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Sample records for aureus abscess case

  1. Spinal Subdural Staphylococcus Aureus Abscess: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitris; Aretha, Diamanto; Fligou, Fotini; Filos, Kriton S

    2009-01-01

    Background Only 65 cases (including our case) of spinal subdural abscesses have been reported to the literature, mostly to the lumbar spine. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial. The symptoms are not caracteristic and contrast – enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) is the imaging method of choice. The early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis of the patient. Case presentation We present a patient 75 years old who had a history of diabetes and suffered acute low back pain in the region of the lumbar spine for the last 4 days before his admission to the hospital. He also experienced lower leg weakness, fever and neck stiffness. After having a brain CT scan and a lumbar puncture the patient hospitalized with the diagnosis of meningitis. Five days after his admission the diagnosis of subdural abscess secured with contrast – enhanced MRI but meanwhile the condition of the patient impaired with respiratory failure and quadriplegia and he was admitted to the ICU. A laminectomy was performed eight days after his admission into the hospital but unfortunately the patient died. Conclusion Early diagnosis and treatment are very important for the good outcome in patients with subdural abscess. Although morbidity and mortality are very high, surgical and antibiotic treatment should be established as soon as possible after the diagnosis has secured. PMID:19660120

  2. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus abscesses.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of human infections and syndromes-most notably skin and soft tissue infections. Abscesses are a frequent manifestation of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections and are formed, in part, to contain the nidus of infection. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are the primary cellular host defense against S. aureus infections and a major component of S. aureus abscesses. These host cells contain and produce many antimicrobial agents that are effective at killing bacteria, but can also cause non-specific damage to host tissues and contribute to the formation of abscesses. By comparison, S. aureus produces several molecules that also contribute to the formation of abscesses. Such molecules include those that recruit neutrophils, cause host cell lysis, and are involved in the formation of the fibrin capsule surrounding the abscess. Herein, we review our current knowledge of the mechanisms and processes underlying the formation of S. aureus abscesses, including the involvement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and provide a brief overview of therapeutic approaches.

  3. Fever with intradialytic pelvic pain: a case of iliopsoas abscess complicated with Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus bacteraemia in an end stage renal failure patient.

    PubMed

    Alif Adlan, M T; Wan Mohd Rasis, W A K; Mohd Ramadhan, M D

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus Aureus is a Gram-positive cocci bacteria which had been found to be the causative organism in over 88% of patients with primary iliopsoas abscess. We report the case of a 53-year-old diabetic woman with end-stage renal failure diagnosed with left iliopsoas abscess with a catheter-related infection. Computed tomogram (CT) of abdomen and pelvis revealed hypodense lesions of left psoas, iliacus and quadratus lumborum suggestive of psoas abscesses. In addition, osteomyelitis changes at left sacroiliac and hip joint were seen. At surgery, she was found to have abscess at the posterior psoas muscle where she underwent open surgery drainage and percutaneous drain was inserted. A high index of suspicion of iliopsoas abscess should be maintained among haemodialysis patients presenting with intradialytic pelvic and hip pain and treated with optimal antibiotics therapy with appropriate surgical intervention.

  4. Community acquired Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus cerebral abscess in an 11-month old boy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mutale, Wilbroad; Sahay, Keya M; Hartley, John; Thompson, Dominic; Ratnasinghe, Didi; Hudson, Lee; Hulse, Eleanor; Fellows, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Brain abscess are uncommon childhood infection. Brain abscess caused by Panton-Valentine Leukocidin positive Community acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus have never been reported in the United Kingdom. We report a case of a previously well 11-month old boy of Indian origin who developed a parietal lobe abscess from PVL positive CA-MRSA. This case is one of the few described cases of brain abscess caused by PVL CA-MRSA in children. The unusual (insidious) presentation, the absence of a clear staphylococcal focus and the unexpected finding of a CA-MRSA in this patient highlight the challenges of managing such cases in clinical settings and the potential future risk to public health.

  5. First Reported Case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vertebral Osteomyelitis with Multiple Spinal and Paraspinal Abscesses Associated with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Singh Lubana, Sandeep; Alfishawy, Mostafa; Singh, Navdeep; Brennessel, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the oldest medical procedures in the world and originated in China about 2,000 years ago. Acupuncture is a form of complementary medicine and has gained popularity worldwide in the last few decades. It is mainly used for the treatment of chronic pain. Acupuncture is usually considered a safe procedure but has been reported to cause serious complications including death. It has been associated with transmission of many viruses and bacteria. Two cases of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus have been reported recently following acupuncture therapy. We are reporting a case of a 57-year-old Korean female who developed vertebral osteomyelitis and intraspinal and paraspinal abscesses as a complication of acupuncture. Blood cultures, skin lesion culture, and body fluid culture yielded Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Good anatomical and medical knowledge, good hygiene standards, and proper acupuncture techniques should be followed to prevent the complications. Acupuncturists should consistently review the infection control guidelines to acupuncture. This case should raise awareness of such condition and hazards of presumably benign procedures such as acupuncture. PMID:26257786

  6. Resection of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus liver abscess in a patient with Crohn’s disease under infliximab treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A liver abscess in Crohn’s disease is a rare but important entity that is associated with a poor prognosis and high mortality when treatment is delayed. We report a case of successful liver segmentectomy for a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus liver abscess in a patient with Crohn’s disease under infliximab treatment. Case presentation A 31-year-old Japanese man, who had been treated with infliximab infusions for Crohn’s disease, was referred to our hospital presenting with an abrupt onset of high fever and an elevated white blood cell count and serum C-reactive protein level. Computed tomography revealed a liver abscess occupying segment 8. The limited effect of percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage and antibiotics led us to perform radical resection of the abscess. The patient recovered quickly after surgery and the postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion The present case suggests that surgical removal of an abscess should be considered for patients under immunosuppression or refractory to conventional treatment. PMID:23374532

  7. Neck abscess: 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Demirhan, Erhan; Kozcu, Sureyya Hikmet; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neck abscess is a disease that might cause mortality and severe morbidity, if it is not treated urgently. In our study, patients with diagnosis of neck abscess in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively and presented in the light of the literature. METHODS: In our clinic, age distribution, source of infection, systemic disease, imaging methods that were used in diagnosis, preferred anaesthesia during drainage, abscess sites, culture results of abscess material, complications during treatment procedure, any antibiotherapy before admission and duration of hospitalization of 79 cases with neck abscess who were treated in the hospital between January 2008 and January 2015 were assessed. RESULTS: Cases in our study were aged between 1–79 (mean 28.3) years and 43 of them were female and 36 were male patients. Systemic diseases were determined in 19 of the cases. The most common systemic disease was diabetes mellitus. Abscesses were localized mostly at peritonsillar region and 13 of the cases were operated when abscess were in multipl localizations. In 74 of the cases, drainage was performed under local anaesthesia and in 5 cases under general anaesthesia. Four of these 5 cases, abscesses were localized within retropharyngeal region and 1 of them had multiple abscesses at various regions. Staphylococcus aereus was the most detected microorganism based on culture results. Three adult cases were followed up in the intensive care unit because of development of mediastinitis. One of these 3 cases exited because of sepsis. Hospitalization periods of 79 cases ranged between 2–21 days (mean 7.64 days). Hospitalization period of 19 cases with systemic diseases were 9.47 days (p<0.05) and statistically which were statistically significantly longer when compared with those without any systemic disease. CONCLUSION: Neck abscess must be diagnosed early and treated with surgical drainage and parenteral therapy because it might cause severe complications. PMID:28058371

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Machicado, Jorge D.; Davogustto, Giovanni E.; Pan, Jen-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic abscesses are usually related to gram-negative bacilli. However, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a substantial cause of prostatic abscesses in recent years. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of orthotopic liver transplantation 10 years ago who presented with acute onset dysuria and abdominal pain and was diagnosed with a MRSA prostatic abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing a prostatic abscess in a liver transplant recipient and the first reporting MRSA as the causative organism of a prostatic abscess in a solid organ transplant recipient. PMID:25389507

  9. Health and economic burden of post-partum Staphylococcus aureus breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Branch-Elliman, Westyn; Lee, Grace M; Golen, Toni H; Gold, Howard S; Baldini, Linda M; Wright, Sharon B

    2013-01-01

    To determine the health and economic burdens of post-partum Staphylococcus aureus breast abscess. We conducted a matched cohort study (N = 216) in a population of pregnant women (N = 32,770) who delivered at our center during the study period from 10/1/03-9/30/10. Data were extracted from hospital databases, or via chart review if unavailable electronically. We compared cases of S. aureus breast abscess to controls matched by delivery date to compare health services utilization and mean attributable medical costs in 2012 United States dollars using Medicare and hospital-based estimates. We also evaluated whether resource utilization and health care costs differed between cases with methicillin-resistant and -susceptible S. aureus isolates. Fifty-four cases of culture-confirmed post-partum S. aureus breast abscess were identified. Breastfeeding cessation (41%), milk fistula (11.1%) and hospital readmission (50%) occurred frequently among case patients. Breast abscess case patients had high rates of health services utilization compared to controls, including high rates of imaging and drainage procedures. The mean attributable cost of post-partum S. aureus breast abscess ranged from $2,340-$4,012, depending on the methods and data sources used. Mean attributable costs were not significantly higher among methicillin-resistant vs. -susceptible S. aureus cases. Post-partum S. aureus breast abscess is associated with worse health and economic outcomes for women and their infants, including high rates of breastfeeding cessation. Future study is needed to determine the optimal treatment and prevention of these infections.

  10. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver abscess Anorectal abscess Bartholin abscess Brain abscess Epidural abscess Peritonsillar abscess Pyogenic liver abscess Skin abscess Spinal ... Anorectal abscess Bartholin cyst or abscess Brain abscess Epidural abscess Peritonsillar abscess Pyogenic liver abscess Skin abscess Spinal ...

  11. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess Presenting as Acute Urinary Retention: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Naboush, Ali; Abou Yassine, Ali; Yasmin, Mohamad; Mobarakai, Neville

    2013-01-01

    Background. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains have emerged as a substantial cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the healthcare system. Prostatic abscess is an uncommon disease. To date, there are only 6 published reports of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA. Case Description. A 52-year-old diabetic Caucasian presented to the emergency department with severe lower abdominal pain of few hours duration, urinary frequency, and dribbling over the last 3 weeks. Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged nontender prostate. A urine analysis showed pyuria while urine cultures grew CA-MRSA. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed multiple prostate abscesses and a thickened urinary bladder wall. A TURP was performed by the urology team and pathology showed severe acute and chronic prostatitis with abscess formation and necrotic tissue. Our treatment regimen included IV vancomycin followed by oral trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin. Eradication of CA-MRSA was confirmed by follow-up cultures 2 months following discharge. Conclusion. This case illustrates the successful identification, diagnosis, and prompt treatment of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA in a diabetic patient without recent hospitalization. Early treatment with antibiotics and transurethral resection of the prostate abscess led to a shortened hospital stay and decreased morbidity.

  12. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  13. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Seap, Bel; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis.

  14. [Brucellar spinal abscess. Case report

    PubMed

    Cecchini, L.; Coari, G.; Iagnocco, A.; Valesini, G.

    2001-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis commonly present in many areas of the world; in some Mediterranean countries it is endemic. The disease is usually transmitted to humans by ingestion of contaminated food; rarely it may be transmitted either by direct penetration through skin lesions or conjunctival mucosa or even by inhalation of aerosols. The disease may be asymptomatic, but in some occasions acute or chronic symptoms are present. Among localised forms of the disease spinal involvement is rare but it should be suspected in many Mediterranean areas where brucellosis is endemic. In particular, the extension of the brucellar abscess within the epidural space with contemporaneous muscular involvement is unusual. The authors report a case of a patient with multiple spinal brucellar abscesses of exceptional dimensions, extending in the epidural space and within paravertebral and psoas muscles and causing compression of the lumbar nerve roots. The exact localisation and extension of the abscess have been accurately defined by MRI.

  15. Management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin abscesses in children

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L; Salvadori, Marina I

    2011-01-01

    Uncomplicated skin abscesses in previously well children are typically managed with drainage alone. An increasing percentage of such abscesses are due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although definitive data are lacking, drainage alone appears to be a reasonable strategy for methicillin-resistant S aureus skin abscesses, with antibiotics reserved for infants younger than three months of age, or for children who are systemically unwell, have underlying medical problems or have significant surrounding cellulitis. PMID:22294871

  16. Prostate abscess: MRSA spreading its influence into Gram-negative territory: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Aartee; Haleblian, George; Rapose, Alwyn

    2013-03-25

    Prostate abscess is a rare complication of an ascending urinary tract infection (UTI). Its incidence has reduced secondary to routine and early use of antibiotics for treatment of UTIs. Prostate abscess has been reported in patients with uncontrolled diabetes, prolonged indwelling urinary catheters, prostate biopsy or other instrumentation of lower urinary tract. Prostate abscess is most commonly associated with Gram-negative bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is rarely implicated and has been reported in patients with underlying risk factors like long-term or uncontrolled diabetes, intravenous drug abuse or bacteraemia. We present a rare case of prostate abscess due to methicillin resistant S aureus without obvious risk factors.

  17. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or another staph infection, follow instructions for self-care at home.

  18. [Retrospective evaluation of 15 cases with psoas abscesses].

    PubMed

    Turunç, Tahsin; Turunç, Tuba; Demiroğlu, Y Ziya; Colakoğlu, Sule

    2009-01-01

    Psoas abscesses are suppurative collections within the fascia surrounding the psoas and iliacus muscles. In this retrospective study it was aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings and treatment outcomes of 15 psoas abscess cases admitted to Baskent University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey during June 2003-January 2008 period. The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years (range 18 to 70 years) with a female to male ratio of 5/10. Thirteen of the cases (86.5%) were admitted with the complaints of fever and back pain. Thirteen of the cases were diagnosed by abdominal computerized tomography while the other two by abdominal ultrasonography. One of the 15 patients was considered as primary psoas abscess, while the remaining 14 as secondary psoas abscess. The most common accompanying disease was diabetes mellitus (66.6%). Fourteen patients with secondary psoas abscess had vertebral osteomyelitis which was due to tuberculosis in five cases, to urinary tract infection in five cases, to pneumoniae in two cases, to surgical infection in one case and to brucellosis in one case. The cultivation of the abscess material from the 14 secondary psoas abscess cases revealed growth of bacteria in 11 of them (5 Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1 Escherichia coli, 1 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, 1 methicilin-resistant S. aureus, 1 Acinetobacter baumannii, 1 Brucella melitensis, 1 Serratia marcescens). The biochemical parameters of the cases (mean leukocyte counts: 14.500 cell/mm3; mean erythrocyte sedimentation rates: 78 mm/hour; mean C-reactive protein levels: 108 mg/dl) were also high. Thirteen patients underwent percutaneous drainage and received appropriate antibiotic treatment and the other two patients were treated with open surgical debridement. The duration of antimicrobial treatment was one year for M. tuberculosis cases and about 4-6 weeks in the others. One of the cases died due to complicating meningitis and sepsis. It is

  19. A Case Of Atypical Presentation of Thoracic Osteomyelitis & Paraspinal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Utkarsh

    2008-01-01

    Here presented is a case involving a 44-year-old man with a chief complaint of sharp lateral right-sided rib pain with notable radiation to the anterior portion of the thorax and minor radiation around the lateral back. The etiology of the pain and radiculopathy, which was initially attributed to a right-sided rib fracture, was later accurately credited to a paraspinal abscess discovered on a lateral X-ray of the thoracic spine. Subsequently, studies including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and bone scan all confirmed the diagnosis of a paraspinal abscess between the right lobe and its neighboring T9 and T10 vertebrae. The mass was biopsied and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Appropriate surgical and medical intervention was possible due to the early diagnosis of the abscess. PMID:19148317

  20. [Iliopsoas abscess accompanied by epidural abscess--a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushige, Tetsushi; Sano, Tomomi; Yamada, Sinichi; Ueda, Sawako; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2003-09-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to a hospital with pain of the low back as well as the left leg, and fever. He was suspected of suffering from the lumbar disc herniation because of the presence of Lasegue's sign on the first physical examination. Abdominal computed tomography, however, revealed the swelling of the left iliopsoas muscle. Iliopsoas abscess accompanied epidural abscess was confirmed by subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibiotic therapy was started for the successive 8 days. The fever resolved, but the pain persisted. The abscess extending from the iliopsoas muscle to the epidural space was still seen on the MRI 20 days after the completion of the antibiotic therapy, and he still complained of the pain of his low back and left leg. Therefore, we conducted epidural puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. Approximately 3 ml of pus was aspirated from the epidural space. Then, his complains decreased remarkably. Iliopsoas abscess should be taken into account in case of a patient with pain on the low back and leg and also inflammatory signs such as fever and leucocytosis.

  1. Paediatric Iliopsoas abscess: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Carla

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. The clinical presentation is variable and may be confused with other conditions such as septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and appendicular abscess. A suspicion of iliopsoas abscess requires a prompt diagnosis so that rapid management and treatment can be undertaken. Discussion: This case describes the presence of an iliopsoas abscess in a paediatric patient presenting to the emergency department within a rural community. Due to the variability in clinical presentation imaging studies are necessary to distinguish an iliopsoas abscess from other inflammatory processes. Ultrasound is often the modality of choice. Imaging guided percutaneous drainage and/or aspiration and the administration of intravenous antibiotics are minimally invasive modern techniques providing a safe treatment options in the presence of an iliopsoas abscess. Conclusion: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. Due to the variability in clinical presentation, imaging, and in particular, ultrasound play a vital role in the diagnosis of cases with a high suspicion of abscess formation. Accurate diagnosis leads to a rapid treatment plan, avoiding further insult.

  2. Effects of Neutrophils on Cefazolin Activity and Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, David M.; Herndon, Betty L.; Fitch, Jeffrey; Florkowski, Aaron; Parkhurst, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria survive within abscesses despite antimicrobial therapy, usually necessitating drainage. Our previous work showed that bacterial killing is diminished within the neutrophils of animals with abscesses. To further assess the role of neutrophils in Staphylococcus aureus survival and the poor activities of β-lactams in abscesses, tissue cage abscess-bearing rats were given polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-depleting antibody prior to and several times following inoculation of the tissue cages with S. aureus. Cefazolin (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) was administered to all animals in appropriately divided doses. After 7 days of antimicrobial therapy, the 17 animals that received anti-PMN serum had significantly fewer abscess neutrophils than the 18 controls and fewer abscess bacteria (5.55 versus 3.79 log10 CFU/ml [P = 0.04]) than the 18 controls. The data were consistent with the premise that cefazolin is more effective in abscesses depleted of neutrophils. To investigate further, S. aureus was incubated with rat peritoneal neutrophils; and bacterial cell membrane proteins were isolated, labeled with biotinylated ampicillin, separated by electrophoresis, blotted onto nitrocellulose, and stained for biotin reactivity. PBP 2 expression was consistently and significantly decreased after a brief, nonkilling PMN exposure. These experiments showed that PMN depletion enhanced the activity of cefazolin in the abscess milieu. Furthermore, altered bacterial cell wall cefazolin targets may be the mechanism by which the PMN diminishes antimicrobial activity, suggesting the importance of the staphylococcus-PMN interaction in the outcome of established infections. PMID:12183241

  3. Utility of nasal swab and age in detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pediatric head and neck abscesses.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Benjamin D; Macias, David; Liu, Yuan F; Inman, Jared C; Dyleski, Robin A

    2017-10-01

    To identify risk factors associated with the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in surgical cultures taken from incision and drainage (I&D) of head and neck abscesses in the pediatric population. Retrospective case series. All patients under 18 years of age with a head and neck abscess requiring I&D from 2009 to 2015 were reviewed. MRSA nasal swab cultures were taken from all patients upon hospitalization. Surgical cultures were obtained from all patients and correlated with MRSA nasal swab results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed, and odds ratios (ORs) along with descriptive statistics were analyzed. Of a total of 272 patients, there were 68 (25%) MRSA-positive abscesses. The majority (86.8%) of these abscesses were in children under 2 years of age. Overall, 12 (4.4%) presented with positive admission MRSA nasal swabs. Of these, 91.7% had MRSA-positive abscess cultures. Decreasing age in years showed an OR of 1.650 (P < 0.001) for MRSA-positive abscess, with children less than 1 year old having the highest OR of 10.74 (P < 0.001). Younger age and MRSA nasal colonization were two statistically significant risk factors for developing an MRSA abscess of the head and neck. This study demonstrates a high positive predictive value for MRSA-positive neck abscesses when nasal swab screenings were MRSA-positive (91.7%). Children under 2 years of age-especially those under 1 year of age-or those with MRSA nasal colonization can be considered a high-risk population that may benefit from empiric antibiotics against MRSA for head and neck abscesses. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2407-2412, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Obturator internus muscle abscess in children: report of seven cases and review.

    PubMed

    Viani, R M; Bromberg, K; Bradley, J S

    1999-01-01

    Obturator internus muscle (OIM) abscess is an uncommon entity often mistaken for septic arthritis of the hip. We describe seven children with OIM abscess and review seven previously reported cases. The most common presenting symptoms were hip or thigh pain (14 patients), fever (13), and limp (13). The hip was flexed, abducted, and externally rotated in 11 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) were diagnostic for OIM abscess in the 14 patients. Associated abscesses were located in the obturator externus muscle (5 patients), psoas muscle (2), and iliac muscle (1). The etiologic agents were Staphylococcus aureus (8 patients), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (2), and Enterococcus faecalis (1). Three patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous drainage, and three had surgical drainage. Three patients had ischial osteomyelitis in addition to OIM abscess. The 11 children with uncomplicated OIM abscess were treated for a median of 28 days. All patients had an uneventful recovery.

  5. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area ... parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are ...

  6. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Abscess KidsHealth > For Teens > Abscess A A A What's ... and suddenly it's Pus City. What Is an Abscess? An abscess is an area of infected tissue ...

  7. [Psoas abscess and lumbar spine osteomyelitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Schmalbach, Lauwence A

    2016-10-01

    Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission. X-ray and ultrasound were performed but the diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. With positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus he completed 2 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and 4 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy with blood cultures negativization and resolution of symptoms.

  8. An experimental model for Staphylococcus aureus hepatic abscess in Bama minipig.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R G; Wang, X D; Zhang, X L; Yang, Y S

    2014-02-21

    Pyogenic hepatic abscess (PHA) is a rare but potentially serious disease. Investigations of new therapeutic methods urgently need experimental support in corresponding animal models. However, to date, few studies have evaluated PHA in the minipig. The linear regression equation of the Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 strain was established. PHA was successfully mocked, and S. aureus ATCC 29213 was the only pathogenic bacterium identified. The abscess formation stage was observed on the 21st day of the operation. This study will provide a baseline for further studies evaluating new treatment methods for PHA.

  9. Delayed intramedullary abscess in operated case of spinal lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Godbole, Chaitanya; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Mehrotra, Anant; Jayesh, Shardhara; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Behari, Sanjay; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Jaiswal, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary abscess is a rare condition with high rate of mortality and morbidity. We are presenting a case of delayed intramedullary abscess in an operated case of spinal lipoma, after 2 years of primary surgery. To best of our knowledge this only second case of intramedullary abscess in a case of spinal lipoma without dermal sinus. PMID:27857795

  10. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1-Regulated Lysyl Oxidase Is Involved in Staphylococcus aureus Abscess Formation

    PubMed Central

    Beerlage, Christiane; Greb, Jessica; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Assaggaf, Mohammad; Trackman, Philip C.; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Bonin, Michael; Eble, Johannes A.; Peschel, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the key transcription factor involved in the adaptation of mammals to hypoxia and plays a crucial role in cancer angiogenesis. Recent evidence suggests a leading role for HIF-1 in various inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we describe the role of HIF-1 in Staphylococcus aureus infections by investigating the HIF-1-dependent host cell response. For this purpose, transcriptional profiling of HIF-1α-deficient HepG2 and control cells, both infected with Staphylococcus aureus, was performed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 190 genes, 24 of which were regulated via HIF-1, was influenced. LOX (encoding lysyl oxidase) was one of the upregulated genes with a potential impact on the course of S. aureus infection. LOX is an amine oxidase required for biosynthetic cross-linking of extracellular matrix components. LOX was upregulated in vitro in different cell cultures infected with S. aureus and also in vivo, in kidney abscesses of mice intravenously infected with S. aureus and in clinical skin samples from patients with S. aureus infections. Inhibition of LOX by β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) did not affect the bacterial load in kidneys or blood but significantly influenced abscess morphology and collagenization. Our data provide evidence for a crucial role of HIF-1-regulated LOX in abscess formation. PMID:23649089

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Strain Collected from a Patient with Cutaneous Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Crawford, Katrina; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2014-01-01

    We describe a cutaneous abscess caused by catalase-negative methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus in a patient who was concomitantly colonized with virulent USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Sequencing of the katA gene demonstrated a thymine insertion leading to a frameshift mutation and premature truncation of catalase to 21 amino acids. PMID:24131694

  12. BRAIN ABSCESS DUE TO Staphylococcus aureus OF CRYPTOGENIC SOURCE IN AN HIV-1 INFECTED PATIENT IN USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Anna Paula Romero; PAPPALARDO, Mara Cristina; DANTAS, Daniel; LINS, Diogo; VIDAL, José Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is broad. The most frequent etiologies include primary diseases (caused by HIV itself) or secondary diseases (opportunistic infections or neoplasms). Despite these conditions, HIV-infected patients are susceptible to other infections observed in patients without HIV infection. Here we report a rare case of a brain abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an HIV-infected patient. After drainage of the abscess and treatment with oxacilin, the patient had a favorable outcome. This case reinforces the importance of a timely neurosurgical procedure that supported adequate management of an unusual cause of expansive brain lesions in HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:27074328

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 modulates the proinflammatory milieu in Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Kielian, Tammy; Haney, Anessa; Mayes, Patrick M; Garg, Sarita; Esen, Nilufer

    2005-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays an important role in innate immune recognition of conserved structural motifs on a wide array of pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. To ascertain the functional significance of TLR2 in the context of central nervous system (CNS) parenchymal infection, we evaluated the pathogenesis of S. aureus-induced experimental brain abscess in TLR2 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. The expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2, was significantly attenuated in brain abscesses of TLR2 KO mice compared to WT mice during the acute phase of infection. Conversely, interleukin-17 (IL-17), a cytokine produced by activated and memory T cells, was significantly elevated in lesions of TLR2 KO mice, suggesting an association between innate and adaptive immunity in brain abscess. Despite these differences, brain abscess severity in TLR2 KO and WT animals was similar, with comparable mortality rates, bacterial titers, and blood-brain barrier permeability, implying a role for alternative PRRs. Expression of the phagocytic PRRs macrophage scavenger receptor type AI/AII and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) was increased in brain abscesses of both TLR2 KO and WT mice compared to uninfected animals. However, LOX-1 induction in brain abscesses of TLR2 KO mice was significantly attenuated compared to WT animals, revealing that the TLR2-dependent signal(s) influence LOX-1 expression. Collectively, these findings reveal the complex nature of gram-positive bacterial recognition in the CNS which occurs, in part, through engagement of TLR2 and highlight the importance of receptor redundancy for S. aureus detection in the CNS.

  14. Brain Abscess as A Complication of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Lakshmi; R, Santhanam; S, Chitralekha

    2013-01-01

    A brain abscess is a life threatening condition which can occur as a complication of various clinical conditions. An intra–cerebral abscess which occurs as a complication of pulmonary arterial hypertension is extremely rare. The present report has described such an uncommon case of an intra–cerebral abscess in a chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism patient with pulmonary hypertension. A–34–year old male who was a known case of chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism with pulmonary artery hypertension, who was diagnosed 6 months back, presented to the Out Patients Department (OPD) with headache and vomiting. He had right homonymous hemianopia. Contrast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) of brain showed a peripherally enhancing lesion in the left temporo-occipital lobe, with oedema and a mass effect. Left parieto–occipital craniotomy and excision of the abscess was done. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the aspirated pus. PMID:24179934

  15. Brain abscess as a complication of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - a rare case report.

    PubMed

    K, Lakshmi; R, Santhanam; S, Chitralekha

    2013-09-01

    A brain abscess is a life threatening condition which can occur as a complication of various clinical conditions. An intra-cerebral abscess which occurs as a complication of pulmonary arterial hypertension is extremely rare. The present report has described such an uncommon case of an intra-cerebral abscess in a chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism patient with pulmonary hypertension. A-34-year old male who was a known case of chronic pulmonary thrombo embolism with pulmonary artery hypertension, who was diagnosed 6 months back, presented to the Out Patients Department (OPD) with headache and vomiting. He had right homonymous hemianopia. Contrast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) of brain showed a peripherally enhancing lesion in the left temporo-occipital lobe, with oedema and a mass effect. Left parieto-occipital craniotomy and excision of the abscess was done. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the aspirated pus.

  16. Evaluation of capsular and acapsular strains of S. aureus in an experimental brain abscess model

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Nilufer; Wagoner, Gail; Philips, Napoleon

    2011-01-01

    Brain abscesses are mainly caused by either direct or indirect inoculation of gram positive bacteria including Stapylococcus aureus (S. aureus) or Streptococcus species into the central nervous system. In the present study, we aimed to compare potential changes in brain abscess pathogenesis induced by two different strains of S. aureus, namely the laboratory strain RN6390 and the clinical isolate Reynolds. Although the Reynolds strain was expected to be more resistant to eradication by the host, due to the existence of a polysaccharide capsule, and subsequently to be more virulent, instead we found parenchymal damage and mortality rates to be more prominent following RN6390 infection. In contrast, the Reynolds strain proliferated faster and induced early expression of the chemokine CXCL2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and complement 3a and C5. Furthermore, there were early and more abundant infiltration of PMNs, T cells and erythrocyte extravasation in brain abscesses induced by the Reynolds strain. However, several immune parameters were not different between the two strains during the later stages of the disease. These results suggest that capsular S. aureus can modulate innate immunity and complement system activation differently than the acapsular strain RN6390, and the early changes induced by Reynolds strain may have an important impact on survival. PMID:19906446

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Strain Type at Various Body Sites among Patients with a Closed Abscess and Uninfected Controls at U.S. Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Valerie S; Limbago, Brandi M; Moran, Gregory J; Krishnadasan, Anusha; Gorwitz, Rachel J; McDougal, Linda K; Talan, David A

    2015-11-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a prevalent cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), but the association between CA-MRSA colonization and infection remains uncertain. We studied the carriage frequency at several body sites and the diversity of S. aureus strains from patients with and without SSTI. Specimens from the nares, throat, rectum, and groin of case subjects with a closed skin abscess (i.e., without drainage) and matched control subjects without a skin infection (n = 147 each) presenting to 10 U.S. emergency departments were cultured using broth enrichment; wound specimens were cultured from abscess cases. Methicillin resistance testing and spa typing were performed for all S. aureus isolates. S. aureus was found in 85/147 (57.8%) of abscesses; 49 isolates were MRSA, and 36 were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). MRSA colonization was more common among cases (59/147; 40.1%) than among controls (27/147; 18.4%) overall (P < 0.001) and at each body site; no differences were observed for MSSA. S. aureus-infected subjects were usually (75/85) colonized with the infecting strain; among MRSA-infected subjects, this was most common in the groin. The CC8 lineage accounted for most of both infecting and colonizing isolates, although more than 16 distinct strains were identified. Nearly all MRSA infections were inferred to be USA300. There was more diversity among colonizing than infecting isolates and among those isolated from controls versus cases. CC8 S. aureus is a common colonizer of persons with and without skin infections. Detection of S. aureus colonization, and especially MRSA, may be enhanced by extranasal site culture.

  18. [Multiple brain abscesses: a case report].

    PubMed

    Banić-Horvat, Sofija; Cvijanović, Milan; Ilin, Miroslav; Kopitović, Aleksandar; Simić, Svetlana; Jovin, Zita

    2004-01-01

    10 days before admission a 45-year old female experienced general weakness, and T 38 degrees C. During that period she had no cardio-respiratory nor neurological complaints, and the temperature varied between 37.5 degrees C and 38 degrees C. Her medical history was unremarkable, without immunodeficiency. The day before admission she presented with left arm paresis and during the next day it progressed to paralysis. She had no headache. On admission the following diagnostic procedures were performed: the cranial CT scan showed two lesions (possibly meta lesions). Chest X-ray was normal. WBC=15x10(9)/L, ESR=90/120. On the second day following admission brain MRI showed multiple abscesses in both hemispheres, mostly in the gray/white junction. High doses of IV metronidasol, cephtriaxon and cipfloxacin were administered without obtaining specimens for micro-biological diagnosis. In next two days she developed coma, respiratory insufficiency and septic temperature. Brain surgery was not performed due to severe involvement of the brain with multiple abscesses. Repeated chest X-ray revealed bilateral pneumonia. A lethal outcome occurred on the third day, regardless of all efforts. Autopsy showed multiple brain abscesses as well as on the lungs and liver. A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection was established. Prevention includes treatment of the infection source. The classic triad of headache, fever and focal deficit occur in less than 50% of patients. Even in such cases brain abscess must be reconsidered CT appearance of brain abscess is similar to that of neoplastic and other infectious and non infectious diseases--especially in the stage of early cerebritis. If the CT findings are not clear, MRI should be performed.

  19. Fibrinolytics in loculated abscess cavities - A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Barthwal, MS; Tyagi, Rahul; Kishore, Kislay

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of fibrinolytic therapy in two loculated abscesses is being reported. First case had a postoperative mediastinal abscess in left paraspinal location and the second case had two bilateral tubercular psoas abscesses. Both cases were managed with pig tail catheter drainage of abcesses and fibrinolytic therapy with instillation of urokinase followed by aspiration. Both cases had significant drainage, clinical and radiological resolution. There were no adverse effects in either case. PMID:27578935

  20. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Miftode, E; Luca, V; Mihalache, D; Leca, D; Stefanidis, E; Anuţa, C; Sabadis, L

    2001-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 68 patients with Spinal Epidural Abscess (SEA) were reviewed. Of these, 66% had different predisposing factors such as staphylococcal skin infections, surgical procedures, rachicentesis, trauma, spondilodiscitis. Abscess had a lumbar region location in 53% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent etiological agent (81%). The overall rate of mortality in SEA patients was 13.2%.

  1. Tularaemia presenting as parapharyngeal abscess: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Koc, S; Gürbüzler, L; Yaman, H; Eyibilen, A; Salman, N; Ekici, A

    2012-05-01

    We report an extremely rare case of the oropharyngeal form of tularaemia, causing a parapharyngeal abscess. A 48-year-old woman presented with fever, sore throat, breathing difficulty and a right-sided neck swelling. This mass had previously been treated with penicillin without response, and had already been surgically drained once in another hospital. On physical examination, the tonsils were exudative and hypertrophic and the pharynx was hyperaemic. A fluctuant, 4 × 4 cm mass was seen on endoscopic examination, originating from the left parapharyngeal area and protruding towards the pyriform sinus, and partly obstructing the airway. Microagglutination test antibody titres for Francisella tularensis were positive (1/1280). The patient healed completely after definitive drainage of the abscess and antimicrobial therapy for 14 days (streptomycin, 2 × 1 g intramuscularly). Tularaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with tonsillopharyngitis, cervical lymphadenitis and parapharyngeal abscess who do not respond to treatment with penicillin, even if they do not live in an endemic region.

  2. Bilateral prosthetic hip joint infections associated with a Psoas abscess. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratne, G D Rajitha; Khan, Riaz J K; Tan, Cynthia; Golledge, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psoas abscess is a recognized but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip joint infections. Case report: We report a case of a 68-year-old man with right and left hip arthroplasties performed 22 and 14 years ago, respectively, who presented with non-specific symptoms and was subsequently diagnosed with left psoas abscess on CT scan. Drainage of the psoas abscess was complicated by the formation of a discharging sinus connected to the left hip. He then developed an infected right thigh haematoma, which also formed a discharging sinus connecting to the right hip post-drainage. He was treated with bilateral two-stage revision total hip arthroplasties and multiple courses of prolonged antibacterial therapy. Both abscesses and hip joints cultured the same species of multi-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The causal link between the psoas abscess and the prosthetic hip infections is discussed, as well as the investigation and management. Conclusion: We recommend routine exploration of the iliopsoas bursa when revision of an infected total hip arthroplasty is performed to rule out intrapelvic spread of the infection [3]. There should be high index of suspicion of prosthetic hip infection in patients presenting with Psoas abscess and vice versa. A CT scan might be warranted to rule out concomitant infection in both these patients. PMID:28116254

  3. The retrospective prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in soft tissue abscesses at two military level I trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Gary W; Wells, Ryan D; Pfaff, James A

    2008-10-01

    Many studies have shown that community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CAMRSA) is a very prevalent organism. However, no data have been published to date with regard to CAMRSA prevalence in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a military medical facility. Our objective is to estimate the period prevalence of CAMRSA in cases of soft tissue abscesses seen in the emergency departments of two major military hospitals. A retrospective review of electronic records was performed from January 1, 2004 to August 10, 2005. This database was used to identify patients with the diagnosis of abscess, the procedure code for incision and drainage, and culture of wound. After data were accumulated, standard prevalence calculations were applied to determine prevalence of CAMRSA in abscesses at our emergency departments. Antibiotic susceptibilities were then evaluated with regard to the CAMRSA bacteria. The prevalence at our two emergency departments was 68% (751 abscesses, 220 cultured, 155 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-positive cultures). The prevalence at Brooke Army Medical Center and Wilford Hall Medical Center emergency departments was 70% (520 abscesses, 145 cultured, and 101 MRSA positive) and 65% (231 abscesses, 75 cultured, and 49 MRSA positive), respectively. The occurrence of CAMRSA is not isolated to the civilian population. The prevalence of CAMRSA in this population is significant, and may pose serious operational and deployment-related ramifications requiring the attention of military medical planners as well as forward medical care providers. The probability of CAMRSA infection should be considered when treating soft tissue abscesses in the military emergency department.

  4. MRI Based Localisation and Quantification of Abscesses following Experimental S. aureus Intravenous Challenge: Application to Vaccine Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth R.; van Diemen, Pauline; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Lindemann, Claudia; Soilleux, Elizabeth; Rollier, Christine; Hill, Fergal; Schneider, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a sensitive and specific method of abscess enumeration and quantification in a preclinical model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methods S. aureus infected murine kidneys were fixed in paraformaldehyde, impregnated with gadolinium, and embedded in agar blocks, which were subjected to 3D magnetic resonance microscopy on a 9.4T MRI scanner. Image analysis techniques were developed, which could identify and quantify abscesses. The result of this imaging was compared with histological examination. The impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccination regime was assessed using the technique. Results Up to 32 murine kidneys could be imaged in a single MRI run, yielding images with voxels of about 25 μm3. S. aureus abscesses could be readily identified in blinded analyses of the kidneys after 3 days of infection, with low inter-observer variability. Comparison with histological sections shows a striking correlation between the two techniques: all presumptive abscesses identified by MRI were confirmed histologically, and histology identified no abscesses not evident on MRI. In view of this, simulations were performed assuming that both MRI reconstruction, and histology examining all sections of the tissue, were fully sensitive and specific at abscess detection. This simulation showed that MRI provided more sensitive and precise estimates of abscess numbers and volume than histology, unless at least 5 histological sections are taken through the long axis of the kidney. We used the MRI technique described to investigate the impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccine. Conclusion Post mortem MRI scanning of large batches of fixed organs has application in the preclinical assessment of S. aureus vaccines. PMID:27228181

  5. MRI Based Localisation and Quantification of Abscesses following Experimental S. aureus Intravenous Challenge: Application to Vaccine Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Elizabeth R; van Diemen, Pauline; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Lindemann, Claudia; Soilleux, Elizabeth; Rollier, Christine; Hill, Fergal; Schneider, Jurgen; Wyllie, David H

    2016-01-01

    To develop and validate a sensitive and specific method of abscess enumeration and quantification in a preclinical model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. S. aureus infected murine kidneys were fixed in paraformaldehyde, impregnated with gadolinium, and embedded in agar blocks, which were subjected to 3D magnetic resonance microscopy on a 9.4T MRI scanner. Image analysis techniques were developed, which could identify and quantify abscesses. The result of this imaging was compared with histological examination. The impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccination regime was assessed using the technique. Up to 32 murine kidneys could be imaged in a single MRI run, yielding images with voxels of about 25 μm3. S. aureus abscesses could be readily identified in blinded analyses of the kidneys after 3 days of infection, with low inter-observer variability. Comparison with histological sections shows a striking correlation between the two techniques: all presumptive abscesses identified by MRI were confirmed histologically, and histology identified no abscesses not evident on MRI. In view of this, simulations were performed assuming that both MRI reconstruction, and histology examining all sections of the tissue, were fully sensitive and specific at abscess detection. This simulation showed that MRI provided more sensitive and precise estimates of abscess numbers and volume than histology, unless at least 5 histological sections are taken through the long axis of the kidney. We used the MRI technique described to investigate the impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccine. Post mortem MRI scanning of large batches of fixed organs has application in the preclinical assessment of S. aureus vaccines.

  6. Efflux Transporter of Siderophore Staphyloferrin A in Staphylococcus aureus Contributes to Bacterial Fitness in Abscesses and Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Chen, Chunhui; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Kim, Eu Suk; Wang, Yin; Hooper, David C

    2017-08-01

    The siderophores staphyloferrin A (SA) and staphyloferrin B (SB) of Staphylococcus aureus are essential for iron acquisition in the iron-restricted environment of the host, such as in subcutaneous abscesses. SA and SB are secreted by SfaA and SbnD transporters, respectively. To assess the further function of SfaA and SbnD in S. aureus fitness, we tested its effect on murine abscess models and intracellular replication in epithelial cells. Bacterial fitness in abscesses and in epithelial cells was studied, by comparing the parental strains RN6390 and MW2 and their ΔsfaA and ΔsbnD mutants using competition assays in a murine abscess model and invasion and replication assays with human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. In the murine abscess model using equal inocula of a ΔsfaA or ΔsbnD mutant and the wild-type RN6390 strain, the ΔsfaA mutant exhibited growth defects of 2.2-fold. Additionally, replication of the ΔsfaA mutant within A549 cells was decreased 3.0-fold. In complementation experiments, the ΔsfaA mutant carrying plasmid-borne sfaA restored the growth fitness in abscesses and epithelial cells. The ΔsbnD mutant, in contrast, showed no growth defect in either abscesses or epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that the efflux transporter of the siderophore SA contributes to the ability of S. aureus to replicate in abscesses and epithelial cells. Furthermore, fitness of S. aureus in these sites of replication is not compromised by the absence of transporter SbnD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. A Rare Case of Fusobacterium Necrophorum Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Hannoodi, Faris; Sabbagh, Hussam; Kulairi, Zain; Kumar, Sarwan

    2017-01-01

    Liver abscesses are an uncommon disease that can present with vague symptoms. Fusobacterium necrophorum causing liver abscesses is a rare condition and only a few cases have been reported. An 88-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with one week of fevers, night sweats, chills, fatigue and vague right upper quadrant abdominal pain. She denied nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea and unintentional weight loss. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed two liver abscesses in the right lobe as well as extensive diverticulosis. Percutaneous drainage was performed and draining catheters were placed in the abscesses. Culture of the abscess fluid grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. She was treated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole as per sensitivities. Rare cases of F. necrophorum hepatic abscesses have been published. The source of infection described in reported cases included hematogenous spread from dental caries/peritonsillar abscess and those involving the gastrointestinal tract resulting from inflammation of the bowel wall or from inflamed diverticuli via the portal circulation. In one study, thirteen cases of liver abscess due to F. necrophorum were studied, and two of these cases had diverticular disease without inflammation. PMID:28243433

  8. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  9. Scrotal abscess, a rare case of extra intestinal amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, R H

    2015-09-01

    The majority of amoeba infection are asymptomatic, but clinically intestinal amoebiasis or extra intestinal amoebiasis may result. Genital amoebiasis is very rare manifestation of extra intestial amoebiasis, but a case of amoebic scrotal abscess, seen in Surabaya. The invasive form of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite was seen in Giemsa stained aspirate of the abscess. In case of an abscess bacteria are primarly considered, but the case presented here shows that amoeba can be the cause, although very rarely. Thus when bacteriological diagnostics are negative amoeba should be considered, especially in case of brown-reddish colored and foul smelling pus.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus meningitis--a rare complication of iliacus muscle abscess.

    PubMed

    Parker, S L; Conn, K S; Ignotus, P I

    1997-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus meningitis is a rare but well recognized condition which had a high mortality and incidence of neurological sequelae. It is usually associated with chronic underlying conditions. A case is reported of S. aureus meningitis in a previously healthy young man. The epidemiology, microbiological findings and treatment of this condition are discussed.

  11. Brain abscess from a peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent child: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    A brain abscess is uncommon but potentially lethal. Common predisposing risk factors include congenital cyanotic heart disease, immunocompromised status, and the presence of septic foci. We describe a left frontal brain abscess accompanied by fever, headache, and weight loss for a 3-month period. The presumptive source of the brain abscess involved a left peritonsillar abscess. To the best of our knowledge, one similar case was reported in the literature in 1929. The specific signs of peritonsillar abscess in our patient included trismus, decreased phonation, and a muffled voice. The peritonsillar abscess was not clinically diagnosed, but incidentally detected on lower axial sections of cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Fever and trismus improved after surgical drainage of the peritonsillar abscess. The cerebral abscess was conservatively treated with intravenous antibiotics. The patient developed hydrocephalus as a sequela to the involvement of the basal meninges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain Abscess after Transanal Hemorrhoidal Dearterialization: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Berkel, A.E.M.; Witte, M.E.; Koop, R.; Hendrix, M.G.R.; Klaase, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A relatively new therapy in the treatment of hemorrhoids is transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization (THD). We report a case of brain abscess caused by Streptococcus milleri following THD. Although a brain abscess after drainage of a perianal abscess has been described in the literature, no report exists of a brain abscess following treatment of hemorrhoids. A healthy 51-year-old man with hemorrhoids underwent THD. Two weeks later he presented with a headache, bradyphrenia, flattened behavior and a left hemiplegia. No perianal complaint and/or perianal abscess was present. A contrast CT scan of the cerebrum showed a right temporoparieto-occipital abscess, with edema and compression of the surrounding tissue and lateral ventricles. MRI showed an abscess with leakage in the right lateral ventricle. Treatment with dexamethasone and intravenous antibiotics was started. Because of progression of symptoms, 3 weeks later ventriculoscopy was performed and the abscess was drained. Culture of the punctuate showed S. milleri. Because of developing hydrocephalus 3 days after ventriculoscopy, first an external ventricle drain and later a ventriculoperitoneal drain was placed. Hereafter the hemiplegia and cognitive disorders improved. This case report describes a severe complication following treatment of hemorrhoids with THD which until now, to our knowledge, has never been described in the literature. PMID:23741208

  13. Brain abscess potentially secondary to odontogenic infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joseph; Liu, Stanley Y; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Pogrel, M Anthony

    2014-02-01

    Odontogenic infections are rarely implicated in the causes of brain abscess formation. As such, there are very few reports of brain abscesses secondary to odontogenic infections in the literature. This is due partly to the relative rarity of brain abscesses but also to the difficulty in matching the causative organisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old woman whose brain abscess may potentially have been secondary to an odontogenic infection. The patient's early diagnosis, supported by imaging and microbiologic assessment, along with early minicraniotomy and extraction of infected dentition followed by a course of cephalosporins and metronidazole, contributed to a successful outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute neonatal parotid abscess: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kolekar, Shreesh; Chincholi, Tejas S.; Kshirsagar, Ashok; Porwal, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Acute suppurative parotitis is uncommon in children and is very rare in neonates. Most common organism isolated is Staphylococcus aureus. We present a 15-day-old full-term breast-fed female neonate with left-sided acute parotid abscess. The baby presented with a left preauricular swelling, pain and redness. Pus was exuded from left Stensen's duct on compression of the gland externally. Early diagnosis and proper intravenous antibiotics are the keys to the treatment. PMID:28051052

  15. Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus abscess and fatal pneumococcal septicemia due to IRAK-4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, Koichi; Ogose, Takeshi; Kubota, Mari; Tomimoto, Ayumi; Kondo, Rieko; Taniguchi, Takako; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Nakatsu, Tadanori; Urano, Yoshio; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    We describe the case of an infant with recurrent episodes of staphylococcal skin abscess and subsequent lethal pneumococcal meningitis/septicemia due to interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) deficiency. In this case, systemic signs of inflammatory response were poor and delayed. Among all other reported cases of IRAK-4 deficiency, none involved severe viral or fungal disease, and the range of infecting bacteria was narrow. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Intracerebral abscess associated with the Camino intracranial pressure monitor: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Morton, Ryan; Lucas, Timothy H; Ko, Andrew; Browd, Samuel R; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Chesnut, R M

    2012-07-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is a mainstay in the management of traumatic brain injury. Large investigations have validated the safety and efficacy of ICP monitors in comatose patients. Clinically relevant infections are extremely rare and cerebral abscess has never been reported with the Camino device. We describe an exceptional case of a life-threatening intracerebral abscess from an intraparenchymal ICP monitor. A 35-month-old child required 7 days of ICP monitoring after a fall from a 2-story window. His hospital course was complicated by severe airway edema treated, in part, with high-dose corticosteroid therapy for a total of 10 days. Two weeks later, the patient deteriorated acutely owing to a large intracerebral abscess under the previous ICP monitor site. Urgent craniotomy with evacuation of the abscess was performed on 2 separate occasions. Cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with long-term antibiotics. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient was meeting age-appropriate milestones without focal deficits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing an intracerebral abscess as a complication from an intraparenchymal pressure monitor. Corticosteroid therapy may have constituted an independent risk factor for the ICP monitor--associated infection, as well as reinsertion of the ICP monitoring device at the same site. That this is the first reported parenchymal infectious complication underscores the safety of this device with respect to infection. When reinsertion of a parenchymal monitor is considered, a new site should be chosen.

  17. Pyogenic Intradural Abscess of Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jeong-Eun; Chung, You-Nam; Park, Sung Bae

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of spinal intradural abscess which shows serial changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Well-encapsulated, rim-enhancing lesion with mass effect was visualized at ventral side of lumbar spinal canal on 17 days after initial negative MRI, which was thought to be epidural abscess. It was revealed to be intradural in location on operation and successfully treated by drainage and antibiotics. Follow-up MRI showed resolution of abscess. Clinical significance and pathogenesis of this case was briefly discussed. PMID:27169060

  18. Neutrophil-derived IL-1β Is Sufficient for Abscess Formation in Immunity against Staphylococcus aureus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Hebroni, Frank; Plaisier, Seema B.; Xuan, Caiyun; Granick, Jennifer L.; Matsushima, Hironori; Takashima, Akira; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Cheng, Genhong; Lee, Delphine J.; Simon, Scott I.; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil abscess formation is critical in innate immunity against many pathogens. Here, the mechanism of neutrophil abscess formation was investigated using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus cutaneous infection. Gene expression analysis and in vivo multispectral noninvasive imaging during the S. aureus infection revealed a strong functional and temporal association between neutrophil recruitment and IL-1β/IL-1R activation. Unexpectedly, neutrophils but not monocytes/macrophages or other MHCII-expressing antigen presenting cells were the predominant source of IL-1β at the site of infection. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived IL-1β was essential for host defense since adoptive transfer of IL-1β-expressing neutrophils was sufficient to restore the impaired neutrophil abscess formation in S. aureus-infected IL-1β-deficient mice. S. aureus-induced IL-1β production by neutrophils required TLR2, NOD2, FPR1 and the ASC/NLRP3 inflammasome in an α-toxin-dependent mechanism. Taken together, IL-1β and neutrophil abscess formation during an infection are functionally, temporally and spatially linked as a consequence of direct IL-1β production by neutrophils. PMID:23209417

  19. [MRI appearance of lumbar epidural abscesses: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Fikri, M; Nassar, I; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-03-01

    The authors report three cases of non-tuberculous epidural abscess. Presenting symptoms included lumbar back pain, muscle spasms, soft tIssue swelling, and neurological deficits in all three cases. MR imaging was helpful for diagnosis and showed involvement of perivertebral soft tissues and an epidural abscess of variable size. There was no significant involvement of intervertebral disks or vertebrae. Diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic exam. Clinical outcome was favourable with antibiotic treatment.

  20. COMMUNITY ACQUIRED METHICILLIN SENSITIVE STAPHYLOCCUS AUREUS CEREBRAL ABSCESS IN A PREVIOUSLY HEALTH GENTLEMAN MIMICKING SIGNS OF CAVERNOUS SINUS THROMBOSIS-A UNIQUE PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Ibrahim, Ahmad Elbagir

    2015-01-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) infections like meningitis and cerebral abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus are usually seen in patients with neurosurgical interventions or immune compromised patients or patients with cardiac vegetation's. They are extremely rare in healthy patients. We report a case of a 44 year old Indian gentleman who was perfectly healthy with no known co morbidities, which presented with fever, neck stiffness and altered mental status. He had fulminant staph bacteraemia (as evidenced by persistently positive blood cultures) with meningitis and cerebral abscess. Extensive search was made to find the source of infection, but it was inconclusive. Isolated CNS Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection in an apparently healthy patient is very rare. This gentleman presented with altered mental status, asymmetrical exophthalmos and multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case highlights the challenge of making early diagnoses of a brain abscess; since it has symptomology mimicking cavernous sinus thrombosis .This is due to the involvement of the cerebellopontine angle and extensive brain oedema and oedema of the retro bulbar tissues.

  1. [Acute mastoiditis with retroauricular abscess - a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Misiak, Andrzej

    2016-12-22

    Otogenic complications may occur as a result of both acute and chronic otitis media. The purpose of the diagnostic process and treatment of patients with otogenic complications is to identify and eliminate focal points of the infection. Due to general application of antibiotics, these complications are rarely observed. Retroauricular abscess may be the first symptom associated with the development of acute mastoiditis in patients with communication disturbances. Intravenous antibiotics and surgery have been successfully used for treatment in the two described cases. First case: 9 years old girl suffering from hydrocephalus, mental retardation. Retroauricular abscess occured as a result of the left ear acute otitis media. Second case: 17 years old girl with multiple congenital defects, mental retardation. Four surgery because of epidural abscess, meningitis, external auditory canal atresia, granulation and cholesteatoma during two years. Retroauricular abscess occured in the course of the right ear chronic otitis media.

  2. Excessive Surgical Adhesive Mimicking Aortic Root Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Natalie A; Bull, David A; Morrissey, Candice K

    2017-07-15

    Aortic root abscess is a complication of aortic valve endocarditis that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis usually is made with transesophageal echocardiography, which is highly sensitive and specific for the disease. We present a case of suspected aortic root abscess 1 week after mechanical aortic valve replacement for native valve endocarditis. The diagnosis was made by the use of transesophageal echocardiography but surgical inspection revealed that the paravalvular fluid collection was excessive surgical adhesive. We discuss the clinical significance and differential diagnosis of aortic root abscess in the setting of infective endocarditis.

  3. Metastatic Endogenous Endophthalmitis: A Rare Presentation with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Mrugank M.; Devarajan, T. V.; Nembi, P. Senthur; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Mani, Ashwin K.

    2017-01-01

    A 62-year-old male with the previous history of uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension on irregular treatment presented with a history of fever, dysuria, and urinary retention with progressive painful loss of vision over a period of 2 days. His eye examination showed hypopyon, and he was diagnosed to have rapidly progressive endogenous endophthalmitis. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam empirically. His blood and urine cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Transesophageal echocardiography ruled out infective endocarditis. Intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime was given. Vitreous culture also grew MRSA. A workup for possible source revealed multiple prostatic abscesses on the transrectal ultrasound. Antibiotic was changed to daptomycin in view of high vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration. His vision was improved at the time of discharge.

  4. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C.; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S.; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W.; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W.; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J.; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H.; Fraunholz, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  5. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Förstner, Konrad U; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H; Fraunholz, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection.

  6. Psoas abscess complicating Crohn's disease: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, M; Masaki, T; Watanabe, T; Hatano, K; Matsuda, K; Yahagi, N; Ichinose, M; Seichi, A; Muto, T

    2000-01-01

    We describe herein the case of a psoas abscess complicating Crohn's disease, and present a review of the literature on this unusual disease entity. A 22-year-old Japanese man with a 5-year history of Crohn's ileocolitis presented with right lower abdominal and hip pain, and a diagnosis of right psoas abscess was subsequently made by abdominal computed tomography (CT). Following the administration of antibiotics and CT-guided percutaneous drainage of the abscess, the patient's symptoms temporarily improved; however, 2 weeks later, the abscess cavity was found to have extended around the periarticular tissue of the right hip joint. To prevent the development of septic arthritis of the hip joint, surgical drainage of the abscess cavity and ileocecal resection were immediately performed, after which the patient's condition greatly improved. The resected specimen showed Crohn's ileocolitis with an external fistula in the terminal ileum which was considered to have caused the psoas abscess. Since psoas abscess in Crohn's disease can result in serious complications such as septic arthritis of the hip joint if left untreated, aggressive treatment should be initiated without delay.

  7. A Case of Otogenic Brain Abscess Causing Loss of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min Kyu; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul Won

    2014-01-01

    Acute or chronic otitis media can cause intracranial complications, one of the most serious being brain abscess. Empirical antibiotic treatment and proper surgical management should be considered to avoid fatal consequences. However, proper extent and optimal timing of surgical intervention are still matters of debate. We present a case of a 31-year-old man who presented with acutely altered mental status, caused by otogenic brain abscess who we treated successfully with antibiotics and otologic surgery and no neurosurgical treatment. PMID:25279229

  8. Hepatic abscess linked to oral actinomycetes: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Farias, Deborah G

    2015-01-01

    Organ abscesses are rare, life-threatening complications that can be caused by bacteremia from oral infections. Metastatic infection is a well-established concept. Dental and periapical infections can cause infections in distant organs and tissues. The frequency of these systemic infections and systemic diseases is open to debate, as some patients are more susceptible to infections than others. This article presents the case report of a 52-year-old woman who was hospitalized with a hepatic abscess after a routine periodontal maintenance procedure. The patient had poor oral health, involving several nonrestorable teeth, multiple failed endodontic treatments, and asymptomatic chronic periapical pathologies. Her dental history included previous diagnoses of moderate generalized chronic periodontitis and advanced localized periodontitis. It was possible that bacteremia developed during her most recent dental treatment, leading to the hepatic abscess. Systemic antibiotic therapy, drainage of the hepatic abscess, and oral rehabilitation resulted in complete recovery.

  9. Ascariasis as a cause of hepatic abscess: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Thakur, S; Rana, B

    2015-01-01

    We receive around 60 cases of hepatic abscess in a year. The commonest diagnosis reached at the time of discharge is amoebic liver abscess. The diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess is mostly presumptive and thus the patients are usually given a mixed treatment with injection ceftriaxone and tablet metronidazole. Here we report three cases of hepatic abscess diagnosed recently, where ascariasis was the probable etiology. Ascariasis may be a much commoner cause of hepatic abscesses in this region than we think.

  10. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora.

  11. Spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Andrew A; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2004-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare infectious disease. However, if left unrecognized and untreated, the clinical outcome of spinal epidural abscess can be devastating. Correctly diagnosing a spinal epidural abscess in a timely fashion is often difficult, particularly if the clinician does not actively consider the diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms of spinal epidural abscess include backache, radicular pain, weakness, and sensory deficits. However, early in its course, spinal epidural abscess can also present with vague and nondescript manifestations. In this report, we describe a case of spinal epidural abscess presenting as abdominal pain, and review the literature describing other cases of spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology.

  12. Pituitary abscess: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Apostolos K A; Dimitropoulou, Fotini; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Lyra, Stavroula; Seretis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a rare life-threating entity that is usually misdiagnosed as a pituitary tumor with a definite diagnosis only made postoperatively. Over the last several decades, advances in healthcare have led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality due to pituitary abscess. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to our department for investigation of a pituitary mass and with symptoms of pituitary dysfunction, headaches and impaired vision. During her admission, she developed meningitis-like symptoms and was treated with antibiotics. She eventually underwent transsphenoidal surgery for excision of the pituitary mass. A significant amount of pus was evident intraoperatively; however, no pathogen was isolated. Six months later, the patient was well and had full recovery of the anterior pituitary function. Her menses returned, and she was only on treatment with desmopressin for diabetes insipidus that developed postoperatively. Learning points Pituitary abscess is a rare disease and the reported clinical features vary mimicking other pituitary lesions. The diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often very difficult to make and rarely included in the differential. The histological findings of acute inflammatory infiltration confirm the diagnosis of pituitary abscess. Medical and surgical treatment is usually recommended upon diagnosis of a pituitary abscess. PMID:27274845

  13. [Brain abscess following cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ichimi, K; Ishiguri, H; Kida, Y; Kinomoto, T

    1989-04-01

    The authors report a case of brain abscess following cerebral infarction. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with symptoms of right hemiparesis and total aphasia. CT scan revealed abnormal low density area in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region. Cerebral angiography demonstrated occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery at the M1 portion. On the 16th hospital day, an episode of generalized seizure with high fever appeared, and intermittent high fever persisted thereafter. Two months after admission, CT scan revealed several cystic lesions with marked ring enhancement at the site of cerebral infarction, suggesting multiple abscesses. Aspirations of left frontal and parietal abscesses were accomplished and the cultures of the pus disclosed Proteus vulgaris. Due to progressive hydrocephalus, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was constructed one month later. Repeated CT scans showed a gradual diminution of the abscesses. It is considered that the blood-brain barrier is broken and the local immunological system against bacteria may be weakened when the brain is damaged by ischemia. Brain abscess seems to be developed in such circumstances even under the influence of transient bacteremia which originates in other parts of the body. Therefore the possibility of cerebral abscess should be suspected if patients with cerebral infarction suffer from the symptoms such as fever, neck stiffness or disturbance of consciousness.

  14. NorB, an efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus strain MW2, contributes to bacterial fitness in abscesses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanpeng; Onodera, Yoshikuni; Lee, Jean C; Hooper, David C

    2008-11-01

    While remaining a major problem in hospitals, Staphylococcus aureus is now spreading in communities. Strain MW2 (USA400 lineage) and other community methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains most commonly cause skin infections with abscess formation. Multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial resistance but may also contribute to bacterial survival by removal of environmental toxins. In S. aureus, NorA, NorB, NorC, and Tet38 are chromosomally encoded efflux pumps whose overexpression can confer MDR to quinolones and other compounds (Nor pumps) or tetracyclines alone (Tet38), but the natural substrates of these pumps are not known. To determine the role of these efflux pumps in a natural environment in the absence of antibiotics, we used strain MW2 in a mouse subcutaneous abscess model and compared pump gene expression as determined by reverse transcription-PCR in the abscesses and in vitro. norB and tet38 were selectively upregulated in vivo more than 171- and 24-fold, respectively, whereas norA and norC were downregulated. These changes were associated with an increase in expression of mgrA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator known to affect pump gene expression. In competition experiments using equal inocula of a norB or tet38 mutant and parent strain MW2, each mutant exhibited growth defects of about two- to threefold in vivo. In complementation experiments, a single-copy insertion of norB (but not a single-copy insertion of tet38) in the attB site within geh restored the growth fitness of the norB mutant in vivo. Our findings indicate that some MDR pumps, like NorB, can facilitate bacterial survival when they are overexpressed in a staphylococcal abscess and may contribute to the relative resistance of abscesses to antimicrobial therapy, thus linking bacterial fitness and resistance in vivo.

  15. Staphylococcal abscess caused by trauma with a rosebush aculeus (Plantae, Rosaceae): apropos of a case.

    PubMed

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Alves, Andreia Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo; Sasso, Letícia Soares; Gama, Carolina Mendonça; Cenci, Gardênia Borges

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous abscess is a localized collection of pus in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by trauma. The authors report the case of a 30-year-old male patient, gardener, that presents an ulcerated plaque in the third right finger, caused by an aculeus plant wound. The examination of the lesion's exudate ruled out the existence of fungi and showed the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. The authors emphasize the sporotrichosis as an important differential diagnosis, especially in endemic areas, and the indication of the exudate culture is discussed.

  16. Bilateral Breast Abscess Caused by E. coli in a Non-lactating Woman: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Gürcan; Gündeş, Ebubekir; Tekin, Şakir; Tavlı, Şakir

    2014-01-01

    Breast abscess usually occurs during lactation and the responsible organism is often S. Aureus. Breast abscess in non-lactating women is extremely rare and limited data is available in the literature regarding this entity. In our study, a 36-year-old non-lactating female patient who developed bilateral breast abscess due to E. coli infection without any predisposing factors has been discussed in light of the literature.

  17. [Clinical experience of 302 cases with brain abscess].

    PubMed

    Cui, X P; Cai, X W; Zhang, Z; Gao, N N; Liu, P R; Li, J; Yang, S Y; Zhang, J N; Yang, X Y

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnosis and treatment experience of brain abscesses and improve prognosis. Methods: The data of 302 patients of brain abscess at Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from 1980 to 2014 was analyzed retrospectively. There were 215 male and 87 female patients aged from 11 to 82 years with mean age of (30±8) years. The patients was divided into 1980-2001 group and 2002-2014 group according to different diagnosis and the treatment methods. The therapy methods include operation and conservative treatment. There were 196 cases received operation, including 95 cases of excision, 89 cases of ventriculopuncture, 12 cases of excision after ventriculopuncture, 106 cases received drug conservative therapy. Two groups of information including clinical manifestation, abscess location, therapeutic effect and prognosis were compared by χ(2) test. Results: Compared to 1980-2001 group, adjacent infection incidence declined(χ(2)=8.000, P=0.005). The ratio of single abscess declined and multiple abscess increased(χ(2)=11.060, P=0.001), the infection proportion of frontal lobe and temporal lobe decreased(χ(2)=9.080, P=0.003; χ(2)=15.440, P=0.000). The ratio of headache and vomit and papilledema declined significantly(χ(2)=23.290, P=0.000; χ(2)=21.020, P=0.000; χ(2)=2.290, P=0.001). Total mortality of 302 patients were 23 cases and 5 cases of 1980-2001 group and 2002-2014 group (10.4% vs. 6.3%, χ(2)=1.180, P=0.277). However, there were statistical difference in postoperative mortality between both groups (14.4% vs. 4.0%, χ(2) =3.880, P=0.049). Conclusion: With the application of antibiotics and the development of neurosurgical techniques, the prognosis of brain abscess has been improved.

  18. [Occipital dermal sinus associated to a cerebellar abscess. Case].

    PubMed

    Costa, J M; de Reina, L; Guillén, A; Claramunt, E

    2004-10-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses are tubular tracts which communicate the skin with deeper structures. It is a manifestation of defective separation of the ectoderm and neuroderm. The incidence is 1/2500-3000 births alive. Almost 10 % of congenital dermal sinuses are localized in the occipitocervical region. They are usually asymptomatic, unless an infectious process is concurrent (meningitis, abscess). We are presenting the case of a 12 months girl with unnoticed cutaneous stigmata in the occipital region, who was admitted with a meningeal syndrome and secondary neurological impairment. She had a cerebellar abscess and was treated with decompression by puncture of the abscess and antibiotics. When infection was resolved, congenital dermal sinus was excised. Process solves without morbidity. We reviewed the clinical and therapeutic features in cases reported previously in the literature.

  19. Development of Epidural and Paraspinal Abscesses after Insufficient Evaluation and Treatment of Acute Pyelonephritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyang Mo; Lee, Woo Joo; Choi, Jin Hwan; Choi, Mi Nyong; Park, Sang Young; Kim, Woo Jung; Son, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Diagnoses of pyelonephritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus should be accompanied by investigations of concomitant bladder obstruction and metastatic infections, especially to the spine or heart. Complicated pyelonephritis due to S. aureus requires more than 2 weeks of antibiotics, which is the typically recommended treatment duration for pyelonephritis. We describe a patient who was diagnosed with complicated epidural and paraspinal abscesses after insufficient evaluation and treatment of acute pyelonephritis due to S. aureus. A 62-year-old man with type 2 diabetes was admitted with fever, increased urinary frequency, and left flank pain. He was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis caused by S. aureus. His fever and flank pain subsided after 3 days of intravenous antibiotics. Evaluation of bladder obstruction and metastatic infection were not performed, as he declined further evaluation. The patient was discharged with oral antibiotics and was requested to attend weekly appointments but was lost to follow-up. One month later, the patient presented at the outpatient clinic with similar symptoms. Computed tomography showed recurrent pyelonephritis and a distended bladder. His flank pain persisted despite administration of an opioid agent. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging was performed, revealing epidural and paraspinal abscesses. Ultrasound-guided aspiration of the paraspinal muscle layer was performed, and blood and percutaneous aspirated fluid cultures revealed S. aureus growth. The pattern of antimicrobial sensitivity was identical to that at his first admission. Following more than 4 weeks of antibiotics, magnetic resonance imaging showed the abscesses had decreased in size. The patient was discharged without neurologic sequelae and was provided with oral antibiotics. PMID:27688864

  20. Microbiology and Initial Antibiotic Therapy for Injection Drug Users and Non-Injection Drug Users with Cutaneous Abscesses in the Era of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Timothy C.; Knepper, Bryan C.; Moore, S. Jason; Saveli, Carla C.; Pawlowski, Sean W.; Perlman, Daniel M.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Burman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cutaneous abscesses has increased markedly since the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Injection drug use is a risk factor for abscesses and may impact the microbiology and treatment of these infections. In a cohort of patients hospitalized with cutaneous abscesses in the era of CA-MRSA, our objectives were to: 1) compare the microbiology of abscesses between injection drug users and non-injection drug users, and 2) evaluate antibiotic therapy started in the emergency department in relation to microbiological findings and national guideline treatment recommendations. Methods This was a secondary analysis of two published retrospective cohorts of patients requiring hospitalization for an acute bacterial skin infection between January 1, 2007 and May 31, 2012 in 7 academic and community hospitals in Colorado. In the subgroup of patients with a cutaneous abscess, microbiological findings and the antibiotic regimen started in the emergency department were compared among injection drug users and non-injection drug users. Antibiotic regimens involving multiple agents, lack of activity against MRSA, or an agent with broad gram-negative activity were classified as discordant with Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guideline treatment recommendations. Results Of 323 patients with a cutaneous abscess, 104 (32%) occurred in injection drug users. Among the 235 cases where at least one microorganism was identified by culture, S. aureus was identified less commonly among injection drug users compared with non-injection drug users (55% vs 75%, p = .003), with similar patterns observed for both MRSA (33% vs. 47%, p = .054) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (17% vs. 26%, p = .11). In contrast to S. aureus, streptococcal species (53% vs 25%, p <.001) and anaerobic organisms (29% vs 10%, p < .001) were identified more commonly among injection drug users. Of 88 injection drug users and

  1. [A case of tuberculous pyothorax with retroperitoneal gravitation abscess].

    PubMed

    Inada, T; Ide, H; Shiomi, K; Tsumura, M; Nakamura, Y; Kageyama, H

    1994-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman being treated under the diagnosis of pneumonia was subjected to further evaluation for right back tenderness. Chest radiography revealed a granular, net-like shadow in the right lower lung field, and right pleural thickening with pleural fluid retention. Ultrasonography demonstrated a cystic mass of uniformly low echo density, corresponding to the site of tenderness. This lesion was located on the right renal dorsal, right iliopsoas muscle ventral side. Based on CT findings of internal water density and marginal enhancement, the lesion was diagnosed as an abscess. With the suspicion of right tuberculous pyothorax with retroperitoneal gravitation abscess, puncture was attempted. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the specimen. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was initiated, with drainage for symptom relief and lesion range definition. The abscess cavity communicated with the right pleural cavity via s stalk. The stalk path was confirmed by CT, and surgical curettage was performed. Tuberculous pyothorax with retroperitoneal gravitation abscess is rare and is not discussed in standard textbooks. In large series of cases it is not mentioned. In this patient we assumed that retroperitoneal gravitation abscess occurred as a result of the advanced state of tuberculous pyothorax.

  2. Nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis with splenic abscess in a pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Zulal; Erkut, Bilgehan; Kadanali, Ayten; Ates, Azman; Yekeler, Ibrahim

    2005-10-01

    A 36-year-old, 7-week-gravida patient with catheter-related nosocomial infective endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is presented in this paper. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of carbon monoxide intoxication. After 14 days, MRSA catheter-related bacteremia developed. The central venous catheter was immediately removed, and teicoplanin therapy was started. Because of persistent fever, leukocytosis, and high C-reactive protein values, endocarditis was suspected. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed 19-mm vegetation on her mitral valve, confirming the diagnosis of endocarditis. Gentamicin and rifampicin were added to the therapy regimen, and the dose of teicoplanin was increased to 12 mg/kg-day. After 8 days, a splenic abscess was detected by ultrasonography. Vegetation excision, mitral valve replacement by open-heart surgery and splenectomy were performed in the same operation. Antibiotherapy was continued for 6 weeks after surgery, and the patient's condition improved. The development of endocarditis could be prevented by proper clinical practices.

  3. A Case of Orbital Abscess following Porous Orbital Implant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung Woo; Paik, Ji-Sun; Kim, So-Youl

    2006-01-01

    Purpose We present a case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection in a 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Just one month after a seemingly uncomplicated enucleation and porous polyethylene (Medpor®) orbital implant surgery, implant exposure developed with profuse pus discharge. The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket. Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed. Results After partial orbital exenteration, the wound finally healed well without any additional abscess formation. Conclusions A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection. PMID:17302210

  4. Sterile Seroma after Drainage of Purulent Muscle Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Treitman, Adam; Tabriz, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Purulent skeletal muscle abscesses can occur in Crohn's disease. We report a case of a sterile seroma complicating percutaneous drainage of a purulent skeletal muscle abscess in Crohn's ileitis. We compare and contrast this case with a similar case we published earlier. We emphasize the importance of recognition and differentiation from a septic purulent abscess. PMID:27529038

  5. Streptococcus intermedius liver abscesses and colon cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J J; McKendrick, A I; Drelichman, V S

    2005-10-01

    Certain species of bacteria are known to be associated with colorectal cancer. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with bacteraemia and liver abscesses due to Streptococcus intermedius. The isolation of this organism should prompt investigation for colorectal neoplasm, which may be present but asymptomatic, without metastases, and therefore at a curative stage.

  6. [Elbow abscess revealing cat-scratch disease: about a case].

    PubMed

    Nkaoui, Mustafa; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Lazrek, Omar; Ibo, Nasser; Zouaidia, Fouad; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Elouadghiri, Mohamed; Lamrani, Omar; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is a common cause of chronic benign lymphadenopathy in the child and the young adult. Bartonella henselae is the agent responsible for this disease. Common symptoms include regional lymphadenopathy associated with fever. We report a clinically atypical and potentially misleading case of a 18-year old girl with CSD revealed by elbow abscess.

  7. Persistent periodic hiccups following brain abscess: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, P H; Joosten, E M; Vingerhoets, H M

    1990-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient with periodic persistent hiccups and secondary generalised epilepsy lasting for a period of five years following a right temporal brain abscess. The recurring episodes of hiccups had a ten day rhythmicity and unlike epileptic convulsions were unresponsive to treatment. Images PMID:2303837

  8. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, T C; Kalamchi, S

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses.

  9. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  10. Case report: perinephric-splenic fistula--a complication of percutaneous perinephric abscess drainage.

    PubMed

    Stewart, I E; Borland, C

    1994-09-01

    A case of acute perinephric abscess due to chronic parenchymal disease and calculi is presented. During percutaneous drainage a reno-splenic vein communication developed acutely. The aetiology and treatment complications of perinephric abscesses are reviewed.

  11. Abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection: three case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Ho, Mao-Wang; Yang, Ya-Fei; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Wang, I-Kuan; Lin, Shin-Huang; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we present 3 cases of abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri. All infected patients recovered after initial empirical antibiotic treatment and percutaneous drainage of the abscess. We reviewed the literature and found 9 adult cases of C. koseri abscess. Most of these patients recovered after timely antibiotic treatment and drainage.

  12. Large tonsillolith mimicking peritonsillar abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Ohashi, N; Nakagawa, H; Asai, M; Koizumi, F

    1993-01-01

    A case of large tonsillolith is described. A 26-year-old male presented with a history of recurrent throat infections. A diagnosis of peritonsillar abscess was made. A tonsillolith was spontaneously expelled on admission. A tonsillectomy was subsequently performed. The tonsillolith was yellowish-gray, measured 30 x 26 x 16 mm, and weighed 8.5 g, which was the largest reported case in Japan. Chemical analysis revealed the stone to consist of calcium phosphate.

  13. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  14. [Liver abscess and infective endocarditis cases caused by Ruminococcus productus].

    PubMed

    Sucu, Nurgün; Köksal, Iftihar; Yilmaz, Gürdal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Caylan, Rahmet; Aktoz Boz, Gönülden

    2006-10-01

    The genus Ruminococcus which are anaerobe Gram positive cocci, previously classified as Peptostreptococcus, may colonize the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, vagina and skin of humans and animals. In this report a case of liver abscess and a case of infective endocarditis caused by Ruminoccocus productus, which is very rarely encountered in the clinical practice were presented. The first case was a 32 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2002, with the complaints of fever lasting for 20 days and pain while breathing. The abdominal ultrasonography revealed the presence of a liver abscess, and the drainage material from the abscess yielded Ruminococcus productus, identified in BACTEC 9200 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md) anaerobe system. As the isolate was found to be sensitive to penicilin, the empirical gentamicin and ampicillin/sulbactam therapy was continued. The second case was a 25 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2005, with the signs of fever lasting for 3-4 months, chills, bone and joint pains. As multiple vegetations were detected in echocardiography, blood cultures were collected and empirical therapy with ceftriaxone and gentamicin was initiated with the preliminary diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Bacteria which were isolated from blood cultures by BACTEC 9200 system have been identified as R. productus. As this strain was also sensitive to penicillin, the empirical therapy was changed to penicilin and gentamicin. These two cases indicated that R. productus should be considered in complicated infections even if it is a rarely isolated species from the clinical samples.

  15. Paracervical abscesses as life-threatening complications of outpatient pain treatment. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Michael; Piek, Jürgen

    2004-12-15

    The authors present three cases of iatrogenic paracervical abscesses caused by infiltration therapy of pain medications used in conservative treatment in patients with chronic cervicobrachialgia. All three patients had received this therapy several times before presenting with clinical signs of a local infection. The diagnosis was made based on results of the clinical examination, laboratory tests, and magnetic resonance imaging. The organism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus in all cases. After immediate surgery and long-term antibiotic therapy, all patients had a good outcome. The authors conclude that infectious complications after invasive outpatient treatment often go undiagnosed, but as shown in these three cases can lead to acute and sometimes life-threatening complications. If the disease is diagnosed early, immediate surgical evacuation combined with antibiotic therapy results in recovery. For medicolegal reasons it should kept in mind that even a routine injection may lead to such complications.

  16. A case of hepatocolic fistula after percutaneous drainage for a gas-containing pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H; Matsuyama, S; Mashima, H; Imoto, A; Hidaka, K; Hisatsugu, T

    1994-12-01

    We describe a rare case of gas-containing pyogenic liver abscess which penetrated the adjacent colon, forming a hepatocolic fistula, after percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) had been performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocolic fistula associated with a gas-forming liver abscess in a diabetic patient, with radiological and surgical confirmation of the fistula.

  17. Microbiology and Management of Pediatric Liver Abscesses: Two Cases Caused by Streptococcus anginosus Group

    PubMed Central

    Cellucci, Michael; Simon, Erin; Eppes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses in the pediatric population are rare occurrences in the developed world. We present two cases of previously healthy males presenting with fever and abdominal pain found to have liver abscesses due to organisms in the Streptococcus anginosus group. The microbiology of S. anginosus along with the management and recommended treatment in children with liver abscesses is discussed. PMID:23119195

  18. Microbiology and Management of Pediatric Liver Abscesses: Two Cases Caused by Streptococcus anginosus Group.

    PubMed

    Cellucci, Michael; Simon, Erin; Eppes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses in the pediatric population are rare occurrences in the developed world. We present two cases of previously healthy males presenting with fever and abdominal pain found to have liver abscesses due to organisms in the Streptococcus anginosus group. The microbiology of S. anginosus along with the management and recommended treatment in children with liver abscesses is discussed.

  19. Psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Ding, Wenyuan; Yang, Dalong

    2014-01-01

    Psoas abscesses are classified into primary or secondary according to infectious etiology. However, the psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection is very rare. Here we report a case of psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection in a young woman. The disease was treated successfully. A literature review of psoas abscess in relation to its etiology, identification, and difficulties in the treatment is also presented. PMID:25356161

  20. Perianal abscess caused by Actinomyces: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Magdeburg, R; Grobholz, R; Dornschneider, G; Post, S; Bussen, D

    2008-12-01

    Most anal abscesses are caused by anal fistula and invasion of the surrounding tissues by a mixed colonic flora. The treatment comprises excision of the abscess and. if appropriate, fistulectomy. Primary anorectal actinomycosis and perianal actinomycosis are very rare and are caused by Actinomyces, which is a ubiquitous microaerophilic bacterium. Here we report a case of perianal actinomycosis. The patient had a short history of painless perineal induration without fever or leucocytosis with normal routine blood tests. After excision sulphur granules drained from the cavity and the pathological investigations were indicative of perianal actinomycosis. Appropriate surgery and antibiotic treatment healed the perianal infection. After elimination of other diagnoses, e.g. Crohn's disease, tuberculosis and malignant growths, this rare case of perianal actinomycosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of a painless perianal mass.

  1. Holocord spinal epidural abscess: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Ma, X; Shen, N; Yue, B; Zhang, G; Chen, B

    2016-10-01

    Holocord spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition. To our knowledge, five cases of SEA have been reported so far, and no consensus has been made on the treatment yet. In this article, we report a case of holocord SEA and review literature to further understanding of SEA. The advent of antibiotic treatment and the recognition of surgical debridement have been important in searching for alternatives to recovery, so the patient was treated surgically together with systemic antibiotics. The patient remained neurologically stable and continued to be clinically in good condition without any low back pain after 1 year. Surgical drainage, together with systemic antibiotics, is the main treatment choice for extensive SEAs. Although treatment should be considered that highlights the importance of examining the factors related to the health and condition of the patients and the anatomy and extent of the abscess, early surgical treatment associated with prolonged antibiotic treatment is necessary.

  2. A case of Bacteroides pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Eun; Park, So-Young; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes, a non-spore-forming, anaerobic, gram-negative rod, is a component of the oral flora of animals and has, on occasion, been reported to cause human infection through dog or cat bites. We report the first case of B. pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess with no history of an animal bite. The microorganism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess in an immunocompetent host without risk factors: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vergori, Alessandra; Cerase, Alfonso; Migliorini, Lucia; Pluchino, Maria Grazia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Arrigucci, Umberto; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) are unusual bacterial infections, with possible devastating neurologic sequelae. Despite abundance of case series in adults, reports in children are scanty. We describe a spontaneous SEA due to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in a previously healthy 15-year old male, and we perform a literature review regarding management of pediatric SEAs without risk factors, from 2001 to 2014. We found a total of 12 cases (8 males, average age 9.6 years). Clinical presentation was mainly fever, back pain and elevation of inflammation markers. All cases were initially misdiagnosed. Lumbar puncture was performed in 36% of patients. Etiological diagnosis was obtained in 8 cases. MSSA was isolated in 4 patients, methicillin-resistant S. aureus in 1 patient, and S. aureus with unknown susceptibility patterns in 2 cases. The average of therapy duration was 6 weeks. Patients' spine was always evaluated by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging; most abscesses were localized at thoracic and lumbar area, without osteomyelitis. In 8 cases, laminectomy and/or abscess drainage were performed in association with medical therapy; 3 cases were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy only; no data were available in one case. A good outcome was obtained in all patients, except a reported residual headache and paraspinal pain lasting for 3 years. The rarity and the possible differential diagnosis can lead to underestimate SEA occurrence in children without risk factors. It seems therefore essential to maintain a high attention to pediatric SEAs. A prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy are essential prognostic factors for remission.

  4. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess in an immunocompetent host without risk factors: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vergori, Alessandra; Cerase, Alfonso; Migliorini, Lucia; Pluchino, Maria Grazia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Arrigucci, Umberto; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) are unusual bacterial infections, with possible devastating neurologic sequelae. Despite abundance of case series in adults, reports in children are scanty. We describe a spontaneous SEA due to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in a previously healthy 15-year old male, and we perform a literature review regarding management of pediatric SEAs without risk factors, from 2001 to 2014. We found a total of 12 cases (8 males, average age 9.6 years). Clinical presentation was mainly fever, back pain and elevation of inflammation markers. All cases were initially misdiagnosed. Lumbar puncture was performed in 36% of patients. Etiological diagnosis was obtained in 8 cases. MSSA was isolated in 4 patients, methicillin-resistant S. aureus in 1 patient, and S. aureus with unknown susceptibility patterns in 2 cases. The average of therapy duration was 6 weeks. Patients’ spine was always evaluated by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging; most abscesses were localized at thoracic and lumbar area, without osteomyelitis. In 8 cases, laminectomy and/or abscess drainage were performed in association with medical therapy; 3 cases were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy only; no data were available in one case. A good outcome was obtained in all patients, except a reported residual headache and paraspinal pain lasting for 3 years. The rarity and the possible differential diagnosis can lead to underestimate SEA occurrence in children without risk factors. It seems therefore essential to maintain a high attention to pediatric SEAs. A prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy are essential prognostic factors for remission. PMID:26793474

  5. Brain abscess due to odontogenic infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yong; Suh, Dong Won; Park, Chul Min; Oh, Min Seok

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of brain abscess due to odontogenic infection. A 53-year-old female who had been suffering from headache and trismus for two weeks visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Sun Dental Hospital (Daejeon, Korea). Even after several routine tests, we still could not make a diagnosis. However, after the combined multidisciplinary efforts of oral surgeons and neurosurgeons, the patient was treated for odontogenic infection and made an uneventful recovery. Therefore, patients with infections in the head and neck region showing symptoms such as headache, changes in mental state, nausea, vomiting, seizures, hemiplegia, speech disturbance, and visual disturbance, a brain abscess should be included in the list of differential diagnoses. PMID:25045643

  6. Treatment of localized abscesses induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using MRgFUS: First in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, Birgit; Curiel, Laura; Mougenot, Charles; Zhang, Kunyan; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    Background. In the present work we study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on localized abscess induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen in health-care facilities. The people, particularly those who are immunocompromised are prone to develop infectious sites that often are non-responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity to propose a new therapy for MRSA-related infections. Methods. A 50μL subcutaneous injection of MRSA strain USA 400 bacteria at a concentration of 7×103/μL was made on the left thigh of BALB/c mice and an abscess of 6±2 mm-length formed after 48hrs. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50mm and diameter of 32mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection 4 ultrasound exposures of 9s-each were applied to each abscess under Magnetic Resonance-guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed in our laboratory. Three experimental groups of 6 animals each were tested: moderate temperature (MT), high temperature (HT) and control. MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 55°C and 65°C at end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by culturing bacteria of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Spleen samples were cultured to test for septicemia. Results. Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1d after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. Bacteria counting 1 day after treatment was 0.7±1.1 × 105, 0.5±0.7 × 105 and 1.1±2.3 × 105 CFU/μl for MT, HT and control groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 0.6±0.6

  7. Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a new aetiological agent of prostatic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Diego; Arroyo, Carlos; Suarez, Ruben; Campolo, Horacio; Izaguirre, Juan; Decía, Ricardo; Machado, Miguel; Carvalhal, Gustavo Franco; Clavijo, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic abscess is rare. Its potentially serious course requires a high level of clinical suspicion and prompt and effective treatment. The causative germs are usually either enterobacteria or Enterococcus. The authors highlight the importance of considering epidemiological and clinical aspects in the early diagnosis and treatment. Prostatic abscess due to community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus has three typical characteristics: skin entry point, periprostatic compromise, and anaemia and low prothrombin. PMID:22696740

  8. Successful Treatment with Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration of Intractable Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Brain Abscess in an Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-kyung; Kim, Young-soo; Lee, Young-soo; Oh, Sung-hee; Lee, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses are an uncommon and devastating complication of bacteremia in extremely low birth weight infants (<1 kg). We report a 25-week preterm neonate who developed a brain abscess 4 weeks following methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) sepsis. A huge brain abscess was seen with routine brain sonography on day 19 of life. Despite intravenous vancomycin treatment, the brain abscess increased in size and was associated with increased intracranial pressure on day 49 of life. The brain abscess was accompanied by mild meningeal inflammation with negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Diagnosis of abscess was confirmed by bedside ultrasound-guided aspiration, and MRSA was isolated from the pus culture. The MRSA brain abscess refractory to vancomycin was successfully treated by surgical ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle aspiration of brain abscess and prolonged courses of antibiotic administration. At the time of this report, the infant was 9 months old (corrected age was 6 months) and had normal neurodevelopment for her corrected age on the Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A case of brain abscess extended from deep fascial space infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruo; Karakida, Kazunari; Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Arai, Masayuki; Shimoda, Masami

    2009-09-01

    A case of brain abscess in the temporal lobe caused by direct intracranial extension of deep neck abscess is described. The abscess also spread to the orbital cavity through infraorbital fissure. The possible etiology of this case might be dental surgery. The diagnostic imaging clearly showed the routes of intracranial and -orbital extension of parapharyngeal and masticator space abscesses. From the abscess specimens, oral streptococci, anaerobic streptococci, and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli were isolated. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates showed that some Prevotella and Fusobacterium strains had decreased susceptibility to penicillin, and these bacteria produced beta-lactamase. The bacteria from the deep neck abscess were consistent with those detected from the brain abscess. Proper diagnosis, aggressive surgical intervention, and antibiotics chemotherapy saved the patient from this life-threatening condition.

  10. Unexpected lumbar abscess due to scarification wet cupping: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turtay, Muhammet Gokhan; Turgut, Kasım; Oguzturk, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    This case presents a rare cause of lumbar abscess. A 51-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with a complaint of lumbar pain. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbar abscess. The abscess was treated with drainage of the abscess and antibiotic. Scarification wet cupping therapy should be taken into consideration as a rare cause of lumbar abscesses in patients who present with skin findings indicative of scarification. Scarification wet cupping therapy practitioners must pay attention to hygienic measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain abscess secondary to a dental infection in an 11-year-old child: case report.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Christine E; Nguyen, Trang D

    2012-01-01

    A primary molar dental abscess was implicated as the cause of a brain abscess in an 11-year-old boy. This case report describes the neurological signs and symptoms, and acute management of a brain abscess in a child. A brain abscess is provisionally diagnosed from the patient's medical history, as well as the presence of signs and symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, focal neurological deficit, altered mentation, speech alterations, papillary edema, and neck stiffness or seizures. A definitive diagnosis of brain abscess is confirmed through imaging. The dental source of infection is identified by the exclusion of more probable foci such as the ears, heart, lungs, eyes or sinuses.

  12. Unroofed Coronary Sinus Presenting as Cerebral Abscess: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Avinash; Jain, Ankit; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    A sixty eight year-old woman with a long-standing history of hypertension, dizziness and a history of congenital heart disease presented with speech difficulties and disorientation. She was diagnosed with a brain abscess, confirmed by a stereotactic biopsy. Transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation revealed a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with an unroofed coronary sinus (URCS) along with a small secundum atrial septal defect. Her heart catheterization showed a partially unroofed coronary sinus along with a bidirectional shunt. She was referred for surgical closure of her unroofed coronary sinus and the secundum atrial septal defect. Her brain abscess responded well to antibiotic treatment. While waiting for open-heart surgery, she suffered from an acute myocardial infarction and underwent emergent percutaneous coronary intervention to the right coronary artery. Subsequently, she underwent elective surgical repair of the unroofed coronary sinus, along with closure of the atrial septal defect. When she was seen in follow-up she reported a complete resolution of her dizziness and felt more energetic. Unroofed coronary sinus syndrome (URCS) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly in which there is a communication between the coronary sinus and the left atrium. While non-invasive imaging with echocardiography, MRI or CT is helpful in making the diagnosis, cardiac catheterization remains integral in the evaluation and management planning. Management is guided by the presence of clinical symptoms with consideration of repair when patients become symptomatic. Prognosis after surgery is excellent, recently transcatheter based treatment therapies are becoming more frequent. We present a rare case of URCS with PLSVC presenting as a cerebral abscess in late adulthood. She had bidirectional shunting manifesting as a cerebral abscess. She responded well to the corrective surgery and was doing well on follow up.

  13. [A case of pulmonary abscess in which Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Streptococcus intermedius were isolated by percutaneous needle aspiration].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Tsuboi, Eiyasu; Takaya, Hisashi; Sugino, Keishi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Kawabata, Masateru; Kishi, Kazuma; Narui, Koji; Homma, Sakae; Nakatani, Tatsuo; Nakata, Koichiro; Yoshimura, Kunihiko

    2006-08-01

    Some microbes, including the Bacteroides species, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus milleri groups, can cause pulmonary abscess. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is usually categorized as one of the normal flora which colonizes in the ears and the nasopharynx, and it has been long considered that H. parainfluenzae has little pathogenicity in the lower respiratory tract and lung parenchymal. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary abscess caused by both H. parainfluenzae and Streptococcus intermedius. The patient was a 75-year-old man who had had total esophageo-gastrectomy because of esophageal cancer. He presented with purulent sputum, and chest X-ray film showed a dense consolidation in the right upper lung field. CT-guided transcutaneous fine needle aspiration was performed as a diagnostic procedure. Since both H. parainfluenzae and S. intermedius had been isolated from the lesion, pulmonary abscess caused by these two pathogens was diagnosed. The patient was treated with panipenem/betamipron, and his symptoms and pulmonary infiltrates on the chest X-ray film improved thereafter. So far, very few cases have been reported in which H. parainfluenzae caused lower respiratory tract infection. Although S. intermedius is known as one of the pathogens of pulmonary abscess, it is possible that H. parainfluenzae could also be pathogenic in infectious diseases of the lung.

  14. [Postoperative complications of Bartholin's duct abscess. About two cases].

    PubMed

    Chêne, G; Tardieu, A-S; Nohuz, E; Rabischong, B; Favard, A; Mage, G

    2006-01-01

    Bartholinitis is the most common infectious vulvar disease and develops in approximately 2% of all women. The choice concerning treatment may be uneasy between medical or surgical modalities, and we have to be cautious because of the risk of severe complications associated with the procedure. We report two cases: one case of sepsis and the other one of bacterial cellulitis after Bartholin's duct abscess marsupialization. In the light of epidemiological and bacteriological date referring to Bartholinitis, we recommend a safe and effective management (particularly the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics) that we will describe.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Nitric-oxide Synthase Affects Antibiotic Sensitivity and Skin Abscess Development*

    PubMed Central

    van Sorge, Nina M.; Beasley, Federico C.; Gusarov, Ivan; Gonzalez, David J.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Anik, Sabina; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nudler, Evgeny; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present an enormous global health concern complicated by an alarming increase in antibiotic resistance. S. aureus is among the few bacterial species that express nitric-oxide synthase (bNOS) and thus can catalyze NO production from l-arginine. Here we generate an isogenic bNOS-deficient mutant in the epidemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 clone to study its contribution to virulence and antibiotic susceptibility. Loss of bNOS increased MRSA susceptibility to reactive oxygen species and host cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, which correlated with increased MRSA killing by human neutrophils and within neutrophil extracellular traps. bNOS also promoted resistance to the pharmaceutical antibiotics that act on the cell envelope such as vancomycin and daptomycin. Surprisingly, bNOS-deficient strains gained resistance to aminoglycosides, suggesting that the role of bNOS in antibiotic susceptibility is more complex than previously observed in Bacillus species. Finally, the MRSA bNOS mutant showed reduced virulence with decreased survival and smaller abscess generation in a mouse subcutaneous infection model. Together, these data indicate that bNOS contributes to MRSA innate immune and antibiotic resistance phenotypes. Future development of specific bNOS inhibitors could be an attractive option to simultaneously reduce MRSA pathology and enhance its susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics. PMID:23322784

  16. Disseminated nocardiosis with psoas abscess in a patient with AIDS: first reported case.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Solari, Rubén; De Carolis, Luis; Cangelos, Diana; Bianchi, Mario; Negroni, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Psoas muscle abscess is an uncommon infection that have been diagnosed increasingly in the last years. We present a case of a patient with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed a disseminated infection due to Nocardia asteroides sensu stricto type VI with psoas abscess. To our knowledge no other cases of Nocardia psoas abscess in the setting of HIV infection have been reported in the literature.

  17. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  18. Spinal epidural abscess successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Chen, Chi-Jen; Tang, Lok-Ming; Chen, Sien-Tsong

    2002-08-01

    We describe a case of a posterior spinal epidural abscess that was successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy. A 48-year-old man experienced acute pain in the paralumbar region for 1 week, followed by gait disturbance and micturition difficulty. Laboratory studies demonstrated leukocytosis and hyperglycemia. Blood cultures yielded Staphylococcus aureus. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the thoracolumbar spine revealed a posterior spinal epidural abscess located between L2 and the lower cervical spine. The patient's low back pain persisted despite 10 days of antibiotic therapy. Therefore, percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration was performed. The low back pain was relieved dramatically and immediately after the procedure. The spinal epidural abscess completely resolved after 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment. Surgical decompression and antibiotic therapy are the treatments of choice for patients with spinal epidural abscesses. Selected patients may be treated nonsurgically. Rarely, percutaneous drainage of the abscess has been reported to be helpful. Our case suggests that percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration might be a rational alternative to surgical decompression for treatment of spinal epidural abscesses.

  19. Citrobacter freundii brain abscess in a preterm infant: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Plakkal, Nishad; Soraisham, Amuchou Singh; Amin, Harish

    2013-04-01

    Intracranial abscesses are serious conditions but uncommon in preterm neonates. Citrobacter species are an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis in neonates, but are associated with brain abscesses in a majority of cases. We report a preterm infant who developed Citrobacter freundii meningitis with brain abscess, who was successfully treated with antibiotics and surgical drainage. The infant had normal neurological outcome at follow-up. We report this case to highlight the importance of serial neuroimaging in the diagnosis of cerebral abscess in infants with Citrobacter meningitis.

  20. Liver hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by ingested fish bones: surgical management of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Matrella, Fulvio; Piardi, Tullio; Dokmak, Safi; Bruno, Onorina; Maestraggi, Quentin; Kianmanesh, Reza; Sommacale, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Several hepatobiliary complications secondary to gastrointestinal perforation after ingestion of a fish bone have been described in the literature, the most common being liver abscess, which can be potentially fatal. Treatment involves removal of the foreign body if possible (endoscopically or surgically), drainage of the abscess (radiologically or surgically), and appropriate antibiotic therapy. To our knowledge, no cases of hepatic hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by a fish bone have been described in the literature. We report surgical management of two cases of abscess localized in the hepatic hilum secondary to the ingestion of fish bones. PMID:25019078

  1. [Pneumoperitoneum due to splenic abscess: a diagnostic challenge. Case Report].

    PubMed

    Peña-Ros, Emilio; Méndez-Martínez, Marcelino; Vicente-Ruiz, María; Sánchez-Cifuentes, Ángela; Martínez-Sanz, Nuria; Albarracín Marín-Blázquez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare clinic entity, its incidence has increased due to the rising number of clinical conditions involving immunosuppression. Endocarditis is the most frequent cause, and gram-positive aerobes are the main causal agents. Its clinical presentation is non-specific and delays diagnosis. Computed tomography scan is the method of choice, and the treatment is based on antibiotics and drainage, radiological or surgical, involving splenectomy in special cases that require it. A 55-year-old man with abdominal pain and fever. The analysis revealed leukocytosis 14,000/mm3, prothrombin activity 53%, and metabolic acidosis. Computed tomography scan showed a peri-hepatic pneumoperitoneum, liquid fluid, and peri-splenic bubbles, and slight trabeculation of fat around the duodenal bulb with pneumoperitoneum in this area. Patient underwent a median laparotomy, finding a purulent peritonitis due to a ruptured abscess in the spleen, splenectomy was performed. Fluid culture showed polymorphonuclears, with no microorganisms identified. The patient progressed and was discharged on the 5th post-operative day. Splenic abscess is an uncommon condition, in which the diagnosis is delayed and mortality, in untreated patients, is high. Its association with pneumoperitoneum may confuse the diagnosis towards viscera perforation. Thus it must be suspected in the finding of unknown cause of pneumoperitoneum by complementary examinations. The treatment of choice is splenectomy, because the capsular rupture is the norm in all of them. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between psoas abscess and prosthetic hip infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Dupon, Michel; Dutronc, Hervé; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Dubuisson, Vincent; Souillac, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between prosthetic hip infection and a psoas abscess is poorly documented. We determined the frequency of prosthetic hip infections associated with psoas abscesses and identified their determinants. We conducted a 2-year observational study. Data from patients with psoas abscesses that were associated with prosthetic hip infections were examined in a case-control study. Of 106 patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department with prosthetic hip infection, 13 also had a psoas abscess (12%; 95% CI: 6-19). By conditional logistic regression analysis, psoas abscesses were observed more frequently in cases of hematogenous prosthetic infections (OR = 93, p = 0.06) and in patients with a history of neoplasm (OR = 20, p = 0.03). Our results suggest that the presence of psoas abscesses is a frequent but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip infection. We recommend that an abdominal CT scan be performed on patients with hematogenous prosthetic hip infection or with a history of neoplasm.

  3. Falciform Ligament Abscess after Omphalitis: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Won; Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2010-01-01

    A falciform ligament abscess is a rare type of intra-abdominal abscess. A 2-yr-old male, who had omphalitis two months previously, presented with a fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The ultrasound and CT scan showed an abdominal wall abscess located anterior to the liver, which was refractory to conservative management with percutaneous draninage and antibiotics. On the third recurrence, surgical exploration was performed and revealed an abscess arising from the falciform ligament; the falciform ligament was excised. A follow up ultrasound confirmed complete resolution of the abscess with no further recurrence. PMID:20592906

  4. Falciform ligament abscess after omphalitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Lee, Hae Won; Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2010-07-01

    A falciform ligament abscess is a rare type of intra-abdominal abscess. A 2-yr-old male, who had omphalitis two months previously, presented with a fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The ultrasound and CT scan showed an abdominal wall abscess located anterior to the liver, which was refractory to conservative management with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. On the third recurrence, surgical exploration was performed and revealed an abscess arising from the falciform ligament; the falciform ligament was excised. A follow up ultrasound confirmed complete resolution of the abscess with no further recurrence.

  5. Spinal epidural abscess in hemodialysis patients: a case series and review.

    PubMed

    Wong, San S; Daka, Smitha; Pastewski, Andrew; Kyaw, Win; Chapnick, Edward; Sepkowitz, Douglas

    2011-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare but potentially devastating condition. We noticed an increase in the number of cases of SEA, with the majority in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This prompted a retrospective chart review of all cases of SEA admitted from 2000 to 2005 and a literature search of similar cases. We identified 19 SEA cases treated at Long Island College Hospital during this 6-year period, of which six were on HD: four were dialyzed via catheter, one via arteriovenous fistula, and in one the method of dialysis was not documented. Four patients had bacteremia with Staphylococcus aureus. Four patients presented with paresis or paralysis; only one improved. The mortality rate was 33% (2/6). We found 30 other cases of SEA in patients on HD from the literature. These 36 HD cases were compared with 85 SEA cases that were not on HD (13 from our study and 72 described in two large case series). The mortality rate was noted to be much higher in HD patients (23% [6/26] versus 7% [6/85]). Neurologic deficit at presentation was noted in 47% (17/36) of HD patients versus 69% (59/85) of non-HD patients, but neurologic improvement was higher in non-HD patients (71% [42/59] versus 29% [5/17]). This is the largest literature review of SEA in patients on HD. When compared with non-HD patients, HD patients had a higher mortality rate and were less likely to improve neurologically.

  6. Case report: brain and liver abscesses caused by oral infection with Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kai Wolfgang; Schön, Ralf; Schumacher, Martin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Schulze, Dirk

    2006-10-01

    Organ abscesses are a rare and life-threatening complication mostly of hematogenously disseminated infections. We report a case of brain and liver abscesses. Identification of the lesions was made by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. An oral examination comprised an oral focus of infection. Streptococcus intermedius was isolated from oral smear, liver and ventricular drainage, and blood sample. After the commencement of antibiotic therapy, drainage of abscesses and oral rehabilitation, complete recovery was noted.

  7. Delayed brain abscess related to a retained foreign body with culture of Clostridium bifermentans. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pencek, T L; Burchiel, K J

    1986-05-01

    Although it is well documented that retained foreign bodies are associated with delayed intracranial abscess, there are few reports of anaerobic organism growth. A case is presented in which a left parieto-occipital abscess surrounded a metallic fragment implanted when a mortar shell exploded in Vietnam 15 years before. The diagnostic evaluation and surgical management of this case are presented.

  8. Group A streptococcal brain abscess: a case report and a review of the literature since 1988.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Anri; Takano, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Narumiya, Seiro

    2011-07-01

    Brain abscesses caused by group A Streptococcus (GAS) are rare infectious diseases. In this report we present a case of brain abscess due to GAS infection occurring after milk tooth extraction in a healthy child. A literature review of previously reported cases is presented.

  9. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: feasibility study in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura

    2014-06-01

    To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. 50 μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10(5) colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess

  10. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic

  11. Case Report of a Primary Pituitary Abscess and Systematic Literature Review of Pituitary Abscess with a Focus on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Justice O; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Leonardo, Jody

    2017-05-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition with an incidence of 0.2%-1.1% of operative pituitary lesions. Diagnosis can be challenging, because this disorder shares many similarities with other pituitary lesions in terms of signs and symptoms and radiographic findings. Most pituitary abscesses are categorized as secondary, arising from preexisting pituitary lesions or in conjunction with transsphenoidal surgery, sepsis, meningitis, or sinusitis. There have been only a few reports of primary pituitary abscess, which occurs without any of the aforementioned risk factors. We present a case of primary pituitary abscess in a 38-year-old woman with headaches, blurry vision, polyuria, and polydipsia who was found to have hypopituitarism. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar/suprasellar mass, which was endoscopically resected via a transsphenoidal approach. Egress of yellow-greenish creamy fluid was noted on dural incision. The patient was treated with a 6-week course of antibiotic therapy postoperatively and had resolution of symptoms. A PubMed search was performed; all cases of pituitary abscess reported in the literature were screened, and 200 cases including our case were analyzed with a focus on outcomes. The most common presentations were headache, visual disturbance, and endocrine abnormalities. Approximately 66.1% of patients achieved partial or complete recovery of pituitary function; 75.7% with vision deficits recovered visual function. Treatment via a craniotomy had a recurrence rate of 17.2% compared with 9.7% via a transsphenoidal approach. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review on the topic and the largest series reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A rare case of lethal retroperitoneal abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tommaso; Giubilei, Gianluca; Vichi, Francesca; Farina, Umberto; Costanzi, Antonio; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Retroperitoneal abscesses are very uncommon clinical conditions. The characteristically vague symptomatology of retroperitoneal abscess and the inherent difficulty of identifying retroperitoneal disease by physical examination contributed to these dismal therapeutic outcomes. We present an unusual case of lethal retroperitoneal abscess, caused by Citrobacter diversus(koseri), treated with surgical drainage. Citrobacter species have rarely been involved in deep tissue infection and there is no reported case of lethal retroperitoneal abscess caused by C. koseri. This case is the only reported case of C. koseri as the sole pathogen associated with a lethal retroperitoneal abscess in immunocompetent patient. The case is also notable because it confirms the recent bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and to other antimicrobial agents, like chloramphenicol or cotrimoxazol.

  13. Fusarium brain abscess: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Ramos; Min, Zaw; Narasimhan, Supriya; Bhanot, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Severely immunocompromised patients such as those with haematological malignancies and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are at an increased risk of acquiring invasive mould infections. Fusarium, a ubiquitous fungus, can cause potentially fatal infections in such hosts. It usually manifests as skin lesions, fevers and sino-pulmonary infections. Brain abscesses have been reported, but are relatively uncommon. We report a case of a 50-year-old patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia and failed autologous peripheral stem cell transplant that presented with new onset seizures and was found to have Fusarium solani brain abscess. Nasal route was the presumed mode of entry of the fungus into the cerebrum. Treatment comprised surgical excision of the lesion, and antimycotic therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole. Despite aggressive therapy, patient succumbed to the disease. We have provided an overview of infections secondary to Fusarium, along with a review of the central nervous system involvement by this pathogenic mould. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. [A case of multiple liver abscesses associated with Streptococcus salivarius in a patient with chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Saori; Otsuka, Taiga; Tsuji, Chika; Nakashita, Shunya; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an oral commensal bacterium that rarely causes disease in humans. Here, we report a case of liver abscess associated with S. salivarius in a 41-year-old woman who presented with continuous abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and fever. She was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses; she underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage. Thereafter, S. salivarius was isolated in all bacterial cultures of the drained abscesses, and it was sensitive to penicillins. She made a good recovery after treatment. In the absence of an infective source other than chronic periodontitis, the cause of liver abscesses was attributed to oral S. salivarius. S. salivarius is a normal oral commensal, and oral commensals must be considered if the infective origin of liver abscess cannot be determined.

  15. [Putaminal abscess occurring at the site of hemorrhage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sumioka, S; Kajikawa, H; Yamamura, K; Furuse, M; Kajikawa, M; Pant, B

    1996-09-01

    Brain abscesses following stroke have been reported only rarely. We presented a case of putaminal abscess following putaminal hemorrhage. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of acute onset of left hemiplegia. The size of the hematoma was medium and the patient was conservatively treated. In about two months after the ictus, he became intermittently febrile and laboratory examinations suggested the presence of general infections including meningitis. Meanwhile, CT and MRI revealed clearly abscess formation at the site of the hematoma with remarkable brain edema. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed the findings of meningitis. On diagnosis of brain abscess, stereotactic exploration was performed and pus mixed with old blood was aspirated. Bacteriological study of the specimen demonstrated Morganella morganii. Postoperative course was uneventful and the abscess cavity gradually subsided following drainage and irrigation of the abscess cavity.

  16. Multiple psoas abscess formation after pharmacopuncture -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Koo, Eun Hye; Choi, Sang Sik; Chung, Dong Hun; Lee, Il Ok; Kim, Nan Sook; Lim, Sang Ho

    2010-12-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used in alternative medicine for pain relief but may have many complications due to lack of appropriate cares. Pharmacopuncture is a sort of acupuncture that injects a herbal ingredient through a thin tube for the purpose of combining the effects of the herb and acupuncture and it has many pitfalls. The agents used in pharmacopuncture are not refined for a desired effect and not produced by sterile standard processes under strict medical surveillance. We report a case of a 44-yr-old male patient who had multiple abscesses in the psoas region with fever, right low back and hip pain that began after the pharmacopuncture treatment. This case shows that although pharmacopuncture has been practiced widely, it is important that the appropriate aseptic technique should be used to prevent severe infections and other complications.

  17. Hepatic abscess induced by foreign body: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sofia A; Alberto, Sara CF; Cruz, Elsa; Pires, Eduardo; Figueira, Tomás; Coimbra, Élia; Estevez, José; Oliveira, Mário; Novais, Luís; Deus, João R

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic abscess due to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract caused by ingested foreign bodies is uncommon. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult as patients are often unaware of the foreign body ingestion and symptoms and imagiology are usually non-specific. The authors report a case of 62-year-old woman who was admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Further investigation revealed hepatic abscess, without resolution despite antibiotic therapy. A liver abscess resulting from perforation and intra-hepatic migration of a bone coming from the pilorum was diagnosed by surgery. The literature concerning foreign body-induced perforation of the gastrointestinal tract complicated by liver abscess is reviewed. PMID:17457985

  18. Retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Coulthard, M; Isaacs, D

    1991-01-01

    Of 31 children with retropharyngeal abscess treated at this hospital between 1954 and 1990, 17 (55%) were 12 months old or less and 10 (32%) less than 6 months. Three of these 10 children were neonates, only one of whom had a predisposing congenital lesion. Fourteen children (45%) had a preceding upper respiratory illness and four (13%) had a prior history of pharyngeal trauma or ingestion of a foreign body. In children less than 1 year old the clinical presentation was usually classical with fever, neck swelling, stridor, and pharyngeal swelling. Significantly fewer children over 1 year had neck swelling and no child over 3 years old had stridor. A lateral radiograph of the neck, when performed, had a sensitivity of 88% in diagnosis. Bacteria isolated included pure growths of Staphylococcus aureus (25%), klebsiella species (13%), group A streptococcus (8%), and a mixture of Gram negative and anaerobic organisms (38%). There were two deaths. In six cases (24%) the abscess recurred necessitating further surgical drainage. Images Figure 2 PMID:1953008

  19. Genes Contributing to Staphylococcus aureus Fitness in Abscess- and Infection-Related Ecologies

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael D.; Foulston, Lucy; Sadaka, Ama; Kos, Veronica N.; Villet, Regis A.; Santa Maria, John; Lazinski, David W.; Camilli, Andrew; Walker, Suzanne; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of both community- and hospital-acquired infections that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. The emergence of S. aureus resistance to even last-line antibiotics heightens the need for the development of new drugs with novel targets. We generated a highly saturated transposon insertion mutant library in the genome of S. aureus and used Tn-seq analysis to probe the entire genome, with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity, for genes of importance in infection. We further identified genes contributing to fitness in various infected compartments (blood and ocular fluids) and compared them to genes required for growth in rich medium. This resulted in the identification of 426 genes that were important for S. aureus fitness during growth in infection models, including 71 genes that could be considered essential for survival specifically during infection. These findings highlight novel as well as previously known genes encoding virulence traits and metabolic pathways important for S. aureus proliferation at sites of infection, which may represent new therapeutic targets. PMID:25182329

  20. Klebsiella pneumonia liver abscess syndrome: Case presentation to a college student health clinic.

    PubMed

    Woll, Christopher; Spotts, P Hunter

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) in a student presenting to a university student health center. The authors also provide a review of KPLA and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome (IKPLAS), including epidemiology, common clinical manifestations, standard diagnostic work-up, management options, and potential complications.

  1. False-negative serologies in amebic liver abscess: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Otto, Marie-Pierre; Gérôme, Patrick; Rapp, Christophe; Pavic, Michel; Vitry, Thierry; Crevon, Lionel; Debourdeau, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Amebiasis, the parasitic disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, may result in extra-intestinal diseases among which liver abscess is the most common manifestation. We report two cases of amebic liver abscess illustrating the inequal sensitivity of serologic tests detecting anti-amebic antibodies. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. Scintigraphic evaluation along with CT and MR images in a case of huge gravitation abscess.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Funakoshi, N; Asano, Y; Watanabe, H; Fujikawa, S; Nakano, T; Nakai, A; Muraoka, N; Ishigaki, T; Todo, G; Nakashima, Y; Shintaku, M

    1997-08-01

    The authors presented a rare case of huge gravitation abscess. 67Ga scintigraphy was useful in the evaluation of the extent and activity of the disease. CT showed clearly the location and shape of the abscess. Enhanced MRI showed vertebral lesions as characteristic geographic and ring-like enhancement.

  3. Madurella mycetomatis as an agent of brain abscess: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mir, Fatima; Shakoor, Sadia; Khan, Mumtaz Jamshed; Minhas, Khurram; Zafar, Afia; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2013-12-01

    Fungal cerebral abscesses are rare and usually seen in immunocompromised individuals. We report a case and review published literature of Madurella mycetomatis as an agent of cerebral abscess. We found contiguous head and neck infections to be the principal cause of cerebral maduromycosis caused by M. mycetomatis. Early recognition of Madurella spp. as the causative agent is essential to avoid cerebral spread.

  4. Multiple Liver Abscesses Associated with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscess following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting occurs very rarely. We report an unusual case of multiple liver abscesses caused by Staphylococcus capitis in a 50-year-old compromised woman due to a complicating VP shunt infection. We reviewed the nine cases of VP shunt complications reported in the English literature, and speculated that the most likely pathogenetic mechanism in our case is an infected peritoneal tip that migrated to and penetrated the liver, which subsequently caused the formation of multiple liver abscesses. The patient was successfully treated with percutaneous aspiration, drainage of the abscesses, intravenous antibiotics, and shunt revision. Awareness and vigilance of the possibility of liver abscess formation caused by VP shunt infection will help establish an early accurate diagnosis and therapeutic strategy. PMID:24379956

  5. Purulent Pericarditis after Liver Abscess: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fidalgo García, María; Rodríguez Sanjuán, Juan Carlos; Riaño Molleda, María; González Andaluz, Marta; Real Noval, Hector; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old woman, with previous clinical antecedents of recent hepatic metastasis, who was admitted to the ICU due to respiratory failure and hemodynamic instability. She was found to have purulent pericarditis complicated by pericardial tamponade and pleural effusion, as well as surgical site infection, which was the origin of the disease. Cultures of the surgical wound and the pericardial effusion were positive for Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. A pericardial tap was performed and the intra-abdominal abscess was surgically drained. Pleural effusion was also evacuated. She received antibiotic treatment and recovered successfully. The only after-effect was a well-tolerated effusive-constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24872819

  6. [Anal abscess with a tuberculous origin: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Romelaer, Charlotte; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tuberculosis represents 1% of extrapulmonary tuberculoses and only sporadic cases of anal tuberculosis have been reported in the literature. We report two cases of tuberculous anal abscess and a review of the literature for diagnosis and treatment.

  7. [Drainage of otogenic brain abscess under imaging guidance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiwen; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Qingquan

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the methods and results of imaging guided puncture and drainage in the treatment of otogenic brain abscess. Reviewed and analyzed four cases of otogenic brain abscess treated by the technique of imaging guided puncture and drainage from May 2010 to October 2013, all of the four cases were male with age ranged from 21 years old to 59 years old, among whom three cases were under 25 years old. All patients had history of middle ear cholesteatoma and were found single brain abscess. Three cases were cerebrum abscess and one case was cerebellum abscess. The three cases with temporal lobe abscess received skull puncture drainage drilling, and one case with cerebellar abscess used the mastoid cavity puncture drainage. Four cases were punctured successfully in one time with the assistance of image navigation, 6-15 ml of pus was drainged out. After imaging showed pus cavity closure, middle ear surgery was performed to thoroughly remove cholesteatoma. The pus bacteria was cultured, which found three cases infected with staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mitis and proteusbacillus vulgaris respectively. The imaging showed brain abscess closed after once puncture drainage, four cases were cured without complications. Postoperative follow-up of one year with good mastoid cavity epithelialization. Image guidance assisted puncture can drainage brain abscess with accurate positioning, less trauma, short operation time, and high safety, which could be choosen for otogenic abscess patient.

  8. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: skin infection presenting as an axillary abscess with cellulitis in a college athlete.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2005-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old black man without any methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus risk factors developed axillary boils after he began lifting weights at the university gym in Houston, TX. He presented with a large tender erythematous fluctuant abscess of his right axillae and a superiorly located smaller painful red indurated nodule; the surrounding cellulitis extended into the adjacent tissue (Figure). The abscess was incised, drained, and cultured. Empiric treatment with cephalexin 500 mg q.i.d. was given for 7 days. The culture grew methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Susceptibility testing of the S. aureus isolate was performed by Laboratory Corp. of America (Houston, TX); the Vitek system (Biomerieux, Hazelwood, MO) was used, and the specimen was incubated for 8 hours. Confirmation of methicillin resistance was performed using a methicillin-resistant S. aureus plate and the specimen was incubated for 24 hours. In addition to resistance to methicillin, the bacterial isolate was also resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and penicillin. The S. aureus strain had intermediate susceptibility to levofloxacin and was susceptible to clindamycin, gentamicin, rifampin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. The infection persisted and the antibiotic was changed to double strength trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, taken twice daily for 15 days. In addition, topical care included lesional and intranasal application of mupirocin 2% ointment and daily cleaning of the area with 10% povidone-iodine liquid soap. The skin infection completely resolved without recurrence within 2 weeks.

  9. Visualization of Abscess Formation in a Murine Thigh Infection Model of Staphylococcus aureus by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Basse-Lüsebrink, Thomas; Haddad, Daniel; Ohlsen, Knut; Jakob, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last years, 19F-MRI and perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion (PFC) emerged as a powerful contrast agent based MRI methodology to track cells and to visualize inflammation. We applied this new modality to visualize deep tissue abscesses during acute and chronic phase of inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, a murine thigh infection model was used to induce abscess formation and PFC or CLIO (cross linked ironoxides) was administered during acute or chronic phase of inflammation. 24 h after inoculation, the contrast agent accumulation was imaged at the site of infection by MRI. Measurements revealed a strong accumulation of PFC at the abscess rim at acute and chronic phase of infection. The pattern was similar to CLIO accumulation at chronic phase and formed a hollow sphere around the edema area. Histology revealed strong influx of neutrophils at the site of infection and to a smaller extend macrophages during acute phase and strong influx of macrophages at chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion and Significance We introduce 19F-MRI in combination with PFC nanoemulsions as a new platform to visualize abscess formation in a murine thigh infection model of S. aureus. The possibility to track immune cells in vivo by this modality offers new opportunities to investigate host immune response, the efficacy of antibacterial therapies and the influence of virulence factors for pathogenesis. PMID:21455319

  10. Spreading of multiple Listeria monocytogenes abscesses via central nervous system fiber tracts: case report.

    PubMed

    Bojanowski, Michel W; Seizeur, Romuald; Effendi, Khaled; Bourgouin, Patrick; Magro, Elsa; Letourneau-Guillon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Animal studies have shown that Listeria monocytogenes can probably access the brain through a peripheral intraneural route, and it has been suggested that a similar process may occur in humans. However, thus far, its spreading through the central nervous system (CNS) has not been completely elucidated. The authors present a case of multiple L. monocytogenes cerebral abscesses characterized by a pattern of distribution that suggested spread along white matter fiber tracts and reviewed the literature to identify other cases for analysis. They elected to include only those cases with 3 or more cerebral abscesses to make sure that the distribution was not random, but rather followed a pattern. In addition, they included those cases with abscesses in both the brainstem and the cerebral hemispheres, but excluded cases in which abscesses were located solely in the brainstem. Of 77 cases of L. monocytogenes CNS abscesses found in the literature, 17 involved multiple abscesses. Of those, 6 were excluded for lack of imaging and 3 because they involved only the brainstem. Of the 8 remaining cases from the literature, one was a case of bilateral abscesses that did not follow a fiber tract; another was also bilateral, but with lesions appearing to follow fiber tracts on one side; and in the remaining 6, to which the authors added their own case for a total of 7, all the abscesses were located exclusively in the same hemisphere and distributed along white matter fiber tracts. The findings suggest that after entering the CNS, L. monocytogenes travels within the axons, resulting in a characteristic pattern of distribution of multiple abscesses along the white matter fiber tracts in the brain. This report is the first description suggesting intraaxonal CNS spread of L. monocytogenes infection in humans following its entry into the brain. This distinct pattern is clearly seen on imaging and its recognition may be valuable in the diagnosis of listeriosis. This finding may allow for

  11. Case-based update: primary intraventricular brain abscess in a 10-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Patricia Barrio; Suárez, Javier Pérez; Messing-Jünger, A Martina

    2015-12-01

    Intraventricular abscesses are very rare and usually result from secondary rupture of a brain abscess. In the few published cases, clinical presentation was subacute and different pathogens were found. The diagnosis might be mistaken as an intraventricular tumor. This is a case of a 10-year-old girl suffering from cyanotic heart disease that was presented with subacute onset of headache, vomiting, and some signs of inflammation. Symptoms lead to early brain imaging (CT/MRI) demonstrating left ventricular horn lesion affecting adjacent brain structures. Neuroradiologists suspected an intraventricular tumor, but cardiac history and signs of inflammation led to lumbar puncture and evidence of CNS infection, and intraventricular abscess was suspected. Navigated aspiration was performed, and multi-sensitive Eikenella corrodens was cultivated. Broad antibiotic treatment and dexamethasone were initiated, and symptoms disappeared. Follow-up imaging demonstrated gradual regression of the intraventricular abscess. The girl underwent regular professional teeth cleaning which was discussed as possible cause of infection. Although an isolated intraventricular abscess is a very rare event, typical predisposing cardiac history together with central nervous symptoms and an intracranial contrasting mass should always lead to the differential diagnosis of a brain abscess and be biopsied first. E. corrodens is a typical organism of the mouth flora, but a rare cause for a brain abscess. Harmless teeth cleaning procedures may cause hematogenic spread and lead to CNS infections, e.g., in patients with predisposing diseases. To our knowledge, there are only six previous reports of primary intraventricular brain abscess.

  12. Seronegative brucellosis of the spine: A case of psoas abscess secondary to brucellar spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Bozbaş, Gülnur Taşcı; Ünübol, Ayşe İyiyapıcı; Gürer, Gülcan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease that affects many organ systems. Osteoarticular involvement, especially spondylitis, is the most common complication of brucellosis, but psoas abscess is very rare. Serological tests at diagnosis of the disease are very valuable and most widely used. Herein, we report a case of psoas abscess secondary to brucellar spondylitis. In this case, interestingly, the serological test results were negative, and the diagnosis could be made by abscess culture. In patients, particularly those who live in areas endemic for brucellosis, as in our case, it should be kept in mind that a negative serological test result should not exclude the diagnosis of brucellosis. PMID:28149665

  13. Recurrent amebic liver abscesses over a 16-year period: a case report.

    PubMed

    Creemers-Schild, D; van Genderen, P J J; Visser, L G; van Hellemond, J J; Wismans, P J

    2016-10-18

    Amebic liver abscess is a rare disease in high-income countries. Recurrence of amebic liver abscess is even rarer with only a few previous reports. Here we present a patient who developed three subsequent amebic liver abscesses over a sixteen-year period. A Caucasian male developed recurrent amebic liver abscesses, when aged 23, 27 and 39 years. Only on the first occasion did this coincide with a recent visit to the tropics. The patient received adequate treatment during each episode. Possible explanations are persistent asymptomatic carrier state, cysts passage in his family, re-infection or chance. We describe the unusual case of a healthy male who developed recurrent amebic liver abscesses over a long period despite adequate treatment. Possible pathophysiological explanations are explored.

  14. [An unusual case of pyogenic hepatic abscess rupturing into the pericardial cavity].

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Maruo, H; Mori, K; Kosaka, A

    1996-11-01

    A rare case of pyogenic hepatic abscess that ruptured into the pericardial cavity is reported. A 50-year-old female who had been admitted for cholangitis associated with bi-lateral stricture of bile duct and intrahepatic stones, presented a pyogenic hepatic abscess in the left lobe on an abdominal computed tomography (CT). Percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed. But during PTAD-graphy five days later, cardiac tamponade developed secondarily to rapid accumulation of contrast medium in the pericardial cavity flowing from liver abscess. An emergency subxiphoid pericardectomy was performed and she made a good recovery. Unfortunately seven months later, she died of septicemia caused by a newly developed abscess in the right lobe of the liver.

  15. [Zosteriform lichen aureus. Pediatric clinical case].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Hernández Ostiz, Sergio; Morales-Moya, Ana L; Prieto-Torres, Lucía; Álvarez-Salafranca, Marcial; Ara Martín, Mariano

    2017-04-01

    Lichen aureus is a rare pigmented purpuric dermatosis. We present an unusual case because of the pediatric age and the great number of lesions with zosteriform distribution. He is a 10-yearold boy, with a brownish, smaller than 1 cm, sharp edges, lichenified surface, asymptomatic macule, over the inner aspect of the left leg with a zosteriform distribution. The histology showed a band-like inflammatory infiltrate in the superficial dermis, composed of lymphocytes, histiocytes, erythrocytes and haemosiderin. He was diagnosed with zosteriform lichen aureus and was treated with topical mometasone furoate during 3 weeks resulting in partial lightening of the macules. Lesions have remained 2 years later, and new ones have appeared in the ipsilateral ankle. We must consider differential diagnosis with other pigmented purpuric dermatitis and pigmented purpuric mycosis fungoides. There are many therapeutic options and it tends to disappear spontaneously, so new studies are necessary.

  16. A rare adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Sae; Nonaka, Mai; Matsumoto, Keiichiro; Awanami, Yuki; Yamasaki, Masatora; Fukuda, Makoto; Miyazono, Motoaki; Ikeda, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    Retropharyngeal abscess is an infection involving the retropharyngeal space which is posterior to the pharynx and oesophagus, and it results as a complication of a primary infection elsewhere in the head and neck including the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, or middle ear, which drain lymph to the retropharyngeal lymph nodes. Their lymph nodes are prominent in children and atrophy with age. Therefore, retropharyngeal abscess is most frequently encountered in children, with 75% of cases occurring before the age of 5 years, and often in the first year of life. We experienced a rare adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess, and conservative therapy ameliorated them. According to past reports, only one child with a retropharyngeal abscess and poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis has been presented at a conference to date; this is the first adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess. Retropharyngeal abscess can be fatal including airway compression, so it is important to remember retropharyngeal abscess in a case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with severe symptoms of neck.

  17. Citrobacter koseri bacteraemia complicated by paraspinal abscess and spondylodiscitis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayati, Shaharuddin Nor; Leong, Chee Loon; Kumar, Chidambaram Suresh; Lee, Christopher

    2012-06-01

    Paraspinal abscess and spondylodiscitis due to Citrobacter koseri is a very rare condition. We report a remarkable case of Citrobacter koseri bacteraemia complicated by paraspinal abscess and spondylodiscitis in a patient who has successfully been treated in our hospital. Our patient demonstrates one of the common challenges in the practice of infectious disease medicine, wherein an innocuous presentation may and often underlie a serious infection. This case report elucidates to us that the diagnosis of a paraspinal abscess and spondylodiscitis requires a high index of suspicion in at risk patient presenting with compatible signs and symptoms.

  18. [A case of liver abscess due to Streptococcus anginosus infection secondary to a dental extraction].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hideyuki; Matsui, Noriaki; Tsukamoto, Shinji; Funakoshi, Sadahiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kabemura, Teppei; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-08-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a high fever. He had undergone a dental extraction about 1 month prior to admission because of apical periodontitis. Imaging study revealed liver abscess lesions. Infection with Streptococcus anginosus was confirmed using both stab and blood culture. An adequate selection of antibiotics was administered, and a good outcome was obtained. There have been no case reports of liver abscess caused by intraoral commensal flora related to dental extraction in healthy adults. This case shows that liver abscesses can occur secondary to dental extractions, even in healthy adults.

  19. Fluorescein sodium-guided surgery of a brain abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Julius; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Up to now, the feasibility and benefit of using fluorescein sodium under a dedicated surgical microscope filter (YE560, YELLOW 560 nm filter, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany) has never been clinically evaluated in infectious disorders of the brain. Case Description: Here, we report the case of a male patient with a brain abscess in the right parietal lobe that was removed under fluorescence-guidance (intravenous administration of fluorescein sodium 10%, 5 mg/kg bodyweight). The abscess capsule showed intensive yellow fluorescent staining, while − under white light − the cortex appeared normal. Conclusion: This technique may improve the identification and surgical removal of brain abscesses. PMID:28031990

  20. Hepatic Abscess in Patients With Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lublin, Matthew; Bartlett, David L.; Danforth, David N.; Kauffman, Howard; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.; Shawker, Thomas; Choyke, Peter; Kleiner, David E.; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Chang, Richard; DeCarlo, Ellen S.; Holland, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical presentation, diagnostic procedures, and surgical management of hepatic abscesses in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Summary Background Data Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency in which phagocytes cannot destroy catalase-positive bacteria and fungi. Defects in the phagocytic cells’ respiratory burst lead to life-threatening infections, including hepatic abscess. These abscesses are recurrent and often multiple and are treated differently from bacterial abscesses in patients without CGD. Methods Between 1980 and 2000, 61 cases of hepatic abscess in 22 patients with CGD were treated at the National Institutes of Health. Clinicopathologic features were investigated by retrospective review of the medical records, radiographs, and histopathology. Results Twelve of the 61 cases were primary hepatic abscesses. Twenty-nine of the cases were recurrent hepatic abscesses, and 20 cases were persistent hepatic abscesses. The median age at the time of initial hepatic abscess presentation was 14 years. Subjective fever was the most frequent presenting symptom, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 98% of cases. Fifty-two cases were managed surgically and eight cases were managed with percutaneous drainage. One patient refused surgery. The surgical complication rate was 56%; however, there were no deaths directly related to the hepatic abscesses. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism identified in culture (88% of positive cultures). Aggressive surgery and antibiotics ultimately resulted in successful treatment of all patients. Conclusions Hepatic abscesses occurring in patients with CGD represent a difficult diagnostic and treatment challenge. Early excision and treatment with antibiotics directed against S. aureus is necessary. General surgeons should be aware of this rare immunodeficiency and should aggressively manage hepatic abscesses in these patients

  1. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Use of Rapid Molecular Testing for Staphylococcus aureus for Patients With Cutaneous Abscesses in the Emergency Department With Standard of Care.

    PubMed

    May, Larissa S; Rothman, Richard E; Miller, Loren G; Brooks, Gillian; Zocchi, Mark; Zatorski, Catherine; Dugas, Andrea F; Ware, Chelsea E; Jordan, Jeanne A

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether real-time availability of rapid molecular results of Staphylococcus aureus would impact emergency department clinician antimicrobial selection for adults with cutaneous abscesses. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing a rapid molecular test with standard of care culture-based testing. Follow-up telephone calls were made at between 2 and 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months after discharge. Two urban, academic emergency departments. Patients at least 18 years old presenting with a chief complaint of abscess, cellulitis, or insect bite and receiving incision and drainage were eligible. Seven hundred seventy-eight people were assessed for eligibility and 252 met eligibility criteria. Clinician antibiotic selection and clinical outcomes were evaluated. An ad hoc outcome of test performance was performed. We enrolled 252 patients and 126 were randomized to receive the rapid test. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus-positive patients receiving rapid test results were prescribed beta-lactams more often than controls (absolute difference, 14.5% [95% CI, 1.1%-30.1%]) whereas methicillin-resistant S. aureus-positive patients receiving rapid test results were more often prescribed anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antibiotics (absolute difference, 21.5% [95% CI, 10.1%-33.0%]). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in 1-week or 3-month clinical outcomes. Availability of rapid molecular test results after incision and drainage was associated with more-targeted antibiotic selection. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01523899.

  2. Treatment of Experimental Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses: Comparison of Cefazolin, Cephalothin, Cefoxitin, and Cefamandole

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Donald; Parsons, James N.; Carrizosa, Jaime; Kobasa, William D.

    1979-01-01

    Cefazolin (CZ), cephalothin (CF), cefoxitin (CX), and cefamandole (CM) were evaluated in therapy of Staphylococcus aureus infection produced in perforated table tennis balls placed intraperitoneally in rabbits. Four weeks after placement of two balls in each rabbit, a beta-lactamase producing strain of S. aureus was injected into one of the balls. Twenty-four hours later therapy was initiated with 40 mg of CZ or 80 mg of CF, CX, or CM per kg intramuscularly every 6 h. After 24 h of treatment, the mean log10 colony-forming units per ml were 7.1 for CZ, 6.7 for CF, 6.5 for CX, and 7.2 for CM. After 72 h the mean log10 colony-forming units per ml were 5.0 for CZ, 4.1 for CF, 3.6 for CX, and 5.6 for CM. After 8 days, the titers were 1.6/ml for CZ, 1.0 for CF, 1.9 for CX, and 3.6 for CM. CZ serum levels were about double CF and CX levels and about two-thirds of CM levels. In sterile ball fluid CZ and CM levels were more than double CF or CX concentrations. Concentrations of all four antibiotics were lower in infected balls. PMID:426513

  3. Secondary brain abscess following simple renal cyst infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common causative bacteria of neonatal meningitis, but hematogenous intracranial E. coli infection is rare in adults. Moreover, intracranial abscess formation owing to E. coli, including brain abscesses and subdural empyema formation, is extremely rare. We herein present a case involving a patient with a brain abscess owing to E. coli following a simple renal cyst infection. A review of the literature is also presented. Case presentation A 77-year-old Japanese woman with a history of polymyalgia rheumatica was admitted to our hospital because of persistent fever, right flank pain, and pyuria. Intravenous antibiotics were administered; however, her level of consciousness deteriorated 6 days after admission. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain abscess in the left occipital lobe and pyogenic ventriculitis. Enhanced abdominal computed tomography revealed a right renal cyst with heterogeneous content. Culture of urine, blood, and aspirated pus from the infected cyst revealed E. coli with identical antibiotic sensitivity in all sites, suggesting that the cyst infection and subsequent bacteremia might have caused the brain abscess. The patient recovered after a 6-week course of meropenem. Conclusion The prognosis of patients with E. coli-associated intracranial abscess is usually poor. Advanced age and immunosuppression may be potent risk factors for intracranial abscess formation owing to the hematogenous spread of E. coli. PMID:24934996

  4. Case of a cerebral abscess caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a subject with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Koenraad; Maes, Honorine; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man presenting with generalised seizures after developing a right frontal brain abscess. Stereotactic aspiration and subsequent matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry revealed Porphyromonas gingivalis as the only causative anaerobe microorganism. Secondary incision and drainage was required due to neurological deterioration with increased dimensions of the abscess, intracranial pressure and formation of a subdural occipitoparietal empyema. Oral imaging was positive for apical periodontitis of multiple elements; therefore, the remaining dentition was removed. Targeted antibiotic treatment included intravenous ceftriaxone and ornidazole. The patient was discharged to our revalidation unit 59 days after admission to make a full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of P. gingivalis causing an intracranial abscess and the third case of a true intracerebral parenchymal abscess caused by this bacterium. PMID:28228396

  5. Perimenopausal pneumococcal tubo-ovarian abscess--a case report and review.

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Srividya; Kirwan, John; Neal, Tim

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genital tract infections in females secondary to Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are unusual. Tubo-ovarian abscess resulting from such an infection is a rare occurrence and diagnosis is not always easy. This report demonstrates the problems of recognizing this condition and summarizes the pathomechanism, investigations leading to a diagnosis and the subsequent management. CASE: A rare case of a tubo-ovarian abscess caused by pneumococcus, occurring in a previously healthy 48-year-old woman, is presented. The tubo-ovarian abscess may have developed insidiously and probably had an acute exacerbation prior to presentation. CONCLUSION: This case is unusual in that there were no identifiable initiating events for the source of the pneumococcal infection. Early recognition of a tubo-ovarian abscess is important in order to prevent the associated morbidity and mortality. This condition has the propensity to mimic a neoplasm. PMID:15460193

  6. Case of a cerebral abscess caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a subject with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Van der Cruyssen, Frederic; Grisar, Koenraad; Maes, Honorine; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-02-22

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man presenting with generalised seizures after developing a right frontal brain abscess. Stereotactic aspiration and subsequent matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry revealed Porphyromonas gingivalis as the only causative anaerobe microorganism. Secondary incision and drainage was required due to neurological deterioration with increased dimensions of the abscess, intracranial pressure and formation of a subdural occipitoparietal empyema. Oral imaging was positive for apical periodontitis of multiple elements; therefore, the remaining dentition was removed. Targeted antibiotic treatment included intravenous ceftriaxone and ornidazole. The patient was discharged to our revalidation unit 59 days after admission to make a full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of P. gingivalis causing an intracranial abscess and the third case of a true intracerebral parenchymal abscess caused by this bacterium. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  8. Double-lumen catheter in the right jugular vein induces two sub-endothelial abscesses in an unusual place, the transition between the superior vena cava and the right atrium: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Endocarditis is a type of infection that is common in internal medicine wards and in haemodialysis clinics. The location that is most affected are the heart valves. Herein, we report a case of an uncommon abscess, a sub-endothelial abscess between the transition of the superior vena cava and the right atrium. There were several emboli to the lung and foot, and the agent was related to Staphylococcus aureus and a double-lumen catheter. Usually, this type of abscess is located in valves, either the tricuspid valve if related to catheters or injection drug use or the mitral valve if related to other causes. An exhaustive review was made, but we found no information about the location of this abscess and the rarity of the event motivating the report of infection. PMID:25110520

  9. Splenic abscess due to fungal infection after kidney transplantation; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Malakoutian, Tahereh; Yarmohamadi, Maliheh; Mohammadi, Ronak; Asgari, Mojgan; Mahmoodian, Reyhaneh

    2016-01-01

    Splenic abscess is one of the rare and potentially life-threatening complications after kidney transplantation. Splenic abscess generally occurs in patients who have immunodeficiency state. It becomes more important with the increased use of immunosuppressed drugs and organ transplantation. The clinical presentation of splenic abscess is insidious, often with constitutional symptoms. Left upper quadrant tenderness is an uncommon sign. Therefore, its diagnosis is difficult and requires a high degree of clinical suspicion. We report a case under renal transplantation with recurrent fungal infection in different organs with two episodes of fungemia who died after splenectomy. PMID:27689116

  10. Excessive Surgical Adhesive: A Case Report of Aortic Root Abscess Doppelgänger.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Natalie A; Bull, David A; Morrissey, Candice K

    2017-05-03

    Aortic root abscess is a complication of aortic valve endocarditis that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis usually is made with transesophageal echocardiography, which is highly sensitive and specific for the disease. We present a case of suspected aortic root abscess 1 week after mechanical aortic valve replacement for native valve endocarditis. The diagnosis was made by the use of transesophageal echocardiography but surgical inspection revealed that the paravalvular fluid collection was excessive surgical adhesive. We discuss the clinical significance and differential diagnosis of aortic root abscess in the setting of infective endocarditis.

  11. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess secondary to primary tooth extraction: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S; Chronakis, Efkleidis; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Vakis, Antonis

    2016-02-01

    We report on a rare case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess of odontogenic origin in a 6-year-old previously healthy boy, who had close contact with a pet dog. The poodle was the most likely source of the infecting organism, which subsequently colonized the patient's oral cavity. The abscess was surgically removed and he recovered completely after prolonged antibiotic treatment with meropenem. We also review the relevant medical literature on A. aphrophilus pediatric brain abscesses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Loss of hemolysin expression in Staphylococcus aureus agr mutants correlates with selective survival during mixed infections in murine abscesses and wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwan, William R; Langhorne, Michael H; Ritchie, Heather D; Stover, C Kendall

    2003-08-18

    During the screening of a Staphylococcus aureus signature-tagged mutagenesis library, it was noted that nonhemolytic bacteria became more abundant as time passed in murine abscess and wound models, but not within organ tissues associated with systemic infections. To examine this further, a mixed population of hyperhemolytic, hemolytic, and nonhemolytic S. aureus strain RN6390 cells were inoculated into mice using abscess, wound, and systemic models of infection. After 7 days in the abscess, the hyperhemolytic group markedly declined, whereas the nonhemolytic population increased significantly. A similar phenomenon occurred in murine wounds, but not during the systemic infection. Sequencing of several of the signature-tagged mutants indicated mutations in the agrC gene or within the agrA-agrC intergenic region. Both alpha-hemolysin and delta-hemolysin activity was curtailed in these mutants, but beta-hemolysin activity was unaffected. Single strain comparisons between wild-type strain 8325-4 and strain DU1090 (hla-) as well as between strain RN6911 (agr) and wild-type strain RN6390 were performed using the same three animal models of infection. The agr mutant strain and the hla mutant strain showed no difference in bacterial counts in murine wounds compared to their respective parent strains. The same held true in murine abscesses at day 4, but strain RN6911 counts then declined at day 7. Considerable clearing of the hla mutant strain and the agr mutant strain occurred in the systemic model of infection. Mixed infections with the DU1090 and 8325-4 strains in the abscess model showed a slight advantage given to the DU1090 population, but a distinct selection for the parental 8325-4 strain in the liver. These results suggest that agr mutations cause reductions in the expression of several secreted proteins, including alpha- and delta-hemolysin, which in turn contribute to a growth advantage of this agr mutant group within a mixed population of S. aureus cells residing

  13. Metastatic endophthalmitis combined with subretinal abscess in a patient with diabetes mellitus--a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Peng, Kai-Ling

    2015-08-14

    Endogenous endophthalmitis, extra-hepatic metastasis from liver abscess with diabetes mellitus, could lead to a devastating outcome without a prompt and appropriate management. We report a case of metastatic endophthalmitis combined with subretinal abscess with successful visual outcome after treatment. A 56-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus under poor control presented to our emergency room with fever, sore throat, cough and poor appetite for 2 weeks. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 2.2 × 2.0 cm liver abscess. During hospitalization, sudden onset of blurred vision with floaters in his left eye was noted. Meanwhile, Brain computed tomography demonstrated subdural abscess in right parietal area. With obvious vitritis, a localized subretinal abscess was also found over temporal arcade with size about four disc areas under indirect ophthalmoscopy. A pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal injection of ceftazidime (2 mg/0.1 ml) and amikacin (0.4 mg/0.1 ml) was performed without retinectomy. The margin of the subretinal abscess became firm and the central area resolved after the operation. Finally, his vision improved to 6/6 after cataract surgery. Subretinal abscess is an extremely rare presentation of metastatic endophthalmitis. It is difficult to develop appropriate treatment guidelines of endophthalmitis complicated with subretinal abscess. Our experience in this case demonstrated if the size of the subretinal abscess is smaller than four disc areas, pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal injection of antibiotics without retinectomy could be considered to avoid further retinal detachment.

  14. Daptomycin efficacy in the central nervous system of a patient with disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen in the last decades and also represents the second most common pathogen isolated from patients in outpatient settings. Although methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections were traditionally limited to hospitals, community-associated cases of methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections have been reported. In our case, we observed an unexpected event during treatment. Case presentation A 60-year-old Caucasian man developed fever and multiple muscle and brain abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Conclusion Although our patient was given antimicrobials active against the isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain, it was only after the introduction of daptomycin that his skin, soft tissue and muscle lesions and also brain manifestations improved. PMID:22938025

  15. Secondary brain abscess following simple renal cyst infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, Nobuhiro; Osawa, Tenshi; Totsuka, Masayuki; Hatori, Takashi; Imai, Kunihiko; Kitahara, Yonosuke; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-06-16

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common causative bacteria of neonatal meningitis, but hematogenous intracranial E. coli infection is rare in adults. Moreover, intracranial abscess formation owing to E. coli, including brain abscesses and subdural empyema formation, is extremely rare. We herein present a case involving a patient with a brain abscess owing to E. coli following a simple renal cyst infection. A review of the literature is also presented. A 77-year-old Japanese woman with a history of polymyalgia rheumatica was admitted to our hospital because of persistent fever, right flank pain, and pyuria. Intravenous antibiotics were administered; however, her level of consciousness deteriorated 6 days after admission. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain abscess in the left occipital lobe and pyogenic ventriculitis. Enhanced abdominal computed tomography revealed a right renal cyst with heterogeneous content. Culture of urine, blood, and aspirated pus from the infected cyst revealed E. coli with identical antibiotic sensitivity in all sites, suggesting that the cyst infection and subsequent bacteremia might have caused the brain abscess. The patient recovered after a 6-week course of meropenem. The prognosis of patients with E. coli-associated intracranial abscess is usually poor. Advanced age and immunosuppression may be potent risk factors for intracranial abscess formation owing to the hematogenous spread of E. coli.

  16. Silent diabetes mellitus, periodontitis and a new case of thalamic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Chandler, Christopher; Whyte, Martin Brunel

    2014-01-01

    Brain abscess is an unusual complication of uncontrolled diabetes. A solitary thalamic abscess is an uncommon type of brain abscess. We report a case of thalamic abscess, whereupon diabetes mellitus and periodontitis were diagnosed. The diagnosis and management of thalamic abscess, and the interplay of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis are discussed. A 56-year-old, Caucasian, man with no medical or travel history, presented with 5-day symptoms of meningeal irritation. Body mass index 30.6 kg/m2. CT demonstrated a solitary midline lesion with neoplasia as a differential diagnosis. It was biopsied and cultures grew Streptococcus milleri. He was treated by stereotactic puncture, external drainage and targeted intrathecal and systemic antibiotic therapy. HIV negative but glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 10.7% (93 mmol/mol). Dental examination revealed a small molar abscess. Radiological resolution of the thalamic abscess occurred within 2 months. Diabetes improved with 7 weeks of insulin, and maintained on metformin, HbA1c 6.9% (51 mmol/mol). There was no residual neurological disability. PMID:25053670

  17. Silent diabetes mellitus, periodontitis and a new case of thalamic abscess.

    PubMed

    Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Chandler, Christopher; Whyte, Martin Brunel

    2014-07-21

    Brain abscess is an unusual complication of uncontrolled diabetes. A solitary thalamic abscess is an uncommon type of brain abscess. We report a case of thalamic abscess, whereupon diabetes mellitus and periodontitis were diagnosed. The diagnosis and management of thalamic abscess, and the interplay of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis are discussed. A 56-year-old, Caucasian, man with no medical or travel history, presented with 5-day symptoms of meningeal irritation. Body mass index 30.6 kg/m(2). CT demonstrated a solitary midline lesion with neoplasia as a differential diagnosis. It was biopsied and cultures grew Streptococcus milleri. He was treated by stereotactic puncture, external drainage and targeted intrathecal and systemic antibiotic therapy. HIV negative but glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 10.7% (93 mmol/mol). Dental examination revealed a small molar abscess. Radiological resolution of the thalamic abscess occurred within 2 months. Diabetes improved with 7 weeks of insulin, and maintained on metformin, HbA1c 6.9% (51 mmol/mol). There was no residual neurological disability. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. [A CASE OF MILIARY TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH HEPATOSPLENIC ABSCESSES APPEARING DURING ANTI-TUBERCULOUS TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Ken; Nishio, Kazumi; Aida, Shinji; Nakano, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    A 27-year-old man with a 4-month history of treatment for miliary tuberculosis at another hospital was admitted to our hospital for continued treatment. Computed tomography showed new lesions in the S8 area of the liver and spleen, despite resolution of chest radiographic findings. Because these new lesions were still present after 8 months of treatment, we performed laparoscopic drainage of the liver abscess. Purulent material drained from the lesion revealed positive polymerase chain reaction results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and identification of granuloma with infiltrating lymphocytes and plasma cells confirmed the diagnosis of tubercular liver abscess. Pathological changes in the spleen over the clinical course were also regarded as representing tubercular abscess. Postoperative course was good, and tuberculosis treatment ended after 12 months. Tubercular liver abscess subsequently showed prominent reduction, and the tubercular splenic abscess disappeared on abdominal ultrasonography. Tubercular hepatosplenic abscesses appearing during tubercular treatment are rare. We report this valuable case in which laparoscopic drainage of a liver abscess proved useful for diagnosis and treatment.

  19. [Clinical study of iliopsoas abscess in 11 cases from 2005 to 2008].

    PubMed

    Tate, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Iliopsoas abscess, a rare disease, has shown a recent alarming increase in the number of patients, especially among older people. This clinical study of iliopsoas abscess in 11 cases seen from 2005 to 2008, showed the average age of patients to be 76 years-higher than the average. Causes were often orthopedic diseases such as pyogenic spondylitis. The four most commonly recognized underlying diseases were spinal, including lumbar spinal canal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation. Antibiotic induced a cure in only 6 of 11 cases. In this conservatively treated group, average abscess diameter was significantly smaller than in the non conservatively treated group. Conservative treatment thus requires that such abscess be detected as early as possible.

  20. Kawasaki disease mimicking a parapharyngeal abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qianyun; Luo, Rong; Gan, Jing; Zhang, Li; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-05-01

    Parapharyngeal abscess (PPA)-like lesion is a very rare manifestation of Kawasaki disease (KD). Here we report a Chinese case of KD initially mimicking PPA, which is the first one reported in Asia.A 3-year-old male patient presented with fever, drooling, and bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy for 3 days. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram were normal. With substantial elevation of white blood count and C-reactive protein, purulent cervical lymphadenitis was considered. Symptoms did not improve after treatment with vancomycin, and the patient further developed trismus and restricted neck movement. Neck CT revealed a 2 × 1.5 cm hypodense lesion in the right parapharyngeal space with peripheral enhancement. PPA was suspected and on the 3rd day following admission, the patient received surgical incision and drainage. One milliliter of serous fluid was drained without bacterial growth on cultures. Fever persisted after surgery. As the clinical course proceeded, additional major signs of KD gradually evolved, and on the 6th day following admission the patient completely fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for KD. Rapid clinical improvement was observed following treatment with high-dose immunoglobulin and aspirin. Due to the parapharyngeal operation, the patient was fed milk through a nasogastric tube for 15 days. His neck incision became infected but healed gradually following dressing change and antibiotic treatment. Currently he remains asymptomatic during regular follow-up and repeated echocardiograms are normal.Both pediatricians and otolaryngologists can learn from this case that KD may initially manifest as PPA. Careful observation for major signs of KD during the clinical course can help to achieve a prompt and correct diagnosis. Thus, unnecessary surgery and cardiac complications of KD may be avoided.

  1. An unusual case of lung abscess caused by Acremonium species treated with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Qazi, M S; Bowalekar, S S; Wanjare, V S; Shankar, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a report of a 37-year-old female with lung abscess due to Acremonium species that responded to oral itraconazole. There was a marked clinical as well as radiological improvement in patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of lung abscess due to Acremonium species which was treated by oral itraconazole. This cost-effective treatment modality proved to be significant in improving symptoms as well as morbidity in this patient.

  2. Thigh abscess caused by Eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus intermedius: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhiyong, Zong; Xiufang, Lin; Jiajie, Lu

    2007-01-01

    A 35-year-old Chinese female has a large thigh abscess without a clear source. No underlying diseases were revealed in the patient. The combination of clindamycin and cefazolin or vancomycin was administered but without a clinical response. Eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus intermedius were isolated from puncture drainage. Then, ceftriaxone was administered and a surgery of incision and further draining was carried. Eventually, the patient recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case of thigh abscess in a previous healthy adult.

  3. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted. Learning points Pituitary abscesses typically develop in patients who have other sources of infection or disruption of the normal suprasellar anatomy by either surgery, irradiation or pre-existing pathology; however, they can develop in the absence of known risk factors. Patients with pituitary abscesses typically complain of headache, visual changes and symptoms of pituitary hormone deficiencies. As other pituitary neoplasms present with similar clinical findings, the diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often not

  4. Hepatic Abscesses in Preterm Infants: Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Semerci, Seda Yilmaz; Babayigit, Aslan; Cebeci, Burcu; Buyukkale, Gokhan; Cetinkaya, Merih

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic abscess is a rare but potentially fatal entity in neonates. The aim of this study was to provide valuable data for diagnosis, management and prevention of hepatic abscess in preterm infants. A retrospective chart review was made for patients diagnosed with hepatic abscesses between 2012 and 2015. Methods included clinical and radiological review of records and evaluation of potential risk factors. A total of three infants with hepatic abscesses were identified. All of them had low birth weight and low gestational age. Predisposing factors included prematurity, late sepsis, umbilical catheterization, necrotizing enterocolitis and previous antibiotic therapy. Isolated organisms from blood included Staphylococcus spp. in two cases and Pseudomonas spp. in one case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first preterm case of hepatic abscess caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the literature. All patients responded well to antibiotic therapy alone, and no interventional drainage was required. We suggest evaluating all preterm neonates who have severe sepsis and/or necrotizing enterocolitis signs and who do not respond to prolonged antibiotic therapy with detailed abdominal ultrasound for possible hepatic abscesses as early diagnosis, and treatment favors prognosis. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Secondary abscess formation in pituitary adenoma after tooth extraction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kroppenstedt, S N; Liebig, T; Mueller, W; Gräf, K J; Lanksch, W R; Unterberg, A W

    2001-02-01

    The presence of an abscess in a pituitary tumor is a very rare finding. The authors report the case of a 69-year-old man with a pituitary adenoma confirmed by neuroimaging results, in whom a high fever, meningismus, and left-sided ophthalmoplegia developed 4 days after tooth extraction. The results of serial cranial magnetic resonance imaging were highly indicative of an abscess formation within the pituitary adenoma. During surgery the tumor was approached transsphenoidally and removed. Histological examination confirmed the presence of an abscess formation within the pituitary adenoma. It is most likely that the tooth extraction caused a bacteremia, which led to an inflammation with abscess formation within the pituitary adenoma. The authors conclude that invasive dental procedures should be avoided before planned resection of a pituitary adenoma.

  6. Ruptured hepatic abscess caused by fish bone penetration of the duodenal wall: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Ryuji; Okamoto, Takahiro; Mori, Takeki; Mori, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    The accidental ingestion of a foreign body into the gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon; however, the development of a hepatic abscess secondary to foreign body perforation is extremely rare. We report the case of a ruptured hepatic abscess caused by fish bone penetration of the duodenal bulb, resulting in generalized peritonitis. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with generalized abdominal pain and high fever. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed ascites and a heterogeneously enhanced mass with a less-dense center and a linear dense object. We diagnosed a ruptured hepatic abscess caused by a calcified foreign body, which was managed by peritoneal lavage, drainage of the hepatic abscess, and removal of the fish bone, followed by simple closure of the hepatoduodenal fistula. The patient's postoperative course was complicated by systemic inflammatory response syndrome, but he recovered eventually.

  7. Spinal epidural abscess following glossectomy and neck dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Esther; Thorpe, Eric; Borrowdale, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon but potentially life threatening entity that rarely occurs after otolaryngology procedures. Presentation of case We report a case of a diabetic patient who presented with a lumbar spinal epidural abscess eight days after head and neck oncologic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an L4 spinal epidural abscess. Cultures from the spinal epidural abscess, blood, urine, and the previous neck incision grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient recovered neurologic function after surgical decompression and drainage, long-term intravenous antibiotics, and physical therapy. Discussion The development of postoperative spinal epidural abscess is rare after otolaryngology procedures but has been reported in the cervical epidural space. To our knowledge, lumbar spinal epidural abscess has not yet been reported after head and neck oncologic surgery. Even more unique is the presence of the pathogen K. pneumoniae. Conclusion A high index of suspicion of this potential outcome is paramount as early recognition and intervention are keys to recovery of neurologic function. PMID:26799413

  8. Abscess of the caudate lobe of the liver, a rare disease with a challenging management: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al Amer, Nasser A.; Abd El Maksoud, Walid M.

    2013-01-01

    We reported a rare case of abscess of the caudate lobe of the liver in a 60-year old man. We first tried computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous drainage of the abscess but failed to eradicate the infection. Deterioration of the general condition of the patient necessitated open surgical drainage, which resulted in cure of the abscess. The peculiar anatomical location of caudate lobe abscess introduces a great challenge for the surgeon in planning the appropriate management and paucity of patients with caudate lobe abscess has led to lack of guidelines for management. The non-operative interventional radiology approach has become the therapeutic choice for pyogenic liver abscess, but is it applicable also for caudate lobe abscess? PMID:24086176

  9. [Drainage of amoebic liver abscess by single incision laparoscopic surgery. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Parrao-Alcántara, Iris Jocelyn; Montes-Hernández, Jesús Manuel; Vega-Pérez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery has increased recently due to successful results, achieved in several procedures. The aim of the present work is to present the first case in which single incision laparoscopy is used for the drainage of an amoebic liver abscess. A 44-year-old man presented with intense right upper quadrant pain, generalised jaundice, tachycardia, fever, hepatomegaly and a positive Murphy's sign. Laboratory results revealed an increased plasma bilirubin, elevated alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, leucocytosis, negative viral panel for hepatitis, and positive antibodies against Entamoeba histolytica. On an abdominal computed tomography a 15 × 12.1 cm hypodense lesion was observed in the patient's liver, identified as an amoebic liver abscess. Analgesics and antibiotics were started and subsequently the patient was submitted to laparoscopic drainage of the abscess using a single port approach. Drainage and irrigation of the abscess was performed. Four days later the patient was discharged without complications. Management of amoebic liver abscess is focused on the elimination of the infectious agent and obliteration of the abscess cavity in order to prevent its complications, especially rupture. Laparoscopic surgery has proved to be a safe and effective way to manage this entity. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ulcerative colitis in remission with cerebral abscess and septic pulmonary emboli: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Katsumura, Hirotoshi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    A 69-year-old man with a 4-year history of ulcerative colitis (UC) presented at our hospital with high fever, dysarthria, and right hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) of the head revealed a low-density area in the left temporal lobe. Chest CT exposed multiple pulmonary nodules in his right lung. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated a 3-cm tumor with ring enhancement located in the left temporal lobe. The patient was diagnosed with a brain abscess and septic pulmonary emboli (SPE); antibiotic therapy was initiated. Shrinkage of the brain abscess was not observed in a follow-up MRI;thus, he underwent aspiration and drainage of the abscess 11 days after his hospitalization. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued for 6 weeks after the operation. Follow-up chest CT performed 48 days after his hospitalization revealed disappearance of the SPE. Follow-up head MRI conducted 63 days after his hospitalization indicated that the cyst had almost disappeared. Occurrence of a brain abscess in patients with UC has been very rarely reported in Japan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of a brain abscess in conjunction with UC and SPE. It is believed that patients with UC have compromised immunity and exhibit activation of the blood coagulation system. Our report suggests that medical practitioners should consider the possibility of a brain abscess and SPE for patients with UC.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess: two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Limmahakhun, Samornrod; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2013-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive bacillus that exhibits predilection to infect the central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals; the most common manifestations are meningitis and rhombencephalitis. Listerial brain abscesses are rare. We report here two brain abscess cases caused by L. monocytogenes in patients receiving immunosuppressive agents. The first patient presented with left hemiparesis mimicking stroke and the second patient presented with neurological symptoms without fever, which was indistinguishable from brain tumor. In both cases, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed to differentiate infectious processes from other causes. Diagnosis was made with a positive blood culture in both cases. Listerial DNA was detected in the pus aspirated from the abscess in the first case. Both patients were successfully treated with intravenous ampicillin followed by oral amoxicillin. MRS was useful in differentiating infectious processes from non-infectious causes.

  12. Gonococcal Subcutaneous Abscess and Pyomyositis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jitmuang, Anupop; Boonyasiri, Adhiratha; Keurueangkul, Nukool; Leelaporn, Amornrut; Leelarasamee, Amorn

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) is an uncommon complication of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection, its manifestation varies from a classic arthritis-dermatitis syndrome to uncommon pyogenic infections of several organs. Herein, we reported atypical presentation of DGI with subcutaneous abscess of right knee, pyomyositis of right lower extremity, and subsequently complicated by Escherichia coli pyomyositis. This infection responded to appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt surgical management with good clinical outcome. PMID:22919521

  13. Diagnostic and management of pediatric brain stem abscess, a case-based update.

    PubMed

    Ghannane, Houssine; Laghmari, Mehdi; Aniba, Khalid; Lmejjati, Mohammed; Benali, Saïd Ait

    2011-07-01

    Authors report their experience of a pediatric brain stem abscess with a literature review. A 2.5-year-old girl first displayed bacterial otitis 3 months before admission. Diagnosis of brain stem abscess was delayed, despite plethoric neurological signs. She complained of right hemiparesis, headache, squint, dysphagia, and false way inhalation pneumopathy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed presence of an abscess in the pons, prompting for a microsurgical pus aspiration. Postoperative course was regular with a total neurological recovery. Clinical and radiological screening showed progressive regression of the pontine lesion after 4 months, despite persistence of a mild contrast enhancement. Present case is the 18th pediatric brain stem abscess reported in literature. Mean age of occurrence is 8.1 ± 4 years (range 0.75-16) without gender predominance. High morbidity is typical and essentially involves motor functions. The most common clinical signs are raised intracranial pressure, motor limbs deficit, and cranial nerve palsies. Fever was found in 10 out of 18 cases (56%). Three patients received conservative medical treatment. Three patients underwent stereotactic aspiration and 12 others underwent microsurgical aspiration or excision. No mortality was reported since the eighties. However, morbidity is still high. High clinical index of suspicion is necessary to improve functional outcome. Stereotactic-guided or microsurgical aspiration are still good therapeutic options. The rarity of pediatric brain stem abscesses and the need of optimal management make this case-based update very peculiar.

  14. Orbital Plasmacytoma Mimicking an Orbital Abscess.

    PubMed

    Russell, David J; Seiff, Stuart R

    An 83-year-old male with a 15-month history of multiple myeloma presented with acute onset of swelling, redness, and pain around his right eye. CT scan was consistent with an orbital abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for drainage of the orbital abscess. Abnormal tissue was encountered intraoperatively so biopsies were taken. His cultures grew only one colony of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus. The histopathology from the biopsies showed a CD-138 positive plasma cell neoplasia consistent with a plasmacytoma. Plasmacytomas have been reported to present as orbital cellulitis and as abscesses in other locations in the body, but to our knowledge, this is the first case of a plasmacytoma presenting as an orbital abscess.

  15. Splenic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Nadim; Graur, Florin; Hassan, Aboul B; Molnár, Geza

    2002-03-01

    Splenic abscesses are rare entities (autopsy incidence between 0.14-0.7%). The most frequent etiology is the septic emboli seeding from bacterial endocarditis (about 20% of cases) or other septic foci (typhoid fever, malaria, urinary tract infections, osteomielitis, otitis). The treatment of splenic abscesses was until recently splenectomy with antibiotherapy. The actual trends are more conservative (mini invasive or non-invasive) because the immunologic role of the spleen has been better understood over the last year

  16. Adolescence spinal epidural abscess with neurological symptoms: case report, a lesson to be re-learnt.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Gavidel, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    Epidural abscess of the spinal column is a rare condition that can be fatal if left untreated. It promptly progresses and can cause neurologic paralysis, urinary retention or cauda equina syndrome. Compromised immune system that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, AIDS, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, or cancer is a predisposing factor. It mostly occurs in adults. Here we would like to report a case of spontaneous pyogenic lumbar epidural abscess with neurological deficit diagnosed in a 15 year old boy. We treated this case successfully with surgical microscopic decompression and drainage.

  17. Enhanced acute immune response in IL-12p35-/- mice is followed by accelerated distinct repair mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus-induced murine brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Held, Josephin; Preuße, Corinna; Döser, Alexandra; Richter, Lydia; Heppner, Frank L; Stenzel, Werner

    2013-09-01

    Murine Staphylococcus aureus-mediated brain abscess comprises 2 major phases, an initial phase of cerebritis, followed by a healing phase characterized by capsule formation. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and IL-12p35(-/-) mice were intracerebrally infected with S. aureus to induce brain abscesses. Clinical disease activity and bacterial load were monitored. The cell populations that were involved, as well as their specific mediators, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. In the acute phase, IL-12p35(-/-) mice were protected from disease. This was associated with enhanced recruitment of granulocytes, accompanied by upregulated expression of Il17a, Csf2 (which encodes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), Cxcl1, and Cxcl5, as well as increased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including Nos2 (which encodes inducible nitric oxide synthase), Ptgs2 (which encodes cyclooxygenase 2), and Tnf, that were primarily produced by granulocytes and activated microglia/macrophages. Furthermore, mechanisms associated with beneficial wound healing, including an accelerated formation of a fibrous capsule, were demonstrated by prominent VEGF-A production and collagen deposition driven by an earlier onset of T-helper 2 immunity in the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12). Brain abscess development is orchestrated by IL-12 at different stages of disease. Our data indicate that IL-12 has a nonprotective role in the acute phase and that IL-12 deficiency results in the accelerated formation of a protective capsule during the healing phase, which we consider crucial for early recovery from disease.

  18. [A case report of GIST of the small intestine with multiple liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Satoshi; Yura, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Yuka; Tani, Naoko; Yamakita, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Masami; Nishihara, Akihiro; Takaishi, Kenji; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Mori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Shinji

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of a woman in her fifties presenting with abdominal pain, headache and high fever. Blood examination showed a high CRP level and liver dysfunction, and then abdominal CT scan showed multiple liver masses and a 5 cm submucosal tumor of the small intestine. We diagnosed the multiple liver masses as liver abscesses, so we administered antibiotics. We suspected that the tumor was a cause of liver abscesses, and then performed a resection of the tumor and partial small intestine on the third day of hospitalization. We diagnosed the tumor as GIST because it was positive for c-kit and CD34 by immunohistochemistry. One of the resected liver nodules showed negative for c-kit and CD34, and we diagnosed it as a liver abscess. We performed percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) because she ran into high fever after the operation, and then she recovered. We consider she has the possibility of liver metastasis, so we administered imatinib mesylate to her. No recurrence was found for 11 months after the operation. This case provides valuable information because there are few reports of GIST with liver abscesses.

  19. [A case of a bacterial brain abscess presenting as symptoms of 'sudden stroke-like' onset].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kenji; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Hara, Shigeru; Nakashima, Toshihiko; Ueda, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Sakai, Noboru

    2003-04-01

    We report a case of a bacterial brain abscess presenting symptoms of 'sudden stroke-like' onset, associated with infective endocarditis. A 59-year-old woman experienced a sudden stroke-like onset of left hemiplegia. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on the day of ictus. No lesion responsible for the symptom was seen on either CT or a T2 weighted image (T2WI), but a diffusion-weighted image (DWI) revealed focal increased signal intensity in the right frontal lobe. An initial diagnosis of acute embolic infarction associated with infective endocarditis was made. Although the patient's neurological state had been stable, motor paresis of her left extremities became worse starting one month after her admission. MRI with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acid (Gd-DTPA) at 37 days after admission showed an irregular-shaped ring-enhancement lesion located at the same place as the initial infarction, and in the left frontal lobe. Surgical drainage of the lesion in the right frontal lobe was performed, and diagnosed as a bacterial abscess. The exact mechanism of a bacterial brain abscess presenting with 'sudden stroke-like' onset is unknown, but various hypotheses have been proposed. One is that paroxysmal septic emboli lead to abscess formation within or near the area of embolic infarction. Our case showed that the creation of a brain abscess followed embolic strokes, and that this hypothesis was demonstrated by MRI carried out on the day of ictus.

  20. Enterobius vermicularis in tubo-ovarian abscess: A rare and interesting incidental finding - A case Report.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faryal; Malik, Faizan; Fatima, Saira

    2017-04-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is a common intestinal nematode; however, rare extraintestinal Enterobius infections have been reported from different parts of the world. Here, we present a case of tubo-ovarian abscess in an otherwise healthy young sexually active female with no known comorbids with history of on and off lower abdominal pain for one year and high grade fever for one month. On the basis of further workup and radiological evaluation, a preoperative diagnosis of right sided tubo-ovarian abscess was made and salpingo-oophorectomy was performed laproscopically in July 2015. Histopathology of the resected tissue revealed necrosis and in one area Enterobius vermicularis was identified surrounded by neutrophils and eosinophil rich abscess. A final diagnosis of severe acute and chronic salpingo-oophoritis with abscess formation, secondary to Enterobius vermicularis was made. Signs and symptoms of parasitic involvement in tubo-ovarian abscesses are not much different than usual presentations of pelvic inflammatory diseases and identification of a parasite in a tubo-ovarian tissue sample is a rare clinical finding. A high index of suspicion on the part of histopathologist as well as clinician is important for timely diagnosis and effective management of such cases.

  1. Abscess formation after lip augmentation with silicone: case report.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Frege, J; Reichart, P A

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an abscess after injection of an alloplastic preparation (silicone) for enhancement of the lower lip. The 56-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling of her lower lip which was incised. Pus drained from the incision. A biopsy was taken. Histology revealed homogeneous foreign body inclusions (silicone) with fibrosis, chronic inflammation and multinuclear giant cells. Healing was uneventful with little deformation of the lower lip. Since the number of persons seeking aesthetic lip augmentation is increasing, oral surgeons and dentists should be familiar with adverse effects to filling agents.

  2. [Giant retropharyngeal abscess in pediatric patient: case report].

    PubMed

    Demir, Ali Oğuz; Doğan, Ersoy; Ecevit, Mustafa Cenk

    2016-01-01

    A two-year-old girl patient, who presented to another center with three months of sore throat and one month of neck swelling with pain, was initiated antibiotherapy but no healing was achieved. Afterwards, the patient was directed to our clinic and an abscess was detected in magnetic resonance imaging extending in both lateral spaces of the neck. The patient was performed surgical drainage urgently. The wound was dressed with rifampicin and the patient was started parenteral antibiotherapy. A dramatic recovery was observed and no complication occurred in the patient.

  3. Carcinoma Cecum Presenting as Right Gluteal Abscess Through Inferior Lumbar Triangle Pathway—Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ram, Duvuru; Ali, Sheik Manwar; Velayutham, Sugi Subramaniam Raghavan; Vijayaraghavan, Nandhagopal

    2014-01-01

    Gluteal abscess commonly follows intramuscular injections with contaminated needles. Carcinoma cecum is known to present with pericolic abscess due to microperforations and may rupture intraperitoneally. Gluteal abscess secondary to perforated carcinoma cecum with pericolic abscess is extremely uncommon. A 50-year-old woman who was receiving intramuscular iron injections for anemia presented with a 10 × 10-cm abscess in the right gluteal region and a vague mass in the right iliac fossa. After investigations, a diagnosis of perforated carcinoma cecum with pericolic abscess tracking into the right gluteal region was made, and incision and drainage were done. Fine-needle aspiration cytology from the cecal growth revealed adenocarcinoma. Unfortunately, the patient was not willing to undergo definitive treatment. This case is being reported for its rarity and as an uncommon etiology for a common condition. PMID:25058767

  4. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masakazu; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Uemura, Hisashi; Okada, Kaoru; Nakane, Shigeru; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hirohito; Oka, Yoshio; Nezu, Riichiro

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses. The 59-year-old female patient presented with a fever at a body temperature of 39.0°C. On abdominal computed tomography (CT), multiple liver abscesses were detected, and percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed. The day after the PTAD, the patient's fever subsided and her inflammatory response abated. A lower gastrointestinal examination, performed to identify the origin of her symptoms, revealed a type 1 tumor in the sigmoid colon. A biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Prior to surgery, a second abdominal CT scan was performed, and a single liver metastasis was detected. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection were simultaneously performed. The histopathological diagnosis of the colon cancer was tub2, pN1, pH1, P0, ly1, v1, stage IV. To date, the patient remains free from hepatic abscess and colon cancer recurrence. Gastrointestinal examinations should be performed as early as possible to identify the cause of hepatic abscesses. Moreover, therapeutic decisions should only be made after imaging and examinations have been performed, which will be sufficient to identify the presence of liver metastases.

  5. Successful hepatectomy for hepatic abscess with chronic granulomatous disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Muranushi, Ryo; Suzuki, Makoto; Araki, Kenichiro; Kubo, Norio; Otake, Sayaka; Nishida, Yutaka; Ishige, Takashi; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken

    2017-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a rare inherited disorder, is characterized by impaired ability of phagocytic cells to kill certain bacteria and fungi. Although liver abscess is a common manifestation of CGD, its optimal management in these patients is unknown. Here, we present a case of successful hepatectomy for hepatic abscess in a patient with CGD. An adolescent patient with previously diagnosed CGD presented to the pediatrics department of our institution with fever. Blood tests showed high concentrations of inflammatory markers. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a multilocular mass measuring 52 mm × 34 mm in hepatic segment 4 (S4). Blood cultures were negative. Despite administration of antibiotics and γ-globulin, his fever and high concentrations of inflammatory markers persisted and the mass did not change on CT scan images. Because the medications had proved ineffective and percutaneous drainage would have been difficult because of the honeycombing in the abscess, we performed hepatic S4a + S5 anatomic resection and cholecystectomy. Culture of the excised specimen was negative. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. On day 62, CT showed no abscess around the resection stump. On day 81, he was transferred to undergo bone marrow transplantation. Surgical treatment for hepatic abscess can be effective when medical treatment has failed.

  6. Human Listeriosis Presenting as Breast Abscess: Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    An abscess is defined as a collection of pus in various tissues of the body including skin and other organs. Abscesses most commonly are formed on the skin under the armpits, groin areas, and rectal areas. Most abscesses involve microbial infections with few remaining sterile. The treatment of abscesses includes both medical and surgical intervention. In the era of multidrug resistance, isolation and identification of the causative microbe and testing for antimicrobial susceptible patterns assume greater significance for the better management of patients, thereby reducing the resultant morbidity and mortality. Listeria spp. are a group of aerobic and non-spore forming gram-positive bacilli. They are present in the environment, soil, and water. Listeria spp. have also been noted to be present as a normal intestinal flora of animals. They are known for their ability to thrive under both cold and hot environmental conditions. Human infections with Listeria spp. have not been frequently reported, mostly because of the difficulty in laboratory identification and complex clinical presentations. In humans, Listeria spp. have been frequently responsible for food poisoning and neonatal meningitis. Although not considered as a classic pathogen, Listeria spp. are associated with infections in elderly people, pregnant women, newborns, and persons with weakened immune systems. This report presents a case of breast abscess caused by Listeria spp. in a young lactating female belonging to rural India. PMID:28289572

  7. First Described Case of Group B Streptococcus Pelvic Abscess in a Patient with No Medical Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dwarki, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group B Streptococcus is an organism that commonly infects a wide range of hosts including infants in the first week of life, pregnant women, and older age adults as well as adults with underlying medical comorbidities. Case. Large pelvic abscess in a nonpregnant patient found to be caused by Group B Streptococcus was treated successfully with IR guided drainage and antibiotics. Conclusion. Though rare, GBS can still be a cause of invasive infection even in individuals who are nonpregnant and have no underlying comorbidities. Empiric antibiotic coverage for this organism should be kept in mind when treating an abscess. PMID:27529043

  8. An unnoticed origin of fever: periapical tooth abscess. Three case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ferhat; Karagöz, Ergenekon; Arslan, Birsen Yigit; Mert, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Dental infections may lead to severe local or systemic infections such as endocarditis, brain abscesses and mediastinitis. Fever may be the only symptom. We aim to highlight dental/odontogenic abscesses as the occult source of unexplained fever by reporting on three cases and reviewing the relevant literature. Early dental evaluation and referral of patients with persistent fever (even without any oral symptoms) to a dentist plays a critical role in preventing unnecessary, time-consuming and high-cost further diagnostic tests and invasive procedures. A simple panoramic dental radiography may suffice to establish the diagnosis.

  9. [Psoas major abscess by heroin addictive patients--a case report].

    PubMed

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Durasić, Ljubomir M

    2011-01-01

    Drug abuse is related to many medical complications, which depend on the drug type, dose injected, the method of delivery and site of injection. We report a case of psoas abscess in young heroin addict, HIV negative, who was admitted in Emergency Center of Clinical Center in Belgrade because of fever, anaemia, prostration and right groin pain. Clinical and radiological examination were performed. CT showed large abscess of the right psoas muscle, 12 x 4 cm large. Treatment included percutaneous drainage and administration of iv antibiotics. There is regression of inflamation. At discharge patient was in good condition without signs of infection.

  10. Right ventricular wall abscess in structurally normal heart after leg osteomyelitis: First case.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere

    2016-09-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented with fever and acute dyspnea for 4 days. She had suffered an injury to the left lower leg 3 weeks earlier, with abscess formation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed osteomyelitis of the lower tibia. Echocardiography showed a mass in the right ventricular wall. She underwent concomitant heart surgery for removal of the right ventricular mass and limb arthrotomy. We believe this is a first reported case in which a ventricular wall abscess developed in a structurally normal heart following leg osteomyelitis.

  11. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with masticator and parapharyngeal space abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a fatal neurological disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Many reports indicate that Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by malnutrition. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient who had a left masticator space and parapharyngeal space abscess who was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. She reported problems while eating due to the presence of the abscess, but the true quantities of food she was ingesting were never assessed. Clinicians have a responsibility to provide adequate nutritional support by ensuring that patients receive adequate nutrition. Clinicians should also keep in mind that Wernicke's encephalopathy may occur in patients who experienced prolonged periods of malnutrition. PMID:27162754

  12. Skin infections caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: clinical and microbiological characteristics of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Pulido Pérez, A; Baniandrés Rodríguez, O; Ceballos Rodríguez, M C; Mendoza Cembranos, M D; Campos Domínguez, M; Suárez Fernández, R

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen that causes skin and soft-tissue infections. To describe the clinical characteristics of skin infections caused by CA-MRSA and correlations with the available demographic and microbiological data. This was a descriptive study of patients with a microbiologically confirmed diagnosis of CA-MRSA infection treated in a dermatology department between June 2009 and December 2011. We recorded demographic details, the clinical characteristics of lesions, and the treatments used. We studied 11 patients (5 men and 6 women); 91% were under 40 years of age and had no relevant past medical history. The most common presentation was a skin abscess (with or without cellulitis). In all such cases, marked tissue necrosis and little or no purulent exudate was observed when the abscess was drained. Fifty percent of these abscesses had been treated previously with β-lactam antibiotics, and in all cases the lesions resolved after surgical drainage, which was combined in 63% of cases with quinolones or cotrimoxazole. Today, skin infections due to CA-MRSA affect healthy young athletes who have no contact with healthcare settings. The most common presentation is a skin abscess characterized by marked tissue necrosis and little or no purulent exudate. In cases with these characteristics in susceptible patients, the involvement of CA-MRSA as the causative agent should be suspected. The abscesses should be drained whenever possible and, if necessary, antibiotic treatment should be prescribed; empirical use of β-lactam antibiotics should be avoided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  14. [A case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Young Sun; Choi, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Kul; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2009-03-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is a very rare complication of liver abscess. We report a case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 59-year-old man presented with right upper quadrant pain and febrile sense. Computed tomography showed a low attenuated mass with extensive subcapsular hematoma on the right hepatic lobe. The initial impression was a hematoma caused by the rupture of cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic arteriography was performed, but no active bleeding focus was found. After drainage of the subcapsular hematoma, a hematoma wall biopsy through the drainage catheter and a liver biopsy of the low attenuated mass were performed. The biopsies showed many neutrophils, macrophages, and granulation tissues consistent with an abscess, but no malignant cells were detected. After antibiotics therapy for 6 weeks, computed tomography was performed 4 months later, and revealed complete resolution of the hematoma and the low attenuated hepatic lesion.

  15. Amebic lung abscess with coexisting lung adenocarcinoma: a unusual case of amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hailong; Min, Xiangyang; Li, Shuai; Feng, Meng; Zhang, Guofeng; Yi, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    Amebic lung abscess with concurrent lung cancer, but without either a liver abscess or amebic colitis, is extremely uncommon. Here, we report a 70-year-old man presenting with pulmonary amebiasis and coexisting lung adenocarcinoma. During his first-time hospitalization, the diagnosis of lung amebiasis was confirmed by morphological observation and PCR in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sediments of pleural effusion. Almost four months later, the patient was readmitted to hospital for similar complaints. On readmission, lung adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by liquid-based sputum cytology and thought to be delayed because coexisting amebic lung abscess. This case demonstrated that sediments of pleural effusion may be used for further pathological examination after routine cytology has shown negative results. At the same time, we concluded that lung cancer may easily go undetected in the patients with pulmonary amebiasis and repetitive evaluation by cytology and imaging follow-up are useful to find potential cancer.

  16. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia without endocarditis associated with psoas abscess: the first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Upapan, Prasit; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-03-01

    The authors report a patient with a rare manifestation of invasive septic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection without endocardial involvement. Our patient presented with progressive paraparesis and subacute fever for ten days. He had underlying diabetes mellitus and alcoholic cirrhosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbosacral spine showed a psoas abscess with vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis at level of L23 of the lumbar spine. His blood culture grew E. rhusiopathiae. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated normal endocardium. Surgical drainage and debridement with concomitant intravenous antibiotics administration resulted in clinical improvement, including neurological status. MRI showed resolution of the psoas abscess and osteomyelitis. Erysipelothrix infection should be considered as a causative pathogen of musculoskeletal infection in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of psoas abscess caused by E. rhusiopathiae in Thailand.

  17. Brain abscess caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Case report.

    PubMed

    Guinand Vives, Carlos H; Monsalve Duarte, Guillermo A; Beltrán, Sandra Valderrama; Pinzón, Johanna Osorio

    2009-08-01

    This 24-year-old soldier had a history of polytrauma caused by firearm missiles of a fragmentation weapon. He was referred to the Hospital Militar Central, where multiple shrapnel wounds in the head, face, thorax, and extremities were found. A brain abscess was documented and drained, and a culture grew a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. An appropriate antibiotic treatment was started but did not lead to a good response, and the patient died. The clinical course of the illness is presented, as is its treatment and the role of A baumannii as an etiological agent of a brain abscess. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reported cases in the worldwide literature of brain abscess by this infectious agent.

  18. Fusarium falciforme vertebral abscess and osteomyelitis: case report and molecular classification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium is a ubiquitous filamentous mold that rarely causes disease in immunocompetent humans but can be fatal in immunocompromised hosts. We report an unusual case of vertebral abscess and osteomyelitis in a patient with an autoimmune disorder who was on long term glucocorticoids. Multilocus DNA s...

  19. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pelaez, Ana Isabel; del Mar Garcia-Suarez, Maria; Manteca, Angel; Melon, Ovidio; Aranaz, Carlos; Cimadevilla, Rafael; Mendez, Francisco Javier; Vazquez, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:19366439

  20. Case report: a brain abscess in a disaster zone- beyond the call of duty.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Giora; Mendlovic, Joseph; Dagan, David; Albukrek, Dov; Shpriz, Manor; Merin, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a child with a suspected brain abscess treated by a military field hospital in post-typhoon Philippines. We review our intervention and decision process both at the field hospital and following his transfer to a referral center. These interventions were critical for his successful outcome.

  1. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Ana Isabel; Garcia-Suarez, Maria del Mar; Manteca, Angel; Melon, Ovidio; Aranaz, Carlos; Cimadevilla, Rafael; Mendez, Francisco Javier; Vazquez, Fernando

    2009-04-14

    We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  2. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus renal abscess: a rare cause of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Casullo, V A; Bottone, E; Herold, B C

    2001-01-01

    Renal abscess is uncommon in pediatrics and is rarely a cause of fever of unknown origin. We recently cared for a patient who presented with a 3-week history of fever. An indium scan ultimately led to the diagnosis of a renal abscess. Aspiration yielded Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus. This unusual case prompted a review of the clinical and microbiologic features of renal abscess in pediatric patients at our hospital over the past 10 years. Seven additional patients with a discharge diagnosis of renal abscess were identified. Only 2 of the patients had identifiable risk factors (diabetes mellitus and polycystic kidneys). Staphylococcus aureus or Enterobacteriaceae were responsible for most infections, consistent with hematogenous and urinary tract sources, respectively. No other cases of anaerobic abscess were identified. This case highlights the importance of considering a renal abscess in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and of processing specimens for both aerobic and anaerobic organisms.

  3. Fungal brain abscess caused by "Black Mold" (Cladophialophora bantiana) - A case report of successful treatment with an emphasis on how fungal brain abscess may be different from bacterial brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Aljuboori, Zaid; Hruska, Rob; Yaseen, Alae; Arnold, Forest; Wojda, Barbara; Nauta, Haring

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infection with Cladophialophora bantiana (Black Mold) is rare. It carries a high mortality rate, that is more than 70%, despite multimodal therapy. We present a rare case of "black mold" fungal brain abscess that was successfully treated with good patient outcome. The case is unusual because there were two fungal brain abscesses located bilaterally symmetrically in the mesial frontal lobes, and the response to different treatment strategies was well documented by over 25 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Initial attempts to treat these lesions by repeated surgical excision and systemic amphotericin B was followed by continued growth rather than resolution. We realized that the application of treatment principles learned from bacterial brain abscess may not transpose intuitively to the treatment of fungal brain abscess. Therefore, a new treatment strategy was adopted that avoided further attempts at resection in favor of long-term oral voriconazole and repeated intracavitary aspiration and instillation of amphotericin B on an outpatient basis. Without further resection, the lesions stabilized and the aspirates eventually sterilized, however, the enhancing capsule never resolved on MRI scans. All treatment was stopped after 1 year. The apparently sterilized lesions have been followed for an additional 3 years without further growth, and the patient remains functionally, intellectually, and behaviorally normal. We conclude that, in the case of fungal abscess, it may be preferable to sterilize the lesion in situ rather than attempting to achieve resolution on imaging studies by repeated surgical resection of the capsule which can be counterproductive. This strategy accepts that the capsule may be important to the patient's immune defense against the fungus. Helping that defense barrier with intracapsular and systemic antifungal agents, rather than capsular removal, may be the better strategy for patients in whom early aggressive resection

  4. Liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei in a young man: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Partha; Ray, Sayantan; Moulick, Avijit; Dey, Subhasis; Jana, Anirban; Banerjee, Kokila

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a common entity in Indian subcontinent and is mostly caused by gram negative bacteria. Melioidosis is not commonly seen in India and only a few cases are reported. It can give rise to multiple abscesses at different sites including liver. We report a case of isolated liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei) in a 29-year-old recently diagnosed diabetic, immunocompetent male. Diagnosis was made by imaging and culture of pus aspirated from the abscess and he was treated with percutaneous pigtail catheter drainage followed by antibiotics (meropenem and trimethoprim-sulphmethoxazole). Melioidosis is an emerging infection in India and has high mortality rate, so early diagnosis and prompt management is warranted which requires clinical vigilance and an intensive microbiological workup. Clinicians should be aware of isolated liver abscess caused by B. pseudomallei in appropriate clinical settings. PMID:25325075

  5. [Splenic rupture secondary to abscess: Rare cause of pneumoperitoneum. Case report].

    PubMed

    Barrón-Reyes, Jorge Enrique; Chávez-Galván, Julio César; Martínez-Peralta, Jesús Alejandro; López-Valdés, Julio César

    2016-12-24

    Splenic abscesses are rare entities; reports are commonly described in immunocompromised patients (72%) as: hematologic diseases, diabetes, endocarditis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, transplant patients and subjects who had abdominal trauma or splenic infarction. The main and most serious complication is the abscess rupture into the peritoneal cavity or adjacent organs (stomach or colon), which determines hemodynamic instability or septic state. Fifty-year-old man, who was admitted at Emergency Room due eight days' progressive, oppressive, and current pain; intensity 4/10, irradiated at hemi-back, which was higher intensity during the standing and decreased at supine position. It was accompanied by nausea and vomiting in two occasions. Hemoglobin 15.1g/dl, hematocrit 45.2%, platelets 176×10(3), 23.1×10(3) leukocytosis, neutrophils 92%. Simple abdominal radiographic studies revealed in 'ground glass' and radiopaque imagines. At presence of free air inside the abdominal cavity, is usually to think of a complicated diverticular disease, intestinal perforation or perforated peptic ulcer. The actual medical literature described very few cases of splenic abscess with pneumoperitoneum as cardinal manifestation. In our case, the splenic abscess was detected during exploratory laparotomy and only in retrospective the imaging studies were interpreted. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. “Dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia turns out to be epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh Kumar; Kaul, Vinca; Parampill, Reena

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of “dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia in a patient posted for incision and drainage of lower limb with cellulitis. When the patient was being given sub-arachnoid block (SAB) for regional anaesthesia, it turned out to be a case of pyogenic ilio-psoas abscess extended up to the paravertebral and epidural spaces. The causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first case reported when epidural abscess is diagnosed during SAB. PMID:22923830

  7. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Patient Instructions Brain surgery - discharge Images Amebic brain abscess ...

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Use of Rapid Molecular Testing for Staphylococcus aureus for Patients With Cutaneous Abscesses in the Emergency Department With Standard of Care

    PubMed Central

    May, Larissa S.; Rothman, Richard E.; Miller, Loren G.; Brooks, Gillian; Zocchi, Mark; Zatorski, Catherine; Dugas, Andrea F.; Ware, Chelsea E.; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether real-time availability of rapid molecular results of Staphylococcus aureus would impact emergency department clinician antimicrobial selection for adults with cutaneous abscesses. DESIGN We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing a rapid molecular test with standard of care culture-based testing. Follow-up telephone calls were made at between 2 and 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months after discharge. SETTING Two urban, academic emergency departments. PATIENTS Patients at least 18 years old presenting with a chief complaint of abscess, cellulitis, or insect bite and receiving incision and drainage were eligible. Seven hundred seventy-eight people were assessed for eligibility and 252 met eligibility criteria. METHODS Clinician antibiotic selection and clinical outcomes were evaluated. An ad hoc outcome of test performance was performed. RESULTS We enrolled 252 patients and 126 were randomized to receive the rapid test. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus–positive patients receiving rapid test results were prescribed beta-lactams more often than controls (absolute difference, 14.5% [95% CI, 1.1%–30.1%]) whereas methicillin-resistant S. aureus–positive patients receiving rapid test results were more often prescribed anti–methicillin-resistant S. aureus antibiotics (absolute difference, 21.5% [95% CI, 10.1%–33.0%]). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in 1-week or 3-month clinical outcomes. CONCLUSION Availability of rapid molecular test results after incision and drainage was associated with more-targeted antibiotic selection. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01523899 PMID:26306996

  9. [Actinomycosis sub-masseter abscess, simulating a parotiditis. Review of case and revision of literature].

    PubMed

    Padilla Parrado, M; Aranzana Gómez, A; Jiménez Antolín, J A; García Manríquez, A; Céspedes Más, M; Menéndez Loras, L M

    2003-01-01

    We present one case of a pluripathologic female patient who has developed an submaseterin abscess secondary to an actinomyces mandibular osteomielitis. The initial presentation seems an acute supurative parothiditis. We describe its presentation, evolution, special tests done for its diagnostic, as also the discussion of the type and duration of the treatment. And we include also a differential diagnosis between the two diseases, with a similar form. We do also a bibliographic revision of the few similar cases published.

  10. Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Dornbos, David; Morin, Jocelyn; Watson, Joshua R; Pindrik, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the spine with associated spinal epidural abscess represents an uncommon entity in the pediatric population, requiring prompt evaluation and diagnosis to prevent neurological compromise. Cat scratch disease, caused by the pathogen Bartonella henselae, encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations; however, an association with osteomyelitis and epidural abscess has been reported in only 4 other instances in the literature. The authors report a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural abscess in a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease. A 5-year-old girl, who initially presented with vague constitutional symptoms, was diagnosed with cat scratch disease following biopsy of an inguinal lymph node. Despite appropriate antibiotics, she presented several weeks later with recurrent symptoms and back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 2 foci of osteomyelitis at T-8 and T-11 with an associated anterior epidural abscess from T-9 to T-12. Percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy revealed B. henselae by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with favorable clinical outcome.

  11. [Tubo-ovarian abscess in the 39th week of pregnancy (case report)].

    PubMed

    Piegzová, A; Unzeitig, V

    2017-01-01

    A case of tubo-ovarian abscess in a patient with term pregnancy. Case report. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nemocnice s poliklinikou Karviná Ráj. I hereby report a case of a patient in her 39th week of pregnancy hospitalized for abdominal pain and vomiting. Due to unclear aetiology and growing dynamics of inflammatory markers the ending of the pregnancy by induction of labour was indicated. Postpartum examination performed through computed tomography determines the cause of current problems. Conservative therapy of the diagnosed adnexal abscess, however, is insufficient. In the fourth postpartum day, the patient is indicated for surgical intervention and unilateral salpingo oophorectomy is performed. Even though rare during this period, some forms of clinical pelvic inflammatory disorders during pregnancy have to be taken into consideration. Timely and correct diagnosis combined with adequate therapy is of vital importance for reduction of perinatal and maternal mortality and morbidity.

  12. Myocardial abscess and bacteremia complicating Mycobacterium fortuitum pacemaker infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al Maslamani, Mona; Al Khuwaiter, Jameela; El Deeb, Yasser; Abu Khattab, Mohammed

    2009-11-01

    A case of pacemaker infection complicated by bacteremia and myocardial abscess caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum is reported and 9 other cases of pacemaker infection associated with rapidly growing mycobacteria are reviewed. Most cases developed within 6 months from implantation suggesting nosocomial acquisition. Wound discharge, fever, and pain at generator site were the most common presenting features. At presentation they had a median duration of symptoms of 34 days. Concomitant bacteremia was present in half of the cases. Antibiotics therapy and removal of the pacemaker system were needed to achieve cure in the majority of cases. Clarithromycin and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used antibiotics.

  13. Efficacy of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng in a Murine Model of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Abscesses.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Francisco Fábio Martins; Torres, Alba Fabiola; Gonçalves, Thially Braga; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano; Aguiar, Milena Braga; Camara, Lilia Maria Carneiro; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Valença Junior, José Telmo; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against MRSA clinical isolates. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE), the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction and its subfractions were determined by broth microdilution and bioautography against MRSA clinical isolates. The microdilution checkerboard method was used to assess in vitro drug combination studies. To induce abscess formation, bacterial suspensions were added to Citodex and inoculated subcutaneously into male Swiss mice. The treatment protocol consisted of 2 doses of HE, the EA fraction or vancomycin introduced intraperitoneally into mice 3 and 12 h after infection. The EA fraction and its subfractions presented the lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC, 0.25 to 0.5 mg/mL). The plant samples were bacteriostatic at 2x and 4x MIC and bactericidal at 100 mg/mL. The EA fraction presented synergism with vancomycin and an additive effect with ciprofloxacin. A significant reduction of abscess volume, bacterial cell counts in abscess slurries, and inflammatory scores was observed in the HE and EA fraction-treated groups. The samples were effective in treating the animals in a dose-dependent fashion. The present study proved the effectiveness of P. amboinicus fractions against MRSA using in vitro and in vivo assays.

  14. Efficacy of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng in a Murine Model of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Francisco Fábio Martins; Torres, Alba Fabiola; Gonçalves, Thially Braga; Santiago, Gilvandete Maria Pinheiro; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano; Aguiar, Milena Braga; Camara, Lilia Maria Carneiro; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Valença Junior, José Telmo; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against MRSA clinical isolates. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE), the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction and its subfractions were determined by broth microdilution and bioautography against MRSA clinical isolates. The microdilution checkerboard method was used to assess in vitro drug combination studies. To induce abscess formation, bacterial suspensions were added to Citodex and inoculated subcutaneously into male Swiss mice. The treatment protocol consisted of 2 doses of HE, the EA fraction or vancomycin introduced intraperitoneally into mice 3 and 12 h after infection. The EA fraction and its subfractions presented the lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC, 0.25 to 0.5 mg/mL). The plant samples were bacteriostatic at 2x and 4x MIC and bactericidal at 100 mg/mL. The EA fraction presented synergism with vancomycin and an additive effect with ciprofloxacin. A significant reduction of abscess volume, bacterial cell counts in abscess slurries, and inflammatory scores was observed in the HE and EA fraction-treated groups. The samples were effective in treating the animals in a dose-dependent fashion. The present study proved the effectiveness of P. amboinicus fractions against MRSA using in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:23533472

  15. [Splenic abscess].

    PubMed

    Troncoso, P; Geni, R; Llanos, O

    1989-06-01

    Splenic abscess is an uncommon condition associated with a high mortality. In most cases an hematogenous focus can be identified. Early diagnosis is essential for recovery. CT scan and ultrasound tomography are the best diagnostic tools. The latter was used to establish the diagnosis in 2 patients who were successfully treated by surgery.

  16. Delayed diagnosis of central skull-base osteomyelitis with abscess: case report and learning points.

    PubMed

    Chawdhary, G; Hussain, S; Corbridge, R

    2017-01-01

    Central skull-base osteomyelitis (CSBO) is a rare life-threatening infection, usually resulting from medial spread of necrotising otitis externa. Here, we describe a case with no identifiable source of infection, causing a delay in diagnosis. An 80-year-old man with Crohn's disease treated with mesalazine presented with collapse and tonic-clonic seizure. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a nasopharyngeal mass that was initially thought to be a neoplasm. Awaiting formal biopsy, he represented with collapse and repeat imaging showed features of abscess formation. Review of previous scans revealed skull-base erosion and the diagnosis was revised to skull-base osteomyelitis. This is the first reported case of CSBO associated with mesalazine use, an aminosalicylate used in Crohn's disease. It is only the second reported case with abscess formation. We discuss the learning points in making a timely diagnosis and examine the potential association of factors such as mesalazine use and abscess formation in this case.

  17. Pelvic abscess after oocyte retrieval in women with endometriosis: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Bárbara; Aibar, Laura; Martínez Navarro, Luis; Fontes, Juan; Calderón, Maria-Angeles; Mozas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pelvic inflammatory disease with progression to pelvic abscess is a rare complication after oocyte retrieval during in vitro fertilization cycles. However, in patients with endometriosis the risk appears to be increased. Many authors agree on the need for antibiotic prophylaxis during the oocyte retrieval in these patients, but there is no consensus regarding the best antibiotic. Case: We discuss 3 clinical cases of tubo-ovarian abscess in women with endometriosis after oocyte retrieval despite antibiotic prophylaxis between 2004 and 2011 at our center, and discuss our experience in the context of earlier reports. Conclusion: It is unclear whether antibiotic prophylaxis is necessary in these women, and which antibiotic is best. Only douching with povidone-iodine appears to decrease the rate of pelvic infection. PMID:24639807

  18. A 15-Month-Old Boy With Respiratory Distress and Parapharyngeal Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Behdad; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Sharifzadeh, Meisam; Mirashrafi, Fatemeh; Yaghmaie, Bahareh; Pak, Neda; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad; Eshaghi, Hamid; Gorji, Mojtaba; Memarian, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Parapharyngeal abscess is a life-threatening disease. Upper respiratory tract infection is the main cause in children. We present a 15-month-old boy admitted to the emergency ward with the chief complaint of difficulty in breathing caused by parapharyngealabscess. His condition deteriorated gradually, and he transferred to the operation theater quickly for abscess drainage and because of the difficulty in orotracheal intubation; a tracheostomy was performed. His respiratory condition deteriorated 2 days after PICU admission, and the medical team noticed an unexplainable respiratory distress. A chest x ray obtained and showed a right side pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema around theneck area. The case presented here, had not been diagnosed at the first examination; however, there were enough clinical clues (such as respiratory distress, drooling, torticollis, bulging of theneck, previous viral respiratory infection, possible pharyngeal trauma). The story of this case reminds us the importance of the precise physical exam and history taking which could be life-saving.

  19. Spinal epidural abscess associated with infliximab treatment for psoriatic arthritis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam P; Musacchio, Michael J; O'Toole, John E

    2008-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are used to treat numerous chronic inflammatory and rheumatological diseases, such as Crohn disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. Because the mechanism of these inhibitors is to decrease the body's inflammatory response, the primary complication of treatment is infection. The authors present the first case of a spinal epidural abscess in a patient receiving long-term infliximab therapy for severe psoriatic arthritis. Infliximab and its side-effect profile are discussed, along with other associated complications.

  20. Primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Primary extraintestinal complications caused by Yersinia enterocolitica are extremely rare, especially in the form of skin and soft-tissue manifestations, and little is known about their clinical characteristics and treatments. We presented our case and reviewed past cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica. We report a case of primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Y enterocolitica in an immunocompetent 70-year-old woman with keratodermia tylodes palmaris progressiva. She presented to an outpatient clinic with redness, swelling, and pain of the left ring finger and left upper arm without fever or gastrointestinal symptoms 3 days before admission. One day later, ulceration of the skin with exposed bone of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger developed, and cefditoren pivoxil was described. However, she was admitted to our hospital due to deterioration of symptoms involving the left finger and upper arm. Cefazolin was initiated on admission, then changed to sulbactam/ampicillin and vancomycin with debridement of the left ring finger and drainage of the left upper arm abscess. Wound culture grew Y enterocolitica serotype O:8 and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Blood cultures were negative and osteomyelitis was ruled out. Vancomycin was switched to ciprofloxacin, then skin and soft-tissue manifestations showed clear improvement within a few days. The patient received 14 days of ciprofloxacin and oral amoxicillin/clavulanate and has since shown no recurrence. We reviewed 12 cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica from the literature. In several past cases, portal entry involved failure of the skin barrier on distal body parts. Thereafter, infection might have spread to the regional lymph nodes from the ruptured skin. Y enterocolitica is typically resistant to aminopenicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins. In most cases, these inefficient

  1. [Metronidazole-Induced Encephalopathy during Brain Abscess Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuka; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Uchida, Kazuki; Shimbo, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Itamoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Metronidazole is a widely used antibiotic against anaerobic bacteria and protozoa. We report two cases of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy(MIE)during treatment of a brain abscess with metronidazole. The patients developed mental disturbance, and brain MRI showed reversible signals on DWI, FLAIR, and T2. Case 1: A 48-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebellar abscess. We initiated treatment with oral metronidazole. After taking the medication, she developed mental disturbance, and her brain MRI showed a hyperintensity within the corpus callosum. We suspected metronidazole toxicity and discontinued metronidazole treatment. The symptoms resolved rapidly within a week, and the hyperintensity on the MRI disappeared. Case 2: A 22-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a brain abscess. We initiated treatment with oral metronidazole. On day 38, he developed mental disturbance, and his MRI showed hyperintensities within the bilateral dentate nuclei and corpus callosum. These symptoms were consistent with MIE. After cessation of metronidazole, his symptoms and abnormal MRI signals completely disappeared.

  2. A rare cause of lower abdominal and pelvic mass, primary tuberculous psoas abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous psoas abscess was usually associated to complicate Pott's disease, but it can also be secondary to direct extension from other adjacent structures or haematogenous spread from an occult source. However, the occurrence of this entity as the presenting manifestation of tuberculosis, without evidence of active infection elsewhere, has been seldom reported. Case Presentation We report a clinical case of a 64-year-old immunocompetent female that presented with left lower abdominal pain and a soft tissue mass over the left iliac fossa and inguinal regions due to a primary tuberculous psoas abscess. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment with percutaneous drainage guided by ultrasound along with antituberculous drugs, lead to a satisfactory outcome. Conclusion The purpose of this case report is to point out attention to the diagnostic challenge of tuberculous psoas abscess in the absence of tuberculosis in other organs or a predisposing condition. A brief review of the literature about its epidemiology, etiology, clinical features and management is discussed over the text. PMID:19946492

  3. [Brain abscesses. Value of computed tomography. A review of seven cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leriche, B; Boucetta, M; Jourdan, P; Desgeorges, M

    1980-01-01

    Based on a series of seven cases of subtentorial abscess, the authors analyze the results of different methods of exploration. Though in certain clinical conditions (intracranial hypertension and meningeal infections) the etiology is of no consequence, in most cases of definite diagnosis can be made of a space-occupying lesion by the use of EEG, arteriography, and scintigraphy examinations, without establishing the precise nature of the affection. As expected, computed tomography appears to be the most reliable examination. Diagnosis was confirmed by this method in 6 of the 7 cases, and it also enabled the number, size, and location of the lesions to be determined. Typical appearances after injection of an iodized contrast medium revealed the development of an abscess following the intracerebral infection, and determined the time for surgical intervention. In spite of intensive care and antibiotic therapy, an abscess remains a "delayed-action bomb", with poor prognosis, requiring drainage or surgical excision as soon as conditions are appropriate. The mortality and morbidity of this rare, and therefore poorly recognized, affection should improve with systematic use of the scanner during meningeal infections.

  4. Liver Retransplantation for Hepatic Abscess Due to Hepatic Artery Thrombosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zanus, G; Romano, M; Finotti, M; Dalla Bona, E; Sgarabotto, D; Bassi, D; Mescoli, C; Angeli, P; Burra, P; Gringeri, E; Vitale, A; D'Amico, F; Feltracco, P; Cillo, U

    2017-05-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a well-recognized complication of liver transplantation (LT). HAT is an important risk factor for infectious, in particular hepatic abscess, which can cause graft loss and increasing morbidity and mortality. We present a case report of complicated LT in a 52-year-old Caucasian man with primary sclerosing cholangitis. In 2007 the patient was included on the waiting list in Padua for LT. In 2012 the patient underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for bile duct stricture, complicated with acute pancreatitis. A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed with choledochotomy and Kehr's T tube drainage. On February 14, 2012, the patient underwent LT with arterial reconstruction and choledochojejunostomy. The postoperative course was complicated with HAT, multiple liver abscesses, and sepsis associated with bacteremia due to Enterococcus faecium despite massive intravenous antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainages. On November 28, 2012, the patient underwent retransplantation. Four years after transplantation the patient is still in good general condition. Hepatic abscess formation secondary to HAT following LT is a major complication associated with important morbidity and mortality. In selected cases retransplantation should be considered as our case demonstrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cribriform carcinoma mimicking breast abscess - case report. Diagnostic and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Roszkowska-Purska, Katarzyna; Chrapowicki, Eryk

    2013-06-01

    The authors presents a case of cribriform breast carcinoma in a cyst that clinically imitated an abscess. The case concerns a 71-year-old female patient treated for ankylosing spondylitis, with a positive family history of breast cancer. The patient presented at the surgical clinic for incision of an abscess of the mammary gland localized in the lower inner quadrant that was a consequence of previous trauma to the right breast. The abscess was incised and the serosanguineous contents were evacuated. The wound was drained and antibiotics (Dalacin with Metronidazol) were administered for the period of 10 days. During the treatment, a cutaneous fistula was formed. At the incision site, a hard thickening was palpable (tumor). Core needle biopsy of the clinically palpable tumor was performed and the purulent material from the fistula was collected for a culture test. Complete blood count did not reveal leucocytosis. In accordance with the obtained sensitivity report, the patient was started on antibiotics again. Breast ultrasound performed upon the completion of the antibiotic therapy, in the right breast, revealed two solidcystic oval lesions with thick echogenic walls and blurred margins. Both masses contained dense levels of fluid material and solid polycyclic structures. On sonoelastography, the lesions were heterogeneous with a high Young's modulus. In the right axillary fossa, ultrasound examination revealed three abnormal lymph nodes enlarged to 31 mm length, which were rounded, hypoechoic and without visible sinuses. Histopathology of the core needle biopsy performed at admittance and after the antibiotic therapy indicated a breast abscess (presence of fibrinous and partly fibrinopurulent material). The mass was finally resected to confirm histopathology. The resected material revealed the presence of an invasive, moderately differentiated cribriform carcinoma, which developed within a cyst, with a 40% necrotic component. Eighteen months after the commencement

  6. Cervical spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess after knife stab wounds to the neck: A case report.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Anna; von der Hoeh, Nicolas H; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    Cervical spondylodiscitis is usually caused by pyogenic infections, associated with retropharyngeal abscesses, or due to the swallowing of foreign bodies. No cases of cervical spondylodiscitis caused by a penetrating neck injury have been published in the literature. We describe a case of cervical spondylodiscitis after multiple knife stab wounds to the lateral soft tissue of the neck. Case report and review of the literature. A 54-year-old patient was brought to our clinic with destructive spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscesses. He had been involved in a fight and had suffered multiple stab wounds to his neck with a knife 1 month prior. The initial CT scan had revealed one deeper wound canal behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the left side without any injury to the vessels. The wound was cleaned and an antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime was given for 1 week. After an uneventful and complete healing of the wound the patient developed severe neck pain. Inflammatory laboratory parameters were elevated, and a MRI of the neck revealed a distinct spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscess formations. Surgery was performed and included debridement, abscess drainage, decompression of the spinal canal, fusion of the C3/4 segment using an autologous iliac crest bone graft and a plate osteosynthesis. A course of calculated antibiotic therapy was administered for 8 weeks. Normal laboratory parameters and no radiological signs of an ongoing inflammatory process were observed during follow-up examinations. The C3/4 segment was consolidated. Stab wound injuries to the neck not only bear the risk of injuries to the nerves, vessels and organs of the neck but also increase the risk of developing secondary spondylodiscitis. Specifically, cervical spondylodiscitis can result in distinct neurological symptoms, and surgical intervention should be performed in a timely manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spontaneous abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, K; Vanpaemel, G; Verheyen, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of spontaneous abscess of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci. A 52-year-old diabetic woman presented with abdominal tenderness and weight loss that had persisted for a few weeks. CT scan showed several abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity. The abscesses were drained laparoscopically and antibiotics were given postoperatively. Biopsies and cultures showed group G streptococci. The patient recovered without any complication and left our hospital on the 17th postoperative day.

  8. A rare case of sinus of valsalva-right atrial fistula secondary to an abscess perforation from underlying aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva-right atrial fistulas are abnormal connections between the aorta and the right atrium, and present challenging surgical conditions. An extremely rare etiology of aorto-right atrial fistula is infective endocarditis. This case report presents a 21 year old Caucasian female patient who had native aortic valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis complicated by sinus of Valsalva abscess perforation associated with an acute heart block, an aorto-right atrial fistula, severe heart failure, and cardiogenic shock. She underwent emergent aortic valve replacement and complex sinus of Valsalva fistula pericardial patch reconstruction and repair. This case report further explores the advantages and disadvantages of different valves for different patient populations, and evaluates the patient’s prosthesis mismatch and effective orifice area. PMID:25022608

  9. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Berger, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) remains a relatively infrequent diagnosis. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism identified, and the infectious source in SEA emanates from skin and soft tissue infections in about 20 % of instances. The thoracic spine is most often involved followed by the lumbar spine. The classic triad of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is present in but a minority of patients. The appearance of neurological deficits with SEA has a significant impact on the prognosis; therefore, early diagnosis is imperative. Magnetic resonance imaging has permitted earlier diagnosis, although significant delays in diagnosis are common due to the nonspecific symptoms that frequently attend the disorder. Due to the rarity of this condition, there have been few randomized controlled trials to evaluate new treatment strategies, and most recommendations regarding treatment are based on case series studies often derived from the experiences at a single center.

  10. Case report: misdiagnosis of tailgut cyst presenting as recurrent perianal fistula with pelvic abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin N; Young-Fadok, Tonia M; Carpentieri, David; Acosta, Juan M; Notrica, David M

    2013-02-01

    Tailgut cysts are uncommon lesions that usually occur within the presacral space. The relative rarity and nonspecific complaints associated with these lesions often lead to misdiagnosis or unnecessary procedures before the correct diagnosis is made. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female who presented with pelvic pain. She had previously undergone several procedures at an outside institution for recurrent perianal fistula and perirectal abscess. Subsequent evaluation under anesthesia revealed a presacral cystic mass with a well-developed tract within the anorectal ring in the posterior midline. This mass was surgically removed using a combined transanal and posterior sagittal excision technique and was found to be a tailgut cyst upon pathologic evaluation. Tailgut cysts and other presacral masses should be included in the differential for patients with recurrent abscess in the presacral space or fistula within the anal canal. A variety of surgical approaches are available depending on the anatomy of the lesion.

  11. Spinal epidural abscess: common symptoms of an emergency condition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Rosc-Bereza, K; Arkuszewski, M; Ciach-Wysocka, E; Boczarska-Jedynak, M

    2013-08-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a severe pyogenic infection of the epidural space that leads to devastating neurological deficits and may be fatal. SEA is usually located in the thoracic and lumbar parts of the vertebral column and injures the spine by direct compression or local ischemia. Spinal injury may be prevented if surgical and medical interventions are implemented early. The diagnosis is difficult, because clinical symptoms are not specific and can mimic many benign conditions. The classical triad of symptoms includes back pain, fever and neurological deterioration. The gold standard in the diagnostic evaluation is magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement, which determines the location and extent of the abscess. Increased awareness of the disease is essential for rapid recognition and immediate implementation of treatment. Here we describe the case of a 26-year-old woman with SEA with fever, back pain in the thoracic region and delayed symptoms of a transverse spinal cord injury.

  12. [An Unusual Case of Proctitis and Rectal Abscess due to Irritants by Artemisia asiatica Smoke (Ssukjwahun)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seunghyup; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Seo Hyun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Park, Se Jun; Yun, Seo Young; Kim, Dae Young; Lee, Jeonghun; Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-04-25

    Proctitis is an inflammatory change of rectal mucosa induced by various agents or stimulus. Among many etiologies, it may be caused by medical treatments such as radiation or antibiotics. Proctitis usually presents with rectal ulcer but abscess formation is uncommon. Therapy using Ssukjwahun exerts its effect by directly applying the smoke around genital area and anus with various medicinal brewed herbs, especially worm-wood. Secondary metabolite of this plant, monoterpene, is known to facilitate circulation, exert anti-inflammatory effect, and help control pain. Herein, we report an unusual case of infectious proctitis presenting with rectal ulcer and abscess formation after perianal application of warm steam made by Artemisia asiatica smoke for treatment of dysmenorrhea.

  13. [Hydronephrosis as a complication of the appendiceal abscess: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Iida, K; Yamaguchi, K; Nishimura, Y; Tominaga, T

    2000-03-01

    We report a case of appendiceal abscess complicated with right hydronephrosis in a 67-year-old woman. She visited our department complaining of right flank pain. Intravenous pyelography (IVP) showed hydronephrosis and hydroureter on right and a narrow ureter at the pelvic brim. A pelvic computed tomographic scan revealed a low density area measuring 44 x 37 mm in size, anterior to the right ureter, which was thought to be a pelvic tumor. Further examination did not reveal the origin of the tumor. An exploratory laparotomy was performed. The tumor developed from the cecum and adhered to the right ureter. The appendix was not found. The tumor was resected with the cecum while the ureter was preserved. Histological investigations revealed an appendiceal abscess. The postoperative course was uneventful. IVP after the operation showed the hydronephrosis to have resolved.

  14. Laparoscopic treatment of a hepatic subcapsular abscess secondary to gallbladder perforation: case report.

    PubMed

    Cristian, D; Grama, F; Burcoş, T

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of type II Niemeier gallbladder perforation(GBP) developed as a complication of acute calculous cholecystitis. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our surgical unit with the presumptive diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. CT scan revealed a subcapsular collection developed on the visceral surface of the right hepatic lobe. It was communicating through a thin hypodense band with the cystic duct, distal to an impacted stone. Through laparoscopy the collection was confirmed to be a subcapsular liver abscess secondary to GBP.The cholecystectomy and the abscess cavity treatment were completely handled via laparoscopic approach. The paper demonstrates that laparoscopic approach can be a safe and feasible method in order to treat both the cause and the complication in this situation. Early diagnosis and appropriate minimally invasive approach are the key to manage this rarity. Celsius.

  15. [Thalamo-mesencephalic aspergillus abscess in a heart transplant subject: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Mazzaferri, Fulvia; Adami, Irene; Tocco, Pierluigi; Cazzadori, Angelo; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Storato, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Concia, Ercole

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare and highly fatal infection that mainly affects immunocompromised patients. We report on a case of a heart transplanted Caucasian man, who arrived at our hospital because of the onset of diplopy. We performed a broad diagnostic work-up: the brain MRI showed a single ring-enhancing thalamo-mesencephalic area suggestive of abscess lesion; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis disclosed galactomannan and beta-D-glucan antigens. Thus the antifungal therapy was immediately started. We decided to discontinue the therapy 16 months later because of severe hepatic toxicity, given that the patient was persistently asymptomatic, brain imaging showed a progressive resolution of the abscess area and CSF antigen analysis was persistently negative. The follow-up at three months was unchanged.

  16. [A case of psoas abscess due to renal pelvic carcinoma complicated with non-ketotic hyperosmolar diabetic coma].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Y; Fujii, Y; Kitade, K; Hara, M

    1991-09-01

    A 85-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of semicomatous status. Laboratory data on admission showed elevation of blood sugar (823 mg/dl) and serum osmotic pressure (345 mOsm/l), but ketonuria was not detected. Non-ketotic hyperosmolar diabetic coma was diagnosed. The insulin infusion and physiological saline improved the blood sugar level and consciousness within a day. The abdominal ultrasound examination revealed an abscess in the left kidney and right psoas muscle. The same findings were seen by abdominal computed tomography but the possibility of malignant neoplasm of the left kidney could not be ruled out because of a swelling of the left adrenal gland. Pain associated with psoas abscess and low grade fever were observed. Because of his poor general condition, drainage of the abscess was not performed and conservative therapy using antibiotics was administered. Without any improvement of the abscess, he died due to general deterioration four months later. Autopsy findings showed carcinoma of the left renal pelvis and metastasis to the right psoas muscle, left adrenal gland, liver, bilateral lungs and lymph modes. Psoas abscess is a relatively uncommon disease, especially in elderly patients. The etiology of the disease is divided into primary and secondary causes. Most secondary psoas abscess cases are caused by intestinal diseases, and Crohn's disease has been related to the highest incidence. A few cases of psoas abscess caused by colorectal carcinoma have been reported. Ultrasound and computed tomography are useful in diagnosing this disease and drainage of an abscess is necessary for therapy and proving the cause. Cancer metastasis should considered in differential diagnoses, when psoas abscess is seen in elderly patients.

  17. Liver abscess secondary to duodenal perforation by fishbone: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Fuertes, Montiel; Moreno-Posadas, Ana; Ruíz-Tovar Polo, Jaime; Durán-Poveda, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Liver abscesses usually arise from amoebian or bacterial origin, being rarely secondary to foreign bodies (1-3). We report the case of a 72-years-old female complaining from abdominal pain located in epoigastrium and right hypochondrium during the last 48 hours. Laboratory data revealed leukocytosis with neutrophilia and pain located in the mentioned locations at physical examination. Ultrasonography showed a liver abscess involving segments 2 and 3. CT scan revealed that the abscess was secondary to a fishbone perforating the duodenum and inlaid in the liver (Figure 1). The fishbone was surgically extracted from the hepatic lobe with hemostasia and a duodenal suture with epiploplastia was performed. Antibiotic was added to the treatment. The patient presented an uneventful postoperative course. The intake of foreign bodies is a frequent event, representing bones and fishbones the most frequent foreing bodies in the adults. Sometimes, the diagnosis may be difficult because the symptoms are not specific. Imaging test are very usefol for the diagnosis, as in the case we present.

  18. Fungal brain abscess caused by “Black Mold” (Cladophialophora bantiana) – A case report of successful treatment with an emphasis on how fungal brain abscess may be different from bacterial brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aljuboori, Zaid; Hruska, Rob; Yaseen, Alae; Arnold, Forest; Wojda, Barbara; Nauta, Haring

    2017-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system infection with Cladophialophora bantiana (Black Mold) is rare. It carries a high mortality rate, that is more than 70%, despite multimodal therapy. Case Description: We present a rare case of “black mold” fungal brain abscess that was successfully treated with good patient outcome. The case is unusual because there were two fungal brain abscesses located bilaterally symmetrically in the mesial frontal lobes, and the response to different treatment strategies was well documented by over 25 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Initial attempts to treat these lesions by repeated surgical excision and systemic amphotericin B was followed by continued growth rather than resolution. We realized that the application of treatment principles learned from bacterial brain abscess may not transpose intuitively to the treatment of fungal brain abscess. Therefore, a new treatment strategy was adopted that avoided further attempts at resection in favor of long-term oral voriconazole and repeated intracavitary aspiration and instillation of amphotericin B on an outpatient basis. Without further resection, the lesions stabilized and the aspirates eventually sterilized, however, the enhancing capsule never resolved on MRI scans. All treatment was stopped after 1 year. The apparently sterilized lesions have been followed for an additional 3 years without further growth, and the patient remains functionally, intellectually, and behaviorally normal. Conclusion: We conclude that, in the case of fungal abscess, it may be preferable to sterilize the lesion in situ rather than attempting to achieve resolution on imaging studies by repeated surgical resection of the capsule which can be counterproductive. This strategy accepts that the capsule may be important to the patient's immune defense against the fungus. Helping that defense barrier with intracapsular and systemic antifungal agents, rather than capsular removal, may be the better strategy for

  19. Ultrasound Visualization of Atypical Abscess Ultimately Containing Bot Fly Larva.

    PubMed

    Bovino, Patrick; Cole, John; Scheatzle, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Because of the rise in community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), presentations to the emergency department for the evaluation of cutaneous abscesses have risen dramatically over the past 2 decades. Soft tissue point of care ultrasound (POCUS) differentiates abscess from cellulitis, determines the size and shape, and characterizes the contents of the abscess. It has been shown to improve medical decision-making and therefore the emergency management of cutaneous abscesses over physical examination alone. We report a case of an unusual nonhealing abscess in an 18-year-old woman with a recent history of foreign travel where soft tissue POCUS identified motion within the abscess pocket. This changed the management of the case, leading to the diagnosis of bot fly myiasis. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Clinicians should entertain a broader differential for an apparent abscess and consider liberal use of soft tissue POCUS in these cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disseminated tuberculosis with prostatic abscesses in an immunocompromised patient-A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Joneja, Upasana; Short, William R; Roberts, Amity L

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB) with prostatic abscess in a newly diagnosed HIV patient in the United States. The patient is a 34 year-old male who presented with respiratory symptoms and was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS complicated by disseminated mTB infection of the lungs, liver, and prostate. His prostate showed abscess formation on imaging that required drainage however he did not present with any genitourinary complaints. Our literature review revealed that prostatic involvement in mTB in the form of granulomatous prostatitis is uncommon; however, abscess formation is extremely rare and only few such cases have been published. Nearly 50% of the patients with prostatic abscess formation present without symptoms and therefore a high level of suspicion should be maintained; imaging should be performed early and prophylactic antibiotics for non-specific urinary symptoms should be avoided as this may lead to drug resistance of mTB to flouroquinolones.

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-03-07

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient's condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease.

  2. Post-partum, post-sterilization tubo-ovarian abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-partum, post-sterilization tubo-ovarian abscess is a rare event. Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme, a normal flora found mainly in the oral cavity, appears to be the etiologic organism. Case presentation In this case report, a 25-year-old Thai woman had a post-partum, post-sterilization tubo-ovarian abscess caused by the strictly anaerobic bacterium, Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme. Progressively severe symptoms started 3 weeks after her third vaginal delivery with a tubal sterilization on the following day. On admission, she presented with peritonitis and impending shock. An exploratory laparotomy showed a ruptured left tubo-ovarian abscess. A segment of her ileum had to be resected because of severe inflammation. Conclusions Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme can be an etiologic organism of a ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess following tubal sterilization in a healthy host. PMID:23031581

  3. Lung Abscess in a Patient With VAP: A Rare Case of Lung Infection Complicated by Two Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mystakelli, Christina; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Aravosita, Paraskevi; Seretis, Charalampos; Kanna, Efthymia; Aloizos, Stavros

    2013-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is defined as pneumonia occurring in a patient after intubation with an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy tube lasting for 48 hours or more. We describe a case of 75-year-old male who initially presented with pneumonia of the right basis with accompanying plevritis. The patient was intubated and his condition was complicated with a VAP infection while he developed a lung abscess. The antibiotic therapy was based on susceptibility bronchial secretions isolated acinetobacter baumannii and klebsiella pneumoniae; these pathogens were also isolated from the drained abscess. The patient was discharged in good health. The interest of this case is recommended in the existence of two responsible pathogens, the paucity of the development of lung abscess in a patient with VAP, and the successful treatment of the patient with the combination of controlled drainage of the abscess and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  5. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  6. Protocol-based management of 154 cases of pediatric liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Subhasis; Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Saxena, Rahul; Yadav, Partap Singh; Patel, Jigar N; Chadha, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    Although liver abscess (LA) is prevalent worldwide, especially in developing countries, there is a paucity of data regarding the protocol for management of LA in children. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of a protocol-based management of pediatric LA from a single institution. This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary-care children's hospital and included all patients with LA managed over a 5-year period. Detailed clinical, laboratory, microbiological and imaging parameters were recorded, and the patients were treated according to a standardized management protocol. Small abscesses (<5 cm) and those with solid appearance on initial ultra-sonogram (US) were managed with antimicrobial therapy alone. Liquefied abscesses on imaging were additionally subjected to US guided percutaneous needle aspirations (PNA). Large abscesses pointing to the surface were treated by percutaneous drainage (PCD). Ruptured LA, abscess inaccessible to image-guided drainage and those not responding to other modes of treatment were subjected to open surgical drainage (OSD). Pleural collections were treated by aspirations or intercostal tube drainage. Outcome was analyzed in terms of duration of recovery and complications including mortality. Over the 5-year period, 154 pediatric LA patients underwent protocol-based management. The mean age of the patients was 6.76 years with the male:female being 1.26:1. Medical management alone, PNA, PCD and OSD were successful in 38 (24.6%), 76 (49.3%), 11 (7.14%) and 29 (18.8%) cases, respectively. Pleural collections developed in 43 (27.9%) patients out of which aspiration/drainage was needed in 24 (55.81%) cases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 20.67 ± 9.52 days. Ongoing sepsis and multi-organ failure lead to mortality in 6 (3.8%) cases; rest of the patients were doing well on follow-up. Ultra-sonography was useful for the initial diagnosis, monitoring the progress and management of LA in children. The

  7. A case of brucellosis with abscess of the iliacus muscle, olecranon bursitis, and sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Turan, Hale; Serefhanoglu, Kivanc; Karadeli, Elif; Timurkaynak, Funda; Arslan, Hande

    2009-11-01

    Brucellosis is a systemic infection involving many organs and tissues. The musculoskeletal system is one of the most commonly affected. The disease can present with sacroiliitis, peripheral arthritis, spondylitis, paraspinal abscess, bursitis, and osteomyelitis. A 25-year-old male patient was admitted with fever of 20-day duration, right-sided hip pain, and night sweating. A Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titer of 1/160. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip joint showed right sacroiliitis and a hyperintense, nodular, lobulated mass within the right iliacus muscle, consistent with abscess. The patient was started on intramuscular streptomycin at a dose of 1 g/day, oral rifampin 600 mg/day, and doxycycline 200 mg/day. On day 20 of treatment, the patient was admitted with swelling and pain over the left elbow for the past week. MRI of the left elbow was performed, which showed fluid edema suggestive of olecranon bursitis. Taking the patient's complaints into consideration, rifampin and doxycycline treatment were maintained for a year. Pain at the hip joint and elbow resolved and MRI findings disappeared. Abscess of the iliacus muscle, which has not been reported before, and the olecranon bursitis that developed during treatment make this case worth presenting.

  8. A Case of Recurrent Skin Abscesses: A Conundrum Solved after Obtaining a Thorough Sexual History

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aymara Y.; Soto-Ruiz, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Background. Despite the improvement in patient-physician communication techniques, sexuality and sexual health continue to be challenging areas for discussion during a clinical encounter. Most people are not prepared to discuss sexual matters openly as it can be perceived as negative or inappropriate. Consequently, an incomplete health assessment can result in delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. Case Report. We present a 33-year-old woman who developed recurrent left breast abscesses. She required multiple incision and drainage procedures in the operating room followed by antimicrobial therapy. Although she always had an initial improvement with this approach, she continued to have recurrences and development of new abscesses in other body areas. The polymicrobial nature of her recurrences prompted an extensive and costly workup to determine the nature of her condition. The cause was finally elucidated when a thorough sexual history was obtained. Poor hygiene practices during her sexual encounters were considered the cause of her recurrent abscesses. After medical therapy and modification of her sexual practices, she has not developed new recurrences for more than two years. Conclusion. Discussions on sexuality and sexual health are important parts of any clinical encounter, yet frequently forgotten or avoided. Becoming aware of their importance would avoid delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. PMID:28386492

  9. [Thyroid abscess revealing Graves-Basedow disease: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Chenguir, Meriem; Souldi, Hajar; Loufad, Fatima Zahra; Rouadi, Sami; Abada, Reda; Roubal, Mohamed; Mahtar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid abscess is a very rare clinical entity. It accounts for 0.1% of the surgical pathologies of the thyroid gland. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the gland give it resistance to pathogens. Streptococcal and Staphylococcal are the most common. Tuberculosis is rarely reported in the literature. The occurrence of infection associated with toxic goiter is exceptional. The authors report a rare case of a 22-year-old young patient with thyroid abscess revealing a toxic goitre. He presented to our otorhinolaryngology emergency unit with anterior cervical swelling, slightly lateralized to the left, moving on swallowing, associated with hemoptysis, signs of thyroid dysfunction, fever, night sweats. Cervical CT scan showed a mass occupying the left lobe of the thyroid gland, with fluid content, measuring 2 cm and with purulent fluid collected via fine needle aspiration biopsy. Cytobacteriological examination showed Staphylococcus with positive BK test. Patient underwent chest radiograph showing right apical pulmonary alveolar. Cytobacteriological examination of sputum isolated Koch bacillus. Thyroid biological assessment was in favor of Graves-Basedow disease. The management was medical and included parenteral triple antibiotic, anti-bacillary and anti-thyroid synthesis therapy with good evolution. The diagnosis of tuberculosis should be suspected in patients with thyroid abscess formation associated with an unclear clinical picture. This is most often caused by hematogenous spread from another primary infection, particularly a pulmonary infection. The treatment is based on antibacillary drugs sometimes associated with surgery.

  10. Pulmonary nocardiosis associated with cerebral abscess successfully treated by co-trimoxazole: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed; Heidarzadeh, Siamak; Soodbakhsh, Abdolreza; Pourmand, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Amir; GramiShoar, Mohsen; Zibafar, Ensieh; Aliramezani, Amir

    2014-07-01

    Nocardiosis is an acute or chronic infectious disease caused by the soil-borne filamentous bacteria belonging to the genus Nocardia. The organisms opportunistically infect both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. The lungs are the primary site of infection and brain abscess is, by far, the most common complication following nocardial metastasis from pulmonary lesions. Although surgical intervention must always be considered in the treatment of nocardial brain abscess, it can obviously be cured by antibiotic therapy alone. This report describes a case infected by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica. Identification of the infectious agent was achieved by conventional and semi-nested PCR techniques. A 55-year-old woman with fever was referred to the infect disclinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran and was hospitalized after clinical assessment. She was a kidney transplant recipient for 4 years and was taking immunosuppressive treatment including azathioprine and methylprednisolone. Follow-up of the patient by CT scan revealed pulmonary infection and cerebral lesions. Specimens of the brain lesions contained filamentous bacteria. The patient received a combination of co-trimoxazole and ceftriaxone and brain abscesses as well as lung inflammation disappeared gradually during the course of antibiotic therapy within 3 months. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 months of therapy.

  11. A Rare Case of Acute Phlegmonous Esophagogastritis Complicated with Hypopharyngeal Abscess and Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan-Chun; Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Liao, Chiung-Ying; Hsueh, Ching; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Ho, Shang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess • esophageal perforation Symptoms: Fever • painful swallowing • chest pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Drainage • debridement • esophageal reconstruction Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis is a life-threatening disease that may be combined with serious complications. We present the classical radiological and endoscopic features and treatment strategy of a middle-aged female patient suffering from acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess, esophageal perforation, mediastinitis, and empyema. Case Report: A 60-year-old Taiwanese female presented at our hospital due to fever, fatigue, painful swallowing, and vague chest pain for 5 days. She had a past history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. On physical examination, general weakness, chest pain, odynophagia, and a fever up to 38.9°C were found. Positive laboratory findings included leukocytosis (leukocyte count of 14.58×103/μL, neutrophils 76.8%) and serum glucose 348 mg/dL (HbA1c 11.3%). A diagnosis of acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis with hypopharyngeal abscess was made based on typical computed tomography image features and clinical signs of infection. The patient received empirical antibiotic therapy initially; however, esophageal perforation with mediastinitis and empyema developed after admission. Emergency surgery with drainage and debridement was performed and antibiotics were administered. She was discharged in a stable condition on the 56th day of hospitalization. Six months later, a delayed esophageal reconstruction was performed. The patient has performed well for 9 months to date since the initial diagnosis. Conclusions: Acute phlegmonous esophagogastritis complicated with hypopharyngeal abscess and esophageal perforation is extremely rare, and requires immediate medical

  12. Multiple nerve abscesses on cutaneous radial nerve--a case of pure neural leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ankad, B S; Jawalgi, A; Dombale, V D; Telkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a unique infectious disease due to varied spectrum of clinical signs it exhibits. Pure neural leprosy (PNL) is an unusual form of leprosy and accounts for 4-8% of all leprosy cases. It can manifest as a simple tingling sensation to complex and tragic motor paralysis. Here we report a case of PNL involving isolated cutaneous radial nerve as multiple abscesses along the course of the nerve. To the best of our knowledge, this is rarest presentation of pure neural leprosy.

  13. [Three case reports of breast abscess after nipple piercing: underestimated health problems of a fashion phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, V R; Golombeck, K; Jonat, W; Kiechle, M

    2002-07-01

    Piercing is a growing fashion trend among young people. Nipple piercing has shown an increase over the last years. We report about three coincidental cases of breast abscess after nipple piercing within the last months in our clinics and discuss the related problems for health and society. Retrospective analysis of three case reports regarding course of illness and reasons as well as review of literature and internet. Three patients average age 31.9 (28-35) years were hospitalized with breast abscess after nipple piercing (2 x left, 1 x right). The distance piercing to infection was on average 7.7 (5-12) months. In all patients the abscess was incised and the abscess cavity removed, two had an irrigation tubing for a three days, all received i. v. antibiotics postoperatively. Evidence for bacteria was found in case 1: PCR-confirmation of atypical mycobacteria and coagulase negative staphylococcus, case 2: coagulase negative staphylococcus and group B-streptococcus and case 3: green and microaerophilic staphylococcus. The length of hospital stay was on average 8.0 (6-9) days/case, the hospital costs were 3 624,54 e (3 000,26-4 310,58 e) euro;/case. In a follow-up period of 10,0 (5-15) months one relapse occurred which had to be re-operated. Nipple piercing has grown in popularity within the last years and is in general not a stigma of a subculture or lower social classes any more. However, the risk for breast infection is on the one hand underestimated by the women and on the other hand played down by piercing studios. Breast infection after nipple piercing is rarely documented in scientific literature and data bases. Only seven case reports are scientifically published so far. Healing of the wound channel varies and can take up to 6-12 months. The risk for infection is approximately 10-20 %, often in a interval of months after the procedure. Insufficient understanding as well as inconsequent performance of hygienic preparation of the wound beneath other risk

  14. Neonatal sepsis and multiple skin abscess in a newborn with Down's syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava; Sivaraman, Umadevi; Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Stephen, Selvaraj

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Congenital heart disease accounts for additional risk of sepsis in neonates. Here we report a case of Down's syndrome with late onset neonatal sepsis associated with multiple superficial skin abscesses simulating staphylococcal infection. The baby was empirically treated with vancomycin. Subsequently, multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected from both pus and blood culture. Change to appropriate antibiotic resulted in clinical recovery. Although sepsis is one of the major ailments in neonates, atypical presentations of neonatal sepsis in Down's syndrome patients are underreported. Here we highlight the atypical presentation of Klebsiella sepsis and the importance of early antibiogram in such cases.

  15. Propionibacterium acnes prosthetic valve endocarditis with abscess formation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endocarditis due to Propionibacterium acnes is a rare disease. Scant data on treatment of these infections is available and is based on case reports only. If the disease is complicated by abscess formation, surgical intervention combined with an antibiotic therapy might improve clinical outcome. In some cases, cardiac surgeons are reluctant to perform surgery, since they consider the intervention as high risk. Therefore, a conservative therapy is required, with little, if any evidence to choose the optimal antibiotic. We report the first case of a successfully treated patient with P. acnes prosthetic valve endocarditis without surgery. Case presentation We report the case of a 29-year-old patient with a prosthetic valve endocarditis and composite graft infection with abscess formation of the left ventricular outflow tract due to P. acnes. Since cardiac surgery was considered as high risk, the patient was treated intravenously with ceftriaxone 2 g qd and rifampin 600 mg bid for 7 weeks and was switched to an oral therapy with levofloxacin 500 mg bid and rifampin 600 mg bid for an additional 6 months. Two sets of blood cultures collected six weeks after completion of treatment remained negative. The patient is considered to be cured based on absence of clinical signs and symptoms, normal laboratory parameters, negative radiology scans and negative blood cultures, determined at site visits over two years after completion of treatment. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first successfully managed patient with P. acnes prosthetic valve endocarditis with abscess formation of the left ventricular outflow tract who was treated with antibiotics alone without a surgical intervention. A six month treatment with a rifampin and levofloxacin combination was chosen, based on the excellent activity against stationary-phase and adherent bacteria. PMID:24568204

  16. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06) and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002). Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002). In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004), bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06), and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02). Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes. PMID:20667139

  17. Effect of rehabilitation on a patient suffering from a tuberculous brain abscess with Gerstmann's syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Lan; Lo, Sui-Foon; Liu, Chun-Lin; Chou, Chia-Hui; Chou, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    There are few reports in the literature of tuberculous brain abscess. Tuberculous brain abscess usually occurs in an immunocompromised host. Almost all previously documented cases have involved acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We encountered a 53-year-old right-handed immunocompetent male who was initially suspected of having a cerebrovascular accident due to acute-onset right hemiparesis and paresthesia. A tentative diagnosis of brain tumor versus brain abscess was made on imaging studies. The patient was finally diagnosed with a tuberculous brain abscess based upon deterioration on imaging and a positive tuberculosis culture. The tuberculous brain abscess was located in the left parietal lobe, which resulted in Gerstmann's syndrome and right-sided apraxia. Stereotactic surgery was performed. He was also given antituberculosis chemotherapy and comprehensive rehabilitation. Considerable improvement was noted after rehabilitation. The patient even returned to a normal life and work. Our case demonstrates that an aggressive intensive inpatient rehabilitation program combined with stereotactic surgery and effective antituberculosis therapy play an important role in improving the outcome for patients with tuberculous brain abscess, Gerstmann's syndrome, and right-sided apraxia.

  18. Effect of rehabilitation on a patient suffering from a tuberculous brain abscess with Gerstmann’s syndrome: case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Lan; Lo, Sui-Foon; Liu, Chun-Lin; Chou, Chia-Hui; Chou, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    There are few reports in the literature of tuberculous brain abscess. Tuberculous brain abscess usually occurs in an immunocompromised host. Almost all previously documented cases have involved acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We encountered a 53-year-old right-handed immunocompetent male who was initially suspected of having a cerebrovascular accident due to acute-onset right hemiparesis and paresthesia. A tentative diagnosis of brain tumor versus brain abscess was made on imaging studies. The patient was finally diagnosed with a tuberculous brain abscess based upon deterioration on imaging and a positive tuberculosis culture. The tuberculous brain abscess was located in the left parietal lobe, which resulted in Gerstmann’s syndrome and right-sided apraxia. Stereotactic surgery was performed. He was also given antituberculosis chemotherapy and comprehensive rehabilitation. Considerable improvement was noted after rehabilitation. The patient even returned to a normal life and work. Our case demonstrates that an aggressive intensive inpatient rehabilitation program combined with stereotactic surgery and effective antituberculosis therapy play an important role in improving the outcome for patients with tuberculous brain abscess, Gerstmann’s syndrome, and right-sided apraxia. PMID:22665998

  19. Male Breast Abscess Secondary to Actinomycosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, A. Jill; Kommehl, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast actinomycosis is a rare condition that has been previously reported in the female breast. Male breast infection is uncommon and most often associated with trauma to the skin or predisposing conditions like diabetes. We report the first case to our knowledge of primary breast actinomycosis in the male breast caused by Actinomycesneuii (A. neuii), a rare strain of Actinomyces. Mammography demonstrated periareolar skin thickening with a mottled pattern. Sonography showed multiple small cystic structures. Definitive diagnosis was made by culture of the nipple discharge. PMID:27190917

  20. Hepatic abscess secondary to a rosemary twig migrating from the stomach into the liver

    PubMed Central

    Karamarkovic, Aleksandar R; Djuranovic, Srdjan P; Popovic, Nada P; Bumbasirevic, Vesna D; Sijacki, Ana D; Blazic, Ivan V

    2007-01-01

    The ingestion of a foreign body that penetrates the gastric wall and migrates to the liver, where it causes an abscess is uncommon. A case of an ingested rosemary twig perforating the gastric antrum, then migrating to the liver, complicated by hepatic abscess and Staphylococcus aureus sepsis is reported. A 59-year-old man without a history of foreign body ingestion was admitted to our hospital because of sepsis and epigastralgia, which had progressively worsened. No foreign body was identified at preoperative imaging, but a rosemary twig was discovered during laparotomy. The liver abscess and sepsis were controlled successfully with surgery and antibiotics. This unusual condition should be kept in mind when dealing with cases of hepatic abscess, or even sepsis of unknown origin. Despite the improvement of non-surgical techniques such as percutaneous drainage and interventional endoscopy, surgery still remains important in the treatment of hepatic abscess caused by an ingested foreign body. PMID:17907303

  1. Hepatic abscess secondary to a rosemary twig migrating from the stomach into the liver.

    PubMed

    Karamarkovic, Aleksandar-R; Djuranovic, Srdjan-P; Popovic, Nada-P; Bumbasirevic, Vesna-D; Sijacki, Ana-D; Blazic, Ivan-V

    2007-11-07

    The ingestion of a foreign body that penetrates the gastric wall and migrates to the liver, where it causes an abscess is uncommon. A case of an ingested rosemary twig perforating the gastric antrum, then migrating to the liver, complicated by hepatic abscess and Staphylococcus aureus sepsis is reported. A 59-year-old man without a history of foreign body ingestion was admitted to our hospital because of sepsis and epigastralgia, which had progressively worsened. No foreign body was identified at preoperative imaging, but a rosemary twig was discovered during laparotomy. The liver abscess and sepsis were controlled successfully with surgery and antibiotics. This unusual condition should be kept in mind when dealing with cases of hepatic abscess, or even sepsis of unknown origin. Despite the improvement of non-surgical techniques such as percutaneous drainage and interventional endoscopy, surgery still remains important in the treatment of hepatic abscess caused by an ingested foreign body.

  2. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  3. Legionella micdadei prosthetic valve endocarditis complicated by brain abscess: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Yuriko; Yildiz-Aktas, Isil Z; William Pasculle, A; Veldkamp, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    Legionella endocarditis is extremely uncommon, and embolic phenomena have never been reported. We report the first case of Legionella micdadei prosthetic valve endocarditis complicated by brain abscess. A 57-y-old immunocompromised woman with a history of mitral valve replacement developed confusion and left-sided weakness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a 3-cm peripheral-enhancing mass. Transoesophageal echocardiography suggested a perivalvular abscess. Blood cultures and valve cultures were negative. She was diagnosed with 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction and silver stain, and was discharged with levofloxacin after a redo mitral valve replacement. Twelve cases of Legionella endocarditis were reviewed. Only one case had a native valve, and her endocarditis occurred after pneumonia. All cases were cured. The duration of antibiotic therapy was variable. Legionella species should be considered in the differential diagnosis of culture-negative endocarditis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Molecular techniques and silver impregnation stains are useful, especially when cultures using buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar are negative.

  4. Aseptic Abscesses and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Two Cases and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Michael A.; Al-Mazroui, Ahmed; Tessolini, Jenna; Showler, Adrienne; Colak, Errol

    2017-01-01

    Background. Aseptic abscesses (AA) are sterile lesions that represent an extraintestinal manifestation (EIM) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Though Canada has the highest prevalence of IBD in the world, reports of IBD-associated AA are absent in Canada. This may represent a different IBD phenotype or underrecognition and underreporting. Purpose. To explore AA as a possible EIM of IBD and evaluate clinical and investigative findings among patients with IBD-associated AA. Methods. Retrospective chart and literature reviews were performed to find cases of IBD-associated AA at our institution and in the literature. Results. We identified 2 cases of IBD-associated AA in our institution. Both patients had ulcerative colitis and presented with fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Radiological workup and aspiration showed sterile splenic abscesses. The AA were unresponsive to antibiotics. One patient improved on corticosteroids and one underwent splenectomy. We retrieved 37 cases of IBD-associated AA from the literature. All patients showed no evidence of infection, failed to resolve with antibiotics, and, if attempted, improved on corticosteroids. Conclusions. Our cases are the first reported in Canada. They support literature which suggests AA as an EIM of IBD and may help increase recognition and reporting of this phenomenon. PMID:28265555

  5. Aseptic Abscesses and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Two Cases and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Bollegala, Natasha; Khan, Rishad; Scaffidi, Michael A; Al-Mazroui, Ahmed; Tessolini, Jenna; Showler, Adrienne; Colak, Errol; Grover, Samir C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Aseptic abscesses (AA) are sterile lesions that represent an extraintestinal manifestation (EIM) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Though Canada has the highest prevalence of IBD in the world, reports of IBD-associated AA are absent in Canada. This may represent a different IBD phenotype or underrecognition and underreporting. Purpose. To explore AA as a possible EIM of IBD and evaluate clinical and investigative findings among patients with IBD-associated AA. Methods. Retrospective chart and literature reviews were performed to find cases of IBD-associated AA at our institution and in the literature. Results. We identified 2 cases of IBD-associated AA in our institution. Both patients had ulcerative colitis and presented with fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Radiological workup and aspiration showed sterile splenic abscesses. The AA were unresponsive to antibiotics. One patient improved on corticosteroids and one underwent splenectomy. We retrieved 37 cases of IBD-associated AA from the literature. All patients showed no evidence of infection, failed to resolve with antibiotics, and, if attempted, improved on corticosteroids. Conclusions. Our cases are the first reported in Canada. They support literature which suggests AA as an EIM of IBD and may help increase recognition and reporting of this phenomenon.

  6. Brain abscess due to Cladophialophora bantiana: a review of 124 cases.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Kaur, Harsimran; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Appannanavar, Suma B; Patel, Atul; Mukherjee, Kanchan K; Ghosh, Anup; Ray, Ujjwayini

    2016-02-01

    Brain abscess caused by Cladophialophora bantiana is a rare disease associated with high mortality due to delay in diagnosis and absence of standardized therapy. We reviewed 124 culture proven C. bantiana brain abscess cases; 103 cases published in English literature during 1952 through 2014 and 21 unpublished cases from our reference center. The majority (57.3%) of the patients was from Asian countries especially from India (62/124, 50%). The diagnosis of the cases was delayed with mean duration 115 days after developing symptoms. The disease was nearly equally distributed in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts but associated with significantly higher mortality (77.1%) in later group. Complete excision of brain lesion in immunocompetent host led to significantly better survival (43.7%). Though all commercially available antifungal drugs have been used in these patients, amphotericin B deoxycholate or lipid preparations were most commonly (62.83%) prescribed agent. None of the drugs used was found to be independently associated with improved outcome. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of 13 isolates of our center, demonstrated good activity to voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole, but these triazoles were prescribed in only 29.2% patients. Increased awareness with early suspicion of the disease, and aggressive medical and surgical approach in treating these patients may improve the outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [A rare case of the extensive Fournier's gangrene developed in the course of a perianal abscess].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Marcin; Drozdz, Włodzimierz

    2008-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene is a rare necrotising fascitis of the perineum and genitals caused by mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganism. Despite appropriate therapy mortality in this disease is still high. We report a case of Fournier's syndrome which developed in the course of a perianal abscess. Due to the aggressive nature of this condition, early diagnosis is crucial. Treatment involves extensive soft tissue debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. The clinical applicability of the so called Fournier's gangrene severity index score (FGSIS) was discussed.

  8. A case of afebrile miliary tuberculosis that progressed from tuberculous spondylitis with iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Namisato, Shun; Nakasone, Chikara; Okudaira, Shoko; Touyama, Masato; Ishikawa, Naoki; Higa, Hajime; Fujita, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old woman who visited our hospital for chronic atrial fibrillation. She consulted an orthopedic surgeon for lumbar pain in August 2009 and has been followed up for osteoporosis. However, her lumbar pain became exacerbated. In December 2009, clinical examination revealed that the pain was caused by tuberculous spondylitis and iliopsoas abscess. Diffuse miliary shadow, which was undetected earlier, was noted on chest roentgenogram; she was diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis. Lumbar pain is common in elderly individuals and should be regarded as one of the tuberculosis symptoms, considering its atypical course in elderly patients.

  9. Vertically acquired neonatal citrobacter brain abscess - case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2005-02-01

    Vertically acquired citrobacter meningitis in the neonate is very rare and carries a very high mortality and morbidity. Overall, approximately 30% of neonates with Citrobacter meningitis die and 50% sustain some damage to the CNS. The authors describe a case of a newborn with Citrobacter koseri meningitis with multiple brain abscesses, with a successful outcome following multiple burr-hole aspirations and prolonged antibiotic therapy. An aggressive surgical approach combined with intravenous antibiotics (including imipenems, to which the organism is very sensitive) for a minimum of 4 weeks appears to improve the outcome of infection with this virulent organism.

  10. A case report of Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, H; Rabier, V; Eveillard, M; Mahaza, C; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Chennebault, J-M; Kempf, M; Lemarié, C

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess occurring after a cranial trauma, which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The presence of colonies on classic blood agar plates and the use of MALDI-TOF MS, a valuable diagnostic tool that identified M. hominis due to its presence in the VITEK MS database, allowed the rapid diagnosis of this infection. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Pulmonary Thromboembolism Complicating Amebic Liver Abscess: First Reported Case in the United States—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Devon; Gale, Michael; Patel, Sunny; Kaluta, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Even in the absence of Amebic colitis, Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal complication of Entamoeba histolytica infection. In the USA, it is most prevalent in middle aged immigrant males from endemic countries such as Africa, Mexico, and India. One of the complications of ALA is inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis, which is believed to result from the mechanical compression of the IVC and the consequent thrombogenic nidus elicited from the resultant inflammatory response. There are very few reported cases and even fewer in which the thrombus became a harbinger to pulmonary thromboembolism. We present the case of a 43-year-old male from West Africa who presented with the chief complaint of right upper quadrant abdominal pain for one week associated with persistent nonproductive cough. He had a positive serum Entamoeba histolytica antibody with CT scan findings of a hepatic abscess with thrombosis of the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava and numerous bilateral pulmonary emboli. This amebic liver abscess was successfully treated with metronidazole and paromomycin, whereas the pulmonary thromboembolism was managed with medical anticoagulation. Based on current knowledge, this is the first reported case in the USA. PMID:26294987

  12. Cutaneous bacterial infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Larru, Beatriz; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in children. The medical burden of SSSIs, particularly abscesses, has increased nationwide since the emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. SSSIs represent a wide spectrum of disease severity. Prompt recognition, timely institution of appropriate therapy, and judicious antimicrobial use optimize patient outcomes. For abscesses, incision and drainage are paramount and might avoid the need for antibiotic treatment in uncomplicated cases. If indicated, empiric antimicrobial therapy should target Streptococcus pyogenes for nonpurulent SSSIs, such as uncomplicated cellulitis, and S aureus for purulent SSSIs such as abscesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intrahepatic perforation of the gallbladder causing liver abscesses: case studies and literature review of a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, T; Adams, M; Ahmed, M; Arshad, N; Solkar, M

    2016-01-01

    A spontaneous (non-traumatic) gallbladder perforation with gallstone disease is not common. Concomitant development of a liver abscess is a very rare complication observed in such cases. A few cases of intrahepatic gallbladder perforations with chronic liver abscesses have been described. However, a patient series summarising classical and atypical presentations, relevant imaging studies, and the role of surgical and non-surgical options are lacking. We report a short case series on this rare complication of intrahepatic gallbladder perforations and share our experience of management of this condition. PMID:27055407

  14. Retrosternal abscess after trigger point injections in a pregnant woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Usman, Faisal; Bajwa, Abubakr; Shujaat, Adil; Cury, James

    2011-08-23

    Although retrosternal abscess is a well known complication of sternotomy and intravenous drug abuse, to date it has not been described as a consequence of trigger point injections. There are reported cases of serious complications as a result of this procedure including epidural abscess, necrotizing fasciitis, osteomyelitis and gas gangrene. A 37-year-old African-American woman, who was 20 weeks pregnant, presented to our emergency room with complaints of progressively worsening chest pain and shortness of breath over the course of the last two months. She was undergoing trigger point injections at multiple different sites including the sternoclavicular joint for chest pain and dystonia. Two years previously she had developed a left-sided pneumothorax as a result of this procedure, requiring chest tube placement and subsequent pleurodesis. Her vital signs in our emergency room were normal except for resting tachycardia, with a pulse of 100 beats per minute. A physical examination revealed swelling and tenderness of the sternal notch with tenderness to palpation over the left sternoclavicular joint. Laboratory data was significant for a white blood count of 13.3 × 109/L with 82% granulocytes. A chest radiograph revealed left basilar scarring with blunting of the left costophrenic angle. A computed tomography angiogram showed a 4.7 cm abscess in the retrosternal region behind the manubrium with associated sclerosis and cortical irregularity of the manubrium and left clavicle. Trigger point injection is generally considered very safe. However, there are reported cases of serious complications as a result of this procedure. A computed tomography scan of the chest should strongly be considered in the evaluation of chest pain and shortness of breath of unclear etiology in patients with even a remote history of trigger point injections.

  15. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  16. Undiagnosed amebic brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Riganti, Mario

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of amebic brain abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was a 31-year-old man who presented with amebic liver abscess. His clinical course deteriorated in spite of proper drainage and treatment. He developed delirium, lethargy and then expired. With a history of heroin addiction, withdrawal syndrome from heroin was suspected. At autopsy, amebic abscesses were detected in the liver, large intestine, meninges and brain. A 19 cm amebic liver abscess was found in the right lobe of the liver. A 4 cm amebic brain abscess was found in the right occipital lobe. Microscopically, the tissue sections from the affected organs were confirmed to have degenerated E. histolytica trophozoites. Involvement of the brain in amebic liver abscess should be suspected in patients with neurological signs and symptoms.

  17. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  18. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  19. Successful treatment of liver abscess secondary to foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lee-Won; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Wu, Chin-Chu; Sun, Cheuk-Kay

    2014-04-07

    Hepatic abscess caused by foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract is rare. We report a case of gastric antrum penetration due to a toothpick complicated by liver abscess formation. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of upper abdominal pain for 2 mo. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed at a local clinic revealed a toothpick penetrating the gastric antrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen at our hospital revealed a gastric foreign body embedded in the posterior wall of gastric antrum with regional phlegmon over the lesser sac and adhesion to the pancreatic body without notable vascular injury, and a hepatic abscess seven cm in diameter over the left liver lobe. Endoscopic removal of the foreign body was successfully performed without complication. The liver abscess was treated with parenteral antibiotics without drainage. The patient's recovery was uneventful. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated complete resolution of the hepatic abscess six months after discharge. Relevant literature from the PubMed database was reviewed and the clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, treatment strategies and outcomes of 88 reported cases were analyzed. The results showed that only 6 patients received conservative treatment with parenteral antibiotics, while the majority underwent either image-guided abscess drainage or laparotomy. Patients receiving abscess drainage via laparotomy had a significantly shorter length of hospitalization compared with those undergoing image-guided drainage. There was no significant difference in age between those who survived and those who died, however, the latter presented to hospitals in a more critical condition than the former. The overall mortality rate was 7.95%.

  20. Successful treatment of liver abscess secondary to foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Lee-Won; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Wu, Chin-Chu; Sun, Cheuk-Kay

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic abscess caused by foreign body penetration of the alimentary tract is rare. We report a case of gastric antrum penetration due to a toothpick complicated by liver abscess formation. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of upper abdominal pain for 2 mo. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed at a local clinic revealed a toothpick penetrating the gastric antrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen at our hospital revealed a gastric foreign body embedded in the posterior wall of gastric antrum with regional phlegmon over the lesser sac and adhesion to the pancreatic body without notable vascular injury, and a hepatic abscess seven cm in diameter over the left liver lobe. Endoscopic removal of the foreign body was successfully performed without complication. The liver abscess was treated with parenteral antibiotics without drainage. The patient’s recovery was uneventful. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated complete resolution of the hepatic abscess six months after discharge. Relevant literature from the PubMed database was reviewed and the clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, treatment strategies and outcomes of 88 reported cases were analyzed. The results showed that only 6 patients received conservative treatment with parenteral antibiotics, while the majority underwent either image-guided abscess drainage or laparotomy. Patients receiving abscess drainage via laparotomy had a significantly shorter length of hospitalization compared with those undergoing image-guided drainage. There was no significant difference in age between those who survived and those who died, however, the latter presented to hospitals in a more critical condition than the former. The overall mortality rate was 7.95%. PMID:24707157

  1. A Case of Buccal Abscess from an Impacted Wisdom Tooth in an Elderly Person with Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yuki; Kojima, Mizuha; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakaguchi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of buccal abscess caused by an impacted wisdom tooth in an extremely elderly person with malnutrition. The patient was a 94-year-old man, who complained that he had found it hard to open his mouth and that his cheek had been swollen for the previous 2 weeks. He had a shallow oral wound caused by an improperly fitting denture; however, the wound became infected. We performed incisional drainage of the abscess under local anesthesia. The swelling disappeared and he was able to open his mouth 55 mm. The elderly have a high risk of healing failure of injuries and it has been reported that infection in a host in a compromised state is severely intractable. This elderly patient was in a compromised state because of malnutrition. Cases such as this one will increase as the elderly population increases. Dentists need to consider the quality of life of patients with a longer life expectancy and should offer patients several treatment options before their general condition deteriorates.

  2. Disseminated cryptococcosis with recurrent multiple abscesses in an immunocompetent patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qiaoling; Zhu, Yimin; Chen, Shu; Zhu, Liping; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Wenhong

    2017-05-30

    Cryptococcus neoformans is frequently present as an opportunistic pathogen mainly affecting immunocompromised populations. Disseminated C. neoformans infection in immunocompetent population is rare and usually involves lung and central nerve system. Cryptococcus from biologic samples can easily grow on routine fungal and bacterial culture media. Besides, cryptococcal latex agglutination test has been established as a reliable diagnostic tool with overall sensitivities of 93-100%. We report a rare disseminated cryptococcosis case which presented with chronic recurrent multiple abscess in an immunocompetent male involving skin, lung, spine and iliac fossa without evidence of central nerve system involving. The results of serum cryptococcal latex agglutination tests and standard microbial cultures were negative. The patient underwent empirical anti-bacterial and anti-tuberculosis therapy which turned out to be effectless. Finally, bedside inoculation of the pus was carried out and revealed Cryptococcus neoformans, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. After the administration of anti-fungal drugs including liposomal amphotericin B, the patient recovered from fever and paraplegia. This case reveals an uncommon pattern of disseminated C. neoformans infection in immunocompetent population presented with chronic multiple abscess and without central nerve system involving. Negative routine microbial cultures may not necessarily rule out cryptococcosis, especially in early stage. Besides, cryptococcal latex agglutination test does have a chance of false negative, which might be related with "capsule-deficiency". Moreover, this phenomenon could be related with low-grade virulence and relative long illness duration.

  3. A Case of Buccal Abscess from an Impacted Wisdom Tooth in an Elderly Person with Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Mizuha; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakaguchi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of buccal abscess caused by an impacted wisdom tooth in an extremely elderly person with malnutrition. The patient was a 94-year-old man, who complained that he had found it hard to open his mouth and that his cheek had been swollen for the previous 2 weeks. He had a shallow oral wound caused by an improperly fitting denture; however, the wound became infected. We performed incisional drainage of the abscess under local anesthesia. The swelling disappeared and he was able to open his mouth 55 mm. The elderly have a high risk of healing failure of injuries and it has been reported that infection in a host in a compromised state is severely intractable. This elderly patient was in a compromised state because of malnutrition. Cases such as this one will increase as the elderly population increases. Dentists need to consider the quality of life of patients with a longer life expectancy and should offer patients several treatment options before their general condition deteriorates. PMID:27957349

  4. Gliomas with intratumoral abscess formation: Description of new cases, review of the literature, and the role of (99m)TC-Leukoscan.

    PubMed

    Campennì, Alfredo; Caruso, Gerardo; Barresi, Valeria; Pino, Mariangela; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Baldari, Sergio; Caffo, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Abscess formation within a brain tumor is uncommon. Intrasellar or parasellar tumors are the most common neoplasms that develop such complications. Cerebral gliomas with abscesses are extremely rare. In this paper three rare cases of glioma associated with abscess formation are described. The diagnosis of brain tumor associated with abscess is particularly difficult by conventional neuroradiological studies. (99m)Tc-labeled sulesomab can be useful in the diagnosis of brain tumors with intratumoral abscesses. There are no precise guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral gliomas associated with abscesses formation for the low number of cases reported to date. Appropriate treatment, aimed at radical surgery, and a suitable antibiotic-protocol, deferring adjuvant postoperative therapy, is associated with a more favorable outcome. A review of the pertinent literature is also performed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. Vancomycin penetration of a brain abscess: case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.M.; Gutin, P.H.; Baskin, D.S.; Pons, V.G.

    1986-05-01

    A 56-year-old man developed an abscess within a right parietal cystic anaplastic astrocytoma 3 days after removal of iodine-125 sources placed 9 days earlier for interstitial radiation therapy. After treatment with cephalosporin antibiotics proved unsuccessful, the patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin and intermittent percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Vancomycin levels obtained from the brain abscess fluid, both before and during later operative removal of the abscess, were 15 and 18 micrograms/ml, respectively; the serum vancomycin level was 21 micrograms/ml. This is the first report of the excellent penetration of vancomycin into brain abscess fluid.

  6. [Community associated-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SAMR-AC): comunication of the first four pediatric cases in the Roberto del Rio Children's Hospital].

    PubMed

    Acuña, Mirta; Benadof, Dona; Jadue, Carla; Hormazábal, Juan C; Alarcón, Pedro; Contreras, Julio; Torres, Ramón; Mülchi, Cristóbal; Aguayo, Carolina; Fernández, Jorge; Araya, Pamela

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a known pathogen in pediatric patients that produces skin infections, cutaneous abscess, cellulitis and osteoarticular infections. Most of these infections are produced by a meticilin susceptible strain. The community associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was published for the first time in 1993, ever since then is has been recognized as a cosmopolite pathogen. The first report in Latin America was published in 2003, and in Chile in 2008 from adult patients that have reported traveling to other countries. The following series describes four pediatric cases, all school-aged children, diagnosed since 2012 with clinical followups and molecular studies. Two cases presented as osteomyelitis of the lower extremity; and one presented as arm cellulitis. These three cases had Panton Valentine leukocidine (PV-L) negative strains from the clone complex 8. The last case presented a renal abscess, the strain was PV-L positive from the clone complex 30. This case series constitutes the first pediatric case report in Chile.

  7. Cutaneous abscess due to Eubacterium lentum in injection drug user: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Emanuela; Zorzi, Antonella; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Antolini, Dario; Fontana, Roberta; Vento, Sandro; Concia, Ercole

    2005-08-01

    We described the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of cutaneous abscess due to Eubacterium lentum in a parenteral drug user, after complete fracture of the right femor. The case underlines the importance of carefully performed microbiological tests, due to the peculiar cultural needs of the micro-organism.

  8. [Liver tuberculous abscess in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: report of 2 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Roig Rico, P; Pérez Rodríguez, L; Navarro Ibáñez, V; López Pérezagua, M M; Portilla Sogorb, J; Cuadrado Pastor, J M

    1995-02-01

    Two cases are reported of hepatic tuberculous abscesses (HTBA) in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), stressing the rarity of this location. Likewise, a review is made of cases reported in the literature. Our two patients presented with a prolonged febrile condition, with constitutional symptoms and nonspecific abdominal discomfort. In one patient the hepatic location was accompanied by a pulmonar location too. The course of the patients was good and symptoms subsided with tuberculostatic therapy. To note the possibility of finding hepatic tuberculous abscesses in HIV patients with prolonged fever and nonspecific abdominal pain more frequently than considered until now.

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae brain abscess in neonates: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Agrawal, Sunil; Chacham, Swathi; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Dutta, Sourabh; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-03-01

    Brain abscesses are uncommon in neonates. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a very uncommon microbial agent to cause brain abscess. We report 2 infants with Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis who developed brain abscesses. One infant was a premature neonate who required mechanical ventilation for respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently developed nosocomial sepsis and brain abscess without evidence of preceding meningitis. Another infant was a full-term neonate without risk factors for sepsis who developed seizures on the sixth postnatal day and was found to have meningitis and brain abscess. Both infants had Klebsiella pneumoniae septicemia with multiple relatively large brain abscesses that responded poorly to antimicrobial agents. These infants were managed with transfontanel drainage and prolonged courses of antimicrobial agents. Key message of this report is that Klebsiella pneumoniae brain abscess may occur in the absence of meningitis and even in the absence of any identifiable risk factors.

  10. Richter’s Type of Incarcerated Obturator Hernia that Presented with a Deep Femoral Abscess: An Autopsy Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Satoru; Kodama, Masaaki; Murano, Shunichi; Kishi, Hirohisa; Toyoda, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 89 Final Diagnosis: Obturator hernia Symptoms: Coxalgia • femoral abscess • gait disorder Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Richter’s obturator hernia is a rare abdominal hernia that is difficult to diagnose. The purpose of this case report is to show an unusual presentation of a fatal Richter’s obturator hernia that was accompanied by a femoral abscess. Case Report: An 89-year-old woman complained of sudden left coxalgia and a gait disorder but no abdominal symptoms. She had no history of trauma or surgery in the inguinal area. Twenty-three days after her first complaint of coxalgia, the patient was admitted in a coma with necrotizing fasciitis in the left inguinal area. The patient died of asystole due to hyperkalemia. During surveillance for the cause of death, a Richter’s type of incarcerated obturator hernia was identified at autopsy. The incarcerated small intestine had penetrated into the left obturator foramen to form an abscess that extended into the deep femoral region. Conclusions: Obturator hernia accompanied by femoral abscess is extremely rare, but it should be suspected when a patient with no history of trauma or surgery has a femoral abscess, even in the absence of abdominal symptoms. PMID:27818487

  11. Extradural frontal abscess complicating nasal septal abscess in a child.

    PubMed

    Thomson, C J; Berkowitz, R G

    1998-10-02

    Nasal septal abscess (NSA) is an uncommon sequel to minor nasal trauma. Abscess extension beyond the nasal cavity is rarely documented. A case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with a NSA associated with a large extradural frontal abscess is presented and indications for CT scanning in the workup of pediatric patients with NSA is discussed.

  12. Brain abscess as the initial presentation of a macroprolactinoma: Case report.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Almanza, Matilde; Cámara-Gómez, Rosa; de San Román-Mena, Laila Pérez; Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Ramos-Prol, Agustín; Botella-Asunción, Carlos; Merino-Torres, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Macroprolactinomas may behave invasively and infiltrate the skull base, causing a subsequent thinning that can also lead to a bone defect and a direct route of entry for pathogens. We describe the case of a 34-year-old male admitted to hospital with fever (38°C), headache, stiffness in the neck, diplopia and neurological impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed two bilateral abscesses in the fronto-parietal areas with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis and a pituitary adenoma that extended from the suprasellar region, eroding the sellar floor into the sphenoid sinus. Laboratory hormone measurements showed increased levels of prolactin and low levels of FSH, LH and testosterone. The patient received antibiotic treatment and surgery was performed. The patient developed central deafness as a neurological deficit. It is advisable to include pituitary adenoma in the differential diagnosis of meningitis even though its onset as intracranial abscess and rectus sinus thrombosis is extremely rare. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Klebsiella Pneumoniae Liver Abscess: a Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Williams, George; Akbar, Hina; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Kadaria, Dipen

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.pneumoniae) is a known cause of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) in the absence of hepatobiliary disease. In settings of hepatic infection, it has also been known to cause disseminated infections including meningitis and endopthalmitis. Several groups of patients are particularly susceptible to infection, including patients with diabetes mellitus, those from Southeast Asia and those with the preexisting hepatobiliary disease. We present a case of K.pneumoniae PLA with bacteremia. A 39-year-old Vietnamese male with no previous medical history who presented with complaints of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and fever. A computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a large complex mass in the right lobe of the liver with multiple septations. Over course of hospitalization, the patient developed acute respiratory failure and was monitored in medical intensive care unit (MICU). Blood cultures grew K. pneumonia. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and the abscess was drained by interventional radiology. After appropriate management, he progressed well during his hospital course and was eventually discharged from the hospital. K. pneumonia PLA had previously been an endemic disease in Southeast Asia, however, with a highly mobile patient population, it is now seen throughout the world and should be in the differential of patients who present with solitary liver mass in the setting of sepsis. PMID:28191374

  14. Spinal epidural abscess in a patient with piriformis pyomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gerald S.; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Arnone, Gregory D.; Barks, Ashley L.; Hage, Ziad A.; Neckrysh, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal epidural abscess resulting from piriformis pyomyositis is extremely rare. Such condition can result in serious morbidity and mortality if not addressed in a timely manner. Case Description: The authors describe the case of a 19-year-old male presenting with a 2-week history of fever, low back pain, and nuchal rigidity. When found to have radiographic evidence of a right piriformis pyomyositis, he was transferred to our institution for further evaluation. Because he demonstrated rapid deterioration, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans were emergently performed. They revealed an extensive posterior spinal epidural abscess causing symptomatic spinal cord compression extending from C2 to the sacrum. He underwent emergent decompression and abscess evacuation through a dorsal midline approach. Postoperatively, he markedly improved. Upon discharge, the patient regained 5/5 strength in both upper and lower extremities. Cultures from the epidural abscess grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus warranting a 6-week course of intravenous nafcillin. Conclusion: A 19-year-old male presented with a holospinal epidural abscess (C2 to sacrum) originating from piriformis pyomyositis. The multilevel cord abscess was emergently decompressed, leading to a marked restoration of neurological function. PMID:28028447

  15. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-07-12

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess.

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae Spinal Epidural Abscess treated conservatively: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Filipe; Ribeiro, Célia; Silva, Inês; Nero, Patrícia; Branco, Jaime C

    2012-01-01

    Spinal infections are rare but potentially life-threatening disorders. A high level of clinical suspicion is necessary for rapid diagnosis and treatment initiation. The treatment combines both antibiotics and surgical intervention in the vast majority of cases. The authors report the case of a 84-year old female patient with a three week history of persistent lumbar back pain radiating to both thighs following a lower respiratory tract infection. She had lumbar spine tenderness but no neurological compromise. Her inflammatory markers were elevated and lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed L4-L5 spondylodiscitis with spinal epidural abscess. Blood cultures isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae and, since she was neurologically stable, conservative treatment with two-week intravenous gentamicin and eight-week intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated with positive inpatient and outpatient evolution.

  17. Retroperitoneal abscess and acute acalculous cholecystitis after iatrogenic colon injury: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengwei; Wang, Yuxu; Hu, Sanyuan; Du, Futian; Ding, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis has a high mortality rate due to the difficulties in early diagnosis and high rate of complications like empyema, gangrene and perforation. We report a case of 20-year-old male with acute severe pancreatitis, acute renal failure and acute peripancreatic fluid collection who was transferred to our department after blood filtration treatment in ICU. After percutaneous catheter drainage for 20 hours, the patient got a high fever. Computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal colon injury. In this case, percutaneous catheter drainage was performed again and the pus cavity was flushed regularly, after which the patient’s state gradually improved. Unpredictably, septic shock appeared on the 51st day. Repeated computed tomography revealed acute acalculous cholecystitis and abscess formation. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder catheterization and drainage, the patient got better gradually. Three months later the retroperitoneal catheter was removed. Four months later, ultrasound examination showed normal gallbladder and the catheter was removed. PMID:26131252

  18. Two-tuohy needle and catheter technique for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous drainage of spinal epidural abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Perez-Toro, Marco R; Burton, Allen W; Hamid, Basem; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of spinal epidural abscess has increased in the past decades. Traditionally, management was based on surgical decompression. More recent studies have shown conservative management has successful outcomes in selected patients. We present a case, in which an elderly woman presented with new onset radicular pain and mild leukocytosis more than a week after a complicated revision of an intrathecal catheter in place for management of chronic axial low back pain. Magentic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a posterior epidural abscess from T12 to L2. Two Touhy needles were placed in the epidural space with fluoroscopic guidance for drainage of the abscess. A catheter was then advanced into the epidural space for irrigation with saline and an antibiotic solution. Intravenous antibiotics were continued for a total of 6 weeks. Radicular pain resolved immediately post-procedure. Serial MRIs also showed decreasing size of the abscess. Posterior spinal epidural abscesses may be successfully treated by way of the two Touhy needle and catheter technique for drainage and irrigation. This procedure should be reserved for patients that present with no neurological deficits or deemed nonsurgical candidates. Patients should continue on prolonged intravenous antibiotics and be monitored closely for clinical deterioration and undergo serial follow-up MRIs.

  19. Disseminated Cunninghamella bertholletiae infection with spinal epidural abscess in a kidney transplant patient: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Navanukroh, O; Jitmuang, A; Chayakulkeeree, M; Ngamskulrungroj, P

    2014-08-01

    Cunninghamella bertholletiae is a rare cause of invasive mucormycosis. We report the case of a 42-year-old Thai woman who suffered from disseminated C. bertholletiae infection. The patient developed dry cough, sharp shooting pain in the left buttock referred to the left leg, and fever 1 month after undergoing deceased-donor kidney transplantation. Radiographic studies exhibited multiple pulmonary cavities, osteomyelitis of the sacral spine, epidural abscess along the lumbrosacral spine, and paravertebral soft tissue involvement. Surgical debridement of the epidural abscess concurrent with prolonged intravenous administration of amphotericin B resulted in a good outcome.

  20. Sonographic diagnosis of acute mastoiditis and subsequent retroauricular abscess in a pediatric cochlear implant recipient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sakaida, Hiroshi; Usui, Satoko; Matsuda, Yasunori; Masuda, Sawako; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2017-10-01

    When acute mastoiditis occurs in cochlear implant recipients, it can progress to subsequent retroauricular abscess due to the absence of the external mastoid cortex resulting from mastoidectomy performed for cochlear implantation. The management goal is to control infection while preserving the implanted device. A 2-year-old boy with cochlear implants developed acute mastoiditis and a subsequent retroauricular abscess. The patient underwent a surgical intervention based on the diagnosis made utilizing gray-scale and power Doppler sonography. This case illustrates the diagnostic usefulness of sonography in this rare situation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:515-519, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nocardia farcinica abscess of the cerebellum in an immunocompetent patient: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Gallego, María; Alonso-Lera, Pedro; Arribi, Ana; Barcia, Juan A.; Marco, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Nocardial brain abscesses are uncommon and rarely occur in patients without predisposing factors. They may be mistaken for gliomas or necrotic metastases, and surgical intervention may be required to make the diagnosis. We report the first case of Nocardia farcinica cerebellar abscess in a patient without immunosuppression. He presented to us with headache and instability beginning a week before. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic lesion located at the right cerebellar hemisphere, hypointense in T1 and hyperintense in T2, with a fine wall that enhanced after injection of gadolinium. Image tests also showed a cavitated lesion at the upper lobule of the right lung. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the cerebellar abscess. Initial post-operative treatment with linezolid produced a limited response. He was re-operated and vancomycin, imipenem and ciprofloxacin were added with an excellent outcome of the cerebellar and lung lesions. PMID:27695569

  2. Liver abscess caused by toothpick and treated by laparoscopic left hepatic resection: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Wasel, Bassam; Eltawil, Karim M; Keough, Valerie; Molinari, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses caused by ingested foreign bodies have been reported in the medical literature but represent very uncommon events. Extra-luminal migration of sawing needles and pins is the most common cause of perforation of the gastrointestinal tract associated with liver infections. Other non-metallic sharp objects such as animal bones and toothpicks have been described but are less frequent. The authors present a case of a 45-year-old woman who suffered from sepsis and a liver abscess because of the migration of a toothpick that lodged in the left hepatic lobe. Review of the literature on the pathogenesis and clinical management of liver abscesses caused by ingested foreign is presented. PMID:22969156

  3. Liver abscess caused by toothpick and treated by laparoscopic left hepatic resection: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Abu-Wasel, Bassam; Eltawil, Karim M; Keough, Valerie; Molinari, Michele

    2012-08-08

    Hepatic abscesses caused by ingested foreign bodies have been reported in the medical literature but represent very uncommon events. Extra-luminal migration of sawing needles and pins is the most common cause of perforation of the gastrointestinal tract associated with liver infections. Other non-metallic sharp objects such as animal bones and toothpicks have been described but are less frequent. The authors present a case of a 45-year-old woman who suffered from sepsis and a liver abscess because of the migration of a toothpick that lodged in the left hepatic lobe. Review of the literature on the pathogenesis and clinical management of liver abscesses caused by ingested foreign is presented.

  4. First Report of Brain Abscess Caused by a Satelliting Phenotypic Variant of Helcococcus kunzii

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Chan, Jasper F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Helcococcus kunzii was isolated from a brain abscess in a diabetic patient with cholesteatoma and demonstrated satellitism around Staphylococcus aureus in culture. This is the first reported case of severe central nervous system infection due to H. kunzii and the first description of a satelliting phenotypic variant of this organism. PMID:24172152

  5. Forgotten? Not yet- Cardiogenic brain abscess in children - a case series based review.

    PubMed

    Udayakumaran, Suhas; Onyia, Chiazor U; Krishnakumar, R

    2017-08-02

    Brain abscess is a significant cause of morbidity in patients with uncorrected or partially palliated congenital cyanotic heart disease (CCHD). Unfortunately, in the developing world, the majority of the patients with CCHD remain either uncorrected or partially palliated. Furthermore, a risk of this feared complication also exists even among those undergoing staged corrective operations in the interval in between operations. There have been no recent articles in the literature on surgical outcomes of management of cardiogenic brain abscess in children. To describe the clinical and demographic profile of patients with cardiogenic cerebral abscess and to highlight the fact that uncorrected or palliated CCHD continue to be at risk for brain abscess. Retrospective analysis of 26 children (age below 19 years) being managed for CCHD who were diagnosed with cerebral abscess managed surgically (26/ 39 of cerebral abscess in children), at AIMS, Kochi, India from December 2000 to January of 2014 was done. Details of variables were retrospectively collected included demographics, modes of presentation, diagnosis, location of abscess, details of the underlying heart disease, management of the cerebral abscess and the outcome of the management. Mean age for all 26 patients was 7.19 years, with a wide range of 1.5 years to 19 years. There were 16 males and 10 females. 10 of the 26 patients (38%) required reaspiration after the initial surgery. On follow up, all the patients improved symptomatically and were cured for the cerebral abscess. Cardiogenic origin of cerebral abscess is the commonest cause of cerebral abscess amongst children. Unresolved cyanotic heart disease is a risk for occurrence, persistence and recurrence of cerebral abscess. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001416.htm Epidural abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An epidural abscess is a collection of pus (infected material) between ...

  7. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... high. Possible Complications Complications may include: Multiple abscesses Sepsis When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... 2016:chap 144. Read More Abscess Pancreatic pseudocyst Sepsis Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh ...

  8. A Case Series of Liver Abscess Formation after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Fei; Li, Xiao; Li, Chen-Rui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Liver abscess is a serious complication following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Much attention has been paid to this condition as it may interfere with the treatment process and result in a poor prognosis of the patient. This study aimed to analyze the causes of liver abscess, a complication, after TACE for hepatic tumors and to summarize management approaches. Methods: From June 2012 to June 2014, of 1480 consecutive patients who underwent TACE at our hospital, five patients developed liver abscess after TACE procedures for hepatic tumors. Of the five patients, each receiving conventional TACE, one underwent three sessions, two underwent two sessions, and the remaining two underwent one session of TACE. Demographic and clinical characteristics, together with management approaches and prognosis, were collected through a review of medical records. Results: These five patients were confirmed to have post-TACE liver abscess through clinical manifestations, laboratory, and imaging tests. After percutaneous drainage and anti-inflammatory treatments, the symptoms present in four patients with liver abscess significantly improved as evidenced by shrinkage or disappearance of the abscess cavity, and the patients recovered completely after sufficient drainage. The remaining patient experienced recurrent symptoms and abdominal abscess, achieved no significant improvement after treatment, and eventually died of severe infection and multiple organ failures. Conclusions: TACE must be implemented with extreme caution to avoid liver abscess. An effective management relies on an early diagnosis, prompt use of sufficient doses of appropriate antibiotics, and active implementation of abscess incision, drainage, and aspiration. PMID:28524831

  9. A Case Series of Liver Abscess Formation after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Fei; Li, Xiao; Li, Chen-Rui

    2017-06-05

    Liver abscess is a serious complication following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Much attention has been paid to this condition as it may interfere with the treatment process and result in a poor prognosis of the patient. This study aimed to analyze the causes of liver abscess, a complication, after TACE for hepatic tumors and to summarize management approaches. From June 2012 to June 2014, of 1480 consecutive patients who underwent TACE at our hospital, five patients developed liver abscess after TACE procedures for hepatic tumors. Of the five patients, each receiving conventional TACE, one underwent three sessions, two underwent two sessions, and the remaining two underwent one session of TACE. Demographic and clinical characteristics, together with management approaches and prognosis, were collected through a review of medical records. These five patients were confirmed to have post-TACE liver abscess through clinical manifestations, laboratory, and imaging tests. After percutaneous drainage and anti-inflammatory treatments, the symptoms present in four patients with liver abscess significantly improved as evidenced by shrinkage or disappearance of the abscess cavity, and the patients recovered completely after sufficient drainage. The remaining patient experienced recurrent symptoms and abdominal abscess, achieved no significant improvement after treatment, and eventually died of severe infection and multiple organ failures. TACE must be implemented with extreme caution to avoid liver abscess. An effective management relies on an early diagnosis, prompt use of sufficient doses of appropriate antibiotics, and active implementation of abscess incision, drainage, and aspiration.

  10. Pyogenic liver abscesses of bacterial origin. A study of 45 cases.

    PubMed

    Barrio, J; Cosme, A; Ojeda, E; Garmendia, G; Castiella, A; Bujanda, L; Fernández, J; Arenas, J I

    2000-04-01

    to determine the clinical, microbiological, diagnostic and therapeutic characteristics of pyogenic liver abscesses of bacterial origin. retrospective analysis of pyogenic liver abscesses diagnosed at the Aránzazu Hospital in San Sebastián (northern Spain) between 1989 and 1998. we studied 45 patients with pyogenic liver abscesses of bacterial origin (30 men, 15 women, mean age 61 years 11 months). The site of the liver abscess was biliary in 28.9% of the patients, portal in 11.1%, and unknown in 33.3%. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (95.5%), leukocytosis (86.7%) and fever (82.2%) were the most frequent clinical and laboratory findings. The abscesses were solitary in 55. 5% of the patients. Echography was diagnostic in 68.4% of patients, and computed tomography was diagnostic in 100%. Cultures of pus from the abscess and blood were positive in 77.1% and 50% respectively. Of the abscesses diagnosed as being of bacterial origin, 44.4% involved multiple organisms. Escherichia coli and Streptococcus milleri were the germs isolated most frequently. Percutaneous drainage was done in 22 patients (48.9%), with satisfactory results in 18. Overall mortality related with abscesses was 15.5%. the clinical presentation of pyogenic liver abscess did not vary during the study period. Computed tomography is fundamental for diagnosis and treatment. Percutaneous drainage associated with early antibiotic therapy is the treatment of choice.

  11. Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Presenting as a Primary Psoas Abscess: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, William A.; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A.; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMID:15695728

  12. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-07-07

    Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was performed and histopathological analysis revealed glioblastoma multiforme. On the seventh day post-surgery, she presented a sudden neurological deterioration with a meningeal syndrome, confusion, and fever of 39.8°C. Her cerebrospinal fluid sample and blood cultures were positive for S. enterica Enteritidis. She was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. On the 17th day post-surgery, she presented a new neurological disorder and purulent discharge from the surgical wound. Brain computed tomography revealed a large cerebral abscess located at the operative site. Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed and microbial cultures of surgical deep samples were positive for the same S. enterica Enteritidis isolate. She recovered and was discharged 6 weeks after admission. In this case report, a brain abscess was initially diagnosed as Salmonella post-surgical meningitis before the imaging diagnosis of the brain abscess. The diagnosis of brain abscess should be considered in all cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella meningitis after surgery for brain tumor. Surgical brain abscess drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic treatment remains a major therapeutic option.

  13. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array.

  14. Pyogenic granuloma associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss - A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Panseriya, Bhrugesh J.; Hungund, Shital

    2011-01-01

    A diverse group of the pathologic process can produce the enlargement of soft tissues in the oral cavity and often present a diagnostic challenge. This soft tissue enlargement may represent a variation of the normal anatomic structure, inflammatory reaction, cyst, neoplasm, and developmental anomalies. A group of reactive hyperplasias, which develop in response to chronic recurring tissue injury that stimulates an excessive tissue repair response. The pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a reactive enlargement that is an inflammatory response to local irritation such as calculus, a fractured tooth, rough dental restoration, and foreign materials or hormonal (pregnancy tumor) and rarely associated with bone loss. This paper presents a rare case of PG associated with periodontal abscess and bone loss in a 30-year-old male. PMID:22090773

  15. Tuberculous spondylitis and paravertebral abscess formation after kyphoplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ivo, Roland; Sobottke, Rolf; Seifert, Harald; Ortmann, Monika; Eysel, Peer

    2010-05-20

    Case report. To report a patient with spinal tuberculosis (TB) and paravertebral abscess formation after kyphoplasty of L1. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic options are discussed. Kyphoplasty is a well-established procedure in the treatment of osteoporotic compression fractures and metastatic tumors of the vertebrae. Although complication rates are low, there is evidence for an increased risk of serious local infections after kyphoplasty in patients with any history of systemic infection. Spinal TB accounts for 2% of all TB cases with a trend toward an increased incidence in parallel with the growing number of immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, only 1 article had reported a patient suffering from Pott disease after vertebroplasty. A 70-year-old patient with compression fracture of L1 underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty using polymethyl methacrylate. Two weeks after kyphoplasty, the patient was readmitted with backache and signs of acute infection. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of spondylitis with paravertebral abscess formation. A tissue specimen obtained by computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy did not yield any pathogen. As broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failed, combined surgery consisting of posterior instrumentation of Th11-L3 and anterior debridement, corporectomy of L1, and interposition of a titanium mesh cage filled with autologous rib graft was performed. Histologic examination of resected tissue and PCR and culture results confirmed diagnosis of spinal TB. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment and local surgical interventions, the patient died from septic multiple organ failure. Indication for kyphoplasty in patients with any history of local or systemic infection should be scrutinized rigorously. Symptoms of spinal TB are often nonspecific, and the clinician should be aware of this entity. Active investigation including microbiological and histologic examination is of utmost importance to avoid any

  16. Invasive liver abscess syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae with definite K2 serotyping in Japan: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ryota; Kudo, Daisuke; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Omura, Taku; Irino, Shigemi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2016-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia is a well-known human pathogen, and recently, a distinct invasive syndrome caused by K. pneumoniae serotypes K1 and K2 has been recognized in Southeast Asia. This syndrome is characterized by primary liver abscess and extrahepatic complications resulting from bacteremic dissemination. We report the first adult case of primary liver abscess caused by the definite K2 serotyped pathogen, with endogenous endophthalmitis in Japan. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to a nearby hospital for a high fever and diarrhea. She had visual loss of her right eye, renal dysfunction, and thrombocytopenia within 24 h from admission. She was transferred to our institution. On admission, she had no alteration of mental status and normal vital signs; however, she had almost complete ablepsia of the right eye. Laboratory data showed severe inflammation, liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, an increased serum creatinine level, and coagulopathy. Computed tomography showed a low density area in the right lobe of the liver. Invasive liver abscess syndrome probably caused by K. pneumonia was highly suspected and immediately administered broad-spectrum antibiotics for severe sepsis. Concurrently, endogenous endophthalmitis was diagnosed, and we performed vitrectomy on the day of admission. The blood culture showed K. pneumoniae infection. Percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess was also performed. Although she was discharged in a good general condition on day 22, she had complete ablepsia of the right eye. The K2A gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is consistent with the K2 serotype. PCR was also positive for the virulence-associated gene rmpA. Final diagnosis was invasive liver abscess syndrome caused by K2 serotype K. pneumonia. Although the primary liver abscess caused by K. pneumoniae with a hypermucoviscous phenotype is infrequently reported outside Southeast Asia, physicians should recognize this syndrome, and appropriate diagnosis and

  17. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis. PMID:27536469

  18. Neck swelling from a retropharyngeal abscess caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hyo, Yukiyoshi; Fukushima, Hisaki; Harada, Tamotsu

    2014-05-10

    In small children, retropharyngeal abscesses usually occur after upper respiratory tract infections. Unlike in adults, these abscesses are difficult to diagnose in small children, and can rapidly develop into deep neck or mediastinal abscesses. A 2-year-old Japanese boy recently presented to our department with a chief complaint of neck swelling. Physical examination revealed bilateral tonsillitis and swelling of the left posterior pharyngeal wall. Emergency neck computed tomography angiography showed a contrast-enhanced abscess cavity posterior to the left retropharyngeal space, and a low-density area surrounded by an area without contrast enhancement in the posterior neck. The latter was suspected to be a deep neck infection secondary to a retropharyngeal abscess. After surgery, the patient was diagnosed with a retropharyngeal abscess and concurrent cystic lymphangioma. The lesions improved after intraoral incision and drainage, and administration of antibiotics. Lymphangiomas and retropharyngeal abscesses are both known to be more common in children than in adults. However, we found no other reports of concomitant presentation of lymphangioma and retropharyngeal abscess in the literature.

  19. Retropharyngeal abscess with secondary osteomyelitis and epidural abscess: proposed pathophysiological mechanism of an underrecognized complication of unstable craniocervical injuries: case report.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Carlos R; Mattei, Tobias A; Fiore, Mariano E; Thoman, William J; Mendel, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Because of the proximity of the oropharynx (a naturally contaminated region) to the spinal structures of the craniocervical junction, it is possible that small mucosal lacerations in the oropharynx caused by unstable traumatic craniocervical injuries may become contaminated and lead to secondary infection and osteomyelitis. In this report, the authors describe the case of a previously healthy and immunocompetent patient who developed a large retropharyngeal abscess with spinal osteomyelitis after a high-energy craniocervical injury. This unusual report of osteomyelitis with a delayed presentation after a high-energy traumatic injury of the craniocervical junction highlights the possibility of direct injury to a specific area in the oropharyngeal mucosa adjacent to the osteoligamentous structures of the craniocervical junction, an overall underrecognized complication of unstable craniocervical injuries.

  20. Diagnostic use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a cervical epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis in an infant – case report

    PubMed Central

    RAUS, IULIAN; TATAR, SIMONA; COROIU, ROXANA ELENA

    2015-01-01

    Epidural abscess in infancy is very rare and has non-specific features, requiring very careful attention and early diagnosis. We present a case of a 3-month-old girl in which the diagnosis of spontaneous cervical epidural abscess developed after an initial episode of acute enterocolitis and was subsequently identified at a later visit to the emergency department for right-upper extremity hypotonia. Endoscopy revealed slightly domed retro pharynx and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed cervical spondylodiscitis at the level of intervertebral disc C5–C6 with right-sided epidural abscess that compressed the spinal cord and right C6 nerve root, without extension into superior mediastinum. The systemic antibiotic treatment with meropenem and clindamycin solved the symptoms but the spondylodiscitis complicated with vertebral body fusion which can be symptomatic or not in the future and needs follow-up. Cervical spontaneous spondylodiscitis with abscess is very rare, especially in this age group. This case emphasizes the importance of investigating an upper extremity motor deficiency in infancy and diagnosing any potential spondylodiscitis complication. PMID:26733756

  1. Treatment Challenges of Prosthetic Hip Infection with Associated Iliacus Muscle Abscess: Report of 5 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Joshua M; Mesko, Nathan W; Higuera, Carlos A; Molloy, Robert M; Simpfendorfer, Claus; Babic, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection is an unfortunate though well-recognized complication of total joint arthroplasty. An iliacus and/or iliopsoas muscle abscess is a rarely documented presentation of hip prosthetic joint infection. It is thought an unrecognized retroperitoneal nidus of infection can be a source of continual seeding of the prosthetic hip joint, prolonging attempts to eradicate infection despite aggressive debridement and explant attempts. The current study presents five cases demonstrating this clinical scenario, and discusses various treatment challenges. In each case we report the patient's clinical history, pertinent imaging, management and outcome. Diagnosis of the iliacus muscle abscess was made using computed tomography imaging. In brief, the mean number of total drainage procedures (open and percutaneous) per patient was 4.2, and outcomes consisted of one patient with a hip girdlestone, two patients with delayed revisions, and two patients with retained prosthesis. All patients ended with functional pain and on oral antibiotic suppression with an average follow up of 18 months. This article highlights an iliacus muscle abscess as an unrecognized source of infection to a prosthetic hip. It demonstrates resilience to standard treatment protocols for prosthetic hip infection, and is associated with poor patient outcomes. Aggressive surgical debridement appears to remain critical to treatment success, and early retroperitoneal debridement of the abscess should be considered.

  2. [Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus community acquired meningitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Spini, Roxana Gabriela; Ferraris, Verónica; Glasman, María Patricia; Orofino, Guillermina; Casanovas, Alejandra; Debaisi, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are becoming more frequent. Most cases present an infection of skin and soft tissue, and the most invasive forms observed are osteoarticular and pleuropulmonary infections. Meningitis is a rare manifestation of Staphylococcus aureus infections. We describe an unusual case of CA-MRSA infection. An infant of eight months presented with signs of irritability and 4 days duration fever, with alternating sensory and abdomen pain. Acute abdomen surgery was discarded and hospitalization was decided with diagnosis of sepsis due to probable enteral focus; antibiotics were indicated. Blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid culture were positive for MRSA. Sepsis with meningitis by MRSA was diagnosed. On the 7th day of hospitalization the infant presented neurological signs and symptoms. On the resolution computed tomography and the magnetic resonance, images compatible with myelitis were observed. The patient complied with the 21 day endovenous treatment, and showed positive results, being discharged from hospital a month after the appearance of the symptoms.

  3. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  4. Legionella micdadei Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edward; Macyk-Davey, Andrea; Henry, Monica; Nilsson, Jan-Erik; Miedzinski, Lil

    2013-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient who developed a large frontal brain abscess caused by Legionella micdadei. This is, to our knowledge, a rare case of culture-proven Legionella central nervous system infection. PMID:23224082

  5. Bacterial Etiology and Risk Factors Associated with Cellulitis and Purulent Skin Abscesses in Military Trainees.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Ellis, Michael W; Schlett, Carey D; Millar, Eugene V; LaBreck, Patrick T; Mor, Deepika; Elassal, Emad M; Lanier, Jeffrey B; Redden, Cassie L; Cui, Tianyuan; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Bishop, Danett K; Hall, Eric R; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Merrell, D Scott

    2016-01-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Although Staphylococcus aureus is associated with purulent SSTI, it is unclear to what degree this pathogen causes nonpurulent cellulitis. To inform effective prevention strategies and to provide novel insights into SSTI pathogenesis, we aimed to determine the etiology of SSTI in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study in US Army Infantry trainees with SSTI (cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis) from July 2012 through December 2014. We used standard microbiology, serology, and high-throughput sequencing to determine the etiology of SSTI. Furthermore, we compared purported risk factors as well as anatomic site colonization for S. aureus. Among 201 SSTI cases evaluated for SSTI risk factors, cellulitis was associated with lower extremity blisters (P = 0.01) and abscess was associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization (P<0.001). Among the 22 tested cellulitis cases that were part of the microbiome analysis, only 1 leading edge aspirate was culturable (Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Microbiome evaluation of aspirate specimens demonstrated that Rhodanobacter terrae was the most abundant species (66.8% average abundance), while abscesses were dominated by S. aureus (92.9% average abundance). Although abscesses and cellulitis share the spectrum of clinical SSTI, the bacterial etiologies as determined by current technology appear distinct. Furthermore, the presence of atypical bacteria within cellulitis aspirates may indicate novel mechanisms of cellulitis pathogenesis. NCT01105767.

  6. Bacterial Etiology and Risk Factors Associated with Cellulitis and Purulent Skin Abscesses in Military Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Ellis, Michael W.; Schlett, Carey D.; Millar, Eugene V.; LaBreck, Patrick T.; Mor, Deepika; Elassal, Emad M.; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Redden, Cassie L.; Cui, Tianyuan; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Bishop, Danett K.; Hall, Eric R.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Although Staphylococcus aureus is associated with purulent SSTI, it is unclear to what degree this pathogen causes nonpurulent cellulitis. To inform effective prevention strategies and to provide novel insights into SSTI pathogenesis, we aimed to determine the etiology of SSTI in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study in US Army Infantry trainees with SSTI (cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis) from July 2012 through December 2014. We used standard microbiology, serology, and high-throughput sequencing to determine the etiology of SSTI. Furthermore, we compared purported risk factors as well as anatomic site colonization for S. aureus. Among 201 SSTI cases evaluated for SSTI risk factors, cellulitis was associated with lower extremity blisters (P = 0.01) and abscess was associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization (P<0.001). Among the 22 tested cellulitis cases that were part of the microbiome analysis, only 1 leading edge aspirate was culturable (Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Microbiome evaluation of aspirate specimens demonstrated that Rhodanobacter terrae was the most abundant species (66.8% average abundance), while abscesses were dominated by S. aureus (92.9% average abundance). Although abscesses and cellulitis share the spectrum of clinical SSTI, the bacterial etiologies as determined by current technology appear distinct. Furthermore, the presence of atypical bacteria within cellulitis aspirates may indicate novel mechanisms of cellulitis pathogenesis. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT01105767. PMID:27780238

  7. Anorectal abscess during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Hirota, Masaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kubota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Ryo; Isobe, Masanori; Shiki, Yasuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Anorectal symptoms and complaints caused by hemorrhoids or anal fissures are common during pregnancy. It is known that one-third of pregnant women complain of anal pain in the third trimester. Anal pain may be caused by a wide spectrum of conditions, but if it begins gradually and becomes excruciating within a few days it may indicate anorectal abscess. We experienced a case of anorectal abscess during pregnancy which was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and treated by incision and seton drainage at 36 weeks of gestation, followed by a normal spontaneous delivery at 38 weeks of gestation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of anorectal abscess during pregnancy in the English-language published work. The clinical course of our case and clinical considerations of anorectal abscesses are discussed.

  8. Modern management of pyogenic hepatic abscess: a case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyogenic hepatic abscesses are relatively rare, though untreated are uniformly fatal. A recent paradigm shift in the management of liver abscesses, facilitated by advances in diagnostic and interventional radiology, has decreased mortality rates. The aim of this study was to review our experience in managing pyogenic liver abscess, review the literature in this field, and propose guidelines to aid in the current management of this complex disease. Methods Demographic and clinical details of all patients admitted to a single institution with liver abscess over a 5 year period were reviewed. Clinical presentation, aetiology, diagnostic work-up, treatment, morbidity and mortality data were collated. Results Over a 5 year period 11 patients presented to a single institution with pyogenic hepatic abscess (55% males, mean age 60.3 years). Common clinical features at presentation were non-specific constitutional symptoms and signs. Aetiology was predominantly gallstones (45%) or diverticular disease (27%). In addition to empiric antimicrobial therapy, all patients underwent radiologically guided percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess at diagnosis and only 2 patients required surgical intervention, including one 16-year old female who underwent hemi-hepatectomy for a complex and rare Actinomycotic abscess. There were no mortalities after minimum follow-up of one year. Conclusions Pyogenic liver abscesses are uncommon, and mortality has decreased over the last two decades. Antimicrobial therapy and radiological intervention form the mainstay of modern treatment. Surgical intervention should be considered for patients with large, complex, septated or multiple abscesses, underlying disease or in whom percutaneous drainage has failed. PMID:21435221

  9. Late-onset chest wall abscess due to a biodegradable rib pin infection after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goda, Yasufumi; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Kusunose, Masaaki; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    A 55-year-old man with end-stage emphysema underwent a right single-lung transplantation through a posterolateral thoracotomy. The fifth rib was divided and fused back using a biodegradable pin made of polylactide acid and hydroxyapatite. Two weeks postoperatively, he suffered from central vein catheter-related sepsis due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After being successfully treated for sepsis, he was discharged. However, 3 months later, computed tomography revealed multiple loculated abscesses in the chest wall and the right pleural space. Reoperative thoracotomy revealed abscesses mainly located around the fifth rib, where the pin was inserted. Both cultures of the abscess and the fifth rib were positive for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, which suggested that the rib pin was the cause of the secondary infection. This case suggests the rib pins, even if they are biodegradable, could have a risk of infections side effect especially for the immunosuppressed patients.

  10. [Bifrontal cerebritis and brain abscess caused by Sreptococcus anginosus group: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Matamala, José Manuel; Núñez, Carolina; Ogrodnik, Rosa; Cartier, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of brain abscesses is mostly polymicrobial. Streptococci and anaerobic bacteria are the most commonly isolated pathogens. We report a previously healthy female without predisposing factors, presenting with a bifrontal cerebritis caused by a Streptococcus anginosus group infection. The patient developed a brain abscess and a subdural collection with severe intracranial hypertension of fatal evolution. The etiologic diagnosis was made culturing the material obtained from the subdural collection. It is presumed that, within the Streptococcus anginosus group, Streptococus intermedius could have been the causing bacteria, given its central nervous system tissue tropism and its predisposition to form brain abscesses.

  11. A case of skeletal tuberculosis and psoas abscess: disease activity evaluated using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psoas abscess complicating tuberculous spondylitis is a rare morbidity in extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are no established guidelines for evaluating the clinical response of psoas abscess. Although several studies have shown that positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose can play a potential role in diagnosing multifocal tuberculosis and monitoring the clinical response of pulmonary tuberculosis, to our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating local inflammation and disease activity of a tuberculous psoas abscess. Case presentation We report a case of multifocal bone and lymph node tuberculosis with concomitant lumbar psoas abscess in a 77-year-old man, along with a literature review. An initial positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan showed intense 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. The patient was successfully treated with antitubercular agents and computed tomography-guided drainage therapy. A follow-up positron emission tomography-computed tomography after abscess drainage and 9 months of antitubercular drug treatment revealed that the majority of lesions improved; however, protracted inflammation surrounding the psoas abscess was still observed. These results indicate that disease activity of psoas abscess can remain, even after successful drainage and antitubercular medication regime of appropriate duration. Conclusion We have successfully followed up the extent of skeletal tuberculosis complicated with psoas abscess by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In this patient, positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating the disease activity of tuberculous psoas abscess and for assessing the appropriate duration of antitubercular drug therapy in psoas abscess. PMID:24225333

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor as entry port for S. intermedius causing bacteremia and multiple liver abscesses. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Benou, C; Walter, B M; Schlitter, M A; Wilhelm, D; Neu, B; Schmid, R M

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with fever and liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease, which proved subsequently to be abscesses. Further workup revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the gastric corpus as entry port to Streptococcus intermedius-associated bacteremia and liver abscesses. After antibiotic treatment and surgical resection of the tumor, the patient recovered well. This unusual case indicates that gastrointestinal stromal tumors can remain undetected until they cause a life threatening infection. A review of recent literature pertaining to GIST and liver abscesses follows.

  13. Rapid brain death caused by a cerebellar abscess with Fusobacterium nucleatum in a young man with drug abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobic microorganism that causes disease entities such as periodontal and soft tissue abscesses, pulmonary and intraabdominal infections and very rarely intracerebral infections. Case presentation Here, we report the rare case of a previously healthy 25-year-old German man with a cerebellar abscess caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum that resulted in rapid brain death. Toxicological screening showed positivity for amphetamines and cannabis. The diagnosis was obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification of bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusions In drug users clinicians should think about rare causes of brain abscesses/meningitis. Early diagnosis is necessary and justifies the use of molecular techniques. PMID:24915846

  14. Spinal epidural abscesses: risk factors, medical versus surgical management, a retrospective review of 128 cases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit R; Alton, Timothy B; Bransford, Richard J; Lee, Michael J; Bellabarba, Carlo B; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare, serious and increasingly frequent diagnosis. Ideal management (medical vs. surgical) remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of risk factors, organisms, location and extent of SEA on neurologic outcome after medical management or surgery in combination with medical management. Retrospective electronic medical record (EMR) review. We included 128 consecutive, spontaneous SEA from a single tertiary medical center, from January 2005 to September 11. There were 79 male and 49 female with a mean age of 52.9 years (range, 22-83). Patient demographics, presenting complaints, radiographic features, pre/post-treatment neurologic status (ASIA motor score [MS] 0-100), treatment (medical vs. surgical) and clinical follow-up were recorded. Neurologic status was determined before treatment and at last available clinical encounter. Imaging studies reviewed location/extent of pathology. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of a bacterial SEA based on radiographs and/or intraoperative findings, age greater than 18 years, and adequate EMR. Exclusion criteria were postinterventional infections, Pott's disease, isolated discitis/osteomyelitis, treatment initiated at an outside facility, and imaging suggestive of a SEA but negative intraoperative findings/cultures. The mean follow-up was 241 days. The presenting chief complaint was site-specific pain (100%), subjective fevers (50%), and weakness (47%). In this cohort, 54.7% had lumbar, 39.1% thoracic, 35.9% cervical, and 23.4% sacral involvement spanning an average of 3.85 disc levels. There were 36% ventral, 41% dorsal, and 23% circumferential infections. Risk factors included a history of IV drug abuse (39.1%), diabetes mellitus (21.9%), and no risk factors (22.7%). Pathogens were methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (40%) and methicillin-resistance S aureus (30%). Location, SEA extent, and pathogen did not impact MS recovery. Fifty-one patients were

  15. First confirmed case of spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess caused by Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shiro; Nemoto, Tadanobu; Yano, Hisakazu; Kakuta, Risako; Kanamori, Hajime; Inomata, Shinya; Ishibashi, Noriomi; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Gu, Yoshiaki; Kitagawa, Miho; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Parvimonas micra was renamed species as within Gram-positive anaerobic cocci and rarely causes severe infections in healthy people. We report the first confirmed case of spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess caused by P. micra in a healthy women. The patient has a pain in low back and anterior left thigh. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography detected the affected lesion at the L2 and L3 vertebral bodies. All isolates from the surgical and needle biopsy specimens were identified as P. micra by 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF. In this case, P. micra showed high sensitivity to antimicrobial therapy. She was successfully treated with debridement and sulbactam/ampicillin, followed by oral metronidazole for a total of 10 weeks. The causative microorganisms of spondylodiscitis are not often identified, especially anaerobic bacteria tend to be underestimated. On the other hand, antimicrobial therapy for spondylodiscitis is usually prolonged. Accordingly, we emphasize the importance of performing accurate identification including anaerobic bacteria.

  16. Appendicular abscess with appendicolith in a Spigelian hernia masquerading caecal volvulus—A case report

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, G.A.; Nair, M.S.; Al-Abed, Y.; Alobaid, N.; Safar-Aly, H.; Athow, A.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spigelian hernias are rare hernias of the anterior abdominal wall named after Adrian van den Spiegel, the anatomist who first described them in the 16th century. They represent around 2% of all hernias. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present an 83-year-old female with one week history of a painful right iliac fossa swelling, her examination revealed a tender lump with no cough impulse and non-reducible and her computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass anterior to ileocaecal valve suggestive of a caecal volvulus. Intra-operative the finding was a Spigelian hernia containing an appendicular abscess and an appendicolith. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Spigelian hernias represents a challenge for the surgeons principally due to their rarity but also due to their anatomy and the variety of their contents. Searching the literature we found many different intra-abdominal structures presenting within a Spigelian hernia but we did not encounter a case similar to this. CONCLUSION Clinicians need to be aware of these hernias when dealing with lower abdominal swellings and have a high index of suspicion even in the presence of negative clinical and CT findings. PMID:22771909

  17. Liver abscess and bacteremia caused by lactobacillus: role of probiotics? Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sherid, Muhammed; Samo, Salih; Sulaiman, Samian; Husein, Husein; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-11-18

    Lactobacilli are non-spore forming, lactic acid producing, gram-positive rods. They are a part of the normal gastrointestinal and genitourinary microbiota and have rarely been reported to be the cause of infections. Lactobacilli species are considered non-pathogenic organisms and have been used as probiotics to prevent antibiotic associated diarrhea. There are sporadic reported cases of infections related to lactobacilli containing probiotics. In this paper we discuss a case of an 82 year old female with liver abscess and bacteremia from lactobacillus after using probiotics containing lactobacilli in the course of her treatment of Clostridium difficile colitis. The Lactobacillus strain identification was not performed and therefore, both commensal microbiota and the probiotic product should be considered as possible sources of the strain. Lactobacilli can lead to bacteremia and liver abscesses in some susceptible persons and greater awareness of this potential side effect is warranted with the increasing use of probiotics containing lactobacilli.

  18. Prostatic abscess in a pediatric patient with Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Report of a unique case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Agochukwu, Nnenaya Q.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Richter, Lee A.; Barak, Stephanie; Zerbe, Christa S.; Holland, Steven M.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare hereditary disease in which phagocytes have difficulty forming the superoxide radical required to kill certain pathogens. Individuals with CGD are susceptible to a specific set of infections and granulomatous lesions. We present the case of a 15 year old male with X-linked CGD who presented with unremitting cough and fevers. He had a left sided pneumonia which persisted despite home IV antibiotics. He was admitted to an outside facility for bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cultures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Computed Tomography (CT) of chest, abdomen and pelvis was done for baseline evaluation of extent of disease. CT revealed a fluid collection in the prostatic fossa, later determined to be a prostatic abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a prostatic abscess in a pediatric patient with CGD. PMID:22325401

  19. Iliopsoas abscess as a complication of tunneled jugular vein catheterization in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is a rare complication in hemodialysis patients that is mainly due to adjacent catheterization, local acupuncture, discitis, and bacteremia. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman undergoing regular hemodialysis via a catheter in the internal jugular vein who presented with low back pain and dyspnea. A heart murmur suggested the presence of catheter-related endocarditis, and this was confirmed by an echocardiogram and a blood culture of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A computed tomography indicated a pulmonary embolism and an incidental finding of iliopsoas abscess. Following surgical intervention and intravenous daptomycin, the patient experienced full recovery and a return to usual activities. This case indicates that an iliopsoas abscess can be related to a jugular vein catheter, which is apparently facilitated by infective endocarditis. The possibility of iliopsoas abscess should be considered when a hemodialysis patient presents with severe low back pain, even when there is no history of adjacent mechanical intervention.

  20. Successful switch to oral therapy with doxycycline in the case of an actinomycotic hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Petrache, Diana; Popescu, Gabriel-Adrian

    2013-05-13

    A 72-year-old female was admitted with the symptoms of malaise, loss of appetite, upper right quadrant pain, fever, and sweats, which had been present for last 7 days. CT-scan of the abdomen revealed a hypodense mass in the right liver lobe; histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen yielded a diagnosis of actinomycotic abscess. Treatment with intravenous ampicillin for 8 weeks followed by a course of oral doxicycline for 28 weeks resulted in the complete resolution of the abscess.

  1. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, P; Morris, S

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  2. Acrophialophora fusispora Brain Abscess in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Review of Cases and Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohsen, I. Z.; Sutton, D. A.; Sigler, L.; Almodovar, E.; Mahgoub, N.; Frayha, H.; Al-Hajjar, S.; Rinaldi, M. G.; Walsh, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was referred to King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. The diagnosis without central nervous system (CNS) involvement was confirmed on admission, and chemotherapy was initiated according to the Children Cancer Group (CCG) 1882 protocol for high-risk-group leukemia. During neutropenia amphotericin B (AMB) (1 mg/kg of body weight/day) was initiated for presumed fungal infection when a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed multiple nodular densities. After 3 weeks of AMB therapy, a follow-up chest CT revealed progression of the pulmonary nodules. The patient subsequently suffered a seizure, and a CT scan of the brain was consistent with infarction or hemorrhage. Because of progression of pulmonary lesions while receiving AMB, antifungal therapy was changed to liposomal AMB (LAMB) (6 mg/kg/day). Despite 26 days of LAMB, the patient continued to have intermittent fever, and CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated findings consistent with a brain abscess. Aspiration of brain abscess was performed and the Gomori methenamine silver stain was positive for hyphal elements. Culture of this material grew Acrophialophora fusispora. Lung biopsy showed necrotizing fungal pneumonia with negative culture. The dosage of LAMB was increased, and itraconazole (ITRA) was added; subsequently LAMB was discontinued and therapy was continued with ITRA alone. The patient demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement. In vitro, the isolate was susceptible to low concentrations of AMB and ITRA. A. fusispora is a thermotolerant, fast-growing fungus with neurotropic potential. We report the first case of human infection involving the CNS. Acrophialophora resembles Paecilomyces but differs in having colonies that become dark and in the development of phialides along the sides or at the tips of echinulate brown conidiophores. Conidia are borne in long chains and are smooth or ornamented with

  3. Acrophialophora fusispora brain abscess in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: review of cases and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohsen, I Z; Sutton, D A; Sigler, L; Almodovar, E; Mahgoub, N; Frayha, H; Al-Hajjar, S; Rinaldi, M G; Walsh, T J

    2000-12-01

    A 12-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was referred to King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. The diagnosis without central nervous system (CNS) involvement was confirmed on admission, and chemotherapy was initiated according to the Children Cancer Group (CCG) 1882 protocol for high-risk-group leukemia. During neutropenia amphotericin B (AMB) (1 mg/kg of body weight/day) was initiated for presumed fungal infection when a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed multiple nodular densities. After 3 weeks of AMB therapy, a follow-up chest CT revealed progression of the pulmonary nodules. The patient subsequently suffered a seizure, and a CT scan of the brain was consistent with infarction or hemorrhage. Because of progression of pulmonary lesions while receiving AMB, antifungal therapy was changed to liposomal AMB (LAMB) (6 mg/kg/day). Despite 26 days of LAMB, the patient continued to have intermittent fever, and CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated findings consistent with a brain abscess. Aspiration of brain abscess was performed and the Gomori methenamine silver stain was positive for hyphal elements. Culture of this material grew Acrophialophora fusispora. Lung biopsy showed necrotizing fungal pneumonia with negative culture. The dosage of LAMB was increased, and itraconazole (ITRA) was added; subsequently LAMB was discontinued and therapy was continued with ITRA alone. The patient demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement. In vitro, the isolate was susceptible to low concentrations of AMB and ITRA. A. fusispora is a thermotolerant, fast-growing fungus with neurotropic potential. We report the first case of human infection involving the CNS. Acrophialophora resembles Paecilomyces but differs in having colonies that become dark and in the development of phialides along the sides or at the tips of echinulate brown conidiophores. Conidia are borne in long chains and are smooth or ornamented with

  4. A Case of Abdominal Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Successful Endoscopic Demonstration of an Obscure Enteric Fistula by Dye Injection via a Percutaneous Drainage Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Toshihide; Kosaka, Keiichi; Sonde, Cho; Nakai, Kuniharu; Suenaga, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal and pelvic abscesses occur in approximately 10–30% of Crohn's disease patients during the course of the disease; most of these abscesses have an enteric communication. For this condition, percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) rather than emergency surgery has recently been recognized as a valuable procedure for initial treatment. However, in cases wherein the abscess is accompanied by an enteric fistula, the recurrence of abscess might be inevitable without the management of the enteric fistula. Therefore, demonstration and evaluation of the enteric fistula is essential to prevent abscess recurrence; however, this is not necessarily a simple procedure. Here, we report abdominal abscess accompanied by a rectal fistula in a patient with Crohn's disease; this condition was successfully treated by PAD. Furthermore, PAD was also useful in identifying the fistula by colonoscopy involving dye injection via the drainage catheter. To our knowledge, no previous literature has reported the use of dye injection via the drainage catheter for identifying a fistula during endoscopic examination. We present here the radiographic, sonographic, and endoscopic findings of this case. PMID:21103266

  5. Abscess of urachal remnants presenting with acute abdomen: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urachal diseases are rare and may develop from a congenital anomaly in which a persistent or partial reopening of the fetal communication between the bladder and the umbilicus persists. The most frequently reported urachal anomalies in adults are infected urachal cyst and urachal carcinoma. The diagnosis of this entity is not always easy because of the rarity of these diseases and the atypical symptoms at presentation. Imaging techniques, such as ultrasonography and computed tomography have a significant role in recognizing the presence of urachus-derived lesions. Cases presentations Case presentation 1: A 25-year-old Arab-Berber man presented with a 10-day history of progressive lower abdominal pain accompanied by fever, vomiting, and low urinary tract symptoms to our emergency department. Laboratory data revealed leucocytosis. The diagnosis of an acute peritonitis was made initially. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic tract from the umbilicus to the abdominal wall, and the diagnosis was rectified (infected urachal remnants). The patient was initially treated with intravenous antibiotics in combination with a percutaneous drainage. Afterwards an extraperitoneal excision of the urachal remnant including a cuff of bladder was performed. The histological analysis did not reveal a tumor of the urachal remnant. Follow-up examinations a few months later showed no abnormality. Case presentation 2: A 35-year-old Arab-Berber man, without prior medical history with one week of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, associated with fever but without lower urinary tract symptoms visited our emergency department. Laboratory data revealed leucocytosis. Abdominal ultrasonography was not conclusive. Computed tomography of the abdomen was the key to the investigation and the diagnosis of an abscess of urachal remnants was made. The patient underwent the same choice of medical-surgical treatment as previously described for case one, with a good follow

  6. Brain abscess of unknown etiology in a 2-year-old child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stănescu, Georgeta Ligia; NedelcuŢă, Ramona Mihaela; Dop, Dalia; Diaconu, Radu; Călin, Gigi; Niculescu, Elena Carmen; Gheonea, Cristian; Stănescu, Radu; Anghelina, Liliana; Stănescu, Mihail Relu

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of brain abscess necroptically discovered in a 2-year-old child hospitalized in the Pediatrics Clinic of the "Filantropia" Municipal Hospital, Craiova, Romania. The family, with a poor financial situation, reports previous episodes that may be interpreted as comitial crises. Clinically speaking, he presents a height-weight hypertrophia, vitamin D loss rickets, and psychomotor retardation. At the objective examination, we found a weight of 10 500 g (!), second and third degree mesocardiac systolic beat and cardiomegaly in the thorax-cardiac-pulmonary X-ray examination. Despite the intensive treatment, death occurs few hours after hospitalization. During the autopsy, there is observed a partial dehiscence of the cranial arch sutures, with a 6/5 cm ovalary cavity in the parietal lobe, containing approximately 200 mL of yellow-green serous liquid, with uneven walls, but with no hemorrhagic or puss infiltrates. The heart is enlarged (in comparison to the general somatic development) of 9/7/4 cm, without any cardiac malformations. The microscopic examination showed degenerative neuronal and ischemic lesions on the left-brain hemisphere. Comparing to the data from specialty literature, we consider it as a yellow brain softening (according to Rokitansky's classification), most probably of an embolic cause.

  7. An emboligenic pulmonary abscess leading to ischemic stroke and secondary brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Philipp; Stettner, Mark; Husseini, Leila; Macht, Stephan; Jander, Sebastian; Mackenzie, Colin; Oesterlee, Ulrike; Slotty, Philipp; Methner, Axel; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Aktas, Orhan

    2012-11-05

    Ischemic stroke by septic embolism occurs primarily in the context of infective endocarditis or in patients with a right-to-left shunt and formation of a secondary cerebral abscess is a rare event. Erosion of pulmonary veins by a pulmonary abscess can lead to transcardiac septic embolism but to our knowledge no case of septic embolic ischemic stroke from a pulmonary abscess with secondary transformation into a brain abscess has been reported to date. We report the case of a patient with a pulmonary abscess causing a septic embolic cerebral infarction which then transformed into a cerebral abscess. After antibiotic therapy and drainage of the abscess the patient could be rehabilitated and presented an impressive improvement of symptoms. Septic embolism should be considered as cause of ischemic stroke in patients with pulmonary abscess and can be followed by formation of a secondary cerebral abscess. Early antibiotic treatment and repeated cranial CT-scans for detection of a secondary abscess should be performed.

  8. Surgical management of cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by Brucella melitensis : report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Ozbek, Zühtü; Gökoğlu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months.

  9. Cat-scratch disease presenting as a solitary splenic abscess in an immunocompetent adult: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Kastanakis, Miltiades; Papadomichelakis, Alexandros; Petrakis, Georgios; Bobolakis, Emmanouil

    2013-06-01

    Cat-scratch disease is a common zoonotic infectious disease caused by Bartonella henselae. It is generally characterized by regional lymphadenopathy following exposure to an infected cat. Organ systemic manifestations occur rarely in atypical forms of the disease. Abscess of the spleen represents a rare, life-threatening clinical entity. Here we report an unusual case of cat scratch disease presenting as an isolated splenic abscess in an immunocompetent adult. Comprehensive social history revealed retrospectively close contact with cats. Diagnosis of B. henselae infection was confirmed on the basis of positive serology, skin lesion and imaging findings. Initial efforts at spleen preserving management failed to improve clinical symptoms and classical splenectomy was finally performed. Splenic bartonellosis may become potentially fatal if not recognized. Since diagnosis is challenging, a high index of clinical suspicion is required.

  10. Spontaneous intraventricular rupture of pyogenic brain abscess: A short series of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Savardekar, Amey R.; Krishna, Rajesh; Arivazhagan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous intraventricular rupture of brain abscess (IVROBA) is a dreaded complication of pyogenic brain abscess (PBA) and is associated with very high mortality. We discuss the clinical, radiological, and therapeutic aspects associated with this potentially fatal complication of PBAs. Case Descriptions: Three cases of spontaneous IVROBA presenting to our institute over a period of 6 months were reviewed with respect to their clinical and radiological presentation, their therapeutic plan, and neurological outcome. Individualized approach to our patients with IVROBA with abscess drainage/excision, intrathecal and intravenous antibiotic therapy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion (if under high pressure), and close monitoring of clinical status, CSF reports, and computed tomography (CT) scan findings enabled us to achieve good neurological outcome in two patients presenting in conscious state; however, one patient presenting in poor neurological status succumbed to IVROBA due to fulminant septic arteritis. Conclusion: In the present neurosurgical era, IVROBA is rarely encountered; however when it occurs, patient outcome is adversely affected. Early detection and prompt aggressive management, as seen in our short series, can give the patient a fighting chance and significantly improve the neurological outcome. PMID:28031988

  11. Localized Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Fang; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Wu, Yi-Der; Kuo, Chun-Lang; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, refers to a spectrum of diseases characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes that produce either focal (localized LCH) or systemic manifestations (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease). Localized LCH accounts for approximately 60-70 % of all LCH cases. Osseous involvement is the most common manifestation and typically involves the flat bones, along with lesions of the skull, pelvis, and ribs. Localized LCH in bone shows a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and radiologic features that may mimic those of infections as well as benign and malignant tumors. The diagnostic imaging findings of localized LCH are also diverse and challenging. The penumbra sign is a common and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) feature of Brodie's abscess, but is rarely seen in localized LCH. In this report, we describe a case of localized LCH misdiagnosed as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child based on clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and pre-diagnostic MRI findings (penumbra sign). Therefore, the penumbra sign is not sufficient to clearly establish the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess, and the differential diagnosis of localized LCH should be considered when a child with an osteolytic lesion presents with a penumbra sign. PMID:27065773

  12. [Amoebic liver abscess in a patient initially diagnosed with pneumonia: case report and discussion of relevant literature].

    PubMed

    Kurt, Özgür; Aktaş, Neslihan; Çalışkan, Can; Karatuna, Onur; Aygün, Hande; Akyar, Işın

    2015-03-01

    In one-third of the patients with amoebiasis, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) may occur after the penetration of amoebic trophozoites through the intestinal wall. ALA is seen mostly among men aged 20-45 years with a serious clinical outcome, with fever and abdominal pain on the right upper quadrant. Most patients have no recent history of amoebic colitis; indeed, they have neither gastrointestinal complaints nor Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) cysts/trophozoites in their stools. Therefore, ultrasonography and serology are primary in ALA diagnosis, while searching for E. histolytica DNA in abscess fluid using PCR has been preferred as an effective and reliable method, lately. Early antimicrobial therapy is effective; however, for cases irresponsive to therapy after 72 hours and with large abscess, drainage or surgical intervention is indicated. If left untreated, ALA may disseminate to other organs and cause death. The data concerning the extra-intestinal manifestations of amebiasis in Turkey are limited. Here, a rare case of a young man with an initial diagnosis of pneumonia followed by the identification of ALA after radiological interventions and laboratory tests is presented and the relevant literature is discussed.

  13. Pancreatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Shi, E C; Yeo, B W; Ham, J M

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents the clinical features and problems in the management of 34 patients with pancreatic abscesses. In the majority of patients the abscesses developed following an attack of pancreatitis due to alcohol or gallstones. The abscesses were usually multilocular, and often had spread widely in the retroperitoneal space. Invasion into surrounding viscera or the peritoneal cavity occurred in 12 instances, and eight patients developed major bleeding into the abscess cavity. Obstructive complications (affecting bowel, common bile duct and large veins) occurred in eight patients. Twelve of the 34 patients (35 per cent) died, most deaths being due to failure to control sepsis (seven patients) or to massive bleeding from the abscess cavity (three patients). The mortality of this condition is likely to remain high, but may be reduced by better drainage techniques at the initial exploration. The importance of the infra-mesocolic approach for drainage is emphasized.

  14. A 10-year retrospective review of pediatric lung abscesses from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Kavi; McGrath, Eric; Guglani, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pediatric lung abscesses can be primary or secondary, and there is limited data regarding response to treatments and patient outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and microbiologic profile of pediatric patients with lung abscess and assess the differences in outcomes for patients treated with medical therapy or medical plus surgical therapy. METHODS: A retrospective review of all pediatric patients ≤ 18 years of age that were treated as an inpatient for lung abscess between the dates of August 2004 and August 2014 was conducted. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on the need for surgical intervention. RESULTS: A total of 39 patients with lung abscess (30 treated with medical therapy alone, 9 also required surgical interventions) were included. Fever, cough, and emesis were the most common presenting symptoms, and most of the patients had underlying respiratory (31%) or neurologic disorders (15%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism in those that had culture results available, and ceftriaxone with clindamycin was the most common combination of antibiotics used for treatment. Comparison of medical and surgical subgroups identified the duration of fever and abscess size as risk factors for surgical intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric lung abscesses can be managed with medical therapy alone in most cases. Presence of prolonged duration of fever and larger abscess size may be predictive of the need for surgical intervention. Good clinical response to prolonged therapy with ceftriaxone and clindamycin was noted. PMID:27512508

  15. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Salmonella brain abscess in a patient on chronic azathioprine therapy for myasthenia gravis: report of an unusual case and review of literature in the postantibiotic era.

    PubMed

    Soni, Chetan R; Kumar, Gyanendra; Bollu, Pradeep C; Sahota, Pradeep; Litofsky, N Scott

    2010-02-01

    Focal intracranial infections caused by Salmonella species in adults are exceedingly uncommon. Structural brain injury with coexisting immunocompromised status appears to predispose adults to this rare manifestation of Salmonella infection. We report a case of Salmonella brain abscess in a patient with myasthenia gravis on chronic azathioprine therapy without any prior structural brain lesion. We reviewed world literature and discuss their analysis of Salmonella brain abscess in adult population in the postantibiotic era.

  17. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reşorlu, Hatice; Saçar, Suzan; Inceer, Beşir Şahin; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Zateri, Coskun; Savaş, Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. Epidural abscess may occur as a rare complication of spondylitis. Spinal brucellosis and development of epidural abscess in the cervical region are rare. Development of epidural abscess affects the duration and success of treatment. Spinal brucellosis should be considered in patients presenting with fever and lower back-neck pain in endemic regions, and treatment must be initiated with early diagnosis in order to prevent potential complications.

  18. First case of amebic liver abscess 22 years after the first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Nespola, Benoît; Betz, Valérie; Brunet, Julie; Gagnard, Jean-Charles; Krummel, Yves; Hansmann, Yves; Hannedouche, Thierry; Christmann, Daniel; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Filisetti, Denis; Pesson, Bernard; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man consulted in November 2012 for abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. The patient had a history of suspected hepatic amebiasis treated in Senegal in 1985 and has not traveled to endemic areas since 1990. Abdominal CT scan revealed a liver abscess. At first, no parasitological tests were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Only after failure of this therapy, serology and PCR performed after liver abscess puncture established the diagnosis of hepatic amebiasis. The patient was treated with metronidazole and tiliquinol-tilbroquinol. Amebic liver abscess is the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation. Hepatic amebiasis 22 years after the last visit to an endemic area is exceptional and raises questions on the mechanisms of latency and recurrence of these intestinal protozoan parasites. PMID:26088504

  19. [Case of Behçet's disease with frequent recurrence of multiple pulmonary abscess-like opacities].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirokazu; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Tsuji, Fumio; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Miyara, Takayuki; Tohda, Yuji; Nakajima, Shigenori

    2007-10-01

    A 39-year-old woman, who had a history of recurrent oral and genital ulcerations and folliculitis and had had a low-grade fever since December 2003, consulted our hospital on February 5, 2004. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) showed multiple pulmonary abscess-like opacities. She was admitted to the Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Kinki University School of Medicine on February 19, 2004. A transbronchial lung biopsy showed nonspecific inflammation with lymphocytic infiltration. The patient was discharged after she showed improvement with antibiotic therapy. She was readmitted to our hospital on October 3, 2006, because of recurrence of pulmonary abscess-like opacities. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed lymphocytosis (53%) but yielded no significant bacteria on culture. Behçet's disease was diagnosed on the basis of the three major symptoms (recurrent oral and genital ulcerations and folliculitis). The frequent recurrence of pulmonary lesions was suspected to be due to immunological impairment associated with Behçet's disease, and the pulmonary lesions and inflammatory reaction tests showed improvement after colchicine was administered. The patient was discharged on October 28, 2006. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of frequently recurrent multiple pulmonary abscess-like opacities in Behçet's disease.

  20. [Complex vacuum therapy of an abdominal abscess from gastric perforation : case report of innovative operative endoscopic management].

    PubMed

    Loske, G; Lang, U; Schorsch, T; Müller, C T

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous use of abdominal and endoscopic vacuum therapy in a case of an abdominal abscess caused by gastric perforation is demonstrated and innovative operative endoscopic management is described. A computed tomography scan performed on a 67-year-old female patient showed a large abscess of the upper abdominal cavity where laparoscopic fundoplication had been performed 6 months previously. Endoscopy showed a transmural perforation of the dorsal wall of the stomach. The gastric perforation was closed and drained using intracavitary endoscopic vacuum therapy. Open pore polyurethane foam drainage was inserted through the defect into the extraluminal cavity for 3 days. A second period of therapy followed using intraluminal therapy with total drainage of the stomach, simultaneous enteral nutrition via a jejunal tube and a vacuum pressure of - 125 mmHg was applied with an electronic vacuum device. The abdominal abscess was drained via laparotomy and intra-abdominal vacuum therapy was performed with an open pore double-layered film using a vacuum pressure of - 75 mmHg. The perforation defect was not treated by operative means. Abdominal vacuum therapy ended 3 days postoperatively and the abdominal wall was closed by suture. Endoscopic vacuum therapy of the gastric perforation was terminated after 7 days and primary wound healing could then be achieved. Use of endoscopic and abdominal vacuum therapy as well as new open pore material is an innovative option for operative management.

  1. [Case of spinal epidural abscess after continuous epidural block to manage the pain of herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuhito; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Narai, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Youji

    2014-03-01

    A woman in her 90's received continuous epidural block for the pain of herpes zoster. Four days after epidural catheterization, she was found with cellutitis. Fourteen days after epidural catheterization, spinal epidural abscess was pointed out on MRI. Since there were no neurological symptoms, we performed conservative medical management with antibiotics. She recovered without sequela When the symptoms of cellutitis appeared after epidural block (even if there are neither neurological symptoms nor infectious signs), there is a possibility of progressing into spinal epidural abscess.

  2. Diagnosis of brainstem abscess in the cerebritis stage by magnetic resonance imaging--case report.

    PubMed

    Adachi, J; Uki, J; Kazumoto, K; Takeda, F

    1995-07-01

    A 52-year-old male presented with a brainstem abscess manifesting as high fever, diplopia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid showed the lesion as a ring-like enhanced mass consisting of a necrotic center with surrounding edema, whereas postcontrast computed tomography revealed no such confirmatory findings. He was treated with antibiotics as the lesion had been detected in the acute cerebritis stage. Serial MR images showed that the lesion decreased remarkably in size. MR imaging can detect brain abscess in the earliest inflammatory stage.

  3. PERCUTANEOUS LAPAROSCOPIC TROCAR DRAINAGE OF HEPATIC ABSCESS IN A SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENT - A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Afuwape, O O; Chibuzo, I N C; Ayandipo, O O; Nwafulume, N A

    2015-12-01

    Hepatic abscess as a manifestation of sickle cell disease is rare. A 25 year old Nigerian male with sickle cell disease presented with right sided upper abdominal pain, fever, massive hepatomegaly, neutrophilic leucocytosis and mildly deranged liver enzymes. Sonographic findings were a large thin walled right hepatic lobe abscess; with an estimated volume of 2000ml. He had percutaneous laparoscopic trocar drainage of 2250mls of pus with insertion of a drain. The drain was removed after ten days and the patient was discharged home.

  4. [Acute periproctal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    Periproctal inflammations related to the anus are characterized by the rapid spread of the infection to the surrounding tissue, which is determined by the anatomical characteristics and infectious agents. Inflammation, which starts as a phlegmon, quickly forms boundaries and an abscess develops in most cases. Up to 80-90% of anorectal abscesses develop according to the crypto-glandular theory on the basis of infection of the anal glands, spilling into the Morgagni crypts in the anal canal. Up to two-thirds of such abscesses are associated with the emergence of anorectal fistulas. Anorectal abscesses can be divided into marginal and subcutaneous perianal abscesses, submucosal, intersphincteric, ischiorectal and supralevator abscesses. Their diagnosis is based on thorough physical examination, sometimes also with the help of imaging methods such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoanal ultrasound. What is decisive for the successful treatment of anorectal abscessess is their early and adequate surgical drainage. Adjuvant antibiotic therapy is necessary only when the overall signs of sepsis are present and for patients with a comorbidity such as diabetes, valvular heart disease, or immunodeficiency.

  5. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassl, Jens; Tobler, Daniel; Zumofen, Daniel; Steiner, Luzius A.; Goettel, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:27928498

  6. Brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Slazinski, Tess

    2013-09-01

    A brain abscess is defined as a localized collection of pus within the parenchyma of the brain or meninges. Brain abscesses are a complication of ear, sinus, and/or dental infections. Although they may occur in many brain locations, the most common sites are frontal and temporal lobes. Modern neuroimaging and laboratory analysis have led to prompt diagnosis and have decreased the mortality rates from brain abscess. Critical care nurses have a vital role in performing accurate neurologic assessments, timely administration of antibiotics, and management of fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Management of brain abscesses in era of computed tomography in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of 112 cases].

    PubMed

    Kabré, A; Zabsonré, S; Diallo, O; Cissé, R

    2014-10-01

    The authors report a retrospective study conducted on 112 cases of cerebral abscesses collected over a period of 12 years from the medical records of the department of neurosurgery at the Yalgado Ouedraogo university teaching hospital, Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso. The analyses were conducted on the epidemiological, clinical and prognostic aspects of the cases. The mean age of the patients (73 men and 39 women) was 26 years. The primary mode of infection ranged from cranial injuries (25%) to meningitis (17.9%) and sinusitis (15.2%). Bacteria were isolated from 16.1% cases; staphylococci and streptococci were the most frequent bacteria identified. The main clinical symptoms were motor deficit (75.9%), fever (74.1%) and headache (66.1%). Diagnosis was performed by CT scan in all cases. Fifty-three patients were treated using antibiotics alone; this medical treatment was completed by surgery in 59 cases. The results showed that 37.5% of the patients in fact fully recovered while some sequelae were identified in 49.1%. The mortality rate was 13.4%. Consciousness disorders were in most cases responsible for the patient's death. Moreover multiple and/or voluminous abscesses were factors of the poor functional prognosis. Due to the high mortality rate and the frequency of sequelae, the authors emphasize the need of prevention by using adequate and sufficient antibiotics during primary infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [A case of appendceal cancer with abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masao; Tomochika, Shinobu; Matoba, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital owing to difficulty walking and an abdominal tumor in the right lower abdomen. An irregular mass with calcification was detected in her cecum, and abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscess was detected by computed tomography(CT). An irregular mass was diagnosed as Group 5 adenocarcinoma by biopsy. After the inflammation improved by abscess drainage, we conducted ileocecal resection and fenestrated the abscess. Pathological analysis showed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma: dimensions 20 × 20 mm, pSS, stroma: med, INF a, ly1, v0, pPM0 (70 mm), pDM0 (70 mm), pRM0 (8mm), LN(-): #201: (0/9), fStageII. Thepatie nts can now walk, and she remains in good health and has been recurrence-free 8 months after surgery. To our knowledge, colon cancer with an abdominal abscess is comparatively rare, and we discuss this in light of the literature.

  9. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  10. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  11. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... an anal fissure Sexually transmitted infection (STD) Trauma Deep rectal abscesses may be caused by intestinal disorders ... drains the pus. If the pus collection is deep, you may need to stay in the hospital ...

  12. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Your health care provider will perform a breast exam. Sometimes an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  13. Amebic abscess of urachal remnants.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, D; Mirk, P; Carbone, A; Macis, G; Danza, F M

    2001-06-01

    We report a rare case of amebic abscess of the urachus, mimicking an urachal neoplasm: no previous reports of amebic infection of the urachus were found in the literature. The challenges of the differential diagnosis between urachal abscess and carcinomas based both on clinical and radiological data are discussed.

  14. Intracranial abscess in Ectopia Cordis.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph; Tipper, Geoffrey Adrian; Hussain, Zakier; Balakrishnan, Venkataraman; Gan, Peter

    2014-08-25

    We present a case of intracranial abscess in a young female with Ectopia Cordis, an exceptionally rare cardiac condition. The neurosurgical implication is the predisposition to intracranial abscess formation. A heightened awareness of this association will aid diagnosis in similar clinical scenarios.

  15. Primary psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Amy; Lau, Kenneth K; Korman, Tony M; Kornman, Tony; Wallace, Euan M; Polyakov, Alex

    2008-12-01

    Primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess formation is very uncommon during pregnancy. We present a case of a primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy causing back pain with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Understanding the clinical presentation of iliacus-psoas muscle abscess helps with considering it in the differential diagnosis of back pain during pregnancy.

  16. A Case on Streptococcal Pneumonia Associated with Leptomeningitis, Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae Woong; Kim, Joo Seok; Ryu, Il Hwan; Choi, Ji Wook; Kim, Min Gyu; Na, Young Min; Yun, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at higher risks of bacterial pneumonia than the general population, and the pathogen is the most commonly involved Streptococcus pneumoniae. We hereby report a case of pneumococcal pneumonia associated with leptomeningitis, osteomyelitis and epidural abscess in a patient with AIDS. He is being successfully treated with ampicillin/sulbactam and clindamycin. And because the pneumococcal infection is usually associated with morbidity and mortality rates in the setting of AIDS, we should consider for pneumococcal vaccinations among the AIDS populations. PMID:24624217

  17. Case Report of Subcutaneous Nodules and Sterile Abscesses Due to Delayed Type Hypersensitivity to Aluminum-Containing Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lauren, Christine T; Belsito, Donald V; Morel, Kimberly D; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Routine childhood immunizations have resulted in great reductions in vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. Vaccine-related adverse events, albeit rare, can be of significant consequence. Although anaphylaxis, or type I hypersensitivity, is recognized as a potential reaction after vaccination, delayed type hypersensitivity or type IV reactions are less so. We present a case of persistent subcutaneous nodules and sterile abscesses in the setting of delayed type hypersensitivity to aluminum, confirmed by patch testing and recurrence on re-exposure. We review sources of aluminum in common immunizations, principles for treatment, and strategies for management of future vaccinations for this patient. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess usually occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue ... bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess to form. This abscess gets larger and presses ...

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy aids recovery following surgical debridement due to severe bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess post-cesarean: A case report (CARE-Compliant).

    PubMed

    Young, Christopher N J; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Webb, Vanessa; Vidow, Sarah; Parasuraman, Rajeswari; Umranikar, Sameer

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial cellulitis post-Cesarean section is rare. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in various medical specialities; its effectiveness in obstetrics however remains the topic of debate-used predominantly as an adjunct to secondary intention specific to high-risk patient groups. Its application in the treatment of actively infected wounds post-Cesarean is not well documented. Here, we document NPWT in the treatment of an unusually severe case of bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess postpartum. We provide a unique photographic timeline of wound progression following major surgical debridement, documenting the effectiveness of 2 different NPWT systems (RENASYS GO and PICO, Smith & Nephew). We report problems encountered using these NPWT systems and "ad-hoc" solutions to improve efficacy and patient experience.A 34-year-old primiparous Caucasian female with no prior history or risk factors for infection and a normal body mass index (BMI) presented with severe abdominal pain, swelling, and extensive abdominal redness 7 days postemergency Cesarean section. Examination revealed extensive cellulitis with associated abdominal abscess. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in wound exudates and extensive surgical debridement undertaken day 11 postnatally due to continued febrile episodes and clinical deterioration, despite aggressive intravenous antibiotic therapy. Occlusive NPWT dressings were applied for a period of 3 weeks before discharge, as well as a further 5 weeks postdischarge into the community.NPWT was well tolerated and efficacious in infection clearance and wound healing during bacterial cellulitis. Wound healing averaged 1 cm per week before NPWT withdrawal; cessation of NPWT before full wound closure resulted in significantly reduced healing rate, increased purulent discharges, and skin irritation, highlighting the efficacy of NPWT. Five-month follow-up in the clinic found the wound to be fully healed with no additional scarring

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis: A Review of Hospital Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Sherine Jue; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Ma, David H. K.; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Phil Y. F.; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chuang, Chih-Chun; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to characterize the patient demographics, clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and clinical outcomes of keratitis caused by S. aureus, and to make a comparison between MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Methodology/Principal findings Patients (n = 59) with culture-proven S. aureus keratitis treated in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, were included in our study. Patients' demographic and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six MRSA (44%) and 33 MSSA (56%) isolates were collected. The MRSA keratitis was significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.038), but 46.2% (12/26) of patients with MRSA keratitis were considered to have community-associated infections. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. MRSA isolates were significantly more resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Ocular surface disease was a significant risk factor for MRSA keratitis (P = 0.011). Visual outcome did not differ significantly between the MRSA and MSSA groups. However, age (B = 0.01, P = 0.035, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.001–0.019) and visual acuity at presentation (B = 0.749, P<0.001, 95% CI: 0.573–0.926) were significantly correlated with visual outcome. Conclusions/Significance Ocular surface disease is an important predisposing factor for S. aureus keratitis, especially for MRSA infections. Advanced age and poor visual acuity at presentation are important prognostic indicators for poor visual outcome in S. aureus keratitis. Oxacillin resistance may not be a significant prognostic indicator. PMID:24244625

  1. A Late-onset Psoas Abscess Formation Associated with Previous Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Sam; Tahamtan, Maryam; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Psoas abscesses could originate from an adjacent source of infection in the abdominopelvic cavity known as a secondary complication of acute appendicitis. However, it is considered as a very rare event when occurring late after the presentation of appendicitis. Whether it is the source or complication of acute appendicitis following appendectomy remains unclear. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our center with fever and abdominal pain. His past medical history was unremarkable except for having an acute appendicitis and complicated appendectomy 4 years before presenting illness. On admission, the patient was febrile with right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and moderate leukocytosis. The Abdominopelvic CT- scan revealed a large right psoas muscle than the opposite site, that contained a hypodense mass measuring 6 cm in diameter with extension into right iliacus and internal oblique muscles..The patient underwent subsequent percutaneous abscess drainage under image guide and concurrent broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy.

  2. An atypical case of retropharyngeal abscess with long blind tract treated with Ryle's tube drainage.

    PubMed

    Tang, M L; Lee, S C; Phoon, M P Y

    2011-12-01

    A 10 year-old Iban girl presented with severe odynophagia for 4 days and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinically, her neck was tender with crepitus. Lateral neck radiograph showed multiple linear radiolucent shadows at retropharyngeal space. Flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscope revealed a tunnel behind upper oesophagus with slough and there was pooling of saliva at pyriform sinus. Feeding via nasogastric tube was started and empirical treatment for fungal and bacterial infection was commenced. Subsequent computed tomography of neck and thorax showed a 15-long blind tract at subglottic region posterior to oesophagus (prevertebral region), extending to superior mediastinum just before carina at T3/T4 level, represent abscess. Hourly suctioning of the remaining abscess in the blind tract with 10ml-syringe was done.

  3. Hepatic abscess in the Spiegel lobe caused by foreign body penetration: report of a case report.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuki; Shiba, Hiroaki; Nakabayashi, Yukio; Otsuka, Masahiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-12-01

    A 69-year-old male patient visited our hospital because of a continuous low-grade fever and right back pain since 2 weeks. Enhanced computed tomography (CT) of his abdomen revealed a mass with ring enhancement (35 × 30 mm) in the Spiegel lobe as well as a needle-like foreign body. Because conservative treatment by fasting and administration of antibiotics was unsuccessful, the patient underwent emergency laparotomy for removal of the foreign body and drainage of the liver abscess. The patient made a satisfactory postoperative recovery without complications and was discharged on the eighth postoperative day. The foreign body was composed of both protein and calcium phosphate and was histologically diagnosed as matured bone. We herein report successful surgical treatment of a patient with a liver abscess in the Spiegel lobe caused by foreign body penetration.

  4. Massive retroperitoneal tubercular abscess mimicking a leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj K; Azam, Amir; Singh, Vinay K; Tomar, Juhi; Mishra, Alka; Singh, Kuldeep K; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    In spite of being a common diagnosis in the patients of Asian origin, atypical presentations of tuberculosis may pose diagnostic challenges. We report a huge prevertebral abscess in a 30-year-old female, mimicking a leaking aortic aneurysm. The patient was managed successfully by emergency decompression and stabilization. The issues related to poor patient compliance to chemotherapy and management of atypical presentations of spinal tuberculosis are discussed here. PMID:18854051

  5. [A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal with a Perianal Abscess].

    PubMed

    Adikrisna, Rama; Udagawa, Masaru; Sugita, Yuusuke; Ishii, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was referred to our department because she felt pain at the anus with pus discharge. Physical examination revealed a tumor on the left side of the anus, and a subcutaneous induration near the tumor. Abdominal CT scan revealed an irregularly shaped tumor with abscess formation. There were no enlarged lymph nodes or distant metastasis. Anal canal carcinoma (cStage Ⅱ) with a complication of perianal abscess was suspected, so we performed surgical incision and drainage. A biopsy of the tumor led to the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. However, because surgical drainage alone was not effective for treatment of the abscess, colostomy of the sigmoid colon was carried out 14 days after admission. After chemoradiation therapy (5-FU 800 mg/m2/day on days 1-4 and 29-32, mitomycin C [MMC] 10 mg/m2 on days 1 and 29, and radiation with a total dose 54 Gy), the tumor disappeared completely, considered to be a complete response. Twenty months after chemoradiation, there were no signs of recurrence.

  6. A case of IgG4-related hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor replaced by an abscess after steroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masayuki; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Aramaki, Tsuyoshi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Tsutsumi, Naoyuki; Sasaki, Keiko; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-02

    Hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare disease which often mimics a malignant tumor and is therefore often misdiagnosed and surgically resected. Recently, a concept of IgG4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) has been proposed that is becoming widely recognized and includes IgG4-related hepatic IPT. Corticosteroids are widely accepted as the standard treatment. A 72-year-old Japanese man, who had been followed for ten years after surgery and chemotherapy for treatment of hilar and lower bile duct cancers, developed intermittent fever and abdominal pain and visited this hospital. Blood examinations revealed an inflammatory reaction, worsened glucose intolerance, and an increased level of serum IgG4 (137 mg/dL). Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 5 cm-sized mass in hepatic segment 7. Because of his cancer history, not only was a benign mass suspected, but there was also the possibility of a recurrent biliary malignancy. Liver biopsy was performed and the histology met the criteria for IgG4-related IPT. Corticosteroid therapy was initiated and his symptoms quickly resolved. However, two months later, a repeat CT demonstrated that the hepatic mass had been replaced by an abscess. The abscess was initially refractory, despite tapering corticosteroid treatment, controlling diabetes by intensive insulin therapy, administration of antibiotics, and percutaneous abscess drainage. Finally, after six months, the condition resolved. The diagnosis of hepatic IPT is sometimes difficult. To differentiate it from a malignant tumor, histological examination is necessary. Although corticosteroids are recognized as the standard therapy, unexpected and critical complications can develop in cases of IgG4-related hepatic IPT.

  7. Streptococcus pyogenes Associated Post-traumatic Brodie’s Abscess of Cuboid: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Priyadarshi; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Varma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Brodie’s abscess of cuboid bone is one of the rarest diagnosis in children which most often is hematogenous in origin. Although Streptococcus pyogenes has been uncommonly implicated as causative organism in other bones, it is not yet reported in the cuboid. Case Report: We report the case of 14-year-old boy who presented with a lytic lesion in the cuboid bone. It was preceded by a penetrating injury with a small iron nail. He was treated with simple curettage without the addition of bone graft. Frank pus present in the cavity in the cuboid bone grew S. pyogenes on bacterial culture. Symptoms resolved after 6 weeks of antibiotics, however, complete radiological healing was obtained after 9 months. Conclusion: Although very rare, S. pyogenes associated Brodie’s abscess should strongly be suspected in a posttraumatic lytic lesion in the cuboid bone and bone grafting is not always required for bone healing even in presence of large pus-filled cavity. PMID:27299080

  8. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine G

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare bacterial infection located within the spinal canal. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment are important because of its potential to cause rapidly progressive spinal cord compression and irreversible paralysis. A staphylococcus bacterial infection is the cause in most cases. Treatment includes antibiotics and possible surgical drainage of the abscess. A favorable neurologic outcome correlates with the severity and duration of neurologic deficits before surgery and the timeliness of the chosen intervention. It is important for the critical care nurse to monitor the patient's neurologic status and provide appropriate interventions.

  9. Pelvic primary staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess.

    PubMed

    Abbas, T O

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal disease can present as an extra-abdominal abscess and can follow several routes, including the greater sciatic foramen, obturator foramen, femoral canal, pelvic outlet, and inguinal canal. Nerves and vessels can also serve as a route out of the abdomen. The psoas muscle extends from the twelfth thoracic and fifth lower lumbar vertebrae to the lesser trochanter of the femur, which means that disease in this muscle group can migrate along the muscle, out of the abdomen, and present as a thigh abscess. We present a case of a primary pelvic staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess. The patient was a 60-year-old man who presented with left posterior thigh pain and fever. Physical examination revealed a diffusely swollen left thigh with overlying erythematous, shiny, and tense skin. X-rays revealed no significant soft tissue lesions, ultrasound was suggestive of an inflammatory process, and MRI showed inflammatory changes along the left hemipelvis and thigh involving the iliacus muscle group, left gluteal region, and obturator internus muscle. The abscess was drained passively via two incisions in the posterior left thigh, releasing large amounts of purulent discharge. Subsequent bacterial culture revealed profuse growth of Staphylococcus aureus. The patient recovered uneventfully except for a moderate fever on the third postoperative day.

  10. Multiple brain abscesses caused by Rhinocladiella mackenziei in an immunocompetent patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yusupov, Natan; Merve, Ashirwad; Warrell, Clare E; Johnson, Elizabeth; Curtis, Carmel; Samandouras, George

    2017-04-01

    Primary cerebral phaeohyphomycosis due to Rhinocladiella mackenziei is an extremely rare infection carrying more than 80% mortality, with most cases reported from the Middle East region. This darkly pigmented black yeast is highly neurotropic, aggressive and refractory to most antifungal agents. Here we present an immunocompetent elderly male, presenting with multiple brain abscesses, with R. mackenziei confirmed by nuclear ribosomal repeat region sequencing, who was successfully treated by surgical debridement and intravenous voriconazole. To our knowledge this is the first case reported from the United Kingdom. We also present a review of all such cases so far reported in the English literature world-wide, which we believe is a step further to understanding the pathogenesis and establishing effective treatment of this rare, yet often fatal disease.

  11. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Mark A.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  12. Nocardia abscessus-related intracranial aneurysm of the internal carotid artery with associated brain abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Farran, Yvette; Antony, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infections primarily begin in the lungs and spread hematogenously to other sites in the body. Thus, a Nocardia brain abscess is not a completely uncommon occurrence. However, a Nocardia brain abscess complicated by a middle cerebral artery and infectious intracranial aneurysm is a very rare clinical entity. We present a case of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with an associated Nocardia brain abscess that required surgical intervention and resection. The patient was an immunocompetent 60-year-old male who presented with a chief complaint of headache and was found to have an infected intracranial aneurysm and cerebral abscess. He underwent drainage of the abscess with subsequent resection of the infected aneurysm. Cultures from both the blood vessel and brain tissue grew Nocardia abscessus. He was successfully treated with 6 weeks of ceftriaxone and high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Infectious intracranial aneurysms of the brain caused by Nocardia are rare occurrences, and only a single previous case has been described in the literature. The outcomes of this condition can be catastrophic if it is not treated with a combination of surgery and intravenous antibiotics. The guidelines for the management of this infection are not well defined at this time. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis and abscess treated by regenerative endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide and MTA: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Mirae; Ahn, Byung Duk

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic techniques have been introduced to overcome the limits of the traditional apexification approach and allow continued root development after treatment of infected immature permanent teeth. The purpose of this report was to describe two cases with severe apical periodontitis and abscess that were successfully treated by regenerative endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide. The report involves treatment of two patients who developed apical periodontitis and abscesses on their immature premolars affected by dens evaginatus. Regenerative endodontic treatment was performed using calcium hydroxide. The treatment procedures have been shown to result in increased thickening of root walls and encourage continued root development. Different outcomes were observed when calcium hydroxide was placed past and within the coronal half of the canal. Calcium hydroxide can be used as an effective medicament in regenerative endodontic technique, and successful regeneration can be expected even in severe cases of apical periodontitis or abscess.

  14. Dermatophyte abscesses caused by Trichophyton rubrum in a patient without pre-existing superficial dermatophytosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Jo, Ik Hyun; Kang, Jun; Joo, Sun Young; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-06-17

    Trichophyton usually causes a superficial skin infection, affecting the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum. In immunocompromised patients, deeper invasion into the dermis and even severe systemic infection with distant organ involvement can occur. Most cases of deeper dermal dermatophytosis described in the literature so far involved pre-existing superficial dermatophytosis. We report a 68-year-old woman presented to our clinic with a 3-month history of palpable nodules on the right ankle without pre-existing superficial dermatophytosis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple, well-demarcated, cystic lesions around the lateral malleolus, located in the subcutaneous or dermal layers. The sizes varied from 0.5 cm to 4 cm in diameter. The patient underwent complete excision of the lesions. Fungal culture yielded Trichophyton rubrum on Sabouraud dextrose agar. Histopathology showed organizing abscesses with degenerated fungal hyphae. After the 12-week oral itraconazole therapy, the lesions were completely resolved. Dermatophytes should be considered as a possible cause of deep soft tissue abscesses in immunocompromised patients, even though there is no superficial dermatophytosis lesion.

  15. Delayed Brain Edema and Swelling following Craniectomy for Evacuation of an Epidural Abscess that Improved by Cranioplasty: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Narushi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sekine, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-07-01

    We report a unique case of delayed brain swelling following craniectomy that improved rapidly after cranioplasty, and discuss the potential mechanism underlying this delayed and reversible brain swelling. A 22-year-old woman developed surgical site infection after removal of a convexity meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural abscess around the surgical site. Subsequently, the abscess was evacuated, and the bone flap was removed. Later, brain edema around the skull defect emerged and progressed gradually, despite resolution of the infection. The edematous brain developed focal swelling outward through the bone defect without ventricle dilatation. Because we suspected that the edema and swelling were caused by the state of the bone defect, we performed a cranioplasty 10 weeks after the bone flap removal, and brain edema improved rapidly. We hypothesized that the brain edema was initially caused by surgical stress and inflammation, followed by compression of cortical veins between the dural edge and brain tissue, leading to disruption of venous return and exacerbation of brain edema. When delayed focal brain edema and external swelling progress gradually after bone flap removal, after excluding other pathological conditions, cranioplasty should be considered to improve cortical venous congestion caused by postsurgical adhesion.

  16. Acute iliopsoas and adductor brevis abscesses presenting with proximal leg muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Devetag Chalaupka, F

    2006-06-01

    Pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of skeletal muscle. We describe the clinical case of a 77-year-old woman affected by gait disturbance, repetitive falls, low back pain and left thigh and groin pain, but without symptoms of systemic infection. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis showed abscesses in the left psoas and adductor brevis muscles. Investigations of urogenital tract and gastrointestinal system were normal. Systemic antibiotic treatment alone was not efficient, while surgical drainage improved the clinical picture. The aetiological organism, isolated from the abscess, was Staphylococcus aureus. We suggest that this patient had a primary pyomyositis rather than a secondary form. This is the first report of concomitant abscesses of psoas and adductor brevis muscles with early neurological involvement.

  17. [Iris abscess after bacterial endocarditis in a patient with leukaemia. Differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Manrique Lipa, R; González Sánchez, E; Asencio Duran, M; Gonzalez-Peramato, P; Fonseca Santodomingo, A

    2014-04-01

    To report a case of iris abscess due to bacterial endocarditis. A 46-year-old male under diagnosis of promielocitic leukemia and endocarditis presented with decreased vision in left eye (OS). Ophthalmic exploration revealed iris abscess and hypopyon with fibrinous exudate in iris of the left eye and tyndall +1 in right eye (OD). Blood culture and anterior chamber paracentesis was positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and negative for blastic cells in citology. Treatment with systemic antibiotic was initiated with total resolution of inflammation. Iris abscess is an unusual septic focus in bacterial endocarditis. It is crucial to rule out an extramedullary metastasis in a patient with leukemia due to the general prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Nieto-Guevara, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a serious and life-threatening disease among children despite advances in diagnosis and management. Changes in the epidemiology of predisposing conditions for brain abscess are associated with changes in the patient population and causative organisms. Though still a potentially fatal infection, there have been recent improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Although mortality appears to be decreasing, a significant percentage of children continue to have residual neurological deficits, including epilepsy, permanent motor or sensory dysfunction, visual field defects, and personality change. Some children also require placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The most common origin of microbial infection in children remains direct or indirect cranial infection arising from the middle ear, paranasal sinuses, or teeth. No prospective clinical trials have compared the various surgical and medical treatment strategies available to guide the management of cerebral abscesses in children. Most surgical and medical treatment guidelines are based on populations consisting primarily of adult patients. The use of corticosteroids for treatment of brain abscess is controversial. Anticonvulsants are recommended in children who have developed seizures potentially to prevent further episodes. Duration of anticonvulsant therapy should be individualized and guided by electroencephalographic (EEG) study in the follow-up phase of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral abscessed orchiepididymitis associated with sepsis caused by Veillonella parvula and Clostridium perfringens: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Arrosagaray, P M; Salas, C; Morales, M; Correas, M; Barros, J M; Cordon, M L

    1987-01-01

    Veillonella species is a gram-negative coccus which is part of the anaerobic normal flora in the oral cavity, small intestine, upper respiratory tract, vagina, and urinary tract. The role that this organism plays in infection is not well known, and it is generally associated with other bacteria. We present a case of bilateral abscessed orchiepididymitis associated with septicemia due to Veillonella parvula and, later, to Clostridium perfringens, with the development of severe renal insufficiency and septic shock, which resolved favorably with antibiotic therapy, treatment of shock, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In reviewing the literature, we have not found any other case of sepsis due to Veillonella sp. associated with urological disorders. PMID:2887584

  20. [Psoas abscess as a chicken pox complication].

    PubMed

    Larcamon, Jorge E; Juanco, Gabriela; Alvarez, Lionel A; Pebe, Florián V

    2010-06-01

    Chicken pox is the most frequent exantematic illness; usually its course is self-limited and benign. Several bacterial complications are described due to the disruption of the skin as a defensive barrier because of the characteristics of the injuries and the associated inmunodepression. Psoas abscess is a rare illness and it's difficult to diagnose, with a general unspecified clinical presentation. We present the case of a 5-year-old girl, on her fifth day of chicken pox, who consults about a febrile convulsion, from which she recovers without any neurological symptoms, referring to functional impotence of her inferior left limb and pain in the lumbar and gluteal zone, which irradiates to the homolateral hip, making deambulation impossible. The definitive diagnosis was made with a CAT at hospital admission. The germ isolated was community-acquired methricillin-resistant Staphilococcus aureus. Treatment consisted in surgical drainage and endovenous antibiotics.

  1. Holospinal epidural abscess of the spinal axis: two illustrative cases with review of treatment strategies and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel A; Kochar, Arshneel S; Manjila, Sunil; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Geertman, Robert T; Anderson, James S; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of spinal infections, the subcategory of holospinal epidural abscesses (HEAs) is extremely infrequent and requires unique management. Panspinal imaging (preferably MRI), modern aggressive antibiotic therapy, and prompt surgical intervention remain the standard of care for all spinal axis infections including HEAs; however, the surgical decision making on timing and extent of the procedure still remain ill defined for HEAs. Decompression including skip laminectomies or laminoplasties is described, with varied clinical outcomes. In this review the authors present the illustrative cases of 2 patients with HEAs who were treated using skip laminectomies and epidural catheter irrigation techniques. The discussion highlights different management strategies including the role of conservative (nonsurgical) management in these lesions, especially with an already identified pathogen and the absence of mass effect on MRI or significant neurological defects. Among fewer than 25 case reports of HEA published in the past 25 years, the most important aspect in deciding a role for surgery is the neurological examination. Nearly 20% were treated successfully with medical therapy alone if neurologically intact. None of the reported cases had an associated cranial infection with HEA, because the dural adhesion around the foramen magnum prevented rostral spread of infection. Traditionally a posterior approach to the epidural space with irrigation is performed, unless an extensive focal ventral collection is causing cord compression. Surgical intervention for HEA should be an adjuvant treatment strategy for all acutely deteriorating patients, whereas aspiration of other infected sites like a psoas abscess can determine an infective pathogen, and appropriate antibiotic treatment may avoid surgical intervention in the neurologically intact patient.

  2. Isolated subacute tuberculous spinal epidural abscess of the cervical spine: a brief report of a special case.

    PubMed

    Alg, Varinder S; Demetriades, Andreas K; Naik, Sunil; Gunasekera, Lal

    2009-06-01

    A tuberculous spinal epidural abscess is seen rarely as a late complication of Pott's disease or in immunocompromised patients. Such abscesses in isolation are rare indeed and very uncommon in the developed and developing world. We report a patient with an isolated subacute tuberculous spinal epidural abscess without disc or vertebral involvement and no primary focus or risk factors associated with the development of spinal tuberculosis.

  3. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. Case presentation A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Conclusions Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected joints are negative. Clinical

  4. Disseminated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Staphylococcus aureus infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Karli, Arzu; Yanik, Keramettin; Paksu, Muhammet S; Sensoy, Gulnar; Aykanat, Alper; Yener, Nazik; Belet, Nursen; Ceyhan, Meltem

    2016-04-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an exotoxin that is produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and an important virulence factor. A PVL-positive S. aureus infection leads to rapid and severe infections of soft tissue and necrotizing pneumonia in healthy adolescents, and has a high mortality. This case report included a 12-year-old male patient who admitted for fever, respiratory distress and hip pain and was identified with necrotizing pneumonia with septic pulmonary embolism, psoas abscess, cellulitis and osteomyelitis. The PVL positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in the patient blood culture.

  5. Nerve abscess in Hansen's disease as part of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, Neema M; Nayak, Kashinath; Kumar, Pramod

    2017-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is an inflammatory reaction in HIV-infected patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy resulting from restored immunity to specific infectious or non-infectious antigens. A 36-year-old male patient on highly active antiretroviral therapy of six months duration, presented with reddish, tender lesions over medial aspect of arm and a single, anaesthetic patch. Tender fluctuant swellings were seen on the medial aspect of left forearm. A few of them had ruptured spontaneously discharging pus. A skin biopsy from the anaesthetic patch showed caseating epitheloid granulomas. A diagnosis of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid in type 1 reversal reaction, with formation of nerve abscess due to Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome was made. The patient was started on multibacillary multidrug therapy as per WHO guidelines and highly active antiretroviral therapy was continued.

  6. [A case of huge abscess extended from anterior neck to left lung and lateral chest wall].

    PubMed

    Ikeya, T; Tsuda, M; Hara, H; Koyama, S; Sugiyama, S; Misaki, T

    1997-11-01

    62-year-old woman admitted our hospital with pain of left upper extremity from the left chest and dysphasia. Chest X-ray showed the huge mass shadow in the left lung field. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory reaction such as high fervor, leukocytosis, CRP and ESR accentuation were recognized. Conservative therapy was done at first, but mass shadow on X-ray increased, and swelling appeared from the neck to the left lateral chest wall. And the same site appeared like subcutaneous emphysema. Computed Tomography showed mass shadow which was enlarged and spread in lung parenchyma and left chest wall with bubble image. Incision and open drainage was performed for the left chest wall but origin bacteria was detected in neither anaerobic nor aerobic culture of pus. Inflammation and mass shadow of left upper lung field have decreased gradually. The patient discharged without bronchoalveolar fistula. Abscess extending from the neck or chest wall with diabetes mellitus is very rare.

  7. Blastomycosis presenting as multiple splenic abscesses: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al-Nassar, Sami; Macnair, Tracy; Lipschitz, Jeremy; Greenberg, Howard; Trepman, Elly; Hamza, Sate; Embil, John M

    2010-01-01

    A 31-year-old Canadian Aboriginal man from northwestern Ontario presented with left upper quadrant pain and a tender left upper quadrant mass. Evaluation with a computed tomography scan showed multiple lesions within the spleen, a collection between the splenic tip and splenic flexure of the colon, and several small adrenal lesions. Computed tomographic-guided needle biopsy showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and multinucleated giant cells. Gomori's methenamine silver stain showed broad-based budding yeast consistent with Blastomyces dermatitidis. Abdominal symptoms resolved after two months of oral itraconazole. Multiple splenic abscesses are a rare presentation of blastomycosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of left upper quadrant abdominal pain in a patient with a history of travel or residence in a region endemic for B dermatitidis.

  8. [A case of generalized disseminated atypical mycobacteriosis caused by M. avium complex with a giant gravitation abscess].

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, H; Torii, Y; Senda, Y; Totani, Y; Suzuki, M; Ooshika, H; Wakayama, H; Ito, Y; Noguchi, M

    1994-02-01

    A case of generalized disseminated atypical mycobacteriosis caused by M. avium complex (MAC) was reported. The case was a female of 52 years of age. She was admitted to our hospital due to high fever and polyarthralgia. Her chest X-ray and CT scan revealed infiltrative shadows in the right S2b and S4 segments, and multiple accumulation shadows were seen on osteoscintigraphy. Pus aspirated from a lesion of the right fifth rib were acid-fast bacilli positive by smear (Gaffky v). The administration of four drugs, INH, RFP, EB and SM, was introduced, then corticosteroid was added, and the case became afebrile. Later, acid-fast bacilli were also isolated from bronchial washing and aspirated specimen from bone marrow, and all of them were identified as MAC. Based on these findings, the case was diagnosed as generalized disseminated mycobacteriosis. After several months remission, tenderness over the fifth lumbar vertebra deteriorated, and MRI scan on lumbar vertebrae showed high-intensity area both on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. MAC was isolated from the pus of the fifth lumbar vertebra. Lumbar lesions deteriorated gradually, and a giant gravitation abscess which involved right ilium was revealed by CT scan of the pelvis. In spite of vigorous treatment including chemotherapy, aspiration of pus and drainage, general condition of the case deteriorated, and the case finally died of renal insufficiency.

  9. Pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Al Salman, Jameela Mohammed; Al Agha, Rawan Al Muataz Billa; Helmy, Mohamed

    2017-06-08

    Pituitary abscess is an uncommon pituitary lesion. Its clinical diagnosis can be difficult to distinguish from other pituitary lesions. This pathology is characterised by vague symptoms of headaches, generalised tiredness and hypopituitarism manifestations. A history of recent meningitis, paranasal sinusitis or head surgery can be a suggestive of the source of infection.A 20-year-old man was admitted to neurosurgery department with complain of headache, fatigue, polyuria, polydipsia, blurred vision and sexual dysfunction. MRI of the head revealed a suprasellar mass that was centrally hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images with peripheral hypointensity and isointense centrally on T1 images with peripheral hyperintensity images. Treatment of this lesion pituitary abscess was surgical drainage of the pituitary area through a trans-sphenoidal approach and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, metronidazole and vancomycin for 6 weeks. The patient continues to have pituitary insufficiency and treated with oral hydrocortisone.Although pituitary abscess is a rare condition, it should always be kept in mind when evaluating a patient with hypopituitarism. After the diagnosis, the surgery and antibiotics should be commenced rapidly. The outcome is usually good with proper treatment. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  11. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, Pasquale; Corpolongo, Angela; Conte, Aristide; Gentilotti, Elisa; Narciso, Pasquale

    2012-01-10

    Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected joints are negative. Clinical outcomes of prosthetic joint infection by

  12. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many possible causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis as a Complication of Toxocariasis-Associated Endomyocarditis With Fibrosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzli, Esther; Labhardt, Niklaus; Balestra, Gianmarco; Weisser, Maja; Zellweger, Michael J.; Blum, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with Toxocara canis infection are rare. We present a case of a patient with Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis as a complication of an endomyocardial fibrosis caused by T canis. The epidemiological, pathological, and clinical features of this rare complication are described here. PMID:27800525

  14. Staphylococcus aureus aortitis and retroperitoneal fibrosis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yague, Marta; Temprano, Ignacio; Losa, Juan; De Benito, Luis; De La Cruz, Raul; Cheyne, Natalie; Henriquez, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    An infected aortic aneurysm is a process with high mortality rate. Survival is dependent on an early diagnosis and surgical management. This case report details a rare presentation of aortitis with persistent methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia, which initially presented as retroperitoneal fibrosis and was ultimately fatal.

  15. Grover's disease secondarily infected with herpes simplex virus and Staphylococcus aureus: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Penelope Am; Stanford, Duncan G

    2013-11-01

    The case of a 73-year old man with herpes simplex and staphylococcus aureus infection complicating established Grover's disease is presented. This was treated successfully with valaciclovir. While reports of bacterial and herpetic infections complicating other acantholytic diseases, such as Darier's disease, have been published previously, only one publication to date shows herpes simplex infection in Grover's disease.

  16. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess: A population-based, nested, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Han-Wei; Huang, Jing-Yang; Teng, Ying-Hock

    2017-01-01

    Bacteremic pneumonia is considered a potential cause of distal organ abscess formation. Therefore, we hypothesize that pneumonia is a risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess (PLA).The aim of this study is to explore the association between pneumonia and PLA. A nationwide, population-based, nested, case-control study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In total, 494 patients with PLA and 1,976 propensity score matched controls were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) in patients with exposure to pneumonia before PLA. After matched and adjusted for confounding factors including age, sex, urbanization, income, chronic liver disease, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, and cancer, hospitalization for pneumonia remained an independent risk factor for PLA with an aORs of 2.104 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.309-3.379, p = 0.0021]. Moreover, the aORs were significantly higher among patients hospitalized for pneumonia within 30 days (aORs = 10.73, 95% CI = 3.381-34.054), 30-90 days (aORs = 4.698, 95% CI = 1.541-14.327) and 90-180 (aORs = 4.000, 95% CI = 1.158-13.817) days before PLA diagnosis. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for subsequent PLA. Moreover, hospitalization for pneumonia within 180 days before PLA diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of PLA.

  17. Idiopathic pontine Streptococcus salivarius abscess in an immunocompetent patient: management lessons through case illustration and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mandapat, Aimee Luna; Eddleman, Christopher S; Bissonnette, Mei Lin; Batjer, H Hunt; Zembower, Teresa R

    2011-12-01

    A 55-y-old woman with no previous medical history presented with a 3-day history of progressive headache, nausea, emesis, right-sided facial numbness, and right-sided extremity weakness. Serial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid enlargement of a left-sided ring-enhancing dorsal pontine lesion with an exophytic portion, raising concern for an abscess. A stereotactically guided left-sided retrosigmoid craniotomy for abscess incision and decompression was performed given the rapid progression of her neurological deficits. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the intra-operative samples. After an extensive evaluation, no source for the S. salivarius was identified. Solitary brainstem abscesses are uncommon intracranial infections with high morbidity and mortality. Patients can present with non-specific symptoms and often have no previous medical history. Since 1974, 40 patients with solitary brainstem abscess have survived to hospital discharge. We outline management strategies for solitary brainstem abscess based on a literature review of survivors.

  18. Appendicular Sinus as a Cause of Chronic Psoas Abscess in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Abbas; Khan, Yahya; Popoola, Joyce

    2016-08-01

    A psoas abscess is a condition with vague symptomatology that is associated with potentially life-threatening suppurative myositis of the iliopsoas muscular compartment. Immunocompromised pa-tients run an increased risk of developing suppurative or chronic abscesses from acute foci. The presence of a solid-organ transplant, and the attendant need for immunosuppressant therapies and impaired renal provide additional factors that could contribute to the comorbidities of this condition. Here, we present a 61-year-old white man with a functioning renal transplant who developed a chronic psoas abscess associated with an appendicular sinus that required serial computed tomographic-guided drainages during 8 years. We highlight the difficulties and limitations of managing a psoas abscess. We conclude that a conservative approach toward managing a chronic psoas abscess may be associated with good long-term patient and graft functions, with minimal risk to the patient.

  19. A case of epididymitis associated with Panton-Valentine leukocidin Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Malini; Chew, Pei Ru

    2012-08-01

    A new pattern of disease caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus is emerging in the UK and worldwide. Community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is more likely to produce PVL, a pore-forming cytotoxin inducing leucocyte lysis, which often infects young healthy individuals. The worldwide emergence and continually increasing prevalence of community-acquired PVL-MRSA have recently attracted high-profile media attention and prompted concern regarding the transmissibility and virulence. This paper reports a case of genitourinary tract infection associated with PVL-positive community-associated MRSA in an immunocompetent young man.

  20. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection that is also called ...

  1. Case report: Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of typical 'bull's eye' sign of hepatic abscess caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in a tumor patient.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Zheng, Qi-Chao

    2016-03-01

    The present case report details a unique case of a 51-year-old male patient who underwent a radical operation for carcinoma of the stomach and pancreaticoduodenectomy. Conventional ultrasonography examination exhibited a characteristic 'bull's eye' sign in the liver; whereas real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) demonstrated the patient was suffering from a hepatic abscess, corroborated by cytologic examination, which confirmed the presence of Acinetobacter baumannii. The hepatic localization of A. baumannii is rare in tumor patients presenting with a typical 'bull's eye' sign; and such a case could easily be misdiagnosed as hepatic metastasis. The findings presented in this case report demonstrate that real-time CEUS may offer important diagnostic elements, albeit not specific, which should, together with a positive cytologic test, confirm the diagnosis of a hepatic abscess.

  2. Successful medical treatment of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo-Ren; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2008-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal disease. A 67-year-old female suffered fever and painful swelling of the right knee and lower leg for one week. Both synovial fluid and blood cultures yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Low back pain developed and fever was sustained despite the administration of intravenous oxacillin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed spinal epidural abscess from T12 to S1. Because of severe hypoalbuminemia and general anasarca and followed by exploratory laparotomy for massive duodenal bleeding, she did not receive surgical intervention for the spinal epidural abscess. After intravenous administration of oxacillin 2 g 4-hourly for 12 weeks, she recovered and follow-up MRI confirmed the efficacy of the medical treatment. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. In a patient with minimal neurological deficit or surgical contraindication, spinal epidural abscess can be successfully treated with a medical regimen.

  3. Sepsis complicated by brain abscess following ESWL of a caliceal kidney stone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Capitanini, Alessandro; Rosso, Luca; Giannecchini, Laura; Meniconi, Ophelia; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 47-year old, Caucasian man underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of a 14mm calcium stone in the right renal pelvis, without urinary tract obstruction or sepsis. 24 hours after ESWL septic shock occurred and the patient was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Escherichia coli emerged from the blood and urine culture. The patient developed acute renal failure and it was necessary to start a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Infection was successfully treated, patient recovered renal function and an improvement of general condition occurred. The patient was then discharged but three day later the patient returned to the hospital to seek treatment for left facial hemiparesis and hypotonia of his left arm. The brain computed tomography showed a wide abscess (55×75mm) in the frontal right parietal region. A neurosurgical intervention was then performed and the culture of the drained material resulted positive for Escherichia coli. The guidelines of European and American Associations of Urology do not suggest a prophylactic antibiotic therapy for pre-ESWL (except in the presence of risk factors). The serious complication that occurred in the described low risk patient raises the question of whether routine culture and/or antibiotic prophylaxis, is appropriate. PMID:27583356

  4. Pituitary abscess after autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leff, R S; Martino, R L; Pollock, W J; Knight, W A

    1989-05-01

    The first case of pituitary abscess arising in a patient during recovery from autologous bone marrow transplantation is reported. A 31-year-old man with a 9 month history of T-cell lymphoma died suddenly more than 60 days after successful treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and autologous bone marrow infusion. Autopsy revealed a pituitary abscess associated with clinically silent sphenoid sinusitis. Unique aspects of this case are presented and clinical and pathologic features of pituitary abscess are reviewed. Although rare, pituitary abscess may complicate recovery from bone marrow transplantation.

  5. [Prostatic abscess: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Menéndez, V; Luque, M P; Ribal, M J; Mallafre, J M; Alcover, J; Vilana, R; Carretero, P

    1996-02-01

    Prostatic abscesses are an infrequent pathology, probably due to a better and early management of prostatic infections. Predisposing factors in this pathology are diabetes mellitus, urethral catheterism or manipulation, and immunodepressed states like AIDS. Nowadays, ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic method of this pathology, and serves as a guidance of directed drainage. We present five cases in which the size of the abscess was determining in relation to the therapeutic attitude. Abscesses of less than 2 cm, measured by transrectal ultrasonography, can be evacuated by directed puncture, followed by antibiotic treatment. When the diameter of the abscess is greater than 2 cm, we realize a perineal drainage with a catheter placed with transrectal ultrasonography. Currently, TUR and other methods seems to be overcome.

  6. Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Kim, Paul E; Attenello, Frank J

    2017-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rarely encountered in modern neurosurgical practice. Select patients are at high risk for developing an intramedullary spinal cord abscess, which can result in acute neurologic deficits. Patients with failed conservative management may benefit from early surgical intervention; however, the evidence is limited by level 3 studies. In this case presentation, the patient failed conservative management for a cervical intramedullary spinal cord abscess and developed acute neurologic deficits. The decision was made to perform an urgent cervical laminectomy and drainage to avoid any further decline that may have occurred with continued conservative management. Increased awareness of intramedullary spinal cord abscess is warranted for its clinical suspicion and emergent treatment in select circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary tubercular abscess of the breast--an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Singal, R P; Gupta, A; Singal, S; Shahi, S R; Singal, R

    2012-02-22

    Primary breast tuberculosis manifested as abscess is a rare entity. We are reporting a case of primary breast tuberculosis, which presented as breast abscess. Abscess was drained and tissue sent for histopathology. To our surprise, diagnosis came as breast tuberculosis. Aspiration cytology was not done, as it is not a routine test for abscess cases. Patient was put on anti- tubercular drugs. In the follow-up of 6 months, she was asymptomatic and advised to continue medicine.

  8. Vesicoovarian Fistula on an Endometriosis Abscessed Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Tran, C.; Even, M.; Carbonnel, M.; Preaux, F.; Isnard, F.; Rault, A.; Rouanne, M.; Ayoubi, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed a vesicoovarian fistula on an endometriosis abscessed cyst. The patient presented with an advanced endometriosis stage IV complicated with a right ovarian abscessed cyst of 10 cm. A first coelioscopy with cystectomy was realized. After surgery, a voiding cystography highlighted a fistula between the ovarian abscess and the bladder. A second surgery by median laparotomy was realized with the resection of the right ovarian abscess and the resection of vesical fistula. PMID:25152819

  9. [Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: A multicenter matched case-control study].

    PubMed

    Arias-Ortiz, Paola Mariana; Calderón, Libia Del Pilar; Castillo, Juan Sebastián; Moreno, José; Leal, Aura Lucía; Cortés, Jorge Alberto; Álvarez, Carlos Arturo; Grebo, Grupo

    2016-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent pathogen at critical care services. Its presence leads to increased hospital stays and mortality risk in patients with bacteremia. However, the etiology of this resistance marker has not been fully studied. To identify risk factors associated with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia in critically ill patients treated at intensive care units in Bogotá, Colombia. We conducted a retrospective paired case-control study, nested in a cohort of patients diagnosed with S. aureus bacteremia and treated at intensive care units between 2006 and 2008 in Bogotá. Cases were patients with positive blood culture to methicillin resistance, matched in a 1:1 ratio with methicillin-sensitive controls isolated from the same institution and hospitalization year. We used conditional logistic regression to analyze the risk factors associated with the presence of resistance, with emphasis on prior antibiotic therapy. We included 372 patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Factors such as the use of pre-hospital devices: vascular (OR=1.986, 95% CI 1.038 to 3.801) and urinary (OR=2.559, 95% CI: 1.170 to 5.596), along with the number of previously used antibiotics, were associated with the emergence of resistance. The number of antibiotics used previously was determined to have a gradient effect, particularly carbapenems. The rational use of antibiotics and surveillance of exposure to surgical procedures or use of invasive devices are interventions that could diminish the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia causes.

  10. Prostatic abscess of Klebsiella pneumonia complicating septic pulmonary emboli and meningitis: A case report and brief review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jai-Wen; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Chang, Yao-Tien; Tsai, Che-An; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Prostatic abscess is a rare entity with an incidence of 0.5%-2.5% in all prostate diseases and usually occurs in the 5th and 6th decades of life with immunocompromised status. Prostatic abscess might be a process of evolution from acute prostatitis. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the leading microorganism in the diabetic patients of prostatic abscess in Taiwan. A 60-year-old diabetic man, with a one-week history of acute bacterial prostatitis was reported in this study, presenting to the emergency department with sudden altered mental status. The abdominal computed tomographic scan demonstrated lobulated prostatic abscess and multiple septic pulmonary emboli with lung abscesses. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid showed white blood cells of 10771 counts/mm(3) with segmented neutrophils of 99%. Cultures of blood, cerebrospinal fluid and sputum yielded Klebsiella pneumoniae. We concluded that computed tomographic scan can make a definite diagnosis of prostatic abscess associated with complications and management with empiric antibiotics and adequate drainage is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pyogenic brain abscess, a 15 year survey.

    PubMed

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Astradsson, Arnar; Richhall, Humeira; Erdal, Jesper; Laursen, Alex; Brennum, Jannick

    2012-11-30

    Brain abscess is a potentially fatal disease. This study assesses clinical aspects of brain abscess in a large hospital cohort. Retrospective review of adult patients with pyogenic brain abscess at Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2009. Prognostic factors associated with Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) (death, severe disability or vegetative state) were assessed by logistic regression. 102 patients were included. On admission, only 20% of patients had a triad of fever, headache and nausea, 39% had no fever, 26% had normal CRP and 49% had no leucocytosis. Median delay from symptom onset to antibiotic treatment was 7 days (range 0-97 days). Source of infection was contiguous in 36%, haematogenous in 28%, surgical or traumatic in 9% and unknown in 27% of cases. Abscess location did not accurately predict the portal of entry. 67% were treated by burr hole aspiration, 20% by craniotomy and 13% by antibiotics alone. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 62 days. No cases of recurrent abscess were observed. At discharge 23% had GOS ≤3. The 1-, 3- and 12-month mortality was 11%, 17% and 19%. Adverse outcome was associated with a low GCS at admission, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of abscess. The clinical signs of brain abscess are unspecific, many patients presented without clear signs of infection and diagnosis and treatment were often delayed. Decreased GCS, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of brain abscess were associated with poor outcome. Brain abscess remains associated with considerable morbidity and mortality.

  12. Pyogenic brain abscess, a 15 year survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain abscess is a potentially fatal disease. This study assesses clinical aspects of brain abscess in a large hospital cohort. Methods Retrospective review of adult patients with pyogenic brain abscess at Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2009. Prognostic factors associated with Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) (death, severe disability or vegetative state) were assessed by logistic regression. Results 102 patients were included. On admission, only 20% of patients had a triad of fever, headache and nausea, 39% had no fever, 26% had normal CRP and 49% had no leucocytosis. Median delay from symptom onset to antibiotic treatment was 7 days (range 0–97 days). Source of infection was contiguous in 36%, haematogenous in 28%, surgical or traumatic in 9% and unknown in 27% of cases. Abscess location did not accurately predict the portal of entry. 67% were treated by burr hole aspiration, 20% by craniotomy and 13% by antibiotics alone. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 62 days. No cases of recurrent abscess were observed. At discharge 23% had GOS ≤3. The 1-, 3- and 12-month mortality was 11%, 17% and 19%. Adverse outcome was associated with a low GCS at admission, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of abscess. Conclusions The clinical signs of brain abscess are unspecific, many patients presented without clear signs of infection and diagnosis and treatment were often delayed. Decreased GCS, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of brain abscess were associated with poor outcome. Brain abscess remains associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. PMID:23193986

  13. An emboligenic pulmonary abscess leading to ischemic stroke and secondary brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke by septic embolism occurs primarily in the context of infective endocarditis or in patients with a right-to-left shunt and formation of a secondary cerebral abscess is a rare event. Erosion of pulmonary veins by a pulmonary abscess can lead to transcardiac septic embolism but to our knowledge no case of septic embolic ischemic stroke from a pulmonary abscess with secondary transformation into a brain abscess has been reported to date. Case presentation We report the case of a patient with a pulmonary abscess causing a septic embolic cerebral infarction which then transformed into a cerebral abscess. After antibiotic therapy and drainage of the abscess the patient could be rehabilitated and presented an impressive improvement of symptoms. Conclusion Septic embolism should be considered as cause of ischemic stroke in patients with pulmonary abscess and can be followed by formation of a secondary cerebral abscess. Early antibiotic treatment and repeated cranial CT-scans for detection of a secondary abscess should be performed. PMID:23121862

  14. [Prognostic study of liver abscess].

    PubMed

    Nouira, Ramzi; Bedoui, Riadh; Miaadi, Naoufel; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Hani, Mohamed; Daghfous, Mounir; Ben Osman, Samia; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study factors of prognostic of mortality of abscesses of the liver. We have treated between 1990 and 2000 in our service, 38 patient for abscess of the liver. The symptoms are dominated by the pain of the right hypochondria (37 cases) and the fever (34 cases). An unique abscess has been recovered in 25 cases. Some multiple localizations have been observed in 12 cases. 21 patients have been operated. The bacteriological study at all patients revealed the presence of germ in 27 cases. In 6 cases, there were two germs. It was a bacillus negative gram in 26 cases and a cocci positive gram in 7 cases. Six complications have been observed at the operated patients. In 5 cases, it was a septic shock having leads to the death. After survey univariate and multivariate the only factor of bad prognostic recovered is the septic shock. The aetiology was identified in only 9 cases; it was abscess cholangiotis.

  15. A case of cardiac tamponade due to an isolated abscess in the ascending aorta of a pregnant woman with a history of intravenous substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Shattuck, Brandy; Livingstone, John

    2017-06-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old white female, 10-12 weeks pregnant, with a history of intravenous drug use and a recently diagnosed pneumonia, who was found deceased in her bed after a night of sleep. Although postmortem serum toxicology tested positive for alprazolam, tetrahydrocannabinol, and morphine, the ultimate cause of death was determined to be cardiac tamponade secondary to an isolated abscess in the ascending aorta. The patient had several risk factors for aortic rupture and cardiac tamponade including intravenous drug use, pneumonia, and pregnancy. However, an autopsy of the patient showed an isolated abscess of the ascending aorta without evidence of infective endocarditis, coronary artery rupture, aortic aneurysm, or aortic dissection making this an unusual case of cardiac tamponade. The aim of this case report is to encourage providers to obtain a tissue culture of any aortic abscesses so that the organisms involved can be identified. The identification of such organisms may help guide antimicrobial treatment in similar presentations in the future.

  16. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vertebral Osteomyelitis Following Epidural Catheterization: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Renjitkumar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indwelling epidural catheters are frequently used to manage postoperative pain. This report describes a patient who developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) vertebral osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine following epidural catheterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MRSA vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to epidural catheter use in the English orthopedic literature. The patient and his family consented to publishing the data. PMID:24353973

  18. [Amoebic liver abscess: echographic aspects].

    PubMed

    Niang, H E; Ka, M M; Badiane, M; Ba, A; Konde, L; Lamouche, P

    1994-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is the most frequent location of the extra-intestine amibiasis with an epidemio-endemic repartition in our areas. We are reporting in this study the main echographic patterns that can be found. 117 documents were collected and studied between 1982 and 1988 in the main hospitals of Dakar (SENEGAL). Most of the patients were young, the range of age being between 25 and 55 years old and 83% of them, were male. The diagnosis of the amoebic liver abscess was evocated on the basis of the following clinical and biological symptoms: 54.38% of painful haetomegaly, 42.10% of pleuro-pulmonary and digestive signs, 3.50% of long lasting isolated fever, non specific biological sign of inflammation, 74.57% of positive hemaglutination test. An echographic test was performed before the anti-parasitic treatment with an echotomograph PHILIPS SDR 1500 in real time using a probe of 3 MHZ. The amoebic abscess of liver was detected by the echography in all cases. The unique abscess (83.10%) was the most frequent form. It was localized in the right liver (64%) and had an heterogeneous echostructure (55.70%). The hypo-echogeneous form (36.50%) was the earlier stage of the collecting abscess. The liquid form (07.80%) was observed in the latter stages of the disease. Some difficulties to determine the amoebic abscess may appear when primitive liver cancer or pyogensus abscess are present. In these cases it is necessary to analyse the liquid of ponction to be affirmative.

  19. Psoas abscess in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Courtney M; Salhab, Mohammed; Schmidhofer, Sarah; Pop-Vicas, Aurora

    2014-08-01

    We present a case of iliopsoas abscess in an immunocompetent patient. She experienced three weeks of worsening right hip pain, which was initially misdiagnosed as degenerative joint disease. This led to admission to the Intensive Care Unit for severe sepsis. The patient improved with intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous abscess drainage.

  20. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  1. Unusual complication of dental extraction: lingual abscess.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Lalee; Agarwal, Pratibha; Rupa, Vedantam

    2013-01-01

    Acute lingual swelling is a potentially life threatening clinical condition which is encountered very rarely, the differential diagnosis of which includes hemorrhage, infarction, abscess, tumor and edema. Herein we report a case of lingual abscess that presented with acute tongue swelling and respiratory distress after extraction of lower two incisor teeth.

  2. Liver Abscess: Increasing Occurrence in Premature Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Bosnalı, Oktav; Moralıoğlu, Serdar; Pektaş, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal liver abscess is a very rare condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. There seems to be an increasing trend of this rare condition amongst the newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care units. We report a case of liver abscess in a premature newborn and briefly review the literature and discuss its management. PMID:26023443

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Central Nervous System Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Jesus G; Cain, Alexandra N; Mason, Edward O; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Hultén, Kristina G

    2017-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are uncommon in pediatric patients. We review the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment in 68 patients with a S. aureus CNS infection evaluated at Texas Children's Hospital. Cases of CNS infection in children with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures or spinal epidural abscess (SEA) for S. aureus at Texas Children's Hospital from 2001 to 2013 were reviewed. Seventy cases of S. aureus CNS infection occurred in 68 patients. Forty-nine cases (70%) were secondary to a CNS device, 5 (7.1%) were postoperative meningitis, 9 (12.8%) were hematogenous meningitis and 7 (10%) were SEAs. Forty-seven (67.2%) were caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 23 (32.8%) by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Community-acquired infections were more often caused by MRSA that was clone USA300/pvl. Most patients were treated with nafcillin (MSSA) or vancomycin (MRSA) with or without rifampin. Among patients with MRSA infection, 50% had a serum vancomycin trough obtained with the median level being 10.6 μg/mL (range: 5.4-15.7 μg/mL). Only 1 death was associated with S. aureus infection. The epidemiology of invasive of S. aureus infections continues to evolve with MSSA accounting for most of the infections in this series. The majority of cases were associated with neurosurgical procedures; however, hematogenous S. aureus meningitis and SEA occurred as community-acquired infections in patients without predisposing factors. Patients with MRSA CNS infections had a favorable response to vancomycin, but the beneficial effect of combination therapy or targeting vancomycin trough concentrations of 15-20 μg/mL remains unclear.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus with Panton-Valentine toxin skin infection in a medical laboratory technician.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Richard; Pougnet, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    This report exposes the case of a Staphylococcus aureus infection occurring in a microbiology laboratory technician. He was a 52 year-old man without medical history. He presented an abscess on the anterior aspect of the left forearm. Analysis showed that it was a Staphylococcus aureus secreting the Panton-Valentine toxin. The study of the workplace found the frequency of exposure. The study of workstation showed the link between the technician position and the infection. Indeed, this man touched an area where the biocleaning was hard to do. This is the first case of infection with PVL described for a laboratory technician.

  5. [Psoas abscess. Etiology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Tonus, C; Kasparek, S; Nier, H

    2002-10-01

    Psoas abscess is in general a syndrome with low incidence. In the following, two cases are presented which describe the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of primary and secondary retroperitoneal manifestations. The article mainly focuses on the different respective surgical procedures. Because of its rareness, an overview of further cases discussed in the literature is provided.

  6. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia–A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated. PMID:24987612

  7. A Rare Association of Pentalogy of Fallot with Situs Inversus Totalis Complicated by Brain Abscess in an Adolescent–Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwalla, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most frequently diagnosed congenital cyanotic heart disease. It is often associated with additional findings, such as atrial septal defect (i.e., pentalogy of Fallot) or right sided aortic arch. Association of this pentalogy of Fallot with situs inversus totalis is rarely reported in paediatric literature and it can cause technical challenges to intracardiac repair. We report the case of pentalogy of Fallot with dextrocardia and situs inversus presenting as parieto-occipital abscess in a 12-year-old child. Complicated cardiac malformation like this when associated with brain abscess pose several challenges to the anaesthetist due to the altered haemodynamics and warrant a meticulous anaesthetic as well as surgical plan. PMID:28208971

  8. Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess formation following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture is very rare. We herein report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with progressive low back pain and fever with a root sign. She underwent surgical decompression, with an immediate improvement of the low back pain. A culture of the epidural abscess grew Serratia marcescens. One year postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the almost complete eradication of the abscess. This case is the first case of Serratia marcescens-associated spinal epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture. The characteristics of spinal epidural abscess that develop after acupuncture and how to prevent such complications are also discussed.

  9. [Pyomyositis in children: Two cases of Staphylococcus aureus infection].

    PubMed

    Gravot, F; Hébert, J; Robert-Dehault, A; Bouttier, R; Le Gall, F; Blondin, G; Vic, P

    2017-09-15

    Pyomyositis is a term used to denote primary pyogenic infection of a skeletal muscle. It is a rare disease that was first described in immunodeficient patients living in tropical climates. Lately, however, cases involving healthy children have been described in temperate climates. The origin of primary pyomyositis remains unclear, although it is thought to be caused by seeding from transient bacteremia. Onset of disease is insidious, therefore necessitating rapid diagnosis to successfully select appropriate antibiotic therapy and avoid complications. The signs and symptoms of pyomyositis are nonspecific, which highlights the importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis including disease entities such as osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the best imaging modality for distinguishing pyomyositis from other potential etiologies. Here, we present two cases of primary pyomyositis of the lower limb muscles in an 8-year-old boy and in an 11-year-old girl. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Calabrese, Milena; Romeo, Valeria; Scordino, Fabrizio; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Clemente, Marco; Rapicano, Gaetano; Salvatore, Marco

    2013-11-11

    Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial.

  11. An unusual presentation of a nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, P J; Srinivasan, V

    1998-08-01

    Nasal septal abscess is a rare complication of septal haematoma. Nasal obstruction and, less frequently, pain are the usual presenting features. We report a case of a nasal septal abscess in a 21-year-old female patient who developed a naso-oral fistula. To our knowledge this is the first report of such an unusual presentation of a septal abscess. The aetiology, pathogenesis and management of septal abscesses are discussed.

  12. Appearance of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome in Argentina: case report and review of molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Andrea; Cassata, Andrea; Pagella, Hugo; Amadio, Claudio; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Chang, Feng-Yee; Siu, L Kristopher

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome (KLAS) is an emerging invasive infection caused by highly virulent community-acquired strains of K. pneumoniae displaying hypermucoviscosity. The salient features of this syndrome include the presence of bacteremia, primary monomicrobial liver abscess, and metastatic complications. A previously healthy Argentinean man presented with fever and found to have liver abscess caused by K. pneumoniae with metastatic seeding of gastric wall. Cultures from blood and liver abscess grew hypermucoviscous K1 K. pneumoniae with sequence type (ST) 23 by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), positive for rmpA (regulator of mucoid phenotype A), wzy(KpK1) (capsular polymerase) and aerobactin genes. The hypermucoviscous phenotype of this K. pneumoniae isolate was readily identified by the "string test" (colonies formed a long string when touched with a loop). The patient responded favourably to percutaneous drainage of the abscess and antibiotics. This is the first documented report of KLAS described in Argentina, and may signal the emergence of this syndrome in South America.

  13. Appearance of Klebsiella Pneumoniae Liver Abscess Syndrome in Argentina: Case Report and Review of Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Andrea; Cassata, Andrea; Pagella, Hugo; Amadio, Claudio; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Chang, Feng-Yee; Siu, L. Kristopher

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess syndrome (KLAS) is an emerging invasive infection caused by highly virulent community-acquired strains of K. pneumoniae displaying hypermucoviscosity. The salient features of this syndrome include the presence of bacteremia, primary monomicrobial liver abscess, and metastatic complications. A previously healthy Argentinean man presented with fever and found to have liver abscess caused by K. pneumoniae with metastatic seeding of gastric wall. Cultures from blood and liver abscess grew hypermucoviscous K1 K. pneumoniae with sequence type (ST) 23 by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), positive for rmpA (regulator of mucoid phenotype A), wzyKpK1 (capsular polymerase) and aerobactin genes. The hypermucoviscous phenotype of this K. pneumoniae isolate was readily identified by the "string test" (colonies formed a long string when touched with a loop). The patient responded favourably to percutaneous drainage of the abscess and antibiotics. This is the first documented report of KLAS described in Argentina, and may signal the emergence of this syndrome in South America. PMID:22145012

  14. A case-control study of mastitis: nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Lisa H; Garland, Suzanne M; Lumley, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Background Mastitis is a common problem for breastfeeding women. Researchers have called for an investigation into the possible role of maternal nasal carriage of S. aureus in the causation of mastitis in breastfeeding women. Methods The aim of the study was to investigate the role of maternal S. aureus nasal carriage in mastitis. Other factors such as infant nasal S. aureus carriage, nipple damage, maternal fatigue and oversupply of milk were also investigated. A case-control design was used. Women with mastitis (cases, n = 100) were recruited from two maternity hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (emergency departments, breastfeeding clinics and postnatal wards). Breastfeeding women without mastitis (controls, n = 99) were recruited from maternal and child health (community) centres and the rooms of a private obstetrician. Women completed a questionnaire and nasal specimens were collected from mother and baby and placed in charcoal transport medium. Women also collected a small sample of milk in a sterile jar. Results There was no difference between nasal carriage of S. aureus in breastfeeding women with mastitis (42/98, 43%) and control women (45/98, 46%). However, significantly more infants of mothers with mastitis were nasal carriers of S. aureus (72/88, 82%) than controls (52/93, 56%). The association was strong (adjusted OR 3.23, 95%CI 1.30, 8.27) after adjustment for the following confounding factors: income, private health insurance, difficulty with breastfeeding, nipple damage and tight bra. There was also a strong association between nipple damage and mastitis (adjusted OR 9.34, 95%CI 2.99, 29.20). Conclusion We found no association between maternal nasal carriage of S. aureus and mastitis, but nasal carriage in the infant was associated with breast infections. As in other studies of mastitis, we found a strong association between nipple damage and mastitis. Prevention of nipple damage is likely to reduce the incidence of infectious mastitis. Mothers need

  15. A case-control study of mastitis: nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Amir, Lisa H; Garland, Suzanne M; Lumley, Judith

    2006-10-11

    Mastitis is a common problem for breastfeeding women. Researchers have called for an investigation into the possible role of maternal nasal carriage of S. aureus in the causation of mastitis in breastfeeding women. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of maternal S. aureus nasal carriage in mastitis. Other factors such as infant nasal S. aureus carriage, nipple damage, maternal fatigue and oversupply of milk were also investigated. A case-control design was used. Women with mastitis (cases, n = 100) were recruited from two maternity hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (emergency departments, breastfeeding clinics and postnatal wards). Breastfeeding women without mastitis (controls, n = 99) were recruited from maternal and child health (community) centres and the rooms of a private obstetrician. Women completed a questionnaire and nasal specimens were collected from mother and baby and placed in charcoal transport medium. Women also collected a small sample of milk in a sterile jar. There was no difference between nasal carriage of S. aureus in breastfeeding women with mastitis (42/98, 43%) and control women (45/98, 46%). However, significantly more infants of mothers with mastitis were nasal carriers of S. aureus (72/88, 82%) than controls (52/93, 56%). The association was strong (adjusted OR 3.23, 95%CI 1.30, 8.27) after adjustment for the following confounding factors: income, private health insurance, difficulty with breastfeeding, nipple damage and tight bra. There was also a strong association between nipple damage and mastitis (adjusted OR 9.34, 95%CI 2.99, 29.20). We found no association between maternal nasal carriage of S. aureus and mastitis, but nasal carriage in the infant was associated with breast infections. As in other studies of mastitis, we found a strong association between nipple damage and mastitis. Prevention of nipple damage is likely to reduce the incidence of infectious mastitis. Mothers need good advice about optimal attachment

  16. Impact of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) genetic typing in cases of prosthetic shunt graft infections.

    PubMed

    Konstantiniuk, P; Grisold, A; Schramayer, G; Santler, S C; Koter, S; Cohnert, T

    In January 2014 an internal audit was performed at the department of surgery, division of vascular surgery of the Medical University Graz, Austria, to assess the short and long-term outcomes of prosthetic shunt graft implantations performed between December 1998 and December 2013. A 10.8 % explantation rate due to graft infection was detected. The majority of the cases were associated with Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this constitutes a nosocomial problem. Between December 1998 and December 2014 a total of 490 prosthetic shunt grafts were implanted. After exclusion of 54 cases, 436 shunts remained for statistical analysis. Genetic analysis (spa typing) was acquired from three new cases with involvement of S. aureus in 2014. The impact of several factors (e.g. sex, institute for dialysis, age, type of prosthesis, implantation surgeon and position of shunt) on the shunt graft infection rate was statistically analyzed. Of the prostheses 14.0 % (61 out of 436) had to be explanted of which 12.4 % (54/436) were due to infection. In 77.8 % (42/54) bacteria were found in blood and/or wound cultures. Staphylococcus aureus was present in 76.2 % (32/42) of the cases with detected bacteria and in all cases was sensitive to methicillin. The infection rate was not significantly dependent on any of the investigated factors; however, the factor "institute for dialysis" had a remarkable p‑value of 0.060 with the infection rate ranging from 8.5 % to 18.2 % depending on the institution. Three different S. aureus protein A (spa) types were found: t015, t359, t6265. The detection of three different spa types means that these patients had different sources of S. aureus so that a nosocomial problem is very unlikely. Genetic typing of spa is a suitable technique for distinguishing between nosocomial and community acquired sources of prosthetic shunt graft infections.

  17. Breast Abscess by Salmonella Paratyphi A: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A case of suspicious breast mass due to Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A in a non-lactating, diabetic female is being described. The infection was successfully treated with a combination of surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. This case highlights the fact that a focal Salmonella infection involving the breast should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis for breast malignancy and submission of specimens for microbiological analysis may be helpful in establishment of an accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26500907

  18. A review of eleven cases of tuberculosis presenting as sternal wound abscess after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tabaja, Hussam; Hajar, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S

    2017-10-01

    Sternal wound infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an uncommon yet highly challenging disease that can be quite insidious with various presentations. We hereby provide a review of 10 cases in current literature and describe an additional case which illustrates the difficulties associated with diagnosis. We used PubMed and Google search engine to search the literature for all published papers reporting on cases of sternal M. tuberculosis infections post open-heart surgeries. A total of 11 cases were presented, including a case of our own. The majority were males and were exposed to endemic areas. The average age was 59.6 ± 15.5 years. Coronary artery bypass surgery accounted for 73% of procedures and the average time to symptoms onset was 12.2 ± 16.6 months. Diabetes was the most reported non-cardiac comorbidity. Presenting symptoms varied and only 5 patients had other organs involved. Blood tests and radiographic studies were neither sensitive nor specific. M. tuberculosis culture on debrided tissues was the most sensitive test but often forgotten initially. Diagnostic delay was seen in almost all cases, often leading to unnecessary courses of antibiotics and aggressive surgical interventions. Finally, all patients responded well to anti-tuberculosis treatment, with reported treatment duration ranging from 9 to 12 months. M. tuberculosis infection of the sternum should be suspected in late-onset sternal wound infections post open-heart surgery especially when the course is chronic and indolent.

  19. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Barıs; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture. PMID:24197809

  20. Complication of nasal piercing by Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis: a case report and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Body piercing, a growing trend especially in young people, is often complicated by severe infections. We present a case of acute bacterial endocarditis by Staphylococcus aureus complicated by multiple cerebral, kidney, spleen embolisms in a young girl, with no known previous cardiac abnormalities, following the piercing of nasal septum. This case highlights the importance of education of patients with and without structural heart disease to the potential dangerous and even life threatening infectious complications of piercing, and stimulate further discussion on the possibility of antibiotic prophylaxis of such procedures. PMID:20205910

  1. Spinal Tuberculosis and Cold Abscess without Known Primary Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gannamani, Vedavyas; Shay, Emily; Alcid, David

    2016-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is uncommon but not rare. Bone and joint involvement constitute about 10% of extrapulmonary TB cases, with the spine being the most frequently affected site. Spinal TB patients typically present with back pain but other constitutional or pulmonary symptoms may be absent, rendering the diagnosis difficult. This case explores challenges in the diagnosis of spinal TB. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with vague back swelling for many years. Imaging revealed osteomyelitis of the spine but initial studies and cultures were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed weeks later when cultures demonstrated Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Considering the severe complications of untreated spinal TB including paraplegia and need for surgical intervention, high suspicion is critical in early diagnosis. PMID:28070429

  2. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected fluid and pus located inside the belly (abdominal cavity). This type of abscess can be located near ... abdominal abscesses: Abdominal x-ray Ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis CT scan of the abdomen and ...

  3. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  4. Peritonsillar Abscess (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth clean. But sometimes a peritonsillar abscess is beyond your control. If you think you have an abscess, call your doctor right away. ... ON THIS TOPIC Tonsils and Tonsillectomies Tonsillitis ...

  5. Successful treatment of a hepatic abscess formed secondary to fish bone penetration by laparoscopic removal of the foreign body: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Koşar, Mehmet Nuri; Oruk, İhsan; Yazıcıoğlu, Murat Burç; Erol, Çiğdem; Çabuk, Birgül

    2014-09-01

    Although foreign body ingestion is a common problem in children, it is also seen among adults. Perforation of the gut by a foreign body, followed by migration of the foreign body to the liver is quite rare. Most fish bone ingestions have uneventful outcome. However, occasionally, it can cause serious complications if the gastrointestinal tract is perforated. Herein, a case of liver abscess caused by a fish bone is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case in our country.

  6. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen

    2013-09-26

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16 weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient's symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined.

  7. Splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a young healthy man.

    PubMed

    Maliyil, Jepsin; Caire, William; Nair, Rajasree; Bridges, Debbie

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of splenic abscess with multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a healthy young man without any identifiable risk factors, which resolved with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Streptococcus intermedius, a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, is a common commensal organism of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and it is a known cause of deep-seated infections. Suppurative infections caused by Streptococcus anginosus group are sometimes associated with bacteremia, but hematogenous spread of infection from an occult source leading to concurrent splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses has never been previously reported in a healthy young individual.

  8. [Prostatic abscesses. A review].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Rais, H; Joual, A; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1999-01-01

    We review the literature to the diagnosis and therapeutic aspect of prostatic abscess. The prostatic abscess having become an uncommon disease. The diagnosis of prostatic abscess has been nearly made by transrectal ultrasound and computed tomography scan. The best diagnostic method is considered to be the transrectal ultrasound. The choice therapy was intravenous antibiotic, and drainage by ultrasound guided transperineal percutaneous puncture.

  9. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Independent Cases of Bacteremia Display Increased Bacterial Fitness and Novel Immune Evasion Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R. L.; Haigh, R. D.; Pascoe, B.; Sheppard, S. K.; Price, F.; Jenkins, D.; Rajakumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion. PMID:26056388

  10. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two independent cases of bacteremia display increased bacterial fitness and novel immune evasion phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Richards, R L; Haigh, R D; Pascoe, B; Sheppard, S K; Price, F; Jenkins, D; Rajakumar, K; Morrissey, J A

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion.

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of Corynebacterium xerosis isolated from a sheep cutaneous abscess: first case report in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-León, Fernando; Acosta-Dibarrat, Jorge; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Rosas, Pomposo Fernandez; de Oca-Jiménez, Roberto Montes

    2016-07-22

    Corynebacterium xerosis is a commensal organism found in skin and mucous membranes of humans. It is considered an unusual pathogen, and it is rarely found in human and animal clinical samples. Here we describe the isolation of C. xerosis from a 4-months-old Pelifolk lamb located in Tesistán, central western Mexico. This microorganism should be considered for differential diagnosis in cutaneous abscessed lesions in sheep, as it represents a zoonotic risk factor for human infection in sheep farms. The animal exhibited a hard-consistency, 5 cm diameter abscess, without drainage, in the neck. The presumptive clinical diagnosis was caseous lymphadenitis, caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. Samples were obtained by puncture and cultured in 8 % sheep blood agar under microaerophilic conditions. Colonies were non-haemolytic, brown-yellowish and showed microscopic and biochemical features similar to C. pseudotuberculosis, except for the urea test. A multiplex-PCR for the amplification of partial sequences of the pld, rpoB and intergenic fragment from 16S to 23S genes suggested that isolate could be C. xerosis, which was later confirmed by sequencing analysis of the rpoB gene. This study shows for the first time isolation and molecular characterization of C. xerosis from a clinical sample of an ovine cutaneous abscess in Mexico. This finding highlights the need for differential diagnosis of this pathogen in ovine skin abscesses, as well as epidemiological and control studies of this pathogen in sheep farms.

  12. Emerging K1 serotype Klebsiella pneumoniae primary liver abscess: three cases presenting to a single university hospital in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Holmås, Kristoffer; Fostervold, Aasmund; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Struve, Carsten; Holter, Jan Cato

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae primary liver abscess (KLA) has been emerging worldwide over the past two decades and with high incidence in Asia. The presence of specific virulence characteristics is a risk factor for a syndrome with metastatic complications. This report signals an increasing emergence in Northern Europe. PMID:25356268

  13. Pseudotumoral hepatic tuberculosis with pericardial abscess.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Nangia, Rattan; Mishra, Pratibha

    2010-01-01

    We report the postmortem findings in a 28-year-old immunocompetent male patient, a rare case of tuberculous liver abscesses with concomitant pericardial abscess in the absence of pleuropulmonary or splenic involvement, who continued to be a diagnostic dilemma. This case report illustrates the difficulty in reaching the correct diagnosis in case of hepatic masses, which are most often confused with carcinoma of the liver, primary or metastatic and, hence, have been aptly referred to as pseudotumoral hepatic tuberculosis in the past.

  14. Relapse of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with aortic root abscess following treatment with daptomycin in a patient not fit for surgery.

    PubMed

    Enoch, D A; Phillimore, N; Karas, J A; Horswill, L; Mlangeni, D A

    2010-04-01

    Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including enterococci. It is licensed for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis, but not endocarditis due to Enterococcus spp. We report a case of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with an aortic root abscess in an elderly patient who was not fit for surgery. The patient's endocarditis relapsed 9 weeks after a 6 week course of daptomycin.

  15. Ewing sarcoma of the mandible mimicking an odontogenic abscess – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gosau, Martin; Baumhoer, Daniel; Ihrler, Stefan; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Driemel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) of the mandible is rare and can be mistaken for inflammation of dental origin. We present a 24-year old male patient which underwent radical tumour surgery and primary reconstruction with a microvascular osteoseptocutaneous free fibular flap as well as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Incomplete osseous tumour resection required a second intervention. This case report recapitulates the clinical and histopathological findings in oral ES, demonstrates its sometimes difficult diagnosis and discusses the (dis-)advantages of primary osseous reconstruction in ablative tumour surgery. PMID:18983686

  16. [Amebic colitis and amebic liver abscess--epidemiology and personal case report].

    PubMed

    Kassahun, W; Steinert, M; Schwokowski, C; Petzold, A; Emmrich, P

    1997-01-01

    The large intestine reacts relatively monomorphically to different stimuli. From this differential-diagnostic problems may result. The history of a patient is described which could be pursued clinically over 12 weeks and during the course of which the correction of the diagnosis ulcerative colitis into amoebic colitis was necessary. It is concluded that in every symptomatology of colitis bacterial and parasitologic examinations of the faeces should be performed primarily specially if there is a history of overseas travel. In these cases it must be also thought of spontaneous amoebic infections.

  17. Hepatic mucormycosis with abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Su, Henry; Thompson, George R; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-06-01

    We describe a case of hepatic mucormycosis with abscess, an uncommon presentation of mucormycetes infection. Our patient was initially treated with transcutaneous pigtail catheter placement, liposomal amphotericin B, and micafungin without improvement. The patient subsequently improved after hepatic segmentectomy and hemidiaphragm resection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Traumatic bone cyst suggestive of a chronic periapical abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Traumatic bone cysts can mimic the signs and symptoms of an endodontic lesion. This case reports on a 19-year-old male patient who was referred for endodontic assessment of a symptomatic tooth with a gingival swelling and a draining sinus at the furcation of a mandibular second molar. Radiographically, a periradicular radiolucency is evident. A prior history of trauma as well as removal of the wisdom teeth was determined. After careful diagnosis unnecessary endodontic intervention was avoided. Surgical exploration, curettage and the generation of a blood clot resulted in healing at the 6 month review appointment. The tooth remained responsive to pulp sensibility testing at that time. © 2010 The Author. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  19. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  20. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416