino acid difference) is more variable than the glycoprotein genes. Although the evolutionary order of descent within Lassa virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> was not completely resolved, the phylogenetic analyses of full-length NP, GP1, and GP2 gene sequences suggested that Nigerian <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Lassa virus were ancestral to <span class="hlt">strains</span> from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Compared to the New World arenaviruses, Lassa and the other Old World arenaviruses have either undergone a shorter period of diverisification or are evolving at a slower rate. This study represents the first large-scale examination of Lassa virus genetic variation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JMPSo..56..360P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JMPSo..56..360P"><span>Recoverable <span class="hlt">strains</span> in composite shape memory alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peigney, Michaël</p> <p></p> <p>New upper bounds are proposed for a generic problem of geometric compatibility, which covers the problem of bounding the effective recoverable <span class="hlt">strains</span> in composite shape memory alloys (SMAs), such as polycrystalline SMAs or rigidly reinforced SMAs. Both the finite deformation and infinitesimal <span class="hlt">strain</span> frameworks are considered. The methodology employed is a generalization of a homogenization approach introduced by Milton and Serkov [2000. Bounding the current in nonlinear conducting composites. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 48, 1295-1324] for nonlinear composites in infinitesimal <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Some analytical and numerical examples are given to illustrate the method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10543843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10543843"><span>Genotypic diversity among Brevibacillus laterosporus <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zahner, V; Rabinovitch, L; Suffys, P; Momen, H</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>In comparison with other entomopathogenic Bacillus species, the genome of Brevibacillus laterosporus is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to examine genetic variability in B. laterosporus by using a range of typing methodologies. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of B. laterosporus were examined for variation in 13 chromosomal genes encoding enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Optimal conditions of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA were established that allowed analysis of the genome of B. laterosporus. None of these techniques allowed the identification of a convenient molecular marker for entomopathogenic <span class="hlt">strains</span>, although one specific primer amplified only DNA from almost all mosquitocidal <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95q4517L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95q4517L"><span>Fractional Josephson effect in nonuniformly <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Shu-Ping; Nandi, Debaleena; Marsiglio, Frank; Maciejko, Joseph</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>Nonuniform <span class="hlt">strain</span> distributions in a graphene lattice can give rise to uniform pseudomagnetic fields and associated pseudo-Landau levels without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that by inducing superconductivity in a nonuniformly <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene sheet, the lowest pseudo-Landau levels split by a pairing gap can be inverted by changing the sign of the pairing potential. As a consequence of this inversion, we predict that a Josephson π junction deposited on top of a <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene sheet exhibits one-dimensional gapless modes propagating along the junction. These gapless modes mediate single electron tunneling across the junction, giving rise to the 4 π -periodic fractional Josephson effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6239469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6239469"><span>Differentiation of pathogenic and saprophytic leptospira <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bazovská, S; Kmety, E; Rak, J</p> <p>1984-09-01</p> <p>Comparative studies of 249 pathogenic and 80 saprophytic leptospira <span class="hlt">strains</span>, including 2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the illini type, using the 8-azaguanine test, growth at 13 degrees C and growth on trypticase soy broth revealed their good differentiating potency if the recommended conditions were carefully observed. The same results were obtained by a simple hemolytic test using sheep and rat blood cells, having the advantage of providing results within 24 h. This test is suggested to replace the 8-azaguanine and the growth test at 13 degrees C. In these investigations, the first European <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the illini type was recognized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.V12A0552Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.V12A0552Q"><span>Microstructural Analysis of Welding: Deformation and <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quane, S. L.; Russell, K.</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>Welding in pyroclastic deposits involves the sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles and is attended by systematic changes in physical properties. Welded materials contain implicit information regarding the total accumulated <span class="hlt">strain</span> as well as the mechanisms of deformation. Here, we use detailed microstructural analysis of synthetic and natural welded materials to make quantitative estimates of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and constrain the rheology of these materials during the welding process. Part one of our study comprises microstructural analysis of end products from unconfined high temperature deformation experiments on sintered cores of soda-lime silica glass spheres. This analogue material has relatively simple and well-characterized starting properties. Furthermore, the initially spherical shapes of particles provide excellent <span class="hlt">strain</span> markers. Experiments were run at a variety of temperatures, <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates and stresses resulting in end products with varying degrees of total <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The nature of <span class="hlt">strain</span> partitioning and accumulation are evaluated using image analysis techniques on scanned images and photomicrographs of thin sections cut perpendicular to the loading direction of each experimental product. Shapes of the individual deformed particles (e.g., oblate spheroids) were determined and the Scion image analysis program was used to create a best-fit ellipse for each particle. Statistics collected on each particle include: axial dimension (a), vertical dimension (c) and angle from the horizontal. The data are used to calculate the oblateness of each particle (1-c/a) and the angle of deformation induced foliation. Furthermore, the relative proportions of visible blue epoxy in the sample scans determine bulk porosity. The average oblateness of the particles is a direct, independent measure of the accumulated <span class="hlt">strain</span> in each sample. Results indicate that these measured values are equal to calculated theoretical values of oblateness for spheroids undergoing the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9634E..7VN','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9634E..7VN"><span>Lithium batteries temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> fiber monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nascimento, Micael; Novais, Susana; Leitão, Cátia; Domingues, M. Fátima; Alberto, Nélia; Antunes, Paulo; Pinto, João. L.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Fiber Bragg grating sensors were attached to the surface of a rechargeable lithium battery in order to monitor its thermal and <span class="hlt">strain</span> fluctuations through charge and different discharge C rates. During the discharge process above 1C, it were observed, a temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> fluctuations of a 4.12 +/- 0.67 °C and 24.64 +/- 6.02 μɛ, respectively. In the regular charge process, a temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> variation of 1.03 +/- 0.67 °C and 15.86 +/- 6.02 μɛ, were detected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506808','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506808"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Determination Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Krause, M.; Graff, A.; Altmann, F.</p> <p>2010-11-24</p> <p>In the present paper we demonstrate the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for high resolution elastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> determination. Here, we focus on analysis methods based on determination of small shifts in EBSD pattern with respect to a reference pattern using cross-correlation algorithms. Additionally we highlight the excellent spatial and depth resolution of EBSD and introduce the use of simulated diffraction patterns based on dynamical diffraction theory for sensitivity estimation. Moreover the potential of EBSD for <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis of <span class="hlt">strained</span> thin films with particular emphasis on appropriate target preparation which respect to occurring lattice defects is demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5378936','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5378936"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate echocardiography in children with Wilson’s disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cemşit, Karakurt; Serkan, Çelik; Ayşe, Selimoğlu; İlknur, Varol; Hamza, Karabiber; Saim, Yoloğlu</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Summary Objective This study aimed to evaluate <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate echocardiography in children with Wilson’s disease to detect early cardiac dysfunction. Methods In this study, 21 patients with Wilson’s disease and a control group of 20 age- and gender-matched healthy children were included. All the patients and the control group were evaluated with two-dimensional (2D) and colour-coded conventional transthoracic echocardiography by the same paediatric cardiologist using the same echocardiography machine (Vivid E9, GE Healthcare, Norway) in standard precordial positions, according to the American Society of Echocardiography recommendations. 2D <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate echocardiography were performed after the ECG probes of the echocardiography machine were adjusted for ECG monitoring. Longitudinal, transverse and radial <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate were assessed from six basal and six mid-ventricular segments of the left ventricle, as recommended by the American Society of Echocardiography. Results Left ventricular wall thickness, systolic and diastolic diameters, left ventricular diameters normalised to body surface area, end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, cardiac output and cardiac index values were within normal limits and statistically similar in the patient and control groups (p < 0.05). Global <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate: the patient group had a statistically significant lower peak A longitudinal velocity of the left basal point and peak E longitudinal velocity of the left basal (VAbasR) point, and higher global peak A longitudinal/circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate (GSRa) compared to the corresponding values of the control group (p < 0.05). Radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate: end-systolic rotation [ROT (ES)] was statistically significantly lower in the patient group (p < 0.05). Longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate: end-systolic longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> [SLSC (ES)] and positive peak transverse <span class="hlt">strain</span> (STSR peak P) were statistically significantly lower in the patient group (p</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010448','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010448"><span>A study of the effect of apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> on thermal stress measurement for two types of elevated temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jenkins, J. M.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A weldable type <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage was used to measure low level thermal stress in an elevated temperature environment. Foil <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages used in a comparative manner reveal that the apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> of weldable <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages is not sufficiently known to acquire accurate low level thermal stress data. Apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> data acquired from coupon tests reveals a large scatter in apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics among the weldable <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages. It is concluded that apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> data for individual weldable <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages must be required prior to installation if valid thermal stress data is to be obtained through the temperature range of room temperature to 755 K (900 F).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24267899','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24267899"><span>Rat <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Ontology: structured controlled vocabulary designed to facilitate access to <span class="hlt">strain</span> data at RGD.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nigam, Rajni; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J</p> <p>2013-11-22</p> <p>The Rat Genome Database (RGD) ( http://rgd.mcw.edu/) is the premier site for comprehensive data on the different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus). The <span class="hlt">strain</span> data are collected from various publications, direct submissions from individual researchers, and rat providers worldwide. Rat <span class="hlt">strain</span>, substrain designation and nomenclature follow the Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat <span class="hlt">Strains</span>, instituted by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. While symbols and names aid in identifying <span class="hlt">strains</span> correctly, the flat nature of this information prohibits easy search and retrieval, as well as other data mining functions. In order to improve these functionalities, particularly in ontology-based tools, the Rat <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Ontology (RS) was developed. The Rat <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Ontology (RS) reflects the breeding history, parental background, and genetic manipulation of rat <span class="hlt">strains</span>. This controlled vocabulary organizes <span class="hlt">strains</span> by type: inbred, outbred, chromosome altered, congenic, mutant and so on. In addition, under the chromosome altered category, <span class="hlt">strains</span> are organized by chromosome, and further by type of manipulations, such as mutant or congenic. This allows users to easily retrieve <span class="hlt">strains</span> of interest with modifications in specific genomic regions. The ontology was developed using the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology (OBO) file format, and is organized on the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) structure. Rat <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Ontology IDs are included as part of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> report (RS: ######). As rat researchers are often unaware of the number of substrains or altered <span class="hlt">strains</span> within a breeding line, this vocabulary now provides an easy way to retrieve all substrains and accompanying information. Its usefulness is particularly evident in tools such as the PhenoMiner at RGD, where users can now easily retrieve phenotype measurement data for related <span class="hlt">strains</span>, <span class="hlt">strains</span> with similar backgrounds or those with similar introgressed regions. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9040E..15Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9040E..15Y"><span>A new radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate estimation method using autocorrelation for carotid artery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ye, Jihui; Kim, Hoonmin; Park, Jongho; Yeo, Sunmi; Shim, Hwan; Lim, Hyungjoon; Yoo, Yangmo</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is of clinical interest since it can prevent any adverse effects of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this paper, a new carotid artery radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimation method based on autocorrelation is presented. In the proposed method, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> is first estimated by the autocorrelation of two complex signals from the consecutive frames. Then, the angular phase from autocorrelation is converted to <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and they are analyzed over time. In addition, a 2D <span class="hlt">strain</span> image over region of interest in a carotid artery can be displayed. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimation method, radiofrequency (RF) data of 408 frames in the carotid artery of a volunteer were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (V10, Samsung Medison, Korea) by using a L5-13IS linear array transducer. From in vivo carotid artery data, the mean <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimate was -0.1372 while its minimum and maximum values were -2.961 and 0.909, respectively. Moreover, the overall <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimates are highly correlated with the reconstructed M-mode trace. Similar results were obtained from the estimation of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate change over time. These results indicate that the proposed carotid artery radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimation method is useful for assessing the arterial wall's stiffness noninvasively without increasing the computational complexity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol24-sec180-1209.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol24-sec180-1209.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol25-sec180-1209.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol25-sec180-1209.pdf"><span>40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25769835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25769835"><span>Tropical <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete race 3 biovar 2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> at lowland tropical temperatures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huerta, Alejandra I; Milling, Annett; Allen, Caitilyn</p> <p>2015-05-15</p> <p>Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum <span class="hlt">strains</span>, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) <span class="hlt">strains</span> do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span>, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-<span class="hlt">strain</span> inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical <span class="hlt">strain</span> GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strain</span> UW551 and U.S. warm temperate <span class="hlt">strain</span> K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland <span class="hlt">strain</span> UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> threaten highland agriculture. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> do not cause disease in tropical lowlands. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407210','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407210"><span>Tropical <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete Race 3 Biovar 2 <span class="hlt">Strains</span> at Lowland Tropical Temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Huerta, Alejandra I.; Milling, Annett</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum <span class="hlt">strains</span>, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) <span class="hlt">strains</span> do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span>, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-<span class="hlt">strain</span> inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical <span class="hlt">strain</span> GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strain</span> UW551 and U.S. warm temperate <span class="hlt">strain</span> K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland <span class="hlt">strain</span> UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> threaten highland agriculture. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 <span class="hlt">strains</span> do not cause disease in tropical lowlands. PMID:25769835</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820059659&hterms=Durbin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DDurbin','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820059659&hterms=Durbin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DDurbin"><span>The premixed flame in uniform <span class="hlt">straining</span> flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Durbin, P. A.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Characteristics of the premixed flame in uniform <span class="hlt">straining</span> flow are investigated by the technique of activation-energy asymptotics. An inverse method is used, which avoids some of the restrictions of previous analyses. It is shown that this method recovers known results for adiabatic flames. New results for flames with heat loss are obtained, and it is shown that, in the presence of finite heat loss, <span class="hlt">straining</span> can extinguish flames. A stability analysis shows that <span class="hlt">straining</span> can suppress the cellular instability of flames with Lewis number less than unity. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> can produce instability of flames with Lewis number greater than unity. A comparison shows quite good agreement between theoretical deductions and experimental observations of Ishizuka, Miyasaka & Law (1981).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013558','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013558"><span>Method of transferring <span class="hlt">strained</span> semiconductor structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Nastasi, Michael A.; Shao, Lin</p> <p>2009-12-29</p> <p>The transfer of <span class="hlt">strained</span> semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure and allowed to diffuse to the interface. Afterward, the deposited multilayer structure is bonded to a second substrate and is separated away at the interface, which results in transferring a multilayer structure from one substrate to the other substrate. The multilayer structure includes at least one <span class="hlt">strained</span> semiconductor layer and at least one <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced seed layer. The <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced seed layer can be optionally etched away after the layer transfer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870013527','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870013527"><span>Optical <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement system development, phase 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lant, Christian T.; Qaqish, Walid</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A laser speckle, differential <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement system was built and tested for future applications in hostile environments. One dimensional electronic correlation of speckle pattern movement allows a quasi-real time measure of <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The system was used successfully to measure uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> reaching into plastic deformation of a test specimen, at temperatures ranging to 450 C. A resolution of 16 microstrain is given by the photodiode array sensor pitch and the specimen to sensor separation. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement limit of the gauge is determined by air density perturbations causing decorrelation of the reference and shifted speckle patterns, and may be improved by limiting convective flow in the immediate vicinity of the test specimen.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/broken-bones.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/broken-bones.html"><span>Broken Bones, Sprains, and <span class="hlt">Strains</span> (For Parents)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Broken Bones, Sprains, and <span class="hlt">Strains</span> KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940008401','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940008401"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> sensing technology for high temperature applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Williams, W. Dan</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This review discusses the status of <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARZ39008B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARZ39008B"><span>Can a <span class="hlt">strain</span> yield a qubit?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benjamin, Colin</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>A Josepshon qubit is designed via the application of a tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span> to a topological insulator surface, sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> applied leads to a shift in Dirac point without changing the conducting states existing on the surface of a topological insulator. This <span class="hlt">strain</span> applied can be tuned to form a π-junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in a doubly degenerate state- ``0'' and ``1'' states of the qubit. A qubit designed this way is easily controlled via the tunable <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived. This work was supported by funds from Dept. of Science and Technology (Nanomission), Govt. of India, Grant No. SR/NM/NS-1101/2011.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25817029','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25817029"><span>Survival and activity of individual bioaugmentation <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dueholm, Morten S; Marques, Irina G; Karst, Søren M; D'Imperio, Seth; Tale, Vaibhav P; Lewis, Derrick; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Successful application of bioaugmentation for enhanced degradation of environmental pollutants is often limited by the lack of methods to monitor the survival and activity of individual bioaugmentation <span class="hlt">strains</span>. However, recent advancements in sequencing technologies and molecular techniques now allow us to address these limitations. Here a complementing set of general applicable molecular methods are presented that provides detailed information on the performance of individual bioaugmentation <span class="hlt">strains</span> under in situ conditions. The approach involves genome sequencing to establish highly specific qPCR and RT-qPCR tools for cell enumerations and expression of involved genes, stable isotope probing to follow growth on the target compounds and GFP-tagging to visualize the bioaugmentation <span class="hlt">strains</span> directly in samples, all in combination with removal studies of the target compounds. The concept of the approach is demonstrated through a case study involving degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in activated sludge augmented with the bioaugmentation <span class="hlt">strain</span> Pseudomonas monteilii SB3078.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050163141','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050163141"><span><span class="hlt">Strained</span> Hydrocarbons as Potential Hypergolic Fuels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A storable combination of high-energy hypergolic fuel and oxidizer is advantageous to the future of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). The combination will allow an increase in energy per unit volume of fuel and eliminate the need for an external ignition system. <span class="hlt">Strained</span> systems have been studied as potential high-density fuels. Adding hypergolic functional groups, such as amino groups, to these hydrocarbons will potentially allow auto ignition of <span class="hlt">strained</span> systems with hydrogen peroxide. Several straight chain amines and their <span class="hlt">strained</span> counterparts containing an equivalent number of carbon atoms have been purchased and synthesized. These amines provide initial studies to determine the effects of fuel vapor pressure, <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy, fuel miscibility, and amine substitution upon fuel ignition time and hypergolicity with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27872965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27872965"><span>Novel Technologies for Optimal <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Breeding.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar</p> <p></p> <p>The implementation of a knowledge-based bioeconomy requires the rapid development of highly efficient microbial production <span class="hlt">strains</span> that are able to convert renewable carbon sources to value-added products, such as bulk and fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, or proteins at industrial scale. Starting from classical <span class="hlt">strain</span> breeding by random mutagenesis and screening in the 1950s via rational design by metabolic engineering initiated in the 1970s, a range of powerful new technologies have been developed in the past two decades that can revolutionize future <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering. In particular, next-generation sequencing technologies combined with new methods of genome engineering and high-throughput screening based on genetically encoded biosensors have allowed for new concepts. In this chapter, selected new technologies relevant for breeding microbial production <span class="hlt">strains</span> with a special emphasis on amino acid producers will be summarized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8346E..1CT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8346E..1CT"><span>Aerosol printed carbon nanotube <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>In recent years, printed electronics have received attention as a method to produce low-cost macro electronics on flexible substrates. In this regard, inkjet and aerosol printing have been the primary printing methods for producing passive electrical components, transistors, and a number of sensors. In this research, a custom aerosol printer was utilized to create a <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor capable of measuring static and dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The proposed sensor was created by aerosol printing a multiwall carbon nanotube solution onto an aluminum beam covered with an insulating layer. After printing the carbon nanotube-based sensor, the sensor was tested under quasi-static and vibration <span class="hlt">strain</span> conditions, and the results are presented. The results show that the printed sensor could potentially serve as an effective method for measuring dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> of structural components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=243113','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=243113"><span>Carotene-superproducing <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Phycomyces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Murillo, F J; Calderón, I L; López-Díaz, I; Cerdá-Olmedo, E</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Production of beta-carotene by wild-type Phycomyces blakesleeanus can be stimulated by light, chemicals, regulatory mutations, and sexual interaction between mycelia of opposite sex. Through genetic manipulations, we have isolated <span class="hlt">strains</span> which have simultaneously and constitutively incorporated several of these stimulatory effects. In the dark and in a simple medium, some of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> produce up to 25 mg of beta-carotene per g (dry weight), or about 500 times the wild-type production under the same conditions. High lycopene-producing <span class="hlt">strains</span> have also been isolated by using carR mutants, which are blocked in the conversion of lycopene to beta-carotene. These <span class="hlt">strains</span> should be useful in both industrial production of these pigments and basic research related to carotenogenesis. PMID:727783</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870019450','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870019450"><span>Thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage development program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Anderson, W. L.; Claing, R. G.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Sputtered thin-film dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages of 2 millimeter (0.08 in) gage length and 10 micrometer (0.0004 in) thickness were fabricated on turbojet engine blades and tested in a simulated compressor environment. Four designs were developed, two for service to 600 K (600 F) and two for service to 900 K (1200 F). The program included a detailed study of guidelines for formulating <span class="hlt">strain</span>-gage alloys to achieve superior dynamic and static gage performance. The tests included gage factor, fatigue, temperature cycling, spin to 100,000 G, and erosion. Since the installations are 30 times thinner than conventional wire <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage installations, and any alteration of the aerodynamic, thermal, or structural performance of the blade is correspondingly reduced, dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement accuracy higher than that attained with conventional gages is expected. The low profile and good adherence of the thin film elements is expected to result in improved durability over conventional gage elements in engine tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5373..173T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5373..173T"><span>Simultaneous narrowband ultrasonic <span class="hlt">strain</span>-flow imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tsou, Jean K.; Mai, Jerome J.; Lupotti, Fermin A.; Insana, Michael F.</p> <p>2004-04-01</p> <p>We are summarizing new research aimed at forming spatially and temporally registered combinations of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and color-flow images using echo data recorded from a commercial ultrasound system. Applications include diagnosis of vascular diseases and tumor malignancies. The challenge is to meet the diverse needs of each measurement. The approach is to first apply eigenfilters that separate echo components from moving tissues and blood flow, and then estimate blood velocity and tissue displacement from the filtered-IQ-signal phase modulations. At the cost of a lower acquisition frame rate, we find the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimator yields higher resolution <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimate than the cross-correlator since estimates are made from ensembles at a single point in space. The technique is applied to in vivo carotid imaging, to demonstrate the sensitivity for <span class="hlt">strain</span>-flow vascular imaging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strain+AND+gauges&id=EJ095175','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strain+AND+gauges&id=EJ095175"><span>Dynamic Force Measurement with <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Bruce E.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the use of four <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006975','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006975"><span>Analysis of silicon stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dillon, O.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Results are presented for work on stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships in silicon ribbon. Calculations of stress fields, dislocation desities, and buckling were made; uniaxial tensile tests were made on silicon at 1150 C; and dislocation motion studies were performed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850024124','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850024124"><span>Silicon ribbon stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> activities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wada, B. K.; Shih, C. F.; Kuo, C. P.; Phillips, W. M.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The finite element method is used to investigate stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span> in silicon ribbon. Failure considerations such as residual stress, buckling material non-linearity and creep are discussed. Temperature profiles are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=centripetal+AND+force&pg=2&id=EJ095175','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=centripetal+AND+force&pg=2&id=EJ095175"><span>Dynamic Force Measurement with <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Bruce E.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the use of four <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987isa..symp..607D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987isa..symp..607D"><span>The new international <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage specification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dorsey, Jim</p> <p></p> <p>Previous standards for the performance tests of metallic resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages and the shortcomings of these old standards are discussed together with the new standards recommended by the Organisation Internationale de Metrologie Legale (OIML) as described in the International Recommendation No. 62 'Performance Characteristics of Metallic Resistance <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauges'. The OIML Recommendation No. 62 was adopted in 1984 as an international <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage standard. It will allow all nations to select their own test methods, but requires each nation to accept the methods and equipment of others. The Recommendation No. 62 includes sections on terminology, test requirements, data reduction and statistics, and the presentation of data. When the United States completes a revision to ASTM E-251, all of the tools will be available for the U.S. manufacturers of <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages to comply with the requirements of most industrialized countries of the world.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.107s3102G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.107s3102G"><span>Tuning <span class="hlt">strain</span> in flexible graphene nanoelectromechanical resonators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guan, Fen; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Averin, Dmitri V.; Du, Xu</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The structural flexibility of low dimensional nanomaterials offers unique opportunities for studying the impact of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on their physical properties and for developing innovative devices utilizing <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering. A key towards such goals is a device platform which allows the independent tuning and reliable calibration of the <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanoelectromechanical resonators (GNEMRs) on flexible substrates. Combining substrate bending and electrostatic gating, we achieve the independent tuning of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> and sagging in graphene and explore the nonlinear dynamics over a wide parameter space. Analytical and numerical studies of a continuum mechanics model, including the competing higher order nonlinear terms, reveal a comprehensive nonlinear dynamics phase diagram, which quantitatively explains the complex behaviors of GNEMRs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022316','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022316"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> accumulation along the Cascadia subduction zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Murray, M.H.; Lisowski, M.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>We combine triangulation, trilateration, and GPS observations to determine horizontal <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates along the Cascadia subduction zone from Cape Mendocino to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Shear-<span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are significantly greater than zero (95% confidence) in all forearc regions (26-167 nanoradians/yr), and are not significant in the arc and backarc regions. The deformation is primarily uniaxial contraction nearly parallel to Juan de Fuca-North America plate convergence (N55??-80??E). The <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are consistent with an elastic dislocation model for interseismic slip with a shallow 100-km wide locked zone and a deeper 75-km transition zone along the entire megathrust, except along the central Oregon coast where relatively lower <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are consistent with 30-40 km wide locked and transition zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NaPho...7...86L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NaPho...7...86L"><span>Optical physics: Magnetic appeal in <span class="hlt">strained</span> lattice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lepetit, Thomas</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Using <span class="hlt">strain</span> to induce a pseudomagnetic field in a photonic lattice at optical frequencies might bring improvements to fields such as photonic crystal fibres, supercontinuum generation and frequency combs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21882791','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21882791"><span>Heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> during explosive ordnance disposal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stewart, Ian B; Rojek, Amanda M; Hunt, Andrew P</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Bomb technicians perform their work while encapsulated in explosive ordnance disposal suits. Designed primarily for safety, these suits have an unintended consequence of impairing the body's natural mechanisms for heat dissipation. Consequently, bomb technicians are known to experience symptoms of heat illness while performing their work. This research provides the first field based analysis of heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> in bomb technicians. Six participants undertook simulated operational tasks across 2 days of variable climate. All subjects demonstrated high levels of heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> as evidenced by elevated heart rate, core body temperature, and physiological <span class="hlt">strain</span> index. Participants also reported signs and symptoms associated with heat illness. These results were exacerbated by more intense physical activity despite being undertaken in a cooler environment. The universal experience of heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> in this sample has significant implications for the health of bomb technicians and additional research examining methods to improve temperature regulation and performance is warranted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930081520','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930081520"><span>The Development of Electrical <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>De Forest, A V; Leaderman, H</p> <p>1940-01-01</p> <p>The design, construction, and properties of an electrical-resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage consisting of fine wires molded in a laminated plastic are described. The properties of such gages are discussed and also the problems of molding of wires in plastic materials, temperature compensation, and cementing and removal of the gages. Further work to be carried out on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage, together with instrument problems, is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870000237&hterms=uses+pulley&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Duses%2Bpulley','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870000237&hterms=uses+pulley&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Duses%2Bpulley"><span>Hydraulic Calibrator for <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-Gauge Balances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Skelly, Kenneth; Ballard, John</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Instrument for calibrating <span class="hlt">strain</span>-gauge balances uses hydraulic actuators and load cells. Eliminates effects of nonparallelism, nonperpendicularity, and changes of cable directions upon vector sums of applied forces. Errors due to cable stretching, pulley friction, and weight inaccuracy also eliminated. New instrument rugged and transportable. Set up quickly. Developed to apply known loads to wind-tunnel models with encapsulated <span class="hlt">strain</span>-gauge balances, also adapted for use in calibrating dynamometers, load sensors on machinery and laboratory instruments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050179347&hterms=Adhesives&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DAdhesives','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050179347&hterms=Adhesives&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DAdhesives"><span>High-Temperature Adhesive <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gage Developed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have developed a unique <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage and adhesive system for measuring the mechanical properties of polymers and polymer composites at elevated temperatures. This system overcomes some of the problems encountered in using commercial <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages and adhesives. For example, typical commercial <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage adhesives require a postcure at temperatures substantially higher than the maximum test temperature. The exposure of the specimen to this temperature may affect subsequent results, and in some cases may be higher than the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. In addition, although typical commercial <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages can be used for short times at temperatures up to 370 C, their long-term use is limited to 230 C. This precludes their use for testing some high-temperature polyimides near their maximum temperature capability. Lewis' <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage and adhesive system consists of a nonencapsulated, unbacked gage grid that is bonded directly to the polymer after the specimen has been cured but prior to the normal postcure cycle. The gage is applied with an adhesive specially formulated to cure under the specimen postcure conditions. Special handling, mounting, and electrical connection procedures were developed, and a fixture was designed to calibrate each <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage after it was applied to a specimen. A variety of tests was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the gages at elevated temperatures on PMR-15 neat resin and titanium specimens. For these tests, which included static tension, thermal exposure, and creep tests, the gage and adhesive system performed within normal <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage specifications at 315 C. An example of the performance characteristics of the gage can be seen in the figure, which compares the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage measurement on a polyimide specimen at 315 C with an extensometer measurement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8671E..1EP','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8671E..1EP"><span>Geometric reconstruction using tracked ultrasound <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Miga, Michael I.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>The accurate identification of tumor margins during neurosurgery is a primary concern for the surgeon in order to maximize resection of malignant tissue while preserving normal function. The use of preoperative imaging for guidance is standard of care, but tumor margins are not always clear even when contrast agents are used, and so margins are often determined intraoperatively by visual and tactile feedback. Ultrasound <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging creates a quantitative representation of tissue stiffness which can be used in real-time. The information offered by <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging can be placed within a conventional image-guidance workflow by tracking the ultrasound probe and calibrating the image plane, which facilitates interpretation of the data by placing it within a common coordinate space with preoperative imaging. Tumor geometry in <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging is then directly comparable to the geometry in preoperative imaging. This paper presents a tracked ultrasound <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging system capable of co-registering with preoperative tomograms and also of reconstructing a 3D surface using the border of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> lesion. In a preliminary study using four phantoms with subsurface tumors, tracked <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging was registered to preoperative image volumes and then tumor surfaces were reconstructed using contours extracted from <span class="hlt">strain</span> image slices. The volumes of the phantom tumors reconstructed from tracked <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging were approximately between 1.5 to 2.4 cm3, which was similar to the CT volumes of 1.0 to 2.3 cm3. Future work will be done to robustly characterize the reconstruction accuracy of the system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647418','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647418"><span>Feline Origin of Rotavirus <span class="hlt">Strain</span>, Tunisia, 2008</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fredj, Mouna Ben Hadj; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Fodha, Imene; Benhamida-Rebai, Meriam; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In Tunisia in 2008, an unusual G6P[9] rotavirus, RVA/human-wt/TUN/17237/2008/G6P[9], rarely found in humans, was detected in a child. To determine the origin of this <span class="hlt">strain</span>, we conducted phylogenetic analyses and found a unique genotype constellation resembling rotaviruses belonging to the feline BA222-like genotype constellation. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> probably resulted from direct cat-to-human transmission. PMID:23631866</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA...48.3175G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA...48.3175G"><span>Prediction of Transformation <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Using Microtexture Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giri, Sushil K.; Biswas, Pinaki; Kundu, Saurabh</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>The transformation <span class="hlt">strain</span>, resulting from austenite-to-bainite transformation induced under both external stress and without stress, is estimated by employing two different mathematical models. These models use actual fractions of individual variants in every prior austenite grain, which are calculated using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) scans after reconstruction of prior austenite microstructure. The <span class="hlt">strains</span> predicted by models match closely with the experimentally determined macrostrain obtained using dilation data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNS....23..113W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNS....23..113W"><span>Superinfection Behaviors on Scale-Free Networks with Competing <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wu, Qingchu; Small, Michael; Liu, Huaxiang</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>This paper considers the epidemiology of two <span class="hlt">strains</span> ( I, J) of a disease spreading through a population represented by a scale-free network. The epidemiological model is SIS and the two <span class="hlt">strains</span> have different reproductive numbers. Superinfection means that <span class="hlt">strain</span> I can infect individuals already infected with <span class="hlt">strain</span> J, replacing the <span class="hlt">strain</span> J infection. Individuals infected with <span class="hlt">strain</span> I cannot be infected with <span class="hlt">strain</span> J. The model is set up as a system of ordering differential equations and stability of the disease free, marginal <span class="hlt">strain</span> I and <span class="hlt">strain</span> J, and coexistence equilibria are assessed using linear stability analysis, supported by simulations. The main conclusion is that superinfection, as modeled in this paper, can allow <span class="hlt">strain</span> I to coexist with <span class="hlt">strain</span> J even when it has a lower basic reproductive number. Most strikingly, it can allow <span class="hlt">strain</span> I to persist even when its reproductive number is less than 1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26033369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26033369"><span>Actinoallomurus bryophytorum sp. nov., an endophytic actinomycete isolated from moss (Bryophyta).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Chuang; Wang, Haiyan; Jin, Pinjiao; Zheng, Weijia; Chu, Liyang; Liu, Chongxi; Li, Jiansong; Xiang, Wensheng; Wang, Xiangjing</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>A novel endophytic actinomycete, <span class="hlt">strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T), was isolated from moss, collected from Wuchang, Heilongjiang province, north China. A polyphasic taxonomic study was carried out to establish the status of <span class="hlt">strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T). Morphological and chemotaxonomic properties of <span class="hlt">strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T) are consistent with the description of the genus Actinoallomurus. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T) was observed to form short spiral or looped spore chains on aerial hyphae. The cell wall peptidoglycan was found to contain lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major menaquinones were identified as MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The only phospholipid identified was phosphatidylglycerol. The major fatty acid was identified as iso-C16:0. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence supports the assignment of the novel <span class="hlt">strain</span> to the genus Actinoallomurus, as it exhibits 99.2 % gene sequence similarity to that of Actinoallomurus yoronensis NBRC 103686(T). However, the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness allowed the <span class="hlt">strain</span> to be differentiated from its close relative. Moreover, <span class="hlt">strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T) could also be differentiated from A. yoronensis NBRC 103686(T) and other Actinoallomurus species showing high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>98.0 %) by cultural and physiological characteristics. Therefore, the combination of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, and the DNA-DNA hybridization value, indicated that <span class="hlt">strain</span> NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T) represents a novel species of the genus Actinoallomurus for which the name Actinoallomurus bryophytorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type <span class="hlt">strain</span> is NEAU-<span class="hlt">TX</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-15(T) (=CGMCC 4.7200(T) = JCM 30340(T)).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6722711','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6722711"><span>Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011OptMa..33..408F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011OptMa..33..408F"><span>Flexible photonic crystals for <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fortes, Luís M.; Gonçalves, M. Clara; Almeida, Rui M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Three-dimensional (3-D) photonic crystals (PCs) have been studied as possible <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensing materials, based on <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced stop band frequency shifting. Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, achieved by sedimentation over a flexible polyimide tape substrate whose surface hydrophilicity was optimized in order to achieve maximum wettability, led to an organized 3-D direct opal template. This was infiltrated with a silica sol-gel solution by dip-coating or by chemical vapour deposition and an inverse opal structure was ultimately obtained by chemical dissolution of the polymer template. The structural and optical properties of these PCs have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV/visible spectroscopy under variable degrees of <span class="hlt">strain</span>. FE-SEM showed the presence of ordered domains up to ∼30 μm2. A mechano-optical effect was evidenced by <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced shifting of the photonic stop band peak wavelength of the direct, infiltrated and inverse opals up to 50 nm in transmission mode, due to changes in interplanar spacing upon bending the flexible PCs. Optical response <span class="hlt">strain</span> cycles were studied, suggesting the possible use of these structures in reversible photonic <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors integrated in sensor/actuator devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10161061','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10161061"><span>Thermographic phosphor <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Allison, S.W.; Capps, G.J.; Smith, D.B.; Cates, M.R.; Gleason, J.; Turley, W.D.</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>This report describes the first phase of research aimed at developing a high-temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge for power equipment use based on materials whose fluorescence characteristics are affected by <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In electric power generating plants, the combined effect of temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> on equipment and structures is a critical factor in safe, efficient operation and component lifetime. For the first part of this project, the pressure responses of phosphor and crystalline materials were surveyed. Next, pressure measurements on some promising materials, YVO{sub 4}:Dy and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb, were performed. The latter phosphor appears to exhibit the greatest change with pressure. Its fluorescence lifetime decreases by a factor of 10 with pressure increase of 20 kbar. In a <span class="hlt">strain</span> test configuration, a tapered sapphire rod compressed a similar phosphor material, La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu. The intensity level increased, as expected for this material, with compression. Both of the oxysulfide materials possess potential for use in an optical <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge for temperatures up to at least 300{degrees}C. It is suggested that a mixture of these two materials may be a useful way to obtain the maximum pressure or <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H43E1060P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H43E1060P"><span>Colloid <span class="hlt">Straining</span> within Saturated Heterogeneous Porous Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Porubcan, A.; Walczak, J.; Xu, S.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>A thorough understanding of colloid movement in the subsurface system is critical to the assessment of groundwater pollution by pathogenic bacteria and colloid-bound contaminants. It is increasingly recognized that <span class="hlt">straining</span>, a process that occurs when the pore space is too small to allow for a particle's passage, represents an important process in colloid immobilization within groundwater systems. Previously published studies have focused on the kinetics of colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> within sand packs composed of uniform mineral grains. Natural aquifers, however, are usually characterized by physically heterogeneous sediments. In this study, we conducted column transport experiments with carboxylated latex particles and quartz sand to investigate the impact of sediment texture (i.e., the size distribution of mineral grains) on colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> kinetics. The quartz sands used in the experiment were thoroughly cleaned and the strong repulsive interactions between colloid particles and quartz sands resulted in minimal physicochemical deposition so the <span class="hlt">straining</span> kinetics can be quantified unambiguously. Sand packs of different textures were prepared by mixing sands of various sizes (mesh sizes of 20-25, 35-40 and 60-70). Our results suggested that the ratio of colloid size and the median sand grain size was insufficient to predict colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> within heterogeneous sediments. Soil texture, which was related to the size distribution of the sand grains, must be considered. A relationship between colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> kinetics and the heterogeneity of porous media that can be useful for the prediction of colloid transport within heterogeneous sediments was presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902633','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902633"><span>Load cell having <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges of arbitrary location</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Spletzer, Barry</p> <p>2007-03-13</p> <p>A load cell utilizes a plurality of <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-<span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity matrix to a measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910067307&hterms=1500&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231500','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910067307&hterms=1500&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231500"><span>A resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage with repeatable and cancellable apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> for use to 1500 F</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Jih-Fen</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A temperature compensated static <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge, which is fabricated from Pd13Cr alloy and a Pt compensator, is being developed and has been tested over a temperature range to 1500 F at NASA-Lewis. The PdCr compensated <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage has significantly lower apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> to 500 F than other high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages. The PdCr compensated gage is protected from oxidation by a flame-sprayed alumina-4 wt pct zirconia overcoating. Test Results to 1500 F indicate apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> variations of less than 250 micro-epsilon and reproducibility between thermal cycles within 50 micro-epsilon. The apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the coated PdCr compensated gage can be predicted and cancelled due to its reproducibility and low value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18689636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18689636"><span>Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Junin virus in two <span class="hlt">strains</span> of guinea pigs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yun, Nadezhda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judy F; Chumakova, Olga V; Lander, Heather M; Peters, Clarence J; Paessler, Slobodan</p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ <span class="hlt">strain</span> is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero <span class="hlt">strain</span> is highly virulent in <span class="hlt">Strain</span> 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated aspartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig <span class="hlt">strains</span> are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero <span class="hlt">strain</span>) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900016747','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900016747"><span>A resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage with repeatable and cancellable apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> for use to 800 C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Jih-Fen</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A temperature compensated static <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage, which is fabricated from palladium-13w/o chromium (Pd13Cr) alloy and a platinum (Pt) compensator, is being developed and was tested over a temperature range to 800 C at NASA-Lewis. The PdCr compensated <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage has significantly lower apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> to 800 C than other high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages. The PdCr compensated gage is protected from oxidation by a flame-sprayed alumina-4w/o zirconia overcoating. Test results to 800 C indicate apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> variations of less than 300 micro-epsilon and reproducibility between thermal cycles within 50 micro-epsilon. Apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the coated PdCr compensated gage can be predicted and cancelled due to its reproducibility and low value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2700623','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2700623"><span>Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of Junin Virus in Two <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of Guinea Pigs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yun, Nadezhda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Aronson, Judy F.; Chumakova, Olga V.; Lander, Heather M.; Peters, Clarence J.; Paessler, Slobodan</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ <span class="hlt">strain</span> is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero <span class="hlt">strain</span> is highly virulent in <span class="hlt">Strain</span> 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated apartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig <span class="hlt">strains</span> are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero <span class="hlt">strain</span>) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development. PMID:18689636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990SPIE.1170..452H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990SPIE.1170..452H"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> or stress component separation in surface mounted interferometric optical fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haslach, Henry W., Jr.; Sirkis, James S.</p> <p>1990-02-01</p> <p>Design flexibility is often touted as an advantage of optical fiber transducers. This advantage is exploited by formalizing the geometric design of interferometric optical fiber stress and <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. The equations that govern the phase-<span class="hlt">strain</span> correlation are used to define some basic design laws. The most common design goal is to separate <span class="hlt">strain</span> or stress components from composite phase-<span class="hlt">strain</span> data. This can be accomplished in a Mach-Zehnder format or in a format in which both the sensing and reference fibers are exposed to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> field. The design laws together with simple configurations are used to devise several fiber transducers. Design flexibility exists because there are many solutions which satisfy the design objectives and constraints. The constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> assumption is the basic of design. A comparison of the transverse sensitivity of resistance and optical fiber gages is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25582323','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25582323"><span>Purification of Helicobacter suis <span class="hlt">Strains</span> From Biphasic Cultures by Single Colony Isolation: Influence on <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Characteristics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liang, Jungang; De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastritis and decreased weight gain in pigs. It is also the most prevalent non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species in humans with gastric disease. H. suis is extremely fastidious, and so far, biphasic culture conditions were essential for isolation and culture, making it impossible to obtain single colonies. Hence, cultures obtained from an individual animal may contain multiple H. suis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which is undesirable for experiments aiming for instance at investigating H. suis <span class="hlt">strain</span> differences. Pure cultures of H. suis were established by growing bacteria as colonies on 1% brucella agar plates, followed by purification and enrichment by biphasic subculture. Characteristics of these single colony-derived <span class="hlt">strains</span> were compared with those of their parent <span class="hlt">strains</span> using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and by studying bacterium-host interactions using a gastric epithelial cell line and Mongolian gerbil model. The purification/enrichment procedure required a nonstop culture of several weeks. For 4 of 17 H. suis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, MLST revealed differences between parental and single colony-derived <span class="hlt">strains</span>. For three of four single colony-derived <span class="hlt">strains</span> tested, the cell death-inducing capacity was higher than for the parental <span class="hlt">strain</span>. One single colony-derived <span class="hlt">strain</span> lost its capacity to colonize Mongolian gerbils. For the four other <span class="hlt">strains</span> tested, colonization capacity and histopathologic changes were similar to what has been described when using <span class="hlt">strains</span> with only a history of limited biphasic culture. A method was developed to obtain single colony-derived H. suis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, but this procedure may affect the bacterial genotype and phenotype. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22021041','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22021041"><span>Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> and differentiation from the vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> Rev-1.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>In the present study forty-four Greek endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Br. melitensis and three reference <span class="hlt">strains</span> were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four <span class="hlt">strains</span> were discriminated from the vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be discriminated from endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542202','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542202"><span>Intramyocardial <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimation from cardiac cine MRI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elnakib, Ahmed; Beache, Garth M; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Functional <span class="hlt">strain</span> is one of the important clinical indicators for the quantification of heart performance and the early detection of cardiovascular diseases, and functional <span class="hlt">strain</span> parameters are used to aid therapeutic decisions and follow-up evaluations after cardiac surgery. A comprehensive framework for deriving functional <span class="hlt">strain</span> parameters at the endocardium, epicardium, and mid-wall of the left ventricle (LV) from conventional cine MRI data was developed and tested. Cine data were collected using short TR-/TE-balanced steady-state free precession acquisitions on a 1.5T Siemens Espree scanner. The LV wall borders are segmented using a level set-based deformable model guided by a stochastic force derived from a second-order Markov-Gibbs random field model that accounts for the object shape and appearance features. Then, the mid-wall of the segmented LV is determined based on estimating the centerline between the endocardium and epicardium of the LV. Finally, a geometrical Laplace-based method is proposed to track corresponding points on successive myocardial contours throughout the cardiac cycle in order to characterize the <span class="hlt">strain</span> evolutions. The method was tested using simulated phantom images with predefined point locations of the LV wall throughout the cardiac cycle. The method was tested on 30 in vivo datasets to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed framework to index functional <span class="hlt">strain</span> parameters. The cine MRI-based model agreed with the ground truth for functional metrics to within 0.30 % for indexing the peak systolic <span class="hlt">strain</span> change and 0.29 % (per unit time) for indexing systolic and diastolic <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. The method was feasible for in vivo extraction of functional <span class="hlt">strain</span> parameters. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> indexes of the endocardium, mid-wall, and epicardium can be derived from routine cine images using automated techniques, thereby improving the utility of cine MRI data for characterization of myocardial function. Unlike traditional texture-based tracking, the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/762874','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/762874"><span>Imploding Liner Material Strength Measurements at High-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> and High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bartsch, R.R.; Lee, H.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.; Stokes, J.; Morgan, D.; Anderson, W.; Broste, W.</p> <p>1998-10-18</p> <p>Imploding, cylindrical liners provide a unique, shockless means of simultaneously accessing high <span class="hlt">strain</span> and high-<span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate for measurement of strength of materials in plastic flow. The radial convergence in the liner geometry results in the liner thickening as the circumference becomes smaller. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of up to {approximately}1.25 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates of up to {approximately}10{sup 6} sec{sup -1} can be readily achieved in a material sample placed inside of an aluminum driver liner, using the Pegasus II capacitor bank. This provides yield strength data at conditions where none presently exists. The heating from work done against the yield strength is measured with multichannel pyrometry from infrared radiation emitted by the material sample. The temperature data as a function of liner position are unfolded to give the yield strength along the <span class="hlt">strain</span>, <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate trajectory. Proper design of the liner and sample configuration ensures that the current diffused into the sample adds negligible heating. An important issue, in this type of temperature measurement, is shielding of the pickup optics from other sources of radiation. At <span class="hlt">strains</span> greater than those achievable on Pegasus, e.g. the LANL Atlas facility, some materials may be heated all the way to melt by this process. Recent data on 6061-T6 Aluminum will be compared with an existing model for <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate heating. The liner configuration and pyrometry diagnostic will also be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850013288','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850013288"><span>Thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer. [suitable for in-flight measurement of scientific balloon <span class="hlt">strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rand, J. L. (Inventor)</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer system and process for making same is disclosed wherein a beryllium-copper ring having four <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages disposed thereon is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the surface causing bending of the ring and providing an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A figure is provided which illustrates a pattern of a one-half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium-copper for chem-mill etch formation, prior to bending and welding of a pair of the segments to form a ring structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2936195','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2936195"><span>Gradients of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the hollow muscular organs of soft-bodied animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Thompson, Joseph T.; Taylor, Kari R.; Gentile, Christopher</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The cylindrical shape of soft-bodied invertebrates is well suited to functions in skeletal support and locomotion, but may result in a previously unrecognized cost—large non-uniformities in muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate among the circular muscle fibres of the body wall. We investigated such gradients of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the mantle of eight long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and two oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana. Transmural gradients of circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> were present during all jets (n = 312); i.e. for a given change in the circumference of the outer surface of the mantle, the inner surface experienced a greater proportional change. The magnitude of the difference increased with the amplitude of the mantle movement, with circular muscle fibres at the inner surface of the mantle experiencing a total range of <span class="hlt">strains</span> up to 1.45 times greater than fibres at the outer surface during vigorous jets. Differences in <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate between the circular fibres near the inner versus the outer surface of the mantle were also present in all jets, with the greatest differences occurring during vigorous jetting. The transmural gradients of circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate we describe probably apply not only to squids and other coleoid cephalopods, but also to diverse soft-bodied invertebrates with hollow cylindrical or conical bodies and muscular organs. PMID:20106857</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106857','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106857"><span>Gradients of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the hollow muscular organs of soft-bodied animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thompson, Joseph T; Taylor, Kari R; Gentile, Christopher</p> <p>2010-08-23</p> <p>The cylindrical shape of soft-bodied invertebrates is well suited to functions in skeletal support and locomotion, but may result in a previously unrecognized cost-large non-uniformities in muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate among the circular muscle fibres of the body wall. We investigated such gradients of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the mantle of eight long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and two oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana. Transmural gradients of circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> were present during all jets (n = 312); i.e. for a given change in the circumference of the outer surface of the mantle, the inner surface experienced a greater proportional change. The magnitude of the difference increased with the amplitude of the mantle movement, with circular muscle fibres at the inner surface of the mantle experiencing a total range of <span class="hlt">strains</span> up to 1.45 times greater than fibres at the outer surface during vigorous jets. Differences in <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate between the circular fibres near the inner versus the outer surface of the mantle were also present in all jets, with the greatest differences occurring during vigorous jetting. The transmural gradients of circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate we describe probably apply not only to squids and other coleoid cephalopods, but also to diverse soft-bodied invertebrates with hollow cylindrical or conical bodies and muscular organs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4567374','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4567374"><span>Genome-Wide Transcription Study of Cryptococcus neoformans H99 Clinical <span class="hlt">Strain</span> versus Environmental <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Movahed, Elaheh; Munusamy, Komathy; Tan, Grace Min Yi; Looi, Chung Yeng; Tay, Sun Tee; Wong, Won Fen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The infection of Cryptococcus neoformans is acquired through the inhalation of desiccated yeast cells and basidiospores originated from the environment, particularly from bird’s droppings and decaying wood. Three environmental <span class="hlt">strains</span> of C. neoformans originated from bird droppings (H4, S48B and S68B) and C. neoformans reference clinical <span class="hlt">strain</span> (H99) were used for intranasal infection in C57BL/6 mice. We showed that the H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span> demonstrated higher virulence compared to H4, S48B and S68B <span class="hlt">strains</span>. To examine if gene expression contributed to the different degree of virulence among these <span class="hlt">strains</span>, a genome-wide microarray study was performed to inspect the transcriptomic profiles of all four <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Our results revealed that out of 7,419 genes (22,257 probes) examined, 65 genes were significantly up-or down-regulated in H99 versus H4, S48B and S68B <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The up-regulated genes in H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span> include Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (MVA1), Mitochondrial matrix factor 1 (MMF1), Bud-site-selection protein 8 (BUD8), High affinity glucose transporter 3 (SNF3) and Rho GTPase-activating protein 2 (RGA2). Pathway annotation using DAVID bioinformatics resource showed that metal ion binding and sugar transmembrane transporter activity pathways were highly expressed in the H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We suggest that the genes and pathways identified may possibly play crucial roles in the fungal pathogenesis. PMID:26360021</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960184','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960184"><span>Stress-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Relation and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-Induced Crystallization in Rubber</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Toki,S.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Rubber is composed of flexible chains and network points. Theory of rubber elasticity succeeds to elucidate stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relation of rubber using the inverse Langevin equation of entropy modulus. However, actual rubber is much different from ideal networks composed of ideal rubber chains. Network points may not distribute homogeneously and the molecular weight between two network points may show wide distribution. Flexible chains show <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallization. Recent synchrotron X-ray and simultaneous stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements reveal that <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallization reduces the stress by increasing the length of molecules along the stretching direction. Also, <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystals are created not at the middle of the network points, but at the close location to the network points. The hybrid structure of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallites and network points may be stronger than network points alone. Therefore, <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization may increase the tensile strength of rubber by two mechanisms, they are, increase of elongation at break and reinforcement of network points. Natural rubber has biotic network points in nature. After vulcanization, the biotic network may contribute the superior toughness of NR, comparing to IR. Carbon filled NR also shows <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization. In order to acquire high tensile strength, molecules should have higher flexibility to perform <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization by selecting a kind of carbon blacks, an accelerator and a curing condition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/305920','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/305920"><span>The influence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and hydrogen on the plane-<span class="hlt">strain</span> ductility of Zircaloy cladding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.</p> <p>1998-03-01</p> <p>The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-<span class="hlt">strain</span> deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-<span class="hlt">strain</span> deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit <span class="hlt">strain</span> at the onset of localized necking and the fracture <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-<span class="hlt">strain</span> conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture <span class="hlt">strain</span> but no clear effect on limit <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18851573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18851573"><span>Influence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the conduction band structure of <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon nanomembranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Euaruksakul, C; Li, Z W; Zheng, F; Himpsel, F J; Ritz, C S; Tanto, B; Savage, D E; Liu, X S; Lagally, M G</p> <p>2008-10-03</p> <p>The influence of in-plane biaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the conduction bands of Si is explored using elastically <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si(001) nanomembranes and high-resolution x-ray absorption measurements with electron yield detection. The <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced splitting of the conduction band minimum and the energy shifts of two higher conduction bands near L1 and L3 are clearly resolved. The linear increase of the splitting of the conduction band minimum with increasing <span class="hlt">strain</span> and the nonlinear shift of the L1 point toward the conduction band minimum agree quantitatively with current theories.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CMT....28..977A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CMT....28..977A"><span>A numerical method for determining the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor under plane <span class="hlt">strain</span> conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor. The distribution of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScI...87j2506M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScI...87j2506M"><span>On the use of <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor technologies for <span class="hlt">strain</span> modal analysis: Case studies in aeronautical applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marques dos Santos, Fábio Luis; Peeters, Bart</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>This paper discusses the use of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and piezo <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors for structural dynamic measurements. For certain industrial applications, there is an interest to use <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors rather than in combination with accelerometers for experimental modal analysis. Classical electrical <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges can be used hereto, but other types of <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors are an interesting alternative with some very specific advantages. This work gives an overview of two types of dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors, applied to two industrial applications (a helicopter main rotor blade and an F-16 aircraft), FBG sensors and dynamic piezo <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors, discussing their use and benefits. Moreover, the concept of <span class="hlt">strain</span> modal analysis is introduced and it is shown how it can be beneficial to apply <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements to experimental modal analysis. Finally, experimental results for the two applications are shown, with an experimental modal analysis carried out on the helicopter main rotor blade using FBG sensors and a similar experiment is done with the aircraft but using piezo <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors instead.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26063842','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26063842"><span>Bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is correlated with bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aiello, B R; Iriarte-Diaz, J; Blob, R W; Butcher, M T; Carrano, M T; Espinoza, N R; Main, R P; Ross, C F</p> <p>2015-07-07</p> <p>Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar-canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is encoded in <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4590470','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4590470"><span>Bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is correlated with bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aiello, B. R.; Iriarte-Diaz, J.; Blob, R. W.; Butcher, M. T.; Carrano, M. T.; Espinoza, N. R.; Main, R. P.; Ross, C. F.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar–canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone <span class="hlt">strain</span> magnitude is encoded in <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. PMID:26063842</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26360021','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26360021"><span>Genome-Wide Transcription Study of Cryptococcus neoformans H99 Clinical <span class="hlt">Strain</span> versus Environmental <span class="hlt">Strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Movahed, Elaheh; Munusamy, Komathy; Tan, Grace Min Yi; Looi, Chung Yeng; Tay, Sun Tee; Wong, Won Fen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The infection of Cryptococcus neoformans is acquired through the inhalation of desiccated yeast cells and basidiospores originated from the environment, particularly from bird's droppings and decaying wood. Three environmental <span class="hlt">strains</span> of C. neoformans originated from bird droppings (H4, S48B and S68B) and C. neoformans reference clinical <span class="hlt">strain</span> (H99) were used for intranasal infection in C57BL/6 mice. We showed that the H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span> demonstrated higher virulence compared to H4, S48B and S68B <span class="hlt">strains</span>. To examine if gene expression contributed to the different degree of virulence among these <span class="hlt">strains</span>, a genome-wide microarray study was performed to inspect the transcriptomic profiles of all four <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Our results revealed that out of 7,419 genes (22,257 probes) examined, 65 genes were significantly up-or down-regulated in H99 versus H4, S48B and S68B <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The up-regulated genes in H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span> include Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (MVA1), Mitochondrial matrix factor 1 (MMF1), Bud-site-selection protein 8 (BUD8), High affinity glucose transporter 3 (SNF3) and Rho GTPase-activating protein 2 (RGA2). Pathway annotation using DAVID bioinformatics resource showed that metal ion binding and sugar transmembrane transporter activity pathways were highly expressed in the H99 <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We suggest that the genes and pathways identified may possibly play crucial roles in the fungal pathogenesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APLM....4f4107S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APLM....4f4107S"><span>Elastocaloric cooling processes: The influence of material <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate on efficiency and temperature span</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schmidt, Marvin; Schütze, Andreas; Seelecke, Stefan</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>This paper discusses the influence of material <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate on efficiency and temperature span of elastocaloric cooling processes. The elastocaloric material, a newly developed quaternary Ni-Ti-Cu-V alloy, is characterized at different maximum <span class="hlt">strains</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. The experiments are performed with a specially designed test setup, which enables the measurement of mechanical and thermal process parameters. The material efficiency is compared to the efficiency of the Carnot process at equivalent thermal operation conditions. This method allows for a direct comparison of the investigated material with other caloric materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://dx.doi.org/10.1785/0220160155','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://dx.doi.org/10.1785/0220160155"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">strains</span> for earthquake source characterization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Barbour, Andrew J.; Crowell, Brendan W</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Strainmeters measure elastodynamic deformation associated with earthquakes over a broad frequency band, with detection characteristics that complement traditional instrumentation, but they are commonly used to study slow transient deformation along active faults and at subduction zones, for example. Here, we analyze dynamic <span class="hlt">strains</span> at Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeters (BSM) associated with 146 local and regional earthquakes from 2004–2014, with magnitudes from M 4.5 to 7.2. We find that peak values in seismic <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be predicted from a general regression against distance and magnitude, with improvements in accuracy gained by accounting for biases associated with site–station effects and source–path effects, the latter exhibiting the strongest influence on the regression coefficients. To account for the influence of these biases in a general way, we include crustal‐type classifications from the CRUST1.0 global velocity model, which demonstrates that high‐frequency <span class="hlt">strain</span> data from the PBO BSM network carry information on crustal structure and fault mechanics: earthquakes nucleating offshore on the Blanco fracture zone, for example, generate consistently lower dynamic <span class="hlt">strains</span> than earthquakes around the Sierra Nevada microplate and in the Salton trough. Finally, we test our dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> prediction equations on the 2011 M 9 Tohoku‐Oki earthquake, specifically continuous <span class="hlt">strain</span> records derived from triangulation of 137 high‐rate Global Navigation Satellite System Earth Observation Network stations in Japan. Moment magnitudes inferred from these data and the <span class="hlt">strain</span> model are in agreement when Global Positioning System subnetworks are unaffected by spatial aliasing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15076778','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15076778"><span>Predicting hamstring <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury in elite athletes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brockett, Camilla L; Morgan, David L; Proske, Uwe</p> <p>2004-03-01</p> <p>Eccentric exercise, where the contracting muscle is lengthened, produces microscopic damage in muscle fibers, and sensations of stiffness and soreness, the next day. These normally resolve within a week. A more major sports injury is the muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Because <span class="hlt">strain</span> injuries are known to occur during eccentric contractions, it is hypothesized that the microscopic damage from eccentric exercise can, at times, progress to a muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span>. As the amount of microscopic damage depends on the muscle's optimum length for active tension, it is further proposed that optimum length is a measure of susceptibility for muscle <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The athletes most at risk of a hamstring <span class="hlt">strain</span> are those with a previous history of such injuries. Here the prediction is tested that optimum lengths of previously injured hamstrings are shorter and therefore more prone to eccentric damage than uninjured muscles. Mean optimum angle for peak torque in a previously injured muscle of nine athletes with a history of unilateral hamstring <span class="hlt">strains</span> was compared with the uninjured muscle of the other leg and with muscles of 18 uninjured athletes. Optimum angle was determined with isokinetic dynamometry. In previously injured muscles, torque peaked at significantly shorter lengths than for uninjured muscles. Peak torque and quadriceps:hamstrings torque ratios were not significantly different. The shorter optimum of previously injured muscles makes them more prone to damage from eccentric exercise than uninjured muscles and this may account for the high reinjury rate. The shorter optimum may reflect the muscle's preinjury state or be a consequence of the healing process. To reduce the incidence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> injuries, it is recommended that a combined program of eccentric exercise and muscle testing be carried out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989JSG....11..959J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989JSG....11..959J"><span>Fault-fracture <span class="hlt">strain</span> in Wingate Sandstone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jamison, William R.</p> <p></p> <p>The Laramide deformation of the Triassic Wingate Sandstone along the northeast flank of the Uncompahgre uplift has occurred by faulting at various scales. Macroscopically smooth flexures of beds within the Wingate occur by small displacements across a myriad of intraformational, mesoscale faults. The deformation resultant from these small faults may be approximated by a <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor, provided the measurement domain satisfies certain size criteria. Equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> (ɛ) measurements, obtained from 22 locations in the East Kodel's Canyon, range from 1% to 15.5% (the maximum contractional <span class="hlt">strains</span> range from -0.9% to -13.4%). The faults producing this <span class="hlt">strain</span> have displacements ranging from a fraction of a millimeter to 18.5 cm. The fault intensity increases with increasing ɛ, although in a distinctly non-linear fashion. At low <span class="hlt">strains</span>, incremental increases in the deformation produce additional, small displacement faults. At larger <span class="hlt">strains</span>, incremental increases in the deformation occur via progressive displacement along existing faults. The principal <span class="hlt">strain</span> axes are consistently non-coaxial with the inferred principal stresses (average σ1Λɛ1 is 18.5°). This non-coaxiality results from the non-uniform development of the conjugate fault systems. This same inequality of the conjugate systems produces a non-zero rotation tensor, ω, but ω is not related to σ1Λɛ1. The non-uniform development of conjugate shears (and the associated non-coaxiality of σ1 and ɛ1) may be an intrinsic characteristic of a Coulomb material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20215607','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20215607"><span>Volume <span class="hlt">strain</span> within the Geysers geothermal field</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul</p> <p>1999-12-10</p> <p>During the 1970s and 1980s. The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant <span class="hlt">strain</span> within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume <span class="hlt">strain</span> within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume <span class="hlt">strains</span> in excess of 5x10{sup -4} are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume <span class="hlt">strain</span>. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume <span class="hlt">strain</span>, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6x10{sup 9} Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much stiffer reservoir with K=3.4x10{sup 10} Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume <span class="hlt">strain</span> is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016hsla.book..179Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016hsla.book..179Q"><span>Determination of Dynamic Recrystallization Process by Equivalent <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Xiaomei; Deng, Wei</p> <p></p> <p>Based on Tpнoвckiй's displacement field, equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> expression was derived. And according to the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) critical <span class="hlt">strain</span>, DRX process was determined by equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span>. It was found that equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> distribution in deformed specimen is inhomogeneous, and it increases with increasing true <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Under a certain true <span class="hlt">strain</span>, equivalent <span class="hlt">strains</span> at the center, demisemi radius or on tangential plane just below the surface of the specimen are higher than the true <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Thus, micrographs at those positions can not exactly reflect the true microstructures under the certain true <span class="hlt">strain</span>. With increasing <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, the initial and finish time of DRX decrease. The frozen microstructures of 20Mn23AlV steel with the experimental condition validate the feasibility of predicting DRX process by equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23462347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23462347"><span>Psychological <span class="hlt">strains</span> found in the suicides of 72 celebrities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jie; Tan, Jiandan; Lester, David</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>The interpretation of suicide involves theories from many disciplines, and the <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory of suicide is a social-psychological model that attempts to account for this complicated behavior. We have earlier explored the presence of psychological <span class="hlt">strains</span> in a number of diverse samples of suicides and in the present study, we identified the <span class="hlt">strains</span> experienced throughout the lives as documented in the biographies of 72 celebrities. The biographies were systematically identified through a number of requirements and composed by one of the authors of this study years before the <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory of suicide was proposed. A graduate student coder, who was unaware of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory of suicide, was hired to carry out a content analysis of the biography essays and categorize the life events and the responses of the suicide in terms of the four types of <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Of the 72 suicides, one had no <span class="hlt">strains</span>, one had all the four <span class="hlt">strains</span>, four had only one, 30 had two, and 36 had three <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The most common <span class="hlt">strain</span> was aspiration <span class="hlt">strain</span> (97%), followed by deprivation <span class="hlt">strain</span> (89%), value <span class="hlt">strain</span> (54%) and coping deficiency <span class="hlt">strain</span> (4%). It is also noted that religious celebrities were more likely to experience value <span class="hlt">strain</span>, while those celebrities who had experienced a downhill path in their careers were more likely to experience deprivation and coping <span class="hlt">strains</span>. This analysis of the 72 celebrity suicides supported the <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory of suicide.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17093023','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17093023"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays for the Bacillus anthracis Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Ert, Matthew N; Easterday, W Ryan; Simonson, Tatum S; U'Ren, Jana M; Pearson, Talima; Kenefic, Leo J; Busch, Joseph D; Huynh, Lynn Y; Dukerich, Megan; Trim, Carla B; Beaudry, Jodi; Welty-Bernard, Amy; Read, Timothy; Fraser, Claire M; Ravel, Jacques; Keim, Paul</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Highly precise diagnostics and forensic assays can be developed through a combination of evolutionary analysis and the exhaustive examination of genomic sequences. In Bacillus anthracis, whole-genome sequencing efforts revealed ca. 3,500 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among eight different <span class="hlt">strains</span> and evolutionary analysis provides the identification of canonical SNPs. We have previously shown that SNPs are highly evolutionarily stable, and the clonal nature of B. anthracis makes them ideal signatures for subtyping this pathogen. Here we identified SNPs that define the lineage of B. anthracis that contains the Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span>, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> used in the 2001 bioterrorist attacks in the United States. Sequencing and real-time PCR were used to validate these SNPs across B. anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, including (i) 88 globally and genetically diverse isolates; (ii) isolates that were shown to be genetic relatives of the Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span> by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA); and (iii) several different lab stocks of the Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span>, including a clinical isolate from the 2001 letter attack. Six SNPs were found to be highly specific for the Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span>; four on the chromosome, one on the pX01 plasmid, and one on the pX02 plasmid. All six SNPs differentiated the B. anthracis Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span> from the 88 unique B. anthracis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, while five of the six separated Ames from its close genetic relatives. The use of these SNPs coupled with real-time PCR allows specific and sensitive (<100 fg of template DNA) identification of the Ames <span class="hlt">strain</span>. This evolutionary and genomics-based approach provides an effective means for the discovery of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific SNPs in B. anthracis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810062035&hterms=behavior+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dbehavior%2Banalysis','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810062035&hterms=behavior+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dbehavior%2Banalysis"><span>Analysis of the tensile stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> behavior of elastomers at constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relation of elastomers at constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-<span class="hlt">strain</span> separability is valid if the <span class="hlt">strain</span> function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and that when time-<span class="hlt">strain</span> separability holds, two <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and <span class="hlt">strain</span> effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent shift factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810062035&hterms=stress-strain&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dstress-strain','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810062035&hterms=stress-strain&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dstress-strain"><span>Analysis of the tensile stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> behavior of elastomers at constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relation of elastomers at constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-<span class="hlt">strain</span> separability is valid if the <span class="hlt">strain</span> function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and that when time-<span class="hlt">strain</span> separability holds, two <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and <span class="hlt">strain</span> effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent shift factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......536S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......536S"><span>Anisotropic nature of radially <span class="hlt">strained</span> metal tubes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Strickland, Julie N.</p> <p></p> <p>Metal pipes are sometimes swaged by a metal cone to enlarge them, which increases the <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the material. The amount of <span class="hlt">strain</span> is important because it affects the burst and collapse strength. Burst strength is the amount of internal pressure that a pipe can withstand before failure, while collapse strength is the amount of external pressure that a pipe can withstand before failure. If the burst or collapse strengths are exceeded, the pipe may fracture, causing critical failure. Such an event could cost the owners and their customers millions of dollars in clean up, repair, and lost time, in addition to the potential environmental damage. Therefore, a reliable way of estimating the burst and collapse strength of <span class="hlt">strained</span> pipe is desired and valuable. The sponsor currently rates <span class="hlt">strained</span> pipes using the properties of raw steel, because those properties are easily measured (for example, yield strength). In the past, the engineers assumed that the metal would be work-hardened when swaged, so that yield strength would increase. However, swaging introduces anisotropic <span class="hlt">strain</span>, which may decrease the yield strength. This study measured the yield strength of <span class="hlt">strained</span> material in the transverse and axial direction and compared them to raw material, to determine the amount of anisotropy. This information will be used to more accurately determine burst and collapse ratings for <span class="hlt">strained</span> pipes. More accurate ratings mean safer products, which will minimize risk for the sponsor's customers. Since the <span class="hlt">strained</span> metal has a higher yield strength than the raw material, using the raw yield strength to calculate burst and collapse ratings is a conservative method. The metal has even higher yield strength after <span class="hlt">strain</span> aging, which indicates that the stresses are relieved. Even with the 12% anisotropy in the <span class="hlt">strained</span> and 9% anisotropy in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> aged specimens, the raw yield strengths are lower and therefore more conservative. I recommend that the sponsor continue using the raw</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3942497','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3942497"><span>The Effect of Ivermectin in Seven <span class="hlt">Strains</span> of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Including a Genetically Diverse Laboratory <span class="hlt">Strain</span> and Three Permethrin Resistant <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Deus, K. M.; Saavedra-rodriguez, K.; Butters, M. P.; Black, W. C.; Foy, B. D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Seven different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Aedes aegypti (L.), including a genetically diverse laboratory <span class="hlt">strain</span>, three laboratory-selected permethrin-resistant <span class="hlt">strains</span>, a standard reference <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and two recently colonized <span class="hlt">strains</span> were fed on human blood containing various concentrations of ivermectin. Ivermectin reduced adult survival, fecundity, and hatch rate of eggs laid by ivermectin-treated adults in all seven <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The LC50 of ivermectin for adults and the concentration that prevented 50% of eggs from hatching was calculated for all <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Considerable variation in adult survival after an ivermectin-bloodmeal occurred among <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and all three permethrin-resistant <span class="hlt">strains</span> were significantly less susceptible to ivermectin than the standard reference <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The hatch rate after an ivermectin bloodmeal was less variable among <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and only one of the permethrin-resistant <span class="hlt">strains</span> differed significantly from the standard reference <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Our studies suggest that ivermectin induces adult mortality and decreases the hatch rate of eggs through different mechanisms. A correlation analysis of log-transformed LC50 among <span class="hlt">strains</span> suggests that permethrin and ivermectin cross-resistance may occur. PMID:22493855</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2395655','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2395655"><span>Mixing of Schistosoma haematobium <span class="hlt">strains</span> in Ghana*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chu, K. Y.; Kpo, H. K.; Klumpp, R. K.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>In Ghana, Schistosoma haematobium exists as two <span class="hlt">strains</span>, one transmitted by Bulinus rohlfsi and the other by B. globosus. In Anyaboni, a resettlement town, where the field station of the UNDP/WHO Schistosomiasis Research and Control Project is located, the residents contract the ”rohlfsi” <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the parasite from the Volta Lake and the ”globosus” <span class="hlt">strain</span> from a stream near the town. The present studies indicate that there is mixing of the two parasite <span class="hlt">strains</span> on a community and an individual basis. In Anyaboni, the parasite developed well in both B. rohlfsi and B. globosus. In another village 25 km from Accra, where B. globosus was the only vector, the parasite developed well in B. globosus but was refractory in B. rohlfsi. In a village near the Volta Lake where B. rohlfsi was the sole vector, the parasite developed well in B. rohlfsi but was refractory in B. globosus. However, complete separation of the two <span class="hlt">strains</span> is uncommon in Ghana because extensive mixing has already occurred owing to migration of people and snails. PMID:310361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23416347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23416347"><span>Fast flexible electronics with <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon nanomembranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Han; Seo, Jung-Hun; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Zhu, Ye; Celler, George K; Voyles, Paul M; Zhou, Weidong; Lagally, Max G; Ma, Zhenqiang</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fast flexible electronics operating at radio frequencies (>1 GHz) are more attractive than traditional flexible electronics because of their versatile capabilities, dramatic power savings when operating at reduced speed and broader spectrum of applications. Transferrable single-crystalline Si nanomembranes (SiNMs) are preferred to other materials for flexible electronics owing to their unique advantages. Further improvement of Si-based device speed implies significant technical and economic advantages. While the mobility of bulk Si can be enhanced using <span class="hlt">strain</span> techniques, implementing these techniques into transferrable single-crystalline SiNMs has been challenging and not demonstrated. The past approach presents severe challenges to achieve effective doping and desired material topology. Here we demonstrate the combination of <span class="hlt">strained</span>- NM-compatible doping techniques with self-sustained-<span class="hlt">strain</span> sharing by applying a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-sharing scheme between Si and SiGe multiple epitaxial layers, to create <span class="hlt">strained</span> print-transferrable SiNMs. We demonstrate a new speed record of Si-based flexible electronics without using aggressively scaled critical device dimensions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3575016','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3575016"><span>Fast flexible electronics with <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon nanomembranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhou, Han; Seo, Jung-Hun; Paskiewicz, Deborah M.; Zhu, Ye; Celler, George K.; Voyles, Paul M.; Zhou, Weidong; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fast flexible electronics operating at radio frequencies (>1 GHz) are more attractive than traditional flexible electronics because of their versatile capabilities, dramatic power savings when operating at reduced speed and broader spectrum of applications. Transferrable single-crystalline Si nanomembranes (SiNMs) are preferred to other materials for flexible electronics owing to their unique advantages. Further improvement of Si-based device speed implies significant technical and economic advantages. While the mobility of bulk Si can be enhanced using <span class="hlt">strain</span> techniques, implementing these techniques into transferrable single-crystalline SiNMs has been challenging and not demonstrated. The past approach presents severe challenges to achieve effective doping and desired material topology. Here we demonstrate the combination of <span class="hlt">strained</span>- NM-compatible doping techniques with self-sustained-<span class="hlt">strain</span> sharing by applying a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-sharing scheme between Si and SiGe multiple epitaxial layers, to create <span class="hlt">strained</span> print-transferrable SiNMs. We demonstrate a new speed record of Si-based flexible electronics without using aggressively scaled critical device dimensions. PMID:23416347</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860008318','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860008318"><span>Closure of fatigue cracks at high <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic <span class="hlt">strains</span> under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high <span class="hlt">strains</span>, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high <span class="hlt">strain</span> is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25111022','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25111022"><span>Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D <span class="hlt">strains</span> are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic <span class="hlt">strains</span> to non-toxigenic <span class="hlt">strains</span> by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D <span class="hlt">strains</span> has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic <span class="hlt">strains</span> can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4034219','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4034219"><span>Extraordinary <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening by gradient structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening and an obvious <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures. PMID:24799688</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=236087','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=236087"><span>Transfectability of rough <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Salmonella typhimurium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bursztyn, H; Sgaramella, V; Ciferri, O; Lederberg, J</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Cells of rough (but not smooth) <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Salmonella typhimurium become competent for transfection by phage P22 deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment with 0.1 M CaCl2. The yield of infectious centers is about 10(-8) per genome equivalent of deoxyribonucleic acid. However, different sorts of rough <span class="hlt">strains</span> vary in their ability to become competent in a fashion that can be correlated with the level of the genetic block in cell wall lipopolysaccharide synthesis. The most amenable <span class="hlt">strains</span> are blocked by defects in the addition of galactose units I and II of the lipopolysaccharide by the inability to synthesize uridine 5'-diphosphate-galactose (galE point mutants and gal deletion mutants). <span class="hlt">Strains</span> blocked only in the addition of galactose I, glucose I, or heptose II have low levels of transfectability, whereas <span class="hlt">strains</span> with either more complete or more deficient lipopolysaccharide core are not competent for transfection. When normal lipopolysaccharide synthesis is restored either genetically or by furnishing exogenous galactose (galE point mutants that can still use it), the cells are not longer competent for transfection. PMID:1104596</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11874722','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11874722"><span>Growth <span class="hlt">strain</span> in coconut palm trees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huang, Yan S; Chen, Shin S; Lin, Tsan P; Chen, Yuh S</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>Until recently, growth stress studies have been made only on coniferous and dicotyledonous trees. Growth stress of trees is thought to be initiated in newly formed secondary xylem cells. This stress can accumulate for years and is distributed inside the trunk. Major characteristics of the trunk of monocotyledonous trees include numerous vascular bundles scattered inside the ground tissue and the lack of secondary growth for enlarging the diameter of the trunk. We used the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge method to measure the released growth <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the monocotyledonous woody palm, coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), and to investigate the surface growth <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the trunk and central cylinder at different trunk heights. The internal <span class="hlt">strains</span> of both vertical and leaning trunks were measured and compared with those of coniferous and dicotyledonous trees. We found that tensile stress existed longitudinally on the surface of vertically growing trunks, whereas compression stress was found at the bending position of leaning trunks. Compression stress was found in the outer part of the central cylinder, whereas tensile stress is generally found in the outer part of the trunk in coniferous and dicotyledonous trees. The distribution of <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the palm trunk is similar to that of compression wood of the leaning trunk of a conifer. Specific gravity was greater in the outer part of the trunk than in the inner part of the trunk. This difference may be related to the distribution of growth stress.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22398929','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22398929"><span>Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile <span class="hlt">strains</span> (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile <span class="hlt">strains</span> CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent <span class="hlt">strains</span> were identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17474617','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17474617"><span>[A prophylactic program for <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stadnicka, Grazyna; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grazyna J; Bień, Agnieszka M</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the study was to work out a prophylactic program for <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence. Analysis of literature on the subject and results of own investigations presented in the first part of the paper indicate that the program of prophylaxis of <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence should primarily include: (1) Preparation of the medical staff (nurses, midwives) for propagating health education among women on prevention of <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence. (2) Preparation of adequate educational materials in the form of brochures, leaflets, information posters about symptoms, causes and prophylaxis of urinary incontinence indicating health care institutions available to all women when the disease is suspected or already present. (3) Propagation of problems connected with <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence in the mass media providing information to a wide audience in order to make people realize the significance of this social problem and break stereotypes associated with this disease of "shame". (4) Preparation of sets of exercises for the muscles of the base of the pelvis to be performed during pregnancy, confinement and menopause to maintain their proper function. (5) Indicating factors predisposing to <span class="hlt">strain</span> urinary incontinence with focus on possibilities of their reduction or elimination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1015378','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1015378"><span>Brittle superconducting magnets: an equivilent <span class="hlt">strain</span> model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barzi, E.; Danuso, M.</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>To exceed fields of 10 T in accelerator magnets, brittle superconductors like A15 Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al or ceramic High Temperature Superconductors have to be used. For such brittle superconductors it is not their maximum tensile yield stress that limits their structural resistance as much as <span class="hlt">strain</span> values that provoke deformations in their delicate lattice, which in turn affect their superconducting properties. Work on the sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn cables to <span class="hlt">strain</span> has been conducted in a number of stress states, including uniaxial and multi-axial, producing usually different results. This has made the need of a constituent design criterion imperative for magnet builders. In conventional structural problems an equivalent stress model is typically used to verify mechanical soundness. In the superconducting community a simple scalar equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> to be used in place of an equivalent stress would be an extremely useful tool. As is well known in fundamental mechanics, there is not one single way to reduce a multiaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> state as represented by a 2nd order tensor to a scalar. The conceptual experiment proposed here will help determine the best scalar representation to use in the identification of an equivalent <span class="hlt">strain</span> model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=261492','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=261492"><span>Comparison of Bacteroides zoogleoformans <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from soft tissue infections in cats with <span class="hlt">strains</span> from periodontal disease in humans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Love, D N; Johnson, J L; Jones, R F; Bailey, M</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A total of 11 <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Bacteroides zoogleoformans were isolated from 11 of 106 different cat subcutaneous "fight wound" abscesses and were among a total of 143 Bacteroides species isolated from these samples. They constituted 3.4% (11 of 325) of all anaerobic isolates. The cat <span class="hlt">strains</span> and <span class="hlt">strains</span> of B. zoogleoformans isolated from humans with periodontal disease were similar phenotypically as determined by biochemical reactions, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of soluble proteins, and guanine plus cytosine ratios of DNA. Eight cat <span class="hlt">strains</span> and five human <span class="hlt">strains</span> tested had 45 to 54% DNA homology with the type <span class="hlt">strain</span> of B. zoogleoformans. The eight cat <span class="hlt">strains</span> and five human <span class="hlt">strains</span> (excluding the type <span class="hlt">strain</span>) were related by DNA homology at 70 to 77%. There was 85 to 90% intragroup DNA homology among the cat <span class="hlt">strains</span> and 86 to 89% intragroup homology among the five human <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The implications for epidemiology and human and animal ecology are discussed. Images PMID:3965393</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22840216','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22840216"><span>Hepatitis E virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> in rabbits and evidence of a closely related <span class="hlt">strain</span> in humans, France.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Izopet, Jacques; Dubois, Martine; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Lhomme, Sébastien; Marchandeau, Stéphane; Boucher, Samuel; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Guérin, Jean-Luc</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Hepatitis E virus (HEV) <span class="hlt">strains</span> from rabbits indicate that these mammals may be a reservoir for HEVs that cause infection in humans. To determine HEV prevalence in rabbits and the <span class="hlt">strains</span>' genetic characteristics, we tested bile, liver, and additional samples from farmed and wild rabbits in France. We detected HEV RNA in 7% (14/200) of bile samples from farmed rabbits (in 2009) and in 23% (47/205) of liver samples from wild rabbits (in 2007-2010). Full-length genomic sequences indicated that all rabbit <span class="hlt">strains</span> belonged to the same clade (nucleotide sequences 72.2%-78.2% identical to HEV genotypes 1-4). Comparison with HEV sequences of human <span class="hlt">strains</span> and reference sequences identified a human <span class="hlt">strain</span> closely related to rabbit <span class="hlt">strain</span> HEV. We found a 93-nt insertion in the X domain of open reading frame 1 of the human <span class="hlt">strain</span> and all rabbit HEV <span class="hlt">strains</span>. These findings indicate that the host range of HEV in Europe is expanding and that zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits is possible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306125','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306125"><span>MRI-based <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate analysis of left ventricle: a modified hierarchical transformation model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Different from other indicators of cardiac function, such as ejection fraction and transmitral early diastolic velocity, myocardial <span class="hlt">strain</span> is promising to capture subtle alterations that result from early diseases of the myocardium. In order to extract the left ventricle (LV) myocardial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate from cardiac cine-MRI, a modified hierarchical transformation model was proposed. Methods A hierarchical transformation model including the global and local LV deformations was employed to analyze the <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate of the left ventricle by cine-MRI image registration. The endocardial and epicardial contour information was introduced to enhance the registration accuracy by combining the original hierarchical algorithm with an Iterative Closest Points using Invariant Features algorithm. The hierarchical model was validated by a normal volunteer first and then applied to two clinical cases (i.e., the normal volunteer and a diabetic patient) to evaluate their respective function. Results Based on the two clinical cases, by comparing the displacement fields of two selected landmarks in the normal volunteer, the proposed method showed a better performance than the original or unmodified model. Meanwhile, the comparison of the radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> between the volunteer and patient demonstrated their apparent functional difference. Conclusions The present method could be used to estimate the LV myocardial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate during a cardiac cycle and thus to quantify the analysis of the LV motion function. PMID:25602778</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830024945','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830024945"><span>Effect of <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolator pad modulus on inplane <span class="hlt">strain</span> in Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sawyer, J. W.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The thermal protection system used on the Space Shuttle orbiter to determine <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the reusable surface insulation tiles under simulated flight loads was investigated. The effects of changes in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolator pad (SIP) moduli on the <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the tile were evaluated. To analyze the SIP/tile system, it was necessary to conduct tests to determine inplane tension and compression modulus and inplane failure <span class="hlt">strain</span> for the densified layer of the tiles. It is shown that densification of the LI-900 tile material increases the modulus by a factor of 6 to 10 and reduces the failure <span class="hlt">strain</span> by about 50%. It is indicated that the inplane <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels in the Shuttle tiles in the highly loaded regions are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the failure <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the material. It is concluded that most of the LI-900 tiles on the Shuttle could be mounted on a SIP with tensile and shear stiffnesses 10 times those of the present SIP without inplane <span class="hlt">strain</span> failure in the tile.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...625...69R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...625...69R"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> in <span class="hlt">strain</span>-free benzenoid hydrocarbons: The case of phenanthrene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Radenković, Slavko; Gutman, Ivan; Đorđević, Slađana</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Benzenoid molecules possessing bays are traditionally considered as '<span class="hlt">strain</span>-free'. Yet, repulsion between the two bay H-atoms affects the length of the near-lying carbon-carbon bonds. A method is developed to estimate the energy of this <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In the case of phenanthrene its value was found to be about 7 kJ/mol.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24978749','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24978749"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> dependence of the nonlinear optical properties of <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dhara, Soumen; Imakita, Kenji; Giri, P K; Fujii, Minoru</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We report on the lattice <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence of the nonlinear optical (NLO) parameters of <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si nanoparticles (NPs), which are prepared in a controlled way by a mechanical ball milling process. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the nature of <span class="hlt">strain</span> is compressive and is primarily caused by milling-induced lattice dislocations, which is further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. It is found that the nonlinear refractive index (n₂) and nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) are strongly influenced by the associated lattice <span class="hlt">strain</span> present in Si NPs. With the increase of lattice <span class="hlt">strain</span>, the β gradually decreases while n₂ increases slowly. The <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent observed changes in the NLO parameters of Si NPs are found to be advantageous for application purpose, and it is explained on the basis of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced modification in the electronic structure of the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Si NPs. These results demonstrate the potential of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-dependent enhancement of nonlinearities for silicon photonics applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27585446','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27585446"><span>Computer modelling of bone's adaptation: the role of normal <span class="hlt">strain</span>, shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> and fluid flow.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tiwari, Abhishek Kumar; Prasad, Jitendra</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Bone loss is a serious health problem. In vivo studies have found that mechanical stimulation may inhibit bone loss as elevated <span class="hlt">strain</span> in bone induces osteogenesis, i.e. new bone formation. However, the exact relationship between mechanical environment and osteogenesis is less clear. Normal <span class="hlt">strain</span> is considered as a prime stimulus of osteogenic activity; however, there are some instances in the literature where osteogenesis is observed in the vicinity of minimal normal <span class="hlt">strain</span>, specifically near the neutral axis of bending in long bones. It suggests that osteogenesis may also be induced by other or secondary components of mechanical environment such as shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> or canalicular fluid flow. As it is evident from the literature, shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> and fluid flow can be potent stimuli of osteogenesis. This study presents a computational model to investigate the roles of these stimuli in bone adaptation. The model assumes that bone formation rate is roughly proportional to the normal, shear and fluid shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy density above their osteogenic thresholds. In vivo osteogenesis due to cyclic cantilever bending of a murine tibia has been simulated. The model predicts results close to experimental findings when normal <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> or fluid shear were combined. This study also gives a new perspective on the relation between osteogenic potential of micro-level fluid shear and that of macro-level bending shear. Attempts to establish such relations among the components of mechanical environment and corresponding osteogenesis may ultimately aid in the development of effective approaches to mitigating bone loss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850007898','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850007898"><span>Measurement of high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> by the laser-speckle <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yamaguchi, I.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>By using the laser-speckle <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> of metal at the temperature lower than 250 C is measured. The principle of the gauge is to measure the expansion or contraction of the fine structures of surface by detecting the resultant speckle displacement in an optoelectronic way, whereby the effect of rigid-body motion is automatically cancelled out with the aid of a differential detection system. A transportable apparatus was built and a comparison experiment performed with a resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge at room temperature. It has a <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of .00002, a gauge length smaller than 1 mm, and no upper limit in a range of <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement. In the measurement of high-temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> it is free from the need for a dummy gauge and insensitive to an electric drift effect. As examples of <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement at high-temperature, thermal expansion and contraction of a top of a soldering iron are measured. The interval of the measurement can be made at shortest 1.6 sec. and the change in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> is clearly followed until the ultimate stationary temperature is reached.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25j5008X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25j5008X"><span>High sensitivity knitted fabric <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Juan; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Wearable sensors are increasingly used in smart garments for detecting and transferring vital signals and body posture, movement and respiration. Existing fabric <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors made from metallized yarns have low sensitivity, poor comfort and low durability to washing. Here we report a knitted fabric <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor made from a cotton/stainless steel (SS) fibre blended yarn which shows much higher sensitivity than sensors knitted from metallized yarns. The fabric feels softer than pure cotton textiles owing to the ultrafine stainless steel fibres and does not lose its electrical property after washing. The reason for the high sensitivity of the cotton/SS knitted fabric sensor was explored by comparing its sensing mechanism with the knitted fabric sensor made from metallized yarns. The results show that the cotton/SS yarn-to-yarn contact resistance is highly sensitive to <span class="hlt">strain</span> applied to hooked yarn loops.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21666210','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21666210"><span>Genetic characterization of measles vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bankamp, Bettina; Takeda, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wenbo; Rota, Paul A</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>The complete genomic sequences of 9 measles vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> were compared with the sequence of the Edmonston wild-type virus. AIK-C, Moraten, Rubeovax, Schwarz, and Zagreb are vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the Edmonston lineage, whereas CAM-70, Changchun-47, Leningrad-4 and Shanghai-191 were derived from 4 different wild-type isolates. Nucleotide substitutions were found in the noncoding regions of the genomes as well as in all coding regions, leading to deduced amino acid substitutions in all 8 viral proteins. Although the precise mechanisms involved in the attenuation of individual measles vaccines remain to be elucidated, in vitro assays of viral protein functions and recombinant viruses with defined genetic modifications have been used to characterize the differences between vaccine and wild-type <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Although almost every protein contributes to an attenuated phenotype, substitutions affecting host cell tropism, virus assembly, and the ability to inhibit cellular antiviral defense mechanisms play an especially important role in attenuation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940036325&hterms=bethel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbethel','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940036325&hterms=bethel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbethel"><span>A photoelastic fiber optic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Su, Wei; Gilbert, John A.; Katsunis, Constantine</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports on the development of a photoelastic fiber optic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage sensitive to transverse <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The sensing element is made from an epoxy resin which is stress frozen to passively achieve the quadrature condition. Light, emitted from an LED operating at 820 nm, is transmitted to and from the sensing element via multimode fibers and the signal is detected using a dual channel operational photodiode/amplifier. This unique combination of optics and electronics produces a fiber optic sensor having a high signal to noise ratio which is lead-in/out insensitive. Results show that <span class="hlt">strains</span> on the order of 1 microstrain can be measured over an 800 microstrain range and that dummy gages can be used for temperature compensation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16178463','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16178463"><span>[Deoxyribonuclease activity detection in Clostridium chauvoei <span class="hlt">strains</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carloni, G H; Bentancor, L D; De Torres, R A</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Beta toxin of C. chauvoei has desoxiribonuclease (DNase) activity which is regarded as one of its virulence factors. The production of DNase was detected in <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from bovines, using as controls C. chauvoei ATCC 10092, and C. perfringens Type A and C. septicum, both laboratory isolates. The enzyme activity was made evident on a DNA substrate observing the macroscopic degradation. A simple methodology was developed using a commercial medium for DNase test, with the incorporation of sterile horse serum. Each <span class="hlt">strain</span> was streaked on the surface of the medium, incubated in anaerobic atmosphere at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The plates were revealed with HCI 1 N. The appearance of a clear and transparent zone around and under the microbial growing was considered a positive reaction. Enzyme activity was detected in 10 of 12 <span class="hlt">strains</span> and also in the controls. The serum addition to the commercial basal medium allows the optimum development of the microorganism showing the enzymatic digestion zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150000844','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150000844"><span>Wing Shape Sensing from Measured <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pak, Chan-Gi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A new two step theory is investigated for predicting the deflection and slope of an entire structure using <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements at discrete locations. In the first step, a measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> is fitted using a piecewise least squares curve fitting method together with the cubic spline technique. These fitted <span class="hlt">strains</span> are integrated twice to obtain deflection data along the fibers. In the second step, computed deflection along the fibers are combined with a finite element model of the structure in order to extrapolate the deflection and slope of the entire structure through the use of System Equivalent Reduction and Expansion Process. The theory is first validated on a computational model, a cantilevered rectangular wing. It is then applied to test data from a cantilevered swept wing model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSemi..38e3003K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSemi..38e3003K"><span>MWCNTs based flexible and stretchable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Khan, Saeed Ahmed; Gao, Min; Zhu, Yuechang; Yan, Zhuocheng; Lin, Yuan</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>Carbon nanotubes have potential applications in flexible and stretchable devices due to their remarkable electromechanical properties. Flexible and stretchable <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with aligned or random structures were fabricated on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate with different techniques. It was observed that the spraycoatedtechniquebased <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor fabricated on PDMS substrate showed higher sensitivity higher stretchability, better linearity and excellent longer time stability than the sensor fabricated with other methods presented in this work. The scanning electron microscopy images indicated the spray coating technique can produce a better uniform and compact CNT network, which is the important role affecting the performance of CNT-based flexible <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2015CB351905), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306015), the Technology Innovative Research Team of Sichuan Province of China (No.2015TD0005), and “111” Project (No. B13042)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26424643','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26424643"><span>Epstein-Barr Virus <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Variation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farrell, Paul J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>What is wild-type Epstein-Barr virus and are there genetic differences in EBV <span class="hlt">strains</span> that contribute to some of the EBV-associated diseases? Recent progress in DNA sequencing has resulted in many new Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences becoming available. EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into type 1 and type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than type 2 EBV and molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming understood. Study of geographic variation of EBV <span class="hlt">strains</span> independent of the type 1/type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral <span class="hlt">strains</span>, infection and disease are now becoming possible. So we should consider more directly whether viral sequence variation might play a role in the incidence of some EBV-associated diseases.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11712610','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11712610"><span>Conservative treatment for repetitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C</p> <p>2001-10-01</p> <p>Various conservative treatment options for repetitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=246638','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=246638"><span>Dialysis Culture of T-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Mycoplasmas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Masover, Gerald K.; Hayflick, Leonard</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Using dialyzing cultures of T-<span class="hlt">strain</span> mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-<span class="hlt">strain</span> mycoplasmas. Titers above 107 color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-<span class="hlt">strain</span> mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4286197','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4286197"><span>Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii <span class="hlt">strain</span> Namibia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii <span class="hlt">strain</span> Namibia. This <span class="hlt">strain</span> was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the <span class="hlt">strain</span> into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26446292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26446292"><span>Realization of a <span class="hlt">Strained</span> Atomic Wire Superlattice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong</p> <p>2015-11-24</p> <p>A superlattice of <span class="hlt">strained</span> Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a <span class="hlt">strained</span>-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.F4002B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.F4002B"><span>Diffraction Correlation to Reconstruct Highly <span class="hlt">Strained</span> Particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brown, Douglas; Harder, Ross; Clark, Jesse; Kim, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Fullerton, Eric; Shpyrko, Oleg; Fohtung, Edwin</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Through the use of coherent x-ray diffraction a three-dimensional diffraction pattern of a highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> nano-crystal can be recorded in reciprocal space by a detector. Only the intensities are recorded, resulting in a loss of the complex phase. The recorded diffraction pattern therefore requires computational processing to reconstruct the density and complex distribution of the diffracted nano-crystal. For highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> crystals, standard methods using HIO and ER algorithms are no longer sufficient to reconstruct the diffraction pattern. Our solution is to correlate the symmetry in reciprocal space to generate an a priori shape constraint to guide the computational reconstruction of the diffraction pattern. This approach has improved the ability to accurately reconstruct highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> nano-crystals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3586687','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3586687"><span>Convergent Replication of Mouse Synthetic Prion <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Colby, David W.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Hayashi, Shigenari; Oehler, Abby; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the aberrant folding of endogenous proteins into self-propagating pathogenic conformers. Prion disease can be initiated in animal models by inoculation with amyloid fibrils formed from bacterially derived recombinant prion protein. The synthetic prions that accumulated in infected organisms are structurally distinct from the amyloid preparations used to initiate their formation and change conformationally on repeated passage. To investigate the nature of synthetic prion transformation, we infected mice with a conformationally diverse set of amyloids and serially passaged the resulting prion <span class="hlt">strains</span>. At each passage, we monitored changes in the biochemical and biological properties of the adapting <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The physicochemical properties of each synthetic prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> gradually changed on serial propagation until attaining a common adapted state with shared physicochemical characteristics. These results indicate that synthetic prions can assume multiple intermediate conformations before converging into one conformation optimized for in vivo propagation. PMID:23438476</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19777804','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19777804"><span>[Novel methods and strategies for <span class="hlt">strain</span> improvement].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Wenting; Zou, Yi; Hu, Changhua</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Improvement of the productivity of industrial <span class="hlt">strains</span> is an important field in micro-biology, because wild-type <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from nature usually produce only a low level of antibiotics. Although random screening and simple rational screening are still effective without using genomic information, they are always time- and labor-consuming. With the broad application of recombinant DNA technology, protoplast fusion and X-omics, novel methods and strategies such as metabolic engineering, genome shuffling, system biology and system biotechnology, ribosome engineering, epigenetic modification are being exploited for the industry microbiology. In this review, we will focus on the progress of these novel methods and strategies for <span class="hlt">strain</span> improvement in recent years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6217136','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6217136"><span>Glycerol production of various <span class="hlt">strains</span> of saccharomyces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Radler, F.; Schuetz, H.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The quantity of glycerol as principal by-product of the alcoholic fermentation depends to a large extent on the yeast <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to form amounts of glycerol varying between 4.2 to 10.4 g/L. The formation of glycerol is regarded as a result of the competition between alcohol dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that compete for the reduced coenzyme NADH/sub 2/. High and low glycerol forming yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed large differences in the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and only small variation in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. The total amount of glycerol formed was also influenced by amino acids. In thiamine deficient media a decrease in glycerol formation was observed. Experiments indicate a correlation between the formation of acetaldehyde and glycerol and the production of cell mass that may be of practical interest. (Refs. 12).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11899471','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11899471"><span>Yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> from Livingston Island, Antarctica.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pavlova, K; Grigorova, D; Hristozova, T; Angelov, A</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Five yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> were isolated from soil and moss samples from the Livingston Island (Antarctica) and identified according to morphological cultural and physiological characteristics. All <span class="hlt">strains</span> had an optimum growth temperature of 15 degrees C: none grew above 25 degrees C. They assimilated D-glucose, D-galactose, sucrose, cellobiose, trehalose, 2-keto-D-gluconate, D-xylose, D-ribose and melezitose. Four of them were nonfermentative, only one, which formed pseudomycelium fermented glucose, galactose, trehalose. Two <span class="hlt">strains</span> were identified as pink-red yeasts belonging to genus Rhodotorula--R. minuta and R. mucilaginosa; two were related to the genus Cryptococcus--C. albidus and C. laurentii; one was Candida oleophila.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981RScI...52.1417R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981RScI...52.1417R"><span>Simple and sensitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge displacement transducer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ramana, Y. V.; Sarma, L. P.</p> <p>1981-09-01</p> <p>We describe a simple and sensitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge displacement transducer. It is based on the linear movement of a shaft (with two cantilevers and four <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges) in a tapered chamber, resulting in a change in resistance proportional to the cantilever deformation. The transducer with its Wheatstone full bridge configuration is calibrated against a mechanical dial indicator of 0.002 mm accuracy for both ac and dc voltage excitations. Its output is linear for measurements of full range displacement up to 25 mm. It has a sensitivity of ±0.0082 mm for ac excitation with a <span class="hlt">strain</span> indicator whose resolution is ±1 μɛ. It has a dc full range sensitivity of 1.5 mV/V for excitation levels up to 5 V. It can have varied field and laboratory applications wherever displacements are precisely read, recorded, or monitored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/956356','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/956356"><span>The breaking <span class="hlt">strain</span> of neutron star crust</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kadau, Kai; Horowitz, C J</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking <span class="hlt">strain</span> of neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking <span class="hlt">strain</span> of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking <span class="hlt">strain</span> to around 0.1. Due to the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gTavitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in Magnetar Giant and Micro Flares.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950022297','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950022297"><span>Test load verification through <span class="hlt">strain</span> data analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>A traditional binding acceptance criterion on polycrystalline structures is the experimental verification of the ultimate factor of safety. At fracture, the induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> is inelastic and about an order-of-magnitude greater than designed for maximum expected operational limit. At this extreme <span class="hlt">strained</span> condition, the structure may rotate and displace at the applied verification load such as to unknowingly distort the load transfer into the static test article. Test may result in erroneously accepting a submarginal design or rejecting a reliable one. A technique was developed to identify, monitor, and assess the load transmission error through two back-to-back surface-measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> data. The technique is programmed for expediency and convenience. Though the method was developed to support affordable aerostructures, the method is also applicable for most high-performance air and surface transportation structural systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9531071','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9531071"><span>Two nosocomial <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia transferring antibiotic resistance to Proteus mirabilis P-38 recipient <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blahová, J; Králiková, K; Krcméry, V; Chmelarová, E; Torsová, V</p> <p>1998-02-01</p> <p>In this report we describe a specific transfer of carbenicillin and cephaloridine resistance determinants from two different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: No. 215 and 221 isolated from two critically ill patients treated in different Intensive Care Units of a large University Hospital in Ostrava, Czech Republic. These <span class="hlt">strains</span> were resistant to flouroquinolones and the following beta-lactam drugs: carbenicillin, cephaloridine, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem and aztreonam. Both <span class="hlt">strains</span> transferred carbenicillin and cephaloridine resistance determinants, with rather different frequency, to Proteus mirabilis P-38. All carbenicillin-selected transconjugants were found by an indirect selection method to be co-resistant to cephaloridine only. In a second cycle of transfers Proteus mirabilis R+ <span class="hlt">strains</span> directly transferred carbenicillin and cephalothin determinants to Escherichia coli K-12 No. 185 nal+ lac+ recipient <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24c6801S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24c6801S"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> analysis of free-standing <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon-on-insulator nanomembrane</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Gao-Di; Dong, Lin-Xi; Xue, Zhong-Ying; Chen, Da; Guo, Qing-Lei; Mu, Zhi-Qiang</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Based on the ultra-thin <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) technology, by creatively using a hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor corrosion system to dry etch the SiO2 layer, a large area of suspended <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon (sSi) nanomembrane with uniform <span class="hlt">strain</span> distribution is fabricated. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> state in the implemented nanomembrane is comprehensively analyzed by using an UV-Raman spectrometer with different laser powers. The results show that the inherent <span class="hlt">strain</span> is preserved while there are artificial Raman shifts induced by the heat effect, which is proportional to the laser power. The suspended sSOI nanomembrane will be an important material for future novel high-performance devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376117 and 61107025) and the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. LY13F040004).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012129','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012129"><span>Controlled-<span class="hlt">strain</span> rate tests at very low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates of 2618 aluminum at 200 C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ding, J. L.; Lee, S. R.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate tests and constant load creep tests were performed on 2618 aluminum at 200 C. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates used in the constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate tests were 10 to the minus 6, 10 to the minus 7, 10 to the minum 8, and 10 to the minus 9/sec. Due to the fact that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in both tests were comparable to each other, the similarities between them can therefore be studied. It was concluded that metals are essentially rate sensitive at elevated temperatures. The traditional definition of creep and plasticity used in the classical creep analysis is actually a reflection of the material behavior under different loading conditions. A constitutive equation based on the test data under one loading condition should work well for other loading conditions as long as the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are in the same range as those under which the material constants are determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.3054..118R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.3054..118R"><span>Measurement of local values of <span class="hlt">strains</span> of the briquette by means of special resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rysz, Jozef</p> <p>1997-02-01</p> <p>Local measurement of the coal briquette <span class="hlt">strains</span> during its destruction caused by sudden decrease of pressure of gas filling pores is difficult, because of high <span class="hlt">strain</span> of coal (exceeds 16%), which results in bursting. A special type of an resistance-<span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge, which is pressed into a defined position during briquette preparation was elaborated. This gauge is deformed just as the surrounding coal. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> is measured as a difference in resistance of a mixture of coal grains (briquette material) and short, 8 micrometers dia. graphite fibers. A ca. 0.5 mm thick and ca. 1 mm long gauge was prepared. Its initial resistance constituted several hundreds ohms. The resistance vs. <span class="hlt">strain</span> dependence is not linear but stable enough in time and does not depend on the type of gas filling briquette pores (e.g. CO2 and He).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28068587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28068587"><span>Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> in single, dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko</p> <p>2017-03-06</p> <p>Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single <span class="hlt">strains</span>, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> FBR1-FBR6 and the model <span class="hlt">strain</span> L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple <span class="hlt">strain</span> competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with added propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual <span class="hlt">strains</span> in multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative <span class="hlt">strain</span> abundance in multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms positively correlated with the relative <span class="hlt">strain</span> abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual <span class="hlt">strains</span> in dual-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant <span class="hlt">strain</span> obtained in single <span class="hlt">strain</span> studies. However, the combination of <span class="hlt">strain</span> FBR5 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both <span class="hlt">strains</span> indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other <span class="hlt">strains</span> and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms. All the dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20375237','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20375237"><span>Cyclomodulins in urosepsis <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Escherichia coli.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the <span class="hlt">strains</span>. It emerged from this study that <span class="hlt">strains</span> harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, <0.001), (ii) frequently harbored both toxin-encoded genes in phylogroup B2 (33%), and (iii) were predictive of a urosepsis origin (P, <0.001 to 0.005). However, the prevalences of the pks island among phylogroup B2 <span class="hlt">strains</span>, in contrast to those of the cnf1 gene, were not significantly different between fecal and urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring <span class="hlt">strains</span> were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all <span class="hlt">strains</span> harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17832524','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17832524"><span>Episodic <span class="hlt">strain</span> accumulation in southern california.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thatcher, W</p> <p>1976-11-12</p> <p>Reexamination of horizontal geodetic data in the region of recently discovered aseismic uplift has demonstrated that equally unusual horizontal crustal deformation accompanied the development of the uplift. During this time interval compressive <span class="hlt">strains</span> were oriented roughly normal to the San Andreas fault, suggesting that the uplift produced little shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> accumulation across this fault. On the other hand, the orientation of the anomalous shear <span class="hlt">straining</span> is consistent with <span class="hlt">strain</span> accumulation across northdipping range-front thrusts like the San Fernando fault. Accordingly, the horizontal and vertical crustal deformation disclosed by geodetic observation is interpreted as a short epoch of rapid <span class="hlt">strain</span> accumulation on these frontal faults. If this interpretation is correct, thrust-type earthquakes will eventually release the accumulated <span class="hlt">strains</span>, but the geodetic data examined here cannot be used to estimate when these events might occur. However, observation of an unusual sequence of tilts prior to 1971 on a level line lying to the north of the magnitude 6.4 San Fernando earthquake offers some promise for precursor monitoring. The data are adequately explained by a simple model of up-dip aseismic slip propagation toward the 1971 epicentral region. These observations and the simple model that accounts for them suggest a conceptually straightforward monitoring scheme to search for similar uplift and tilt precursors within the uplifted region. Such premonitory effects could be detected by a combination of frequenlty repeated short (30 to 70 km in length) level line measurements, precise gravity traverses, and continuously recording gravimeters sited to the north of the active frontal thrust faults. Once identified, such precursors could be closely followed in space and time, and might then provide effective warnings of impending potentially destructive earth-quakes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5055..319C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5055..319C"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> energy harvesting for wireless sensor networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Churchill, David L.; Hamel, Michael J.; Townsend, Christopher P.; Arms, Steven W.</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>Our goal was to demonstrate a robust <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy harvesting system for powering an embedded wireless sensor network without batteries. A composite material specimen was laminated with unidirectional aligned piezoelectric fibers (PZT5A, 250 um, overall 13x10x.38 mm). The fibers were embedded within a resin matrix for damage tolerance (Advanced Cerametrics, Lambertville, NJ). A foil <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge (Micro-Measurements, Raleigh, NC) was bonded to the piezoelectric fiber and shunt calibrated. The specimen was loaded in three point cyclic bending (75 to 300 μɛ peak) using an electrodynamic actuator operating at 60,120, and 180 Hz. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> energy was stored by rectifying piezoelectric fiber output into a capacitor bank. When the capacitor voltage reached a preset threshold, charge was transferred to an integrated, embeddable wireless sensor node (<span class="hlt">Strain</span>Link, Micro<span class="hlt">Strain</span>, Inc., Williston, VT). Nodes include: 16 bit A/D converter w/programmable gain and filter, 5 single ended or 3 differential sensor inputs, microcontroller w/16 bit address, on-board EEPROM, and 418 MHz FSK RF transmitter. Transmission range was 1/3 mile (LOS, 1/4 wavelength antennas, 12 milliamps at +3 VDC). The RF receiver included EEPROM, XML output, and Ethernet connectivity. Received data from network nodes are parsed according to their individual addresses. The times required to accumulate sufficient charge to accomplish data transmission was evaluated. For peak <span class="hlt">strains</span> of 150 μɛ, the time to transmit was 30 to 160 seconds (for 180 to 60 Hz tests).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3224125','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3224125"><span>Genome organization of epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii <span class="hlt">strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for hospital-acquired infections. A. baumannii epidemics described world-wide were caused by few genotypic clusters of <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The occurrence of epidemics caused by multi-drug resistant <span class="hlt">strains</span> assigned to novel genotypes have been reported over the last few years. Results In the present study, we compared whole genome sequences of three A. baumannii <span class="hlt">strains</span> assigned to genotypes ST2, ST25 and ST78, representative of the most frequent genotypes responsible for epidemics in several Mediterranean hospitals, and four complete genome sequences of A. baumannii <span class="hlt">strains</span> assigned to genotypes ST1, ST2 and ST77. Comparative genome analysis showed extensive synteny and identified 3068 coding regions which are conserved, at the same chromosomal position, in all A. baumannii genomes. Genome alignments also identified 63 DNA regions, ranging in size from 4 o 126 kb, all defined as genomic islands, which were present in some genomes, but were either missing or replaced by non-homologous DNA sequences in others. Some islands are involved in resistance to drugs and metals, others carry genes encoding surface proteins or enzymes involved in specific metabolic pathways, and others correspond to prophage-like elements. Accessory DNA regions encode 12 to 19% of the potential gene products of the analyzed <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The analysis of a collection of epidemic A. baumannii <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed that some islands were restricted to specific genotypes. Conclusion The definition of the genome components of A. baumannii provides a scaffold to rapidly evaluate the genomic organization of novel clinical A. baumannii isolates. Changes in island profiling will be useful in genomic epidemiology of A. baumannii population. PMID:21985032</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22328768','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22328768"><span>Genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus <span class="hlt">strain</span> GI-9.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Pradip K; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Korpole, Suresh; Patil, Prabhu B</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>We report the 5.18-Mb genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus <span class="hlt">strain</span> GI-9, isolated from a subsurface soil sample during a screen for novel <span class="hlt">strains</span> producing antimicrobial compounds. The draft genome of this <span class="hlt">strain</span> will aid in biotechnological exploitation and comparative genomics of Brevibacillus laterosporus <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000024984&hterms=new+madrid+seismic+zone&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Bmadrid%2Bseismic%2Bzone','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000024984&hterms=new+madrid+seismic+zone&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Bmadrid%2Bseismic%2Bzone"><span>Stresses and <span class="hlt">Strains</span> within the "Stable" North American Plate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Engeln, Joe</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents a final report on "Stresses and <span class="hlt">Strains</span> within the "Stable" North American Plate". The topics include: 1) <span class="hlt">Strain</span> rates near the New Madrid seismic zone; 2) Signal Processing of intermediate term data; and 3) Transform fault stresses and <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The paper also includes graphs of the stress and <span class="hlt">strain</span> distributions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28820384','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28820384"><span>Chronic Wasting Disease Prion <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Emergence and Host Range Expansion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herbst, Allen; Velásquez, Camilo Duque; Triscott, Elizabeth; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Human and mouse prion proteins share a structural motif that regulates resistance to common chronic wasting disease (CWD) prion <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Successful transmission of an emergent <span class="hlt">strain</span> of CWD prion, H95(+), into mice resulted in infection. Thus, emergent CWD prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> may have higher zoonotic potential than common <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26769927','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26769927"><span>Draft Genome Sequences of Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> SUL3, Microbacterium sp. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> GCS4, Shinella sp. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> GWS1, and Shinella sp. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> SUS2 Isolated from Consortium with the Hydrocarbon-Producing Alga Botryococcus braunii.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, Katy J; Moore, Karen; Sambles, Christine; Love, John; Studholme, David J; Aves, Stephen J</p> <p>2016-01-14</p> <p>A variety of bacteria associate with the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii, some of which may influence its growth. We report here the genome sequences for Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> SUL3, Microbacterium sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> GCS4, and Shinella sp. <span class="hlt">strains</span> GWS1 and SUS2, isolated from a laboratory culture of B. braunii, race B, <span class="hlt">strain</span> Guadeloupe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4982289','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4982289"><span>Complete Genome Sequence of the Oncolytic Sendai virus <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Moscow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zainutdinov, Sergei S.; Tikunov, Artem Y.; Matveeva, Olga V.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We report here the complete genome sequence of Sendai virus Moscow <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Anecdotal evidence for the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy exists for this <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The RNA genome of the Moscow <span class="hlt">strain</span> is 15,384 nucleotides in length and differs from the nearest <span class="hlt">strain</span>, BB1, by 18 nucleotides and 11 amino acids. PMID:27516510</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=287069','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=287069"><span>Pheromonal divergence between two <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Spodoptera frugiperda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Abstract- Spodoptera frugiperda consists of two genetically and behaviorally different <span class="hlt">strains</span>, the corn- and the rice-<span class="hlt">strain</span>, which seem to be in the process of sympatric speciation. We investigated the role of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sexual communication as a prezygotic mating barrier between both <span class="hlt">strains</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740031112&hterms=magnesium+oxide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmagnesium%2Boxide','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740031112&hterms=magnesium+oxide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmagnesium%2Boxide"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> aging in magnesium oxide single crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, M.; Stoebe, T. G.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate change transients are considered together with aspects of serrated flow, questions of flow stress and work hardening during dynamic <span class="hlt">strain</span> aging, and time, temperature, and prestrain dependence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> aging. On continuing the deformation process after aging for certain periods of time for a particular <span class="hlt">strain</span>, a subsidiary load drop is sometimes observed in addition to the main yield drops.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3768671','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3768671"><span>Ciprofloxacin susceptibility reduction of Salmonella <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from outbreaks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Souza, Roberta B.; Ferrari, Rafaela G.; Magnani, Marciane; Kottwitz, Luciana B. M.; Alcocer, Iliana; Tognim, Maria Cristina B.; Oliveira, Tereza C. R. M.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The antimicrobial susceptibility of 212 Salmonella <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from patients and foods was evaluated and 45% were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid. Nalidixic acid resistant <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed a higher minimal inhibitory concentration for ciprofloxacin than sensitive <span class="hlt">strains</span>. During the study an increase of <span class="hlt">strains</span> with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was also observed. PMID:24031522</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26655590','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26655590"><span>Ultrasound <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping of Achilles tendon compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> patterns during dorsiflexion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chimenti, Ruth L; Flemister, A Samuel; Ketz, John; Bucklin, Mary; Buckley, Mark R; Richards, Michael S</p> <p>2016-01-04</p> <p>Heel lifts are commonly prescribed to patients with Achilles tendinopathy, yet little is known about the effect on tendon compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The purposes of the current study were to (1) develop a valid and reliable ultrasound elastography technique and algorithm to measure compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> of human Achilles tendon in vivo, (2) examine the effects of ankle dorsiflexion (lowering via controlled removal of a heel lift and partial squat) on compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the Achilles tendon insertion and (3) examine the relative compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> between the deep and superficial regions of the Achilles tendon insertion. All tasks started in a position equivalent to standing with a 30mm heel lift. An ultrasound transducer positioned over the Achilles tendon insertion was used to capture radiofrequency images. A non-rigid image registration-based algorithm was used to estimate compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> of the tendon, which was divided into 2 regions (superficial, deep). The bland-Altman test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to test validity and reliability. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> between regions and across tasks. Compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> was accurately and reliably (ICC>0.75) quantified. There was greater compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> during the combined task of lowering and partial squat compared to the lowering (P=.001) and partial squat (P<.001) tasks separately. There was greater compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the deep region of the tendon compared to the superficial for all tasks (P=.001). While these findings need to be examined in a pathological population, heel lifts may reduce tendon compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> during daily activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293154','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293154"><span>Development of a <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-Specific Molecular Method for Quantitating Individual Campylobacter <span class="hlt">Strains</span> in Mixed Populations▿</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Elvers, Karen T.; Helps, Christopher R.; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Allen, Vivien M.; Newell, Diane G.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The identification of sites resulting in cross-contamination of poultry flocks in the abattoir and determination of the survival and persistence of campylobacters at these sites are essential for the development of intervention strategies aimed at reducing the microbial burden on poultry at retail. A novel molecule-based method, using <span class="hlt">strain</span>- and genus-specific oligonucleotide probes, was developed to detect and enumerate specific campylobacter <span class="hlt">strains</span> in mixed populations. <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-specific oligonucleotide probes were designed for the short variable regions (SVR) of the flaA gene in individual Campylobacter jejuni <span class="hlt">strains</span>. A 16S rRNA Campylobacter genus-specific probe was also used. Both types of probes were used to investigate populations of campylobacters by colony lift hybridization. The specificity and proof of principle of the method were tested using <span class="hlt">strains</span> with closely related SVR sequences and mixtures of these <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Colony lifts of campylobacters were hybridized sequentially with up to two labeled <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific probes, followed by the generic 16S rRNA probe. SVR probes were highly specific, differentiating down to 1 nucleotide in the target sequence, and were sufficiently sensitive to detect colonies of a single <span class="hlt">strain</span> in a mixed population. The 16S rRNA probe detected all Campylobacter spp. tested but not closely related species, such as Arcobacter skirrowi and Helicobacter pullorum. Preliminary field studies demonstrated the application of this technique to target <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from poultry transport crate wash tank water. This method is quantitative, sensitive, and highly specific and allows the identification and enumeration of selected <span class="hlt">strains</span> among all of the campylobacters in environmental samples. PMID:18281428</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16988334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16988334"><span>Nucleic acid extraction from Agrobacterium <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wise, Arlene A; Liu, Zhenying; Binns, Andrew N</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Agrobacterium is routinely used as a tool for moving genetic constructs into plant cells. The successful use of Agrobacterium as a tool for the genetic engineering of plant cells often requires the manipulation and analysis of nucleic acids present in recombinant Agrobacterium <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Here we present dependable methods for the isolation of genomic (total) DNA, mega-plasmid DNA, shuttle or binary plasmid DNA, and RNA. In addition, we provide a simple method for the electronic transfer of shuttle plasmids from Agrobacterium to E. coli for use when their low copy number in Agrobacterium impedes plasmid isolation from that <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930022369','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930022369"><span>Progress in speckle-shift <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lant, Christian T.; Barranger, John P.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The Instrumentation and Control Technology Division of the Lewis Research Center has been developing an in-house capability to make one dimensional and two dimensional optical <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements on high temperature test specimens. The measurements are based on a two-beam speckle-shift technique. The development of composite materials for use in high temperature applications is generating interest in using the speckle-shift technique to measure <span class="hlt">strains</span> on small diameter fibers and wires of various compositions. The results of preliminary speckle correlation tests on wire and fiber specimens are covered, and the advanced system currently under development is described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170007760','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170007760"><span>Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pak, Chan-Gi</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady <span class="hlt">strain</span> using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..87..177C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..87..177C"><span>Cells as <span class="hlt">strain</span>-cued automata</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cox, Brian N.; Snead, Malcolm L.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We argue in favor of representing living cells as automata and review demonstrations that autonomous cells can form patterns by responding to local variations in the <span class="hlt">strain</span> fields that arise from their individual or collective motions. An autonomous cell's response to <span class="hlt">strain</span> stimuli is assumed to be effected by internally-generated, internally-powered forces, which generally move the cell in directions other than those implied by external energy gradients. Evidence of cells acting as <span class="hlt">strain</span>-cued automata have been inferred from patterns observed in nature and from experiments conducted in vitro. Simulations that mimic particular cases of pattern forming share the idealization that cells are assumed to pass information among themselves solely via mechanical boundary conditions, i.e., the tractions and displacements present at their membranes. This assumption opens three mechanisms for pattern formation in large cell populations: wavelike behavior, kinematic feedback in cell motility that can lead to sliding and rotational patterns, and directed migration during invasions. Wavelike behavior among ameloblast cells during amelogenesis (the formation of dental enamel) has been inferred from enamel microstructure, while <span class="hlt">strain</span> waves in populations of epithelial cells have been observed in vitro. One hypothesized kinematic feedback mechanism, "enhanced shear motility", accounts successfully for the spontaneous formation of layered patterns during amelogenesis in the mouse incisor. Directed migration is exemplified by a theory of invader cells that sense and respond to the <span class="hlt">strains</span> they themselves create in the host population as they invade it: analysis shows that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> fields contain positional information that could aid the formation of cell network structures, stabilizing the slender geometry of branches and helping govern the frequency of branch bifurcation and branch coalescence (the formation of closed networks). In simulations of pattern formation in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860025310&hterms=contour&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcontour','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860025310&hterms=contour&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcontour"><span>Shear-<span class="hlt">strain</span> contours from moire interferometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The development of whole-field contour maps of shear <span class="hlt">strains</span> gamma (xy), derived from displacement fields obtained by moire interferometry with 2400 lines/mm, is described. The use of mechanical differentiation to obtain cross-derivatives of displacements and the use of graphical additive moire to sum the cross-derivatives are explained. Quantitative analysis in the small-<span class="hlt">strain</span> domain is possible because of the high sensitivity of moire interferometry. The applicability of this technique is shown by the testing of a short epoxy beam under three-point bending.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/840807','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/840807"><span>Traumatic injuries: office treatment of <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ryan, A J</p> <p>1977-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span>, defined as trauma to a musculotendinous unit, is characterized by pain, muscle spasm, swelling, and loss of range of motion. Conservative treatment consists of rest and elevation of the affected muscle, application of ice and compression, active and passive stretching, and resisted motion exercises. If rupture of muscle and fascia is extensive, surgery may be required. Chronic <span class="hlt">strain</span> may result from repeated injuries. It is usually treated with rest and administration of an anti-inflammatory agent, such as oxyphenbutazone or a corticosteroid preparation. In the event that this regimen does not provide relief from pain and disability, surgery may be necessary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/920878','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/920878"><span>Enabling <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Arsenlis, A; Cai, W</p> <p>2006-12-20</p> <p>Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750023410','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750023410"><span>NASTRAN modifications for recovering <span class="hlt">strains</span> and curvatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hennrich, C. W.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Modifications to the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program are described. The modifications allow the recovery of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and curvature data for the general two-dimensional elements, in addition to the usual stress data. Option features allow the transformation of the <span class="hlt">strain</span>/curvature (or stress) data to a common coordinate system and representation at the grid points of the structural model rather than at the conventional element center locations. Usage information is provided which will allow present users of NASTRAN to easily utilize the new capability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17155419','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17155419"><span>Phosphorus donors in highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huebl, Hans; Stegner, Andre R; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S; Vogg, Guenther; Bensch, Frank; Rauls, Eva; Gerstmann, Uwe</p> <p>2006-10-20</p> <p>The hyperfine interaction of phosphorus donors in fully <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si thin films grown on virtual Si(1-x)Ge(x) substrates with x< or =0.3 is determined via electrically detected magnetic resonance. For highly <span class="hlt">strained</span> epilayers, hyperfine interactions as low as 0.8 mT are observed, significantly below the limit predicted by valley repopulation. Within a Green's function approach, density functional theory shows that the additional reduction is caused by the volume increase of the unit cell and a relaxation of the Si ligands of the donor.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95x5418S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95x5418S"><span>Propagating edge states in <span class="hlt">strained</span> honeycomb lattices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>We investigate the helically propagating edge states associated with pseudo-Landau levels in <span class="hlt">strained</span> honeycomb lattices. We exploit chiral symmetry to derive a general criterion for the existence of these propagating edge states in the presence of only nearest-neighbor hoppings and we verify our criterion using numerical simulations of both uniaxially and trigonally <span class="hlt">strained</span> honeycomb lattices. We show that the propagation of the helical edge state can be controlled by engineering the shape of the edges. Sensitivity to chiral-symmetry-breaking next-nearest-neighbor hoppings is assessed. Our result opens up an avenue toward the precise control of edge modes through manipulation of the edge shape.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730009719','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730009719"><span>Development of high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lemcoe, M. M.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>High temperature electric resistance wire <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages were developed and evaluated for use at temperatures exceeding 922 K (1200 F). A special high temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage alloy (Fe-25Cr-7.5A1), designated BCL-3, was used to fabricate the gages. Pertinent gage characteristics were determined at temperatures up to 1255 K (1800 F). The results of the evaluation were reported in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that the gages will perform satisfactorily at temperatures to at least 1089 K (1500 F) for at least one hour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22734363','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22734363"><span>Principles and clinical applications of <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Govind, Satish C; Kiotsekoglou, Anatoli; Gopal, Aasha S; Brodin, Lars Ake; Ramesh; Saha, Samir K</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>M-Mode echocardiography, 2-D grey scale imaging and standard Doppler that constitute conventional echocardiography has been used for over many decades now. Although these modalities form the backbone in routine clinical echocardiography, its inability to objectively quantify left ventricular function at regional and global levels as well as its loading and heart rate dependency make conventional echocardiography an incomplete tool in clinical situations. Tissue Doppler imaging (which includes myocardial velocity, displacement and <span class="hlt">strain</span>) has been successfully used in a variety of clinical situations, from investigations of diastolic function to implantation of bi-ventricular pacing for cardiac resynchronization therapy and even in preclinical diagnosis of genetic diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> imaging has been found to be superior to velocity in a variety of clinical conditions and enables us to quantify deformation as a measurable number in terms of regional myocardial deformation. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate have to be assessed together since they provide complementary information somewhat analogous to ejection fraction and contraction. This article has tried to simplify its principles, understand its limitations and know its utility to ensure having a better knowledge of this promising tool before one starts to actively use it. In this review, focus has been made on the physical, technical and also clinical aspects of <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging. In the new world of multi-modality imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and nuclear perfusion scintigraphy (NPS) are the competitors of echocardiography, but it would be of interest to note that even these modalities are also adapting concepts of <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging (in CMR) and left ventricular synchronicity (in NPS). This only emphasizes the role of advanced echocardiography as a more economical and stand-alone modality visa vis the other two related technologies. The sooner we adapt to these advanced</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhL..91y1912C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhL..91y1912C"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> responsive concave and convex microlens arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We report the fabrication of single-component, <span class="hlt">strain</span> responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied <span class="hlt">strain</span>: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992ONERA....Q....K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992ONERA....Q....K"><span>High temperature thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kayser, P.; Godefroy, J. C.; Leca, L.</p> <p></p> <p>The development of thin-film resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges suitable for dynamic stress measurements up to 900 C and intended for blade vibration measurements is reported. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge is deposited by RF sputtering on nickel-base superalloys and consists of an NiCoCrAlY coating, an Al2O3 insulating layer, a sensing layer (NiCr, PdCr), an intermediate splicing layer (Pt), and a protective film (Al2O3 or SiO2). The electrical and mechanical properties of the sensing layers and preliminary results on the thermal stability of the gauges are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960018814&hterms=mcneill&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmcneill','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960018814&hterms=mcneill&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmcneill"><span>Computing Displacements And <span class="hlt">Strains</span> From Video Images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Russell, Samuel S.; Mcneill, Stephen R.; Lansing, Matthew D.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Subpixel digital video image correlation (SDVIC) technique for measuring in-plane displacements on surfaces of objects under loads, without contact. Used for analyses of experimental research specimens or actual service structures of virtually any size or material. Only minimal preparation of test objects needed, and no need to isolate test objects from minor vibrations or fluctuating temperatures. Technique implemented by SDVIC software, producing color-graduated, full-field representations of in-plane displacements and partial derivatives with respect to position along both principal directions in each image plane. From representations, linear <span class="hlt">strains</span>, shear <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and rotation fields determined. Written in C language.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MeScT..28a5106K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MeScT..28a5106K"><span>Atmospheric corrosion sensor based on <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kasai, Naoya; Hiroki, Masatoshi; Yamada, Toshirou; Kihira, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Kazumi; Kuriyama, Yukihisa; Okazaki, Shinji</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, an in situ atmospheric corrosion sensor based on <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement is discussed. The theoretical background for measuring the reduction in thickness of low carbon steel is also presented. Based on the theoretical considerations, a test piece and apparatus for an atmospheric corrosion sensor were designed. Furthermore, in a dry-wet cyclic accelerated exposure experiment, the measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> indicated thinning of the test piece, although the corrosion product generated on the surface of the test piece affected the results. The atmospheric corrosion sensor would be effective for evaluating atmospheric corrosion of many types of infrastructure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22267707','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22267707"><span>Tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping in flat germanium membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rhead, S. D. Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.</p> <p>2014-04-28</p> <p>Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic <span class="hlt">strain</span> variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1389.1228E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1389.1228E"><span>Ecoepidemics with Two <span class="hlt">Strains</span>: Diseased Prey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elena, Elisa; Grammauro, Maria; Venturino, Ezio</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>In this work we present a minimal model for an ecoepidemic situation with two diseases affecting the prey population. The main assumptions are the following ones. The predators recognize and hunt only the healthy prey. An infected prey of one <span class="hlt">strain</span> becomes immune to the other one. The major finding shows that the two <span class="hlt">strains</span> cannot simultaneously thrive in the system, contrary to the standard assumptions in epidemiology. But this rather unexpected and remarkable result, paralleling another one when the epidemics affects the predators, is most likely due to the assumptions made.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=243828','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=243828"><span>Comparison of Ethanol Production by Different Zymomonas <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Skotnicki, M. L.; Lee, K. J.; Tribe, D. E.; Rogers, P. L.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A comparison of the rates of growth and ethanol production by 11 different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Zymomonas revealed a wide range of characteristics, with some <span class="hlt">strains</span> being more tolerant of high sugar or ethanol concentrations and high incubation temperatures than others. Some <span class="hlt">strains</span> were unable to utilize sucrose; others produced large amounts of levan, and one <span class="hlt">strain</span> grew well but produced no levan. One <span class="hlt">strain</span>, CP4, was considerably better in all respects than most of the other <span class="hlt">strains</span> and was chosen as a starting <span class="hlt">strain</span> for genetic improvement of ethanol production. PMID:16345753</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9798E..37N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9798E..37N"><span>Novel pre-<span class="hlt">strain</span> method for dielectric electroactive polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Newell, Brittany; Krutz, Gary; Stewart, Frank; Pascal, Kevin</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Dielectric electroactive polymers have demonstrated their significant potential in a variety of applications due to their material strength and elastomeric material properties. Mechanical pre-<span class="hlt">strain</span> has been shown to enhance material actuation potential significantly. However, with this enhancement comes sacrifices. Mechanical pre-<span class="hlt">strain</span> imposes a stiff mechanical boundary on the dielectric material in order to maintain the <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In this research, investigations were made into the mechanisms of mechanical pre-<span class="hlt">strain</span> and into alternate pre-<span class="hlt">strain</span> methods. These studies discovered alternate methods capable of producing enhanced pre-<span class="hlt">strains</span> and final actuation without the addition of the solid <span class="hlt">strain</span> boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1388493','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1388493"><span>Variability among Rhizobium <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>van Berkum, P.; Beyene, D.; Vera, F. T.; Keyser, H. H.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Rhizobium <span class="hlt">strains</span> from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the different geographical locations from which the <span class="hlt">strains</span> originated. An investigation of pea <span class="hlt">strains</span> with antibodies prepared against fava bean <span class="hlt">strains</span> and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium <span class="hlt">strains</span> from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4178652','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4178652"><span>Dynamics of Dual Infection with Campylobacter jejuni <span class="hlt">Strains</span> in Chickens Reveals Distinct <span class="hlt">Strain-to-Strain</span> Variation in Infection Ecology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Suzanne; Kemmett, Kirsty; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Although multiple genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni may be isolated from the same commercial broiler flock, little is known about the infection dynamics of different genotypes within individuals or their colonization sites within the gut. Single experimental infections with C. jejuni M1 (sequence type 137, clonal complex 45) and C. jejuni 13126 (sequence type 21, clonal complex 21) revealed that 13126 colonized the ceca at significantly higher levels. The dissemination and colonization sites of the two C. jejuni <span class="hlt">strains</span> then were examined in an experimental broiler flock. Two 33-day-old broiler chickens were infected with M1 and two with 13126, and 15 birds were left unchallenged. Cloacal swabs were taken postinfection to determine the colonization and shedding of each <span class="hlt">strain</span>. By 2 days postinfection (dpi), 8/19 birds were shedding M1 whereas none were shedding 13126. At 8 dpi, all birds were shedding both <span class="hlt">strains</span>. At 18 dpi, liver and cecal levels of each isolate were quantified, while in 10 birds they also were quantified at nine sites throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. 13126 was found throughout the GI tract, while M1 was largely restricted to the ceca and colon. The livers of 7/19 birds were culture positive for 13126 only. These data show that 13126 has a distinctly different infection biology than <span class="hlt">strain</span> M1. It showed slower colonization of the lower GI tract but was more invasive and able to colonize at a high level throughout the GI tract. The finding that C. jejuni <span class="hlt">strains</span> have markedly different infection ecologies within the chicken has implications for control in the poultry industry and suggests that the contamination risk of edible tissues is dependent on the isolate involved. PMID:25107966</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.4556H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.4556H"><span>Revisiting borehole <span class="hlt">strain</span>, typhoons, and slow earthquakes using quantitative estimates of precipitation-induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hsu, Ya-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Shu; Liu, Chi-Ching; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn I.; Kitagawa, Genshio; Chen, Yue-Gau</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Taiwan experiences high deformation rates, particularly along its eastern margin where a shortening rate of about 30 mm/yr is experienced in the Longitudinal Valley and the Coastal Range. Four Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters have been installed in this area since 2003. Liu et al. (2009) proposed that a number of <span class="hlt">strain</span> transient events, primarily coincident with low-barometric pressure during passages of typhoons, were due to deep-triggered slow slip. Here we extend that investigation with a quantitative analysis of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> responses to precipitation as well as barometric pressure and the Earth tides in order to isolate tectonic source effects. Estimates of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> responses to barometric pressure and groundwater level changes for the different stations vary over the ranges -1 to -3 nanostrain/millibar(hPa) and -0.3 to -1.0 nanostrain/hPa, respectively, consistent with theoretical values derived using Hooke's law. Liu et al. (2009) noted that during some typhoons, including at least one with very heavy rainfall, the observed <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes were consistent with only barometric forcing. By considering a more extensive data set, we now find that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> response to rainfall is about -5.1 nanostrain/hPa. A larger <span class="hlt">strain</span> response to rainfall compared to that to air pressure and water level may be associated with an additional <span class="hlt">strain</span> from fluid pressure changes that take place due to infiltration of precipitation. Using a state-space model, we remove the <span class="hlt">strain</span> response to rainfall, in addition to those due to air pressure changes and the Earth tides, and investigate whether corrected <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes are related to environmental disturbances or tectonic-original motions. The majority of <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes attributed to slow earthquakes seem rather to be associated with environmental factors. However, some events show remaining <span class="hlt">strain</span> changes after all corrections. These events include <span class="hlt">strain</span> polarity changes during passages of typhoons (a characteristic that is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19353890','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19353890"><span>[Effects of different iron concentrations on the growths of a unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> and a colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Microcystis aeruginosa].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Yu-wen; Li, Jian-hong; Fu, Lu; Wu, Min; Weng, Yong-ping; Zhou, Yao-ming</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the growth, photosynthetic efficiency, siderophore production and iron accumulation of two <span class="hlt">strains</span> of M. aeruginosa, a unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> M. aeruginosa PCC7806 and a colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> M. aeruginosa XW01, under iron-limited and iron-replete conditions. The identities of ITS and fur gene sequences of two <span class="hlt">strains</span> were 95% and 98% respectively.That implied the two <span class="hlt">strains</span> should be close relatives. Results showed the growths of two <span class="hlt">strains</span> were severely inhibited under an iron-limited condition. The unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> died in 6 days,whereas the colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> could maintain a weak growth in 10 days under the iron-limited condition. PSII maximum light energy transformation (Fv/Fm) of the colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and the unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> were 0.182 +/- 0.014 and 0.160 +/- 0.017, respectively. The colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> displayed a higher photosynthetic oxygen evolution than the unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Two <span class="hlt">strains</span> could produce siderophores, which were hydroxamate type. The colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> produced more siderophores than unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> under the iron-limited condition.Iron contents of two <span class="hlt">strains</span> were less than 1/3 cultured in the iron-limited condition than in iron-replete condition, but no obvious difference appeared between the two <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Our result demonstrated that the colonial <span class="hlt">strain</span> have a stronger endurance than unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> under the iron-limited condition. As two <span class="hlt">strains</span> had almost same abilities of iron accumulation, the other physiological mechanisms in the unicellular <span class="hlt">strain</span> should be more sensitive to lower iron level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA573739','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA573739"><span>High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Tensile and Compressive Effects in Glassy Polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-02-08</p> <p>polymers under high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates has been determined in compression. Some research programs have studied the combined effects of temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate...glassy polymers to high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate loading in compression. More recently, research programs that study the combined effects of temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span>...Force Materiel Command  United States Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2013-006 High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA208826','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA208826"><span>High-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Testing of Gun Propellants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-12-01</p> <p>specimen is loaded beyond the elastic range. Instrumentation of the bars allows recording of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> history in the bars during the test event. The...<span class="hlt">strain</span> history on the input bar gives a record of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate history in the sample. )The output bar <span class="hlt">strain</span> history is proportional to the stress... history in the sample.) The data were compared to the results reported in the literature of earlier high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate tests on the same propellants. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000187&hterms=laser+cooling&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dlaser%2Bcooling','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000187&hterms=laser+cooling&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dlaser%2Bcooling"><span>Two-Dimensional Laser-Speckle Surface-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gauge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Barranger, John P.; Lant, Christian</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Extension of Yamaguchi's laser-speckle surface-<span class="hlt">strain</span>-gauge method yields data on two-dimensional surface <span class="hlt">strains</span> in times as short as fractions of second. Laser beams probe rough spot on surface of specimen before and after processing. Changes in speckle pattern of laser light reflected from spot indicative of changes in surface <span class="hlt">strains</span> during processing. Used to monitor <span class="hlt">strains</span> and changes in <span class="hlt">strains</span> induced by hot-forming and subsequent cooling of steel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5289684','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5289684"><span>Genome Sequences of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar kurstaki <span class="hlt">Strain</span> BP865 and B. thuringiensis Serovar aizawai <span class="hlt">Strain</span> HD-133</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jeong, Haeyoung</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT We report the draft genome sequences of two insecticidal <span class="hlt">strains</span> against lepidopteran pests, Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki <span class="hlt">strain</span> BP865, an isolate from the South Korean phylloplane, and <span class="hlt">strain</span> HD-133, a reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> of B. thuringiensis serovar aizawai. PMID:28153898</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26186451','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26186451"><span>Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV <span class="hlt">Strains</span> from China with Other <span class="hlt">Strains</span> from Different Geographic Regions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV <span class="hlt">strains</span> have been published in GenBank, including one <span class="hlt">strain</span> from China, and nineteen <span class="hlt">strains</span> from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 <span class="hlt">strains</span> from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 <span class="hlt">strains</span> were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese <span class="hlt">strain</span> WG and the Australian <span class="hlt">strains</span> SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG <span class="hlt">strain</span> established close relationships with the Australian <span class="hlt">strain</span> SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG <span class="hlt">strain</span> with the sequences of SA2 and K317 <span class="hlt">strains</span> as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV <span class="hlt">strains</span> were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV <span class="hlt">strains</span> from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese <span class="hlt">strain</span> WG and the Australian <span class="hlt">strains</span> SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV <span class="hlt">strains</span> from different geographic regions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25660626','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25660626"><span>Perceptual <span class="hlt">strain</span> index for heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> assessment in an experimental study: an application to construction workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Y; Chan, Albert P C</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Although the physiological <span class="hlt">strain</span> index (PhSI) is universal and comprehensive, its restrictions are recognized in terms of invasive on-site measurements and the requirement of accurate instruments. The perceptual <span class="hlt">strain</span> index (PeSI) has been proposed as a user-friendly and practical indicator for heat <span class="hlt">strain</span>. However, the application of this index in assessing the heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> of construction workers has yet to be examined and documented. This study aims to ascertain the reliability and applicability of PeSI in an experimental setting that simulates a stressful working environment (i.e., environment, work uniform, and work pace) experienced by construction workers. Ten males and two females performed intermittent exercise on a treadmill while wearing a summer work uniform at 34.5 °C and 75% relative humidity in a climatic chamber. Physiological parameters (core temperature, heart rate) and perceptual variables (thermal sensation, perceived exertion) were collated synchronously at 3 min intervals. The results of two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (clothing×time) revealed that the PeSI was useful in differentiating the heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> levels between different work uniforms. Not only did the PeSI change in the same general manner with the PhSI, but it was also powerful in reflecting different levels of physiological <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Thus, the PeSI offers considerable promise for heat <span class="hlt">strain</span> assessment under simulated working conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017RPPh...80i6501N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017RPPh...80i6501N"><span>Electronic and optical properties of <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene and other <span class="hlt">strained</span> 2D materials: a review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Naumis, Gerardo G.; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Oliva-Leyva, Maurice; Terrones, Humberto</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>This review presents the state of the art in <span class="hlt">strain</span> and ripple-induced effects on the electronic and optical properties of graphene. It starts by providing the crystallographic description of mechanical deformations, as well as the diffraction pattern for different kinds of representative deformation fields. Then, the focus turns to the unique elastic properties of graphene, and to how <span class="hlt">strain</span> is produced. Thereafter, various theoretical approaches used to study the electronic properties of <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene are examined, discussing the advantages of each. These approaches provide a platform to describe exotic properties, such as a fractal spectrum related with quasicrystals, a mixed Dirac–Schrödinger behavior, emergent gravity, topological insulator states, in molecular graphene and other 2D discrete lattices. The physical consequences of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the optical properties are reviewed next, with a focus on the Raman spectrum. At the same time, recent advances to tune the optical conductivity of graphene by <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering are given, which open new paths in device applications. Finally, a brief review of <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects in multilayered graphene and other promising 2D materials like silicene and materials based on other group-IV elements, phosphorene, dichalcogenide- and monochalcogenide-monolayers is presented, with a brief discussion of interplays among <span class="hlt">strain</span>, thermal effects, and illumination in the latter material family.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SMaS...17c5037W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SMaS...17c5037W"><span>Investigation of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer for surface-attached optical fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K. Y.; Olson, Noah G.</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>The relation between the component <span class="hlt">strain</span> and the <span class="hlt">strain</span> on a surface-attached optical fiber is governed by the effectiveness of shear transfer through the adhesive and the polymeric coating(s) on the optical fiber. A classical shear lag model can predict the <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer through a soft layer well. However, experiments showed that the results are unsatisfactory for bare fiber with stiff adhesive case. A 3D-FEM is established to model the <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer of a surface-mounted <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor and it is verified by experiments. Then, it is used to investigate the influence of four geometric parameters of the adhesive: (1) side width, (2) top thickness, (3) bond length, (4) bottom thickness, on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> transfer. By sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that the bond length and the bottom thickness are dominant factors. Based on finite element results, the parameter of the analytical model is modified to suit stiff layer cases. Important considerations for practical installation of surface-attached optical interferometric and FBG <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Nanot..21m4013M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Nanot..21m4013M"><span>Nanoscale patterning induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> redistribution in ultrathin <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si layers on oxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Moutanabbir, O.; Reiche, M.; Hähnel, A.; Erfurth, W.; Gösele, U.; Motohashi, M.; Tarun, A.; Hayazawa, N.; Kawata, S.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>We present a comparative study of the influence of the thickness on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> behavior upon nanoscale patterning of ultrathin <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si layers directly on oxide. The <span class="hlt">strained</span> layers were grown on a SiGe virtual substrate and transferred onto a SiO2/Si substrate using wafer bonding and hydrogen ion induced exfoliation. The post-patterning <span class="hlt">strain</span> was evaluated using UV micro-Raman spectroscopy for thin (20 nm) and thick (60 nm) nanostructures with lateral dimensions in the range of 80-400 nm. We found that about 40-50% of the initial <span class="hlt">strain</span> is maintained in the 20 nm thick nanostructures, whereas this fraction drops significantly to ~ 2-20% for the 60 nm thick ones. This phenomenon of free surface induced relaxation is described using detailed three-dimensional finite element simulations. The simulated <span class="hlt">strain</span> 3D maps confirm the limited relaxation in thin nanostructures. This result has direct implications for the fabrication and manipulation of <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si nanodevices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20208119','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20208119"><span>Nanoscale patterning induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> redistribution in ultrathin <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si layers on oxide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moutanabbir, O; Reiche, M; Hähnel, A; Erfurth, W; Gösele, U; Motohashi, M; Tarun, A; Hayazawa, N; Kawata, S</p> <p>2010-04-02</p> <p>We present a comparative study of the influence of the thickness on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> behavior upon nanoscale patterning of ultrathin <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si layers directly on oxide. The <span class="hlt">strained</span> layers were grown on a SiGe virtual substrate and transferred onto a SiO(2)/Si substrate using wafer bonding and hydrogen ion induced exfoliation. The post-patterning <span class="hlt">strain</span> was evaluated using UV micro-Raman spectroscopy for thin (20 nm) and thick (60 nm) nanostructures with lateral dimensions in the range of 80-400 nm. We found that about 40-50% of the initial <span class="hlt">strain</span> is maintained in the 20 nm thick nanostructures, whereas this fraction drops significantly to approximately 2-20% for the 60 nm thick ones. This phenomenon of free surface induced relaxation is described using detailed three-dimensional finite element simulations. The simulated <span class="hlt">strain</span> 3D maps confirm the limited relaxation in thin nanostructures. This result has direct implications for the fabrication and manipulation of <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si nanodevices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/935902','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/935902"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Effects on the Mechanical Response of Polypropylene-Based Composites Deformed at Small <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pessey, D.; Bahlouli, N.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>The mechanical properties and response of two composites based polypropylene (PP) have been determined for small <span class="hlt">strains</span> and for a range of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in the quasi static domain. These two materials are the talc-filled and non-filled high impact PP. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed at different <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in order to characterize the mechanical response and the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate effect. Experimental results showed that both unfilled and talc-filled high impact polypropylene were sensitive to <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and have a non linear behavior even at relatively low <span class="hlt">strains</span>. SEM analysis has been conducted to obtain a better comprehension of deformation mechanisms involved during loading by observations of the microstructure evolution. For each of these two materials, two existing modeling approaches are proposed. The first one is a three-parameter nonlinear constitutive model based on the experimental results. The second is a micromechanically-based approach for the elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the composite materials. The stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> curves predicted by these models are in fairly good agreement with our experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4106073','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4106073"><span>Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus <span class="hlt">Strains</span> with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial <span class="hlt">strains</span> from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic <span class="hlt">strains</span>. One hundred and forty bacterial <span class="hlt">strains</span> were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic <span class="hlt">strains</span> of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus <span class="hlt">strains</span> could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic <span class="hlt">strains</span> against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910010090','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910010090"><span>The apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> stability and repeatability of a BCL3 resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Jih-Fen</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Experiments were conducted at NASA-Lewis to study the effect of microstructural instability on the apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> stability and reproducibility of a BCL3 resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage. The resistance drift of the gage at various temperatures in the phase transition temperature range (PTTR) was measured. The effects of the heating and cooling rates with which the gage passed through the PTTR on the apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics of the gage were also studied. BCL3 gage, like other Fe-Cr-Al based gages, exhibited apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> instability in the temperature range of 700 to 1100 F due to the reversible microstructural transition the gage materials experienced in this temperature range. The BCL3 gage had a maximum apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> drift in the neighborhood of 770 F with an average drift rate of approx. -440 microstrain/hr in 2 hrs. The use of the BCL3 gage as well as other Fe-Cl-Al based gages for static <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements within the PTTR should be avoided unless the time durations in the PTTR are small enough to introduce a neglible drift. The microstructure transition that the BCL3 gage underwent occurred in the temperature range of 750 to 1050 F during heating and around 1000 to 800 F during cooling. The heating rate, and, in particular, the cooling rate with which the gage passed through the PTTR affected the shape and the repeatability of the apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> curve of the gage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21136127','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21136127"><span>Genomic comparison between attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> and their parental virulent <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>A lentiviral vaccine, live attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, was developed in the 1970s, and this has made tremendous contributions to the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. Four key virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> were generated during the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine: the original Liao-Ning <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EIAV(LN40)), a donkey-adapted virulent <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EIAV(DV117)), a donkey-leukocyte-attenuated vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EIAV(DLV121)), and a fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-adapted vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EIAV(FDDV13)). In this study, we analyzed the proviral genomes of these four EIAV <span class="hlt">strains</span> and found a series of consensus substitutions among these <span class="hlt">strains</span>. These mutations provide useful information for understanding the genetic basis of EIAV attenuation. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in a variety of genes in our attenuated EIAV vaccines not only provide a basis for virulence attenuation and induction of protective immunity but also greatly reduce the risk of reversion to virulence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28770643','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28770643"><span>Life Stress, <span class="hlt">Strain</span>, and Deviance Across Schools: Testing the Contextual Version of General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory in China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jinwu; Liu, Jianhong; Wang, Xin; Zou, Anquan</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory delineates different types of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and intervening processes from <span class="hlt">strain</span> to deviance and crime. In addition to explaining individual <span class="hlt">strain</span>-crime relationship, a contextualized version of general <span class="hlt">strain</span> theory, which is called the Macro General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory, has been used to analyze how aggregate variables influence aggregate and individual deviance and crime. Using a sample of 1,852 students (Level 1) nested in 52 schools (Level 2), the current study tests the Macro General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory using Chinese data. The results revealed that aggregate life stress and <span class="hlt">strain</span> have influences on aggregate and individual deviance, and reinforce the individual stress-deviance association. The current study contributes by providing the first Macro General <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Theory test based on Chinese data and offering empirical evidence for the multilevel intervening processes from <span class="hlt">strain</span> to deviance. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Geote..50..336P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Geote..50..336P"><span>Prediction of swelling rocks <span class="hlt">strain</span> in tunneling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Parsapour, D.; Fahimifar, A.</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Swelling deformations leading to convergence of tunnels may result in significant difficulties during the construction, in particular for long term use of tunnels. By extracting an experimental based explicit analytical solution for formulating swelling <span class="hlt">strains</span> as a function of time and stress, swelling <span class="hlt">strains</span> are predicted from the beginning of excavation and during the service life of tunnel. Results obtained from the analytical model show a proper agreement with experimental results. This closed-form solution has been implemented within a numerical program using the finite element method for predicting time-dependent swelling <span class="hlt">strain</span> around tunnels. Evaluating effects of swelling parameters on time-dependent <span class="hlt">strains</span> and tunnel shape on swelling behavior around the tunnel according to this analytical solution is considered. The ground-support interaction and consequent swelling effect on the induced forces in tunnel lining is considered too. Effect of delay in lining installation on swelling pressure which acting on the lining and its structural integrity, is also evaluated. A MATLAB code of " SRAP" is prepared and applied to calculate all swelling analysis around tunnels based on analytical solution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1020442','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1020442"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Imaging Using Terahertz Waves and Metamaterials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Heimbeck Weapons Development and Integration Directorate Aviation and Missile Research , Development, and Engineering Center And Willie D. Caraway...AND ADDRESS(ES) Commander, U.S. Army Research , Development, and Engineering Command ATTN: RDMR-WDI-WSD Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898-5000 8...<span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced birefringence at terahertz frequencies. Preliminary measurements are encouraging and show a qualitative agreement with theoretical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.500l2006S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.500l2006S"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate behavior of magnetorheological materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Seminuk, Kenneth; Joshi, Vasant; Gump, Jared; Stoltz, Chad; Forbes, Jerry</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate response of two Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene/ Iron (HTPB/Fe) compositions under electromagnetic fields has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure bar arrangement equipped with aluminum bars. Two HTPB/Fe compositions were developed, the first without plasticizer and the second containing plasticizer. Samples were tested with and without the application of a 0.01 Tesla magnetic field. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> gauge data taken from the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar has been used to determine the extent of change in mechanical properties by inducing a mild electromagnetic field onto each sample. Raw data from <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages was processed using commercial software (Signo) and Excel spreadsheet. It is of particular interest to determine whether the mechanical properties of binder systems can be manipulated by adding ferrous or Magnetostrictive particulates. Data collected from the Split Hopkinson Pressure bar indicate changes in the Mechanical Stress-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> curves and suggest that the impedance of a binder system can be altered by means of a magnetic field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864172','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864172"><span>Superconducting wire with improved <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics of the wire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864302','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864302"><span>Superconducting wire with improved <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics of the wire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5188875','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5188875"><span>Superconducting wire with improved <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.</p> <p>1979-12-19</p> <p>A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the <span class="hlt">strain</span> characteristics of the wire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27714887','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27714887"><span>Highly Stretchable, <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Sensing Hydrogel Optical Fibers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Xinyue; Jiang, Nan; Yetisen, Ali K; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Yang, Changxi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhao, Xuanhe; Yun, Seok-Hyun</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>A core-clad fiber made of elastic, tough hydrogels is highly stretchable while guiding light. Fluorescent dyes are easily doped into the hydrogel fiber by diffusion. When stretched, the transmission spectrum of the fiber is altered, enabling the <span class="hlt">strain</span> to be measured and also its location.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880000040&hterms=hygroscopic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dhygroscopic','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880000040&hterms=hygroscopic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dhygroscopic"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-Energy-Release Rates In Delamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Raju, I. S.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Q3DG computer program developed to perform quasi-three-dimensional stress analysis of composite laminates containing delaminations. Calculates <span class="hlt">strain</span>-energy-release rates for long, rectangular composite laminates containing delaminations and subjected to any combination of mechanical, thermal, and hygroscopic loading. Written in FORTRAN V.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=michael+AND+crichton&id=ED332225','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=michael+AND+crichton&id=ED332225"><span>"The Andromeda <span class="hlt">Strain</span>" as Science and Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaczmarek, Nancy</p> <p></p> <p>Well-written, with a flair for character development, and focusing on controversial issues, Michael Crichton's novel "The Andromeda <span class="hlt">Strain</span>" can precipitate lively discussions in science, English, and social studies classes and can help students to integrate all three areas. English and science teachers can collaborate in a variety of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867538','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867538"><span>Neutron apparatus for measuring <span class="hlt">strain</span> in composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kupperman, David S.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Faber, Jr., John F.; Singh, J. P.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A method and apparatus for orienting a pulsed neutron source and a multi-angle diffractometer toward a sample of a ceramic-matrix or metal-matrix composite so that the measurement of internal <span class="hlt">strain</span> (from which stress is calculated) is reduced to uncomplicated time-of-flight measurements.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARJ32004F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARJ32004F"><span>Charge and <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Control of Interface Magnetism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Dumesnil, K.; Jaouen, N.; Maroutian, T.; Agnus, G.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Kirby, B.; Fohtung, E.; Holladay, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O.; Sinha, S. K.; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Jia, Q. X.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We studied the influence of an electric field applied to an La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer in a LSMO/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3 (PZT)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STO) heterostructure by measuring its magnetization depth profile using resonant x-ray magnetic reflectivity. The saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetically-ordered LSMO was not affected by the direction of the polarization of the PZT. However, the ferromagnetic thickness and magnetization of the LSMO film at remanence were reduced for hole-charge accumulation at the LSMO/PZT interface. To understand the independent roles of <span class="hlt">strain</span> and hole-doping, we performed neutron scattering experiments of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 films grown on Nb-doped STO in which bending <span class="hlt">strain</span> (via 4-point bending jig) or electric field (via parallel plate capacitor) was applied to the films. We observed that bending <span class="hlt">strain</span> affects the saturation magnetization of the LSMO film, whereas electric field affects the remanent magnetization of the film. These observations suggest <span class="hlt">strain</span> may be a more effective means to control magnetism than charge. This work has benefited from use of CINT(LANL), NIST Center for Neutron Research and the Synchrotron SOLEIL and funding from LANL/LDRD program, DOE-BES (UCSD) and DOD (NMSU).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050111538','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050111538"><span>Comparison of Fiber Optic <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Demodulation Implementations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>NASA Langley Research Center is developing instrumentation based upon principles of Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) for the provision of large-scale, dense distribution of <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors using fiber optics embedded with Bragg gratings. Fiber Optic Bragg Grating technology enables the distribution of thousands of sensors immune to moisture and electromagnetic interference with negligible weight penalty. At Langley, this technology provides a key component for research and development relevant to comprehensive aerospace vehicle structural health monitoring. A prototype system is under development that includes hardware and software necessary for the acquisition of data from an optical network and conversion of the data into <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements. This report documents the steps taken to verify the software that implements the algorithm for calculating the fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Brief descriptions of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurement system and the test article are given. The scope of this report is the verification of software implementations as compared to a reference model. The algorithm will be detailed along with comparison results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=merton&pg=2&id=EJ762245','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=merton&pg=2&id=EJ762245"><span>Role <span class="hlt">Strain</span> in University Research Centers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boardman, Craig; Bozeman, Barry</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>One way in which university faculty members' professional lives have become more complex with the advent of contemporary university research centers is that many faculty have taken on additional roles. The authors' concern in this article is to determine the extent to which role <span class="hlt">strain</span> is experienced by university faculty members who are…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARH25009R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARH25009R"><span>High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Behavior of Nanoporous Tantalum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruestes, Carlos J.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Stukowski, Alexander; Rodriguez Nieva, Joaquin F.; Bertolino, Graciela; Tang, Yizhe; Meyers, Marc A.</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Nano-scale failure under extreme conditions is not well understood. In addition to porosity arising from mechanical failure at high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates, porous structures also develop due to radiation damage. Therefore, understanding the role of porosity on mechanical behavior is important for the assessment and development of materials like metallic foams, and materials for new fission and fusion reactors, with improved mechanical properties. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a Tantalum (a model body-centered cubic metal) crystal with a collection of nanovoids under compression. The effects of high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, ranging from 10^7s-1 to 10^10s-1, on the stress <span class="hlt">strain</span> curve and on dislocation activity are examined. We find massive total dislocation densities, and estimate a much lower density of mobile dislocations, due to the formation of junctions. Despite the large stress and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, we do not observe twin formation, since nanopores are effective dislocation production sources. A significant fraction of dislocations survive unloading, unlike what happens in fcc metals, and future experiments might be able to study similar recovered samples and find clues to their plastic behavior during loading.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017TDM.....4b5041N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017TDM.....4b5041N"><span>Optical Hall effect in <span class="hlt">strained</span> graphene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nguyen, V. Hung; Lherbier, A.; Charlier, J.-C.</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>When passing an optical medium in the presence of a magnetic field, the polarization of light can be rotated either when reflected at the surface (Kerr effect) or when transmitted through the material (Faraday rotation). This phenomenon is a direct consequence of the optical Hall effect arising from the light-charge carrier interaction in solid state systems subjected to an external magnetic field, in analogy with the conventional Hall effect. The optical Hall effect has been explored in many thin films and also more recently in 2D layered materials. Here, an alternative approach based on <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering is proposed to achieve an optical Hall conductivity in graphene without magnetic field. Indeed, <span class="hlt">strain</span> induces lattice symmetry breaking and hence can result in a finite optical Hall conductivity. First-principles calculations also predict this <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced optical Hall effect in other 2D materials. Combining with the possibility of tuning the light energy and polarization, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> amplitude and direction, and the nature of the optical medium, large ranges of positive and negative optical Hall conductivities are predicted, thus opening the way to use these atomistic thin materials in novel specific opto-electro-mechanical devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...118l3904D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...118l3904D"><span>High <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate magnetoelasticity in Galfenol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Domann, J. P.; Loeffler, C. M.; Martin, B. E.; Carman, G. P.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>This paper presents the experimental measurements of a highly magnetoelastic material (Galfenol) under impact loading. A Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar was used to generate compressive stress up to 275 MPa at <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates of either 20/s or 33/s while measuring the stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> response and change in magnetic flux density due to magnetoelastic coupling. The average Young's modulus (44.85 GPa) was invariant to <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, with instantaneous stiffness ranging from 25 to 55 GPa. A lumped parameters model simulated the measured pickup coil voltages in response to an applied stress pulse. Fitting the model to the experimental data provided the average piezomagnetic coefficient and relative permeability as functions of field strength. The model suggests magnetoelastic coupling is primarily insensitive to <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates as high as 33/s. Additionally, the lumped parameters model was used to investigate magnetoelastic transducers as potential pulsed power sources. Results show that Galfenol can generate large quantities of instantaneous power (80 MW/m3 ), comparable to explosively driven ferromagnetic pulse generators (500 MW/m3 ). However, this process is much more efficient and can be cyclically carried out in the linear elastic range of the material, in stark contrast with explosively driven pulsed power generators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..845..809J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..845..809J"><span>High <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Response of an Elastomer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiao, Tong; Clifton, Rodney J.; Grunschel, Stephen E.</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are used to study the nonlinear dynamic response of an elastomer at shearing rates of 105 - 106 s-1. Samples with thicknesses in the range 100 μm - 400 μm are cast between two hard steel plates. Because of the comparatively low impedance of the elastomer, longitudinal waves reverberating through the thickness of the sample — and recorded with a laser interferometer — are used to determine the isentrope of the material under uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> compression. Once the sample is fully compressed a shear wave arrives and imposes a simple shearing deformation. From the transverse velocity, measured interferometrically at the rear surface of the sandwich target, the shear stress and the transverse velocity at the rear surface of the sample are determined. These measurements provide an indication of the shearing resistance of the material under pressure. When the longitudinal unloading wave arrives from the rear surface of the target, these same measurements provide an indication of the shearing resistance of the material at zero pressure. Because the sample adheres to the bounding plates the reflection of unloading waves from both the rear surface of the flyer and the rear surface of the target allows the sample to be <span class="hlt">strained</span> in uniaxial extension. Thus, from a single experiment, one obtains the response of the elastomer in uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> compression, simple shear and uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> extension.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=270866','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=270866"><span>Genome sequence of Haemophilus parasuis <span class="hlt">strain</span> 29755</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Haemophilus parasuis is a member of the family Pasteurellaceae and is the etiologic agent of Glasser's disease in pigs, a systemic syndrome associated with only a subset of isolates. The genetic basis for virulence and systemic spread of particular H. parasuis isolates is currently unknown. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> 2...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860019919','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860019919"><span>Silicon ribbon stress/<span class="hlt">strain</span> workshop</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Leipold, M. H.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Highlights of the Flat Plate Solar Array Project sponsored Silicon Ribbon Stress/<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Workshop that was held 23 to 24 January 1985 are reported. The presentations and discussions were aimed at acquiring a generic understanding of the sources of stress, deformation, and structural characteristics occurring during the growth of silicon ribbon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17786125','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17786125"><span>Job <span class="hlt">strain</span> and risk of breast cancer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuper, Hannah; Yang, Ling; Theorell, Tores; Weiderpass, Elisabete</p> <p>2007-11-01</p> <p>Cohort studies investigating the association between stress and breast cancer have shown highly inconsistent results. The Women's Lifestyle and Health Cohort Study included 36,332 Swedish women age 30-50 years who were employed at baseline (1991-1992). Participants were followed through December 2004 using linkages to national registries. A total of 767 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up. Among women working full-time, low job control and high job demands were weakly associated with breast cancer risk (hazard ratios of 1.2; 95% CI = 1.0-1.5). Women with both low job control and high job demands ("job <span class="hlt">strain</span>") had higher risk of breast cancer than women with high job control and low demands ("low <span class="hlt">strain</span>") (1.2; 0.9-1.6). Multivariate adjustment slightly strengthened the association between breast cancer and job <span class="hlt">strain</span> (1.4; 1.1-1.9), whereas the associations with control and demands were unchanged. Work characteristics were unrelated to breast cancer risk among women working part-time. There was a small increased risk of breast cancer among women in full-time employment who experienced job <span class="hlt">strain</span>, but not among part-time workers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EPJWC..2602006G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EPJWC..2602006G"><span>High <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate on the mechanical properties. High <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23385407','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23385407"><span>Thermal <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis of optic fiber sensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying</p> <p>2013-01-31</p> <p>An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal <span class="hlt">strain</span> and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal <span class="hlt">strain</span> and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045489','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045489"><span>Genomic comparison of Kingella kingae <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Rouli, Laetitia; El Karkouri, Khalid; Nguyen, Thi-Tien; Yagupsky, Pablo; Raoult, Didier</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Kingella kingae is a betaproteobacterium from the order Neisseriales, and it is an agent of invasive infections in children. We sequenced the genome from the septic arthritis <span class="hlt">strain</span> 11220434. It is composed of a 1,990,794-bp chromosome but no plasmid, and it contains 2,042 protein-coding genes and 52 RNA genes, including 3 rRNA genes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030015756','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030015756"><span>Simple Numerical Simulation of <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tai, H.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>By adopting the basic principle of the reflection (and transmission) of a plane polarized electromagnetic wave incident normal to a stack of films of alternating refractive index, a simple numerical code was written to simulate the maximum reflectivity (transmittivity) of a fiber optic Bragg grating corresponding to various non-uniform <span class="hlt">strain</span> conditions including photo-elastic effect in certain cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506805','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506805"><span>Quality Control On <span class="hlt">Strained</span> Semiconductor Devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia</p> <p>2010-11-24</p> <p>New semiconductor devices are based very often on <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon which promises to squeeze more device performance out of current devices. With <span class="hlt">strained</span> silicon it is possible to get the same device performance using less power. The technique is using <span class="hlt">strain</span> as a 'design element' for silicon to improve the device performance and has become a hot topic in semiconductor research in the past years. However in the same time topics like 'System in Package'(SiP) on thin wafers are getting more and more important. The chips of thin wafers in advanced packaging are extremely sensitive to induced stresses due to packaging issues. If we are using now <span class="hlt">strain</span> as a design element for improving device performance we increase the sensitivity again and therefore also the risk of aging of such SiP's. High Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) techniques such as Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) are therefore very powerful tools to study the stresses in packaged devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300283','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300283"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> engineering of Dirac cones in graphyne</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Gaoxue; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Si, Mingsu</p> <p>2014-05-26</p> <p>6,6,12-graphyne, one of the two-dimensional carbon allotropes with the rectangular lattice structure, has two kinds of non-equivalent anisotropic Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone. We show that Dirac cones can be tuned independently by the uniaxial compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> applied to graphyne, which induces n-type and p-type self-doping effect, by shifting the energy of the Dirac cones in the opposite directions. On the other hand, application of the tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span> results into a transition from gapless to finite gap system for the monolayer. For the AB-stacked bilayer, the results predict tunability of Dirac-cones by in-plane <span class="hlt">strains</span> as well as the <span class="hlt">strain</span> applied perpendicular to the plane. The group velocities of the Dirac cones show enhancement in the resistance anisotropy for bilayer relative to the case of monolayer. Such tunable and direction-dependent electronic properties predicted for 6,6,12-graphyne make it to be competitive for the next-generation electronic devices at nanoscale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/437675','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/437675"><span>Characterizing large <span class="hlt">strain</span> crush response of redwood</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cramer, S.M.; Hermanson, J.C.; McMurtry, W.M.</p> <p>1996-12-01</p> <p>Containers for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials incorporate redwood in impact limiters. Redwood is an excellent energy absorber, but only the most rudimentary information exists on its crush properties. The objectives of the study were to fill the information gap by collecting triaxial load-deformation data for redwood; to use these data to characterize redwood crush, assess current wood failure theories, provide developments toward a complete stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> theory for redwood; and to review the literature on <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate effects on redwood crush performance. The load-deformation responses of redwood at temperature conditions corresponding to ambient (70{degrees}F), 150{degrees}F, and {minus}20{degrees}F conditions were measured in approximately 100 confined compression tests for crush levels leading to material densification. Data analysis provided a more complete description of redwood crush performance and a basis for assessing proposed general orthotropic stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships for redwood. A review of existing literature indicated that <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate effects cause at most a 20 percent increase in crush stress parallel to grain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MeScT..26e5103W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MeScT..26e5103W"><span>Network of flexible capacitive <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges for the reconstruction of surface <span class="hlt">strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wu, Jingzhe; Song, Chunhui; Saleem, Hussam S.; Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Monitoring of surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> on mesosurfaces is a difficult task, often impeded by the lack of scalability of conventional sensing systems. A solution is to deploy large networks of flexible <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauges, a type of large area electronics. The authors have recently proposed a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) as an economical skin-type solution for large-scale deployment onto mesosurfaces. The sensing principle is based on a measurable change in the sensor’s capacitance upon <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In this paper, we study the performance of the sensor at reconstructing surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> map and deflection shapes. A particular feature of the sensor is that it measures surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> additively, because it is not utilized within a Wheatstone bridge configuration. An algorithm is proposed to decompose the additive in-plane <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements from the SEC into principal components. The algorithm consists of assuming a polynomial shape function, and deriving the <span class="hlt">strain</span> based on Kirchhoff plate theory. A least-squares estimator (LSE) is used to minimize the error between the assumed model and the SEC signals after the enforcement of boundary conditions. Numerical simulations are conducted on a symmetric rectangular cantilever thin plate under symmetric and asymmetric static loads to demonstrate the accuracy and real-time applicability of the algorithm. The performance of the algorithm is further examined on an asymmetric cantilever laminated thin plate constituted with orthotropic materials mimicking a wind turbine blade, and subjected to a non-stationary wind load. Results from simulations show good performance of the algorithm at reconstructing the surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> maps for both in-plane principal <span class="hlt">strain</span> components, and that it can be applied in real time. However, its performance can be improved by strengthening assumptions on boundary conditions. The algorithm exhibits robustness in performance with respect to load and noise in signals, except when most of the sensors’ signals are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22043083','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22043083"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Hardening and <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L</p> <p>2011-09-27</p> <p>The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by adding bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 1450 s(-1)), whereas <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 17 s(-1)). The mechanism of <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is attributed primarily to a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at <span class="hlt">strains</span> approaching network fracture. The divergent <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5228237','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5228237"><span>Identification of <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-Specific Sequences That Distinguish a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine <span class="hlt">Strain</span> from Field Isolates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ricketts, Camir; Pickler, Larissa; Maurer, John; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; García, Maricarmen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Despite attempts to control avian mycoplasmosis through management, vaccination, and surveillance, Mycoplasma gallisepticum continues to cause significant morbidity, mortality, and economic losses in poultry production. Live attenuated vaccines are commonly used in the poultry industry to control avian mycoplasmosis; unfortunately, some vaccines may revert to virulence and vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> are generally difficult to distinguish from natural field isolates. In order to identify genome differences among vaccine revertants, vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and field isolates, whole-genome sequencing of the M. gallisepticum vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> ts-11 and several “ts-11-like” <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from commercial flocks was performed using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing and the sequenced genomes compared to the M. gallisepticum Rlow reference genome. The collective contigs for each <span class="hlt">strain</span> were annotated using the fully annotated Mycoplasma reference genome. The analysis revealed genetic differences among vlhA alleles, as well as among genes annotated as coding for a cell wall surface anchor protein (mg0377) and a hypothetical protein gene, mg0359, unique to M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span>. PCR protocols were designed to target 5 sequences unique to the M. gallisepticum ts-11 <span class="hlt">strain</span>: vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.04b, vlhA3.05, mg0377, and mg0359. All ts-11 isolates were positive for the five gene alleles tested by PCR; however, 5 to 36% of field isolates were also positive for at least one of the alleles tested. A combination of PCR tests for vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.05, and mg0359 was able to distinguish the M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> from field isolates. This method will further supplement current approaches to quickly distinguish M. gallisepticum vaccine <span class="hlt">strains</span> from field isolates. PMID:27847370</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3203206','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3203206"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Hardening and <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by adding bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (kd ∼ 1450 s−1), whereas <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (kd ∼ 17 s−1). The mechanism of <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is attributed primarily to a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at <span class="hlt">strains</span> approaching network fracture. The divergent <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system. PMID:22043083</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160011958','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160011958"><span>Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured <span class="hlt">Strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pak, Chan-Gi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured <span class="hlt">strain</span> data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady <span class="hlt">strain</span> using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and <span class="hlt">strains</span> are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured <span class="hlt">strains</span>, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady <span class="hlt">strain</span> data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed <span class="hlt">strain</span> data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhST..114...22W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhST..114...22W"><span>Silicon Germanium <span class="hlt">Strained</span> Layers and Heterostructures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Jain, S. C.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The integration of <span class="hlt">strained</span>-Si1 xGex into Si technology has enhanced the performance and extended the functionality of Si based circuits. The improvement of device performance is observed in both AC as well as DC characteristics of these devices. The category of such devices includes field effect as well as bipolar families. Speed performance in some based circuits has reached limits previously dominated by III-V heterostructures based devices. In addition, for some optoelectronics applications including photodetectors it is now possible to easily integrate <span class="hlt">strained</span>-Si1 xGex based optical devices into standard Silicon technology. The impact of integrating <span class="hlt">strained</span> and relaxed Si1 xGex alloys into Si technology is important. It has lead to stimulate Si research as well as offers easy options for performances that requires very complicated and costly process if pure Si has to be used. In this paper we start by discussing the <span class="hlt">strain</span> and stability of Si1 xGex alloys. The origin and the process responsible for transient enhanced diffusion (TED) in highly doped Si containing layers will be mentioned. Due to the importance of TED for thin highly doped Boron <span class="hlt">strained</span>-Si1 xGex layers and its degrading consequences, possible suppression design methods will be presented. Quantum well pchannel MOSFETs (QW-PMOSFETs) based on thin buried QW are solution to the low speed and weak current derivability. Different aspects of designing these devices for a better performance are briefly reviewed. Other FETs based on tensile <span class="hlt">strained</span> Si on relaxed Si1 xGex for n-channel and modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFETs) showed excellent performance. Record AC performance well above 200GHz for fmax is already observed and this record is expected to increase in the coming years. Heterojunction bipolar transistors (HPTs) with thin <span class="hlt">strained</span>-Si1 xGex highly doped base have lead to optimize the performance of the bipolar technology for many applications easily. The strategies of design</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5244430','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5244430"><span>Novel Human Intervertebral Disc <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Template to Quantify Regional Three-Dimensional <span class="hlt">Strains</span> in a Population and Compare to Internal <span class="hlt">Strains</span> Predicted by a Finite Element Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Showalter, Brent L.; DeLucca, John F.; Peloquin, John M.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Yoder, Jonathon H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Wright, Alexander C.; Gee, James C.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Tissue <span class="hlt">strain</span> is an important indicator of mechanical function, but is difficult to noninvasively measure in the intervertebral disc. The objective of this study was to generate a disc <span class="hlt">strain</span> template, a 3D average of disc <span class="hlt">strain</span>, of a group of human L4–L5 discs loaded in axial compression. To do so, magnetic resonance images of uncompressed discs were used to create an average disc shape. Next, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensors were calculated pixel-wise by using a previously developed registration algorithm. Individual disc <span class="hlt">strain</span> tensor components were then transformed to the template space and averaged to create the disc <span class="hlt">strain</span> template. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> template reduced individual variability while highlighting group trends. For example, higher axial and circumferential <span class="hlt">strains</span> were present in the lateral and posterolateral regions of the disc, which may lead to annular tears. This quantification of group-level trends in local 3D <span class="hlt">strain</span> is a significant step forward in the study of disc biomechanics. These trends were compared to a finite element model that had been previously validated against the disc-level mechanical response. Depending on the <span class="hlt">strain</span> component, 81–99% of the regions within the finite element model had calculated <span class="hlt">strains</span> within one standard deviation of the template <span class="hlt">strain</span> results. The template creation technique provides a new measurement technique useful for a wide range of studies, including more complex loading conditions, the effect of disc pathologies and degeneration, damage mechanisms, and design and evaluation of treatments. PMID:26694516</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992ApOpt..31.2987F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992ApOpt..31.2987F"><span>Simultaneous interferometric and polarimetric <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements on composites using a fiber-optic <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fuerstenau, N.; Schmidt, W.; Goetting, H.-C.</p> <p>1992-06-01</p> <p>A fiberoptic Michelson interferometer is used for remote sensing of the bending-induced surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> of plates made from carbon-fiber composites. The double-polarization method is used for eliminating the ambiguity of fringe counting. Simultaneous measurement of the birefringence-dependent phase offset yields an additional analog (polarimetric) signal, which allows for initialization of the incremental readout. The measured dependence of surface <span class="hlt">strain</span> on plate bending agrees with the theoretically expected linear relationship, and it agrees with the gauge sensitivity published by Valis et al. (1989). The observed hysteresis and temperature sensitivity are significantly smaller than the same effects in an electrical <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910064276&hterms=wire+resistance+temperature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dwire%2Bresistance%2Btemperature','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910064276&hterms=wire+resistance+temperature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dwire%2Bresistance%2Btemperature"><span>A resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage with repeatable apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> to 800 C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lei, J.-F.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Experimental PdCr temperature-compensated resistance static-<span class="hlt">strain</span> gages are described. The gages are developed in both fine-wire and thin-film forms. It is found that a PdCr wire <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage coated with a flame-sprayed mixture of alumina and 4 wt pct zirconia demonstrates the smallest variation in and the best repeatability of apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> among the existing gages used at temperatures up to 800 C. Results of preliminary tests indicate uncompensated uncoated thin-film gages have potential usefulness at temperatures up to 1000 C.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10323E..3EM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10323E..3EM"><span>A comparison of brazed metal and epoxied fibre Bragg grating <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors under high <span class="hlt">strain</span> regimes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mckeeman, I.; Niewczas, P.; Khan, S.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Three different fibre Bragg grating <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensors were tested for their suitability for measuring high <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The sensor types were: a bare epoxied fibre Bragg grating, a standard fibre Bragg grating epoxied into a metal capillary and, finally, a metal coated fibre Bragg grating brazed into a metal capillary. The sensors were calibrated on a steel specimen up to 1400MPa (equivalent to 7.3mɛ). The results show that the bare epoxied Bragg grating and the metal packaged grating are suitable for measuring <span class="hlt">strains</span> of this level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19038549','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19038549"><span>Biomechanical response to hamstring muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> injury.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schache, Anthony G; Wrigley, Tim V; Baker, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>Hamstring <span class="hlt">strains</span> are common injuries, the majority of which occur whilst sprinting. An understanding of the biomechanical circumstances that cause the hamstrings to fail during sprinting is required to improve rehabilitation specificity. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the biomechanics of an acute hamstring <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a sprinting athlete prior to and immediately following a right hamstring <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Ten sprinting trials were collected: nine normal (pre-injury) trials and one injury trial. Joint angles, torques and powers as well as hamstring muscle-tendon unit lengths were computed using a three-dimensional biomechanical model. For the pre-injury trials, the right leg compared to the left displayed greater knee extension and hamstring muscle-tendon unit length during terminal swing, an increased vertical ground reaction force peak and loading rate, and an increased peak hip extensor torque and peak hip power generation during initial stance. For the injury trial, significant biomechanical reactions were evident in response to the right hamstring <span class="hlt">strain</span>, most notably for the right leg during the proceeding swing phase after the onset of the injury. The earliest kinematic deviations in response to the injury were displayed by the trunk and pelvis during right mid-stance. Taking into account neuromuscular latencies and electromechanical delays, the stimulus for the injury must have occurred prior to right foot-strike during the swing phase of the sprinting cycle. It is concluded that hamstring <span class="hlt">strains</span> during sprinting most likely occur during terminal swing as a consequence of an eccentric contraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G53C..02W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G53C..02W"><span>Searching for <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Transients in PBO data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wei, M.; McGuire, J. J.; Richardson, E.; Kraft, R. L.; Hardwig, M. D.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>We applied a recently developed <span class="hlt">strain</span> anomaly detector, the Network Stain Filter [Ohtani et al., 2010], to the continuous GPS datasets from the PBO in Alaska and Salton Trough. The strategy of the filter is to find spatially and temporally coherent signals by processing data from the entire network simultaneously. Compared to previous Network Inversion Filter [Segall and Matthews, 1997], the new detector does not require the knowledge of potential sources, which can be either unknown and/or very numerous in a large tectonically active area. At Alaska, we find a <span class="hlt">strain</span> anomaly between Kodiak Island and Kenai Peninsula that began in early 2010. There are earthquakes that are likely related to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> anomaly. The physical interpretation of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> anomaly is still in progress. The secular motion since 2006 that PBO recorded is consistent with a model that consist of two locked patches on Kodiak Island and Kenai Peninsula and a creeping patch near Cook Inlet as determined earlier by Zweck et al. [2002]. Seasonal signals dominate in the data and are highly correlated between stations in the horizontal components. The reason for this correlation in seasonal term azimuths between stations is not clear. At Salton Trough, the post-seismic deformation of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor Earthquake dominates the transient signals. The maximum post-seismic slip recorded by the GPS is 23 mm during 1.5 years after the earthquake (Site ID P494). Additionally, we are exploring using InSAR data as a complimentary method for detecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> anomaly in areas with shallow sources, such as in the Salton Trough. A creep event on the Superstition Hills Fault in October 2006 has been observed by InSAR but missed by nearby GPS stations due to low amplitude at the location [Wei et al., 2009].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23575634','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23575634"><span>Unexpected <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening in crystalline solids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jiang, Chao; Srinivasan, Srivilliputhur G</p> <p>2013-04-18</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-stiffening--an increase in material stiffness at large <span class="hlt">strains</span>--is a vital mechanism by which many soft biological materials thwart excessive deformation to protect tissue integrity. Understanding the fundamental science of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening and incorporating this concept into the design of metals and ceramics for advanced applications is an attractive prospect. Using cementite (Fe3C) and aluminium borocarbide (Al3BC3) as prototypes, here we show via quantum-mechanical calculations that <span class="hlt">strain</span>-stiffening also occurs, surprisingly, in simple inorganic crystalline solids and confers exceptionally high strengths to these two solids, which have anomalously low resistance to deformation near equilibrium. For Fe3C and Al3BC3, their ideal shear strength to shear modulus ratios attain remarkably high values of 1.14 and 1.34 along the (010)[001] and slip systems, respectively. These values are more than seven times larger than the original Frenkel value of 1/2π (refs 4, 5) and are the highest yet reported for crystalline solids. The extraordinary stiffening of Fe3C arises from the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced reversible 'cross-linking' between weakly coupled edge- and corner-sharing Fe6C slabs. This new bond formation creates a strong, three-dimensional covalent bond network that resists large shear deformation. Unlike Fe3C, no new bond forms in Al3BC3 but stiffening still occurs because strong repulsion between Al and B in a compressed Al-B bond unsettles the existing covalent bond network. These discoveries challenge the conventional wisdom that large shear modulus is a reliable predictor of hardness and strength of materials, and provide new lessons for materials selection and design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJWC..9404006H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJWC..9404006H"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate effects for spallation of concrete</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Häussler-Combe, Ulrich; Panteki, Evmorfia; Kühn, Tino</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property - which can be covered by rate dependent stress <span class="hlt">strain</span> relations - or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects [3].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21185052','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21185052"><span>Colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> within saturated heterogeneous porous media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Porubcan, Alexis A; Xu, Shangping</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>The transport of 0.46 μm, 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles in heterogeneous porous media prepared from the mixing of 0.78 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.23 mm quartz sands was investigated through column transport experiments. It was observed that the 0.46 μm particles traveled conservatively within the heterogeneous porous media, suggesting that under the experimental conditions employed in this research the strong repulsive interactions between the negatively charged latex particles and the clean quartz sands led to minimal colloid immobilization due to physicochemical filtration. The immobilization of the 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles was thus attributed to colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span>. Experimental results showed that the <span class="hlt">straining</span> of colloidal particles within heterogeneous sand mixtures increased when the fraction of finer sands increased. The mathematical model that was developed and tested based on results obtained using uniform sands (Xu et al., 2006) was found to be able to describe colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> within heterogeneous porous media. Examination of the relationship between the best-fit values of the clean-bed <span class="hlt">straining</span> rate coefficients (k(0)) and the ratio of colloid diameter (d(p)) and sand grain size (d(g)) indicated that when number-average sizes were used to represent the size of the heterogeneous porous media, there existed a consistent relationship for both uniform sands and heterogeneous sand mixtures. Similarly, the use of the number-averaged sizes for the heterogeneous porous media produced a uniform relationship between the colloid <span class="hlt">straining</span> capacity term (λ) and the ratio of d(p)/d(g) for all the sand treatments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96i4109M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96i4109M"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-phonon coupling in (111)-oriented perovskite oxides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Moreau, Magnus; Marthinsen, Astrid; Selbach, Sverre M.; Tybell, Thomas</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-phonon coupling, in terms of the shift in phonon frequencies under biaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span>, is studied by density functional theory calculations for 20 perovskite oxides <span class="hlt">strained</span> in their (111) and (001) planes. While the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-phonon coupling under (001) <span class="hlt">strain</span> follows the established, intuitive trends, the response to (111) <span class="hlt">strain</span> is more complex. Here we show that <span class="hlt">strain</span>-phonon coupling under (111) <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be rationalized in terms of the Goldschmidt tolerance factor and the formal cation oxidation states. The established trends for coupling between (111) <span class="hlt">strain</span> and in-phase and out-of-phase octahedral rotational modes as well as polar modes provide guidelines for rational design of (111)-oriented perovskite thin films.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyE...94..178L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyE...94..178L"><span>Influences of misfit <span class="hlt">strains</span> on liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Yu, Genggeng; Chen, Zheng</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>Influences of misfit <span class="hlt">strains</span> with different signs on liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth are studied by binary phase field crystal model. It is amazing to find that double islands are formed because of lateral and vertical separation. The morphological evolution of epitaxial layer depends on signs of misfit <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The maximum atomic layer thickness of double islands under negative misfit <span class="hlt">strain</span> is larger than that of under positive misfit <span class="hlt">strain</span> at the same evolutional time, and size differences between light and dark islands is much smaller under negative misfit <span class="hlt">strain</span> than that of under positive misfit <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In addition, concentration field and density field approximately have similar variational law along x direction under the same misfit <span class="hlt">strain</span> but show opposite variational trend under misfit <span class="hlt">strains</span> with different signs. Generally, free energy of epitaxial growth systems keeps similar variational trend under misfit <span class="hlt">strains</span> with different signs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1532..754Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1532..754Z"><span>The evolution of <span class="hlt">strain</span> path in cold wire drawing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, Tianzhang; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Cheng, Ming; Song, Hong-Wu</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Evidence shows that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> path significantly influences the subsequent material mechanical behaviors, while the <span class="hlt">strain</span> path effect is neglected in the classical material models. In order to study the influence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> path on wire property and establish a more accurate material model that will take <span class="hlt">strain</span> path effects into consideration for improving drawn-wire production, the evolution of <span class="hlt">strain</span> path must be investigated in cold wire drawing. In this article, three typical models for the expression of <span class="hlt">strain</span> path change (SPC), which are written by <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, <span class="hlt">strain</span> and stress deviator, respectively, are discussed. Mechanisms of <span class="hlt">strain</span> path evolution in wire drawing, and the effect of die angle and reduction rate on SPC are investigated via finite element modeling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18051229','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18051229"><span>[Behavior of Argentine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> in rodents].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saavedra, María del Cármen; Ambrosio, Ana M; Riera, Laura; Sabattini, Marta S</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The activity of LCM virus was first reported in Argentina at the beginning of the seventies and only five <span class="hlt">strains</span> have been isolated from rodents Mus domesticus and two from humans. The objective of this paper was to find differential biological characteristics of Argentine <span class="hlt">strains</span> of LCM virus comparing them in relation to the historical <span class="hlt">strains</span> WE and Armstrong. Regarding the results obtained in tissue culture, when L 929 cells were used, plaque forming units (PFU) were obtained with human and mouse <span class="hlt">strains</span>, whilst on Vero cells only human <span class="hlt">strains</span> developed PFU. Differentials characteristics of historical and Argentine <span class="hlt">strain</span>'s plates were not found, neither differences related to the <span class="hlt">strain</span>'s origin. Neither historical nor Argentine <span class="hlt">strains</span> were lethal to new-born mice giving a persistent infection, that was demonstrated when we inoculated new-born mouse by intracranial route with different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of LCM virus and virus was isolated from brains harvested at different days post inoculation. The only exception was Cba An 13065 <span class="hlt">strain</span> that exhibited virulence in new-born mice, only with 0.026 PFU was obtained 1 DL50. All the <span class="hlt">strains</span> resulted lethal to adult mice. The mouse <span class="hlt">strains</span> were more virulent than human <span class="hlt">strains</span>, being Cba An 13065 the most virulent. These results demonstrate a different behavior in tissue culture between human and mouse <span class="hlt">strains</span> and allow the identification of virulence markers by intracranial inoculation into new-born or adult mice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002iaf..confE.501B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002iaf..confE.501B"><span>Spacecraft Dynamic Characterization by <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Energies Method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bretagne, J.-M.; Fragnito, M.; Massier, S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>In the last years the significant increase in satellite broadcasting demand, with the wide band communication dawn, has given a great impulse to the telecommunication satellite market. The big demand is translated from operators (such as SES/Astra, Eutelsat, Intelsat, Inmarsat, EuroSkyWay etc.) in an increase of orders of telecom satellite to the world industrials. The largest part of these telecom satellite orders consists of Geostationary platforms which grow more and more in mass (over 5 tons) due to an ever longer demanded lifetime (up to 20 years), and become more complex due to the need of implementing an ever larger number of repeaters, antenna reflectors and feeds, etc... In this frame, the mechanical design and verification of these large spacecraft become difficult and ambitious at the same time, driven by the dry mass limitation objective. By the Finite Element Method (FEM), and on the basis of the telecom satellite heritage of a world leader constructor such as Alcatel Space Industries it is nowadays possible to model these spacecraft in a realistic and confident way in order to identify the main global dynamic aspects such as mode shapes, mass participation and/or dynamic responses. But on the other hand, one of the main aims consists in identifying soon in a program the most critical aspects of the system behavior in the launch dynamic environment, such as possible dynamic coupling between the different subsystems and secondary structures of the spacecraft (large deployable reflectors, thrusters, etc.). To this aim a numerical method has been developed in the frame of the Alcatel SPACEBUS family program, using MSC/Nastran capabilities and it is presented in this paper. The method is based on Spacecraft sub-structuring and <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy calculation. The method mainly consists of two steps : 1) subsystem modal <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy ratio (with respect to the global <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy); 2) subsystem <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy calculation for each mode according to the base driven</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24582508','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24582508"><span>Development of quantitative PCR and metagenomics-based approaches for <span class="hlt">strain</span> quantification of a defined mixed-<span class="hlt">strain</span> starter culture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johansen, Pernille; Vindeløv, Jannik; Arneborg, Nils; Brockmann, Elke</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Although the <span class="hlt">strain</span> composition of mixed cultures may hugely affect production of various fermented foods, such as e.g. cheese, tools for investigating it have so far been limited. In this study, two new approaches for quantification of seven Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris <span class="hlt">strains</span> (S1-S7) in a defined mixed-<span class="hlt">strain</span> starter culture were developed and verified. By mapping NGS reads from 47 sequenced L. lactis <span class="hlt">strains</span> to de novo assembly contigs of the seven <span class="hlt">strains</span>, two <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sequence regions (SEQ1 and SEQ2) were identified for each <span class="hlt">strain</span> for qPCR primer design (A1 and A2). The qPCR assays amplified their <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sequence region target efficiently. Additionally, high reproducibility was obtained in a validation sample containing equal amounts of the seven <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and assay-to-assay coefficients of variance (CVs) for six (i.e. S1, S2, S4-S7) of the seven <span class="hlt">strains</span> correlated to the inter-plate CVs. Hence, at least for six <span class="hlt">strains</span>, the qPCR assay design approach was successful. The metagenomics-based approach quantified the seven <span class="hlt">strains</span> based on average coverage of SEQ1 and SEQ2 by mapping sequencing reads from the validation sample to the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sequence regions. Average coverages of the SEQ1 and SEQ2 in the metagenomics data showed CVs of ≤17.3% for six <span class="hlt">strains</span> (i.e. S1-S4, S6, S7). Thus, the metagenomics-based quantification approach was considered successful for six <span class="hlt">strains</span>, regardless of the <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sequence region used. When comparing qPCR- and metagenomics-based quantifications of the validation sample, the identified <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific sequence regions were considered suitable and applicable for quantification at a <span class="hlt">strain</span> level of defined mixed-<span class="hlt">strain</span> starter cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26968547','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26968547"><span>The influence of acute unloading on left ventricular <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate by speckle tracking echocardiography in a porcine model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dahle, Geir Olav; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil</p> <p>2016-05-15</p> <p>Noninvasive measurements of myocardial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate by speckle tracking echocardiography correlate to cardiac contractile state but also to load, which may weaken their value as indices of inotropy. In a porcine model, we investigated the influence of acute dynamic preload reductions on left ventricular <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate and their relation to the pressure-conductance catheter-derived preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LV-dP/dtmax). Speckle tracking <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate in the longitudinal, circumferential, and radial directions were measured during acute dynamic reductions of end-diastolic volume during three different myocardial inotropic states. Both <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate were sensitive to unloading of the left ventricle (P < 0.001), but the load dependency for <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate was modest compared with <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Changes in longitudinal and circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> correlated more strongly to changes in end-diastolic volume (r = -0.86 and r = -0.72) than did radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> (r = 0.35). Longitudinal, circumferential, and radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> significantly correlated with LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.53, r = -0.46, and r = 0.86), whereas only radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> correlated with PRSW (r = 0.55). <span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate in the longitudinal, circumferential and radial direction significantly correlated with both PRSW (r = -0.64, r = -0.58, and r = 0.74) and LV-dP/dtmax (r = -0.95, r = -0.70, and r = 0.85). In conclusion, the speckle tracking echocardiography-derived <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is more robust to dynamic ventricular unloading than <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Longitudinal and circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span> could not predict load-independent contractility. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> rates, and especially in the radial direction, are good predictors of preload-independent inotropic markers derived from conductance catheter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27746773','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27746773"><span>Brucella abortus <span class="hlt">Strain</span> 2308 Wisconsin Genome: Importance of the Definition of Reference <span class="hlt">Strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Castillo-Zeledón, Amanda; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Roop Ii, R Martin; Comerci, Diego J; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Caswell, Clayton C; Baker, Kate S; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R; Moreno, Edgardo; Letesson, Jean J; De Bolle, Xavier; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Brucellosis is a bacterial infectious disease affecting a wide range of mammals and a neglected zoonosis caused by species of the genetically homogenous genus Brucella. As in most studies on bacterial diseases, research in brucellosis is carried out by using reference <span class="hlt">strains</span> as canonical models to understand the mechanisms underlying host pathogen interactions. We performed whole genome sequencing analysis of the reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> B. abortus 2308 routinely used in our laboratory, including manual curated annotation accessible as an editable version through a link at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucella#Genomics. Comparison of this genome with two publically available 2308 genomes showed significant differences, particularly indels related to insertional elements, suggesting variability related to the transposition of these elements within the same <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Considering the outcome of high resolution genomic techniques in the bacteriology field, the conventional concept of <span class="hlt">strain</span> definition needs to be revised.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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