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Sample records for aureus including livestock-associated

  1. Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus on Polish pig farms

    PubMed Central

    Mroczkowska, Aneta; Żmudzki, Jacek; Marszałek, Natalia; Orczykowska-Kotyna, Monika; Komorowska, Iga; Nowak, Agnieszka; Grzesiak, Anna; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Wyszomirski, Tomasz; Empel, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus (LA-SA) draws increasing attention due to its particular ability to colonize farm animals and be transmitted to people, which in turn leads to its spread in the environment. The aim of the study was to determine the dissemination of LA-SA on pig farms selected throughout Poland, characterize the population structure of identified S. aureus, and assess the prevalence of LA-SA carriage amongst farmers and veterinarians being in contact with pigs. Methods and findings The study was conducted on 123 pig farms (89 farrow-to-finish and 34 nucleus herds), located in 15 out of 16 provinces of Poland. Human and pig nasal swabs, as well as dust samples were analyzed. S. aureus was detected on 79 (64.2%) farms from 14 provinces. Amongst these farms LA-SA-positive farms dominated (71/79, 89.9%, 95% CI [81.0%, 95.5%]). The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive farms was lower than LA-MSSA-positive (36.6% of LA-SA-positive farms, 95% CI [25.5%, 48.9%] vs. 74.6%, 95% CI [62.9%, 84.2%]). In total, 190 S. aureus isolates were identified: 72 (38%) MRSA and 118 (62%) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), of which 174 (92%) isolates were classified to three livestock-associated lineages: CC398 (73%), CC9 (13%), and CC30/ST433 (6%). All CC398 isolates belonged to the animal clade. Four LA-MRSA clones were detected: ST433-IVa(2B) clone (n = 8, 11%), described to the best of our knowledge for the first time, and three ST398 clones (n = 64, 89%) with the most prevalent being ST398-V(5C2&5)c, followed by ST398-V(5C2), and ST398-IVa(2B). Nasal carriage of LA-SA by pig farmers was estimated at 13.2% (38/283), CC398 carriage at 12.7% (36/283) and ST398-MRSA carriage at 3.2% (9/283), whereas by veterinarians at 21.1% (8/38), 18.4% (7/38) and 10.5% (4/38), respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive pig farms in Poland has increased considerably since 2008, when the first MRSA EU baseline survey was conducted in Europe. On

  2. Potential Relationship between Phenotypic and Molecular Characteristics in Revealing Livestock-Associated Staphylococcus aureus in Chinese Humans without Occupational Livestock Contact

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanping; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Ling; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong; Ye, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    While some studies have defined Staphylococcus aureus based on its clonal complex and resistance pattern, few have explored the relations between the genetic lineages and antibiotic resistance patterns and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Our aim was to investigate the potential relationship between phenotypic and molecular characteristics so as to reveal livestock-associated S. aureus in humans. The study participants were interviewed, and they provided two nasal swabs for S. aureus analysis. All S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type and IEC genes. Of the 1162 participants, 9.3% carried S. aureus, including MRSA (1.4%) and multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA, 2.8%). The predominant multidrug-resistant pattern among MDRSA isolates was non-susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. The most common S. aureus genotypes were ST7, ST6, ST188, and ST59, and the predominant MRSA genotype was ST7. Notably, the livestock-associated S. aureus isolates (IEC-negative CC9, IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC398, and IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC5) were found in people with no occupational livestock contact. These findings reveal a potential relationship between S. aureus CCs and IEC genes and antibiotic resistance patterns in defining livestock-associated S. aureus in humans and support growing concern about the potential livestock-to-human transmission of livestock-associated S. aureus by non-occupational livestock contact. PMID:27729903

  3. Potential Relationship between Phenotypic and Molecular Characteristics in Revealing Livestock-Associated Staphylococcus aureus in Chinese Humans without Occupational Livestock Contact.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Ling; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong; Ye, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    While some studies have defined Staphylococcus aureus based on its clonal complex and resistance pattern, few have explored the relations between the genetic lineages and antibiotic resistance patterns and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Our aim was to investigate the potential relationship between phenotypic and molecular characteristics so as to reveal livestock-associated S. aureus in humans. The study participants were interviewed, and they provided two nasal swabs for S. aureus analysis. All S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type and IEC genes. Of the 1162 participants, 9.3% carried S. aureus, including MRSA (1.4%) and multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA, 2.8%). The predominant multidrug-resistant pattern among MDRSA isolates was non-susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. The most common S. aureus genotypes were ST7, ST6, ST188, and ST59, and the predominant MRSA genotype was ST7. Notably, the livestock-associated S. aureus isolates (IEC-negative CC9, IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC398, and IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC5) were found in people with no occupational livestock contact. These findings reveal a potential relationship between S. aureus CCs and IEC genes and antibiotic resistance patterns in defining livestock-associated S. aureus in humans and support growing concern about the potential livestock-to-human transmission of livestock-associated S. aureus by non-occupational livestock contact.

  4. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders R.; Westh, Henrik; Agersø, Yvonne; Fetsch, Alexandra; Kraushaar, Britta; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Feβler, Andrea T.; Schwarz, Stefan; Cuny, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Butaye, Patrick; Denis, Olivier; Haenni, Marisa; Madec, Jean-Yves; Jouy, Eric; Laurent, Frederic; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Alba, Patricia; Mammina, Caterina; Pantosti, Annalisa; Monaco, Monica; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; de Boer, Enne; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Heck, Max; Domínguez, Lucas; Torres, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Price, Lance B.; Skov, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat implicated as a probable source. PMID:27655995

  5. Livestock-associated methicillin and multidrug resistant S. aureus in humans is associated with occupational pig contact, not pet contact

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Fan, Yanping; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Weidong; Yu, Haifeng; Zhou, Junli; Chen, Sidong; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the association of livestock-associated S. aureus with occupational pig contact and pet contact. In this cross-sectional study, 1,422 participants (including 244 pig workers, 200 pet-owning workers and 978 control workers) responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. Resulting isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, the immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes, and multilocus sequence type. Compared with controls, the pig workers demonstrated a greater prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) [prevalence ratio (PR) = 3.38; 95% CI: 2.07–5.53] and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (PR = 7.42; 95% CI: 3.71–14.83), but the prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA was similar in pet-owning workers and controls. There was a positive relation of frequency of pig contact with prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA carriage. Only pig workers carried MDRSA CC9 (16 isolates) and MRSA CC9 (16 isolates), and all of these isolates were tetracycline resistant and absent of IEC genes. These findings suggest that livestock-associated MRSA and MDRSA(CC9, IEC-negative, tetracycline-resistant) in humans is associated with occupational pig contact, not pet contact, and support growing concern about antibiotics use in pig farms and raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus. PMID:26755419

  6. Livestock-associated methicillin and multidrug resistant S. aureus in humans is associated with occupational pig contact, not pet contact.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaohua; Fan, Yanping; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Weidong; Yu, Haifeng; Zhou, Junli; Chen, Sidong; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-12

    This study aimed to explore the association of livestock-associated S. aureus with occupational pig contact and pet contact. In this cross-sectional study, 1,422 participants (including 244 pig workers, 200 pet-owning workers and 978 control workers) responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. Resulting isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, the immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes, and multilocus sequence type. Compared with controls, the pig workers demonstrated a greater prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) [prevalence ratio (PR) = 3.38; 95% CI: 2.07-5.53] and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (PR = 7.42; 95% CI: 3.71-14.83), but the prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA was similar in pet-owning workers and controls. There was a positive relation of frequency of pig contact with prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA carriage. Only pig workers carried MDRSA CC9 (16 isolates) and MRSA CC9 (16 isolates), and all of these isolates were tetracycline resistant and absent of IEC genes. These findings suggest that livestock-associated MRSA and MDRSA(CC9, IEC-negative, tetracycline-resistant) in humans is associated with occupational pig contact, not pet contact, and support growing concern about antibiotics use in pig farms and raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus.

  7. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA.

  8. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  9. The clinical impact of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of the clonal complex 398 for humans.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Ballhausen, Britta; Kahl, Barbara C; Köck, Robin

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) strains in particular of the clonal complex (CC) 398 have emerged in many parts of the world especially in areas with a high density of pig farming. In those regions, farmworkers and other individuals with professional contact to livestock are very frequently colonized with LA-MRSA. These persons are the presumably source for LA-MRSA transmission to household members and other parts of the human population. Altogether, colonization and/or infection of these individuals lead to the introduction of LA-MRSA into hospitals and other healthcare facilities. Since LA-MRSA CC398 have been found to be specifically adapted to their animal hosts in terms of the equipment with virulence factors, their pathogenicity to human patients is a matter of debate with first reports about clinical cases. Meanwhile, case reports, case series and few studies have demonstrated the capability of LA-MRSA to cause all types of infections attributed to S. aureus in general including fatal courses. Human infections observed comprise e.g. bacteremia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis and many manifestations of skin and soft tissue infections. However, inpatients affected by MRSA CC398 generally show different demographic (e.g. younger, shorter length of hospital stay) and clinical characteristics (e.g. less severe complications) which may explain or at least contribute to a lower disease burden of LA-MRSA compared to other MRSA clonal lineages.

  10. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The study participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. The resulting isolates were assessed for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type, and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Livestock workers had significantly higher rates of S. aureus CC9 (odds ratio [OR] = 30.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06 to 236.39) and tetracycline-resistant S. aureus (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.12 to 5.00) carriage than controls. All 19 S. aureus CC9 isolates from livestock workers were MRSA isolates and also exhibited the characteristics of resistance to several classes of antibiotics and absence of the IEC genes. Notably, the interaction analyses indicated phenotype-phenotype (OR = 525.7; 95% CI, 60.0 to 4,602.1) and gene-environment (OR = 232.3; 95% CI, 28.7 to 1,876.7) interactions associated with increased risk for livestock-associated S. aureus CC9 carriage. These findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact, raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus. IMPORTANCE This study adds to existing knowledge by giving insight into the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA. Our findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact. Future studies

  11. Vancomycin-intermediate livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398/t9538 from swine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Dutra, Mauricio C; Moreno, Marina; Ferreira, Thais SP; da Silva, Givago FR; Matajira, Carlos EC; Silva, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been mainly related with pig farming, in Europe and North America, with the ST398 as the most commonly identified type of LA-MRSA. Here we present the draft genome of the first vancomycin-intermediate MRSA ST398/t9538 isolated from a swine presenting exudative epidermitis in Brazil. PMID:27759766

  12. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus on Belgian Pork.

    PubMed

    Verhegghe, Marijke; Crombé, Florence; Luyckx, Kaat; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Herman, Lieve; Heyndrickx, Marc; Rasschaert, Geertrui

    2016-01-01

    Since the first description of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA), a high prevalence was observed in pigs. At present, questions remain about the transmission of LA-MRSA to the general human population through pork. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence of LA-MRSA in Belgian pork and to determine the role of the pork production chain and butcheries in transmission of LA-MRSA to the human population. Pig meat samples (chops, bacon, minced pork, ribs, forelimbs, and ears; n = 137) originating from four butcheries (A through D) were spread plated on ChromID MRSA plates both before and after overnight enrichment culture. Suspect colonies were confirmed using a MRSA-specific triplex PCR assay and a CC398-specific PCR assay. The isolates (n = 147) were further characterized by SCCmec typing, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, a selection of isolates were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing. Direct plating revealed a MRSA prevalence of 8%. After enrichment, MRSA was isolated from 98 (72%) of 137 samples of which the majority were from rib, ear, and forelimb. The majority (97%) of obtained isolates belonged to CC398, the main LA-MRSA type. A high level of genetic diversity was noted among the isolates from one butchery. Thirty antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were found; 13 and 9% of the isolates had Cip-Tet-Tri and Gen-Kan-Tet-Tob-Tri profiles, respectively. These results indicate the importance of enrichment for MRSA detection of pork. The observed genetic diversity of the isolates indicated that the pork production chain can be considered a source of multiple MRSA types that could be transmitted to the human population through cross-contaminated meat.

  13. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Smith, Tara C; Frana, Timothy S; Fraena, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Mechanisms contributing to the persistent carriage and high prevalence rates of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) strains in swine herds and production facilities have not been investigated. One explanation for the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. In this report, the ability of swine LA-MRSA strains, including ST398, ST9, and ST5, to form biofilms was quantified and compared to several swine and human isolates. The contribution of known biofilm matrix components, polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA), was tested in all strains as well. All MRSA swine isolates formed robust biofilms similar to human clinical isolates. The addition of Dispersin B had no inhibitory effect on swine MRSA isolates when added at the initiation of biofilm growth or after pre-established mature biofilms formed. In contrast, the addition of proteinase K inhibited biofilm formation in all strains when added at the initiation of biofilm growth and was able to disperse pre-established mature biofilms. Of the LA-MRSA strains tested, we found ST398 strains to be the most sensitive to both inhibition of biofilm formation and dispersal of pre-formed biofilms by DNaseI. Collectively, these findings provide a critical first step in designing strategies to control or eliminate MRSA in swine herds.

  14. Livestock-Associated, Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage and Recent Skin and Soft Tissue Infection among Industrial Hog Operation Workers

    PubMed Central

    Nadimpalli, Maya; Stewart, Jill R.; Pierce, Elizabeth; Pisanic, Nora; Love, David C.; Hall, Devon; Larsen, Jesper; Carroll, Karen C.; Tekle, Tsigereda; Perl, Trish M.

    2016-01-01

    Swine production work is a risk factor for nasal carriage of livestock-associated (LA-) Staphylococcus aureus and also for skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). However, whether LA-S. aureus nasal carriage is associated with increased risk of SSTI remains unclear. We aimed to examine S. aureus nasal carriage and recent (≤3 months prior to enrollment) SSTI symptoms among industrial hog operation (IHO) workers and their household contacts. IHO workers and their household contacts provided a nasal swab and responded to a questionnaire assessing self-reported personal and occupational exposures and recent SSTI symptoms. Nasal swabs were analyzed for S. aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant-S. aureus (MDRSA), absence of scn (livestock association), and spa type. S. aureus with at least one indicator of LA was observed among 19% of 103 IHO workers and 6% of 80 household members. Prevalence of recent SSTI was 6% among IHO workers and 11% among 54 minor household members (0/26 adult household members reported SSTI). Among IHO workers, nasal carriers of MDRSA and scn-negative S. aureus were 8.8 (95% CI: 1.8, 43.9) and 5.1 (95% CI: 1.2, 22.2) times as likely to report recent SSTI as non-carriers, respectively. In one household, both an IHO worker and child reported recent SSTI and carried the same S. aureus spa type (t4976) intranasally. Prevalence of scn-negative S. aureus (PR: 5.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 21.4) was elevated among IHO workers who reported never versus always wearing a face mask at work. Although few SSTI were reported, this study of IHO workers and their household contacts is the first to characterize a relation between nasal carriage of antibiotic-resistant LA-S. aureus and SSTI. The direction and temporality of this relation and IHO workers’ use of face masks to prevent nasal carriage of these bacteria warrant further investigation. PMID:27851746

  15. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Graveland, Haitske; Duim, Birgitta; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Heederik, Dick; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004 MRSA emerged in animals, particularly in pigs and veal calves. This new MRSA variant was since its first appearance referred to as Livestock Associated-MRSA (LA-MRSA). In Europe and Northern America, LA-MRSA belongs predominantly to clonal complex (CC) 398 whereas in Asia ST9 seems to be dominant in pigs. Persons in direct contact with LA-MRSA-positive animals have an increased risk of becoming MRSA positive. The risk of carriage is mainly related with the intensity of animal contact and with MRSA prevalence among animals on the farm. In contrast with its success in animals, it seemed that MRSA CC398 is a poor persistent colonizer in humans. MRSA ST398 can, however, cause serious (invasive) infections and outbreaks, although, only incidentally reported so far. Farm hygiene and antimicrobial use contributed to MRSA occurrence in animals. Therefore these two determinants should in principle be incorporated into MRSA-control programmes in animal production. Like any other microorganism, LA-MRSA is expected to be able to adapt to new hosts and may change over time in the potential to colonize and to produce toxins. Also, the current circulating clone CC398 may be replaced by another clone in Western countries or emerge in countries where this clone is currently low-prevalent. Ongoing MRSA surveillance in humans and animals is needed to detect changes in epidemiology and to implement effective control measures.

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing Confirms Presumed Nosocomial Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Witteveen, Sandra; Haenen, Anja; Landman, Fabian; Schouls, Leo M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) was detected in 2003 and rapidly became the predominant MRSA clade in the Netherlands. Studies have shown that transmissions are difficult to identify, since this MRSA variant represents a genetically homogenous clade when current typing techniques are used. Here, next-generation sequencing was performed on 206 LA-MRSA isolates to assess the capability of LA-MRSA to be transmitted between humans. The usefulness of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), the composition of the SCCmec region, and the presence of plasmids to identify transmission of LA-MRSA were assessed. In total, 30 presumed putative nosocomial transmission events and 2 LA-MRSA outbreaks were studied; in most cases, SNV analysis revealed that the isolates of the index patient and the contact(s) clustered closely together. In three presumed events, the isolates did not cluster together, indicating that transmission was unlikely. The composition of the SCCmec region corroborated these findings. However, plasmid identification did not support our SNV analysis, since different plasmids were present in several cases where SNV and SCCmec analysis suggested that transmission was likely. Next-generation sequencing shows that transmission of LA-MRSA does occur in Dutch health care settings. Transmission was identified based on SNV analysis combined with epidemiological data and in the context of epidemiologically related and unrelated isolates. Analysis of the SCCmec region provided limited, albeit useful, information to corroborate conclusions on transmissions, but plasmid identification did not. IMPORTANCE In 2003, a variant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from pigs was also found in pig farmers in France and the Netherlands. Soon thereafter, this livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) was identified in many other countries. Transmission of LA-MRSA between humans, particularly in the health care

  17. Genomic information on multidrug-resistant livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 isolated from a Brazilian patient with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Danielle F; Cohen, Renata WF; Rocha, Géssica A; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A; Leão, Robson S

    2017-01-01

    Alarmingly, the isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been increasing among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). During a previous molecular characterisation of MRSA isolates obtained from patients with CF from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, one isolate was identified as the ST398 clone, a livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of an LA-MRSA ST398 clone isolated from a patient with CF. PMID:28076471

  18. Genomic information on multidrug-resistant livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 isolated from a Brazilian patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Danielle F; Cohen, Renata Wf; Rocha, Géssica A; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A; Leão, Robson S

    2017-01-01

    Alarmingly, the isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been increasing among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). During a previous molecular characterisation of MRSA isolates obtained from patients with CF from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, one isolate was identified as the ST398 clone, a livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of an LA-MRSA ST398 clone isolated from a patient with CF.

  19. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) Clonal Complex (CC) 398 Isolated from UK Animals belong to European Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenaxi; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Kearns, Angela M.; Doumith, Michel; Butaye, Patrick R.; Argudín, M. Angeles; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Pichon, Bruno; AbuOun, Manal; Rogers, Jon; Ellis, Richard J.; Teale, Christopher; Anjum, Muna F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013 and 2015, whole genome sequences (WGS) of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases ccr C S. aureus protein A (spa)-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR), heavy metal (HMR), and disinfectant (DR) resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harbored resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harboring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbor φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009) present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the 12 UK LA

  20. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) Clonal Complex (CC) 398 Isolated from UK Animals belong to European Lineages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenaxi; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Kearns, Angela M; Doumith, Michel; Butaye, Patrick R; Argudín, M Angeles; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Pichon, Bruno; AbuOun, Manal; Rogers, Jon; Ellis, Richard J; Teale, Christopher; Anjum, Muna F

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013 and 2015, whole genome sequences (WGS) of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases ccr C S. aureus protein A (spa)-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR), heavy metal (HMR), and disinfectant (DR) resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harbored resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harboring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbor φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009) present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the 12 UK LA

  1. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  2. Longitudinal study of the contamination of air and of soil surfaces in the vicinity of pig barns by livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jochen; Friese, Anika; Klees, Sylvia; Tenhagen, Bernd A; Fetsch, Alexandra; Rösler, Uwe; Hartung, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    During 1 year, samples were taken on 4 days, one sample in each season, from pigs, the floor, and the air inside pig barns and from the ambient air and soil at different distances outside six commercial livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA)-positive pig barns in the north and east of Germany. LA-MRSA was isolated from animals, floor, and air samples in the barn, showing a range of airborne LA-MRSA between 6 and 3,619 CFU/m(3) (median, 151 CFU/m(3)). Downwind of the barns, LA-MRSA was detected in low concentrations (11 to 14 CFU/m(3)) at distances of 50 and 150 m; all upwind air samples were negative. In contrast, LA-MRSA was found on soil surfaces at distances of 50, 150, and 300 m downwind from all barns, but no statistical differences could be observed between the proportions of positive soil surface samples at the three different distances. Upwind of the barns, positive soil surface samples were found only sporadically. Significantly more positive LA-MRSA samples were found in summer than in the other seasons both in air and soil samples upwind and downwind of the pig barns. spa typing was used to confirm the identity of LA-MRSA types found inside and outside the barns. The results show that there is regular airborne LA-MRSA transmission and deposition, which are strongly influenced by wind direction and season, of up to at least 300 m around positive pig barns. The described boot sampling method seems suitable to characterize the contamination of the vicinity of LA-MRSA-positive pig barns by the airborne route.

  3. Identification of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Korea and molecular comparison between isolates from animal carcasses and slaughterhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Nam, Hyang-Mi; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    This study was undertaken to screen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animal carcasses and slaughterhouse workers and characterize MRSA isolates identified during 2010-2012 in Korea. A total of 830 (16.4%) S. aureus and 65 (1.3%) MRSA were isolated from 9669 carcass samples. MRSA was more frequently detected in chicken carcasses (1.2%) than in cattle (0.3%) and pig carcasses (0.6%). The prevalence of MRSA in workers was 6.9% (4/58) in chicken slaughterhouse workers, but no MRSA was detected in pig and cattle slaughterhouse workers (0/41). Two different lineages of MRSA were identified (i.e., human-associated type [ST5, ST59, and ST72] and livestock-associated [LA] type [ST398, ST541, and ST692]); only LA MRSA was observed in chicken carcasses, whereas both types were found in cattle and pig carcasses and workers. All human-associated MRSA isolates carried enterotoxin and/or leukotoxin genes, whereas LA MRSA types did not carry these genes, except ST692 type. However, all LA MRSA isolates were multiresistant, whereas human-associated types were susceptible or resistant to fewer than two antimicrobials except ST5. Furthermore, one or more resistance genes were attributed for resistance to aminoglycosides (aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″), ant(4')-Ia, and aph(3')-IIIa), tetracycline [tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), and tet(S)], macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (ermA, ermB, ermC, and ermT), lincosamide [lnu(B)], phenicol-lincosamide-oxazolidinone-pleuromutilin-streptogramin A (cfr), chloramphenicol (fexA), and fusidic acid [fus(C)]. To our knowledge, this is the first report of tet(S) gene in MRSA isolates and first detection of a unique (ST692) type of MRSA in occupational workers. Detection of new types of human-associated and LA MRSA with multiple resistance and virulence genes in food animal products constitutes a potential threat to public health.

  4. Pig-2-Bac as a biomarker of occupational exposure to pigs and livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus among industrial hog operation workers.

    PubMed

    Pisanic, Nora; Nadimpalli, Maya; Rinsky, Jessica L; Stewart, Jill; Wing, Steve; Love, David C; Hall, Devon; Heaney, Christopher D

    2015-11-01

    Over 50 million hogs are raised annually in the United States for consumption, mostly on industrial hog operations (IHOs). Workers at IHOs are exposed to airborne particulates, zoonotic pathogens, and other workplace hazards, but lack of access to IHOs can hinder exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies. Here, we demonstrate the utility of pig-specific Bacteroidales (Pig-2-Bac) as a biomarker of exposure to pigs and pig waste and to help identify sources of Staphylococcus aureus carriage among IHO workers.

  5. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-11-20

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  6. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  7. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over. PMID:26322785

  8. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans.

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over.

  9. The Emergence and Spread of Multiple Livestock-Associated Clonal Complex 398 Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains among Animals and Humans in the Republic of Ireland, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gráinne I.; Abbott, Yvonne; Burns, Aisling; Leonard, Finola; McManus, Brenda A.; O’Connell, Brian; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex (CC) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are associated with carriage and infection among animals and humans but only a single case of CC398 MRSA has been reported in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). The present study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CC398 MRSA (n = 22) and MSSA (n = 10) from animals and humans in the ROI from 2010–2014. Isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarray profiling and PCR for CC398-associated resistance genes. All MRSA underwent SCCmec IV or V subtyping. Four distinct CC398-MRSA incidents were identified from (i) a man in a nursing home (spa type t011-SCCmec IVa, immune evasion complex (IEC) negative), (ii) a horse and veterinarian who had recently travelled to Belgium (t011-IVa, IEC positive), (iii) pigs (n = 9) and farm workers (n = 9) on two farms, one which had been restocked with German gilts and the other which was a finisher farm (t034-VT, IEC negative, 3/9 pigs; t011- VT, IEC negative, 6/9 pigs & 9/9 farm workers), and (iv) a child who had worked on a pig farm in the UK (t034-VT, IEC negative). Isolates also carried different combinations of multiple resistance genes including erm(A), erm(B), tet(K), tet(M) & tet(L), fexA, spc, dfrG, dfrK aacA-aphD and aadD further highlighting the presence of multiple CC398-MRSA strains. CC398 MSSA were recovered from pigs (n = 8) and humans (n = 2). CC398 MSSA transmission was identified among pigs but zoonotic transmission was not detected with animal and human isolates exhibiting clade-specific traits. This study highlights the importation and zoonotic spread of CC398 MRSA in the ROI and the spread of CC398 MSSA among pigs. Increased surveillance is warranted to prevent further CC398 MRSA importation and spread in a country that was considered CC398 MRSA free. PMID:26886749

  10. The Emergence and Spread of Multiple Livestock-Associated Clonal Complex 398 Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains among Animals and Humans in the Republic of Ireland, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Gráinne I; Abbott, Yvonne; Burns, Aisling; Leonard, Finola; McManus, Brenda A; O'Connell, Brian; Coleman, David C; Shore, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex (CC) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are associated with carriage and infection among animals and humans but only a single case of CC398 MRSA has been reported in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). The present study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CC398 MRSA (n = 22) and MSSA (n = 10) from animals and humans in the ROI from 2010-2014. Isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarray profiling and PCR for CC398-associated resistance genes. All MRSA underwent SCCmec IV or V subtyping. Four distinct CC398-MRSA incidents were identified from (i) a man in a nursing home (spa type t011-SCCmec IVa, immune evasion complex (IEC) negative), (ii) a horse and veterinarian who had recently travelled to Belgium (t011-IVa, IEC positive), (iii) pigs (n = 9) and farm workers (n = 9) on two farms, one which had been restocked with German gilts and the other which was a finisher farm (t034-VT, IEC negative, 3/9 pigs; t011-VT, IEC negative, 6/9 pigs & 9/9 farm workers), and (iv) a child who had worked on a pig farm in the UK (t034-VT, IEC negative). Isolates also carried different combinations of multiple resistance genes including erm(A), erm(B), tet(K), tet(M) & tet(L), fexA, spc, dfrG, dfrK aacA-aphD and aadD further highlighting the presence of multiple CC398-MRSA strains. CC398 MSSA were recovered from pigs (n = 8) and humans (n = 2). CC398 MSSA transmission was identified among pigs but zoonotic transmission was not detected with animal and human isolates exhibiting clade-specific traits. This study highlights the importation and zoonotic spread of CC398 MRSA in the ROI and the spread of CC398 MSSA among pigs. Increased surveillance is warranted to prevent further CC398 MRSA importation and spread in a country that was considered CC398 MRSA free.

  11. Detection and molecular characterization of Livestock-Associated MRSA in raw meat on retail sale in North West England.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Pichon, B; Wilkinson, H; Doumith, M; Hill, R L R; McLauchlin, J; Kearns, A M

    2017-03-01

    Limited data are available on the prevalence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in the UK. We tested 124 raw meat samples for MRSA including pork (n = 63), chicken (n = 50) and turkey (n = 11) collected from retail outlets in North West England between March and July 2015. MRSA was recovered from nine (7·3%) samples (four chicken, three pork and two turkey) from different butchers and supermarkets. Four were labelled of UK origin, three were from continental Europe; the origin was not specified for two samples. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS), spa typing and the presence of lineage-specific canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms confirmed that they belonged to the livestock-associated clade of clonal complex (CC) 398. Seven (77·8%) isolates were multi-drug resistant. Phylogenetic analyses showed the isolates were diverse, suggesting multiple silent introductions of LA-MRSA into the UK food chain. Two chicken meat isolates belonged to a sub-clade recently reported from human cases in Europe where poultry meat was the probable source. The low levels of MRSA identified (<20 CFU per g) and absence of enterotoxin genes suggest the risk of acquisition of, or food-poisoning due to, LA-MRSA is low. Nevertheless, the MRSA contamination rate is higher than previously estimated; further evaluation of the public health impacts of LA-MRSA is warranted.

  12. Livestock-Associated MRSA: The Impact on Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Christiane; Wieler, Lothar H.; Witte, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    During the past 25 years an increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) was recorded worldwide. Additionally, MRSA infections may occur outside and independent of hospitals, caused by community associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Germany, we found that at least 10% of these sporadic infections are due to livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA), which is initially associated with livestock. The majority of these MRSA cases are attributed to clonal complex CC398. LA-MRSA CC398 colonizes the animals asymptomatically in about half of conventional pig farms. For about 77%–86% of humans with occupational exposure to pigs, nasal carriage has been reported; it can be lost when exposure is interrupted. Among family members living at the same farms, only 4%–5% are colonized. Spread beyond this group of people is less frequent. The prevalence of LA-MRSA in livestock seems to be influenced by farm size, farming systems, usage of disinfectants, and in-feed zinc. LA-MRSA CC398 is able to cause the same kind of infections in humans as S. aureus and MRSA in general. It can be introduced to hospitals and cause nosocomial infections such as postoperative surgical site infections, ventilator associated pneumonia, septicemia, and infections after joint replacement. For this reason, screening for MRSA colonization at hospital admittance is recommended for farmers and veterinarians with livestock contacts. Intrahospital dissemination, typical for HA-MRSA in the absence of sufficient hygiene, has only rarely been observed for LA-MRSA to date. The proportion of LA-MRSA among all MRSA from nosocomial infections is about 3% across Germany. In geographical areas with a comparatively high density of conventional farms, LA-MRSA accounts for up to 10% of MRSA from septicemia and 15% of MRSA from wound infections. As known from comparative genome analysis, LA-MRSA has evolved from human-adapted methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and the jump to livestock was

  13. Livestock-Associated MRSA in Household Members of Pig Farmers: Transmission and Dynamics of Carriage, A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    van Cleef, Brigitte A. G. L.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.; Verkade, Erwin J. M.; van Rijen, Miranda M. L.; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, Marjolein F. Q.; Graveland, Haitske; Bosch, Thijs; Verstappen, Koen M. H. W.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Bos, Marian E. H.; Heederik, Dick; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective cohort study describes carriage of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in household members from 49 farrowing pig farms in the Netherlands (2010–2011). Of 171 household members, 4% were persistent MRSA nasal carriers, and the MRSA prevalence on any given sampling moment was 10% (range 7-11%). Working in the stables (of which 98% was MRSA-positive, prevalence ratio (PR) = 2.11 per 10 hours), working with sows (PR=1.97), and living with an MRSA-positive pig farmer (PR=4.63) were significant determinants for MRSA carriage. Significant protective factors were carriage of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (PR=0.50), and wearing a facemask when working in the stables (37% decreased prevalence). All MRSA strains during the study period were known livestock-associated types. The bacteriophage φ3 was not found in household members. Transmission from pigs and the environment appeared to be important determinants; human-to-human transmission could not sufficiently be differentiated. Wearing a facemask when working in the stables and carriage of MSSA are potential interventional targets. PMID:25993665

  14. Prevalence and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus, Including Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Isolated from Bulk Tank Milk from Minnesota Dairy Farms

    PubMed Central

    Haran, K. P.; Godden, S. M.; Boxrud, D.; Jawahir, S.; Bender, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common causative agent of bovine mastitis in dairy herds. The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals as well as the community is a significant and costly public health concern. S. aureus-related bovine mastitis is a common reason for therapeutic and/or prophylactic use of antibiotics on dairy farms. In this study, herd prevalence of S. aureus, including MRSA, was estimated from bulk tank milk (BTM) from Minnesota farms. A total of 150 pooled BTM samples from 50 farms, collected over 3 seasons (spring, summer, and fall of 2009), were assessed. Herd prevalence of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was 84%, while MRSA herd prevalence was 4%. A total of 93 MSSA isolates and 2 MRSA isolates were recovered from 150 BTM samples. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of S. aureus isolates showed pansusceptibility in 54 isolates, resistance to a single antibiotic class in 21 isolates, resistance to two antibiotic classes in 13 isolates, and resistance to ≥3 antibiotics classes and thus multidrug resistance in 5 isolates. The two MRSA isolates displayed resistance to β-lactams, cephalosporins, and lincosamides and were multiresistant. Staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing identified spa types t529 and t034 most frequently among methicillin-susceptible isolates, while t121 was observed in MRSA isolates. Seven isolates, including the two MRSA isolates, produced staphylococcal enterotoxins B, C, D, and E on overnight culture. MRSA isolates were further genotyped using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of the 2 MRSA isolates, one had a composite genotype profile of MLST ST 5-PFGE USA100-unknown spa type, which has been reported among hospital-associated MRSA isolates, while the second isolate carried the MLST ST 8-PFGE USA300-spa type t121 genotype, commonly identified among community-associated MRSA isolates. These results suggest that MRSA genotypes

  15. In vitro susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA to four disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, J; Komatsuzawa, H; Kozai, K; Nagasaka, N

    1997-01-01

    The spread of nosocomial infections caused by pathogenic organisms such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has prompted the dental community to focus more attention on certain control strategies. In the present study, we tested the abilities of the four skin disinfectants (povidone iodine, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine gluconate, and ethanol) to prevent horizontal transmission of MRSA in the dental office. The bactericidal activities of the disinfectants were evaluated by the decrement over time of viable cell numbers of four clinical isolated strains of S. aureus: two MRSA strains and two methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains. The most effective disinfectant was 70 percent ethanol, which eradicated both MRSA and MSSA in less than three minutes. The 0.1 percent chlorhexidine gluconate proved the least effective of four disinfectants. More than 10(2) bacteria survived despite exposure to it for thirty minutes.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Beefpacking Workers in a Midwestern United States Slaughterhouse

    PubMed Central

    Leibler, Jessica H.; Jordan, Jeanne A.; Brownstein, Kirsten; Lander, Lina; Price, Lance B.; Perry, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational contact with livestock is an established risk factor for exposure to livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly among industrial swine workers. While S. aureus is known to infect cattle, livestock-associated S. aureus carriage among workers in the beef production chain has received limited attention. Beefpacking workers, who slaughter, butcher and process cattle, have intensified exposure to potentially infectious animal materials and may be at risk of livestock-associated S. aureus exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of beefpacking workers (n = 137) at an industrial slaughterhouse in the Midwestern United States to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of S. aureus nasal colonization, specifically the absence of the scn gene to identify putative association with livestock, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL) genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV, and spa type. Overall prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 27.0%. No workers carried livestock-associated MRSA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates (MSSA) recovered from five workers (3.6%) lacked the scn gene and were considered putative livestock-associated S. aureus (pLA-SA). Among pLA-SA isolates, spa types t338, t748, t1476 and t2379 were identified. To our knowledge, these spa types have not previously been identified as associated with livestock. Prevalence of human-adapted MRSA carriage in workers was 3.6%. MRSA isolates were identified as spa types t002, t008 and t024, and four of five MRSA isolates were PVL-positive. To date, this is the first study to indicate that industrial beefpacking workers in the United States may be exposed to livestock-associated S. aureus, notably MSSA, and to spa types not previously identified in livestock and livestock workers. Occupational exposure to livestock-associated S. aureus in the beef production chain requires further epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26866374

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Beefpacking Workers in a Midwestern United States Slaughterhouse.

    PubMed

    Leibler, Jessica H; Jordan, Jeanne A; Brownstein, Kirsten; Lander, Lina; Price, Lance B; Perry, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational contact with livestock is an established risk factor for exposure to livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly among industrial swine workers. While S. aureus is known to infect cattle, livestock-associated S. aureus carriage among workers in the beef production chain has received limited attention. Beefpacking workers, who slaughter, butcher and process cattle, have intensified exposure to potentially infectious animal materials and may be at risk of livestock-associated S. aureus exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of beefpacking workers (n = 137) at an industrial slaughterhouse in the Midwestern United States to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of S. aureus nasal colonization, specifically the absence of the scn gene to identify putative association with livestock, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL) genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV, and spa type. Overall prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 27.0%. No workers carried livestock-associated MRSA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates (MSSA) recovered from five workers (3.6%) lacked the scn gene and were considered putative livestock-associated S. aureus (pLA-SA). Among pLA-SA isolates, spa types t338, t748, t1476 and t2379 were identified. To our knowledge, these spa types have not previously been identified as associated with livestock. Prevalence of human-adapted MRSA carriage in workers was 3.6%. MRSA isolates were identified as spa types t002, t008 and t024, and four of five MRSA isolates were PVL-positive. To date, this is the first study to indicate that industrial beefpacking workers in the United States may be exposed to livestock-associated S. aureus, notably MSSA, and to spa types not previously identified in livestock and livestock workers. Occupational exposure to livestock-associated S. aureus in the beef production chain requires further epidemiologic investigation.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in the General Population in Northeast Germany: Results of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND-0)

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Silva; Grumann, Dorothee; Balau, Veronika; Barwich, Annette; Kolata, Julia; Goehler, André; Weiss, Stefan; Holtfreter, Birte; Bauerfeind, Stephanie S.; Döring, Paula; Friebe, Erika; Haasler, Nicole; Henselin, Kristin; Kühn, Katrin; Nowotny, Sophie; Radke, Dörte; Schulz, Katrin; Schulz, Sebastian R.; Trübe, Patricia; Vu, Chi Hai; Walther, Birgit; Westphal, Susanne; Cuny, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Völzke, Henry; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Kocher, Thomas; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Population-based studies on Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization are scarce. We examined the prevalence, resistance, and molecular diversity of S. aureus in the general population in Northeast Germany. Nasal swabs were obtained from 3,891 adults in the large-scale population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND). Isolates were characterized using spa genotyping, as well as antibiotic resistance and virulence gene profiling. We observed an S. aureus prevalence of 27.2%. Nasal S. aureus carriage was associated with male sex and inversely correlated with age. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for 0.95% of the colonizing S. aureus strains. MRSA carriage was associated with frequent visits to hospitals, nursing homes, or retirement homes within the previous 24 months. All MRSA strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Most MRSA isolates belonged to the pandemic European hospital-acquired MRSA sequence type 22 (HA-MRSA-ST22) lineage. We also detected one livestock-associated MRSA ST398 (LA-MRSA-ST398) isolate, as well as six livestock-associated methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (LA-MSSA) isolates (clonal complex 1 [CC1], CC97, and CC398). spa typing revealed a diverse but also highly clonal S. aureus population structure. We identified a total of 357 spa types, which were grouped into 30 CCs or sequence types. The major seven CCs (CC30, CC45, CC15, CC8, CC7, CC22, and CC25) included 75% of all isolates. Virulence gene patterns were strongly linked to the clonal background. In conclusion, MSSA and MRSA prevalences and the molecular diversity of S. aureus in Northeast Germany are consistent with those of other European countries. The detection of HA-MRSA and LA-MRSA within the general population indicates possible transmission from hospitals and livestock, respectively, and should be closely monitored. PMID:27605711

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Methicillin-Resistance Staphylococcus aureus from Different Tertiary Care Hospitals Including Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Haque, N; Barman, T K; Ahmed, S; Nasreen, S A; Hossain, M S; Ahmed, F; Biswas, P; Nahar, F; Begum, H; Islam, M S

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to detect antimicrobial susceptibilities and the presence of drug resistance genes of MRSA from tertiary care hospitals. This study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College during the period from Jan, 2015 to Dec, 2015. Clinical samples, including wound swab, pus, exudates from diabetic ulcer and burn ulcer, aural swab, blood and urine were collected. Standard microbiological procedure & biochemical tests were carried out to detect S. aureus. Oxacillin disk diffusion test was done by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Total 69 isolates of S. aureus were selected for the study. The isolates were collected from three different tertiary care hospitals, of which 33, 27 and 9 were from Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH), BIRDEM hospital and Sir Salimullah Medical College Hospital (SSMCH) respectively. Among the 69 isolates, 17(24.6%) and 52(75.3%) were distinguished as MRSA and MSSA respectively by ODDM (Oxacillin disk diffusion method). In contrast, detection of presence and absence of mecA gene by PCR identified 20 (28.9%) and 49 (71.01%) isolates as MRSA and MSSA respectively. All of the S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA) isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and gentamicin. All MRSA isolates (100%) showed resistance to Penicillin and Oxacillin. Among the MRSA isolates about 88.2% were resistance to Ceftazidime, 64.7% were resistance to Erythromycin and Ciprofloxacin, 11.7% were resistance to Tetracycline. Among the MSSA isolates about 94.2% were resistance to Penicillin and 9.6% resistance to Ciprofloxacin. The MSSA were less resistance for non-beta lactam drugs than MRSA. Regarding drug resistance genes, the blaZ genes were present in 47 out of 49(95.8%) MSSA and in 18 out of 18 (100%) MRSA. The erythromycin resistance gene ermB was found in 8.69% isolates, of which highest 20% in MRSA and 4.08% in MSSA. The ermA was not found in any isolates. Among tetracycline resistance genes, tetK were detected in 10

  20. Staphylococcus aureus CC398: Host Adaptation and Emergence of Methicillin Resistance in Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik; Aziz, Maliha; Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James; Gillece, John; Driebe, Elizabeth; Liu, Cindy M.; Springer, Burkhard; Zdovc, Irena; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Żmudzki, Jacek; Schwarz, Stefan; Butaye, Patrick; Jouy, Eric; Pomba, Constanca; Porrero, M. Concepción; Ruimy, Raymond; Smith, Tara C.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Weese, J. Scott; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Yu, Fangyou; Laurent, Frederic; Keim, Paul; Skov, Robert; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock-associated MRSA possessing three different staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types (IV, V, and VII-like) including nine subtypes. The human-associated isolates from the basal clades carried phages encoding human innate immune modulators that were largely missing among the livestock-associated isolates. Our results strongly suggest that livestock-associated MRSA CC398 originated in humans as MSSA. The lineage appears to have undergone a rapid radiation in conjunction with the jump from humans to livestock, where it subsequently acquired tetracycline and methicillin resistance. Further analyses are required to estimate the number of independent genetic events leading to the methicillin-resistant sublineages, but the diversity of SCCmec subtypes is suggestive of strong and diverse antimicrobial selection associated with food animal production. PMID:22354957

  1. Time-Scaled Evolutionary Analysis of the Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, C. L.; McAdam, P. R.; van Bunnik, B. A. D.; Girvan, E. K.; Edwards, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. R.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) is associated with disease in humans and livestock, and its origins and transmission have generated considerable interest. We performed a time-scaled phylogenetic analysis of CC398, including sequenced isolates from the United Kingdom (Scotland), along with publicly available genomes. Using state-of-the-art methods for mapping traits onto phylogenies, we quantified transitions between host species to identify sink and source populations for CC398 and employed a novel approach to investigate the gain and loss of antibiotic resistance in CC398 over time. We identified distinct human- and livestock-associated CC398 clades and observed multiple transmissions of CC398 from livestock to humans and between countries, lending quantitative support to previous reports. Of note, we identified a subclade within the livestock-associated clade comprised of isolates from hospital environments and newborn babies, suggesting that livestock-associated CC398 is capable of onward transmission in hospitals. In addition, our analysis revealed significant differences in the dynamics of resistance to methicillin and tetracycline related to contrasting historical patterns of antibiotic usage between the livestock industry and human medicine. We also identified significant differences in patterns of gain and loss of different tetracycline resistance determinants, which we ascribe to epistatic interactions between the resistance genes and/or differences in the modes of inheritance of the resistance determinants. PMID:25239891

  2. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-J; Huang, Y-C

    2014-07-01

    Not only is Asia the most populous region in the world, but inappropriate therapy, including self-medication with over-the-counter antimicrobial agents, is a common response to infectious diseases. The high antibiotic selective pressure among the overcrowded inhabitants creates an environment that is suitable for the rapid development and efficient spread of numerous multidrug-resistant pathogens. Indeed, Asia is among the regions with the highest prevalence rates of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) in the world. Most hospitals in Asia are endemic for multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with an estimated proportion from 28% (in Hong Kong and Indonesia) to >70% (in Korea) among all clinical S. aureus isolates in the early 2010s. Isolates with reduced susceptibility or a high level of resistance to glycopeptides have also been increasingly identified in the past few years. In contrast, the proportion of MRSA among community-associated S. aureus infections in Asian countries varies markedly, from <5% to >35%. Two pandemic HA-MRSA clones, namely multilocus sequence type (ST) 239 and ST5, are disseminated internationally in Asia, whereas the molecular epidemiology of CA-MRSA in Asia is characterized by clonal heterogeneity, similar to that in Europe. In this review, the epidemiology of S. aureus in both healthcare facilities and communities in Asia is addressed, with an emphasis on the prevalence, clonal structure and antibiotic resistant profiles of the MRSA strains. The novel MRSA strains from livestock animals have been considered to constitute a public health threat in western countries. The emerging livestock-associated MRSA strains in Asia are also included in this review.

  3. First overview of the Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) livestock associated species of Reunion Island, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Desvars, A; Grimaud, Y; Guis, H; Esnault, O; Allène, X; Gardès, L; Balenghien, T; Baldet, T; Delécolle, J C; Garros, C

    2015-02-01

    This study establishes the first faunistic inventory of livestock associated Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species of Reunion Island (Indian Ocean), where bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease are regularly recorded. Single night-catches were performed at 41 sites using light suction traps at altitudes ranging from 0 to 1525 m, from March to April 2005. Five species were recorded: Culicoides imicola, Culicoides bolitinos, Culicoides enderleini, Culicoides grahamii, and Culicoides kibatiensis, among which at least the first three species are known to be involved in virus transmission to ruminants and equids. This is the first record of C. bolitinos, C. kibatiensis, and C. enderleini on the island. C. imicola was the most abundant species along the sea coast. C. bolitinos was more abundant inland and on two sites on the east coast. C. kibatiensis and C. grahamii were less abundant than the other three species and limited to two foci. Spatial distribution analysis of the different species showed that C. bolitinos, C. enderleini and C. imicola were collected at low altitudes, while the other two species were found at higher altitude. A morphological identification key for adult females and males is given, as well as cytochrome oxydase subunit I sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions showed a clear divergence between C. bolitinos from Reunion Island and mainland Africa. This monograph will help to identify the Culicoides species in the poorly known entomological fauna of the south-western Indian Ocean region.

  4. Bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus efficiently package various bacterial genes and mobile genetic elements including SCCmec with different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mašlaňová, Ivana; Doškař, Jiří; Varga, Marian; Kuntová, Lucie; Mužík, Jan; Malúšková, Denisa; Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human and veterinary pathogen in which new strains with increasing virulence and antimicrobial resistance occur due to acquiring new genes by horizontal transfer. It is generally accepted that temperate bacteriophages play a major role in gene transfer. In this study, we proved the presence of various bacterial genes of the S. aureus COL strain directly within the phage particles via qPCR and quantified their packaging frequency. Non-parametric statistical analysis showed that transducing bacteriophages φ11, φ80 and φ80α of serogroup B, in contrast to serogroup A bacteriophage φ81, efficiently package selected chromosomal genes localized in 4 various loci of the chromosome and 8 genes carried on variable elements, such as staphylococcal cassette chromosome SCCmec, staphylococcal pathogenicity island SaPI1, genomic islands vSaα and vSaβ, and plasmids with various frequency. Bacterial gene copy number per ng of DNA isolated from phage particles ranged between 1.05 × 10(2) for the tetK plasmid gene and 3.86 × 10(5) for the SaPI1 integrase gene. The new and crucial finding that serogroup B bacteriophages can package concurrently ccrA1 (1.16 × 10(4)) and mecA (1.26 × 10(4)) located at SCCmec type I into their capsids indicates that generalized transduction plays an important role in the evolution and emergence of new methicillin-resistant clones.

  5. Livestock-Associated MRSA Carriage in Patients without Direct Contact with Livestock

    PubMed Central

    van Rijen, Miranda M. L.; Bosch, Thijs; Verkade, Erwin J. M.; Schouls, Leo; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Livestock-associated MRSA (MC398) has emerged and is related to an extensive reservoir in pigs and veal calves. Individuals with direct contact with these animals and their family members are known to have high MC398 carriage rates. Until now it was assumed that MC398 does not spread to individuals in the community without pig or veal calf exposure. To test this, we identified the proportion of MC398 in MRSA positive individuals without contact with pigs/veal calves or other known risk factors (MRSA of unknown origin; MUO). Methods In 17 participating hospitals, we determined during two years the occurrence of MC398 in individuals without direct contact with livestock and no other known risk factor (n = 271) and tested in a post analysis the hypothesis whether hospitals in pig-dense areas have higher proportions of MC398 of all MUO. Results Fifty-six individuals (20.7%) without animal contact carried MC398. In hospitals with high pig-densities in the adherence area, the proportion of MC398 of all MUO was higher than this proportion in hospitals without pigs in the surroundings. Conclusions One fifth of the individuals carrying MUO carried MC398. So, MC398 is found in individuals without contact to pigs or veal calves. The way of transmission from the animal reservoir to these individuals is unclear, probably by human-to-human transmission or by exposure to the surroundings of the stables. Further research is needed to investigate the way of transmission. PMID:25000521

  6. Natural product derivatives with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua B; Smith, Adrienne E; Kusche, Brian R; Bessette, Bradley A; Swain, P Whitney; Bergmeier, Stephen C; McMills, Mark C; Wright, Dennis L; Priestley, Nigel D

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the intentional engineering of a natural product biosynthesis pathway is a useful way to generate stereochemically complex scaffolds for use in the generation of combinatorial libraries that capture the structural features of both natural products and synthetic compounds. Analysis of a prototype library based upon nonactic acid lead to the discovery of triazole-containing nonactic acid analogs, a new structural class of antibiotic that exhibits bactericidal activity against drug resistant, Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Staphylococcus aureus Strain Isolated from a Cow with Clinical Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Paresh; Reddy, D. Peddi; Kumar, P. Anand; Gadicherla, Ramya; George, Neena

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Staphylococcus aureus causing clinical mastitis in a cow from India. It is a major causative agent of mastitis and, further, livestock-associated strains are emerging as a potential threat to public health, thereby warranting studies to understand the genome of this deadly pathogen. PMID:26294628

  8. Epidemiology and genotypic characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains of porcine origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA in pigs and pork. Genotypic relatedness of isolates on-farm, at slaughter and retail was assessed. Paired nasal and peri-anal swab samples we...

  9. Effects of Reducing Antimicrobial Use and Applying a Cleaning and Disinfection Program in Veal Calf Farming: Experiences from an Intervention Study to Control Livestock-Associated MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Marian E. H.; Verstappen, Koen M.; Van Cleef, Brigitte A. G. L.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Heederik, Dick J. J.

    2015-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of containing the emergence of resistant bacteria, a Dutch policy was set in place in 2010 promoting a reduction of antimicrobial use (AMU) in food-producing animals. In this context, a study evaluated strategies to curb livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). Fifty-one veal calf farms were assigned to one of 3 study arms: RAB farms reducing antimicrobials by protocol; RAB-CD farms reducing antimicrobials by protocol and applying a cleaning and disinfection program; and Control farms without interventions. MRSA carriage was tested in week 0 and week 12 of 2 consecutive production cycles in farmers, family members and veal calves. Interventions were validated and a cyclic rise in MRSA-prevalence in animals was shown with a more moderate increase in RAB farms. Prevalence in humans declined parallel over time in the study arms but RAB farms were at the lowest MRSA levels from the beginning of the study. In RAB-CD farms, human and animal prevalence did not differ from Control farms and MRSA air loads were significantly higher than in the other study arms. Mimicking the national trend, an overall AMU decrease (daily dosages per animal per cycle (DDDA/C)) was observed over 4 pre-study and the 2 study cycles; this trend did not have a significant effect on a set of evaluated farm technical parameters. AMU was positively associated with MRSA across study arms (ORs per 10 DDDA/C increase = 1.26 for both humans (p = 0.07) and animals (p = 0.12 in first cycle)). These results suggest that AMU reduction might be a good strategy for curbing MRSA in veal calf farming, however the specific cleaning and disinfecting program in RAB-CD farms was not effective. The drop in MRSA prevalence in people during the study could be attributed to the observed long-term AMU decreasing trend. PMID:26305895

  10. Effects of Reducing Antimicrobial Use and Applying a Cleaning and Disinfection Program in Veal Calf Farming: Experiences from an Intervention Study to Control Livestock-Associated MRSA.

    PubMed

    Dorado-García, Alejandro; Graveland, Haitske; Bos, Marian E H; Verstappen, Koen M; Van Cleef, Brigitte A G L; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Heederik, Dick J J

    2015-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of containing the emergence of resistant bacteria, a Dutch policy was set in place in 2010 promoting a reduction of antimicrobial use (AMU) in food-producing animals. In this context, a study evaluated strategies to curb livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). Fifty-one veal calf farms were assigned to one of 3 study arms: RAB farms reducing antimicrobials by protocol; RAB-CD farms reducing antimicrobials by protocol and applying a cleaning and disinfection program; and Control farms without interventions. MRSA carriage was tested in week 0 and week 12 of 2 consecutive production cycles in farmers, family members and veal calves. Interventions were validated and a cyclic rise in MRSA-prevalence in animals was shown with a more moderate increase in RAB farms. Prevalence in humans declined parallel over time in the study arms but RAB farms were at the lowest MRSA levels from the beginning of the study. In RAB-CD farms, human and animal prevalence did not differ from Control farms and MRSA air loads were significantly higher than in the other study arms. Mimicking the national trend, an overall AMU decrease (daily dosages per animal per cycle (DDDA/C)) was observed over 4 pre-study and the 2 study cycles; this trend did not have a significant effect on a set of evaluated farm technical parameters. AMU was positively associated with MRSA across study arms (ORs per 10 DDDA/C increase = 1.26 for both humans (p = 0.07) and animals (p = 0.12 in first cycle)). These results suggest that AMU reduction might be a good strategy for curbing MRSA in veal calf farming, however the specific cleaning and disinfecting program in RAB-CD farms was not effective. The drop in MRSA prevalence in people during the study could be attributed to the observed long-term AMU decreasing trend.

  11. Incidence, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Toxin Genes Possession Screening of Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards

    PubMed Central

    Abdalrahman, Lubna S.; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2015-01-01

    Few recent outbreaks in Europe and the US involving Campylobacter and Salmonella were linked to the consumption of chicken livers. Studies investigating Staphylococcus aureus in chicken livers and gizzards are very limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence of S. aureus and MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in retail chicken livers and gizzards in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In this study, 156 chicken livers and 39 chicken gizzards samples of two brands were collected. While one of the brands showed very low prevalence of 1% (1/100) for S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards, the second brand showed prevalence of 37% (31/95). No MRSA was detected since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. Eighty seven S. aureus isolates from livers and 28 from gizzards were screened for antimicrobial resistance to 16 antimicrobials and the possession of 18 toxin genes. Resistance to most of the antimicrobials screened including cefoxitin and oxacillin was higher in the chicken gizzards isolates. While the prevalence of enterotoxin genes seg and sei was higher in the gizzards isolates, the prevalence of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, and hld was higher in the livers ones. The lucocidin genes lukE-lukD was equally prevalent in chicken livers and gizzards isolates. Using spa typing, a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are not known to be livestock associated and, hence, may be of a human origin. In conclusion, this study stresses the importance of thorough cooking of chicken livers and gizzards since it might contain multidrug resistant enterotoxigenic S. aureus. To our knowledge this is the first study to specifically investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards in the US. PMID:28231192

  12. Human Clostridium difficile infection caused by a livestock-associated PCR ribotype 237 strain in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mc Govern, Alan M.; Foster, Niki F.; Pereira, Lynette A.; Knight, Daniel R.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant gastrointestinal disease in the developed world and increasingly recognised as a zoonotic infection. In North America and Europe, the PCR ribotype (RT) 078 strain of C. difficile is commonly found in production animals and as a cause of disease in humans although proof of transmission from animals is lacking. This strain is absent in Australian livestock. We report a case of human CDI caused by a strain of C. difficile belonging to known Australian livestock-associated RT 237. Case presentation: A young male was admitted for multiple trauma following a motor vehicle accident and placed on piperacillin/tazobactam for pneumonia. After 4 days of treatment, he developed symptoms of CDI, which was confirmed in the laboratory. His symptoms resolved after 6 days of intravenous metronidazole. The strain of C. difficile isolated was identified as RT 237, an unusual RT previously found in with several Western Australia piggeries. Conclusion: This case of CDI caused by an unusual livestock-associated C. difficile RT 237 supports the hypothesis of zoonotic transmission. The case highlights the potential of livestock to act as reservoir for C. difficile and the need for continued surveillance of CDI in both human and animal populations. PMID:28348781

  13. Bullous impetigo in children infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus alone or in combination with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: analysis of genetic characteristics, including assessment of exfoliative toxin gene carriage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Da; Higuchi, Wataru; Takano, Tomomi; Saito, Kohei; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao; Nitahara, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2011-05-01

    Among bullous impetigo isolates, exfoliative toxin (ET) gene carriage was found in 61.5% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates versus 90.6% of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. MRSA-only cases were ETB or ETA positive, while MRSA/MSSA coinfection cases were ET negative for MRSA but ETA positive for MSSA. Collagen adhesin may facilitate some MRSA infections.

  14. Susceptibility trends including emergence of linezolid resistance among coagulase-negative staphylococci and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Desroches, Marine; Bourgeois-Nicolaos, Nadège; Potier, Julien; Jehl, François; Lina, Gérard; Cattoir, Vincent; Vandenesh, François; Doucet-Populaire, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Multiresistance in staphylococci constitutes a major challenge for the antimicrobial chemotherapy of invasive infections such as bacteraemia or bone and joint infections (BJIs). A nationwide prospective study was performed to detect antimicrobial resistance trends among staphylococci causing invasive infections. Between October 2011 and February 2012, 367 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 695 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were collected from 37 French hospitals, mainly from bacteraemia (59.9%) and osteoarticular infections (29.0%). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution, and specific screening and confirmation tests were performed to detect heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA). Staphylococcal isolates exhibiting a linezolid MIC>4 mg/L were further characterised to determinate their clonal relationships and the mechanism of resistance. MRSA exhibited additional resistances, including levofloxacin (82% associated resistance), gentamicin (13.6%), fusidic acid (13.6%) and rifampicin (6.5%), compromising oral step-down therapy in BJIs. Only two hVISA strains (0.5%) were identified. Among the CoNS, mainly Staphylococcus epidermidis (506/695; 72.8%), resistance to first- and second-line agents was more common. Linezolid resistance was identified in 10 CoNS (1.4%). The most frequent linezolid resistance mechanism was the G2576T mutation in 23S rDNA (9/10). For the first time in France, the cfr gene was found in five related sequence type 2 (ST2) S. epidermidis from two different hospitals, in association with ribosomal RNA and L3 ribosomal protein mutations. These national data must be considered when selecting empirical treatment for invasive staphylococcal infections. Moreover, the emergence and spread of linezolid-resistant CoNS carrying the cfr gene is of concern.

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 in Humans and Pigs in Norway: A “One Health” Perspective on Introduction and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Grøntvedt, Carl Andreas; Elstrøm, Petter; Stegger, Marc; Skov, Robert Leo; Skytt Andersen, Paal; Larssen, Kjersti Wik; Urdahl, Anne Margrete; Angen, Øystein; Larsen, Jesper; Åmdal, Solfrid; Løtvedt, Siri Margrete; Sunde, Marianne; Bjørnholt, Jørgen Vildershøj

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) persist in livestock populations and represent a reservoir for transmission to humans. Understanding the routes of introduction and further transmission is crucial to control this threat to human health. Methods. All reported cases of livestock-associated MRSA (CC398) in humans and pigs in Norway between 2008 and 2014 were included. Data were collected during an extensive outbreak investigation, including contact tracing and stringent surveillance. Whole-genome sequencing of isolates from all human cases and pig farms was performed to support and expand the epidemiological findings. The national strategy furthermore included a “search-and-destroy” policy at the pig farm level. Results. Three outbreak clusters were identified, including 26 pig farms, 2 slaughterhouses, and 36 humans. Primary introductions likely occurred by human transmission to 3 sow farms with secondary transmission to other pig farms, mainly through animal trade and to a lesser extent via humans or livestock trucks. All MRSA CC398 isolated from humans without an epidemiological link to the outbreaks were genetically distinct from isolates within the outbreak clusters indicating limited dissemination to the general population. Conclusions. This study identified preventable routes of MRSA CC398 introduction and transmission: human occupational exposure, trade of pigs and livestock transport vehicles. These findings are essential for keeping pig populations MRSA free and, from a “One Health” perspective, preventing pig farms from becoming reservoirs for MRSA transmission to humans. PMID:27516381

  16. A phylogenomic framework for assessing the global emergence and evolution of clonal complex 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Baines, Sarah L.; Carter, Glen P.; Heffernan, Helen; French, Nigel P.; Ren, Xiaoyun; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter; Kwong, Jason; Stinear, Timothy P.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    Distinct clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have emerged as important causes of infection in individuals who have exposure to livestock (livestock-associated MRSA; LA-MRSA). Clonal complex 398 (CC398) is the most prevalent LA-MRSA clone, and has been reported from several geographical settings, including Europe, the Americas and Asia. To understand the factors contributing to the global dissemination of this clone, we analysed CC398 MRSA isolates from New Zealand (NZ), a geographically isolated country with an economy strongly dependent on livestock farming. We supplemented the NZ CC398 MRSA collection with global datasets of CC398 MRSA and CC398 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. Here, we demonstrate multiple sporadic incursions of CC398 MRSA into NZ, as well as recent importation and spread of a swine-associated clade related to the European LA-MRSA lineage. Within a larger global phylogenomic framework, Bayesian modelling suggested that this NZ clade emerged in the late 2000s, with a probable origin in swine from Western Europe. Elucidating the factors responsible for the incursion and spread of LA-MRSA in geographically distant regions, such as NZ, provides important insights into global pathways of S. aureus transmission, and will inform strategies to control importation and spread. PMID:28348878

  17. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  18. Isolation and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from pork farms and visiting veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Frana, Timothy S; Beahm, Aleigh R; Hanson, Blake M; Kinyon, Joann M; Layman, Lori L; Karriker, Locke A; Ramirez, Alejandro; Smith, Tara C

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (LA-MRSA) has become a public health concern in many parts of the world. Sequence type 398 (ST398) has been the most commonly reported type of LA-MRSA. While many studies have focused on long-term exposure experienced by swine workers, this study focuses on short-term exposures experienced by veterinary students conducting diagnostic investigations. The objectives were to assess the rate of MRSA acquisition and longevity of carriage in students exposed to pork farms and characterize the recovered MRSA isolates. Student nasal swabs were collected immediately before and after farm visits. Pig nasal swabs and environmental sponge samples were also collected. MRSA isolates were identified biochemically and molecularly including spa typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Thirty (30) veterinary students were enrolled and 40 pork farms were visited. MRSA was detected in 30% of the pork farms and in 22% of the students following an exposure to a MRSA-positive pork farm. All students found to be MRSA-positive initially following farm visit were negative for MRSA within 24 hours post visit. Most common spa types recovered were t002 (79%), t034 (16%) and t548 (4%). Spa types found in pork farms closely matched those recovered from students with few exceptions. Resistance levels to antimicrobials varied, but resistance was most commonly seen for spectinomycin, tetracyclines and neomycin. Non-ST398 MRSA isolates were more likely to be resistant to florfenicol and neomycin as well as more likely to be multidrug resistant compared to ST398 MRSA isolates. These findings indicate that MRSA can be recovered from persons visiting contaminated farms. However, the duration of carriage was very brief and most likely represents contamination of nasal passages rather than biological colonization. The most common spa types found in this study were associated with ST5 and expands the range of livestock-associated

  19. The Recombinant Bacteriophage Endolysin HY-133 Exhibits In Vitro Activity against Different African Clonal Lineages of the Staphylococcus aureus Complex, Including Staphylococcus schweitzeri.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Schaumburg, Frieder; Knaack, Dennis; Scherzinger, Anna S; Mutter, Wolfgang; Peters, Georg; Peschel, Andreas; Becker, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    HY-133 is a recombinant bacteriophage endolysin with bactericidal activity againstStaphylococcus aureus Here, HY-133 showedin vitroactivity against major African methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistantS. aureuslineages and ceftaroline/ceftobiprole- and borderline oxacillin-resistant isolates. HY-133 was also active againstStaphylococcus schweitzeri, a recently described species of theS. aureuscomplex. The activity of HY-133 on the tested isolates (MIC50, 0.25 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml; range, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml) was independent of the species and strain background or antibiotic resistance.

  20. Mycelium of fungi isolated from mouldy foods inhibits Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA – A rationale for the re-introduction of mycotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Alnaimat, Sulaiman; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh H.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Al-Johny, Bassam O.; Wainwright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal mycelium capable of producing antibacterial agents was isolated from samples of apple, beetroot, lemon and orange; the mycelium of all isolates produced penicillin, while the apple and beetroot samples also produced the antibacterial mycotoxin patulin. The known penicillin-producing fungi were shown to produce penicillin, but not patulin. The mycelial discs of all of fruit and vegetable isolates, as well as the two known penicillin producing fungi, inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, and mycelium of all isolates inhibited MRSA, in contrast, only one of the two known penicillin-producers did so. The results are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the mycelium of Penicillium species in mycotherapy. PMID:26288565

  1. MRSA and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. retail meats, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Mukherjee, Sampa; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Davis, Johnnie A; Tran, Thu Thuy T; Yang, Qianru; Abbott, Jason W; Ayers, Sherry L; Young, Shenia R; Crarey, Emily T; Womack, Niketta A; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been detected in retail meats, although large-scale studies are scarce. We conducted a one-year survey in 2010-2011 within the framework of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Among 3520 retail meats collected from eight U.S. states, 982 (27.9%) contained S. aureus and 66 (1.9%) were positive for MRSA. Approximately 10.4% (107/1032) of S. aureus isolates, including 37.2% (29/78) of MRSA, were multidrug-resistant (MDRSA). Turkey had the highest MRSA prevalence (3.5%), followed by pork (1.9%), beef (1.7%), and chicken (0.3%). Whole-genome sequencing was performed for all 66 non-redundant MRSA. Among five multilocus sequence types identified, ST8 (72.7%) and ST5 (22.7%) were most common and livestock-associated MRSA ST398 was assigned to one pork isolate. Eleven spa types were represented, predominately t008 (43.9%) and t2031 (22.7%). All four types of meats harbored t008, whereas t2031 was recovered from turkey only. The majority of MRSA (84.8%) possessed SCCmec IV and 62.1% harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that all ST8 MRSA belonged to the predominant human epidemic clone USA300, and others included USA100 and USA200. We conclude that a diverse MRSA population was present in U.S. retail meats, albeit at low prevalence.

  2. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus isolates: the "mec alphabet" with specific consideration of mecC, a mec homolog associated with zoonotic S. aureus lineages.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Ballhausen, Britta; Köck, Robin; Kriegeskorte, André

    2014-10-01

    Livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have globally emerged during the past decade. In Europe, this was particularly due to the occurrence of LA-MRSA strains associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, more recently animal-adapted clonal lineages of S. aureus showing phenotypic methicillin resistance have been identified such as CC130, CC599, CC59, CC1943 and CC425. These newly emerging LA-MRSA CCs/STs caused infections in animals and zoonoses in humans. In contrast to other S. aureus clonal lineages, the methicillin resistance of the latter CCs/STs is based on a mecA gene homolog, designated mecC, which is part of a distinct SCCmec type (SCCmec XI). Including mecB found in Macrococcus caseolyticus, henceforth, the "mec alphabet" comprises three major gene types with several allotypes. As known for mecA, the gene homolog mecC is also not restricted to S. aureus, but found in several staphylococcal species including S. sciuri, S. stepanovicii and S. xylosus (mecC1 allotype). First investigations showed a wide geographical distribution of mecC-MRSA in Europe and a broad diversity of host species including livestock, companion and wildlife animals. In particular, wild rodents and insectivores might serve as reservoir for staphylococci harboring mecC. Economic burden may be caused by mastitis of dairy cattle. Livestock animals may likely serve as source for human infections with mecC-MRSA; reported cases comprise skin and soft tissue infections, osteomyelitis and bacteremia. Due to the divergent molecular nature of mecC-MRSA, its diagnostics is hampered by difficulties to verify the methicillin resistance using phenotypic as well as DNA-based procedures, which could have negative consequences for therapy of mecC-MRSA-caused infections.

  3. Short communication: Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in bulk tank milk from dairy goat farms in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cortimiglia, C; Bianchini, V; Franco, A; Caprioli, A; Battisti, A; Colombo, L; Stradiotto, K; Vezzoli, F; Luini, M

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is regarded as a leading cause of mastitis in goats. However, few data are available on the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in this species. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in bulk tank milk samples from dairy goat farms in Northern Italy. Eighty-five out of 197 samples (43.1%) tested positive for S. aureus with counts ranging from 10 to more than 1.5 × 10(4) cfu/mL. The MRSA was screened by both direct plating followed by a disk diffusion test to evaluate methicillin resistance and a selective enrichment method. Methicillin-resistance was confirmed by mecA-specific PCR. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus was identified in 4 samples (2.0%) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed the presence of livestock-associated MRSA belonging to lineages ST398 (n = 3) and ST1 (n = 1). In one case we demonstrated that the same MRSA strain was able to persist over time on the farm, being isolated from both bulk tank milk and the udder of 3 goats 1 yr after the first isolation. The high prevalence of S. aureus-positive herds detected in this study and the presence of MRSA strains belonging to livestock-associated genotypes is of concern, and represents a novel finding in the Italian dairy goat production system. The application of stringent measures for the control of S. aureus mastitis at the farm level seems appropriate to reduce the economic losses, and to minimize the risk of foodborne illness and the transmission of MRSA to humans by occupational exposure.

  4. Local circulating clones of Staphylococcus aureus in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jeannete; Barba, Pedro; Ortega-Paredes, David; Mora, Marcelo; Rivadeneira, Sebastián

    The spread of pandemic Staphylococcus aureus clones, mainly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), must be kept under surveillance to assemble an accurate, local epidemiological analysis. In Ecuador, the prevalence of the USA300 Latin American variant clone (USA300-LV) is well known; however, there is little information about other circulating clones. The aim of this work was to identify the sequence types (ST) using a Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis 14-locus genotyping approach. We analyzed 132 S. aureus strains that were recovered from 2005 to 2013 and isolated in several clinical settings in Quito, Ecuador. MRSA isolates composed 46.97% (62/132) of the study population. Within MRSA, 37 isolates were related to the USA300-LV clone (ST8-MRSA-IV, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin [PVL] +) and 10 were related to the Brazilian clone (ST239-MRSA-III, PVL-). Additionally, two isolates (ST5-MRSA-II, PVL-) were related to the New York/Japan clone. One isolate was related to the Pediatric clone (ST5-MRSA-IV, PVL-), one isolate (ST45-MRSA-II, PVL-) was related to the USA600 clone, and one (ST22-MRSA-IV, PVL-) was related to the epidemic UK-EMRSA-15 clone. Moreover, the most prevalent MSSA sequence types were ST8 (11 isolates), ST45 (8 isolates), ST30 (8 isolates), ST5 (7 isolates) and ST22 (6 isolates). Additionally, we found one isolate that was related to the livestock associated S. aureus clone ST398. We conclude that in addition to the high prevalence of clone LV-ST8-MRSA-IV, other epidemic clones are circulating in Quito, such as the Brazilian, Pediatric and New York/Japan clones. The USA600 and UK-EMRSA-15 clones, which were not previously described in Ecuador, were also found. Moreover, we found evidence of the presence of the livestock associated clone ST398 in a hospital environment.

  5. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Ready-to-Eat Foods in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Guo, Weipeng; Huang, Jiahui; Cai, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in humans, and its presence in food is a public health concern. MRSA has been identified in foods in China, but little information is available regarding MRSA in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in Chinese retail RTE foods. All isolated S. aureus were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, and MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Of the 550 RTE foods collected from 2011 to 2014, 69 (12.5%) were positive for S. aureus. Contamination levels were mostly in the range of 0.3–10 most probable number (MPN)/g, with five samples exceeding 10 MPN/g. Of the 69 S. aureus isolates, seven were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Six isolates were mecA-positive, while no mecC-positive isolates were identified. In total, 75.8% (47/62) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates and all of the MRSA isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Amongst the MRSA isolates, four were identified as community-acquired strains (ST59-MRSA-IVa (n = 2), ST338-MRSA-V, ST1-MRSA-V), while one was a livestock-associated strain (ST9, harboring an unreported SCCmec type 2C2). One novel sequence type was identified (ST3239), the SCCmec gene of which could not be typed. Overall, our findings showed that Chinese retail RTE foods are likely vehicles for transmission of multidrug-resistant S. aureus and MRSA lineages. This is a serious public health risk and highlights the need to implement good hygiene practices. PMID:27375562

  6. Staphylococcus aureus: superbug, super genome?

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Jodi A; Holden, Matthew T G

    2004-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of infection in both hospitals and the community, and it is becoming increasingly virulent and resistant to antibiotics. The recent sequencing of seven strains of S. aureus provides unprecedented information about its genome diversity. Subtle differences in core (stable) regions of the genome have been exploited by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to understand S. aureus population structure. Dramatic differences in the carriage and spread of accessory genes, including those involved in virulence and resistance, contribute to the emergence of new strains with healthcare implications. Understanding the differences between S. aureus genomes and the controls that govern these changes is helping to improve our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenicity and to predict the evolution of super-superbugs.

  7. Trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and impacts of infection control practices including universal MRSA admission screening in a hospital in Scotland, 2006–2010: retrospective cohort study and time-series intervention analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Becky; López-Lozano, José-Maria; Gould, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe secular trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) and to assess the impacts of infection control practices, including universal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) admission screening on associated clinical burdens. Design Retrospective cohort study and multivariate time-series analysis linking microbiology, patient management and health intelligence databases. Setting Teaching hospital in North East Scotland. Participants All patients admitted to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010: n=420 452 admissions and 1 430 052 acute occupied bed days (AOBDs). Intervention Universal admission screening programme for MRSA (August 2008) incorporating isolation and decolonisation. Primary and secondary measures Hospital-wide prevalence density, hospital-associated incidence density and death within 30 days of MRSA or methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteraemia. Results Between 2006 and 2010, prevalence density of all SAB declined by 41%, from 0.73 to 0.50 cases/1000 AOBDs (p=0.002 for trend), and 30-day mortality from 26% to 14% (p=0.013). Significant reductions were observed in MRSA bacteraemia only. Overnight admissions screened for MRSA rose from 43% during selective screening to >90% within 4 months of universal screening. In multivariate time-series analysis (R2 0.45 to 0.68), universal screening was associated with a 19% reduction in prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia (−0.035, 95% CI −0.049 to −0.021/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001), a 29% fall in hospital-associated incidence density (−0.029, 95% CI −0.035 to −0.023/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001) and a 46% reduction in 30-day mortality (−15.6, 95% CI −24.1% to −7.1%; p<0.001). Positive associations with fluoroquinolone and cephalosporin use suggested that antibiotic stewardship reduced prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia by 0.027 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.039)/1000 AOBDs. Rates of MSSA bacteraemia were not

  8. Putative link between Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage serotype and community association.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, D H; Saberesheikh, S; Kearns, A M; Saunders, N A

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans can be broadly separated into 3 groups: healthcare-associated (HA), community-associated (CA), and livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. Initially based on epidemiological features, division into these classes is becoming increasingly problematic. The sequencing of S. aureus genomes has highlighted variations in their accessory components, which likely account for differences in pathogenicity and epidemicity. In particular, temperate bacteriophages have been regarded as key players in bacterial pathogenesis. Bacteriophage-associated Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes (luk-PV) are regarded as epidemiological markers of the CA-MRSA due to their high prevalence in CA strains. This paper describes the development and application of a partial composite S. aureus virulence-associated gene microarray. Epidemic, pandemic, and sporadic lineages of UK HA and CA S. aureus were compared. Phage structural genes linked with CA isolates were identified and in silico analysis revealed these to be correlated with phage serogroup. CA strains predominantly carried a PVL-associated phage either of the A or Fb serogroup, whilst HA strains predominantly carried serogroup Fa or B phages. We speculate that carriage of a serogroup A/Fb PVL-associated phage rather than the luk-PV genes specifically is correlated with CA status.

  9. First report of swine-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ruzauskas, M; Couto, N; Belas, A; Klimiene, I; Siugzdiniene, R; Pomba, C

    2013-01-01

    During 2011, 160 nasal samples were taken from pigs on 8 different farms in Lithuania. Four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates were obtained. The isolates were ST398, spa type t011 and SCCmec V and none carried the lukF/lukS genes. Strains were resistant to tetracycline, attributed to tetK and tetM genes, and to erythromycin owing to the ermB gene. One MRSA strain was resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and carried the dfrK gene. This is the first report on the presence and characteristics of livestock-associated MRSA isolated from pigs in Lithuania.

  10. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and of methicillin-resistant S. aureus clonal complexes in bulk tank milk from dairy cattle herds in Lombardy Region (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Cortimiglia, C; Luini, M; Bianchini, V; Marzagalli, L; Vezzoli, F; Avisani, D; Bertoletti, M; Ianzano, A; Franco, A; Battisti, A

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most important causative agent of subclinical mastitis in cattle resulting in reduced milk production and quality. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains has a clear zoonotic relevance, especially in the case of occupational exposure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in bulk tank milk (BTM) from dairy cattle herds in the Lombardy Region (Northern Italy) and to identify the main MRSA circulating genotypes. MRSA strains were characterized by susceptibility testing, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing and SCCmec typing. A total 844 BTM samples were analysed and S. aureus and MRSA were detected in 47·2% and 3·8% of dairy herds, respectively. MLST showed that the majority (28/32) of isolates belonged to the typical livestock-associated lineages: ST398, ST97 and ST1. Interestingly, in this study we report for the first time the new ST3211, a single locus variant of ST(CC)22, with the newly described 462 aroE allele. Our study indicates high diffusion of S. aureus mastitis and low, but not negligible, prevalence of MRSA in the considered area, suggesting the need for planning specific control programmes for bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus, especially when MRSA is implicated.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus: methicillin-susceptible S. aureus to methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Susan J; Tice, Alan

    2010-09-15

    The evolution of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has demanded serious review of antimicrobial use and development of new agents and revised approaches to prevent and overcome drug resistance. Depending on local conditions and patient risk factors, empirical therapy of suspected S. aureus infection may require coverage of drug-resistant organisms with newer agents and novel antibiotic combinations. The question of treatment with inappropriate antibiotics raises grave concerns with regard to methicillin-resistant S. aureus selection, overgrowth, and increased virulence. Several strategies to reduce the nosocomial burden of resistance are suggested, including shortened hospital stays and outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy of the most serious infections.

  12. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus abscesses.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of human infections and syndromes-most notably skin and soft tissue infections. Abscesses are a frequent manifestation of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections and are formed, in part, to contain the nidus of infection. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are the primary cellular host defense against S. aureus infections and a major component of S. aureus abscesses. These host cells contain and produce many antimicrobial agents that are effective at killing bacteria, but can also cause non-specific damage to host tissues and contribute to the formation of abscesses. By comparison, S. aureus produces several molecules that also contribute to the formation of abscesses. Such molecules include those that recruit neutrophils, cause host cell lysis, and are involved in the formation of the fibrin capsule surrounding the abscess. Herein, we review our current knowledge of the mechanisms and processes underlying the formation of S. aureus abscesses, including the involvement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and provide a brief overview of therapeutic approaches.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with low within-herd prevalence of intra-mammary infections in dairy cows: Genotyping of isolates.

    PubMed

    Luini, M; Cremonesi, P; Magro, G; Bianchini, V; Minozzi, G; Castiglioni, B; Piccinini, R

    2015-08-05

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common mastitis-causing pathogens worldwide. In the last decade, livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (LA-MRSA) infections have been described in several species, included the bovines. Hence, this paper investigates the diffusion of MRSA within Italian dairy herds; the strains were further characterized using a DNA microarray, which detects 330 different sequences, including the methicillin-resistance genes mecA and mecC and SCCmec typing. The analysis of overall patterns allows the assignment to Clonal Complexes (CC). Overall 163 S. aureus isolates, collected from quarter milk samples in 61 herds, were tested. MRSA strains were further processed using spa typing. Fifteen strains (9.2%), isolated in 9 herds (14.75%), carried mecA, but none harboured mecC. MRSA detection was significantly associated (P<0.011) with a within-herd prevalence of S. aureus intra-mammary infections (IMI) ≤5%. Ten MRSA strains were assigned to CC398, the remaining ones to CC97 (n=2), CC1 (n=2) or CC8 (n=1). In 3 herds, MRSA and MSSA co-existed: CC97-MRSA with CC398-MSSA, CC1-MRSA with CC8-MSSA and CC398-MRSA with CC126-MSSA. The results of spa typing showed an overall similar profile of the strains belonging to the same CC: t127-CC1, t1730-CC97, t899 in 8 out of 10 CC398. In the remaining 2 isolates a new spa type, t14644, was identified. The single CC8 was a t3092. The SCCmec cassettes were classified as type IV, type V or type IV/V composite. All or most strains harboured the genes encoding the β-lactamase operon and the tetracycline resistance. Streptogramin resistance gene was related to CC398. Enterotoxin and leukocidin genes were carried only by CC1, CC8 and CC97-MRSA. The persistence of MRSA clones characterized by broader host range, in epidemiologically unrelated areas and in dairy herds with low prevalence of S. aureus IMI, might enhance the risk for adaptation to human species.

  14. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  15. Individual Predisposition to Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Pigs on the Basis of Quantification, Carriage Dynamics, and Serological Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Dahl, Jan; Elvstrøm, Anders; van Wamel, Willem J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on Staphylococcus aureus in pigs focused on livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and had a qualitative cross-sectional design. This study aimed to elucidate the frequency, load, and stability of S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs over time and investigated possible associations between carriage and immune response. Nasal swabs were collected three times weekly from 480 tagged adult pigs in 20 Danish production farms. S. aureus and MRSA were quantified on selective media by the most-probable-number method. The levels of IgG against 10 S. aureus antigens in serum were quantified in selected pigs by a Luminex assay. All the farms were positive for S. aureus and 15 for MRSA, leading to overall prevalences of persistent and intermittent carriers and noncarriers of 24, 52, and 23%, respectively. Carriage frequency and nasal loads were significantly higher on MRSA-positive farms. Logistic-regression modeling revealed the presence of individual pigs characterized by high nasal loads (≥10,000 CFU per swab) and stable carriage regardless of farm- and pen-associated factors. On the other hand, the humoral response was strongly influenced by these environmental factors. The existence of a minority of shedders contributing to maintenance of S. aureus within farms opens up new perspectives on the control of MRSA in pig farming. PMID:25501475

  16. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  17. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus - an overview.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Bari, M S; Bilkis, L; Haque, N; Haque, S; Sultana, S

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains those are resistant to methicillin are referred to as Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. These express mecA gene to produce altered penicillin binding protein. At present Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been increasing as a serious nosocomial and community pathogen having the property of multi drug resistant. Humans are the natural reservoir for Staphylococcus aureus and asymptomatic colonization is far more common than infection. Many hospitals of different country of the world including Bangladesh are struggling with increasing number of this versatile pathogen. Early and specific diagnosis is important to ensure a favourable outcome. In this paper we attempted to explore history, prevalence, transmission, risk factors, pathogenicity, laboratory diagnosis, prevention and control of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a critical review to provide some new upgrade regarding this super bug.

  18. Mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; Kobayashi, Scott D; Braughton, Kevin R; DeLeo, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial skin and soft tissue infections are abundant worldwide and many are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, S. aureus is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the USA. Here, we describe a mouse model of skin and soft tissue infection induced by subcutaneous inoculation of S. aureus. This animal model can be used to investigate a number of factors related to the pathogenesis of skin and soft tissue infections, including strain virulence and the contribution of specific bacterial molecules to disease, and it can be employed to test the potential effectiveness of antibiotic therapies or vaccine candidates.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Matthew M; Freire, Marcelo O; Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Lemon, Katherine P

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus-human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  20. Daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ryan; Dale, Suzanne E; Yamamura, Deborah; Stankus, Vida; Lee, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Due to the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility, newer antibiotics, including daptomycin, have been used to treat methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is approved to treat S aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis, and reports of S aureus with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin are infrequent. To our knowledge, the present report describes the first Canadian case of daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S aureus infection. PMID:23730321

  1. Prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Mohini; Wozniak, Daniel J; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus colonizes both artificial and tissue surfaces in humans causing chronic persistent infections that are difficult to cure. It is a notorious pathogen due to its antibiotic recalcitrance and phenotypic adaptability, both of which are facilitated by its ability to develop biofilms. S. aureus biofilms challenge conventional anti-infective approaches, most notably antibiotic therapy. Therefore there is an unmet need to develop and include parallel approaches that target S. aureus biofilm infections. This review discusses two broad anti-infective strategies: (1) preventative approaches (anti-biofilm surface coatings, the inclusion of biofilm-specific vaccine antigens); and (2) approaches aimed at eradicating established S. aureus biofilms, particularly those associated with implant infections. Advances in understanding the distinct nature of S. aureus biofilm development and pathogenesis have led to growing optimism in S. aureus biofilm targeted anti-infective strategies. Further research is needed however, to see the successful administration and validation of these approaches to the diverse types of infections caused by S. aureus biofilms from multiple clinical strains. PMID:26646248

  2. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Mark A.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  3. High incidence of antimicrobial resistant organisms including extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nasopharyngeal and blood isolates of HIV-infected children from Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Mark F; Wasserman, Elizabeth; Smit, Juanita; Whitelaw, Andrew; Zar, Heather J

    2008-01-01

    Background There is little information on nasopharyngeal (NP) flora or bacteremia in HIV-infected children. Our aim was to describe the organisms and antimicrobial resistance patterns in children enrolled in a prospective study comparing daily and three times weekly trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and isoniazid (INH) or placebo prophylaxis. Methods NP swabs were taken at baseline from HIV-infected children enrolled in the study. Standard microbiological techniques were used. Children were grouped according to previous or current exposure to TMP-SMX and whether enrolled to the study during a period of hospitalization. Blood culture results were also recorded within 12 months of baseline. Results Two hundred and three children, median age 1.8 (Interquartile [IQ]: 0.7–4) years had NP swabs submitted for culture. One hundred and eighty-four (90.7%) had either stage B or C HIV disease. One hundred and forty-one (69.8%) were receiving TMP-SMX and 19 (9.4%) were on antiretroviral therapy. The majority, 168 (82%) had a history of hospitalization and 91 (44.8%) were enrolled during a period of hospitalization. Thirty-two subjects (16.2%) died within 12 months of study entry. One hundred and eighty-one potential pathogens were found in 167 children. The most commonly isolated organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (48: 22.2%), Gram-negative respiratory organisms (Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis) (47: 21.8%), Staphylococcus aureus (44: 20.4%), Enterobacteriaceae 32 (14.8%) and Pseudomonas 5 (2.3%). Resistance to TMP-SMX occurred in > 80% of pathogens except for M. catarrhalis (2: 18.2% of tested organisms). TMP-SMX resistance tended to be higher in those receiving it at baseline (p = 0.065). Carriage of Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was significantly associated with being on TMP-SMX at baseline (p = 0.002). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to penicillin were determined for 18 S. pneumoniae isolates: 7 (38.9%) were fully sensitive

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Causing Childhood Pneumonia in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Gu, Fei-Fei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; He, Ping; Han, Li-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major pathogen causing pneumonia among children. To estimate the prevalence and molecular properties of S. aureus in children pneumonia in Shanghai, China, 107 hospitalized children with S. aureus pneumonia from two children's hospitals from January 2014 through June 2015 were studied. S. aureus isolates from the respiratory specimens were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, agr typing, toxin genes, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa, and SCCmec typing. Fifty-eight (54.2%, 58/107) were MSSA (methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus) and 49 (45.8%, 49/107) were MRSA. No isolates were found resistant to teicoplanin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, rifampicin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, or vancomycin. However, these isolates showed high resistant rates to erythromycin, fosfomycin-trometamol and clindamycin. The agrI (87/107, 81.3%) was the most common agr allele, followed by agrIII(10/107, 9.3%), agrII(9/107, 8.4%), and agrIV(1/107, 0.9%). Six pvl-positive isolates (3 MRSA and 3 MSSA) and 7 isolates of livestock associated clone ST398 (4 MRSA, 3 MSSA) were identified. CC59 was found in 35 isolates (33 MRSA and 2 MSSA), constituting majority of MRSA (33/49, 67.35%). The dominant CC were CC59 (32.7%), CC188 (13.1%), CC7 (12.1%) and CC398 (9.3%) while t172 (16.8%), t189 (12.1%), t437 (9.3%), and t091 (9.3%) were the most common spa types. In conclusion, more particular concern should appeal to ST59-SCCmecIV-t172/t437 as it is the most common epidemic clone causing pneumonia among children in Shanghai. PMID:28377752

  5. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the diversity and topography of S. aureus colonizing BU patients during treatment. Methodology We investigated the presence, diversity, and spatio-temporal distribution of S. aureus in 30 confirmed BU patients from Ghana during treatment. S. aureus was isolated from nose and wound swabs, and by replica plating of wound dressings collected bi-weekly from patients. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) and spa-typing, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested. Principal Findings Nineteen (63%) of the 30 BU patients tested positive for S. aureus at least once during the sampling period, yielding 407 S. aureus isolates. Detailed analysis of 91 isolates grouped these isolates into 13 MLVF clusters and 13 spa-types. Five (26%) S. aureus-positive BU patients carried the same S. aureus genotype in their anterior nares and wounds. S. aureus isolates from the wounds of seven (37%) patients were distributed over two different MLVF clusters. Wounds of three (16%) patients were colonized with isolates belonging to two different genotypes at the same time, and five (26%) patients were colonized with different S. aureus types over time. Five (17%) of the 30 included BU patients tested positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusion/Significance The present study showed that the wounds of many BU patients were contaminated with S. aureus, and that many BU patients from the different communities carried the same S. aureus genotype during treatment. This calls for improved wound care and hygiene. PMID:25658641

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Matthew M.; Freire, Marcelo O.; Gabrilska, Rebecca A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Lemon, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe–microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  7. The Staphylococcus aureus "superbug".

    PubMed

    Foster, Timothy J

    2004-12-01

    There has been some debate about the disease-invoking potential of Staphylococcus aureus strains and whether invasive disease is associated with particularly virulent genotypes, or "superbugs." A study in this issue of the JCI describes the genotyping of a large collection of nonclinical, commensal S. aureus strains from healthy individuals in a Dutch population. Extensive study of their genetic relatedness by amplified restriction fragment typing and comparison with strains that are associated with different types of infections revealed that the S. aureus population is clonal and that some strains have enhanced virulence. This is discussed in the context of growing interest in the mechanisms of bacterial colonization, antibiotic resistance, and novel vaccines.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  9. Bacillithiol: a key protective thiol in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perera, Varahenage R; Newton, Gerald L; Pogliano, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Bacillithiol is a low-molecular-weight thiol analogous to glutathione and is found in several Firmicutes, including Staphylococcus aureus. Since its discovery in 2009, bacillithiol has been a topic of interest because it has been found to contribute to resistance during oxidative stress and detoxification of electrophiles, such as the antibiotic fosfomycin, in S. aureus. The rapid increase in resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to available therapeutic agents is a great health concern, and many research efforts are focused on identifying new drugs and targets to combat this organism. This review describes the discovery of bacillithiol, studies that have elucidated the physiological roles of this molecule in S. aureus and other Bacilli, and the contribution of bacillithiol to S. aureus fitness during pathogenesis. Additionally, the bacillithiol biosynthesis pathway is evaluated as a novel drug target that can be utilized in combination with existing therapies to treat S. aureus infections.

  10. Use of natural antimicrobials from a food safety perspective for control of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Gustafson, John E; Li, Y; Crandall, Philip G; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important foodborne and environmental pathogen that can produce toxins in foods and cause infections in soft tissues. S. aureus that have developed resistance to the conventional antimicrobials are commonly called Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-Resistant S. aureus (VRSA). Their prevalence is believed to be due to the widespread use of antibiotics. Therefore, natural antimicrobials are in urgent demand as alternatives to conventional antibiotics to treat S. aureus infections. In this review, natural antimicrobials from plant, animal and microbiological origins are discussed, including their mode of action and mechanisms of bacterial resistance, major components, chemical structure, effectiveness, synergistic effects and future prospects.

  11. Population genetic structures of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cats and dogs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takashi; Tsubakishita, Sae; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Hongo, Isamu; Fukata, Tsuneo; Kabeya, Hidenori; Maruyama, Soichi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2012-06-01

    We determined the population genetic structures of feline and canine Staphylococcus aureus strains in Japan by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ecological analyses suggested that multiple feline-related S. aureus clones, including ST133, naturally occur as commensals and can cause endogenous infections in felines. In contrast, S. aureus populations do not likely include any clone that exhibits tropism in domestic dogs. Even if S. aureus infections occur in dogs, the pathologies are likely exogenous infections.

  12. Potassium Uptake Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gries, Casey M.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Bulock, Logan L.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Thomas, Vinai C.; Bose, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a leading cause of community-associated and nosocomial infections, Staphylococcus aureus requires sophisticated mechanisms that function to maintain cellular homeostasis in response to its exposure to changing environmental conditions. The adaptation to stress and maintenance of homeostasis depend largely on membrane activity, including supporting electrochemical gradients and synthesis of ATP. This is largely achieved through potassium (K+) transport, which plays an essential role in maintaining chemiosmotic homeostasis, affects antimicrobial resistance, and contributes to fitness in vivo. Here, we report that S. aureus Ktr-mediated K+ uptake is necessary for maintaining cytoplasmic pH and the establishment of a proton motive force. Metabolite analyses revealed that K+ deficiency affects both metabolic and energy states of S. aureus by impairing oxidative phosphorylation and directing carbon flux toward substrate-level phosphorylation. Taken together, these results underline the importance of K+ uptake in maintaining essential components of S. aureus metabolism. IMPORTANCE Previous studies describing mechanisms for K+ uptake in S. aureus revealed that the Ktr-mediated K+ transport system was required for normal growth under alkaline conditions but not under neutral or acidic conditions. This work focuses on the effect of K+ uptake on S. aureus metabolism, including intracellular pH and carbon flux, and is the first to utilize a pH-dependent green fluorescent protein (GFP) to measure S. aureus cytoplasmic pH. These studies highlight the role of K+ uptake in supporting proton efflux under alkaline conditions and uncover a critical role for K+ uptake in establishing efficient carbon utilization. PMID:27340697

  13. Recombination-mediated remodelling of host–pathogen interactions during Staphylococcus aureus niche adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, Laura E.; Richardson, Emily; Richards, Amy C.; Wilson, Gillian J.; Mendonca, Chriselle; Gupta, Ravi Kr.; McAdam, Paul R.; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Stephen; Black, Nikki S.; O'Gara, James P.; Lee, Chia Y.; Corander, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale recombination events have led to the emergence of epidemic clones of several major bacterial pathogens. However, the functional impact of the recombination on clonal success is not understood. Here, we identified a novel widespread hybrid clone (ST71) of livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus that evolved from an ancestor belonging to the major bovine lineage CC97, through multiple large-scale recombination events with other S. aureus lineages occupying the same ruminant niche. The recombination events, affecting a 329 kb region of the chromosome spanning the origin of replication, resulted in allele replacement and loss or gain of an array of genes influencing host–pathogen interactions. Of note, molecular functional analyses revealed that the ST71 hybrid clone has acquired multiple novel pathogenic traits associated with acquired and innate immune evasion and bovine extracellular matrix adherence. These findings provide a paradigm for the impact of large-scale recombination events on the rapid evolution of bacterial pathogens within defined ecological niches. PMID:28348819

  14. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals is of increasing interest, raising questions about the presence of MRSA in food of animal origin and potential sources of transmission to humans via the food chain. In this study, the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of MRSA isolates from 200 retail raw chicken samples in Egypt were determined. MRSA was detected by positive amplification of the mecA gene in 38% (76 of 200) of chicken samples analyzed. This represents a potential public health threat in Egypt, as this contamination rate seems to be the highest among other studies reported worldwide. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, and sec) were detected in all of the 288 MRSA isolates. Nonetheless, none of the strains tested carried tst, the gene encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Antimicrobial resistance of MRSA isolates was most frequently detected against penicillin (93.4%), ampicillin (88.9%), and cloxacillin (83.3%). These results suggest that retail chicken might be a significant potential source for transmission of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt. This underlines the need for stricter hygienic measures in chicken production in Egypt to minimize the risk of transmission of these strains to consumers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the isolation and molecular characterization of MRSA in retail chicken samples in Egypt.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus reservoirs during traditional Austrian raw milk cheese production.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Georg; Gonano, Monika; Kümmel, Judith; Barker, Gary C; Lebl, Karin; Bereuter, Othmar; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin; Stessl, Beatrix

    2014-11-01

    Sampling approaches following the dairy chain, including microbiological hygiene status of critical processing steps and physicochemical parameters, contribute to our understanding of how Staphylococcus aureus contamination risks can be minimised. Such a sampling approach was adopted in this study, together with rapid culture-independent quantification of Staph. aureus to supplement standard microbiological methods. A regional cheese production chain, involving 18 farms, was sampled on two separate occasions. Overall, 51·4% of bulk milk samples were found to be Staph. aureus positive, most of them (34·3%) at the limit of culture-based detection. Staph. aureus positive samples >100 cfu/ml were recorded in 17·1% of bulk milk samples collected mainly during the sampling in November. A higher number of Staph. aureus positive bulk milk samples (94·3%) were detected after applying the culture-independent approach. A concentration effect of Staph. aureus was observed during curd processing. Staph. aureus were not consistently detectable with cultural methods during the late ripening phase, but >100 Staph. aureus cell equivalents (CE)/ml or g were quantifiable by the culture-independent approach until the end of ripening. Enterotoxin gene PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing provided evidence that livestock adapted strains of Staph. aureus mostly dominate the post processing level and substantiates the belief that animal hygiene plays a pivotal role in minimising the risk of Staph. aureus associated contamination in cheese making. Therefore, the actual data strongly support the need for additional sampling activities and recording of physicochemical parameters during semi-hard cheese-making and cheese ripening, to estimate the risk of Staph. aureus contamination before consumption.

  16. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in dairy cattle herds, related swine farms, and humans in contact with herds.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Cremonesi, P; Caprioli, A; Carfora, V; Ianzano, A; Barberio, A; Morandi, S; Casula, A; Castiglioni, B; Bronzo, V; Moroni, P

    2017-01-01

    included swine, environmental, and human isolates from both farms. A high heterogeneity in the genetic and phenotypic profiles was observed in environmental isolates, in particular from farm B. These results demonstrate the possibility of a dynamic sharing and exchange of MRSA lineages or genotypes between different species and farm compartments in mixed-species farms. The risk of transmission between swine and related dairy cattle herds should be considered. Our findings also confirm the zoonotic potential of livestock-associated MRSA and underline the importance of applying biosecurity measures and good hygiene practices to prevent MRSA spread at the farm level and throughout the food production chain.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allan Garlik

    2003-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is still associated with a high mortality, and knowledge on risk factors and the clinical and the therapeutic aspects of SAB is still limited. This thesis focuses on the clinical aspects of SAB and its metastatic infections. In a study of all patients with bacteremia in Copenhagen County October 1992 through April 1993 (study I) we emphasized previous findings, that S. aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens in bacteremia, and in a case control study also in Copenhagen County 1994-95 (study II) we demonstrated, that not only an inserted central venous catheter and nasal S. aureus carriage but also hyponatremia and anemia are important risk factors for hospital-acquired SAB (study II). Studies on the treatment of SAB have pointed out, that the eradication of a primary is important, but there are only limited clinical studies dealing with antibiotic treatment. By logistic regression analysis, we were able to demonstrate that focus eradication is essential, but also that treatment with dicloxacillin 1 g x 4 or 2 g x 3 are superior to 1 g x 3 (studie III), indicating that the time for serum concentration above the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for the bacteria plays a role in the outcome of SAB treatment. S. aureus osteomyelitis secondary to SAB is frequently observed. No other countries, however, have a centralized registration, which make it possible to evaluate a large number of these patients. Since 1960, The Staphylococcal Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, has registrated selected clinical informations from nearly all patients with positive blood cultures of S. aureus. Based on this registration, we were able to show an increased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis among older patients and a decreased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis of femur and tibia among younger infants in the period 1980-90 (study IV). By reviewing the records of a large number of patients with vertebral S. aureus

  18. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  19. Improved quantification of livestock associated odorous volatile organic compounds in a standard flow-through system using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuyan; Zhu, Wenda; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Jenks, William S; Laor, Yael; Leeuwen, J Hans van; Hoff, Steven J

    2015-10-02

    Aerial emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important nuisance factor from livestock production systems. Reliable air sampling and analysis methods are needed to develop and test odor mitigation technologies. Quantification of VOCs responsible for livestock odor remains an analytical challenge due to physicochemical properties of VOCs and the requirement for low detection thresholds. A new air sampling and analysis method was developed for testing of odor/VOCs mitigation in simulated livestock emissions system. A flow-through standard gas generating system simulating odorous VOCs in livestock barn emissions was built on laboratory scale and tested to continuously generate ten odorous VOCs commonly defining livestock odor. Standard VOCs included sulfur VOCs (S-VOCs), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and p-cresol. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was optimized for sampling of diluted odorous gas mixtures in the moving air followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. CAR/PDMS 85μm fiber was shown to have the best sensitivity for the target odorous VOCs. A practical 5-min sampling time was selected to ensure optimal extraction of VFAs and p-cresol, as well as minimum displacement of S-VOCs. Method detection limits ranged from 0.39 to 2.64ppbv for S-VOCs, 0.23 to 0.77ppbv for VFAs, and 0.31ppbv for p-cresol. The method developed was applied to quantify VOCs and odorous VOC mitigation with UV light treatment. The measured concentrations ranged from 20.1 to 815ppbv for S-VOCs, 10.3 to 315ppbv for VFAs, and 4.73 to 417ppbv for p-cresol. Relative standard deviations between replicates ranged from 0.67% to 12.9%, 0.50% to 11.4%, 0.83% to 5.14% for S-VOCs, VFAs, and p-cresol, respectively. This research shows that a simple manual SPME sampler could be used successfully for quantification of important classes of odorous VOCs at concentrations relevant for real aerial emissions from livestock operations.

  20. Molecular Correlates of Host Specialization in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Herron-Olson, Lisa; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Musser, James M.; Kapur, Vivek

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of Staphylococcus aureus isolates that are recovered from either serious infections in humans or from mastitis in cattle represent genetically distinct sets of clonal groups. Moreover, population genetic analyses have provided strong evidence of host specialization among S. aureus clonal groups associated with human and ruminant infection. However, the molecular basis of host specialization in S. aureus is not understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced the genome of strain ET3-1, a representative isolate of a common bovine mastitis-causing S. aureus clone. Strain ET3-1 encodes several genomic elements that have not been previously identified in S. aureus, including homologs of virulence factors from other Gram-positive pathogens. Relative to the other sequenced S. aureus associated with human infection, allelic variation in ET3-1 was high among virulence and surface-associated genes involved in host colonization, toxin production, iron metabolism, antibiotic resistance, and gene regulation. Interestingly, a number of well-characterized S. aureus virulence factors, including protein A and clumping factor A, exist as pseudogenes in ET3-1. Whole-genome DNA microarray hybridization revealed considerable similarity in the gene content of highly successful S. aureus clones associated with bovine mastitis, but not among those clones that are only infrequently recovered from bovine hosts. Conclusions/Significance Whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses revealed a set of molecular genetic features that distinguish clones of highly successful bovine-associated S. aureus optimized for mastitis pathogenesis in cattle from those that infect human hosts or are only infrequently recovered from bovine sources. Further, the results suggest that modern bovine specialist clones diverged from a common ancestor resembling human-associated S. aureus clones through a combination of foreign DNA acquisition and gene decay. PMID:17971880

  1. Foods from black market at EU border as a neglected route of potential methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission.

    PubMed

    Oniciuc, Elena-Alexandra; Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Bolocan, Andrei-Sorin; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; Rovira, Jordi; Hernández, Marta; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Nicolau, Anca Ioana; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2015-09-16

    The illegal entrance of foods to EU through black markets at the EU borders can constitute a neglected route of dissemination of foodborne pathogens, and in particular of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this study, we have assessed the presence of MRSA in foods sold in a black market at an EU border (the southeast part of Romania, on the border with Republic of Moldavia). We performed a search for MRSA among 200 food samples collected from 2012 to 2013. All S. aureus were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and SCCmec typing, and tested for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) virulence factors. Overall, 32 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 16 food samples (8%). One isolate detected in a pork lard sample was MRSA (0.5%). PFGE with the restriction enzyme SmaI revealed 12 genotypes among the 32 S. aureus isolates. The MRSA isolate belonged to sequence type 398, harbored SCCmec type V, tested negative for the presence of the PVL genes and was resistant to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and cefazolin, besides all β-lactams. Among 31 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), 29% were resistant to penicillin, 9.7% to tetracycline and 3.2% to ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, in this study we report the presence of livestock-associated MRSA in foods sold in a black market at an EU border: ST398-MRSA-V. These results confirm the potential role of food in the dissemination of MRSA lineages among population, and the potential role of illegally introduced food to EU in the prevalence and evolution of MRSA clones in the community.

  2. Exfoliative toxins of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michal; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs). The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus meningitis from osteomyelitis of the spine.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, H. S.; Allison, S. P.

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of vertebral osteomyelitis presenting with secondary Staphylococcus aureus meningitis are described. In staphylococcal meningitis a search for a primary source should include the lower vertebral spine. PMID:2616438

  4. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pigs and Farm Workers on Conventional and Antibiotic-Free Swine Farms in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Abley, Melanie J.; Harper, Abby L.; Forshey, Brett M.; Male, Michael J.; Martin, H. Wayne; Molla, Bayleyegn Z.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Thakur, Siddhartha; Thiruvengadam, Madhumathi; Davies, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Much uncertainty remains about the origin and public health implications of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and prevalence of MRSA in general and LA-MRSA in particular in pigs and farm workers in five states. We collected nasal swabs from pigs and farm workers at 45 swine herds (21 antibiotic-free herds; 24 conventional herds) in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio. MRSA was isolated from 50 of 1085 pigs (4.6%) and 31 of 148 (20.9%) of farm workers. MRSA-positive pigs and people were clustered in four conventional swine farms in Iowa and Illinois. Based on genotyping, spa type t034, a common livestock associated variant, was predominant among both human and swine isolates. These results confirm the presence of LA-MRSA in pigs and swine farm workers in the USA, but the prevalence found is relatively low compared with European studies. PMID:23667659

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs and farm workers on conventional and antibiotic-free swine farms in the USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tara C; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Abley, Melanie J; Harper, Abby L; Forshey, Brett M; Male, Michael J; Martin, H Wayne; Molla, Bayleyegn Z; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Thakur, Siddhartha; Thiruvengadam, Madhumathi; Davies, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Much uncertainty remains about the origin and public health implications of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and prevalence of MRSA in general and LA-MRSA in particular in pigs and farm workers in five states. We collected nasal swabs from pigs and farm workers at 45 swine herds (21 antibiotic-free herds; 24 conventional herds) in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio. MRSA was isolated from 50 of 1085 pigs (4.6%) and 31 of 148 (20.9%) of farm workers. MRSA-positive pigs and people were clustered in four conventional swine farms in Iowa and Illinois. Based on genotyping, spa type t034, a common livestock associated variant, was predominant among both human and swine isolates. These results confirm the presence of LA-MRSA in pigs and swine farm workers in the USA, but the prevalence found is relatively low compared with European studies.

  6. The Staphylococcus aureus RNome and Its Commitment to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Felden, Brice; Vandenesch, François; Bouloc, Philippe; Romby, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing a wide spectrum of nosocomial and community-associated infections with high morbidity and mortality. S. aureus generates a large number of virulence factors whose timing and expression levels are precisely tuned by regulatory proteins and RNAs. The aptitude of bacteria to use RNAs to rapidly modify gene expression, including virulence factors in response to stress or environmental changes, and to survive in a host is an evolving concept. Here, we focus on the recently inventoried S. aureus regulatory RNAs, with emphasis on those with identified functions, two of which are directly involved in pathogenicity. PMID:21423670

  7. Sources of intramammary infections from Staphylococcus aureus in dairy heifers at first parturition.

    PubMed

    Roberson, J R; Fox, L K; Hancock, D D; Gay, J M; Besser, T E

    1998-03-01

    The study objective was to identify probable sources and modes of transmission of 91 Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from the colostrum of 76 heifers at parturition. Sources cultured were milk (including colostrum), heifer body sites (teats, muzzle, rectum, vagina, and lacteal secretions), and environmental sites (bedding, insects, housing, water, feedstuffs, humans, nonbovine animals, air, and equipment). Staphylococcus aureus isolates were characterized by 63 phenotypic traits. A similarity coefficient was calculated by herd to identify the S. aureus that most closely resembled the S. aureus obtained from heifer colostrum. Staphylococcus aureus from a heifer's colostrum was compared with all preexisting S. aureus isolates from that heifer's herd. Isolates that were > or = 90% similar were considered to be identical. Because 30 (of the 91) S. aureus isolates from heifer colostrum were collected prior to environmental sampling, only 61 S. aureus isolates from heifer colostrum were available for comparison among all three sources. Possible sources of S. aureus from heifer colostrum at parturition were milk (70%, 43 of 61 isolates), heifer body sites (39%, 24 of 61), environmental sites (28%, 17 of 61), or no identified source (16%, 10 of 61). Three heifers with intramammary infection (IMI) from S. aureus at parturition had the same S. aureus on their teats prior to parturition. Milk was the only source identified for 41% (25 of 61) of isolates from heifer colostrum. Isolates from heifer body sites were the only source identified for 5% (3 of 61) of heifer colostrum isolates. Staphylococcus aureus from the environment was never the sole possible source for S. aureus from heifer colostrum. Data suggest that the major sources of S. aureus IMI in heifers at parturition are milk and heifer body sites. Contact among heifers may be an important mode of transmission of S. aureus leading to IMI in heifers at parturition.

  8. Two TIR-like domain containing proteins in a newly emerging zoonotic Staphylococcus aureus strain sequence type 398 are potential virulence factors by impacting on the host innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Nicholas J.; Günther, Juliane; Gibson, Amanda J.; Offord, Victoria; Coffey, Tracey J.; Splitter, Gary; Monk, Ian; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Werling, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, sequence type (ST) 398, is an emerging pathogen and the leading cause of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections in Europe and North America. This strain is characterized by high promiscuity in terms of host-species and also lacks several traditional S. aureus virulence factors. This does not, however, explain the apparent ease with which it crosses species-barriers. Recently, TIR-domain containing proteins (Tcps) which inhibit the innate immune response were identified in some Gram-negative bacteria. Here we report the presence of two proteins, S. aureus TIR-like Protein 1 (SaTlp1) and S. aureus TIR-like Protein 2 (SaTlp2), expressed by ST398 which contain domain of unknown function 1863 (DUF1863), similar to the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. In contrast to the Tcps in Gram-negative bacteria, our data suggest that SaTlp1 and SaTlp2 increase activation of the transcription factor NF-κB as well as downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune effectors. To assess the role of both proteins as potential virulence factors knock-out mutants were created. These showed a slightly enhanced survival rate in a murine infectious model compared to the wild-type strain at one dose. Our data suggest that both proteins may act as factors contributing to the enhanced ability of ST398 to cross species-barriers. PMID:25538689

  9. Genetic lineages, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus of meat samples in Spain: analysis of immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes.

    PubMed

    Benito, Daniel; Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; Estepa, Vanesa; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the rate of contamination by Staphylococcus aureus in 100 meat samples obtained during 2011-2012 in La Rioja (Northern Spain), to analyze their content in antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, as well as in immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes, and to type recovered isolates. Seven of 100 samples (7%) contained S. aureus: 6 samples harbored methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 1 pork sample harbored methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The MRSA isolate corresponded to the ST398 genetic lineage with a multidrug resistance profile and the absence of human IEC genes, which pointed to a typical livestock-associated MRSA profile. MRSA isolate was ascribed to the spa-type t011, agr-type I, and SCCmec-V and showed resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin, in addition to β-lactams. The remaining six MSSA strains belonged to different sequence types and clonal complexes (three isolates ST45/CC45, one ST617/CC45, one ST5/CC5, and one ST109/CC9), being susceptible to most antibiotics tested but showing a wide virulence gene profile. Five of the six MSSA strains (except ST617/CC45) contained the enterotoxin egc-cluster or egc-like-cluster genes, and strain ST109/CC9 contained eta gene (encoding exfoliatin A). The presence of human IEC genes in MSSA strains (types B and D) points to a possible contamination of meat samples from an undefined human source. The presence of S. aureus with enterotoxin genes and MRSA in food samples might have implications in public health. The IEC system could be a good marker to follow the S. aureus contamination source in meat food products.

  10. Atopic dermatitis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arslanagic, Naima; Arslanagic, Rusmir

    2004-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disorder strongly influenced by environmental factors. Staplylococcus aurcus is the common pathogen and colonize the normal skin but it is not number of normal skin flora. Damaged protective skin function by atopic dermatitis, the disturbance of quantity and quality of lipids of stratum corneum are some of the reasons for increasing degree of skin colonisation with staphylococcus aureus. We had presented frequency of the isolation staphylococcus aureus from eczematous atopic skin, from the nose and throat of atopic patients and also from clinically unaffected atopic skin in the group of 30 children compared with 15 healthy children without positive atopic family history. Staphylococcus aureus had been significantly more isolated by all earlier mentioned places in atopic group of children. There is a direct correlation between intensity and also extensity of atopic dermatitis and frequency of the isolation of staphylococcus aureus from mentioned places. The role of staphylococcus aureus in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis was discussed.

  11. The Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variant Isolated from Chronic Mastitis at a Dairy Farm in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-li; Zou, Feng-cai; Yan, Yu-lin; Wang, Qi-hui; Shi, Yong-qiang; Qu, Wei-jie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative agent leading to bovine mastitis and has specific phonotypical characteristics including small colony, slow growth, and decreased hemolysis, therefore named as the small colony variants (SCVs). Out of 30 tested samples of the chronic S. aureus cases, one strain of SCVs (S. aureus SCV22) was isolated along with its parental strains (S. aureus11). S. aureus SCV22 showed a slow growth rate when it is compared with the parental strain. However, their resistant patterns were similar. Meanwhile, S. aureus SCV22 depicted the lower rate of apoptosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. These findings of the present study presented the unique characteristics of S. aureus SCV22 for the first time in Yunnan province, which provided a prophase foundation for further study about the pathogenesis of S. aureus SCVs in chronic mastitis. PMID:27066529

  12. Evolving Rapid Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Detection: Cover All the Bases

    PubMed Central

    Bakthavatchalam, Yamuna Devi; Nabarro, Laura E B; Veeraraghavan, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    The dissemination of methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) in community and health-care settings is of great concern and associated with high mortality and morbidity. Rapid detection of MRSA with short turnaround time can minimize the time to initiate appropriate therapy and further promote infection control. Early detection of MRSA directly from clinical samples is complicated by the frequent association of MRSA with methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) species. Infection associated with true MRSA or MSSA is differentiated from CoNS, requires target specific primers for the presence of SA and mec A or nuc or fem A gene for confirmation of MR. Recently, livestock-associated MRSA carrying mec C variant complicates the epidemiology of MRSA further. Several commercial rapid molecular kits are available with a different combination of these targets for the detection of MRSA or MSSA. The claimed sensitivity and specificity of the currently available commercial kits is varying, because of the different target combination used for detection of SA and MR. PMID:28250621

  13. Evolving Superantigens of Staphylococcus Aureus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    1993) Phenotypic char- acterization of xpr, a global regulator of extracellular virulence fac- tors in Staphylococcus aureus. Infect . Immun. 61, 919...tional fusions as the detection system in the rabbit endocarditis mod- el. Infect . Immun. 66, 5988-5993. [35] Wieneke, A.A., Roberts, D. and... Infections Diseases, 1425 Porter Street, Frederick, MD 21702, USA Received 24 March 1999; accepted 14 April 1999 Abstract Staphylococcus aureus

  14. Innate and adaptive immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus skin infections.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sheila; Miller, Lloyd S

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that is responsible for the vast majority of bacterial skin and soft tissue infections in humans. S. aureus can also become more invasive and cause life-threatening infections such as bacteremia, pneumonia, abscesses of various organs, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and sepsis. These infections represent a major public health threat due to the enormous numbers of these infections and the widespread emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. MSRA is endemic in hospitals worldwide and is rapidly spreading throughout the normal human population in the community. The increasing frequency of MRSA infections has complicated treatment as these strains are more virulent and are increasingly becoming resistant to multiple different classes of antibiotics. The important role of the immune response against S. aureus infections cannot be overemphasized as humans with certain genetic and acquired immunodeficiency disorders are at an increased risk for infection. Understanding the cutaneous immune responses against S. aureus is essential as most of these infections occur or originate from a site of infection or colonization of the skin and mucosa. This review will summarize the innate immune responses against S. aureus skin infections, including antimicrobial peptides that have direct antimicrobial activity against S. aureus as well as pattern recognition receptors and proinflammatory cytokines that promote neutrophil abscess formation in the skin, which is required for bacterial clearance. Finally, we will discuss the recent discoveries involving IL-17-mediated responses, which provide a key link between cutaneous innate and adaptive immune responses against S. aureus skin infections.

  15. Burden of Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jessica E.; Popoola, Victor O.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Fowler, Vance G.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Clark, Reese H.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    .96-1.49). Risks of death at 7 and 30 days after invasive infection were similar between infants with invasive MSSA and MRSA infection. Conclusion Infant mortality following invasive MRSA and MSSA infections is similar. MSSA causes more infections and more deaths in infants than MRSA. Measures to prevent S. aureus infection should include MSSA in addition to MRSA. PMID:26502073

  16. Adaptive Immunity Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-02-27

    A complex interplay between host and bacterial factors allows Staphylococcus aureus to occupy its niche as a human commensal and a major human pathogen. The role of neutrophils as a critical component of the innate immune response against S. aureus, particularly for control of systemic infection, has been established in both animal models and in humans with acquired and congenital neutrophil dysfunction. The role of the adaptive immune system is less clear. Although deficiencies in adaptive immunity do not result in the marked susceptibility to S. aureus infection that neutrophil dysfunction imparts, emerging evidence suggests both T cell- and B cell-mediated adaptive immunity can influence host susceptibility and control of S. aureus. The contribution of adaptive immunity depends on the context and site of infection and can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Furthermore, S. aureus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate adaptive immune responses to its advantage. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for the role of adaptive immunity during S. aureus infections. Further elucidation of this role will be important to understand how it influences susceptibility to infection and to appropriately design vaccines that elicit adaptive immune responses to protect against subsequent infections.

  17. High diversity of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius lineages and toxigenic traits in healthy pet-owning household members. Underestimating normal household contact?

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three unrelated pet-owning households were screened in Spain to study the Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius nasal carriage, their genetic lineages and virulence traits. Sixty-seven healthy owners and 66 healthy pets were investigated. Isolates characterization was performed and potential interspecies transmission was assessed. S. aureus was present in 51.2% of households studied while S. pseudintermedius in 30.2%. Twenty-eight owners (41.8%) carried S. aureus: one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) [t5173-ST8-SCCmecIVa] and 27 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Three owners (4.5%) were colonized by methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP). Fifteen pets (22.7%) carried S. pseudintermedius: two methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) [ST71-SCCmecII/III; ST92-SCCmecV] and 13 MSSP; in addition, 8 pets (12.1%) presented MSSA. High diversity of spa and sequence types (STs) was detected. Typical livestock-associated S. aureus lineages (CC398, CC9) were observed in humans and/or companion animals and hospital and/or community-acquired S. aureus lineages (CC45, CC121, CC5, CC8) were detected among pets. Almost 40% of S. pseudintermedius were multidrug-resistant. S. aureus isolates harboured a remarkable high number of virulence genes. The expA gene was detected in 3 S. pseudintermedius isolates. Identical strains from both owners and their pets were identified in 5 households (11.6%): (a) four MSSA (t073-ST45/CC45, t159-ST121/CC121, t209-ST109/CC9, t021-ST1654([new])/singleton) and (b) one multidrug-resistant MSSP (ST142([new])). Highly clonally diverse and toxigenic S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius are common colonizers of healthy humans and pets. The presence of these bacterial species, virulence genes, and interspecies transmission detected, points out to consider pet ownership as a risk factor to acquire, maintain and spread, potential pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Christopher F.; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA) and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery. PMID:27164142

  19. The Innate Immune Response Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Stein, Christoph; Uebele, Julia

    2015-12-15

    The innate immune system harbors a multitude of different receptor systems and cells that are constantly prepared to sense and eliminate invading microbial pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus enters the body on its exposed epithelial surfaces, e.g., on skin and mucosa. The initial interaction with epithelial cells is governed by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2-mediated local production of soluble mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. The overall goal is to achieve a steady state of immune mediators and colonizing bacteria. Following cell and tissue invasion clearance of bacteria depends on intracellular microbial sensors and subsequent activation of the inflammasomes. Tissue-resident mast cells and macrophages recruit neutrophils, macrophages, and NK cells. This inflammatory response supports the generation of IL-17 producing NKT, γδ T cells, and T helper cells. Local dendritic cells migrate to the lymph nodes and fine-tune the adaptive immune response. The scope of this chapter is to provide an overview on the major cell types and receptors involved in innate immune defense against S. aureus. By segregating the different stages of infection from epithelial barrier to intracellular and systemic infection, this chapter highlights the different qualities of the innate immune response to S. aureus at different stages of invasiveness.

  20. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher F; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-05-05

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA) and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  1. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat fingerprinting as a method for rapid and cost-effective typing of animal-associated Staphylococcus aureus strains from lineages other than sequence type 398.

    PubMed

    Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Ilczyszyn, Weronika M; Buda, Aneta; Polakowska, Klaudia; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Panz, Tomasz; Bialecka, Anna; Kasprowicz, Andrzej; Jakubczak, Antoni; Krol, Jaroslaw; Wieliczko, Alina; Wladyka, Benedykt; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    In veterinary medicine, Staphylococcus aureus is associated with a range of mild to severe infections. The high density of livestock in intensive farming systems increases the risk of disease spread and hampers its control and measures of prevention, making S. aureus one of the most important animal pathogens. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) has been successfully applied to the characterization of livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 but not to the characterization of a wide range of other animal isolates. The objective of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of MLVF for studying S. aureus strains isolated from households, farms and exotic animals in three regions of Poland. MLVF, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), spa typing and diagnostic microarrays were compared to determine the most suitable combination of methods for veterinary purposes. MLVF generated results consistent with host and geographic origins, reflecting population structures with a high concordance to spa typing results. MLVF has been proven to be a rapid, highly discriminatory and cost-effective method suitable for molecular typing in veterinary settings.

  2. ANTISTAPHYBASE: database of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and essential oils (EOs) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Taieb, Malek; Lamine, Mohamed Ashraf; Cherif, Ammar; Jridi, Taoufik; Mahjoubi, Basma; Mbarek, Sarra; Fliss, Ismail; Nefzi, Adel; Sebei, Khaled; Ben Hamida, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are major pathogens. The antimicrobial peptides and essential oils (EOs) display narrow- or broad-spectrum activity against bacteria including these strains. A centralized resource, such as a database, designed specifically for anti-S. aureus/anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antimicrobial peptides and EOs is therefore needed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of their structure/activity associations and combinations. The database ANTISTAPHYBASE is created to facilitate access to important information on antimicrobial peptides and essential peptides against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus. At the moment, the database contains 596 sequences of antimicrobial peptides produced by diverse organisms and 287 essential oil records. It permits a quick and easy search of peptides based on their activity as well as their general, physicochemical properties and literature data. These data are very useful to perform further bioinformatic or chemometric analysis and would certainly be useful for the development of new drugs for medical use. The ANTISTAPHYBASE database is freely available at: https://www.antistaphybase.com/ .

  3. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Sabat, Artur J.; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. Methodology This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere+ software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance. Principal Findings SeqSphere+ analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus. PMID:26360794

  4. A combination of positive dielectrophoresis driven on-line enrichment and aptamer-fluorescent silica nanoparticle label for rapid and sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; Li, Yuhong; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Zou, Zhen; Shi, Hui

    2015-07-07

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important human pathogen that causes several diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to life-threatening diseases. Here, a method combining positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) driven on-line enrichment and aptamer-fluorescent silica nanoparticle label has been developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of S. aureus in microfluidic channels. An aptamer, having high affinity to S. aureus, is used as the molecular recognition tool and immobilized onto chloropropyl functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles through a click chemistry approach to obtain S. aureus aptamer-nanoparticle bioconjugates (Apt(S.aureus)/FNPs). The pDEP driven on-line enrichment technology was used for accumulating the Apt(S.aureus)/FNP labeled S. aureus. After incubating with S. aureus, the mixture of Apt(S.aureus)/FNP labeled S. aureus and Apt(S.aureus)/FNPs was directly introduced into the pDEP-based microfluidic system. By applying an AC voltage in a pDEP frequency region, the Apt(S.aureus)/FNP labelled S. aureus moved to the electrodes and accumulated in the electrode gap, while the free Apt(S.aureus)/FNPs flowed away. The signal that came from the Apt(S.aureus)/FNP labelled S. aureus in the focused detection areas was then detected. Profiting from the specificity of aptamer, signal amplification of FNP label and pDEP on-line enrichment, this assay can detect as low as 93 and 270 cfu mL(-1)S. aureus in deionized water and spiked water samples, respectively, with higher sensitivities than our previously reported Apt(S.aureus)/FNP based flow cytometry. Moreover, without the need for separation and washing steps usually required for FNP label involved bioassays, the total assay time including sample pretreatment was within 2 h.

  5. A Prophage in Diabetic Foot Ulcer-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Impairs Invasiveness by Limiting Intracellular Growth.

    PubMed

    Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Rémy, Catherine; Sapin, Anaïs; Messad, Nourredine; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Dupieux, Céline; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-11-15

    The mechanisms that drive the transition from commensality to invasiveness in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. We recently reported that >50% of S. aureus isolates from uninfected diabetic foot ulcers in French patients harbor a prophage, ROSA-like, that is absent from invasive isolates from diabetic foot infections, including osteomyelitis. Here we show that the ROSA-like insertion abolishes the ability of S. aureus to replicate within osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, greatly reducing damage to infected cells. These results unravel an important mechanism by which particular S. aureus strains are maintained in a commensal state in diabetic foot ulcers.

  6. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  7. Superantigen-Producing Staphylococcus aureus Elicits Systemic Immune Activation in a Murine Wound Colonization Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choon K; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Krogman, Ashton; David, Chella S; Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2015-12-08

    Staphylococcus aureus, the most common cause of wound infection, produces several exotoxins, including superantigens (SAgs). SAgs are the potent activators of the immune system. Given this unique property, we hypothesized that SAgs produced by S. aureus in wounds would have local, as well as systemic immunologic effects. We tested our hypothesis using a novel staphylococcal skin wound infection model in transgenic mice expressing HLA-DR3. Skin wounds were left uninfected or colonized with S. aureus strains producing SAgs or an isogenic strain not producing any SAg. Animals with wounds challenged with SAg-producing S. aureus had increased morbidity and lower serum IL-17 levels compared to those challenged with the SAg non-producing S. aureus (p = 0.027 and p = 0.032, respectively). At Day 8 following microbial challenge, compared to mice with uninfected wounds, the proportion of Vβ8⁺CD4⁺ T cells was increased, while the proportion of Vβ8⁺CD8⁺ T cells was decreased only in the spleens of mice challenged with SAg-producing S. aureus (p < 0.001). No such changes were measured in mice challenged with SAg non-producing S. aureus. Lungs, livers and kidneys from mice challenged with SAg-producing, but not SAg non-producing, S. aureus showed inflammatory changes. Overall, SAg-mediated systemic immune activation in wounds harboring S. aureus may have clinical implications.

  8. Food Poisoning and Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Argudín, María Ángeles; Mendoza, María Carmen; Rodicio, María Rosario

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide variety of toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs; SEA to SEE, SEG to SEI, SER to SET) with demonstrated emetic activity, and staphylococcal-like (SEl) proteins, which are not emetic in a primate model (SElL and SElQ) or have yet to be tested (SElJ, SElK, SElM to SElP, SElU, SElU2 and SElV). SEs and SEls have been traditionally subdivided into classical (SEA to SEE) and new (SEG to SElU2) types. All possess superantigenic activity and are encoded by accessory genetic elements, including plasmids, prophages, pathogenicity islands, vSa genomic islands, or by genes located next to the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) implicated in methicillin resistance. SEs are a major cause of food poisoning, which typically occurs after ingestion of different foods, particularly processed meat and dairy products, contaminated with S. aureus by improper handling and subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. Symptoms are of rapid onset and include nausea and violent vomiting, with or without diarrhea. The illness is usually self-limiting and only occasionally it is severe enough to warrant hospitalization. SEA is the most common cause of staphylococcal food poisoning worldwide, but the involvement of other classical SEs has been also demonstrated. Of the new SE/SEls, only SEH have clearly been associated with food poisoning. However, genes encoding novel SEs as well as SEls with untested emetic activity are widely represented in S. aureus, and their role in pathogenesis may be underestimated. PMID:22069659

  9. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Hall, G.S.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar.

  10. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Beta-hemolytic streptococci, most often Streptococcus pyogenes (5.1%), were isolated from 2.5% to 10.2% of patients. Staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to most tested antibiotics (except from penicillin and ampicillin) and rarely showed methicillin resistance (n = 1). Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  12. Repurposing the Antihistamine Terfenadine for Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a rapidly growing health threat in the U.S., with resistance to several commonly prescribed treatments. A high-throughput screen identified the antihistamine terfenadine to possess, previously unreported, antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria. In an effort to repurpose this drug, structure–activity relationship studies yielded 84 terfenadine-based analogues with several modifications providing increased activity versus S. aureus and other bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanism of action studies revealed these compounds to exert their antibacterial effects, at least in part, through inhibition of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. This scaffold suffers from hERG liabilities which were not remedied through this round of optimization; however, given the overall improvement in activity of the set, terfenadine-based analogues provide a novel structural class of antimicrobial compounds with potential for further characterization as part of the continuing process to meet the current need for new antibiotics. PMID:25238555

  13. Repurposing the antihistamine terfenadine for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Jessamyn I; Forbes, Lauren T; Krysan, Damian J; Ebsworth-Mojica, Katherine; Colquhoun, Jennifer M; Wang, Jenna L; Dunman, Paul M; Flaherty, Daniel P

    2014-10-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is a rapidly growing health threat in the U.S., with resistance to several commonly prescribed treatments. A high-throughput screen identified the antihistamine terfenadine to possess, previously unreported, antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria. In an effort to repurpose this drug, structure-activity relationship studies yielded 84 terfenadine-based analogues with several modifications providing increased activity versus S. aureus and other bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanism of action studies revealed these compounds to exert their antibacterial effects, at least in part, through inhibition of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. This scaffold suffers from hERG liabilities which were not remedied through this round of optimization; however, given the overall improvement in activity of the set, terfenadine-based analogues provide a novel structural class of antimicrobial compounds with potential for further characterization as part of the continuing process to meet the current need for new antibiotics.

  14. Neutrophil-generated oxidative stress and protein damage in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous, versatile and dangerous pathogen. It colonizes over 30% of the human population, and is one of the leading causes of death by an infectious agent. During S. aureus colonization and invasion, leukocytes are recruited to the site of infection. To combat S. aureus, leukocytes generate an arsenal of reactive species including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and hypohalous acids that modify and inactivate cellular macromolecules, resulting in growth defects or death. When S. aureus colonization cannot be cleared by the immune system, antibiotic treatment is necessary and can be effective. Yet, this organism quickly gains resistance to each new antibiotic it encounters. Therefore, it is in the interest of human health to acquire a deeper understanding of how S. aureus evades killing by the immune system. Advances in this field will have implications for the design of future S. aureus treatments that complement and assist the host immune response. In that regard, this review focuses on how S. aureus avoids host-generated oxidative stress, and discusses the mechanisms used by S. aureus to survive oxidative damage including antioxidants, direct repair of damaged proteins, sensing oxidant stress and transcriptional changes. This review will elucidate areas for studies to identify and validate future antimicrobial targets.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to topical antimicrobials in atopic dermatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Bessa, Giancarlo Rezende; Quinto, Vanessa Petry; Machado, Daiane Corrêa; Lipnharski, Caroline; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background Topical antimicrobial drugs are indicated for limited superficial pyodermitis treatment, although they are largely used as self-prescribed medication for a variety of inflammatory dermatoses, including atopic dermatitis. Monitoring bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is difficult, given the paucity of laboratory standardization. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus topical antimicrobial drug resistance in atopic dermatitis patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of children and adults diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and S. aureus colonization. We used miscellaneous literature reported breakpoints to define S. aureus resistance to mupirocin, fusidic acid, gentamicin, neomycin and bacitracin. Results A total of 91 patients were included and 100 S. aureus isolates were analyzed. All strains were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We found a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance (1.1% and 5.9%, respectively), but high levels of neomycin and bacitracin resistance (42.6% and 100%, respectively). Fusidic acid resistance was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, demonstrated by higher EASI scores (median 17.8 vs 5.7, p=.009). Our results also corroborate the literature on the absence of cross-resistance between the aminoglycosides neomycin and gentamicin. Conclusions Our data, in a southern Brazilian sample of AD patients, revealed a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance of S. aureus atopic eczema colonizer strains. However, for neomycin and bacitracin, which are commonly used topical antimicrobial drugs in Brazil, high levels of resistance were identified. Further restrictions on the use of these antimicrobials seem necessary to keep resistance as low as possible. PMID:27828633

  16. Methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the media.

    PubMed

    Perencevich, Eli N; Treise, Debbie M

    2010-11-01

    How the media communicate and how the scientific community influences the media are important factors to consider in the public health response to emerging pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Social representation theory suggests that the media link "the threatening" to commonplace "anchor representations" which can serve to educate or to create fear.

  17. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Galiana, Antonio; Pedreira, Walter; Mowszowicz, Martin; Christophersen, Inés; Machiavello, Silvia; Lope, Liliana; Benaderet, Sara; Buela, Fernanda; Vicentino, Walter; Albini, María; Bertaux, Olivier; Constenla, Irene; Bagnulo, Homero; Llosa, Luis; Ito, Teruyo

    2005-01-01

    A novel, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone (Uruguay clone) with a non–multidrug-resistant phenotype caused a large outbreak, including 7 deaths, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The clone was distinct from the highly virulent community clone represented by strain MW2, although both clones carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and cna gene. PMID:15963301

  18. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the most applied and effective genetic typing method for epidemiological studies and investigation of foodborne outbreaks caused by different pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. The technique relies on analysis of large DNA fragments generated by th...

  19. PBP 4 Mediates High-Level Resistance to New-Generation Cephalosporins in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Liana C.; Gilbert, Aubre; Basuino, Li; da Costa, Thaina M.; Hamilton, Stephanie M.; dos Santos, Katia R.; Chambers, Henry F.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of both hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections worldwide. β-Lactam antibiotics are the drugs of choice to treat S. aureus infections, but resistance to these and other antibiotics make treatment problematic. High-level β-lactam resistance of S. aureus has always been attributed to the horizontally acquired penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a) encoded by the mecA gene. Here, we show that S. aureus can also express high-level resistance to β-lactams, including new-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporins that are active against methicillin-resistant strains, through an uncanonical core genome-encoded penicillin binding protein, PBP 4, a nonessential enzyme previously considered not to be important for staphylococcal β-lactam resistance. Our results show that PBP 4 can mediate high-level resistance to β-lactams. PMID:27067335

  20. Activation of heme biosynthesis by a small molecule that is toxic to fermenting Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mike, Laura A.; Dutter, Brendan F.; Stauff, Devin L.; Moore, Jessica L.; Vitko, Nicholas P.; Aranmolate, Olusegun; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Sullivan, Sarah; Reid, Paul R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Richardson, Anthony R.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant infectious threat to global public health. Acquisition or synthesis of heme is required for S. aureus to capture energy through respiration, but an excess of this critical cofactor is toxic to bacteria. S. aureus employs the heme sensor system (HssRS) to overcome heme toxicity; however, the mechanism of heme sensing is not defined. Here, we describe the identification of a small molecule activator of HssRS that induces endogenous heme biosynthesis by perturbing central metabolism. This molecule is toxic to fermenting S. aureus, including clinically relevant small colony variants. The utility of targeting fermenting bacteria is exemplified by the fact that this compound prevents the emergence of antibiotic resistance, enhances phagocyte killing, and reduces S. aureus pathogenesis. Not only is this small molecule a powerful tool for studying bacterial heme biosynthesis and central metabolism; it also establishes targeting of fermentation as a viable antibacterial strategy. PMID:23630262

  1. Subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduces expression of virulence-related exoproteins by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Kong, Ryong; Seo, Yun-Soo; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Shin, Dong-Won; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of virulence factors. The major virulence factors exhibited by S aureus include various antigens, enzymes, cytotoxins and exotoxins (e.g. hemolysins, enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin). In this report, we show the influence of punicalagin on the secretion of exoprotein from S aureus by western blotting, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release assay and quantitative RT-PCR. When added to S aureus cultures at an OD600 of 0.9, graded subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduced the production of α-toxin, SEA and SEB in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, punicalagin reduced TNF-inducing activity by S aureus culture supernatants. Here, the transcriptional level of agr (accessory gene regulator) in S aureus was inhibited by punicalagin, suggesting that the reduced transcription may affect the secretion of exotoxins. These findings suggest that the expression of α-toxin and enterotoxins in S aureus is sensitive to the action of punicalagin, which may be an advantageous candidate in the treatment of toxigenic staphylococcal disease.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics used to treat staph infections include methicillin, penicillin, oxacillin, and amoxicillin. In rare cases, the staph ... If needed, an antibiotic in the class of penicillin may be prescribed. Studies looking at use of ...

  3. Predictive characterization of hypothetical proteins in Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325

    PubMed Central

    School, Kuana; Marklevitz, Jessica; K. Schram, William; K. Harris, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. It colonizes immunocompromised patients and with the number of antibiotic resistant strains increasing, medicine needs new treatment options. Understanding more about the proteins this organism uses would further this goal. Hypothetical proteins are sequences thought to encode a functional protein but for which little to no evidence of that function exists. About half of the genomic proteins in reference strain S. aureus NCTC 8325 are hypothetical. Since annotation of these proteins can lead to new therapeutic targets, a high demand to characterize hypothetical proteins is present. This work examines 35 hypothetical proteins from the chromosome of S. aureus NCTC 8325. Examination includes physiochemical characterization; sequence homology; structural homology; domain recognition; structure modeling; active site depiction; predicted protein-protein interactions; protein-chemical interactions; protein localization; protein stability; and protein solubility. The examination revealed some hypothetical proteins related to virulent domains and protein-protein interactions including superoxide dismutase, O-antigen, bacterial ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Yet other hypothetical proteins appear to be metabolic or transport proteins including ABC transporters, major facilitator superfamily, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, and GTPases. Progress evaluating some hypothetical proteins, particularly the smaller ones, was incomplete due to limited homology and structural information in public repositories. These data characterizing hypothetical proteins will contribute to the scientific understanding of S. aureus by identifying potential drug targets and aiding in future drug discovery. PMID:28149057

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis: A Review of Hospital Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Sherine Jue; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Ma, David H. K.; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Phil Y. F.; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chuang, Chih-Chun; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to characterize the patient demographics, clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and clinical outcomes of keratitis caused by S. aureus, and to make a comparison between MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Methodology/Principal findings Patients (n = 59) with culture-proven S. aureus keratitis treated in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, were included in our study. Patients' demographic and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six MRSA (44%) and 33 MSSA (56%) isolates were collected. The MRSA keratitis was significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.038), but 46.2% (12/26) of patients with MRSA keratitis were considered to have community-associated infections. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. MRSA isolates were significantly more resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Ocular surface disease was a significant risk factor for MRSA keratitis (P = 0.011). Visual outcome did not differ significantly between the MRSA and MSSA groups. However, age (B = 0.01, P = 0.035, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.001–0.019) and visual acuity at presentation (B = 0.749, P<0.001, 95% CI: 0.573–0.926) were significantly correlated with visual outcome. Conclusions/Significance Ocular surface disease is an important predisposing factor for S. aureus keratitis, especially for MRSA infections. Advanced age and poor visual acuity at presentation are important prognostic indicators for poor visual outcome in S. aureus keratitis. Oxacillin resistance may not be a significant prognostic indicator. PMID:24244625

  5. Psoriasis and staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in Moroccan patients

    PubMed Central

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; El Azhari, Mohamed; El Kettani, Assiya; Serhier, Zineb; Othmani, Mohamed Bennani; Timinouni, Mohamed; Benchikhi, Hakima; Chiheb, Soumiya; Fellah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic lesions are rarely complicated by recurrent infections. The aim of our study is to determine skin colonisation and nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with psoriasis and in healthy persons. Patients and methods: a comparative study that include 33 patients with psoriasis and 33 healthy persons. Samples were taken from lesional and non lesional psoriatic skin and from healthy skin of control group. For S. aureus nasal carriage, we used sterile cotton tipped swabs. Out of165 samples (66 skin samples and 33 nasal swabs), 26 S. Aureus strains were isolated in 26 persons, 57.69% in the control group and 42.3% in the psoriasisgroup. S. aureus skin colonization was found in one case (3%) inlesional psoriatic skin vs 9 cases (27.3%) in control skin OR=0.08 IC 95% (0.01-0.70) p=0.02 and in 12,1% in non lesional soriatic skin vs 27, 3% in control skin (p =0,13). This colonization was less important in lesional psoriatic skin (3%) than in non lesional psoriatic skin (12.1%) p= 0.20. Nasal screening identified (7/33) 21, 21% S. aureus carriers in psoriasis group and in control group. Our results are in consensus withliterature findings. They have confirmed the importance of antimicrobial peptides in Innateimmunity of human skin. These peptides are normally produced bykeratinocytes in response to inflammatory stimuli such as psoriasis. Their high expression in psoriasis skin reduces the risk of skin infection and skin colonization with S. Aureus. PMID:27200138

  6. Descriptive Analysis of Antibiotic-Resistant Patterns of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) st398 Isolated from Healthy Swine

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Ana; Castro, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Abreu, Rossana; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Arias, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background: Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) such as the MRSA ST398 strain has spread all over the World and the most worrying aspect of this fact appears to be its capacity to easily spread to humans. The excessive use of antibiotics has made swine a reservoir of MRSA. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profile of MRSA samples isolated from healthy swine of the island of Tenerife (Spain). Methods: A total of 256 MRSA isolates from swine samples and five MRSA isolates from pig worker samples were investigated for MRSA antibiotic resistant patterns. Results: Analysis of the susceptibility status of MRSA pig isolates revealed that 39 isolates were resistant to one antibiotic, 71 isolates were resistant to two antibiotics and 96 isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. SCCmec typing revealed the presence of types IV and V. Isolates having SCCmec IV had an increased resistance to the antimicrobial agents tested than those having SCCmec V. We observed significant differences when comparing the most common resistance patterns and SCCmec type. Conclusions: MRSA isolated from humans showed similar resistance to those isolated from pigs, excepting erythromycin, since all the workers’ isolates were sensitive to this antibiotic. The evolution of new MRSA clones has emphasized the need for infection control practices in animals and humans in close contact. PMID:25588155

  7. Hidden Staphylococcus aureus Carriage: Overrated or Underappreciated?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent companion bacterial species in one-third of humankind. Reservoirs include the nasal and nasopharyngeal cavities, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Despite earlier claims that colonization of individuals is caused by clonal organisms, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revealed that resident type heterogeneity is not exceptional. Carriage, whether overt or hidden, is correlated with a risk of autoinfection. In a recent article in mBio, it was shown that, based on staphylococcal genome sequencing, low-level GI persistence may cause long-term nosocomial outbreaks [L. Senn et al., 7(1):e02039-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02039-15]. Institutional endemicity with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) sequence type 228 (ST228) is shown to originate not from high-level nasal carriage or poor compliance with infection control practice but from low-grade asymptomatic GI colonization. This shows the power of NGS in elucidating staphylococcal epidemiology and, even more important, demonstrates that (drug-resistant) microorganisms may possess stealthy means of persistence. Identifying these persistence mechanisms is key to successful infection control. PMID:26884429

  8. Detection of Staphylococcus Aureus Enterotoxin A and B Genes with PCR-EIA and a Hand-Held Electrochemical Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-11

    that included genomic and cloned S. aureus DNA, and genomic DNA from Alcaligens , Bacillus, Bacteroides, Bordetella, Borkholderia, Clostridium...studies, each with 81 samples that included genomic and cloned S. aureus DNA, and genomic DNA from Alcaligens , Bacillus, Bacteroides, Bordetella...Organism Strain/ isolate Alcaligens xylosoxidans 19606 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 17933D Bacillus anthracis Ames Salmonella choleraesuis 9150D Bacillus anthracis

  9. BACTERICIDAL SUBSTANCE FROM STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Gray, Ernest D.; Wannamaker, Lewis W.

    1970-01-01

    A bactericidal substance previously isolated from phage type 71 Slaphylococcus aureus has been further identified and characterized. Staphylococci belonging to phage type 71 produce the substance in higher titers than staphylococci lysed by other phages in group II in addition to phage 71. Other staphylococci do not produce the bactericidal substance. The bactericidal substance shares several of the properties of bacteriocins but differs from this group of antibiotic substances in some respects. A combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation and gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column resulted in considerable degree of purification of the bactericidal substance. The substance is a previously unrecognized product of S. aureus and is distinct from other extracellular products of this organism. PMID:5443199

  10. Fluorescent Reporters for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cheryl L.; Boles, Blaise R.; Lauderdale, Katherine J.; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and Sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  11. Short communication: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in bulk tank milk of dairy cows and effect of swine population density.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Cremonesi, P; Bertocchi, L; Zanoni, M G; Barberio, A; Drigo, I; Varisco, G; Castiglioni, B; Bronzo, V; Moroni, P

    2016-03-01

    The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has recently frequently been reported in dairy cattle, usually with low prevalence. The livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398 is especially involved in cases of subclinical and clinical mastitis. Swine carry LA-MRSA without clinical symptoms and are considered its reservoir and shedder. People exposed to swine are particularly at risk of LA-MRSA colonization. Environments with relevant livestock density are a demonstrated risk factor for humans to be carriers of a LA-MRSA. This work investigated dairy farms located in an area with a high livestock density, mainly represented by swine. Bulk tank milk samples from 224 dairy farms were collected, and their status was defined as MRSA-positive or MRSA-negative based on culture on chromogenic medium. The number of fattening swine and of fattening swine herds was calculated in an area of 3 km around each dairy farm through georeferencing. The probability of a Staphylococcus aureus-positive dairy farm to be MRSA positive based on the extent of potential infective pressure due to swine density was calculated. Both the number of swine herds and the number of swine were associated with the MRSA status of dairy herds. The 9 MRSA isolated were typed by multi-locus sequence typing and spa-typing, and characterized for their virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance profiles. The ST and spa-types detected are consistent with those present in the Italian swine population. Virulence and resistance profiles are mostly consistent with the types detected. This work provides the first evidence of the epidemiological challenge exerted by the density of the swine population on MRSA in dairy cows.

  12. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Will A.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils), are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions. PMID:26999220

  13. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: Frequency and Antibiotic Resistance in Healthy Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Heidar; Dastmalchi Saei, Habib; Ahmadi, Malahat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a significant pathogen that can colonize the nares of different animals, causing a wide range of infections in various hosts. Objectives: We intended to determine the prevalence of S. aureus in the nasal cavity of healthy ruminants and also to investigate the presence of antibiotic resistance genes. Materials and Methods: In the present study, healthy cattle (n = 79), sheep (n = 78) and goats (n = 44) were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Staphylococcus aureus isolates were further assessed for the presence of blaZ (encoding penicillin resistance), mecA (encoding methicillin resistance), tetK and tetM (encoding tetracycline resistance), and ermA and ermC (encoding macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance) genes. Results: The proportion of S. aureus-positive nasal swabs from cattle, sheep and goats were four (5.06%), 11 (14.1%) and 11 isolates (25%), respectively. The blaZ gene was detected in 20 out of 26 S. aureus isolates (76.9%), including four cattle (100%), nine sheep (81.8%) and seven goats (63.6%). Two of the four cattle isolates possessing the blaZ gene also had the tetK gene. Of the nine sheep isolates harboring the blaZ gene, one possessed the mecA and tetK genes together. Of the seven goat isolates with blaZ gene, one harbored the tetM gene. None of the S. aureus isolates were positive for the ermA and ermC genes. Conclusions: In contrast to cattle, S. aureus is frequently present in the nose of sheep and goats, which may represent the primary reservoir of S. aureus in small ruminant flocks. This study also showed that nasal isolates of S. aureus from healthy ruminants might be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance. PMID:26568802

  14. Dissemination of panton-valentine leukocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mine, Yoshiko; Nakasone, Isamu; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Utani, Atsushi; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming cytotoxin that is produced by Staphylococcus aureus closely associated with skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI). PVL-positive S. aureus strains have been identified worldwide, including in the USA; however, few studies have reported the presence of these strains in Japan. In this study, we prospectively investigated the prevalence of PVL in S. aureus strains from outpatients presenting with SSTI in Okinawa and characterized the PVL-positive S. aureus strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). From 2008-2010, 499 clinical samples were obtained from 497 people. S. aureus was identified in 274 samples, and 36% (99 of 274) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Seventeen (6.2%) PVL-positive S. aureus strains were detected by PCR, and 12 of the 17 PVL-positive strains were MRSA. Most PVL-positive S. aureus caused furuncles or carbuncles. Nine of the 17 PVL-positive isolates had an ST8 MRSA genotype and most harbored SCCmec type IVa and the arcA gene of the arginine catabolic mobile element, which is identical to the USA300 clone prevalent in the USA. PVL-positive S. aureus strains were more likely to be resistant to erythromycin (65%) and levofloxacin (53%). PVL-positive S. aureus strains have emerged and are spreading as a causative pathogen for SSTI in Okinawa.

  15. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-02-11

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca(2+) nor Mg(2+) lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones.

  16. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones. PMID:26865182

  17. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones.

  18. Immunomodulation and Disease Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhigang; Peres, Adam G.; Damian, Andreea C.; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens that causes severe morbidity and mortality throughout the world. S. aureus can infect skin and soft tissues or become invasive leading to diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. In contrast, S. aureus is also a common commensal microbe and is often part of the human nasal microbiome without causing any apparent disease. In this review, we explore the immunomodulation and disease tolerance mechanisms that promote commensalism to S. aureus. PMID:26580658

  19. CHROMOSOMAL MAPPING IN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS , CHROMOSOMES), (*CHROMOSOMES, MAPPING), NITROSO COMPOUNDS, GUANIDINES, GENETICS, MUTATIONS, DRUGS, TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), TEST METHODS, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, INHIBITION, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY).

  20. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming. PMID:27509169

  1. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  2. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  3. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drougka, E.; Foka, A.; Posantzis, D.; Giormezis, N.; Anastassiou, E.D.; Petinaki, E.; Spiliopoulou, I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  4. Architecture of a Species: Phylogenomics of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Planet, Paul J; Narechania, Apurva; Chen, Liang; Mathema, Barun; Boundy, Sam; Archer, Gordon; Kreiswirth, Barry

    2017-02-01

    A deluge of whole-genome sequencing has begun to give insights into the patterns and processes of microbial evolution, but genome sequences have accrued in a haphazard manner, with biased sampling of natural variation that is driven largely by medical and epidemiological priorities. For instance, there is a strong bias for sequencing epidemic lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) over sensitive isolates (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus: MSSA). As more diverse genomes are sequenced the emerging picture is of a highly subdivided species with a handful of relatively clonal groups (complexes) that, at any given moment, dominate in particular geographical regions. The establishment of hegemony of particular clones appears to be a dynamic process of successive waves of replacement of the previously dominant clone. Here we review the phylogenomic structure of a diverse range of S. aureus, including both MRSA and MSSA. We consider the utility of the concept of the 'core' genome and the impact of recombination and horizontal transfer. We argue that whole-genome surveillance of S. aureus populations could lead to better forecasting of antibiotic resistance and virulence of emerging clones, and a better understanding of the elusive biological factors that determine repeated strain replacement.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza A Virus: Partners in Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Michelle E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor for secondary staphylococcal pneumonia in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected hosts. However, little research has been undertaken to define the environmental and physiological changes that cause S. aureus to shift from commensal to pathogenic organism in this setting. The ability of virus-driven danger signals to cause S. aureus to transition from commensalism to pulmonary infection was explored in a recent study by Reddinger et al. R. M. Reddinger, N. R. Luke-Marshall, A. P. Hakansson, and A. A. Campagnari, mBio 7(6):e01235-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01235-16. The authors report that physiological host changes, including febrile temperature and a combination of host stress response signals, caused S. aureus biofilms to disperse from the nasal environment and cause active pulmonary infection. This commentary discusses the new finding in light of the current understanding of the mechanisms behind staphylococcal coinfection with IAV. In addition, it considers the mechanisms behind staphylococcal dispersal in this model. Overall, the study indicates that interkingdom signaling may occur following IAV infection and this likely contributes to sensitizing the IAV-infected host to secondary staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:27965455

  6. Vaccine protection of leukopenic mice against Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts-α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)-are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI.

  7. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  8. Anthracimycin Activity Against Contemporary Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hensler, Mary E.; Jang, Kyoung Hwa; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Vuong, Lisa; Tran, Dan N.; Soubih, Evaristus; Lin, Leo; Haste, Nina M.; Cunningham, Mark L.; Kwan, Bryan P.; Shaw, Karen Joy; Fenical, William; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Anthracimycin is a recently discovered novel marine-derived compound with activity against Bacillus anthracis. We tested anthracimycin against an expanded panel of Staphylococcus aureus strains in vitro and in vivo. All strains of S. aureus tested, including methicillin-sensitive (MSSA), methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant strains of S. aureus were sensitive to anthracimycin at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of < 0.25 mg/L. Although its post-antibiotic effects were minimal, anthracimycin exhibited potent and rapid bactericidal activity, with a > 4-log kill of USA300 MRSA within 3 hours at 5 times its MIC. At concentrations significantly below the MIC, anthracimycin slowed MRSA growth and potentiated the bactericidal activity of the human cathelicidin, LL-37. The bactericidal activity of anthracimycin was somewhat mitigated in the presence of 20% human serum, and the compound was minimally toxic to human cells, with an IC50 = 70 mg/L against human carcinoma cells. At concentrations near the MIC anthracimycin inhibited S. aureus nucleic acid synthesis as determined by optimized macromolecular synthesis methodology, with inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis occurring in the absence of DNA intercalation. Anthracimycin at a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg was able to protect mice from MRSA-induced mortality in a murine peritonitis model of infection. Anthracimycin provides an interesting new scaffold for future development of a novel MRSA antibiotic. PMID:24736856

  9. [Severe infection by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin: reports of two cases].

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Martín; Pérez, Guadalupe; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Sarkis, Claudia; Romero, Romina; Mastroianni, Alejandra; Casimir, Lidia; Venuta, María E; Gómez Bonduele, Verónica; Bologna, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major etiologic agent of infections in children from the community and the hospital setting. The severity of these conditions is associated with virulence factors, including the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Both methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus produce this leukocidin although with varying frequency. We present two children with severe infection by sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producer of Panton-Valentine leukocidin with musculoskeletal and endovascular complications. It is essential the suspected diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment and early surgical management to improve the approach of these infections. Epidemiological surveillance should be mantained to detect the frequency of infections caused by these bacteria.

  10. Disseminated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Staphylococcus aureus infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Karli, Arzu; Yanik, Keramettin; Paksu, Muhammet S; Sensoy, Gulnar; Aykanat, Alper; Yener, Nazik; Belet, Nursen; Ceyhan, Meltem

    2016-04-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an exotoxin that is produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and an important virulence factor. A PVL-positive S. aureus infection leads to rapid and severe infections of soft tissue and necrotizing pneumonia in healthy adolescents, and has a high mortality. This case report included a 12-year-old male patient who admitted for fever, respiratory distress and hip pain and was identified with necrotizing pneumonia with septic pulmonary embolism, psoas abscess, cellulitis and osteomyelitis. The PVL positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in the patient blood culture.

  11. Mast cells are activated by Staphylococcus aureus in vitro but do not influence the outcome of intraperitoneal S. aureus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rönnberg, Elin; Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Calounova, Gabriela; Garcia Faroldi, Gianni; Grujic, Mirjana; Hartmann, Karin; Roers, Axel; Guss, Bengt; Lundequist, Anders; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that can cause a broad spectrum of serious infections including skin infections, pneumonia and sepsis. Peritoneal mast cells have been implicated in the host response towards various bacterial insults and to provide mechanistic insight into the role of mast cells in intraperitoneal bacterial infection we here studied the global effects of S. aureus on mast cell gene expression. After co-culture of peritoneal mast cells with live S. aureus we found by gene array analysis that they up-regulate a number of genes. Many of these corresponded to pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-3, interleukin-13 and tumour necrosis factor-α. The cytokine induction in response to S. aureus was confirmed by ELISA. To study the role of peritoneal mast cells during in vivo infection with S. aureus we used newly developed Mcpt5-Cre(+) × R-DTA mice in which mast cell deficiency is independent of c-Kit. This is in contrast to previous studies in which an impact of mast cells on bacterial infection has been proposed based on the use of mice whose mast cell deficiency is a consequence of defective c-Kit signalling. Staphylococcus aureus was injected intraperitoneally into mast-cell-deficient Mcpt5-Cre(+) × R-DTA mice using littermate mast-cell-sufficient mice as controls. We did not observe any difference between mast-cell-deficient and control mice with regard to weight loss, bacterial clearance, inflammation or cytokine production. We conclude that, despite peritoneal mast cells being activated by S. aureus in vitro, they do not influence the in vivo manifestations of intraperitoneal S. aureus infection.

  12. Tracing and inhibiting growth of Staphylococcus aureus in barbecue cheese production after product recall.

    PubMed

    Johler, S; Zurfluh, K; Stephan, R

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne intoxication worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of enterotoxins formed by Staphylococcus aureus during growth in the food matrix. Following a recall of barbecue cheese due to the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins in Switzerland in July 2015, we analyzed the production process of the respective dairy. Although most cheese-making processes involve acidification to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria, barbecue cheese has to maintain a pH >6.0 to prevent undesired melting of the cheese. In addition, the dairy decided to retain the traditional manual production process of the barbecue cheese. In this study, therefore, we aimed to (1) trace Staph. aureus along the barbecue cheese production process, and (2) develop a sustainable strategy to inhibit growth of Staph. aureus and decrease the risk of staphylococcal food poisoning without changing the traditional production process. To this end, we traced Staph. aureus in a step-wise blinded process analysis on 4 different production days using spa (Staphylococcus protein A gene) typing, DNA microarray profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. We subsequently selected a new starter culture and used a model cheese production including a challenge test assay to assess its antagonistic effect on Staph. aureus growth, as well as its sensory and technological implications. We detected Staph. aureus in 30% (37/124) of the collected samples taken from the barbecue cheese production at the dairy. This included detection of Staph. aureus in the final product on all 4 production days, either after enrichment or using quantitative detection. We traced 2 enterotoxigenic Staph. aureus strains (t073/CC45 and t282/CC45) colonizing the nasal cavity and the forearms of the cheesemakers to the final product. In the challenge test assay, we were able to show that the new starter culture inhibited growth of Staph. aureus while meeting

  13. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening. PMID:16081989

  14. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-08-31

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt.

  15. Serine-Aspartate Repeat Protein D Increases Staphylococcus aureus Virulence and Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Satoshi; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Ajayi, Clement; Sollid, Johanna U. E.; van Sorge, Nina M.; Nizet, Victor; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus expresses a panel of cell wall-anchored adhesins, including proteins belonging to the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family, exemplified by the serine-aspartate repeat protein D (SdrD), which serve key roles in colonization and infection. Deletion of sdrD from S. aureus subsp. aureus strain NCTC8325-4 attenuated bacterial survival in human whole blood ex vivo, which was associated with increased killing by human neutrophils. Remarkably, SdrD was able to inhibit innate immune-mediated bacterial killing independently of other S. aureus proteins, since addition of recombinant SdrD protein and heterologous expression of SdrD in Lactococcus lactis promoted bacterial survival in human blood. SdrD contributes to bacterial virulence in vivo, since fewer S. aureus subsp. aureus NCTC8325-4 ΔsdrD bacteria than bacteria of the parent strain were recovered from blood and several organs using a murine intravenous infection model. Collectively, our findings reveal a new property of SdrD as an important key contributor to S. aureus survival and the ability to escape the innate immune system in blood. PMID:27795358

  16. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus in Goose Feces from State Parks in Northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Thapaliya, Dipendra; Dalman, Mark; Kadariya, Jhalka; Little, Katie; Mansell, Victoria; Taha, Mohammed Y; Grenier, Dylan; Smith, Tara C

    2017-03-10

    Staphylococcus aureus can colonize a range of species. Although numerous studies have isolated pathogenic bacteria from wild birds, very little is known regarding S. aureus and their potential to spread methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains. The objective of this study was to determine the presence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in geese fecal samples collected from ten state parks across Northeast Ohio (NEO). A total of 182 fecal samples from Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were collected in April 2015. Isolates were characterized using multi-locus sequence (MLST) and spa typing, as well as PCR to detect the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), mecA, and scn genes. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done via Vitek-2 system. The overall contamination by S. aureus in fecal samples was 7.1% (13/182); 7/182 (3.8%) were MRSA and 6/182 (3.3%) were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). One isolate was positive for PVL. A total of eight different spa types were observed. MLST included ST5, ST8, ST291, ST298, and ST2111. One (7.7%) MSSA isolate was multi-drug resistant. The S. aureus contamination in NEO state parks ranged from 0% (park 1, 4, 8, 9) to 35% (7/20) (park 5). Parks 2, 3, 6, and 7 had 5% (1/20) positive. The results of this study indicate that the feces of geese collected at various state parks in NEO may harbor S. aureus.

  17. Inhibitory effect of totarol on exotoxin proteins hemolysin and enterotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Meng, Rizeng; Liu, Zonghui; Liu, Mingyuan; Guo, Na; Yu, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a wide variety of infections, which are of major concern worldwide. S. aureus produces multiple virulence factors, resulting in food infection and poisoning. These virulence factors include hyaluronidases, proteases, coagulases, lipases, deoxyribonucleases and enterotoxins. Among the extracellular proteins produced by S. aureus that contribute to pathogenicity, the exotoxins α-hemolysin, staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are thought to be of major significance. Totarol, a plant extract, has been revealed to inhibit the proliferation of several pathogens effectively. However, there are no reports on the effects of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin, SEA or SEB secreted by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of totarol on these three exotoxins. Hemolysis assay, western blotting and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay were performed to identify the influence of graded subinhibitory concentrations of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin and the two major enterotoxins, SEA and SEB, by S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the TNF-α production of RAW264.7 cells stimulated by S. aureus supernatants was inhibited by subinhibitory concentrations of totarol. Form the data, we propose that totarol could potentially be used as a promising natural compound in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Phage sensitivity and prophage carriage in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from foods in Spain and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; García, Pilar; Billington, Craig; Premarante, Aruni; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-08-02

    Bacteriophages (phages) are a promising tool for the biocontrol of pathogenic bacteria, including those contaminating food products and causing infectious diseases. However, the success of phage preparations is limited by the host ranges of their constituent phages. The phage resistance/sensitivity profile of eighty seven Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Spain and New Zealand from dairy, meat and seafood sources was determined for six phages (Φ11, K, ΦH5, ΦA72, CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Most of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to phage K (Myoviridae) and CAPSa1 (Siphoviridae) regardless of their origin. There was a higher sensitivity of New Zealand S. aureus strains to phages isolated from both Spain (ΦH5 and ΦA72) and New Zealand (CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Spanish phages had a higher infectivity on S. aureus strains of Spanish dairy origin, while Spanish strains isolated from other environments were more sensitive to New Zealand phages. Lysogeny was more prevalent in Spanish S. aureus compared to New Zealand strains. A multiplex PCR reaction, which detected ΦH5 and ΦA72 sequences, indicated a high prevalence of these prophages in Spanish S. aureus strains, but were infrequently detected in New Zealand strains. Overall, the correlation between phage resistance and lysogeny in S. aureus strains was found to be weak.

  19. Twelve aberrant strains of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, C; Cellini, L; Dainelli, B

    1993-01-01

    A new biovar of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus was isolated from human clinical specimens and described on the basis of studies of 12 isolates that were compared with 11 standard reference strains. Both DNA hybridization experiments and numerical taxonomy analysis demonstrated that these strains were strictly related to S. aureus subsp. aureus; however, they were significantly different from the latter. The atypical strains belonging to the new biovar can be distinguished from typical S. aureus subsp. aureus strains by their alpha-chymotrypsin, alpha-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase (C-14), and leucine arylamidase enzymatic activities and novobiocin resistance. Thus, the combination of alpha-glucosidase and beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase is more useful for distinguishing these S. aureus strains from the other, typical ones. PMID:8370737

  20. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus from retail ground meats.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Alina; Soong, Yee-Ann; Dupuy, Nicole; Shafer, Daniel; Richbourg, William; Johnson, Kourtney; Brown, Twain; Kestler, Edward; Li, Yi; Zheng, Jie; McDermott, Patrick; Meng, Jianghong

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), recovered from raw retail meat products purchased in the Washington, D.C., area. From March to August 2008, 694 samples of ground beef (n = 198), ground pork (n = 300), and ground turkey (n = 196) were collected by random sampling from stores of three grocery chains. In total, 200 S. aureus isolates (29%) were recovered by direct plating. When tested for susceptibility to 22 antimicrobials, 69% of the S. aureus isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 26% to penicillin, 17% to ampicillin, 13% to methicillin, 8% to erythromycin, 4.5% to clindamycin, 1.5% to gentamicin, and 0.5% to chloramphenicol, oxacillin, cefoxitin, or quinupristin-dalfopristin. However, 27% of the isolates were susceptible to all tested antimicrobials. More turkey and pork isolates were resistant to ampicillin, penicillin, and tetracycline than were beef isolates (P < 0.05). Additionally, 17% of the turkey and 17% of the pork isolates were resistant to methicillin (MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml), whereas no beef isolates were resistant to the antimicrobial agent. A single MRSA (methicillin MIC > 32 μg/ml) isolate containing the mecA gene with additional resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, oxacillin plus 2% NaCl, cefoxitin, ampicillin, penicillin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, tetracycline, and gentamicin was recovered from one pork sample. The presence of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus, coupled with the relative lack of such studies in the United States, suggests that further investigations on MRSA in the food supply are needed despite the low rate of MRSA found in this particular study.

  2. Molecular characterization of α-amylase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Hanumanthu Prasanna; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Swarupa, Vimjam; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the prominent Gram positive human pathogen secretes many surface and secretary proteins including various enzymes and pathogenic factors that favour the successful colonization and infection of host tissue. α-amylase is one of the enzymes secreted by S. aureus which catalyses the breakdown of complex sugars to monosaccharides, which are required for colonization and survival of this pathogen in any anatomical locales. In the present study we have cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized α-amylase gene from S. aureus ATCC12600. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular weight of 58kDa and the kinetics showed Vmax 0.0208±0.033 (mg/ml)/mg/min and Km 10.633±0.737mg/ml. The multiple sequence analysis showed α- amylase of S. aureus exhibited large differences with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis. As the crystal structure of S. aureus α- amylase was unavailable, we used homology modelling method to build the structure. The built structure was validated by Ramachandran plot which showed 90% of the residues in the allowed region while no residue was found in the disallowed region and the built structure was close to the crystal structure with Z-Score: -6.85. The structural superimposition studies with α- amylases of Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis showed distinct differences with RMSD values of 18.158Åand 7.091Å respectively which correlated with enzyme kinetics, indicating α-amylase is different among these bacteria.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of the Global Prevalence Rates of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Contamination of Different Raw Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qianting; Peng, Yang; Lin, Dongxin; Bai, Chan; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Jialing; Ye, Xiaohua; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2017-03-30

    Previous research has indicated that raw meats are frequently contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus , but data regarding the pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) contamination in different types of raw meat products (beef, chicken, and pork) and across different periods, regions, and purchase locations remain inconsistent. We systematically searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and HighWire databases to identify studies published up to June 2016. The STROBE guidelines were used to assess the quality of the 39 studies included in this meta-analysis. We observed no significant differences in the pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus and MRSA contamination identified in various raw meat products, with overall pooled prevalence rates of 29.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.8 to 35.9%) and 3.2% (95% CI, 1.8 to 4.9%) identified for the two contaminants, respectively. In the subgroup analyses, the prevalence of S. aureus contamination in chicken products was highest in Asian studies and significantly decreased over time worldwide. In European studies, the prevalence rates of S. aureus contamination in chicken and pork products were lower than those reported on other continents. The pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus contamination in chicken and pork products and MRSA contamination in beef and pork products were significantly higher in samples collected from retail sources than in samples collected from slaughterhouses and processing plants. These results highlight the need for good hygiene during transportation to and manipulation at retail outlets to reduce the risk of transmission of S. aureus and MRSA from meat products to humans.

  4. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  5. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Lee, Chia Y; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    As with many other bacterial species, the most commonly used method to assess staphylococcal biofilm formation in vitro is the microtiter plate assay. This assay is particularly useful for comparison of multiple strains including large-scale screens of mutant libraries. When such screens are applied to the coagulase-negative staphylococci in general, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in particular, they are relatively straightforward by comparison with microtiter plate assays used to assess biofilm formation in other bacterial species. However, in the case of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, we have found it necessary to employ specific modifications including precoating of the wells of the microtiter plate with plasma proteins and supplementation of the medium with both salt and glucose. In this chapter, we describe the microtiter plate assay in the specific context of clinical isolates of S. aureus and the use of these modifications. A second in vitro method, which also is generally dependent on coating with plasma proteins and supplementation of the growth medium, is the use of flow cells. In this method, bacteria are allowed to attach to a surface and then monitored with respect to their ability to remain attached to the substrate and differentiate into mature biofilms under the constant pressure of fluid shear force. Although flow cells are not applicable to large-scale screens, we have found that they provide a more reproducible and accurate assessment of the capacity of S. aureus clinical isolates to form a biofilm. They also provide a means of analyzing structural differences in biofilm architecture and isolating bacteria and/or spent media for analysis of physiological and metabolic changes associated with the adaptive response to growth in a biofilm. While a primary focus of this chapter is on the use of in vitro assays to assess biofilm formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus, it is important to

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview for manual therapists☆

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Egan, Jonathon Todd; Rosenthal, Michael; Griffith, Erin A.; Evans, Marion Willard

    2012-01-01

    Objective Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with difficult-to-treat infections and high levels of morbidity. Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments. Methods PubMed and CINAHL were searched from the beginning of their respective indexing years through June 2011 using the search terms MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Texts and authoritative Web sites were also reviewed. Pertinent articles from the authors' libraries were included if they were not already identified in the literature search. Articles were included if they were applicable to ambulatory health care environments in which manual therapists work or if the content of the article related to the clinical management of MRSA. Results Following information extraction, 95 citations were included in this review, to include 76 peer-reviewed journal articles, 16 government Web sites, and 3 textbooks. Information was organized into 10 clinically relevant categories for presentation. Information was organized into the following clinically relevant categories: microbiology, development of MRSA, risk factors for infection, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, screening tests, reporting, treatment, prevention for patients and athletes, and prevention for health care workers. Conclusion Methicillin-resistant S aureus is a health risk in the community and to patients and athletes treated by manual therapists. Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community

  7. A very early-branching Staphylococcus aureus lineage lacking the carotenoid pigment staphyloxanthin.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; Holden, Matthew T G; Tong, Steven Y C; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Clarke, Louise; Quail, Michael A; Currie, Bart J; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Feil, Edward J; Giffard, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of the northern Australian Staphylococcus aureus isolate MSHR1132 genome. MSHR1132 belongs to the divergent clonal complex 75 lineage. The average nucleotide divergence between orthologous genes in MSHR1132 and typical S. aureus is approximately sevenfold greater than the maximum divergence observed in this species to date. MSHR1132 has a small accessory genome, which includes the well-characterized genomic islands, νSAα and νSaβ, suggesting that these elements were acquired well before the expansion of the typical S. aureus population. Other mobile elements show mosaic structure (the prophage ϕSa3) or evidence of recent acquisition from a typical S. aureus lineage (SCCmec, ICE6013 and plasmid pMSHR1132). There are two differences in gene repertoire compared with typical S. aureus that may be significant clues as to the genetic basis underlying the successful emergence of S. aureus as a pathogen. First, MSHR1132 lacks the genes for production of staphyloxanthin, the carotenoid pigment that confers upon S. aureus its characteristic golden color and protects against oxidative stress. The lack of pigment was demonstrated in 126 of 126 CC75 isolates. Second, a mobile clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) element is inserted into orfX of MSHR1132. Although common in other staphylococcal species, these elements are very rare within S. aureus and may impact accessory genome acquisition. The CRISPR spacer sequences reveal a history of attempted invasion by known S. aureus mobile elements. There is a case for the creation of a new taxon to accommodate this and related isolates.

  8. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly demonstrate that adults and

  9. Facing antibiotic resistance: Staphylococcus aureus phages as a medical tool.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use.

  10. Facing Antibiotic Resistance: Staphylococcus aureus Phages as a Medical Tool

    PubMed Central

    Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use. PMID:24988520

  11. Distribution of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, W D

    2016-01-29

    We identified and analyzed 5 new-type enterotoxin genes, including SEj, SEl, SEq, SEm, and SEr, to explore the distribution of 5 enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus of different origins as well as their correlations and differences. We examined the distribution of the S. aureus enterotoxin genes and their pathogenic mechanisms. A total of 660 specimens were collected from January 2011 to December 2014, and 217 strains of S. aureus were isolated. The template DNA of S. aureus was extracted. The Primer6.0 and Oligo7 software were used to design and synthesize polymerase chain reaction primers. Amplification results were analyzed by electrophoresis, and the amplification products were recovered and sequenced. Thirty-six bacterial strains contained the SEj gene (16.6%), including 15, 8, 8, 4, and 1 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, raw milk, human purulent tissue, and living environment, respectively. Thirty-one bacterial strains contained the SEr gene (14.3%), including 16, 9, and 6 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, and raw milk, respectively. Twenty-one bacterial strains contained the enterotoxin SEq gene (9.7%), including 8, 6, 6, and 1 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, raw milk, and human purulent tissue, respectively. No SEm and SEl genes were detected. Different types of foods carry different types of enterotoxins, providing a basis for quick tracing for food poisoning. Three enterotoxin genes, SEj, SEr, and SEq, showed the highest carrier rate in quick-frozen food. It is imperative to improve their detection in quick-frozen food.

  12. Incidence and treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in cystic fibrosis patients: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Paloma Horejs; Pimentel, Carlos Sidney Silva; Bonfim, Bianca Sampaio; Marostica, Paulo José; Souza, Edna Lúcia

    In Brazil the knowledge about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in cystic fibrosis patients is scarce. This study aimed to determine the incidence of respiratory tract colonization and the identification rates after a standardized treatment. A retrospective cohort was performed highlighting the history of respiratory colonizations between January 2008 and June 2015. Patients under the age of 21 years with cystic fibrosis confirmed by sweat test or genetic study receiving care at the outpatient clinics of a Teaching Hospital were included. The treatment consisted of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, rifampicin, nasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine 2%. The mean follow-up period was of 22.2 months and those with ≥3 negative cultures were considered free of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Forty-two patients were included. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in six patients. Most patients had methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolation prior to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Five children used the standardized treatment, none presented side effects. Only one child had a new isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus during follow-up (after 20 months). The incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection was high and occurred in young patients. The therapeutic regimen was effective, safe and being a good option to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  13. Treating Parents to Reduce NICU Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus (TREAT PARENTS) trial: protocol of a multisite randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M; Koontz, Danielle W; Voskertchian, Annie; Popoola, Victor O; Harrelson, Kathleen; Ross, Tracy; Aucott, Susan W; Gilmore, Maureen M; Carroll, Karen C; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction More than 33 000 healthcare-associated infections occur in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) each year in the USA. Parents, rather than healthcare workers, may be a reservoir from which neonates acquire Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonisation in the NICU. This study looks to measure the effect of treating parents with short course intranasal mupirocin and topical chlorhexidine antisepsis on acquisition of S. aureus colonisation and infection in neonates. Methods and analysis The TREAT PARENTS trial (Treating Parents to Reduce Neonatal Transmission of S. aureus) is a multicentre randomised, masked, placebo-controlled trial. Shortly after a neonate is admitted to the NICU, parents will be tested for S. aureus colonisation. If either parent screens positive for S. aureus, then both parents as a pair will be enrolled and randomised to one of the two possible masked treatment arms. Arm 1 will include assignment to intranasal 2% mupirocin plus topical antisepsis with chlorhexidine gluconate impregnated cloths for 5 days. Arm 2 will include assignment to placebo ointment and placebo cloths for skin antisepsis for 5 days. The primary outcome will be neonatal acquisition of an S. aureus strain that is concordant to the parental baseline S. aureus strain as determined by periodic surveillance cultures or a culture collected during routine clinical care that grows S. aureus. Secondary outcomes will include neonatal acquisition of S. aureus, neonatal S. aureus infection, eradication of S. aureus colonisation in parents, natural history of S. aureus colonisation in parents receiving placebo, adverse reactions to treatment, feasibility of intervention, and attitudes and behaviour in consented parents. Four hundred neonate-parent pairs will be enrolled. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by Johns Hopkins University IRB in June 2014 (IRB number 00092982). Protocol V.7 was approved in November 2014. Findings will be published in peer

  14. Chemical composition of fennel essential oil and its impact on Staphylococcus aureus exotoxin production.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Li, Hongen; Su, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Luo, Mingjing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Deng, Yanhong; Liu, Juxiong; Deng, Xuming

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fennel oil was isolated by hydrodistillation, and the chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis. The antimicrobial activity of fennel oil against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated by broth microdilution. A haemolysis assay, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release assay, western blot, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR were applied to investigate the influence of fennel oil on the production of S. aureus virulence-related exoproteins. The data show that fennel oil, which contains a high level of trans-anethole, was active against S. aureus, with MICs ranging from 64 to 256 μg/ml. Furthermore, fennel oil, when used at subinhibitory concentrations, could dose-dependently decrease the expression of S. aureus exotoxins, including α-toxin, Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1).

  15. Cross reactivity of S. aureus to murine cytokine assays: A source of discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Javed, Numan; Xue, Guang; Lu, Ailing; Xing, Yue; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Xiao, Hui; Lecoeur, Hervé; Späth, Gerald F; Meng, Guangxun

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the versatile Gram positive bacteria causing a range of diseases. Upon challenge, host immune cells recognize S. aureus and mount diverse immune responses including production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α. These cytokines are important mediators of inflammation which can be detected via various immunological methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. In the current study, we found that a number of clinical isolates as well as laboratory strains of S. aureus exhibited cross reactivity with ELISA antibodies for murine IL-1β and TNF-α assays. This cross reactivity generates exaggerated false positive signals which can be a source of discrepancy for the understanding of real immune responses against S. aureus infection by host immune cells.

  16. Colony spreading in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaito, Chikara; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2007-03-01

    Wild-type Staphylococcus aureus rapidly expands on the surface of soft agar plates. The rates of expansion and the shapes of the resultant giant colonies were distinct for different strains of laboratory stocks and clinical isolates. The colony spreading abilities did not correlate with the biofilm-forming abilities in these strains. Insertional disruption of the dltABCD operon, which functions at the step of D-alanine addition to teichoic acids, and of the tagO gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of wall teichoic acids, decreased the colony spreading ability. The results indicate that wall teichoic acids and D-alanylation of teichoic acids are required for colony spreading.

  17. Glycerol Monolaurate and Dodecylglycerol Effects on Staphylococcus aureus and Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Chi; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Anderson, Michele J.; Fair, Christina L.; Schaefers, Matthew M.; Muthyala, Ramaiah; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycerol monolaurate (GML), a 12 carbon fatty acid monoester, inhibits Staphylococcus aureus growth and exotoxin production, but is degraded by S. aureus lipase. Therefore, dodecylglycerol (DDG), a 12 carbon fatty acid monoether, was compared in vitro and in vivo to GML for its effects on S. aureus growth, exotoxin production, and stability. Methodology/Principal Findings Antimicrobial effects of GML and DDG (0 to 500 µg/ml) on 54 clinical isolates of S. aureus, including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types USA200, USA300, and USA400, were determined in vitro. A rabbit Wiffle ball infection model assessed GML and DDG (1 mg/ml instilled into the Wiffle ball every other day) effects on S. aureus (MN8) growth (inoculum 3×108 CFU/ml), toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) production, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and mortality over 7 days. DDG (50 and 100 µg/ml) inhibited S. aureus growth in vitro more effectively than GML (p<0.01) and was stable to lipase degradation. Unlike GML, DDG inhibition of TSST-1 was dependent on S. aureus growth. GML-treated (4 of 5; 80%) and DDG-treated rabbits (2 of 5; 40%) survived after 7 days. Control rabbits (5 of 5; 100%) succumbed by day 4. GML suppressed TNF-α at the infection site on day 7; however, DDG did not (<10 ng/ml versus 80 ng/ml, respectively). Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that DDG was stable to S. aureus lipase and inhibited S. aureus growth at lower concentrations than GML in vitro. However, in vivo GML was more effective than DDG by reducing mortality, and suppressing TNF-α, S. aureus growth and exotoxin production, which may reduce toxic shock syndrome. GML is proposed as a more effective anti-staphylococcal topical anti-infective candidate than DDG, despite its potential degradation by S. aureus lipase. PMID:19838303

  18. Mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance in Staphylococcus aureus in patients with community-onset skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Stephanie A; Hogan, Patrick G; Camins, Bernard C; Ainsworth, Ali J; Patrick, Carol; Martin, Madeline S; Krauss, Melissa J; Rodriguez, Marcela; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-01-01

    Decolonization measures, including mupirocin and chlorhexidine, are often prescribed to prevent Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI). The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of high-level mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance in S. aureus strains recovered from patients with SSTI before and after mupirocin and chlorhexidine administration and to determine whether carriage of a mupirocin- or chlorhexidine-resistant strain at baseline precluded S. aureus eradication. We recruited 1,089 patients with community-onset SSTI with or without S. aureus colonization. In addition to routine care, 483 patients were enrolled in a decolonization trial: 408 received intranasal mupirocin (with or without antimicrobial baths), and 258 performed chlorhexidine body washes. Patients were followed for up to 12 months with repeat colonization cultures. All S. aureus isolates were tested for high-level mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance. At baseline, 23/1,089 (2.1%) patients carried a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain and 10/1,089 (0.9%) patients carried chlorhexidine-resistant S. aureus. Of 4 patients prescribed mupirocin, who carried a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline, 100% remained colonized at 1 month compared to 44% of the 324 patients without mupirocin resistance at baseline (P = 0.041). Of 2 patients prescribed chlorhexidine, who carried a chlorhexidine-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline, 50% remained colonized at 1 month compared to 48% of the 209 patients without chlorhexidine resistance at baseline (P = 1.0). The overall prevalence of mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance is low in S. aureus isolates recovered from outpatients, but eradication efforts were less successful in patients carrying a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline.

  19. How Clonal Is Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Feil, Edward J.; Cooper, Jessica E.; Grundmann, Hajo; Robinson, D. Ashley; Enright, Mark C.; Berendt, Tony; Peacock, Sharon J.; Smith, John Maynard; Murphy, Michael; Spratt, Brian G.; Moore, Catrin E.; Day, Nicholas P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen and represents a growing public health burden owing to the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant clones, particularly within the hospital environment. Despite this, basic questions about the evolution and population biology of the species, particularly with regard to the extent and impact of homologous recombination, remain unanswered. We address these issues through an analysis of sequence data obtained from the characterization by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 334 isolates of S. aureus, recovered from a well-defined population, over a limited time span. We find no significant differences in the distribution of multilocus genotypes between strains isolated from carriers and those from patients with invasive disease; there is, therefore, no evidence from MLST data, which index variation within the stable “core” genome, for the existence of hypervirulent clones of this pathogen. Examination of the sequence changes at MLST loci during clonal diversification shows that point mutations give rise to new alleles at least 15-fold more frequently than does recombination. This contrasts with the naturally transformable species Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which alleles change between 5- and 10-fold more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that homologous recombination does contribute toward the evolution of this species over the long term. Finally, we note a striking excess of nonsynonymous substitutions in comparisons between isolates belonging to the same clonal complex compared to isolates belonging to different clonal complexes, suggesting that the removal of deleterious mutations by purifying selection may be relatively slow. PMID:12754228

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A Mediates Interspecies Interactions at the Cell Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Catherine R.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Mishra, Meenu; Hayden, Hillary S.; Radey, Matthew C.; Merrihew, Gennifer; MacCoss, Michael J.; Burns, Jane; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While considerable research has focused on the properties of individual bacteria, relatively little is known about how microbial interspecies interactions alter bacterial behaviors and pathogenesis. Staphylococcus aureus frequently coinfects with other pathogens in a range of different infectious diseases. For example, coinfection by S. aureus with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs commonly in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with higher lung disease morbidity and mortality. S. aureus secretes numerous exoproducts that are known to interact with host tissues, influencing inflammatory responses. The abundantly secreted S. aureus staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binds a range of human glycoproteins, immunoglobulins, and other molecules, with diverse effects on the host, including inhibition of phagocytosis of S. aureus cells. However, the potential effects of SpA and other S. aureus exoproducts on coinfecting bacteria have not been explored. Here, we show that S. aureus-secreted products, including SpA, significantly alter two behaviors associated with persistent infection. We found that SpA inhibited biofilm formation by specific P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, and it also inhibited phagocytosis by neutrophils of all isolates tested. Our results indicate that these effects were mediated by binding to at least two P. aeruginosa cell surface structures—type IV pili and the exopolysaccharide Psl—that confer attachment to surfaces and to other bacterial cells. Thus, we found that the role of a well-studied S. aureus exoproduct, SpA, extends well beyond interactions with the host immune system. Secreted SpA alters multiple persistence-associated behaviors of another common microbial community member, likely influencing cocolonization and coinfection with other microbes. PMID:27222468

  1. Neutrophil-Mediated Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Initial elimination of invading Staphylococcus aureus from the body is mediated by professional phagocytes. The neutrophil is the major phagocyte of the innate immunity and plays a key role in the host defense against staphylococcal infections. Opsonization of the bacteria with immunoglobulins and complement factors enables efficient recognition by the neutrophil that subsequently leads to intracellular compartmentalization and killing. Here, we provide a review of the key processes evolved in neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus and briefly describe killing. As S. aureus is not helpless against the professional phagocytes, we will also highlight its immune evasion arsenal related to phagocytosis. PMID:25309547

  2. [Recovery of Staphylococcus aureus after acid damage].

    PubMed

    Assis, E M; de Carvalho, E P; Asquieri, E R; da Silva, F V; Robbs, P G

    1995-01-01

    The growth behavior of S. aureus in fresh cheese (Minas and Mozzarella) during their shelf life was studied in this research. The possibility of injury to this microorganism caused by increasing acidity was also investigated. Raw milk was inoculated with S. aureus FRIA-100 with approximately 10(6) cells/ml and cheese production was carried out according to normal procedures. They were stored at 7 degrees C during 40 days for Minas cheese and during 60 days for Mozzarella cheese. At 2 to 3 days intervals the following analyses were performed: acidity, pH, S. aureus count on Baird-Parker agar by traditional methods and by the method recommended by the American Public Health Association, to count repair of injured cells. We were certain of the presence of injured S. aureus when acidity was in the range of 0.7 to 0.8% expressed as lactic acid and when the count was 1.3 log higher.

  3. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses.

    PubMed

    Parlet, Corey P; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Schlueter, Annette J

    2015-04-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b(+) myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection.

  4. Genetic relatedness and virulence factors of bovine Staphylococcus aureus isolated from teat skin and milk.

    PubMed

    da Costa, L B; Rajala-Schultz, P J; Hoet, A; Seo, K S; Fogt, K; Moon, B S

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of teat skin colonization in Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections (IMI) by evaluating genetic relatedness of Staph. aureus isolates from milk and teat skin of dairy cows using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and characterizing the isolates based on the carriage of virulence genes. Cows in 4 known Staph. aureus-positive herds were sampled and Staph. aureus was detected in 43 quarters of 20 cows, with 10 quarters positive in both milk and skin (20 isolates), 18 positive only in milk, and 15 only on teat skin. Quarters with teat skin colonized with Staph. aureus were 4.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with Staph. aureus IMI than quarters not colonized on teat skin. Three main clusters were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using a cutoff of 80% similarity. All 3 clusters included both milk and skin isolates. The majority of isolates (72%) belonged to one predominant cluster (B), with 60% of isolates in the cluster originating from milk and 40% from teat skin. Genotypic variability was observed within 10 pairs (formed by isolates originating from milk and teat skin of the same quarter), where isolates in 5 out of the 10 pairs belonged to the same cluster. Forty-two virulence factors were screened using PCR. Some virulence factors were carried more frequently by teat skin isolates than by milk isolates or isolates from quarters with high somatic cell counts. Isolates in the predominant cluster B carried virulence factors clfA and clfB significantly more often than isolates in the minor clusters, which may have assisted them in becoming predominant in the herds. The present findings suggest that teat skin colonization with Staph. aureus can be an important factor involved in Staph. aureus IMI.

  5. Identification of Infantile Diarrhea Caused by Breast Milk-Transmitted Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Pan, Wei-Guang; Xian, Wei-Yi; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Hu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known organism which is responsible for a variety of human infectious diseases including skin infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and endocarditis. Few of the microorganisms can be transmitted from mother to the newborn or infant by milk breastfeeding. This study aims to identify transmission of S. aureus from healthy, lactating mothers to their infants by breastfeeding. Stool specimens of diarrheal infants and breast milk of their mother (totally three pairs) were collected and six Staphylococcus aureus isolates were cultured positively. Homology and molecular characters of isolated strains were tested using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. Furthermore, toxin genes detection was also performed. Each pair of isolates has the same PFGE type and spa type. Four Sequence types (STs) were found among all the isolates; they are ST15, ST188, and ST59, respectively. Among the strains, seb, sec, and tst genes were found, and all were negative for pvl gene. The homology of the S. aureus strains isolated from the infants' stool and the mothers' milk was genetically demonstrated, which indicated that breastfeeding may be important in the transmission of S. aureus infection, and the character of S. aureus needed to be further evaluated.

  6. Biochemical and Molecular Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Amit; Dua, Parimal; Ghosh, Chandradipa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is opportunistic human as well as animal pathogen that causes a variety of diseases. A total of 100 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were obtained from clinical samples derived from hospitalized patients. The presumptive Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates were identified phenotypically by different biochemical tests. Molecular identification was done by PCR using species specific 16S rRNA primer pairs and finally 100 isolates were found to be positive as Staphylococcus aureus. Screened isolates were further analyzed by several microbiological diagnostics tests including gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase tests. It was found that 78%, 81%, and 51% isolates were positive for gelatin hydrolysis, protease, and lipase activities, respectively. Antibiogram analysis of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains with respect to different antimicrobial agents revealed resistance pattern ranging from 57 to 96%. Our study also shows 70% strains to be MRSA, 54.3% as VRSA, and 54.3% as both MRSA and VRSA. All the identified isolates were subjected to detection of mecA, nuc, and hlb genes and 70%, 84%, and 40% were found to harbour mecA, nuc, and hlb genes, respectively. The current investigation is highly important and informative for the high level multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections inclusive also of methicillin and vancomycin. PMID:27366185

  7. Zosteriform Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Infection: Report of Two Patients With Dermatomal Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Schepp, Elizabeth D; Cohen, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cutaneous infections, which are zosteriform in distribution, including two patients with dermatomal Staphylococcus aureus infection. Herpes zoster infectious lesions usually occur in a dermatomal distribution. Other viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, can also appear with zosteriform lesions and closely mimic the clinical presentation of herpes zoster. Additionally, other skin infections, less commonly, are zosteriform. Two patients who developed zosteriform S aureus skin infection are described. A medical literature search for zosteriform dermatomal infections yielded other cutaneous infections with a zosteriform presentation. Two patients had S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus infection with skin lesions occupying the T11-T12 dermatomes and the T4 dermatome, respectively. They responded to antibacterial agents and adjuvant therapy. Patients with viral, fungal, and spirochete zosteriform infections are summarized. In addition to varicella-zoster virus infection, zosteriform skin infection can occur with viral (varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and Epstein-Barr virus), superficial (dermatophyte), and deep (phaeohyphomycosis and zygomycosis) fungal, and bacterial (S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus) infections. These infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a zosteriform infection that does not present with the classic clinical picture for herpes zoster or that does not respond to standard treatments for varicellazoster virus.

  8. Small-molecule targeting of a diapophytoene desaturase inhibits S. aureus virulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feifei; Di, Hongxia; Wang, Youxin; Cao, Qiao; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Xue; Yang, Nana; Liu, Guijie; Yang, Cai-Guang; Xu, Yong; Jiang, Hualiang; Lian, Fulin; Zhang, Naixia; Li, Jian; Lan, Lefu

    2016-03-01

    The surge of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus has created a dire need for innovative anti-infective agents that attack new targets, to overcome resistance. In S. aureus, carotenoid pigment is an important virulence factor because it shields the bacterium from host oxidant killing. Here we show that naftifine, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved antifungal drug, blocks biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment at nanomolar concentrations. This effect is mediated by competitive inhibition of S. aureus diapophytoene desaturase (CrtN), an essential enzyme for carotenoid pigment synthesis. We found that naftifine attenuated the virulence of a variety of clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, in mouse infection models. Specifically, we determined that naftifine is a lead compound for potent CrtN inhibitors. In sum, these findings reveal that naftifine could serve as a chemical probe to manipulate CrtN activity, providing proof of concept that CrtN is a druggable target against S. aureus infections.

  9. Isolation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus from pet dogs and cats: a public health implication.

    PubMed

    Abdel-moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a globally distributed bacterium causing wide variety of illnesses in humans, which attributed to its ability to produce wide array of virulence factors, including enterotoxins that are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The current study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs and cats and its public health implication. For this purpose, nasal, oral, and wound swabs were collected from 70 dogs and 47 cats, whereas nasal swabs were collected from 26 human contacts. All samples were examined for the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus by isolation of S. aureus in culture media and then tested by specific ELISA kits to detect the produced toxins in bacterial cultures. The prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus was 10% and 2.1% for pet dogs and cats, respectively, whereas the nasal carriage rate in human contacts was 7.7%. The majority of animal isolates were obtained from mouth of the apparently healthy animals. All types of staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in both animal and human isolates. High prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs highlights the possibility of zoonotic transmission to human contacts leading to nasal and/or hand carriage of such strains; thus, pet animals may be incriminated in the epidemiology of household staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  10. Beta-hemolysin promotes skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, Sa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage Sa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes.

  11. Beta-Hemolysin Promotes Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, ϕSa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage ϕSa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes. PMID:23292775

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  13. Enterotoxigenic properties of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from goats' milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Akineden, Omer; Hassan, Abdulwahed Ahmed; Schneider, Elisabeth; Usleber, Ewald

    2008-05-31

    Goats' milk cheeses (n=181) from the Hessian market (retail shops, weekly markets, farm markets) were quantitatively analysed for Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, and 14 were found positive. From these samples, 64 isolates of S. aureus were characterized biochemically and genetically, including their potential to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE). SE genes sea to selo was studied by PCR and gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. SEA-SEE production in culture was determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). One isolate produced SEA, 18 isolates (from 4 samples) produced SEC, while SEB, SED, and SEE were not found. Toxin production was in agreement with PCR and RT-PCR results for the presence and expression, respectively, of the corresponding toxin genes. Trans-SE genes seg, sei, selm, seln, and selo were detected in 14 isolates from 4 cheese samples, exclusively as clusters. These samples were all from small-scale producers which directly or indirectly market their products regionally. No isolate was positive for seh or sej. RT-PCR detected the presence of the corresponding mRNA for all genes except selo, further indicating the possibility that respective proteins indeed have been produced in culture. These results suggest that S. aureus in goats' milk cheese potentially produces SE like proteins, besides SEA and SEC.

  14. Inhibitory effects of antibiofilm compound 1 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Looniva; Kayama, Shizuo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kato, Fuminori; Hisatsune, Junzo; Tsuruda, Keiko; Koizumi, Kazuhisa; Tatsukawa, Nobuyuki; Yu, Liansheng; Takeda, Kei; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2016-03-01

    A novel benzimidazole molecule that was identified in a small-molecule screen and is known as antibiofilm compound 1 (ABC-1) has been found to prevent bacterial biofilm formation by multiple bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, without affecting bacterial growth. Here, the biofilm inhibiting ability of 156 μM ABC-1 was tested in various biofilm-forming strains of S. aureus. It was demonstrated that ABC-1 inhibits biofilm formation by these strains at micromolar concentrations regardless of the strains' dependence on Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin (PIA), cell wall-associated protein dependent or cell wall- associated extracellular DNA (eDNA). Of note, ABC-1 treatment primarily inhibited Protein A (SpA) expression in all strains tested. spa gene disruption showed decreased biofilm formation; however, the mutants still produced more biofilm than ABC-1 treated strains, implying that ABC-1 affects not only SpA but also other factors. Indeed, ABC-1 also attenuated the accumulation of PIA and eDNA on cell surface. Our results suggest that ABC-1 has pleotropic effects on several biofilm components and thus inhibits biofilm formation by S. aureus.

  15. Fecal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the Hospital and Community Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Claassen-Weitz, Shantelle; Shittu, Adebayo O.; Ngwarai, Michelle R.; Thabane, Lehana; Nicol, Mark P.; Kaba, Mamadou

    2016-01-01

    Background and rationale: Staphylococcus aureus fecal carriage has been identified as a potential source for nosocomial transmission and a risk factor for disease development. This systematic review determined the overall S. aureus [including methicillin susceptible and resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA)] fecal carriage rates within the community and healthcare settings. Methodology: Peer-reviewed articles indexed in Medline, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Africa-Wide Information, CINAHL, and Web of Science were identified using applicable and controlled vocabulary through to 11 November 2015. Eligible studies were ascertained by three independent reviewers. Random-effects meta-analyses of proportions were performed to determine S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA fecal carriage rates reported by eligible studies. Results: Twenty six studies were included in this review. The pooled estimates for S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA fecal carriage were 26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 16.8–36.3%), 86% (95% confidence interval (CI): 65.9–97.9%) and 10% (95% CI: 0.7–27.0%), respectively. Fecal S. aureus carriage rates increased on average from 10 to 65% during the first 8 weeks of life, followed by an average carriage rate of 64% at 6 months and 46% at 1 year of life. Genotyping techniques were employed mainly in studies conducted in developed countries and comprised largely of gel-based techniques. Six studies reported on the role of S. aureus fecal strains in diarrhea (n = 2) and the risk for acquiring infections (n = 4). Eight of the 26 studies included in this review performed antibiotic susceptibility testing of S. aureus fecal isolates. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that screening for S. aureus fecal carriage, at least in populations at high risk, could be an effective measure for the prevention of S. aureus transmission and infection in the healthcare and community setting. More well-structured studies need to be conducted and sequence-based genotyping

  16. DNA Macroarray for Identification and Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Salim; Allignet, Jeanine; Frangeul, Lionel; Davi, Marilyne; Vergassola, Massimo; Couve, Elisabeth; Morvan, Anne; Kechrid, Amel; Buchrieser, Carmen; Glaser, Philippe; El Solh, Névine

    2004-01-01

    A DNA macroarray containing 465 intragenic amplicons was designed to identify Staphylococcus aureus at the species level and to type S. aureus isolates. The genes selected included those encoding (i) S. aureus-specific proteins, (ii) staphylococcal and enterococcal proteins mediating antibiotic resistance and factors involved in their expression, (iii) putative virulence proteins and factors controlling their expression, and (iv) proteins produced by mobile elements. The macroarray was hybridized with the cellular DNAs of 80 S. aureus clinical isolates that were previously typed by analyses of their antibiograms and SmaI patterns. The set selected contained unrelated, endemic, and outbreak-related isolates belonging to 45 SmaI genotypes. In a gene content dendrogram, the 80 isolates were distributed into 52 clusters. The outbreak-related isolates were linked in the same or a closely related cluster(s). Clustering based on gene content provided a better discrimination than SmaI pattern analysis for the tested mecA+ isolates that were endemic to Europe. All of the antibiotic resistance genes detected could be correlated with their corresponding phenotypes, except for one isolate which carried a mecA gene without being resistant. The 16 isolates responsible for bone infections were distinguishable from the 12 isolates from uninfected nasal carriers by a significantly higher prevalence of the sdrD gene coding for a putative SD (serine-aspartate) adhesin (in 15 and 7 isolates, respectively). In conclusion, the macroarray designed for this study offers an attractive and rapid typing method which has the advantage of providing additional information concerning the gene content of the isolate of interest. PMID:15131170

  17. Cholecystokinin protects rats against sepsis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zuelli, Fabiana Maria das Graças Corsi; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; Saia, Rafael Simone

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacteria described as an important causative agent of sepsis. The contact between host leukocytes and bacteria activates the innate immune response. Nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β play a key role in increasing microbicidal activity and controlling cell influx into infectious focus. Contrarily, IL-10 acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and bacterial killing suppressor. Immunoregulatory properties have also been attributed to hormones, including cholecystokinin (CCK). CCK protects cardiovascular function and inhibits the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide, product derived from Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, the role of CCK during Gram-positive infection remains a literature gap. Our aims were to investigate whether CCK protects rats against bacterial dissemination during sepsis induced by S. aureus. We determined whether CCK modulates local and systemic inflammatory response, as well as the cell migration into the infectious focus and the bactericidal capacity of leukocytes. Our results revealed that proglumide (nonselective CCK receptor antagonist) pretreated rats showed higher bacterial counts in blood and peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF) and reduced TNF-α and IL-10 levels in PLF. Moreover, the dissemination of S. aureus may be related to the failure of neutrophil and macrophage migration into the peritoneal cavity. Also, CCK improved the phagocytic and bactericidal ability of these inflammatory cells. Noteworthy is that the adoptive transfer of CCK-treated neutrophils and macrophages in septic rats improved immune defense, reducing bacterial number in blood and PLF. All together, our study clearly demonstrates an important protective role of CCK against sepsis induced by S. aureus.

  18. First reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in an industrial rabbit holding and in farm-related people.

    PubMed

    Agnoletti, Fabrizio; Mazzolini, Elena; Bacchin, Cosetta; Bano, Luca; Berto, Giacomo; Rigoli, Roberto; Muffato, Giovanna; Coato, Paola; Tonon, Elena; Drigo, Ilenia

    2014-05-14

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been described in food-producing animals and farm or slaughterhouse workers involved in the primary industrial production of swine, bovine and poultry. This communication describes the first case of LA-MRSA (ST398, spa types t034 and t5210) occurring in rabbits raised intensively for meat production and involving farm workers or their family members. In 2012-2013, in a study involving 40 rabbit industrial holdings in Italy, one farm was found to have rabbits colonized or infected with MRSA. Four farm workers and one of their relatives were found to be carrying MRSA. In this case holding, rabbits, people and the holding environment were further investigated and followed up by a second sampling five months later. MRSA was found in 48% (11/23) and 25% (15/59) of the rabbits carrying S. aureus at first and second samplings, respectively. Five months after first detection, some farm workers or family members were still MRSA carriers. Surface samples (2/10) and air samples (2/3) were contaminated with MRSA. Air samples yielded MRSA counts of 5 and 15CFU/m(3). MRSA from rabbits and people collected at first sampling were spa types t034 and t5210 belonging to ST398. The MRSA isolates from rabbits and persons tested at second sampling were t034 and t5210, but spa types t1190 and t2970 were also detected in MRSA isolates from rabbits. Tracing the epidemiological pattern earlier may prevent further spread of LA-MRSA in these food producing animals.

  19. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in farm workers and the livestock environment in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has a wide host range and is transmissible to humans, especially to those with close contact to colonized animals. This study presents the first data on the occurrence of MRSA in farm workers and livestock farms (pig, cattle and poultry) in the federal state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania in northeast Germany. 78 farm workers at pig farms, cattle farms and poultry farms were tested for MRSA via pooled nasal and pharyngeal swabs. Additionally, from each of the 34 participating farms (17 pig farms, 11 cattle farms, 6 poultry farms) five dust samples were taken from the direct surroundings of the animals. Furthermore, oropharyngeal swabs were additionally taken from 10 animals per poultry farm. Isolated MRSA strains were characterized and confirmed using PCR and spa typing. Resistance patterns were obtained using the broth microdilution assay. Results In total, 20 of 78 (25.6%; 95% CI:17.3-36.3) farm workers were positive for MRSA. All MRSA-positive workers were employed at pig farms. Six of 17 (35.3%; 95% CI:17.3-58.7) pooled dust samples from pig farms were also positive. Overall, six spa types were identified, of which t034 predominated. All strains belonged to LA-MRSA CC398 and were resistant to tetracycline. Resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides was present in some strains. Three farm workers harbored the identical spa type and antimicrobial resistance pattern found in the corresponding dust sample. Neither workers, dust samples from cattle and poultry farms, nor oropharyngeal poultry swabs tested positive for MRSA. Conclusions The present study emphasizes the importance of MRSA on pig farms and pig-farm workers in the rural region of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, whereas LA-MRSA could not be isolated from cattle and poultry farms. PMID:25142727

  20. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  1. Neutrophil antimicrobial defense against Staphylococcus aureus is mediated by phagolysosomal but not extracellular trap-associated cathelicidin

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Naja J.; Schmaler, Mathias; Kristian, Sascha A.; Radek, Katherine A.; Gallo, Richard L.; Nizet, Victor; Peschel, Andreas; Landmann, Regine

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils kill invading pathogens by AMPs, including cathelicidins, ROS, and NETs. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exhibits enhanced resistance to neutrophil AMPs, including the murine cathelicidin CRAMP, in part, as a result of alanylation of teichoic acids by the dlt operon. In this study, we took advantage of the hypersusceptible phenotype of S. aureus ΔdltA against cationic AMPs to study the impact of the murine cathelicidin CRAMP on staphylococcal killing and to identify its key site of action in murine neutrophils. We demonstrate that CRAMP remained intracellular during PMN exudation from blood and was secreted upon PMA stimulation. We show first evidence that CRAMP was recruited to phagolysosomes in infected neutrophils and exhibited intracellular activity against S. aureus. Later in infection, neutrophils produced NETs, and immunofluorescence revealed association of CRAMP with S. aureus in NETs, which similarly killed S. aureus wt and ΔdltA, indicating that CRAMP activity was reduced when associated with NETs. Indeed, the presence of DNA reduced the antimicrobial activity of CRAMP, and CRAMP localization in response to S. aureus was independent of the NADPH oxidase, whereas killing was partially dependent on a functional NADPH oxidase. Our study indicates that neutrophils use CRAMP in a timed and locally coordinated manner in defense against S. aureus. PMID:19638500

  2. Efficacy of Lantibiotic Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections, Monitored by In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heunis, Tiaan; Smith, Carine; Deane, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen responsible for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections. Antibiotics are losing their efficacy as treatment for skin and soft tissue infections as a result of increased resistance in a variety of pathogens, including S. aureus. It is thus imperative to explore alternative antimicrobial treatments to ensure future treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections. A select few lantibiotics, a group of natural defense peptides produced by bacteria, inhibit the growth of numerous clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of nisin, clausin, and amyloliquecidin, separately administered, were compared to that of a mupirocin-based ointment, which is commonly used as treatment for S. aureus-induced skin infections. Full-thickness excisional wounds, generated on the dorsal surfaces of mice, were infected with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (strain Xen 36). The infections were monitored in real time using in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Lantibiotic treatments significantly reduced the bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen 36 to a level similar to that recorded with mupirocin treatment. Wound closure, however, was more pronounced during lantibiotic treatment. Lantibiotics thus have the potential to be used as an alternative treatment option for S. aureus-induced skin infections. PMID:27067340

  3. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437: identification of the most dominant community-associated clone from Asia across Europe.

    PubMed

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H; Arends, J P; Empel, J; Giles, E; Laurent, F; Layer, F; Marstein, L; Matussek, A; Mellmann, A; Pérez-Vásquez, M; Ungvári, E; Yan, X; Žemličková, H; Grundmann, H; van Dijl, J M

    2015-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among large epidemiological studies in Europe. Nevertheless, the overall numbers identified in some Northern European reference laboratories have increased during the past decade. To determine whether the S. aureus t437 clone is present in other European countries, and to assess its genetic diversity across Europe, we analysed 147 S. aureus t437 isolates from 11 European countries collected over a period of 11 years using multiple locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting/analysis (MLVF/MLVA) and MLST. Additionally 16 S. aureus t437 isolates from healthy carriers and patients from China were included. Most isolates were shown to be monophyletic with 98% of the isolates belonging to the single MLVA complex 621, to which nearly all included isolates from China also belonged. More importantly, all MLST-typed isolates belonged to CC59. Our study implies that the European S. aureus t437 population represents a genetically tight cluster, irrespective of the year, country and site of isolation. This underpins the view that S. aureus CC59 has been introduced into several European countries, not being restricted to particular geographical regions or specific host environments. The European S. aureus t437 isolates thus bear the general hallmarks of a high-risk clone.

  4. Efficacy of Lantibiotic Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections, Monitored by In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Staden, Anton Du Preez; Heunis, Tiaan; Smith, Carine; Deane, Shelly; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen responsible for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections. Antibiotics are losing their efficacy as treatment for skin and soft tissue infections as a result of increased resistance in a variety of pathogens, including S. aureus It is thus imperative to explore alternative antimicrobial treatments to ensure future treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections. A select few lantibiotics, a group of natural defense peptides produced by bacteria, inhibit the growth of numerous clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of nisin, clausin, and amyloliquecidin, separately administered, were compared to that of a mupirocin-based ointment, which is commonly used as treatment for S. aureus-induced skin infections. Full-thickness excisional wounds, generated on the dorsal surfaces of mice, were infected with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (strain Xen 36). The infections were monitored in real time using in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Lantibiotic treatments significantly reduced the bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen 36 to a level similar to that recorded with mupirocin treatment. Wound closure, however, was more pronounced during lantibiotic treatment. Lantibiotics thus have the potential to be used as an alternative treatment option for S. aureus-induced skin infections.

  5. Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus and Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Residential Indoor Bioaerosols

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, Angelina; Mota, Linda C.; Flores, Carissa; Perez, Hernando R.; Green, Christopher F.; Gibbs, Shawn G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective In this study we evaluated the levels of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in colony-forming units (CFU) per cubic meter of air. Design We used Andersen two-stage samplers to collect bioaerosol samples from 24 houses in El Paso, Texas, using tryptic soy agar as the collection media, followed by the replicate plate method on Chapman Stone selective medium to isolate S. aureus. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, penicillin, and cefaclor, which represent two distinct classes of antibiotics. Results The average recovered concentration of respirable heterotrophic organisms found outside each home was 345.38 CFU/m3, with an average of 12.63 CFU/m3 for S. aureus. The average recovered concentration of respirable heterotrophic organisms found inside each home was 460.23 CFU/m3, with an average of 15.39 CFU/m3 for S. aureus. The respirable S. aureus recovered from inside each home had an average resistance of 54.59% to ampicillin and 60.46%. to penicillin. Presence of cefaclor-resistant and of multidrug-resistant S. aureus was the same, averaging 13.20% per house. The respirable S. aureus recovered from outside each home had an average resistance of 34.42% to ampicillin and 41.81% to penicillin. Presence of cefaclor-resistant and of multidrug-resistant S. aureus was the same, averaging 13.96% per house. Conclusions This study indicates that antibiotic-resistant bioaerosols are commonly found within residential homes. Our results also suggest that resistant strains of airborne culturable S. aureus are present in higher concentrations inside the study homes than outside the homes. PMID:17185276

  6. Comparative Whole-Genome Mapping To Determine Staphylococcus aureus Genome Size, Virulence Motifs, and Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Pantrang, Madhulatha; Stahl, Buffy; Briska, Adam M.; Stemper, Mary E.; Wagner, Trevor K.; Zentz, Emily B.; Callister, Steven M.; Lovrich, Steven D.; Henkhaus, John K.; Dykes, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite being a clonal pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus continues to acquire virulence and antibiotic-resistant genes located on mobile genetic elements such as genomic islands, prophages, pathogenicity islands, and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) by horizontal gene transfer from other staphylococci. The potential virulence of a S. aureus strain is often determined by comparing its pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) or multilocus sequence typing profiles to that of known epidemic or virulent clones and by PCR of the toxin genes. Whole-genome mapping (formerly optical mapping), which is a high-resolution ordered restriction mapping of a bacterial genome, is a relatively new genomic tool that allows comparative analysis across entire bacterial genomes to identify regions of genomic similarities and dissimilarities, including small and large insertions and deletions. We explored whether whole-genome maps (WGMs) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) could be used to predict the presence of methicillin resistance, SCCmec type, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing genes on an S. aureus genome. We determined the WGMs of 47 diverse clinical isolates of S. aureus, including well-characterized reference MRSA strains, and annotated the signature restriction pattern in SCCmec types, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), and PVL-carrying prophage, PhiSa2 or PhiSa2-like regions on the genome. WGMs of these isolates accurately characterized them as MRSA or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus based on the presence or absence of the SCCmec motif, ACME and the unique signature pattern for the prophage insertion that harbored the PVL genes. Susceptibility to methicillin resistance and the presence of mecA, SCCmec types, and PVL genes were confirmed by PCR. A WGM clustering approach was further able to discriminate isolates within the same PFGE clonal group. These results showed that WGMs could be used not only to genotype S. aureus but also to

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of Staphylococcus aureus FORC_001 and S. aureus MRSA252 reveals the characteristics of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors for human infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kwak, Woori; Shin, Hakdong; Ku, Hye-Jin; Lee, Jong-Eun; Lee, Gun Eui; Kim, Heebal; Choi, Sang-Ho; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important foodborne pathogen that causes diverse diseases ranging from minor infections to life-threatening conditions in humans and animals. To further understand its pathogenesis, the genome of the strain S. aureus FORC_001 was isolated from a contaminated food. Its genome consists of 2,886,017 bp double-stranded DNA with a GC content of 32.8%. It is predicted to contain 2,728 open reading frames, 57 tRNAs, and 6 rRNA operons, including 1 additional 5S rRNA gene. Comparative phylogenetic tree analysis of 40 complete S. aureus genome sequences using average nucleotide identity (ANI) revealed that strain FORC_001 belonged to Group I. The closest phylogenetic match was S. aureus MRSA252, according to a whole-genome ANI (99.87%), suggesting that they might share a common ancestor. Comparative genome analysis of FORC_001 and MRSA252 revealed two non-homologous regions: Regions I and II. The presence of various antibiotic resistance genes, including the SCCmec cluster in Region I of MRSA252, suggests that this strain might have acquired the SCCmec cluster to adapt to specific environments containing methicillin. Region II of both genomes contains prophage regions but their DNA sequence identity is very low, suggesting that the prophages might differ. This is the first report of the complete genome sequence of S. aureus isolated from a real foodborne outbreak in South Korea. This report would be helpful to extend our understanding about the genome, general characteristics, and virulence factors of S. aureus for further studies of pathogenesis, rapid detection, and epidemiological investigation in foodborne outbreak.

  8. Bacillus licheniformis isolated from Korean traditional food sources enhances the resistance of Caenorhabditis elegans to infection by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyun Sun; Heo, Ju Hee; Son, Seok Jun; Park, Mi Ri; Oh, Sangnam; Song, Min-Ho; Kim, Jong Nam; Go, Gwang-Woong; Cho, Ho-Seong; Choi, Nag-Jin; Jo, Seung-Wha; Jeong, Do-Youn; Kim, Younghoon

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether Bacillus spp., newly isolated from Korean traditional food resources, influence the resistance of hosts to foodborne pathogens, by using Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate host model. Initially, we selected 20 Bacillus spp. that possess antimicrobial activity against various foodborne pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. Among the selected strains, six strains of Bacillus spp. used in preconditioning significantly prolonged the survival of nematodes exposed to S. aureus. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, all six strains were identified as B. licheniformis. Our findings suggest that preconditioning with B. licheniformis may modulate the host defense response against S. aureus.

  9. Docking into Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thioredoxin Reductase Protein Yields Pyrazolone Lead Molecules for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Noreena L.; Lipker, Lauren; Hanson, Alicia M.; Bohl, Chris J.; Engel, Katie E.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Stemper, Mary E.; Sem, Daniel S.; Schwan, William R.

    2017-01-01

    The thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system (Trx/TrxR) is an attractive drug target because of its involvement in a number of important physiological processes, from DNA synthesis to regulating signal transduction. This study describes the finding of pyrazolone compounds that are active against Staphylococcus aureus. Initially, the project was focused on discovering small molecules that may have antibacterial properties targeting the Mycobacterium tuberculosis thioredoxin reductase. This led to the discovery of a pyrazolone scaffold-containing compound series that showed bactericidal capability against S. aureus strains, including drug-resistant clinical isolates. The findings support continued development of the pyrazolone compounds as potential anti-S. aureus antibiotics. PMID:28134858

  10. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  11. Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Nimmo, Graeme R; Daly, Denise A; Le, Tam T; Pearson, Julie C; Tan, Hui-Leen; Robinson, James O; Collignon, Peter J; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Turnidge, John D

    2014-12-31

    From 1 January to 31 December 2013, around Australia 26 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2013 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, (with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin) and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the isolates. Overall 19.1% of the 2,010 SAB episodes were methicillin resistant, which is significantly higher than that reported in most European countries. Although the SAB 30-day all cause mortality appears to be decreasing in Australia, methicillin-resistant SAB associated mortality remains high (20.1%) and was significantly higher than methicillin-sensitive SAB associated mortality (13%) (P< 0.0001). With the exception of the ß-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial resistance in methicillin sensitive S. aureus remains rare. However, in addition to the ß-lactams, approximately 50% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 20% were resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. Linezolid, daptomycin and teicoplanin resistance was detected in a small number of S. aureus isolates. Resistance to vancomycin was not detected. Resistance was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) has now become the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Approximately 60% of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal, almost 50% of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA) and ST1-IV [2B] (WA1). CA-MRSA, in particular the ST45-V [5C2&5] (WA84) clone, has acquired multiple antimicrobial resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and

  12. Staphylococcus aureus host specificity: comparative genomics of human versus animal isolates by multi-strain microarray.

    PubMed

    Sung, Julia M-L; Lloyd, David H; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2008-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and pathogen of several mammalian species, particularly humans and cattle. We aimed to (i) identify S. aureus genes associated with host specificity, (ii) determine the relatedness of human and animal isolates, and (iii) identify whether human and animal isolates typically exchanged mobile genetic elements encoding virulence and resistance genes. Using a well-validated seven-strain S. aureus microarray, we compared 56 UK S. aureus isolates that caused infection in cows, horses, goats, sheep and a camel with 161 human S. aureus isolates from healthy carriers and community acquired infections in the UK. We had previously shown that human isolates are clustered into ten dominant and a few minor lineages, each with unique combinations of surface proteins predicted to bind to human proteins. We found that the animal-associated S. aureus clustered into ten lineages, with 61 % assigned to four lineages, ST151, ST771, ST130 and ST873, that were unique to animals. The majority of bovine mastitis was caused by isolates of lineage ST151, ST771 and ST97, but a few human lineages also caused mastitis. S. aureus isolated from horses were more likely to cluster into human-associated lineages, with 54 % of horse-associated S. aureus assigned to the human clusters CC1, CC8 and CC22; along with the presence of some multi-drug resistant strains, this suggests a human origin. This is the most comprehensive genetic comparison of human versus animal S. aureus isolates conducted, and because we used a whole-genome approach we could estimate the key genes with the greatest variability that are associated with host specificity. Several genes conserved in all human isolates were variable or missing in one or more animal lineages, including the well-characterized lineage specific genes fnbA, fnbB and coa. Interestingly, genes carried on mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as chp, scn and sak were less common in animal S. aureus isolates, and bap was not

  13. INTRA-CELLULAR STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ALONE CAUSES INFECTION IN VIVO#

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Therwa; Dietz, Matthew; Pham, Danh; Clovis, Nina; Danley, Suzanne; Li, Bingyun

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can “hide” in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years. PMID:23832687

  14. Intra-cellular Staphylococcus aureus alone causes infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hamza, T; Dietz, M; Pham, D; Clovis, N; Danley, S; Li, B

    2013-07-08

    Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can "hide" in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years.

  15. Detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Pus/Wound Swab Samples of the Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Raghabendra; Neupane, Sanjeev; Neupane, Mukesh; Bhattarai, Roshan; Bhatta, Sabita; Chaudhary, Raina; Lekhak, Binod

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the performance of cefoxitin disc diffusion method and oxacillin broth microdilution method for detection of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), taking presence of mecA gene as reference. In addition, inducible clindamycin resistance and beta-lactamase production were studied and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin for S. aureus isolates was determined. A total of 711 nonrepeated pus/wound swab samples from different anatomic locations were included in the study. The Staphylococcus aureus was identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram's stain, and biochemical tests. A total of 110 (15.47%) S. aureus isolates were recovered, of which 39 (35.50%) isolates were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion method. By oxacillin broth microdilution method, 31.82% of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be MRSA. However, mecA gene was present in only 29.1% of the isolates. Further, beta-lactamase production was observed in 71.82% of the isolates, while inducible clindamycin resistance was found in 10% of S. aureus isolates. The MIC value of vancomycin for S. aureus ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL. On the basis of the absolute sensitivity (100%), both phenotypic methods could be employed for routine diagnosis of MRSA in clinical microbiology laboratory; however cefoxitin disc diffusion could be preferred over MIC method considering time and labour factor. PMID:28154581

  16. Host defense proteins derived from human saliva bind to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok-Mo; Choi, Kyoung-Soo; Kazim, Latif A; Reddy, Molakala S; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A; Ruhl, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Proteins in human saliva are thought to modulate bacterial colonization of the oral cavity. Yet, information is sparse on how salivary proteins interact with systemic pathogens that transiently or permanently colonize the oral environment. Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that frequently colonizes the oral cavity and can cause respiratory disease in hospitalized patients at risk. Here, we investigated salivary protein binding to this organism upon exposure to saliva as a first step toward understanding the mechanism by which the organism can colonize the oral cavity of vulnerable patients. By using fluorescently labeled saliva and proteomic techniques, we demonstrated selective binding of major salivary components by S. aureus to include DMBT1(gp-340), mucin-7, secretory component, immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, S100-A9, and lysozyme C. Biofilm-grown S. aureus strains bound fewer salivary components than in the planctonic state, particularly less salivary immunoglobulins. A corresponding adhesive component on the S. aureus surface responsible for binding salivary immunoglobulins was identified as staphylococcal protein A (SpA). However, SpA did not mediate binding of nonimmunoglobulin components, including mucin-7, indicating the involvement of additional bacterial surface adhesive components. These findings demonstrate that a limited number of salivary proteins, many of which are associated with various aspects of host defense, selectively bind to S. aureus and lead us to propose a possible role of saliva in colonization of the human mouth by this pathogen.

  17. Alpha-toxin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Tranum-Jensen, J

    1991-01-01

    Alpha-toxin, the major cytotoxic agent elaborated by Staphylococcus aureus, was the first bacterial exotoxin to be identified as a pore former. The protein is secreted as a single-chain, water-soluble molecule of Mr 33,000. At low concentrations (less than 100 nM), the toxin binds to as yet unidentified, high-affinity acceptor sites that have been detected on a variety of cells including rabbit erythrocytes, human platelets, monocytes and endothelial cells. At high concentrations, the toxin additionally binds via nonspecific absorption to lipid bilayers; it can thus damage both cells lacking significant numbers of the acceptor and protein-free artificial lipid bilayers. Membrane damage occurs in both cases after membrane-bound toxin molecules collide via lateral diffusion to form ring-structured hexamers. The latter insert spontaneously into the lipid bilayer to form discrete transmembrane pores of effective diameter 1 to 2 nm. A hypothetical model is advanced in which the pore is lined by amphiphilic beta-sheets, one surface of which interacts with lipids whereas the other repels apolar membrane constitutents to force open an aqueous passage. The detrimental effects of alpha-toxin are due not only to the death of susceptible targets, but also to the presence of secondary cellular reactions that can be triggered via Ca2+ influx through the pores. Well-studied phenomena include the stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism, triggering of granule exocytosis, and contractile dysfunction. Such processes cause profound long-range disturbances such as development of pulmonary edema and promotion of blood coagulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1779933

  18. Piperine Plays an Anti-Inflammatory Role in Staphylococcus aureus Endometritis by Inhibiting Activation of NF-κB and MAPK Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Wen-jun; Zhang, Zhen-biao; Xu, Nian-nian; Guo, Ying-fang; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Cheng-ye; Deng, Gan-zhen; Guo, Meng-yao

    2016-01-01

    Endometritis is commonly caused by pathogenic microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Piperine, which is a natural medicine, has shown a variety of biological activities. To explore the effect and mechanism of piperine on S. aureus endometritis, a mouse model of S. aureus endometritis was successfully established in the present study. Histopathological changes were observed with H&E staining, cytokines were analyzed by ELISA, mRNA was analyzed by qPCR, and proteins were detected by western blot. The results showed that piperine could significantly alleviate inflammatory injury in S. aureus endometritis. The qPCR and ELISA results showed that piperine effectively reduced the S. aureus-induced overexpression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 but increased the expression of IL-10. The S. aureus-induced inflammation was related to TLR-2 and TLR-4 because the results showed that their expression was increased in S. aureus infection but then decreased with piperine treatment. To further confirm that piperine caused an anti-inflammatory response by targeting NF-κB and MAPKs, the expression of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was measured. The phosphorylation of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was inhibited by piperine in a dose-dependent manner. All of the results indicated that piperine may be a potential anti-inflammatory drug both in endometritis and in other S. aureus-induced diseases. PMID:27293467

  19. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  20. Presence of Laminin Receptors in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, J. D.; Dos Reis, M.; Brentani, R. R.

    1985-07-01

    A characteristic feature of infection by Staphylococcus aureus is bloodstream invasion and widespread metastatic abscess formation. The ability to extravasate, which entails crossing the vascular basement membrane, appears to be critical for the organism's pathogenicity. Extravasation by normal and neoplastic mammalian cells has been correlated with the presence of specific cell surface receptors for the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin. Similar laminin receptors were found in Staphylococcus aureus but not in Staphylococcus epidermidis, a noninvasive pathogen. There were about 100 binding sites per cell, with an apparent binding affinity of 2.9 nanomolar. The molecular weight of the receptor was 50,000 and pI was 4.2. Eukaryotic laminin receptors were visualized by means of the binding of S. aureus in the presence of laminin. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic invasive cells might utilize similar, if not identical, mechanisms for invasion.

  1. Rapid and low-cost biosensor for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Alhogail, Sahar; Zourob, Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common etiological agents in hospital-acquired infections and food-borne illness. S. aureus toxins and virulence proteases often circulate in host blood vessels leading to life-threatening diseases. Standard identification approaches include bacterial culturing method, which takes several days. Other nucleic acid-based methods were expensive and required trained personnel. To surmount these limitations, a paper-based biosensor was developed. The sensing mechanism was based on the proteolytic activity of S. aureus proteases on a specific peptide substrate, sandwiched between magnetic nanobeads and gold surface on top of a paper support. An external magnet was fixed on the back of the sensor to accelerate the cleavage of the magnetic nanobeads-peptide moieties away from the sensor surface upon test sample dropping. The colour change resulting from the dissociation of the magnetic nanobeads moieties was detected by the naked eye and analysed using ImageJ analysis software for the purpose of quantitative measurement. Experimental results showed detection limits as low as 7, 40 and 100 CFU/mL for S. aureus in pure broth culture, and inoculated in food produces and environmental samples, respectively upon visual observation. The specificity of the sensor was examined by blind testing a panel of food-contaminating pathogens (Listeria monocytogenesis 19115 and E. coli O157:H7), clinical isolates (methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans) and standard (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 15692) pathogens. Negative read-out was observed by the naked eye for all tested isolates except for MRSA. Moreover, this sensing tool requires minute's time to obtain the results. In conclusion, this sensing platform is a powerful tool for the detection of S. aureus as a potential point-of-care diagnostic platform in hospitals and for use by regulatory agencies for better control of health-risks associated with contaminated food

  2. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surface waters near industrial hog operation spray fields.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, S M; Myers, K W; Heaney, C D; Larsen, J; Hall, D; Miller, M B; Stewart, J R

    2016-09-15

    Industrial hog operations (IHOs) have been identified as a source of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, few studies have investigated the presence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in the environment near IHOs, specifically surface waters proximal to spray fields where IHO liquid lagoon waste is sprayed. Surface water samples (n=179) were collected over the course of approximately one year from nine locations in southeastern North Carolina and analyzed for the presence of presumptive MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA media. Culture-based, biochemical, and molecular tests, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to confirm that isolates that grew on CHROMagar MRSA media were S. aureus. Confirmed S. aureus isolates were then tested for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and screened for molecular markers of MRSA (mecA, mecC) and livestock adaptation (absence of scn). A total of 12 confirmed MRSA were detected in 9 distinct water samples. Nine of 12 MRSA isolates were also multidrug-resistant (MDRSA [i.e., resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes]). All MRSA were scn-positive and most (11/12) belonged to a staphylococcal protein A (spa) type t008, which is commonly associated with humans. Additionally, 12 confirmed S. aureus that were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) were recovered, 7 of which belonged to spa type t021 and were scn-negative (a marker of livestock-adaptation). This study demonstrated the presence of MSSA, MRSA, and MDRSA in surface waters adjacent to IHO lagoon waste spray fields in southeastern North Carolina. To our knowledge, this is the first report of waterborne S. aureus from surface waters proximal to IHOs.

  3. Antibacterial mode of action of violacein from Chromobacterium violaceum UTM5 against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aruldass, Claira Arul; Masalamany, Santhana Raj Louis; Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2017-03-31

    Violacein, violet pigment produced by Chromobacterium violaceum, has attracted much attention recently due to its pharmacological properties including antibacterial activity. The present study investigated possible antibacterial mode of action of violacein from C. violaceum UTM5 against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. Violet fraction was obtained by cultivating C. violaceum UTM5 in liquid pineapple waste medium, extracted, and fractionated using ethyl acetate and vacuum liquid chromatography technique. Violacein was quantified as major compound in violet fraction using HPLC analysis. Violet fraction displayed bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.9 μg/mL. Fluorescence dyes for membrane damage and scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed the inhibitory effect by disruption on membrane integrity, morphological alternations, and rupture of the cell membranes of both strains. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed membrane damage, mesosome formation, and leakage of intracellular constituents of both bacterial strains. Mode of action of violet fraction on the cell membrane integrity of both strains was shown by release of protein, K(+), and extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) with 110.5 μg/mL, 2.34 μg/mL, and 87.24 ng/μL, respectively, at 48 h of incubation. Violet fraction was toxic to human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and human fetal lung fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines with LC50 value of 0.998 ± 0.058 and 0.387 ± 0.002 μg/mL, respectively. Thus, violet fraction showed a strong antibacterial property by disrupting the membrane integrity of S. aureus and MRSA strains. This is the first report on the possible mode of antibacterial action of violet fraction from C. violaceum UTM5 on S. aureus and MRSA strains.

  4. Laboratory Maintenance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Nicholas P.; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterial pathogen in the hospital and community settings, especially Staphylococcus aureus clones that exhibit methicillin-resistance (MRSA). Many strains of S. aureus are utilized in the laboratory, underscoring the genetic differences inherent in clinical isolates. S. aureus grows quickly at 37°C with aeration in rich media (e.g. BHI) and exhibits a preference for glycolytic carbon sources. Furthermore, S. aureus has a gold pigmentation, exhibits β-hemolysis, and is catalase and coagulase positive. The four basic laboratory protocols presented in this unit describe how to culture S. aureus on liquid and solid media, how to identify S. aureus strains as methicillin resistant, and how to generate a freezer stock of S. aureus for long-term storage. PMID:23408135

  5. Hyaluronan Modulation Impacts Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ibberson, Carolyn B.; Parlet, Corey P.; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Crosby, Heidi A.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of chronic biofilm infections. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a large glycosaminoglycan abundant in mammalian tissues that has been shown to enhance biofilm formation in multiple Gram-positive pathogens. We observed that HA accumulated in an S. aureus biofilm infection using a murine implant-associated infection model and that HA levels increased in a mutant strain lacking hyaluronidase (HysA). S. aureus secretes HysA in order to cleave HA during infection. Through in vitro biofilm studies with HA, the hysA mutant was found to accumulate increased biofilm biomass compared to the wild type, and confocal microscopy showed that HA is incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Exogenous addition of purified HysA enzyme dispersed HA-containing biofilms, while catalytically inactive enzyme had no impact. Additionally, induction of hysA expression prevented biofilm formation and also dispersed an established biofilm in the presence of HA. These observations were corroborated in the implant model, where there was decreased dissemination from an hysA mutant biofilm infection compared to the S. aureus wild type. Histopathology demonstrated that infection with an hysA mutant caused significantly reduced distribution of tissue inflammation compared to wild-type infection. To extend these studies, the impact of HA and S. aureus HysA on biofilm-like aggregates found in joint infections was examined. We found that HA contributes to the formation of synovial fluid aggregates, and HysA can disrupt aggregate formation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that HA is a relevant component of the S. aureus biofilm matrix and HysA is important for dissemination from a biofilm infection. PMID:27068096

  6. Inhibition of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miletić, Maja; Vuković, Dragana; Živanović, Irena; Dakić, Ivana; Soldatović, Ivan; Maletić, Dejan; Lazović, Saša; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran; Puač, Nevena

    2014-03-01

    In numerous recent papers plasma chemistry of non equilibrium plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure has been linked to plasma medical effects including sterilization. In this paper we present a study of the effectiveness of an atmospheric pressure plasma source, known as plasma needle, in inhibition of the growth of biofilm produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Even at the lowest powers the biofilms formed by inoculi of MRSA of 104 and 105 CFU have been strongly affected by plasma and growth in biofilms was inhibited. The eradication of the already formed biofilm was not achieved and it is required to go to more effective sources.

  7. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Chidambaram, M.; Heath, J. D.; Mallary, L.; Mishra, S. K.; Sharma, B.; Weinstock, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus was isolated over 2 years from Space Shuttle mission crewmembers to determine dissemination and retention of bacteria. Samples before and after each mission were from nasal, throat, urine, and feces and from air and surface sampling of the Space Shuttle. DNA fingerprinting of samples by digestion of DNA with SmaI restriction endonuclease followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed S. aureus from each crewmember had a unique fingerprint and usually only one strain was carried by an individual. There was only one instance of transfer between crewmembers. Strains from interior surfaces after flight matched those of crewmembers, suggesting microbial fingerprinting may have forensic application.

  8. MicroRNA-24 Modulates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Macrophage Polarization by Suppressing CHI3L1.

    PubMed

    Jingjing, Zhang; Nan, Zhang; Wei, Wu; Qinghe, Guo; Weijuan, Wang; Peng, Wang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    2017-03-16

    Macrophages play a crucial role in host innate anti-Staphylococcus aureus defense, which is tightly regulated by multiple factors, including microRNAs. A recent study showed that miR-24 plays an important role in macrophage polarization. Here, we investigated the biological function of miR-24 in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. The results revealed that miR-24 expression was significantly decreased in both human and mouse macrophage cell lines with S. aureus stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, miR-24 overexpression significantly decreased the production of M1 phenotype markers, such as IL-6, iNOS, TNF-α, CD86, and CD80, whereas it increased the production of M2 markers, such as Arg1, CCL17, CCL22, CD163, and CD206, in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Conversely, knockdown of miR-24 promoted M1 macrophage polarization but diminished M2 macrophage polarization in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, CHI3L1 was predicted as a target gene of miR-24 using bioinformatics software and identified by luciferase reporter assay. Additionally, miR-24 overexpression inhibited CHI3L1 expression and downregulated the downstream MAPK pathway in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Finally, CHI3L1 overexpression rescued macrophage polarization and MAPK pathway inhibition induced by miR-24 mimic transfection in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. In conclusion, the data suggest that miR-24 serves as a molecular regulator in S. aureus-induced macrophage polarization through targeting of CHI3L1 and regulation of the MAPK pathway, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for S. aureus-related infections and inflammatory diseases.

  9. Methicillin-Susceptible, Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Panesso, Diana; Planet, Paul J; Diaz, Lorena; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Tran, Truc T; Narechania, Apurva; Munita, Jose M; Rincon, Sandra; Carvajal, Lina P; Reyes, Jinnethe; Londoño, Alejandra; Smith, Hannah; Sebra, Robert; Deikus, Gintaras; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E; Rossi, Flavia; Arthur, Michel; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-10-01

    We report characterization of a methicillin-susceptible, vancomycin-resistant bloodstream isolate of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from a patient in Brazil. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus would indicate that this resistance trait might be poised to disseminate more rapidly among S. aureus and represents a major public health threat.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew E.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M.; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal–specific contamination. PMID:21498385

  11. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus Strain Wood 46

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Manasi; Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46. Wood 46 has played an important role in understanding the virulence and pathogenesis of S. aureus infections. This report will assist efforts in vaccine development against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. PMID:28360163

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus Strain Wood 46.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Manasi; Riley, Matthew C; Bemis, David A; Kania, Stephen A

    2017-03-30

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46. Wood 46 has played an important role in understanding the virulence and pathogenesis of S. aureus infections. This report will assist efforts in vaccine development against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Vancomycin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Related to Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Matyi, Stephanie A.; Sundararajan, Anitha; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Devitt, Nicolas P.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Lamichhane-Khadka, Reena; Hoyt, Peter R.; Mudge, Joann

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of three vancomycin-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. S. aureus strain MV8 is a sequence type 8 (ST-8) staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element type IV (SCCmec IV) derivative, while the other two strains (S. aureus MM25 and MM61) are ST-5 SCCmec II strains. MM61 is also closely related to the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strain MM66. PMID:25301662

  19. Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins involved in adaptation to oxacillin identified using a novel cell shaving approach.

    PubMed

    Solis, Nestor; Parker, Benjamin L; Kwong, Stephen M; Robinson, Gareth; Firth, Neville; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-06-06

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for a variety of infections, and some strains are resistant to virtually all classes of antibiotics. Cell shaving proteomics using a novel probability scoring algorithm to compare the surfaceomes of the methicillin-resistant, laboratory-adapted S. aureus COL strain with a COL strain in vitro adapted to high levels of oxacillin (APT). APT displayed altered cell morphology compared with COL and increased aggregation in biofilm assays. Increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics was observed, but adaptation to oxacillin did not confer multidrug resistance. Analysis of the S. aureus COL and APT surfaceomes identified 150 proteins at a threshold determined by the scoring algorithm. Proteins unique to APT included the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) domain-containing MsrR and SACOL2302. Quantitative RT-PCR showed increased expression of sacol2302 in APT grown with oxacillin (>6-fold compared with COL). Overexpression of sacol2302 in COL to levels consistent with APT (+ oxacillin) did not influence biofilm formation or β-lactam resistance. Proteomics using iTRAQ and LC-MS/MS identified 1323 proteins (∼50% of the theoretical S. aureus proteome), and cluster analysis demonstrated elevated APT abundances of LCP proteins, capsule and peptidoglycan biosynthesis proteins, and proteins involved in wall remodelling. Adaptation to oxacillin also induced urease proteins, which maintained culture pH compared to COL. These results show that S. aureus modifies surface architecture in response to antibiotic adaptation.

  20. Ecological Overlap and Horizontal Gene Transfer in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Méric, Guillaume; Miragaia, Maria; de Been, Mark; Yahara, Koji; Pascoe, Ben; Mageiros, Leonardos; Mikhail, Jane; Harris, Llinos G.; Wilkinson, Thomas S.; Rolo, Joana; Lamble, Sarah; Bray, James E.; Jolley, Keith A.; Hanage, William P.; Bowden, Rory; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Mack, Dietrich; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Feil, Edward J.; Corander, Jukka; Sheppard, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis represent major causes of severe nosocomial infection, and are associated with high levels of mortality and morbidity worldwide. These species are both common commensals on the human skin and in the nasal pharynx, but are genetically distinct, differing at 24% average nucleotide divergence in 1,478 core genes. To better understand the genome dynamics of these ecologically similar staphylococcal species, we carried out a comparative analysis of 324 S. aureus and S. epidermidis genomes, including 83 novel S. epidermidis sequences. A reference pan-genome approach and whole genome multilocus-sequence typing revealed that around half of the genome was shared between the species. Based on a BratNextGen analysis, homologous recombination was found to have impacted on 40% of the core genes in S. epidermidis, but on only 24% of the core genes in S. aureus. Homologous recombination between the species is rare, with a maximum of nine gene alleles shared between any two S. epidermidis and S. aureus isolates. In contrast, there was considerable interspecies admixture of mobile elements, in particular genes associated with the SaPIn1 pathogenicity island, metal detoxification, and the methicillin-resistance island SCCmec. Our data and analysis provide a context for considering the nature of recombinational boundaries between S. aureus and S. epidermidis and, the selective forces that influence realized recombination between these species. PMID:25888688

  1. Proliferation-apoptosis balance in Staphylococcus aureus chronically infected bovine mammary glands during involution.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Carolina S; Pereyra, Elizabet A L; Sacco, Sofía C; Baravalle, Celina; Renna, María S; Ortega, Hugo H; Calvinho, Luis F; Dallard, Bibiana E

    2017-03-13

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Staphylococcus aureus chronic intramammary infection (IMI) influences expression of proteins related to regulation of proliferation and apoptosis processes and proliferation/apoptosis index during active involution in bovine mammary gland. Twenty-one Holstein non-pregnant cows in late lactation either uninfected or with chronic naturally acquired S. aureus IMI were included in this study. Cows were slaughtered at 7, 14 and 21 d after cessation of milking and samples for immunohistochemical analysis were taken. Protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas and active caspase-3 in mammary tissue was significantly affected by chronic S. aureus IMI, all showing increased immunoexpression in S. aureus-infected quarters at all involution stages. The percentage of apoptotic cells was increased by IMI in both mammary parenchyma and stroma, and the percentage of parenchymal and stromal cell proliferation was also increased. The proliferation/apoptosis ratio was significantly increased by IMI only in stromal cells. This imbalance to favour proliferation in S. aureus-infected mammary quarters could be one of the underlying causes that induce aberrant involution with permanence of nonsecretory tissue and increase of stromal components.

  2. Cinnamaldehyde Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors and Protects against Infection in a Galleria mellonella Model

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Thiago A. F.; Araújo, Jéssica M. M.; dos Santos Pinto, Bruna L.; dos Santos, Jéssica S.; Souza, Eliene B.; da Silva, Bruna L. R.; Colares, Valderlane L. P.; Novais, Tânia M. G.; Filho, Clovis M. B.; Struve, Carsten; Calixto, João B.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; da Silva, Luís C. N.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to the available marketed drugs has prompted the search of novel therapies; especially in regards of anti-virulence strategies that aim to make bacteria less pathogenic and/or decrease their probability to become resistant to therapy. Cinnamaldehyde is widely known for its antibacterial properties through mechanisms that include the interaction of this compound with bacterial cell walls. However, only a handful of studies have addressed its effects on bacterial virulence, especially when tested at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Herein, we show for the first time that cinnamaldehyde is bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis multidrug resistant strains and does not promote bacterial tolerance. Cinnamaldehyde actions were stronger on S. aureus as it was able to inhibit its hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes and reduce its adherence to latex. Furthermore, cinnamaldehyde enhanced the serum-dependent lysis of S. aureus. In vivo testing of cinnamaldehyde in Galleria mellonella larvae infected with S. aureus, showed this compound improves larvae survival whilst diminishing bacterial load in their hemolymph. We suggest that cinnamaldehyde may represent an alternative therapy to control S. aureus-induced bacterial infections as it presents the ability to reduce bacterial virulence/survival without promoting an adaptive phenotype. PMID:28066373

  3. A Putative Cro-Like Repressor Contributes to Arylomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Craney, Arryn

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a significant public health concern and motivate efforts to develop new classes of antibiotics. One such class of antibiotics is the arylomycins, which target type I signal peptidase (SPase), the enzyme responsible for the release of secreted proteins from their N-terminal leader sequences. Despite the essentiality, conservation, and relative accessibility of SPase, the activity of the arylomycins is limited against some bacteria, including the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. To understand the origins of the limited activity against S. aureus, we characterized the susceptibility of a panel of strains to two arylomycin derivatives, arylomycin A-C16 and its more potent analog arylomycin M131. We observed a wide range of susceptibilities to the two arylomycins and found that resistant strains were sensitized by cotreatment with tunicamycin, which inhibits the first step of wall teichoic acid synthesis. To further understand how S. aureus responds to the arylomycins, we profiled the transcriptional response of S. aureus NCTC 8325 to growth-inhibitory concentrations of arylomycin M131 and found that it upregulates the cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS) and an operon consisting of a putative transcriptional regulator and three hypothetical proteins. Interestingly, we found that mutations in the putative transcriptional regulator are correlated with resistance, and selection for resistance ex vivo demonstrated that mutations in this gene are sufficient for resistance. The results begin to elucidate how S. aureus copes with secretion stress and how it evolves resistance to the inhibition of SPase. PMID:25753642

  4. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Rebecca; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus. PMID:27025643

  5. Ecological Overlap and Horizontal Gene Transfer in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Méric, Guillaume; Miragaia, Maria; de Been, Mark; Yahara, Koji; Pascoe, Ben; Mageiros, Leonardos; Mikhail, Jane; Harris, Llinos G; Wilkinson, Thomas S; Rolo, Joana; Lamble, Sarah; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; Hanage, William P; Bowden, Rory; Maiden, Martin C J; Mack, Dietrich; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Feil, Edward J; Corander, Jukka; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-04-16

    The opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis represent major causes of severe nosocomial infection, and are associated with high levels of mortality and morbidity worldwide. These species are both common commensals on the human skin and in the nasal pharynx, but are genetically distinct, differing at 24% average nucleotide divergence in 1,478 core genes. To better understand the genome dynamics of these ecologically similar staphylococcal species, we carried out a comparative analysis of 324 S. aureus and S. epidermidis genomes, including 83 novel S. epidermidis sequences. A reference pan-genome approach and whole genome multilocus-sequence typing revealed that around half of the genome was shared between the species. Based on a BratNextGen analysis, homologous recombination was found to have impacted on 40% of the core genes in S. epidermidis, but on only 24% of the core genes in S. aureus. Homologous recombination between the species is rare, with a maximum of nine gene alleles shared between any two S. epidermidis and S. aureus isolates. In contrast, there was considerable interspecies admixture of mobile elements, in particular genes associated with the SaPIn1 pathogenicity island, metal detoxification, and the methicillin-resistance island SCCmec. Our data and analysis provide a context for considering the nature of recombinational boundaries between S. aureus and S. epidermidis and, the selective forces that influence realized recombination between these species.

  6. Genes Contributing to Staphylococcus aureus Fitness in Abscess- and Infection-Related Ecologies

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael D.; Foulston, Lucy; Sadaka, Ama; Kos, Veronica N.; Villet, Regis A.; Santa Maria, John; Lazinski, David W.; Camilli, Andrew; Walker, Suzanne; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of both community- and hospital-acquired infections that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. The emergence of S. aureus resistance to even last-line antibiotics heightens the need for the development of new drugs with novel targets. We generated a highly saturated transposon insertion mutant library in the genome of S. aureus and used Tn-seq analysis to probe the entire genome, with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity, for genes of importance in infection. We further identified genes contributing to fitness in various infected compartments (blood and ocular fluids) and compared them to genes required for growth in rich medium. This resulted in the identification of 426 genes that were important for S. aureus fitness during growth in infection models, including 71 genes that could be considered essential for survival specifically during infection. These findings highlight novel as well as previously known genes encoding virulence traits and metabolic pathways important for S. aureus proliferation at sites of infection, which may represent new therapeutic targets. PMID:25182329

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus: the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Tai, Hao-Chih; Tang, Yueh-Bih

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an uncommon causative agent of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis, but we have noted several cases over the years. The patients treated for necrotizing fasciitis between January 1998 and December 2008 in our institution were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. Of 105 necrotizing fasciitis cases during the study period, 18 were caused by monomicrobial S. aureus infection (17%). The median age was 62 years (range, 12-81 years). Among this cohort, 10 patients had coexisting medical conditions or risk factors, including diabetes and hypertension. Lower limbs and upper limbs are the most commonly involved sites. Among the bacterial isolates from these cases, 8 were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 10 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). One patient died in the MSSA group, and 5 patients died in the MRSA group. The mortality rate and other clinical characteristics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, all MRSA necrotizing fasciitis developed after the year 2000, and it was significantly different from MSSA necrotizing fasciitis that predominantly took place before the year 2000. In conclusion, S. aureus is an important pathogen of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis, and MRSA has emerged as the predominant causative agent in recent years. Therefore, MRSA-directed antibiotic therapy should be considered when treating patients suspected with necrotizing fasciitis in endemic areas.

  8. Cinnamaldehyde Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors and Protects against Infection in a Galleria mellonella Model.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Thiago A F; Araújo, Jéssica M M; Dos Santos Pinto, Bruna L; Dos Santos, Jéssica S; Souza, Eliene B; da Silva, Bruna L R; Colares, Valderlane L P; Novais, Tânia M G; Filho, Clovis M B; Struve, Carsten; Calixto, João B; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; da Silva, Luís C N; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to the available marketed drugs has prompted the search of novel therapies; especially in regards of anti-virulence strategies that aim to make bacteria less pathogenic and/or decrease their probability to become resistant to therapy. Cinnamaldehyde is widely known for its antibacterial properties through mechanisms that include the interaction of this compound with bacterial cell walls. However, only a handful of studies have addressed its effects on bacterial virulence, especially when tested at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Herein, we show for the first time that cinnamaldehyde is bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis multidrug resistant strains and does not promote bacterial tolerance. Cinnamaldehyde actions were stronger on S. aureus as it was able to inhibit its hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes and reduce its adherence to latex. Furthermore, cinnamaldehyde enhanced the serum-dependent lysis of S. aureus. In vivo testing of cinnamaldehyde in Galleria mellonella larvae infected with S. aureus, showed this compound improves larvae survival whilst diminishing bacterial load in their hemolymph. We suggest that cinnamaldehyde may represent an alternative therapy to control S. aureus-induced bacterial infections as it presents the ability to reduce bacterial virulence/survival without promoting an adaptive phenotype.

  9. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Invasion into Human Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnappa, Ajay K.; Dwidar, Mohammed; Seo, Jeong Kon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Mitchell, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 is a predatory bacterium that attacks many Gram-negative human pathogens. A serious drawback of this strain, however, is its ineffectiveness against Gram-positive strains, such as the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that the extracellular proteases produced by a host-independent B. bacteriovorus (HIB) effectively degrade/inhibit the formation of S. aureus biofilms and reduce its virulence. A 10% addition of HIB supernatant caused a 75% or greater reduction in S. aureus biofilm formation as well as 75% dispersal of pre-formed biofilms. LC-MS-MS analyses identified various B. bacteriovorus proteases within the supernatant, including the serine proteases Bd2269 and Bd2321. Tests with AEBSF confirmed that serine proteases were active in the supernatant and that they impacted S. aureus biofilm formation. The supernatant also possessed a slight DNAse activity. Furthermore, treatment of planktonic S. aureus with the supernatant diminished its ability to invade MCF-10a epithelial cells by 5-fold but did not affect the MCF-10a viability. In conclusion, this study illustrates the hitherto unknown ability of B. bacteriovorus to disperse Gram-positive pathogenic biofilms and mitigate their virulence.

  10. Colonization, pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and therapeutics for Staphylococcus aureus: what is the clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    Tong, Steven Y C; Chen, Luke F; Fowler, Vance G

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that can also cause a broad spectrum of clinical disease. Factors associated with clinical disease are myriad and dynamic and include pathogen virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and host susceptibility. Additionally, infection control measures aimed at the environmental niches of S. aureus and therapeutic advances continue to impact upon the incidence and outcomes of staphylococcal infections. This review article focuses on the clinical relevance of advances in our understanding of staphylococcal colonization, virulence, host susceptibility, and therapeutics. Over the past decade key developments have arisen. First, rates of nosocomial methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have significantly declined in many countries. Second, we have made great strides in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of S. aureus in general and community-associated MRSA in particular. Third, host risk factors for invasive staphylococcal infections, such as advancing age, increasing numbers of invasive medical interventions, and a growing proportion of patients with healthcare contact, remain dynamic. Finally, several new antimicrobial agents active against MRSA have become available for clinical use. Humans and S. aureus co-exist, and the dynamic interface between host, pathogen, and our attempts to influence these interactions will continue to rapidly change. Although progress has been made in the past decade, we are likely to face further surprises such as the recent waves of community-associated MRSA.

  11. Adhesiveness of opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus to materials used in dental office: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Bekir, Karima; Kadmi, Yassine; Dallel, Ines; Janel, Sébastien; Bovio, Simone; Barois, Nicolas; Lafont, Frank; Mastouri, Maha

    2017-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of several opportunistic microbial pathogens associated with many healthcare problems. In the present study, S. aureus was assessed for its biofilm-forming ability on materials routinely used in dental offices, including stainless steel (SS), polyethylene (PE), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Materials that were tested were characterized for roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE). The adhesion forces exerted by S. aureus to each substratum were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and biofilm formation was quantitatively assessed by crystal violet staining assay. AFM measurements demonstrated that the strongest adhesion forces (20 nN) were exerted on the PE surfaces (P < 0.05) and depended more on Ra. In addition, the results of biofilm formation capability indicated that S. aureus exhibited more affinity to SS materials when compared to the other materials (P < 0.05). This ability of biofilm formation seems to be more correlated to SFE (R = 0.65). Hence, control of the surface properties of materials used in dental practices is of crucial importance for preventing biofilm formation on dental materials to be used for patients' dental care.

  12. Structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Ren, Jingshan; Lockyer, Michael; Charles, Ian; Hawkins, Alastair R; Stammers, David K

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase (CMK) in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) has been determined at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The active site reveals novel features when compared with two orthologues of known structure. Compared with the Streptococcus pneumoniae CMK solution structure of the enzyme alone, S. aureus CMK adopts a more closed conformation, with the NMP-binding domain rotating by approximately 16 degrees towards the central pocket of the molecule, thereby assembling the active site. Comparing Escherichia coli and S. aureus CMK-CMP complex structures reveals differences within the active site, including a previously unreported indirect interaction of CMP with Asp33, the replacement of a serine residue involved in the binding of CDP by Ala12 in S. aureus CMK and an additional sulfate ion in the E. coli CMK active site. The detailed understanding of the stereochemistry of CMP binding to CMK will assist in the design of novel inhibitors of the enzyme. Inhibitors are required to treat the widespread hospital infection methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), currently a major public health concern.

  13. Antibacterial Effects of Glycyrrhetinic Acid and Its Derivatives on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kentaro; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Norifumi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in humans and causes serious problems due to antibiotic resistance. We investigated the antimicrobial effect of glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA) and its derivatives against 50 clinical S. aureus strains, including 18 methicillin-resistant strains. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of GRA, dipotassium glycyrrhizate, disodium succinoyl glycyrrhetinate (GR-SU), stearyl glycyrrhetinate and glycyrrhetinyl stearate were evaluated against various S. aureus strains. Additionally, we investigated the bactericidal effects of GRA and GR-SU against two specific S. aureus strains. DNA microarray analysis was also performed to clarify the mechanism underlying the antibacterial activity of GR-SU. We detected the antimicrobial activities of five agents against S. aureus strains. GRA and GR-SU showed strong antibacterial activities compared to the other three agents tested. At a higher concentration (above 2x MIC), GRA and GR-SU showed bactericidal activity, whereas at a concentration of 1x MIC, they showed a bacteriostatic effect. Additionally, GRA and GR-SU exhibited a synergistic effect with gentamicin. The expression of a large number of genes (including transporters) and metabolic factors (carbohydrates and amino acids) was altered by the addition of GR-SU, suggesting that the inhibition of these metabolic processes may influence the degree of the requirement for carbohydrates or amino acids. In fact, the requirement for carbohydrates or amino acids was increased in the presence of either GRA or GR-SU. GRA and GR-SU exhibited strong antibacterial activity against several S. aureus strains, including MRSA. This activity may be partly due to the inhibition of several pathways involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. PMID:27820854

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  16. Staphylococcus aureus vaccines: Deviating from the carol

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commensal of the human nasopharynx and skin, also causes invasive disease, most frequently skin and soft tissue infections. Invasive disease caused by drug-resistant strains, designated MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), is associated with failure of antibiotic therapy and elevated mortality. Here we review polysaccharide-conjugate and subunit vaccines that were designed to prevent S. aureus infection in patients at risk of bacteremia or surgical wound infection but failed to reach their clinical endpoints. We also discuss vaccines with ongoing trials for combinations of polysaccharide-conjugates and subunits. S. aureus colonization and invasive disease are not associated with the development of protective immune responses, which is attributable to a large spectrum of immune evasion factors. Two evasive strategies, assembly of protective fibrin shields via coagulases and protein A–mediated B cell superantigen activity, are discussed as possible vaccine targets. Although correlates for protective immunity are not yet known, opsonophagocytic killing of staphylococci by phagocytic cells offers opportunities to establish such criteria. PMID:27526714

  17. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an ongoing challenge for WOC nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Infection is a common complication of chronic wounds that delays healing. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a common pathogen and major impediment to healing affected chronic wounds. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus is virulent, highly communicable, and difficult to eradicate. Treatment options include incision and drainage, debridement, and systemic antimicrobials. Early aggressive wound management and appropriate antibiotic therapy are considered essential to successful treatment. Facility-specific protocols should be developed to minimize the spread of this organism to the general population, with particular attention focused on protecting patients burdened with chronic wounds. This article reviews current knowledge of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus, focusing on its impact on persons with chronic wounds.

  18. Synergy between baicalein and penicillins against penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Minyi; Tang, Shusheng; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Chen, Tingting; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-09-01

    The combination of baicalein (the active constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis) with penicillin G/amoxicillin showed potent synergy against 20 clinical penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains including 10 isolates that were additionally methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices of penicillins+baiclein ranged from 0.14 to 0.38. Baicalein protected penicillins (penicillin G and amoxicillin) from penicillinase and increased the susceptibility of penicillinase-supplemented S. aureus ATCC 29213 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of penicillinase activity by baicalein should be responsible for the synergism and protective effect. These findings offer us good evidence that the penicillins combined with baicalein showed potent synergistic activity against penicillinase-producing S. aureus and penicillinase-producing MRSA in vitro and might provide promising implications for clinical treatment of these bacterial infections.

  19. Anti-Staphylococcus aureus action of three Caatinga fruits evaluated by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luís Cláudio Nascimento; Sandes, Jana Messias; de Paiva, Maurício Magalhães; de Araújo, Janete Magali; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of Anadenanthera colubrina, Libidibia ferrea and Pityrocarpa moniliformis fruit extracts against clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The samples were active for all S. aureus strains (minimum inhibitory concentration: 0.38-3.13 mg mL⁻¹), including the multiresistant strain. The morphological changes suggested the cell wall as the main action target. The treated-cells also lose their ability to form aggregates. The analysis suggests cell wall impairment, which causes the loss of viability and death. This study showed for the first time the morphologic alterations involved in the anti-S. aureus action of fruits of A. colubrina, L. ferrea and P. moniliformis. These findings indicated that these fruit extracts are sources of bioactive compounds that can be used as antibacterial agents.

  20. Lack of doxycycline antimalarial prophylaxis impact on Staphylococcus aureus tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Mende, Katrin; Beckius, Miriam L; Zera, Wendy C; Yu, Xin; Li, Ping; Tribble, David R; Murray, Clinton K

    2016-10-01

    There is concern that susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to tetracyclines may decrease due to use of antimalarial prophylaxis (doxycycline). We examined characteristics related to tetracycline resistance, including doxycycline exposure, in S. aureus isolates collected via admission surveillance swabs and inpatient clinical cultures from United States military personnel injured during deployment (June 2009-January 2012). Tetracycline class resistance was determined using antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The first S. aureus isolate from 168 patients were analyzed, of which 38 (23%) isolates were resistant to tetracyclines (class). Tetracycline-resistant isolates had a higher proportion of resistance to clindamycin (P=0.019) compared to susceptible isolates. There was no significant difference in tetracycline resistance between isolates collected from patients with and without antimalarial prophylaxis; however, significantly more isolates had tet(M) resistance genes in the doxycycline exposure group (P=0.031). Despite 55% of the patients receiving doxycycline as antimalarial prophylaxis, there was no association with resistance to tetracyclines.

  1. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain ATCC BAA-1680.

    PubMed

    Daum, Luke T; Bumah, Violet V; Masson-Meyers, Daniela S; Khubbar, Manjeet; Rodriguez, John D; Fischer, Gerald W; Enwemeka, Chukuka S; Gradus, Steve; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib

    2015-03-12

    We report here the whole-genome sequence of the USA300 strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), designated ATCC BAA-1680, and commonly referred to as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). This clinical MRSA isolate is commercially available from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and is widely utilized as a control strain for research applications and clinical diagnosis. The isolate was propagated in ATCC medium 18, tryptic soy agar, and has been utilized as a model S. aureus strain in several studies, including MRSA genetic analysis after irradiation with 470-nm blue light.

  3. Wall teichoic acids prevent antibody binding to epitopes within the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Samir; Kim, Taehan; Lester, Evan; Deep, Deeksha; Spiegel, David A

    2016-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that produces a range of infections including cellulitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The principle mechanism in antistaphylococcal host defense is opsonization with antibodies and complement proteins, followed by phagocytic clearance. Here we use a previously developed technique for installing chemical epitopes in the peptidoglycan cell wall to show that surface glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids conceal cell wall epitopes, preventing their recognition and opsonization by antibodies. Thus, our results reveal a previously unrecognized immunoevasive role for wall teichoic acids in S. aureus: repulsion of peptidoglycan-targeted antibodies.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genotypic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from food and food animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Jianghong; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Yanming; Yang, Baowei; Xi, Meili; Sheng, Jinling; Zhi, Shuai; Xia, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is commonly present in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial resistance and genetic characteristics of S. aureus from food and food animals in Shaanxi Province in China. A total of 332 nasal swabs, breast skin swabs, raw milk, and pork samples were collected from local pig, dairy farms, or local grocery stores and screened for the presence of S. aureus. S. aureus isolates were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction for detecting pvl and mecA genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were additionally tested for SCCmec type and exfoliative toxin genes. The prevalence of S. aureus was 30.6% in pig nasal swabs, 32.5% in pork, 25.7% in cow nasal swabs, 30.8% in cow breast skin swabs, and 29.3% in milk samples. Resistances were common among isolates tested against erythromycin (65.7%), tetracycline (65.7%), ciprofloxacin (52.7%), followed by gentamicin (36.7%), chloramphenicol (23.1%), cefoxitin (8.3%), and oxacillin (7.7%), but no isolate was resistant to vancomycin, amikacin, or cefoperazone. pvl gene was found in the isolates from all types of samples except from cow nasal swabs. Fourteen isolates from pig nasal swabs contained mecA gene and were considered as MRSA. PFGE analysis showed that nasal isolates differed from food isolates, but isolates from the same animal source appeared to cluster closely. The PFGE patterns of MRSA isolates were different from other S. aureus isolates from pig nasal cavity even though they were from the same source. All the MRSA isolates belonged to SCCmec type IV(b). No isolates contained exfoliative toxin genes. These findings indicated that S. aureus, including multidrug-resistant S. aureus, are widely spread in food animals and animal-derived foods in Shaanxi Province, China. MRSA isolates from pigs may pose potential health risks for workers in swine farms and the

  5. Phenotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish and Thai oral isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, Susanne; Leonhardt, Åsa; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Carlen, Anette; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    and the antibiotic susceptibility (including MRSA) should regularly be checked. The frequent presence of S. aureus, although in low numbers among students and staff, emphasizes the importance of standard infection control precautions and of using diagnostic test in the dental clinic. PMID:25911151

  6. Integration of PK/PD for dose optimization of Cefquinome against Staphylococcus aureus causing septicemia in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Hao, Haihong; Huang, Lingli; Sanders, Pascal; Wang, Xu; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Xie, Shuyu; Xiuhua, Kuang; Li, Juan; Dan, Wan; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-01-01

    Cefquinome is a fourth generation cephalosporin with antimicrobial activity against gram negative and gram positive bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of our study was to observe the ex-vivo activity of cefquinome against Staphylococcus aureus strains by using bovine serum from intravenously treated cattle. Cefquinome kinetics were measured by liquid chromatography and UV detection. In vitro post antibiotic effects (PAEs) and mutant prevention concentrations were determined with S. aureus strain ATCC 12598. Cefquinome exhibited time-dependent killing and produced in vitro PAEs increasing with concentration and time of exposure. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was established to simulate the efficacy of cefquinome for different dosage regimens. A dosage of 2 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days was expected to reach a bactericidal activity against S. aureus in case of septicemia. PMID:26136730

  7. Colostrum Hexasaccharide, a Novel Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A.; Deepak, D.; Singh, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of quorum-sensing (QS) systems regulating antibiotic resistance and virulence factors (VFs) has afforded a novel opportunity to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. Dietary molecules have been demonstrated to attenuate QS circuits of bacteria. But, to our knowledge, no study exploring the potential of colostrum hexasaccharide (CHS) in regulating QS systems has been published. In this study, we analyzed CHS for inhibiting QS signaling in Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated and characterized CHS from mare colostrum by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light-scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antibiofilm activity of CHS against S. aureus and its possible interference with bacterial QS systems were determined. The inhibition and eradication potentials of the biofilms were studied by microscopic analyses and quantified by 96-well-microtiter-plate assays. Also, the ability of CHS to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), one of the most studied signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. The results revealed that CHS exhibited promising inhibitory activities against QS-regulated secretion of VFs, including spreading ability, hemolysis, protease, and lipase activities, when applied at a rate of 5 mg/ml. The results of biofilm experiments indicated that CHS is a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and also has the ability to eradicate it. The potential of CHS to interfere with bacterial QS systems was also examined by degradation of AHLs. Furthermore, it was documented that CHS decreased antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The results thus give a lead that mare colostrum can be a promising source for isolating a next-generation antibacterial. PMID:25645850

  8. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from Humans and a Comparison with İsolates of Animal Origin, in North Dakota, United States.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Valeria; Buyukcangaz, Esra; Sherwood, Julie S; Stepan, Ryan M; Koslofsky, Ryan J; Logue, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Different clones of methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) Staphylococcus aureus have been found in humans as well as in animals and retail meat. However, more information about the genetic characteristics and similarities between strains is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize Staphylococcus aureus from humans, and to compare their characteristics with isolates of animal origin. A total of 550 nasal swabs were taken from healthy humans, and S. aureus was isolated and identified. Positive S. aureus isolates were subjected to molecular typing and susceptibility testing. In addition, 108 MRSA isolates recovered from clinical patients in the state of North Dakota and 133 S. aureus isolates from animals and meat previously analyzed were included. The nasal carriage of S. aureus in healthy people was 7.6% and, in general, clones were genetically diverse. None of the S. aureus strains obtained from healthy people were mecA- or PVL-positive. A total of 105 (97.2%) MRSA isolates from clinical cases harbored the mecA gene and 11 (10.2%) isolated from blood stream infections harbored the PVL gene. The most common resistance profile among S. aureus from healthy people was penicillin, and from clinical cases were erythromycin-penicillin-ciprofloxacin. The rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) was 70% in humans. Most of the S. aureus harboring mecA and PVL genes were identified as ST5 and ST8, and exhibited MDR. However, S. aureus isolates of animal origin used for comparison exhibited a lower rate of MDR. The most common resistance profiles in isolates of animal origin were penicillin-tetracycline and penicillin-tetracycline-erythromycin, in animals and raw meat, respectively. The ST5 was also found in animals and meat, with ST9 and ST398 being the major clones. The genetic similarity between clones from humans and meat suggests the risk of spread of S. aureus in the food chain.

  9. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from Humans and a Comparison with İsolates of Animal Origin, in North Dakota, United States

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Valeria; Buyukcangaz, Esra; Sherwood, Julie S.; Stepan, Ryan M.; Koslofsky, Ryan J.; Logue, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Different clones of methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) Staphylococcus aureus have been found in humans as well as in animals and retail meat. However, more information about the genetic characteristics and similarities between strains is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize Staphylococcus aureus from humans, and to compare their characteristics with isolates of animal origin. A total of 550 nasal swabs were taken from healthy humans, and S. aureus was isolated and identified. Positive S. aureus isolates were subjected to molecular typing and susceptibility testing. In addition, 108 MRSA isolates recovered from clinical patients in the state of North Dakota and 133 S. aureus isolates from animals and meat previously analyzed were included. The nasal carriage of S. aureus in healthy people was 7.6% and, in general, clones were genetically diverse. None of the S. aureus strains obtained from healthy people were mecA- or PVL-positive. A total of 105 (97.2%) MRSA isolates from clinical cases harbored the mecA gene and 11 (10.2%) isolated from blood stream infections harbored the PVL gene. The most common resistance profile among S. aureus from healthy people was penicillin, and from clinical cases were erythromycin-penicillin-ciprofloxacin. The rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) was 70% in humans. Most of the S. aureus harboring mecA and PVL genes were identified as ST5 and ST8, and exhibited MDR. However, S. aureus isolates of animal origin used for comparison exhibited a lower rate of MDR. The most common resistance profiles in isolates of animal origin were penicillin-tetracycline and penicillin-tetracycline-erythromycin, in animals and raw meat, respectively. The ST5 was also found in animals and meat, with ST9 and ST398 being the major clones. The genetic similarity between clones from humans and meat suggests the risk of spread of S. aureus in the food chain. PMID:26484768

  10. Bacterial flora and the epidemiology of staphylococcus aureus in the nose among patients with symptomatic nasal septal perforations.

    PubMed

    Hulterström, Anna Karin; Sellin, Mats; Monsen, Tor; Widerström, Micael; Gurram, Bharath Kumar; Berggren, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions Patients with symptomatic perforations of the nasal septum had a high prevalence of S. aureus in the nasal mucosa. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed a high genetic heterogeneity of S. aureus among both patients and controls. This indicates that presence of different strains of S. aureus can maintain a chronic inflammation in symptomatic nasal septal perforations. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial flora around nasal septal perforations in patients having severe symptoms regarding bleeding, obstruction, and crustation associated with their perforation. Methods Twenty-five patients with untreated symptomatic nasal septal perforations were included. For culture, swabs around the perforations were collected. Bacteria were identified with standard laboratory techniques including a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. Epidemiological analysis was done using PFGE protocols. Bacteriological data were compared with data from a healthy control group. Results Staphylococcus aureus was present in the mucosa surrounding the nasal perforation significantly more often (p < 0.0001) in the patients (88%) compared to a control group (13%). Corynebacterium spp. and Propionibacterium spp. were significantly more frequently identified in the control group. The PFGE analysis of S. aureus strains revealed a high genetic heterogeneity and no specific S. aureus genotypes were associated with septal perforation.

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a beauty salon, the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Huijsdens, Xander W; Janssen, Maria; Renders, Nicole H M; Leenders, Alexander; van Wijk, Paul; van Santen Verheuvel, Marga G; van Driel, Jolanda Koel; Morroy, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    An outbreak of community-associated USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus occurred in a beautician and 2 of her customers. Eight other persons, who were either infected (n = 5) or colonized (n = 3), were linked to this outbreak, including a family member, a household contact, and partners of customers.

  12. Preliminary treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, with trx-SA1, recombinant endolysin of S. aureus bacteriophage IME-SA1.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jindai; Zeng, Zhiliang; Mai, Kaijie; Yang, Yu; Feng, Jiaqi; Bai, Yang; Sun, Baoli; Xie, Qingmei; Tong, Yigang; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-08-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a great threat to human and animal health and there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial agents to control this pathogen. The objective of this study was to obtain an active recombinant endolysin from the novel bacteriophage (IME-SA1), and conduct an efficacy trial of its effectiveness against bovine mastitis. We isolated a phage that was virulent and specific for S. aureus with an optimal multiplicity of infection of 0.01. Electron microscopy revealed that IME-SA1 was a member of the family Myoviridae, with an isometric head (98nm) and a long contractile tail (200nm). Experimental lysis experiments indicated the phage had an incubation period of 20min with a burst size of 80. When host bacteria were in early exponential growth stages, a multiplicity of infection of 0.01 resulted in a complete bacterial lysis after 9h. The endolysin gene (804bp) was cloned into the pET-32a bacterial expression vector and recombinant endolysin Trx-SA1 was successfully obtained with molecular size of about 47kDa. Preliminary results of therapeutic trials in cow udders showed that Trx-SA1 could effectively control mild clinical mastitis caused by S. aureus. The endolysin Trx-SA1 might be an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by S. aureus, including MRSA.

  13. Isolation, Virulence, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) Strains from Oklahoma Retail Poultry Meats.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahman, Lubna S; Stanley, Adriana; Wells, Harrington; Fakhr, Mohamed K

    2015-05-29

    Staphylococcus aureus is one the top five pathogens causing domestically acquired foodborne illness in the U.S. Only a few studies are available related to the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in the U.S. retail poultry industry. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA) in retail chicken and turkey meats sold in Tulsa, Oklahoma and to characterize the recovered strains for their antimicrobial resistance and possession of toxin genes. A total of 167 (114 chicken and 53 turkey) retail poultry samples were used in this study. The chicken samples included 61 organic samples while the rest of the poultry samples were conventional. The overall prevalence of S. aureus was 57/106 (53.8%) in the conventional poultry samples and 25/61 (41%) in the organic ones. Prevalence in the turkey samples (64.2%) was higher than in the chicken ones (42.1%). Prevalence of S. aureus did not vary much between conventional (43.4%) and organic chicken samples (41%). Two chicken samples 2/114 (1.8%) were positive for MRSA. PFGE identified the two MRSA isolates as belonging to PFGE type USA300 (from conventional chicken) and USA 500 (from organic chicken) which are community acquired CA-MRSA suggesting a human based source of contamination. MLST and spa typing also supported this conclusion. A total of 168 Staphylococcus aureus isolates (101 chicken isolates and 67 turkey isolates) were screened for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 16 antimicrobials and their possession of 18 different toxin genes. Multidrug resistance was higher in the turkey isolates compared to the chicken ones and the percentage of resistance to most of the antimicrobials tested was also higher among the turkey isolates. The hemolysin hla and hld genes, enterotoxins seg and sei, and leucocidins lukE-lukD were more prevalent in the chicken isolates. The PVL gene lukS-lukF was detected only in chicken isolates including the MRSA ones. In conclusion, S. aureus is

  14. Temporal and stochastic control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Moormeier, Derek E; Bose, Jeffrey L; Horswill, Alexander R; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2014-10-14

    Biofilm communities contain distinct microniches that result in metabolic heterogeneity and variability in gene expression. Previously, these niches were visualized within Staphylococcus aureus biofilms by observing differential expression of the cid and lrg operons during tower formation. In the present study, we examined early biofilm development and identified two new stages (designated "multiplication" and "exodus") that were associated with changes in matrix composition and a distinct reorganization of the cells as the biofilm matured. The initial attachment and multiplication stages were shown to be protease sensitive but independent of most cell surface-associated proteins. Interestingly, after 6 h of growth, an exodus of the biofilm population that followed the transition of the biofilm to DNase I sensitivity was demonstrated. Furthermore, disruption of the gene encoding staphylococcal nuclease (nuc) abrogated this exodus event, causing hyperproliferation of the biofilm and disrupting normal tower development. Immediately prior to the exodus event, S. aureus cells carrying a nuc::gfp promoter fusion demonstrated Sae-dependent expression but only in an apparently random subpopulation of cells. In contrast to the existing model for tower development in S. aureus, the results of this study suggest the presence of a Sae-controlled nuclease-mediated exodus of biofilm cells that is required for the development of tower structures. Furthermore, these studies indicate that the differential expression of nuc during biofilm development is subject to stochastic regulatory mechanisms that are independent of the formation of metabolic microniches. Importance: In this study, we provide a novel view of four early stages of biofilm formation by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. We identified an initial nucleoprotein matrix during biofilm development that is DNase I insensitive until a critical point when a nuclease-mediated exodus of the population is induced prior

  15. Change in Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Skin-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis during Ten-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Min; Jo, Ju-Hyun; Jin, Hyunju; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Jung-Min; Kim, Do-Won; Jang, Ho-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Background A small subset of adolescents atopic dermatitis (AD) tends to persist. This also leads to get more antibiotics exposure with advancing years. Antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a serious problem during Staphylococcus aureus treatment, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Objective It was investigated the S. aureus colonization frequency in the skin lesions and anterior nares of adolescent AD patients and evaluated the changes in S. aureus antimicrobial susceptibility for years. Methods Patients who visited our clinic from September 2003 to August 2005 were classified into group A, and patients who visited from August 2010 to March 2012 were classified into group B. To investigate the differences with regard to patients' age and disease duration, the patients were subdivided into groups according to age. Lesional and nasal specimens were examined. Results Among the 295 AD patients, the total S. aureus colonization rate in skin lesions was 66.9% (95/142) for group A and 78.4% (120/153) for group B. No significant changes in the systemic antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus strains isolated from adolescent AD patients were observed during about 10-year period. The increased trend of MRSA isolation in recent adolescent AD outpatients suggest that the community including school could be the source of S. aureus antibiotic resistance and higher fusidic acid resistance rates provides evidence of imprudent topical use. Conclusion Relatively high MRSA isolation and fusidic acid resistance rates in recent AD patients suggest that the community harbors antibiotic-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27489430

  16. Pharmacodynamic characterization of ceftobiprole in experimental pneumonia caused by phenotypically diverse Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Laohavaleeson, Somvadee; Tessier, Pamela R; Nicolau, David P

    2008-07-01

    Ceftobiprole (BPR) is an investigational cephalosporin with activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. The pharmacodynamic (PD) profile of BPR against S. aureus strains with a variety of susceptibility phenotypes in an immunocompromised murine pneumonia model was characterized. The BPR MICs of the test isolates ranged from 0.25 to 2 mug/ml. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies were conducted with infected neutropenic BALB/c mice; and the BPR concentrations were measured in plasma, epithelial lining fluid (ELF), and lung tissue. PD studies with these mice were undertaken with eight S. aureus isolates (two methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains, three hospital-acquired MRSA strains, and three community-acquired MRSA strains). Subcutaneous BPR doses of 2 to 125 mg/kg of body weight/day were administered, and the change in the number of log(10) CFU/ml in lungs was evaluated after 24 h of therapy. The PD profile was characterized by using the free drug exposures (f) determined from the following parameters: the percentage of time that the concentration was greater than the MIC (T > MIC), the maximum concentration in serum/MIC, and the area under the concentration-time curve/MIC. The BPR PK parameters were linear over the dose range studied in plasma, and the ELF concentrations ranged from 60 to 94% of the free plasma concentration. fT > MIC was the parameter that best correlated with efficacy against a diverse array of S. aureus isolates in this murine pneumonia model. The 80% effective dose (ED(80)), ED(50), and stasis exposures appeared to be similar among the isolates studied. BPR exerted maximal antibacterial effects when fT > MIC ranged from 6 to 22%, regardless of the phenotypic profile of resistance to beta-lactam, fluoroquinolone, erythromycin, clindamycin, or tetracycline antibiotics.

  17. Implantation of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum for elimination of Staphylococcus aureus from the nasal cavity in volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Kiryukhina, Nataliya

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a well-documented risk factor of infection and inflammation of the skin, soft tissues and bacteremia. It is also known that most often etiology of these disorders is associated with autoinfection. The present-day methods of opportunistic pathogens eradication from the nasal cavity are based principally on the use of antiseptic and antibacterial agents. For instance, a local antibiotic mupirocin in the form of nasal ointment is considered to be the gold standard for the treatment of S. aureus carriage. The literature describes investigations showing how mupirocin can strengthen antibiotic resistance in S. aureus strains, including those with methicillin resistance (MRSA). It is also common knowledge that recolonization of the nasal mucous membrane takes place within several months after mupirocin treatment. This circumstance dictates the necessity to look for alternative ways of preventing the S. aureus carriage and methods of elimination. One of the methods of nasal S. aureus elimination is implantation of nonpathogenic microorganisms which will extrude opportunistic pathogens without impinging the symbiotic microbiota. Effectiveness of saline suspension of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum containing spray was assessed in a several chamber experiments with simulation of some spaceflight factors (dry immersion, isolation). Various schemes of application of preparations were applied. In all cases of corynebacteria application the strong inhibiting effect against S. aureus was detected. This fact opens a prospect of using nonpathogenic corynebacteria as a nasal probiotic. Administration of the nasal corynebacteria spray possibly prevented cross-infection by MRSA and appearance of staphylococcal infection. Further pre-clinical and clinical study of this bacterial therapy method is under development.

  18. Characterization of transcription within sdr region of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Babiak, Ireneusz; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for various infections in humans and animals. It causes localized and systemic infections, such as abscesses, impetigo, cellulitis, sepsis, endocarditis, bone infections, and meningitis. S. aureus virulence factors responsible for the initial contact with host cells (MSCRAMMs-microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) include three Sdr proteins. The presence of particular sdr genes is correlated with putative tissue specificity. The transcriptional organization of the sdr region remains unclear. We tested expression of the sdrC, sdrD, or sdrE genes in various in vitro conditions, as well as after contact with human blood. In this work, we present data suggesting a separation of the sdr region into three transcriptional units, based on their differential reactions to the environment. Differential reaction of the sdrD transcript to environmental conditions and blood suggests dissimilar functions of the sdr genes. SdrE has been previously proposed to play role in bone infections, whilst our results can indicate that sdrD plays a role in the interactions between the pathogen and human immune system, serum or specifically reacts to nutrients/other factors present in human blood.

  19. Haem Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus NEAT Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-01

    Successful pathogenic organisms have developed mechanisms to thrive under extreme levels of iron restriction. Haem-iron represents the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is a significant source of iron for some bacterial pathogens. NEAT (NEAr Transporter) domains are found exclusively in a family of cell surface proteins in Gram-positive bacteria. Many NEAT domain-containing proteins, including IsdA in Staphylococcus aureus, are implicated in haem binding. Here, we show that overexpression of IsdA in S. aureus enhances growth and an inactivation mutant of IsdA has a growth defect, compared with wild type, when grown in media containing haem as the sole iron source. Furthermore, the haem-binding property of IsdA is contained within the NEAT domain. Crystal structures of the apo-IsdA NEAT domain and in complex with haem were solved and reveal a clathrin adapter-like beta-sandwich fold with a large hydrophobic haem-binding pocket. Haem is bound with the propionate groups directed at the molecular surface and the iron is co-ordinated solely by Tyr(166). The phenol groups of Tyr(166) and Tyr(170) form an H-bond that may function in regulating haem binding and release. An analysis of IsdA structure-sequence alignments indicate that conservation of Tyr(166) is a predictor of haem binding by NEAT domains.

  20. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two independent cases of bacteremia display increased bacterial fitness and novel immune evasion phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Richards, R L; Haigh, R D; Pascoe, B; Sheppard, S K; Price, F; Jenkins, D; Rajakumar, K; Morrissey, J A

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion.

  1. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Independent Cases of Bacteremia Display Increased Bacterial Fitness and Novel Immune Evasion Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R. L.; Haigh, R. D.; Pascoe, B.; Sheppard, S. K.; Price, F.; Jenkins, D.; Rajakumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion. PMID:26056388

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alginate Overproduction Promotes Coexistence with Staphylococcus aureus in a Model of Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Limoli, Dominique H.; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Kitao, Tomoe; Ivey, Melissa L.; Davis, Michael R.; Grahl, Nora; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rahme, Laurence G.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT While complex intra- and interspecies microbial community dynamics are apparent during chronic infections and likely alter patient health outcomes, our understanding of these interactions is currently limited. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are often found to coinfect the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet these organisms compete under laboratory conditions. Recent observations that coinfection correlates with decreased health outcomes necessitate we develop a greater understanding of these interbacterial interactions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa and/or S. aureus adopts phenotypes that allow coexistence during infection. We compared competitive interactions of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates from mono- or coinfected CF patients employing in vitro coculture models. P. aeruginosa isolates from monoinfected patients were more competitive toward S. aureus than P. aeruginosa isolates from coinfected patients. We also observed that the least competitive P. aeruginosa isolates possessed a mucoid phenotype. Mucoidy occurs upon constitutive activation of the sigma factor AlgT/U, which regulates synthesis of the polysaccharide alginate and dozens of other secreted factors, including some previously described to kill S. aureus. Here, we show that production of alginate in mucoid strains is sufficient to inhibit anti-S. aureus activity independent of activation of the AlgT regulon. Alginate reduces production of siderophores, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinolone-N-oxide (HQNO), and rhamnolipids—each required for efficient killing of S. aureus. These studies demonstrate alginate overproduction may be an important factor driving P. aeruginosa coinfection with S. aureus. PMID:28325763

  3. Betulin suppresses S. aureus-induced mammary gland inflammatory injury by regulating PPAR-γ in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng-yao; Li, Wen-yu; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is a postpartum disease in both humans and animals. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) can induce mastitis by infection of the lactiferous ducts. There is no efficacious treatment for S. aureus-induced mastitis. Betulin has been confirmed to have multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory properties. The present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of betulin on S. aureus-induced mastitis and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. In vivo, betulin ameliorated the histopathological changes that were induced by S. aureus. ELISA and qPCR results showed that betulin inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Western blotting results demonstrated that betulin inhibited NF-κB phosphorylation but promoted the expression of PPAR-γ. Further investigations were performed in vitro with mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells (mMECs). The results indicated the betulin inhibited the activity of the NF-κB pathway and increased PPAR-γ expression and transcriptional activity. All of the results in the present study demonstrated that betulin played a protective anti-inflammatory role against S. aureus infection in mammary gland tissues and cells by activating PPAR-γ and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  4. Curcumin protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia by interfering with the self-assembly process of α-hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Deng, Yanhong; Niu, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    α-hemolysin (Hla) is a self-assembling extracellular protein secreted as a soluble monomer by most Staphylococcus aureus strains and is an essential virulence factor for the pathogenesis of various S. aureus infections. Here, we show that curcumin (CUR), a natural compound with weak anti-S. aureus activity, can inhibit the hemolysis induced by Hla. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and mutagenesis assays were further employed for the Hla-CUR complex to determine the mechanism of such inhibition. The analysis of this combined approach indicated that the direct binding CUR to Hla blocks the conformational transition of Hla from the monomer to the oligomer, leading to an inhibition of Hla hemolytic activity. We also found that the addition of CUR significantly attenuated Hla-mediated injury of human alveolar cell (A549) co-cultured with S. aureus. The in vivo data further demonstrated that treatment with CUR protects mice from pneumonia caused by S. aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). These findings suggest that CUR inhibits the pore-forming activity of Hla through a novel mechanism, which would pave the way for the development of new and more effective antibacterial agents to combat S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:27345357

  5. [Antibiotic stewardship and Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Weis, S; Kimmig, A; Hagel, S; Pletz, M W

    2017-04-04

    Rates of antibiotic resistance are increasing worldwide and impact on the treatment of patients with bacterial infections. A broad and uncritical application in inpatient and outpatient settings as well as in agriculture has been recognized as the main driving force. Antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs aim at countering this worrisome development using various direct interventions such as infectious disease counseling. Blood stream infections caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus are severe infections associated with high mortality rates. ABS interventions such as de-eskalation of the antibiotic regimen or application of narrow-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics can significantly reduce mortality rates. In this review, we discuss the importance of ABS programs and infectious disease counseling for the treatment of S. aureus blood stream infection.

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Giuseppe; Leone, Sebastiano; Lauria, Francesco N; Nicastri, Emanuele; Wenzel, Richard P

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections.

  7. [Zosteriform lichen aureus. Pediatric clinical case].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Hernández Ostiz, Sergio; Morales-Moya, Ana L; Prieto-Torres, Lucía; Álvarez-Salafranca, Marcial; Ara Martín, Mariano

    2017-04-01

    Lichen aureus is a rare pigmented purpuric dermatosis. We present an unusual case because of the pediatric age and the great number of lesions with zosteriform distribution. He is a 10-yearold boy, with a brownish, smaller than 1 cm, sharp edges, lichenified surface, asymptomatic macule, over the inner aspect of the left leg with a zosteriform distribution. The histology showed a band-like inflammatory infiltrate in the superficial dermis, composed of lymphocytes, histiocytes, erythrocytes and haemosiderin. He was diagnosed with zosteriform lichen aureus and was treated with topical mometasone furoate during 3 weeks resulting in partial lightening of the macules. Lesions have remained 2 years later, and new ones have appeared in the ipsilateral ankle. We must consider differential diagnosis with other pigmented purpuric dermatitis and pigmented purpuric mycosis fungoides. There are many therapeutic options and it tends to disappear spontaneously, so new studies are necessary.

  8. Detection of mecA- and mecC-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates by the New Xpert MRSA Gen 3 PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Denis, Olivier; Roisin, Sandrine; Mellmann, Alexander; Idelevich, Evgeny A; Knaack, Dennis; van Alen, Sarah; Kriegeskorte, André; Köck, Robin; Schaumburg, Frieder; Peters, Georg; Ballhausen, Britta

    2016-01-01

    An advanced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection PCR approach targeting SCCmec-orfX along with mecA and mecC was evaluated for S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. The possession of mecA and/or mecC was correctly confirmed in all cases. All methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains (n = 98; including staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element [SCCmec] remnants) and 98.1% of the MRSA strains (n = 160, including 10 mecC-positive MRSA) were accurately categorized.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor A Remains a Viable Vaccine Target for Prevention of S. aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Annaliesa S; Scully, Ingrid L; Buurman, Ed T; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2016-03-08

    In a recent article, X. Li et al. [mBio 7(1):e02232-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02232-15] investigate the utility of a vaccine composed of the Staphylococcus aureus protein clumping factor A (ClfA) in protecting mice from S. aureus infection. ClfA, one of the first proteins to be identified as a potential vaccine antigen for S. aureus prophylaxis, is currently a component of several investigational vaccines. The authors conclude that ClfA may not be effective for S. aureus prophylaxis. In contrast, previously published papers reporting positive data suggested that ClfA was potentially an important vaccine target to prevent invasive S. aureus disease. This commentary addresses the observed differences between the findings of Li et al. and those from other publications, highlighting the importance for preclinical vaccine antigen assessments to reflect the biological role of said antigen in virulence and, consequently, the importance of choosing appropriate preclinical disease models to test such antigens.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor A Remains a Viable Vaccine Target for Prevention of S. aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Ingrid L.; Buurman, Ed T.; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent article, X. Li et al. [mBio 7(1):e02232-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02232-15] investigate the utility of a vaccine composed of the Staphylococcus aureus protein clumping factor A (ClfA) in protecting mice from S. aureus infection. ClfA, one of the first proteins to be identified as a potential vaccine antigen for S. aureus prophylaxis, is currently a component of several investigational vaccines. The authors conclude that ClfA may not be effective for S. aureus prophylaxis. In contrast, previously published papers reporting positive data suggested that ClfA was potentially an important vaccine target to prevent invasive S. aureus disease. This commentary addresses the observed differences between the findings of Li et al. and those from other publications, highlighting the importance for preclinical vaccine antigen assessments to reflect the biological role of said antigen in virulence and, consequently, the importance of choosing appropriate preclinical disease models to test such antigens. PMID:26956591

  11. Sialic Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; King, Jessica M.; Yahr, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous bacterial pathogen that is the causative agent of numerous acute and chronic infections. S. aureus colonizes the anterior nares of a significant portion of the healthy adult population, but the mechanisms of colonization remain incompletely defined. Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid [Neu5Ac]) is a bioavailable carbon and nitrogen source that is abundant on mucosal surfaces and in secretions in the commensal environment. Our findings demonstrate that Neu5Ac can serve as an S. aureus carbon source, and we have identified a previously uncharacterized chromosomal locus (nan) that is required for Neu5Ac utilization. Molecular characterization of the nan locus indicates that it contains five genes, organized into four transcripts, and the genes were renamed nanE, nanR, nanK, nanA, and nanT. Initial studies with gene deletions indicate that nanT, predicted to encode the Neu5Ac transporter, and nanA and nanE, predicted to encode catabolic enzymes, are essential for growth on Neu5Ac. Furthermore, a nanE deletion mutant exhibits a growth inhibition phenotype in the presence of Neu5Ac. Transcriptional fusions and Northern blot analyses indicate that NanR represses the expression of both the nanAT and nanE transcripts, which can be relieved with Neu5Ac. Electrophoretic mobility studies demonstrate that NanR binds to the nanAT and nanE promoter regions, and the Neu5Ac catabolic intermediate N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate (ManNAc-6P) relieves NanR promoter binding. Taken together, these data indicate that the nan gene cluster is essential for Neu5Ac utilization and may perform an important function for S. aureus survival in the host. PMID:23396916

  12. Staphylococcus aureus infections in Australasian neonatal nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, D; Fraser, S; Hogg, G; Li, H

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence and outcome of systemic infections with methicillin sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in Australasian neonatal nurseries. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study of systemic infections (clinical sepsis plus positive cultures of blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid) in 17 Australasian neonatal nurseries. Results: The incidence of early onset sepsis with S aureus, mainly MSSA, was 19 cases per 244 718 live births or 0.08 per 1000. From 1992 to 1994, MRSA infections caused only 8% of staphylococcal infections. From 1995 to 1998, there was an outbreak of MRSA infection, in two Melbourne hospitals. The outbreak resolved, after the use of topical mupirocin and improved handwashing. Babies with MRSA sepsis were significantly smaller than babies with MSSA sepsis (mean birth weight 1093 v 1617 g) and more preterm (mean gestation 27.5 v 30.3 weeks). The mortality of MRSA sepsis was 24.6% compared with 9.9% for MSSA infections. The mortality of early onset MSSA sepsis, however, was 39% (seven of 18) compared with 7.3% of late onset MSSA infection presenting more than two days after birth. Conclusions: S aureus is a rare but important cause of early onset sepsis. Late onset MRSA infections carried a higher mortality than late onset MSSA infections, but babies with early onset MSSA sepsis had a particularly high mortality. PMID:15210669

  13. Destruction of Staphylococcus aureus during frankfurter processing.

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, S A; Smith, J L; Kissinger, J C

    1977-01-01

    We studied the thermal resistance of Staphylococcus aureus during frankfurter processing in respect to whether staphylococci are killed by the heating step of the process and whether heat injury interferes with the quantitative estimation of the survivors. With S. aureus 198E, heat injury could be demonstrated only when large numbers of cells (10(8)/g) were present and at a product temperature of 140 degrees F (60 degrees C). On tryptic soy agar and tryptic soy agar plus 7% NaCl media, at temperatures less than 140 degrees F, the counts were virtually identical; above 140 degrees F, the counts converged, with the organisms dying so rapidly that heat injury was not demonstrable. Heat injury was thus judged not to interfere with the quantitative estimation of staphylococci surviving the normal commercial heating given frankfurters. By using a combination of direct plating on tryptic soy agar and a most-probable-number technique, we detected no viable cells (less than 0.3/g) of several strains of S. aureus in frankfurters heated to 160 degrees F (71.1 degrees C). This temperature is compatible with the normal final temperature to which federally inspected processors heat their frankfurters and with the temperature needed to destroy salmonellae. PMID:563701

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  15. Comparison of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus Agar Medium to Conventional Media for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus in Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    Flayhart, Diane; Lema, Clara; Borek, Anita; Carroll, Karen C.

    2004-01-01

    Screening for Staphylococcus aureus has become routine in certain patient populations. This study is the first clinical evaluation of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar (CSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, Md.) for detection of S. aureus in nasal surveillance cultures and in respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. S. aureus colonies appear mauve on CSA. Other organisms are inhibited or produce a distinctly different colony color. S. aureus was identified from all media by slide coagulase, exogenous DNase, and mannitol fermentation assays. Susceptibility testing was performed using the agar dilution method. A total of 679 samples were evaluated. All samples were inoculated onto CSA. Nasal surveillance cultures were inoculated onto sheep blood agar (SBA) (BD Diagnostics), and samples from CF patients were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA) (BD Diagnostics). Of the 679 samples cultured, 200 organisms produced a mauve color on CSA (suspicious for S. aureus) and 180 were positive for S. aureus on SBA or MSA. Of 200 CSA-positive samples 191 were identified as S. aureus. Nine mauve colonies were slide coagulase negative and were subsequently identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis (one), Staphylococcus epidermidis (three), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one), and Corynebacterium species (four). CSA improved the ability to detect S. aureus by recovering 12 S. aureus isolates missed by conventional media. Of the 192 S. aureus isolates recovered, 122 were methicillin susceptible and 70 were methicillin resistant. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of CSA in this study were 99.5 and 98%, respectively. There was no difference in the performance of the slide coagulase test or in susceptibility testing performed on S. aureus recovered from CSA compared to SBA or MSA. Our data support the use of CSA in place of standard culture media for detection of S. aureus in heavily contaminated respiratory samples. PMID:15297498

  16. Novel antibody-antibiotic conjugate eliminates intracellular S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Pillow, Thomas; Xu, Min; Staben, Leanna; Kajihara, Kimberly K; Vandlen, Richard; DePalatis, Laura; Raab, Helga; Hazenbos, Wouter L; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Darwish, Martine; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Hernandez, Hilda; Loyet, Kelly M; Lupardus, Patrick; Fong, Rina; Yan, Donghong; Chalouni, Cecile; Luis, Elizabeth; Khalfin, Yana; Plise, Emile; Cheong, Jonathan; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S; Flygare, John A; Wah Tan, Man; Brown, Eric J; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2015-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is considered to be an extracellular pathogen. However, survival of S. aureus within host cells may provide a reservoir relatively protected from antibiotics, thus enabling long-term colonization of the host and explaining clinical failures and relapses after antibiotic therapy. Here we confirm that intracellular reservoirs of S. aureus in mice comprise a virulent subset of bacteria that can establish infection even in the presence of vancomycin, and we introduce a novel therapeutic that effectively kills intracellular S. aureus. This antibody-antibiotic conjugate consists of an anti-S. aureus antibody conjugated to a highly efficacious antibiotic that is activated only after it is released in the proteolytic environment of the phagolysosome. The antibody-antibiotic conjugate is superior to vancomycin for treatment of bacteraemia and provides direct evidence that intracellular S. aureus represents an important component of invasive infections.

  17. Staphylococcus epidermidis Protection Against Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus in an Inner-City Outpatient Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sean B.; Kamath, Suneel; McConville, Thomas H.; Gray, Brett T.; Lowy, Franklin D.; Gordon, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. People living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH) have been disproportionally affected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection, in particular by clones USA300 and USA500. However, the contribution of epidemiological, bacterial, and immunological risk factors to the excess of S aureus in PLWH remain incompletely understood. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, we determined the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of S aureus colonization in 93 PLWH attending an urban human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic. Participants completed a structured interview assessing demographic information and risk factors for MRSA. Swabs were obtained from the nose, throat, and groin and cultured for S aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results. Most participants had well controlled HIV infection (89, 96% CD4 >200). Thirty-six (39%) individuals were colonized with S aureus at 1 or more body sites, including 6 (6%) with MRSA. Regular gym use was a risk factor for S aureus but not MRSA carriage. In contrast, S epidermidis was present in almost all individuals (n = 84, 90%), predominantly in the nares (n = 66, 71%). Using generalized estimating equation models, we observed that the odds of S aureus colonization were significantly and drastically reduced when S epidermidis was detected (P = .0001). After controlling for site, gender, and age, we identified that the odds of S aureus colonization were 80% less if S epidermidis was present (adjusted odds ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, .09–.45; P < .0001). Conclusions. Taken together, we observed a lower prevalence of S aureus and MRSA colonization than has been previously reported in PLWH. In this cohort, colonization with S epidermidis was protective against S aureus colonization. PMID:28018932

  18. Staphylococcus aureus-Related Diabetic Osteomyelitis: Medical or Surgical Management? A French and Spanish Retrospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    Lesens, Olivier; Desbiez, Françoise; Theïs, Clément; Ferry, Tristant; Bensalem, Maryse; Laurichesse, Henri; Tauveron, Igor; Beytout, Jean; Aragón Sánchez, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) and can be treated medically or by surgery. We investigated the outcome of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of S aureus DFO retrospectively in 4 hospitals according to the type of management, medical (including debridement at bedside) or surgical. The outcome was classified as either favorable or failure (relapse, impaired wound healing, or amputation). Seventy-four patients with S aureus DFO, including 26 with methicillin-resistant S aureus, were included with a mean duration of follow-up of 21 ± 1 months. As part of the initial treatment, 47% underwent bone surgery followed with a short course of antibiotic. Others were treated with antibiotic therapy alone with bedside debridement. The outcome was favorable for 84% of these patients, with similar rates in the surgical and medical groups (80% vs 87%, P > .05). Patients in the medical group were less frequently hospitalized (49% vs 94%, P < .001) and had a shorter length of hospital stay (17 ± 3 vs 50 ± 12 days, P = .004). Patients in the surgery group received a shorter course of antibiotic therapy (10 ± 2 vs 11 ± 1 weeks, P = .001) with fewer side effects (9% vs 33%, P = .01). The type of management was not associated with subsequent new episode of noncontiguous DFO, which developed in 32% of cases. In conclusion, except significant differences in duration of hospitalization and antibiotic therapy, medical and surgical management of S aureus DFO had similar outcomes with a cure rate >80%.

  19. Prevalence and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus in Growing Pigs in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jisun; Yang, My; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Davies, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    A decade of research of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in pigs shows that the prevalence and predominant genotypes (i.e., ST398, ST9, ST5) of MRSA vary widely geographically, yet knowledge of the epidemiology of S. aureus generally in swine remains rudimentary. To characterize S. aureus, including MRSA, in the US swine industry, we sampled 38 swine herds in 11 states in major swine producing regions. The herds sampled included pigs sourced from 9 different breeding stock companies, and the sample was likely biased towards larger herds that use regular veterinary services. Twenty nasal swabs were collected from 36 groups of growing pigs by 36 swine veterinarians, 2 more herds were sampled opportunistically, and a historically MRSA-positive herd was included as a positive control. S. aureus was detected on 37 of the 38 herds, and in 77% of pigs sampled. Other than the positive control herd, no MRSA were detected in the study sample, yielding a 95% upper confidence limit of 9.3% for MRSA herd prevalence. All but two (ST1-t127; ST2007-t8314) of 1200 isolates belonged to three MLST lineages (ST9, ST398, and ST5) that have been prominent in studies of MRSA in pigs globally. A total of 35 spa types were detected, with the most prevalent being t337 (ST9), t034 (ST398), and t002 (ST5). A purposively diverse subset of 128 isolates was uniformly negative on PCR testing for major enterotoxin genes. The findings support previous studies suggesting a relatively low herd prevalence of MRSA in the US swine industry, but confirm that methicillin susceptible variants of the most common MRSA genotypes found in swine globally are endemic in the US. The absence of enterotoxin genes suggests that the source of toxigenic S. aureus capable of causing foodborne enterotoxicosis from pork products is most likely post-harvest contamination. PMID:26599635

  20. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  1. Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response during Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Global Gene Expression by Staphylococcus aureus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, Paul Martijn; Lemmens-den Toom, Nicole; Kant, Samantha; Snijders, Susan V.; Boelens, Hélène; Tavakol, Mehri; Verkaik, Nelianne J.; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Wamel, Willem J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to develop an efficient anti-staphylococcal vaccine in humans have so far been unsuccessful. Therefore, more knowledge of the antigens that are expressed by Staphylococcus aureus in human blood and induce an immune response in patients is required. In this study we further characterize the serial levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against 56 staphylococcal antigens in multiple serum samples of 21 patients with a S. aureus bacteremia, compare peak IgG levels between patients and 30 non-infected controls, and analyze the expression of 3626 genes by two genetically distinct isolates in human blood. The serum antibody levels were measured using a bead-based flow cytometry technique (xMAP®, Luminex corporation). Gene expression levels were analyzed using a microarray (BµG@s microarray). The initial levels and time taken to reach peak IgG and IgA antibody levels were heterogeneous in bacteremia patients. The antigen SA0688 was associated with the highest median initial-to-peak antibody fold-increase for IgG (5.05-fold) and the second highest increase for IgA (2.07-fold). Peak IgG levels against 27 antigens, including the antigen SA0688, were significantly elevated in bacteremia patients versus controls (P≤0.05). Expression of diverse genes, including SA0688, was ubiquitously high in both isolates at all time points during incubation in blood. However, only a limited number of genes were specifically up- or downregulated in both isolates when cultured in blood, compared to the start of incubation in blood or during incubation in BHI broth. In conclusion, most staphylococcal antigens tested in this study, including many known virulence factors, do not induce uniform increases in the antibody levels in bacteremia patients. In addition, the expression of these antigens by S. aureus is not significantly altered by incubation in human blood over time. One immunogenic and ubiquitously expressed antigen is the putative iron-regulated ABC transporter SA0688. PMID

  2. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  3. Extensive Genomic Diversity among Bovine-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus: Evidence for a Genomic Rearrangement within CC97.

    PubMed

    Budd, Kathleen E; McCoy, Finola; Monecke, Stefan; Cormican, Paul; Mitchell, Jennifer; Keane, Orla M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen associated with both human and veterinary disease and is a common cause of bovine mastitis. Genomic heterogeneity exists between S. aureus strains and has been implicated in the adaptation of specific strains to colonise particular mammalian hosts. Knowledge of the factors required for host specificity and virulence is important for understanding the pathogenesis and management of S. aureus mastitis. In this study, a panel of mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates (n = 126) was tested for resistance to antibiotics commonly used to treat mastitis. Over half of the isolates (52%) demonstrated resistance to penicillin and ampicillin but all were susceptible to the other antibiotics tested. S. aureus isolates were further examined for their clonal diversity by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). In total, 18 different sequence types (STs) were identified and eBURST analysis demonstrated that the majority of isolates grouped into clonal complexes CC97, CC151 or sequence type (ST) 136. Analysis of the role of recombination events in determining S. aureus population structure determined that ST diversification through nucleotide substitutions were more likely to be due to recombination compared to point mutation, with regions of the genome possibly acting as recombination hotspots. DNA microarray analysis revealed a large number of differences amongst S. aureus STs in their variable genome content, including genes associated with capsule and biofilm formation and adhesion factors. Finally, evidence for a genomic arrangement was observed within isolates from CC97 with the ST71-like subgroup showing evidence of an IS431 insertion element having replaced approximately 30 kb of DNA including the ica operon and histidine biosynthesis genes, resulting in histidine auxotrophy. This genomic rearrangement may be responsible for the diversification of ST71 into an emerging bovine adapted subgroup.

  4. Extensive Genomic Diversity among Bovine-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus: Evidence for a Genomic Rearrangement within CC97

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Kathleen E.; McCoy, Finola; Monecke, Stefan; Cormican, Paul; Mitchell, Jennifer; Keane, Orla M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen associated with both human and veterinary disease and is a common cause of bovine mastitis. Genomic heterogeneity exists between S. aureus strains and has been implicated in the adaptation of specific strains to colonise particular mammalian hosts. Knowledge of the factors required for host specificity and virulence is important for understanding the pathogenesis and management of S. aureus mastitis. In this study, a panel of mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates (n = 126) was tested for resistance to antibiotics commonly used to treat mastitis. Over half of the isolates (52%) demonstrated resistance to penicillin and ampicillin but all were susceptible to the other antibiotics tested. S. aureus isolates were further examined for their clonal diversity by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). In total, 18 different sequence types (STs) were identified and eBURST analysis demonstrated that the majority of isolates grouped into clonal complexes CC97, CC151 or sequence type (ST) 136. Analysis of the role of recombination events in determining S. aureus population structure determined that ST diversification through nucleotide substitutions were more likely to be due to recombination compared to point mutation, with regions of the genome possibly acting as recombination hotspots. DNA microarray analysis revealed a large number of differences amongst S. aureus STs in their variable genome content, including genes associated with capsule and biofilm formation and adhesion factors. Finally, evidence for a genomic arrangement was observed within isolates from CC97 with the ST71-like subgroup showing evidence of an IS431 insertion element having replaced approximately 30 kb of DNA including the ica operon and histidine biosynthesis genes, resulting in histidine auxotrophy. This genomic rearrangement may be responsible for the diversification of ST71 into an emerging bovine adapted subgroup. PMID:26317849

  5. Screening a repurposing library for potentiators of antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, Freija; Brackman, Gilles; Swimberghe, Rosalie; Rigole, Petra; Coenye, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms are involved in a wide range of infections that are extremely difficult to treat with conventional antibiotic therapy. We aimed to identify potentiators of antibiotics against mature biofilms of S. aureus Mu50, a methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-intermediate-resistant strain. Over 700 off-patent drugs from a repurposing library were screened in combination with vancomycin in a microtitre plate (MTP)-based biofilm model system. This led to the identification of 25 hit compounds, including four phenothiazines among which thioridazine was the most potent. Their activity was evaluated in combination with other antibiotics both against planktonic and biofilm-grown S. aureus cells. The most promising combinations were subsequently tested in an in vitro chronic wound biofilm infection model. Although no synergistic activity was observed against planktonic cells, thioridazine potentiated the activity of tobramycin, linezolid and flucloxacillin against S. aureus biofilm cells. However, this effect was only observed in a general biofilm model and not in a chronic wound model of biofilm infection. Several drug compounds were identified that potentiated the activity of vancomycin against biofilms formed in a MTP-based biofilm model. A selected hit compound lost its potentiating activity in a model that mimics specific aspects of wound biofilms. This study provides a platform for discovering and evaluating potentiators against bacterial biofilms and highlights the necessity of using relevant in vitro biofilm model systems.

  6. Global analysis of the impact of linezolid onto virulence factor production in S. aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Florian; Pané-Farré, Jan; Schlüter, Rabea; Schaffer, Marc; Fuchs, Stephan; Bernhardt, Jörg; Riedel, Katharina; Otto, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Becher, Dörte

    2016-05-01

    The translation inhibitor linezolid is an antibiotic of last resort against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin resistant strains of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Linezolid is reported to inhibit production of extracellular virulence factors, but the molecular cause is unknown. To elucidate the physiological response of S. aureus to linezolid in general and the inhibition of virulence factor synthesis in particular a holistic study was performed. Linezolid was added to exponentially growing S. aureus cells and the linezolid stress response was analyzed with transcriptomics and quantitative proteomics methods. In addition, scanning and transmission electron microscopy experiments as well as fluorescence microscopy analyses of the cellular DNA and membrane were performed. As previously observed in studies on other translation inhibitors, S. aureus adapts its protein biosynthesis machinery to the reduced translation efficiency. For example the synthesis of ribosomal proteins was induced. Also unexpected results like a decline in the amount of extracellular and membrane proteins were obtained. In addition, cell shape and size changed after linezolid stress and cell division was diminished. Finally, the chromosome was condensed after linezolid stress and lost contact to the membrane. These morphological changes cannot be explained by established theories. A new hypothesis is discussed, which suggests that the reduced amount of membrane and extracellular proteins and observed defects in cell division are due to the disintegration of transertion complexes by linezolid.

  7. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Chi Hai; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Steil, Leif; Pané‐Farré, Jan; Rühmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Götz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life‐threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in colonization, immune evasion, and immunomodulation. These proteins are potent activators of innate immune receptors termed Toll‐like receptors 2 and 6. This study addressed the specific B‐cell and T‐cell responses directed to lipoproteins in human S. aureus carriers and non‐carriers. 2D immune proteomics and ELISA approaches revealed that titers of antibodies (IgG) binding to S. aureus lipoproteins were very low. Proliferation assays and cytokine profiling data showed only subtle responses of T cells; some lipoproteins did not elicit proliferation. Hence, the robust activation of the innate immune system by S. aureus lipoproteins does not translate into a strong adaptive immune response. Reasons for this may include inaccessibility of lipoproteins for B cells as well as ineffective processing and presentation of the antigens to T cells. PMID:27324828

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Gierok, Philipp; Harms, Manuela; Methling, Karen; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lalk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS) and (HPLC-MS). To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model. PMID:27834866

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis on Staphylococcus aureus carriage in psoriasis, acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Totté, J E E; van der Feltz, W T; Bode, L G M; van Belkum, A; van Zuuren, E J; Pasmans, S G M A

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus might amplify symptoms in chronic inflammatory skin diseases. This study evaluates skin and mucosal colonization with S. aureus in patients with psoriasis, acne and rosacea. A systematic literature search was conducted. Both odds ratios (OR) for colonization in patients versus controls and the prevalence of colonization in patients are reported. Fifteen articles about psoriasis and 13 about acne (12 having a control group) were included. No study in rosacea met our inclusion criteria. For psoriasis, one study out of three controlled studies showed increased skin colonization (OR 18.86; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 2.20-161.99). Three out of the five studies that reported on nasal colonization showed significant ORs varying from 1.73 (95 % CI 1.16-2.58) to 14.64 (95 % CI 2.82-75.95). For acne one of the three studies that evaluated skin colonization reported a significant OR of 4.16 (95 % CI 1.74-9.94). A relation between nasal colonization and acne was not found. Limitations in study design and low sample sizes should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results. Colonisation with S. aureus seems to be increased in patients with psoriasis. This bacterial species, known for its potential to induce long-lasting inflammation, might be involved in psoriasis pathogenesis. Information on acne is limited. Prospective controlled studies should further investigate the role of S. aureus in chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  10. Functional Selection of Vaccine Candidate Peptides from Staphylococcus aureus Whole-Genome Expression Libraries In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Weichhart, Thomas; Horky, Markus; Söllner, Johannes; Gangl, Susanne; Henics, Tamàs; Nagy, Eszter; Meinke, Andreas; von Gabain, Alexander; Fraser, Claire M.; Gill, Steve R.; Hafner, Martin; von Ahsen, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    An in vitro protein selection method, ribosome display, has been applied to comprehensively identify and map the immunologically relevant proteins of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. A library built up from genomic fragments of the virulent S. aureus COL strain (methicillin-resistant S. aureus) allowed us to screen all possible encoded peptides for immunoreactivity. As selective agents, human sera exhibiting a high antibody titer and opsonic activity against S. aureus were used, since these antibodies indicate the in vivo expression and immunoreactivity of the corresponding proteins. Identified clones cluster in distinct regions of 75 genes, most of them classifiable as secreted or surface-localized proteins, including previously identified virulence factors. In addition, 14 putative novel short open reading frames were identified and their immunoreactivity and in vivo mRNA expression were confirmed, underscoring the annotation-independent, true genomic nature of our approach. Evidence is provided that a large fraction of the identified peptides cannot be expressed in an in vivo-based surface display system. Thus, in vitro protein selection, not biased by the context of living entities, allows screening of genomic expression libraries with a large number of different ligands simultaneously. It is a powerful approach for fingerprinting the repertoire of immune reactive proteins serving as target candidates for active and passive vaccination against pathogens. PMID:12874343

  11. Development and evaluation of a rapid strategy to determine enterotoxin gene content in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Adrien; Francois, Patrice; Holtfreter, Silva; Broeker, Barbara; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2009-05-01

    Enterotoxins of S. aureus are important molecules displaying superantigenic properties. To date no less than 18 enterotoxins have been identified in S. aureus and their role has been documented in very diverse diseases. Using available nucleotide sequence information, we developed a rapid and automated PCR-based approach to evaluate enterotoxin content in S aureus. We studied a collection of S. aureus strains previously analyzed for enterotoxins gene content and report a perfect correlation between simplex and multiplex PCR assays for the presence of all enterotoxin genes described so far. The determination of enterotoxin content relies on 4 multiplex PCR tubes whose amplification products are resolved by a rapid microcapillary electrophoresis. Automated analysis of the PCR profiles evaluates for the presence of the 18 enterotoxin genes in less than 3 h and at moderate cost. Finally, the use of enterotoxin gene content for genotyping purpose was compared to multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat assay and spa genotyping. Analysis revealed an important homogeneity of the genetic backgrounds for strains harboring the egc cluster as well as a large diversity for strains harboring other enterotoxins but lacking the egc cluster. A combined genotyping method that includes rapid enterotoxin content determination appears informative for various epidemiological survey purposes.

  12. Evaluation of short synthetic antimicrobial peptides for treatment of drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed F.; Abdelkhalek, Ahmed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections present a serious challenge because of the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, antimicrobial peptides are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics for tackling the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. Herein, we investigated the antibacterial activity of two short novel peptides (WR12, a 12 residue peptide composed exclusively of arginine and tryptophan, and D-IK8, an eight residue β-sheet peptide) against multidrug resistant staphylococci. In vitro, both peptides exhibited good antibacterial activity against MRSA, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis. WR12 and D-IK8 were able to eradicate persisters, MRSA in stationary growth phase, and showed significant clearance of intracellular MRSA in comparison to both vancomycin and linezolid. In vivo, topical WR12 and D-IK8 significantly reduced both the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in MRSA-infected skin lesions. Moreover, both peptides disrupted established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis significantly more so than traditional antimicrobials tested. Taken together, these results support the potential of WR12 and D-IK8 to be used as a topical antimicrobial agent for the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections. PMID:27405275

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Dong, Danfeng; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLS(B) and iMLS(B) phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLS(B) phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLS(B) CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains.

  14. Clonality and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Isolates from Food Animals and Other Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kin-Hung; Lai, Eileen L.; Law, Pierra Y. T.; Chan, Pui-Ying; Ho, Alex Y. M.; Ng, Tak-Keung; Yam, Wing-Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Out of 3,081 animals studied, 24.9% of pigs, 4.7% of chickens, 6.3% of dogs, 10.5% of cats, and 7.1% of rodents were Staphylococcus aureus positive. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was high in pigs (animals, 21.3%; batches, 46.5%), with all MRSA isolates and most methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates belonging to clonal complex 9 (CC9) and being multidrug resistant. The predominant S. aureus CCs among dog and cat isolates were similar. Among rodent isolates, CC398 predominated, with spa t034 the most frequent spa type detected. PMID:22895044

  15. Clonality and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates from food animals and other animals.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Chow, Kin-Hung; Lai, Eileen L; Law, Pierra Y T; Chan, Pui-Ying; Ho, Alex Y M; Ng, Tak-Keung; Yam, Wing-Cheong

    2012-11-01

    Out of 3,081 animals studied, 24.9% of pigs, 4.7% of chickens, 6.3% of dogs, 10.5% of cats, and 7.1% of rodents were Staphylococcus aureus positive. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was high in pigs (animals, 21.3%; batches, 46.5%), with all MRSA isolates and most methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates belonging to clonal complex 9 (CC9) and being multidrug resistant. The predominant S. aureus CCs among dog and cat isolates were similar. Among rodent isolates, CC398 predominated, with spa t034 the most frequent spa type detected.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alginate Overproduction Promotes Coexistence with Staphylococcus aureus in a Model of Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Limoli, Dominique H; Whitfield, Gregory B; Kitao, Tomoe; Ivey, Melissa L; Davis, Michael R; Grahl, Nora; Hogan, Deborah A; Rahme, Laurence G; Howell, P Lynne; O'Toole, George A; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2017-03-21

    While complex intra- and interspecies microbial community dynamics are apparent during chronic infections and likely alter patient health outcomes, our understanding of these interactions is currently limited. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are often found to coinfect the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet these organisms compete under laboratory conditions. Recent observations that coinfection correlates with decreased health outcomes necessitate we develop a greater understanding of these interbacterial interactions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P. aeruginosa and/or S. aureus adopts phenotypes that allow coexistence during infection. We compared competitive interactions of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates from mono- or coinfected CF patients employing in vitro coculture models. P. aeruginosa isolates from monoinfected patients were more competitive toward S. aureus than P. aeruginosa isolates from coinfected patients. We also observed that the least competitive P. aeruginosa isolates possessed a mucoid phenotype. Mucoidy occurs upon constitutive activation of the sigma factor AlgT/U, which regulates synthesis of the polysaccharide alginate and dozens of other secreted factors, including some previously described to kill S. aureus Here, we show that production of alginate in mucoid strains is sufficient to inhibit anti-S. aureus activity independent of activation of the AlgT regulon. Alginate reduces production of siderophores, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinolone-N-oxide (HQNO), and rhamnolipids-each required for efficient killing of S. aureus These studies demonstrate alginate overproduction may be an important factor driving P. aeruginosa coinfection with S. aureusIMPORTANCE Numerous deep-sequencing studies have revealed the microbial communities present during respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are diverse, complex, and dynamic. We now face the challenge of determining

  17. Transcriptomic and metabolic responses of Staphylococcus aureus in mixed culture with Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus durans in milk.

    PubMed

    Zdenkova, Kamila; Alibayov, Babek; Karamonova, Ludmila; Purkrtova, Sabina; Karpiskova, Renata; Demnerova, Katerina

    2016-09-01

    interaction between S. aureus and LAB (L. plantarum, S. thermophilus, E. durans) on the level of the expression and/or production of S. aureus enterotoxins, regulatory and virulence genes in different media, including milk. This study provides data which may improve the quality of food production.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of gallium maltolate against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Carolyn E; Bordin, Angela; Lawhon, Sara D; Libal, Melissa C; Bernstein, Lawrence R; Cohen, Noah D

    2012-03-23

    Gallium is a trivalent semi-metallic element that has shown antimicrobial activity against several important human pathogens. This antimicrobial activity is likely related to its substitution in important iron-dependent pathways of bacteria. The genus Staphylococcus, which includes human and animal pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality, requires iron for growth and colonization. In this study, gallium maltolate, at various concentrations between 50 and 200μM, inhibited the in vitro growth of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at time-points between 8 and 36h after inoculation. The inhibitory activity of gallium maltolate against clinical isolates of MRSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) from a veterinary teaching hospital was determined.

  19. SpA, ClfA, and FnbA Genetic Variations Lead to Staphaurex Test-Negative Phenotypes in Bovine Mastitis Staphylococcus aureus Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Stutz, Katrin; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus encodes many proteins that act as virulence factors, leading to a variety of diseases, including mastitis in cows. Among these virulence factors, SpA, ClfA, ClfB, FnbA, and FnbB are important for the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and invade host cells as well as to evade host immune responses. The interaction between these S. aureus surface proteins and human immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen that are coupled to latex particles is utilized to induce latex agglutination reactions, which are used widely in diagnostic kits for confirmation of presumptive S. aureus isolates. In this study, the Staphaurex latex agglutination test was performed on a collection of confirmed bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates. Notably, 54% (43/79 isolates) of these isolates exhibited latex agglutination-negative phenotypes (Staphaurex-negative result). To gain insights into the reasons for the high frequency of Staphaurex-negative bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates, the spa, clfA, clfB, fnbA, and fnbB genes were examined. Specific genetic changes in spa, clfA, and fnbA, as well as a loss of fnbB, which may impair SpA, ClfA, FnbA, and FnbB functions in latex agglutination reactions, were detected in Staphaurex-negative S. aureus isolates. The genetic changes included a premature stop codon in the spa gene, leading to a truncated SpA protein that is unable to participate in S. aureus cell-mediated agglutination of latex particles. In addition, clfA and fnbA genetic polymorphisms were detected that were linked to ClfA and FnbA amino acid changes that may significantly reduce fibrinogen-binding activity. The genetic variations in these S. aureus isolates might also have implications for their bovine mastitis virulence capacity. PMID:21147952

  20. Assessment of methicillin and clindamycin resistance patterns in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a tertiary hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Alicem; Dal, Tuba; Deveci, Ozcan; Tekin, Recep; Atmaca, Selahattin; Dayan, Saim

    2013-06-01

    In order to detect the methicillin susceptibility and determine the prevalence of constitutive and inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains, a total of 254 S. aureus isolates, including 139 (54.7%) methicillin-sensitive and 115 (45.3%) methicillin-resistant, were tested for clindamycin and erythromycin by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The disk diffusion induction test or D-test was performed on erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-sensitive strains using the disk diffusion method. The erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-sensitive strains with a D-shaped zone around the clindamycin disk were considered positive for inducible clindamycin resistance. If a strain was found to be both erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-resistant, it was considered to have constitutive clindamycin resistance. Overall, ten (3.9%) strains, including two methicillin-resistant S. aureus and eight methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, were found to be erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-sensitive according to the disk diffusion method and all of these strains showed inducible clindamycin resistance by the D-test method. Constitutive clindamycin resistance was detected in 100 of all MRSA strains. In conclusion, the presence of inducible clindamycin-resistant strains may lead to clindamycin treatment failure in patients with S. aureus infection. The D-test method should be used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clindamycin.

  1. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  2. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  3. Clinical and epidemiological factors associated with methicillin resistance in community-onset invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections: prospective multicenter cross-sectional study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Gayeon; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Shinwon; Choi, Young Hwa; Yi, Jongyoun; Kim, Chung Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Kim, Nam-Joong; Lee, Yeong-Seon; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2014-01-01

    Successful empirical therapy of Staphylococcus aureus infections requires the ability to predict methicillin resistance. Our aim was to identify predictors of methicillin resistance in community-onset (CO) invasive S. aureus infections. Sixteen hospitals across Korea participated in this study from May to December 2012. We prospectively included cases of S. aureus infection in which S. aureus was isolated from sterile clinical specimens ≤ 72 hours after hospitalization. Clinical and epidemiological data were gathered and compared in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cases. Community-associated (CA) infections were defined as in previous studies. In total, there were 786 cases of community-onset S. aureus infection, 102 (13.0%) of which were CA-MRSA. In addition to known risk factors, exposure to 3rd generation cephalosporins in the past 6 months [odds ratio (OR), 1.922; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.176-3.142] and close contact with chronically ill patients in the past month (OR, 2.647; 95% CI, 1.189-5.891) were independent risk factors for MRSA infection. However, no clinical predictors of CA-MRSA were identified. Methicillin resistance, CO infection, and appropriateness of empirical antibiotics were not significantly related to 30-day mortality. MRSA infection should be suspected in patients recently exposed to 3rd generation cephalosporins or chronically-ill patients. There were no reliable predictors of CA-MRSA infection, and mortality was not affected by methicillin resistance.

  4. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm. PMID:27625639

  5. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp Degrades Specific Proteins Associated with Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Host-Pathogen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Takeo; Takada, Koji; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Iwase, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits a strong capacity to attach to abiotic or biotic surfaces and form biofilms, which lead to chronic infections. We have recently shown that Esp, a serine protease secreted by commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis, disassembles preformed biofilms of S. aureus and inhibits its colonization. Esp was expected to degrade protein determinants of the adhesive and cohesive strength of S. aureus biofilms. The aim of this study was to elucidate the substrate specificity and target proteins of Esp and thereby determine the mechanism by which Esp disassembles S. aureus biofilms. We used a mutant Esp protein (EspS235A) with defective proteolytic activity; this protein did not disassemble the biofilm formed by a clinically isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, thereby indicating that the proteolytic activity of Esp is essential for biofilm disassembly. Esp degraded specific proteins in the biofilm matrix and cell wall fractions, in contrast to proteinase K, which is frequently used for testing biofilm robustness and showed no preference for proteolysis. Proteomic and immunological analyses showed that Esp degrades at least 75 proteins, including 11 biofilm formation- and colonization-associated proteins, such as the extracellular adherence protein, the extracellular matrix protein-binding protein, fibronectin-binding protein A, and protein A. In addition, Esp selectively degraded several human receptor proteins of S. aureus (e.g., fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin) that are involved in its colonization or infection. These results suggest that Esp inhibits S. aureus colonization and biofilm formation by degrading specific proteins that are crucial for biofilm construction and host-pathogen interaction. PMID:23316041

  6. Evaluation of a nisin-eluting nanofiber scaffold to treat Staphylococcus aureus-induced skin infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Heunis, Tiaan D J; Smith, Carine; Dicks, Leon M T

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen and a major causative agent of superficial and invasive skin and soft tissue infections (SSSTIs). Antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, among other bacterial pathogens, has rapidly increased, and this is placing an enormous burden on the health care sector and has serious implications for infected individuals, especially immunocompromised patients. Alternative treatments thus need to be explored to continue to successfully treat infections caused by S. aureus, including antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus. In this study, an antimicrobial nanofiber wound dressing was generated by electrospinning nisin (Nisaplin) into poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(d,l-lactide) (50:50) blend nanofibers. Active nisin diffused from the nanofiber wound dressings for at least 4 days in vitro, as shown by consecutive transfers onto plates seeded with strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings significantly reduced S. aureus Xen 36 bioluminescence in vivo and viable cell numbers in a murine excisional skin infection model. The bacterial burden of wounds treated with nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings was 4.3 × 10(2) CFU/wound, whereas wounds treated with control nanofiber wound dressings had 2.2 × 10(7) CFU/wound on the last day of the trial (day 7). Furthermore, the wound dressings stimulated wound closure of excisional wounds, and no adverse effects were observed by histological analysis. Nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings have the potential to treat S. aureus skin infections and to potentially accelerate wound healing of excisional wounds.

  7. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects. PMID:26033734

  8. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in health care workers: First report from a major public hospital in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Boncompain, Carina Andrea; Suárez, Cristian Alejandro; Morbidoni, Héctor Ricardo

    2017-03-24

    Staphylococcus aureus causes numerous mild to severe infections in humans, both in health facilities and in the community. Patients and health care workers (HCWs) may disseminate strains during regular medical examinations or hospitalization. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage rate of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus among health care workers at Hospital Provincial del Centenario, a public general hospital in Rosario, Argentina. A transversal study was conducted on 320 health care workers. Nasal swabs were taken and presumptive S. aureus colonies were isolated. Bacterial identity and methicillin resistance status were confirmed by amplification of the nuc and mec genes. Chi square test and Fisher exact test were used for statistical analysis. Of 320 HCWs, 96 (30%) were nasal carriers of S. aureus, 20 of whom (6.3%) carried methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 76 (23.7%) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Carriage was within thepublished values for physicians (30%) and higher for technicians (57%). Accompanying resistance (62/96, 64.6%) was detected, including resistance to fluoroquinolones (23/96, 24%), aminoglucosides (13/96, 13.5%) or to macrolides (33/96, 34.4%). All the strains were susceptible to vancomycin whereas only 3.1% (3/96), all of them on MSSA strains, were resistant to mupirocin. This study is the first one of its kind in Argentina and one of the few performed in South America, to highlight the relevance of nasal carriage of MRSA and MSSA in health care personnel and brings to light the need for consensus recommendations for regular S. aureus carriage screening as well as for decolonization strategies.

  9. A randomized Phase 2 trial of telavancin versus standard therapy in patients with uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: the ASSURE study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a common infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide active against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We conducted a randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 trial in patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia. Methods Patients were randomized to either telavancin or standard therapy (vancomycin or anti-staphylococcal penicillin) for 14 days. Continuation criteria were set to avoid complicated S. aureus bacteremia. The primary end point was clinical cure at 84 days. Results In total, 60 patients were randomized and 58 received ≥1 study medication dose (all-treated), 31 patients fulfilled inclusion/exclusion and continuation criteria (all-treated target [ATT]) (telavancin 15, standard therapy 16), and 17 patients were clinically evaluable (CE) (telavancin 8, standard therapy 9). Mean age (ATT) was 60 years. Intravenous catheters were the most common source of S. aureus bacteremia and ~50% of patients had MRSA. A similar proportion of CE patients were cured in the telavancin (88%) and standard therapy (89%) groups. All patients with MRSA bacteremia were cured and one patient with MSSA bacteremia failed study treatment in each group. Although adverse events (AEs) were more common in the telavancin ATT group (90% vs. 72%), AEs leading to drug discontinuation were similar (7%) in both treatment arms. Potentially clinically significant increases in serum creatinine (≥1.5 mg/dl and at least 50% greater than baseline) were more common in the telavancin group (20% vs. 7%). Conclusions This study suggests that telavancin may have utility for treatment of uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia; additional studies are warranted. (Telavancin for Treatment of Uncomplicated Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteremia (ASSURE); NCT00062647). PMID:24884578

  10. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp degrades specific proteins associated with Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwamoto, Takeo; Takada, Koji; Okuda, Ken-Ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Iwase, Tadayuki; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits a strong capacity to attach to abiotic or biotic surfaces and form biofilms, which lead to chronic infections. We have recently shown that Esp, a serine protease secreted by commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis, disassembles preformed biofilms of S. aureus and inhibits its colonization. Esp was expected to degrade protein determinants of the adhesive and cohesive strength of S. aureus biofilms. The aim of this study was to elucidate the substrate specificity and target proteins of Esp and thereby determine the mechanism by which Esp disassembles S. aureus biofilms. We used a mutant Esp protein (Esp(S235A)) with defective proteolytic activity; this protein did not disassemble the biofilm formed by a clinically isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, thereby indicating that the proteolytic activity of Esp is essential for biofilm disassembly. Esp degraded specific proteins in the biofilm matrix and cell wall fractions, in contrast to proteinase K, which is frequently used for testing biofilm robustness and showed no preference for proteolysis. Proteomic and immunological analyses showed that Esp degrades at least 75 proteins, including 11 biofilm formation- and colonization-associated proteins, such as the extracellular adherence protein, the extracellular matrix protein-binding protein, fibronectin-binding protein A, and protein A. In addition, Esp selectively degraded several human receptor proteins of S. aureus (e.g., fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin) that are involved in its colonization or infection. These results suggest that Esp inhibits S. aureus colonization and biofilm formation by degrading specific proteins that are crucial for biofilm construction and host-pathogen interaction.

  11. Evaluation of a Nisin-Eluting Nanofiber Scaffold To Treat Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heunis, Tiaan D. J.; Smith, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen and a major causative agent of superficial and invasive skin and soft tissue infections (SSSTIs). Antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, among other bacterial pathogens, has rapidly increased, and this is placing an enormous burden on the health care sector and has serious implications for infected individuals, especially immunocompromised patients. Alternative treatments thus need to be explored to continue to successfully treat infections caused by S. aureus, including antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus. In this study, an antimicrobial nanofiber wound dressing was generated by electrospinning nisin (Nisaplin) into poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(d,l-lactide) (50:50) blend nanofibers. Active nisin diffused from the nanofiber wound dressings for at least 4 days in vitro, as shown by consecutive transfers onto plates seeded with strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings significantly reduced S. aureus Xen 36 bioluminescence in vivo and viable cell numbers in a murine excisional skin infection model. The bacterial burden of wounds treated with nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings was 4.3 × 102 CFU/wound, whereas wounds treated with control nanofiber wound dressings had 2.2 × 107 CFU/wound on the last day of the trial (day 7). Furthermore, the wound dressings stimulated wound closure of excisional wounds, and no adverse effects were observed by histological analysis. Nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings have the potential to treat S. aureus skin infections and to potentially accelerate wound healing of excisional wounds. PMID:23733456

  12. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects.

  13. Activity of novel inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seung-Gyun; Lee, So-Yeon; Lee, So-Min; Lim, Kyoung-Hee; Ha, Eun-Ju; Eom, Yong-Bin

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens causing chronic biofilm infections. These are becoming more difficult to treat owing to drug resistance, particularly because S. aureus biofilms limit the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, leading to high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we screened for inhibitors of S. aureus biofilm formation using a natural product library from the Korea Chemical Bank (KCB). Screening by crystal violet-based biomass staining assay identified hit compounds. Further examination of antibiofilm properties of these compounds was conducted and led to the identification of celastrol and telithromycin. In vitro, both celastrol and telithromycin were toxic to planktonic S. aureus and also active against a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolate. The effect of the compounds on preformed biofilms of clinical MRSA isolates was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which revealed the absence of typical biofilm architecture. In addition, celastrol and telithromycin inhibited the production of extracellular protein at selected sub-MIC concentrations, which revealed the reduced extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) secretion. Celastrol exhibited greater cytotoxicity than telithromycin. These data suggest that the hit compounds, especially telithromycin, could be considered novel inhibitors of S. aureus biofilm. Although the mechanisms of the effects on S. aureus biofilms are not fully understood, our data suggest that telithromycin could be a useful adjuvant therapeutic agent for S. aureus biofilm-related infections.

  14. Haemin represses the haemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus in an Sae-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Julia; Joost, Insa; Skaar, Eric P; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause of nosocomial infections. This facultative pathogen produces a large arsenal of virulence factors, including the haemolysins, which allow the bacterium to lyse erythrocytes and thereby release large amounts of the haem-containing haemoglobin. The released haem is thought to be the main iron source of this organism during the course of infection, and is considered to be crucial for bacterial proliferation in vivo. High concentrations of haem and its degradation products, on the other hand, are known to be toxic for S. aureus, making it essential for the pathogen to tightly control haem release from red blood cells. Here we show that S. aureus responds to haemin by downregulating the expression of haemolysins. Subinhibitory concentrations of haemin were found to significantly reduce transcription of the haemolysin genes hlb (encoding β-haemolysin) and hlgA (encoding the S-class component of γ-haemolysin), while hla (encoding α-haemolysin) and RNAIII (encoding δ-haemolysin) transcription did not appear to be affected. The presence of haemin also reduced the haemolytic potential of the supernatants of S. aureus LS1 cultures. Inactivation of the sae locus in LS1 abolished the haemin effect on the transcription of haemolysin genes, indicating that the two-component regulatory system is required for this regulatory effect. Iron limitation, on the other hand, was found to induce the expression of haemolysins, and this effect was again abolished in the sae mutant, indicating that S. aureus modulates its haemolysin production in response to iron and haem availability in an Sae-dependent manner.

  15. Haemin represses the haemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus in an Sae-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Julia; Joost, Insa; Skaar, Eric P.; Herrmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause of nosocomial infections. This facultative pathogen produces a large arsenal of virulence factors, including the haemolysins, which allow the bacterium to lyse erythrocytes and thereby release large amounts of the haem-containing haemoglobin. The released haem is thought to be the main iron source of this organism during the course of infection, and is considered to be crucial for bacterial proliferation in vivo. High concentrations of haem and its degradation products, on the other hand, are known to be toxic for S. aureus, making it essential for the pathogen to tightly control haem release from red blood cells. Here we show that S. aureus responds to haemin by downregulating the expression of haemolysins. Subinhibitory concentrations of haemin were found to significantly reduce transcription of the haemolysin genes hlb (encoding β-haemolysin) and hlgA (encoding the S-class component of γ-haemolysin), while hla (encoding α-haemolysin) and RNAIII (encoding δ-haemolysin) transcription did not appear to be affected. The presence of haemin also reduced the haemolytic potential of the supernatants of S. aureus LS1 cultures. Inactivation of the sae locus in LS1 abolished the haemin effect on the transcription of haemolysin genes, indicating that the two-component regulatory system is required for this regulatory effect. Iron limitation, on the other hand, was found to induce the expression of haemolysins, and this effect was again abolished in the sae mutant, indicating that S. aureus modulates its haemolysin production in response to iron and haem availability in an Sae-dependent manner. PMID:22859613

  16. Efficacy of a biological response modifier in preventing Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections after calving.

    PubMed

    Zecconi, A; Bronzo, V; Casula, A; Luzzago, C; Moroni, P; Piccinini, R; Spreafico, G

    1999-10-01

    A change in the epidemiology of mastitis in recent years has emphasized the role of the udder immune system in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, if the bovine or udder immune capability could be enhanced, susceptibility to Staph. aureus could be reduced and antibiotic efficacy could be increased. Immune system defense mechanisms could be enhanced by vaccination and by biological response modifiers. Within this latter group, a biological response modifier obtained from Parapox ovis that was attenuated over 200 tissue culture passages was recently developed and commercialized in some European countries. This study reports the results of a field trial on the efficacy of this biological response modifier in reducing Staph. aureus intramammary infection (IMI) after calving in primiparous and pluriparous cows. The trial included 106 cows sampled six times (55 cows from herd A and 51 from herd B) for a total of 2544 quarter milk samples. The analysis of IMI prevalence showed that 25.09% of samples were bacteriologically positive in the placebo group, and 23.17% of the positive samples were observed in the biological response modifier group. Staphylococcus aureus IMI had a frequency of 11.44% in the placebo group and 6.00% in the biological response modifier group. The dynamic of the hazards showed significantly lower rates in the biological response modifier group than in the placebo group (risk ratio = 0.47). Treatment with the parapox-containing biological response modifier showed significant reduction of Staph. aureus IMI around calving, and this reduction was attributed to an increase in immune defenses.

  17. Evolutionary blueprint for host- and niche-adaptation in Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30

    PubMed Central

    McGavin, Martin J.; Arsic, Benjamin; Nickerson, Nicholas N.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30 has caused infectious epidemics for more than 60 years, and, therefore, provides a model system to evaluate how evolution has influenced the disease potential of closely related strains. In previous multiple genome comparisons, phylogenetic analyses established three major branches that evolved from a common ancestor. Clade 1, comprised of historic pandemic phage type 80/81 methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and Clade 2 comprised of contemporary community acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) were hyper-virulent in murine infection models. Conversely, Clade 3 strains comprised of contemporary hospital associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and clinical MSSA exhibited attenuated virulence, due to common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) that abrogate production of α-hemolysin Hla, and interfere with signaling of the accessory gene regulator agr. We have now completed additional in silico genome comparisons of 15 additional CC30 genomes in the public domain, to assess the hypothesis that Clade 3 has evolved to favor niche adaptation. In addition to SNP's that influence agr and hla, other common traits of Clade 3 include tryptophan auxotrophy due to a di-nucleotide deletion within trpD, a premature stop codon within isdH encoding an immunogenic cell surface protein involved in iron acquisition, loss of a genomic toxin–antitoxin (TA) addiction module, acquisition of S. aureus pathogenicity islands SaPI4, and SaPI2 encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin tst, and increased copy number of insertion sequence ISSau2, which appears to target transcription terminators. Compared to other Clade 3 MSSA, S. aureus MN8, which is associated with Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, exhibited a unique ISSau2 insertion, and enhanced production of toxic shock syndrome toxin encoded by SaPI2. Cumulatively, our data support the notion that Clade 3 strains are following an evolutionary blueprint toward niche-adaptation. PMID:22919639

  18. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Botucatu, Brazil: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Fabiana Venegas; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Abraão, Lígia Maria; Martins, Patrícia Y. F.; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2014-01-01

    Recent increases in the incidence and severity of staphylococcal infections renewed interest in studies that assess the burden of asymptomatic carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the community setting. We conducted a population-based survey in the city of Botucatu, Brazil (122,000 inhabitants), in order to identify the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains). Nasal swabs were obtained from 686 persons over one year of age. Resistance to methicillin was assessed through phenotypic methods, identification of the mecA gene and typing of the Staphylococcal Chromosome Cassette mec (SCCmec). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were characterized using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and spa typing. Polymerase chain reaction was applied to identify genes coding for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) in isolates. The prevalence of overall S. aureus carriage was 32.7% (95%CI, 29.2%–36.2%). Carriers were significantly younger (mean age, 28.1 versus 36.3 for non-carriers; OR for age, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.97–0.99) and likely to report recent skin infection (OR, 1.85; 95%CI, 1.03–3.34). Carriage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was found in 0.9% of study subjects (95%CI, 0.4%–1.8%). All MRSA isolates harbored SCCmec type IV, and belonged to spa types t002 or t021, but none among them harbored genes coding for PLV. In MLST, most isolates belonged to clones ST5 or ST1776. However, we found one subject who carried a novel clone, ST2594. Two out of six MRSA carriers had household contacts colonized with isolates similar to theirs. Our study pointed to dissemination of community-associated MRSA among the Brazilian population. PMID:24663818

  19. Identification of pathogenic factors potentially involved in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis using proteomics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shamila; Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Garthwaite, Linda L; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Walsh, Bradley J; Willcox, Mark D P

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus is a leading cause of microbial keratitis, characterized by destruction of the cornea by bacterial exoproteins and host-associated factors. The aim of this study was to compare extracellular and cell-associated proteins produced by two different isolates of S. aureus, a virulent clinical isolate (Staph 38) and a laboratory strain (Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4) of weaker virulence in the mouse keratitis model. Proteins were analyzed using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent mass spectrometry. Activity of staphylococcal adhesins was assessed by allowing strains to bind to various proteins adsorbed onto polymethylmethacrylate squares. Thirteen proteins in the extracellular fraction and eight proteins in the cell-associated fractions after bacterial growth were produced in increased amounts in the clinical isolate Staph 38. Four of these proteins were S. aureus virulence factor adhesins, fibronectin binding protein A, staphopain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 and extracellular adherence protein. The clinical isolate Staph 38 adhered to a greater extent to all mammalian proteins tested, indicating the potential of the adhesins to be active on its surface. Other proteins with increased expression in Staph 38 included potential moonlighting proteins and proteins involved in transcription or translation. This is the first demonstration of the proteome of S. aureus isolates from keratitis. These results indicate that the virulent clinical isolate produces more potentially important virulence factors compared to the less virulent laboratory strain and these may be associated with the ability of a S. aureus strain to cause more severe keratitis.

  20. Where Does a Staphylococcus aureus Vaccine Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Vance G.; Proctor, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we examine the current status of Staphylococcus aureus vaccine development and the prospects for future vaccines. Examination of the clinical trials to date show that murine models have not predicted success in humans for active or passive immunization. A key factor in the failure to develop a vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections comes from our relatively limited knowledge of human protective immunity. More recent reports on the elements of the human immune response to staphylococci are analysed. In addition, there is some controversy concerning the role of antibodies for protecting humans, and these data are reviewed. From a review of the current state of understanding of staphylococcal immunity, a working model is proposed. Some new work has provided some initial candidate biomarker(s) to predict outcomes of invasive infections and to predict the efficacy of antibiotic therapy in humans. We conclude by looking to the future through the perspective of lessons gleaned from the clinical vaccine trials. PMID:24476315

  1. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, S; Prema, B; Yoga, Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in dairy products. Methods Isolation and identification of S. aureus were performed in 3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 5 different common antimicrobial drugs. Results Of 50 samples examined, 5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the 5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample 18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. Conclusions The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus. Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistant S. aureus. PMID:23569742

  2. Host-pathogen interactions between the skin and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sheila; Miller, Lloyd S

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for the vast majority of bacterial skin infections in humans. The propensity for S. aureus to infect skin involves a balance between cutaneous immune defense mechanisms and virulence factors of the pathogen. The tissue architecture of the skin is different from other epithelia especially since it possesses a corneal layer, which is an important barrier that protects against the pathogenic microorganisms in the environment. The skin surface, epidermis, and dermis all contribute to host defense against S. aureus. Conversely, S. aureus utilizes various mechanisms to evade these host defenses to promote colonization and infection of the skin. This review will focus on host-pathogen interactions at the skin interface during the pathogenesis of S. aureus colonization and infection.

  3. Impact of Staphylococcus aureus on Pathogenesis in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nisha; Biswas, Raja; Götz, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections involving Staphylococcus aureus exhibit enhanced disease severity and morbidity. We reviewed the nature of polymicrobial interactions between S. aureus and other bacterial, fungal, and viral cocolonizers. Microbes that were frequently recovered from the infection site with S. aureus are Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Corynebacterium sp., Lactobacillus sp., Candida albicans, and influenza virus. Detailed analyses of several in vitro and in vivo observations demonstrate that S. aureus exhibits cooperative relations with C. albicans, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, and influenza virus and competitive relations with P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lactobacillus sp., and Corynebacterium sp. Interactions of both types influence changes in S. aureus that alter its characteristics in terms of colony formation, protein expression, pathogenicity, and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:24643542

  4. Gastrointestinal Dissemination and Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus following Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Maurer, Katie; Torres, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations that alter virulence and antibiotic susceptibility arise and persist during Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. However, an experimental system demonstrating transmission following bacteremia has been lacking, and thus implications of within-host adaptation for between-host transmission are unknown. We report that S. aureus disseminates to the gastrointestinal tract of mice following intravenous injection and readily transmits to cohoused naive mice. Both intestinal dissemination and transmission were linked to the production of virulence factors based on gene deletion studies of the sae and agr two-component systems. Furthermore, antimicrobial selection for antibiotic-resistant S. aureus displaced susceptible S. aureus from the intestine of infected hosts, which led to the preferential transmission and dominance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among cohoused untreated mice. These findings establish an animal model to investigate gastrointestinal dissemination and transmission of S. aureus and suggest that adaptation during the course of systemic infection has implications beyond the level of a single host. PMID:25385792

  5. Quantitation of Staphylococcus aureus in seawater using CHROMagar SA.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan D; Pombo, David; Hui, Jennifer; Kurano, Michelle; Bankowski, Matthew J; Seifried, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    A microbiological algorithm has been developed to analyze beach water samples for the determination of viable colony forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Membrane filtration enumeration of S. aureus from recreational beach waters using the chromogenic media CHROMagar SA alone yields a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70%. Presumptive CHROMagar SA colonies were confirmed as S. aureus by 24-hour tube coagulase test. Combined, these two tests yield a PPV of 100%. This algorithm enables accurate quantitation of S. aureus in seawater in 72 hours and could support risk-prediction processes for recreational waters. A more rapid protocol, utilizing a 4-hour tube coagulase confirmatory test, enables a 48-hour turnaround time with a modest false negative rate of less than 10%.

  6. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SarA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Kristen M; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Blevins, Jon S; Hurlburt, Barry K; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-08-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator locus (sarA) encodes a DNA-binding protein (SarA) that modulates expression of over 100 genes. Whether this occurs via a direct interaction between SarA and cis elements associated with its target genes is unclear, partly because the definitive characteristics of a SarA binding site have not been identified. In this work, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to identify a SarA binding site(s) upstream of the SarA-regulated gene cna. The results suggest the existence of multiple high-affinity binding sites within the cna promoter region. Using a SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) procedure and purified, recombinant SarA, we also selected DNA targets that contain a high-affinity SarA binding site from a random pool of DNA fragments. These fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. Randomly chosen clones were also examined by EMSA. These DNA fragments bound SarA with affinities comparable to those of recognized SarA-regulated genes, including cna, fnbA, and sspA. The composition of SarA-selected DNAs was AT rich, which is consistent with the nucleotide composition of the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Alignment of selected DNAs revealed a 7-bp consensus (ATTTTAT) that was present with no more than one mismatch in 46 of 56 sequenced clones. By using the same criteria, consensus binding sites were also identified upstream of the S. aureus genes spa, fnbA, sspA, agr, hla, and cna. With the exception of cna, which has not been previously examined, this 7-bp motif was within the putative SarA binding site previously associated with each gene.

  7. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  8. Frequencies of resistance to Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and rifampicin in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Katherine A; Carson, Christine F; Riley, Thomas V

    2008-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the frequencies at which single-step mutants resistant to tea tree oil and rifampicin occurred amongst the Gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis. For tea tree oil, resistance frequencies were very low at <10(-9). Single-step mutants resistant to tea tree oil were undetectable at two times the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for S. aureus RN4220 and derivative mutator strains or at 3 x MIC for the remaining S. aureus strains, including a clinical meticillin-resistant S. aureus isolate. Similarly, no mutants were recovered at 2x MIC for S. epidermidis or at 1x MIC for E. faecalis. Resistance frequencies determined in vitro for rifampicin (8 x MIC) ranged from 10(-7) to 10(-8) for all isolates, with the exception of the S. aureus mutator strains, which had slightly higher frequencies. These data suggest that Gram-positive organisms such as Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. have very low frequencies of resistance to tea tree oil.

  9. A Staphylococcus aureus TIR domain protein virulence factor blocks TLR2-mediated NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Askarian, Fatemeh; van Sorge, Nina M; Sangvik, Maria; Beasley, Federico C; Henriksen, Jørn R; Sollid, Johanna U E; van Strijp, Jos A G; Nizet, Victor; Johannessen, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), crucial molecules in the induction of host defense responses, requires adaptor proteins that contain a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces several innate immune-evasion molecules that interfere with the host's innate immune response. A database search analysis suggested the presence of a gene encoding a homologue of the human TIR domain in S. aureus MSSA476 which was named staphylococcal TIR domain protein (TirS). Ectopic expression of TirS in human embryonic kidney, macrophage and keratinocyte cell lines interfered with signaling through TLR2, including MyD88 and TIRAP, NF-κB and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Moreover, the presence of TirS reduced the levels of cytokines MCP-1 and G-CSF secreted in response to S. aureus. The effects on NF-κB pathway were confirmed using S. aureus MSSA476 wild type, an isogenic mutant MSSA476ΔtirS, and complemented MSSA476ΔtirS +pTirS in a Transwell system where bacteria and host cells were physically separated. Finally, in a systematic mouse infection model, TirS promoted bacterial accumulation in several organs 4 days postinfection. The results of this study reveal a new S. aureus virulence factor that can interfere with PAMP-induced innate immune signaling in vitro and bacterial survival in vivo.

  10. Temperature-mediated variations in cellular membrane fatty acid composition of Staphylococcus aureus in resistance to pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Effects of growth temperature on cell membrane fatty acid composition, fluidity and lethal and sublethal injury by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 (S. aureus) in the stationary phase were investigated. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that branched chain fatty acids (iso C14:0, iso C15:0, anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0) and straight chain fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C17:0 and C18:0) were primary constituents in the membrane. The S. aureus changed its membrane fatty acid composition and its overall fluidity when exposed to different temperatures. The PEF lethal and sublethal effects were assessed, and results suggested that the degree of inactivation depended on the cell membrane structure, electric field strength and treatment time. The PEF inactivation kinetics including lethal and sublethal injury fractions were fitted with non-linear Weibull distribution, suggesting that inactivation of the first log cycle of S. aureus population was significantly affected by growth temperature, and the membrane of cells became more fluid, and easier to induce electroportion in low temperatures. Moreover, the morphology of S. aureus cells were investigated by electron microscopy, showing that various temperature-modified cells were distorted to differing extents and some even collapsed due to deep irreversible electroporation after PEF treatment.

  11. Beyond conventional antibiotics for the future treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: two novel alternatives.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc; Humphreys, Hilary

    2012-08-01

    The majority of antibiotics currently used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) infections target bacterial cell wall synthesis or protein synthesis. Only daptomycin has a novel mode of action. Reliance on limited targets for MRSA chemotherapy, has contributed to antimicrobial resistance. Two alternative approaches to the treatment of S. aureus infection, particularly those caused by MRSA, that have alternative mechanisms of action and that address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance are cationic host defence peptides and agents that target S. aureus virulence. Cationic host defence peptides have multiple mechanisms of action and are less likely than conventional agents to select resistant mutants. They are amenable to modifications that improve their stability, effectiveness and selectivity. Some cationic defence peptides such as bactenecin, mucroporin and imcroporin have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against MRSA. Antipathogenic agents also have potential to limit the pathogenesis of S aureus. These are generally small molecules that inhibit virulence targets in S. aureus without killing the bacterium and therefore have limited capacity to promote resistance development. Potential antipathogenic targets include the sortase enzyme system, the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitors of these targets have been identified and these may have potential for further development.

  12. The effect of antibacterial soap with 1.5% triclocarban on Staphylococcus aureus in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Breneman, D L; Hanifin, J M; Berge, C A; Keswick, B H; Neumann, P B

    2000-10-01

    This double-blind study determined whether daily bathing with an antibacterial soap would reduce the number of Staphylococcus aureus on the skin and result in clinical improvement of atopic dermatitis. For 9 weeks, 50 patients with moderately severe atopic dermatitis bathed daily with either an antimicrobial soap containing 1.5% triclocarban or the placebo soap. They also used a nonmedicated moisturizer and 0.025% triamcinolone acetonide cream as needed, but the availability of the corticosteroid cream was discontinued after 6 weeks. The antimicrobial soap regimen caused significantly greater improvement in the severity and extent of skin lesions than the placebo soap regimen, which correlated with reductions both in S aureus in patients with positive cultures at baseline and in total aerobic organisms. Outcome measures included reductions in S aureus, total aerobic organisms, and dermatologic assessments. Overall, daily bathing with an antibacterial soap was well tolerated, provided clinical improvement, and reduced levels of skin microorganisms.

  13. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcal Food-Borne Disease: An Ongoing Challenge in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal food-borne disease (SFD) is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the contamination of food by preformed S. aureus enterotoxins. It is one of the most common causes of reported food-borne diseases in the United States. Although several Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been identified, SEA, a highly heat-stable SE, is the most common cause of SFD worldwide. Outbreak investigations have found that improper food handling practices in the retail industry account for the majority of SFD outbreaks. However, several studies have documented prevalence of S. aureus in many food products including raw retail meat indicating that consumers are at potential risk of S. aureus colonization and subsequent infection. Presence of pathogens in food products imposes potential hazard for consumers and causes grave economic loss and loss in human productivity via food-borne disease. Symptoms of SFD include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea. Preventive measures include safe food handling and processing practice, maintaining cold chain, adequate cleaning and disinfection of equipment, prevention of cross-contamination in home and kitchen, and prevention of contamination from farm to fork. This paper provides a brief overview of SFD, contributing factors, risk that it imposes to the consumers, current research gaps, and preventive measures. PMID:24804250

  15. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-04-22

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration.

  16. Global antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus live-cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Martina; Hertlein, Tobias; Oesterreich, Babett; Klemm, Theresa; Kloppot, Peggy; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Stentzel, Sebastian; Bröker, Barbara M.; Engelmann, Susanne; Ohlsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a broad range of severe diseases and is feared for its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antibiotic substances. The increasing number of highly resistant S. aureus infections has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options to close the widening gap in anti-S. aureus therapy. This study analyses the humoral immune response to vaccination of Balb/c mice with sublethal doses of live S. aureus. The elicited antibody pattern in the sera of intravenously and intramuscularly vaccinated mice was determined using of a recently developed protein array. We observed a specific antibody response against a broad set of S. aureus antigens which was stronger following i.v. than i.m. vaccination. Intravenous but not intramuscular vaccination protected mice against an intramuscular challenge infection with a high bacterial dose. Vaccine protection was correlated with the strength of the anti-S. aureus antibody response. This study identified novel vaccine candidates by using protein microarrays as an effective tool and showed that successful vaccination against S. aureus relies on the optimal route of administration. PMID:27103319

  17. Salicylic acid enhances Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adhesin protein expression.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía P; Barbagelata, María S; Cheung, Ambrose L; Sordelli, Daniel O; Buzzola, Fernanda R

    2011-11-01

    One of the virulence factors required by Staphylococcus aureus at the early stages of infection is Eap, a secreted adhesin that binds many host proteins and is upregulated by the two-component regulatory system saeRS. The S. aureus Newman strain harbors a mutation in saeS that is thought to be responsible for the high level of Eap expression in this strain. This study was designed to ascertain whether salicylic acid (SAL) affects the expression of Eap and the internalization of S. aureus into epithelial cells. The strain Newman treated with SAL exhibited increased levels of eap transcription and protein expression. Furthermore, SAL treatment increased the eap promoter activity. SAL treatment enhanced Eap expression in the Newman and in other S. aureus strains that do not carry the mutation in saeS. Internalization of S. aureus eap and sae mutants into the MAC-T epithelial cells was significantly decreased compared with the wild-type counterparts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a low concentration of SAL increased S. aureus Eap expression possibly due to enhancement of sae. SAL may create the conditions for S. aureus persistence in the host, not only by decreasing the capsular polysaccharide expression as shown before, but also by enhancing Eap expression.

  18. Characterization of a Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, V. J.; Hinsdill, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    The bacteriocin produced by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus has been isolated and designated staphylococcin (414), and a study was made of its chemical, physical, and biological properties. The staphylococcin is released in appreciable quantities after breakage of the cells and can be purified through differential centrifugation and column chromatography. In the native state, it appears to be a lipoprotein-carbohydrate complex with a molecular weight in excess of 200,000. The complex can be dissociated by sodium dodecyl sulfate into smaller subunits which retain activity. The gross chemical and physical properties of the bacteriocin closely resemble those ascribed to certain preparations of cell membranes. Staphylococcin (414) is not a lytic enzyme like lysostaphin and does not have the same spectrum of activity. Like other bacteriocins from gram-positive microorganisms, it does not inhibit any gram-negative bacteria, but does inhibit several other genera. Images PMID:5473880

  19. Immunogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Kapral, F A

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of purified Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin. Rabbits and guinea pigs immunized with delta-toxin incorporated into a multiple antibody, whereas animals given toxin in saline or toxin in saline with Tween 80 did not produce antibody. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction isolated by chromatography on protein A-Sepharose was examined for the presence of anti-delta-toxin antibody by immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, quantitative precipitation tests, affinity chromatography, and toxin neutralization tests. Although delta-toxin-specific IgG precipitated the toxin in agar gels, the antibody did not neutralize the toxin's hemolytic activity. Delta-toxin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining of toxin-treated erythrocytes. Images PMID:7014461

  20. High-Level Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Associated with a Polymicrobial Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Linda M.; Donlan, Rodney M.; Shin, Dong Hyeon; Jensen, Bette; Clark, Nancye C.; McDougal, Linda K.; Zhu, Wenming; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Thompson, Jill; Kohlerschmidt, Donna; Dumas, Nellie; Limberger, Ronald J.; Patel, Jean B.

    2007-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin are the treatment of choice for infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study describes the identification of high-level vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) isolates in a polymicrobial biofilm within an indwelling nephrostomy tube in a patient in New York. S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Micrococcus species, Morganella morganii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the biofilm. For VRSA isolates, vancomycin MICs ranged from 32 to >128 μg/ml. VRSA isolates were also resistant to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillin, and tetracycline but remained susceptible to chloramphenicol, linezolid, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The vanA gene was localized to a plasmid of ∼100 kb in VRSA and E. faecium isolates from the biofilm. Plasmid analysis revealed that the VRSA isolate acquired the 100-kb E. faecium plasmid, which was then maintained without integration into the MRSA plasmid. The tetracycline resistance genes tet(U) and tet(S), not previously detected in S. aureus isolates, were identified in the VRSA isolates. Additional resistance elements in the VRSA isolate included a multiresistance gene cluster, ermB-aadE-sat4-aphA-3, msrA (macrolide efflux), and the bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance gene aac(6′)-aph(2")-Ia. Multiple combinations of resistance genes among the various isolates of staphylococci and enterococci, including vanA, tet(S), and tet(U), illustrate the dynamic nature of gene acquisition and loss within and between bacterial species throughout the course of infection. The potential for interspecies transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, including resistance to vancomycin, may be enhanced by the microenvironment of a biofilm. PMID:17074796

  1. PYRITHIAMINE ADAPTATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS I.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S. K.; Chatterjee, G. C.

    1962-01-01

    Das, S. K. (University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India) and G. C. Chatterjee. Pyrithiamine adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus. I. Adaptation and carbohydrate utilization. J. Bacteriol. 83:1251–1259. 1962.—Staphylococcus aureus has been adapted to pyrithiamine, a thiamine analogue; as a result of this adaptation, the color of the pigment of the organism changes from orange-yellow to lemon-yellow. The adaptation is reversible; the adapted strain will revert after repeated subculture in a medium containing thiamine and no pyrithiamine. Of the major biochemical alterations resulting from adaptation, severe depression in glucose utilization and simultaneous stimulation of acetate utilization have been noticed. The effect of metabolic inhibitors on the utilization of glucose and acetate has also been studied. By measuring the rate of formation of C14O2 from glucose-1-C14 and glucose-6-C14, it has been observed that the reduction in C14O2 formation from glucose-1-C14 by the adapted organism is much more than that obtained from glucose-6-C14, causing thereby a decreased metabolic ratio of these two substrates after such adaptation. Relative to the normal strain, the adapted strain utilizes acetate-C14 at a much faster rate, both in the formation of C14O2 and also in the incorporation of C14 into the protein and lipid fractions; the rate of formation of C14O2 from pyruvate-1-C14 is not greatly altered. It has been postulated that there is a partial blocking of the pentose phosphate cycle, because of the lowered glucose-1-C14 utilization, and simultaneous stimulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle; or perhaps the initiation of some other route after pyrithiamine adaptation would account for the great increase in acetate utilization. PMID:13883630

  2. Antimicrobial Activity against Intraosteoblastic Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Riffard, Natacha; Tasse, Jason; Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Chidiac, Christian; Vandenesch, François; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus persistence in osteoblasts, partly as small-colony variants (SCVs), can contribute to bone and joint infection (BJI) relapses, the intracellular activity of antimicrobials is not currently considered in the choice of treatment strategies for BJI. Here, antistaphylococcal antimicrobials were evaluated for their intraosteoblastic activity and their impact on the intracellular emergence of SCVs in an ex vivo osteoblast infection model. Osteoblastic MG63 cells were infected for 2 h with HG001 S. aureus. After killing the remaining extracellular bacteria with lysostaphin, infected cells were incubated for 24 h with antimicrobials at the intraosseous concentrations reached with standard therapeutic doses. Intracellular bacteria and SCVs were then quantified by plating cell lysates. A bactericidal effect was observed with fosfomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, oxacillin, rifampin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin, with reductions in the intracellular inocula of −2.5, −3.1, −3.9, −4.2, −4.9, −4.9, and −5.2 log10 CFU/100,000 cells, respectively (P < 10−4). Conversely, a bacteriostatic effect was observed with ceftaroline and teicoplanin, whereas vancomycin and daptomycin had no significant impact on intracellular bacterial growth. Ofloxacin, daptomycin, and vancomycin significantly limited intracellular SCV emergence. Overall, ofloxacin was the only molecule to combine an excellent intracellular activity while limiting the emergence of SCVs. These data provide a basis for refining the choice of antibiotics to prioritise in the management of BJI, justifying the combination of a fluoroquinolone for its intracellular activity with an anti-biofilm molecule, such as rifampin. PMID:25605365

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing of a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pseudo-Outbreak in a Professional Football Team

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Harris, Simon R.; Godofsky, Eliot; Toriscelli, Todd; Rude, Thomas H.; Elder, Kevin; Sexton, Daniel J.; Pellman, Elliot J.; Mayer, Thom; Fowler, Vance G.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    Two American football players on the same team were diagnosed with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections on the same day. Our investigation, including whole genome sequencing, confirmed that players did not transmit MRSA to one another nor did they acquire the MRSA from a single source within the training facility. PMID:25734164

  4. An emerging superbug. Staphylococcus aureus becomes less susceptible to vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Brown, J W; Grilli, A

    1998-01-01

    The name staphylococcus aureus comes from the Greek, staphyle (a bunch of grapes), kokkos (berry shaped), and aureus (golden). Morphologically, the pathogen resembles grapelike clusters of gram-positive cocci. The illustration here shows the bacteria infecting nasal epithelial tissue, and causing cell damage and inflammation. S. aureus has been knocking down our antibiotic defenses one by one, with some strains becoming dangerously less susceptible to vancomycin. Epidemiologists warn that these strains are coming soon to a hospital near you; be prepared by knowing how to identify the bug, notify infection control authorities, and use basic infection control procedures.

  5. Structural and functional characterization of Staphylococcus aureus dihydrodipicolinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Girish, Tavarekere S; Sharma, Eshita; Gopal, B

    2008-08-20

    Lysine biosynthesis is crucial for cell-wall formation in bacteria. Enzymes involved in lysine biosynthesis are thus potential targets for anti-microbial therapeutics. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first step of this pathway. Unlike its homologues, Staphylococcus aureus DHDPS is a dimer both in solution and in the crystal and is not feedback inhibited by lysine. The crystal structure of S. aureus DHDPS in the free and substrate bound forms provides a structural rationale for its catalytic mechanism. The structure also reveals unique conformational features of the S. aureus enzyme that could be crucial for the design of specific non-competitive inhibitors.

  6. Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration, host comorbidities and mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Holmes, N E; Turnidge, J D; Munckhof, W J; Robinson, J O; Korman, T M; O'Sullivan, M V N; Anderson, T L; Roberts, S A; Warren, S J C; Gao, W; Johnson, P D R; Howden, B P

    2013-12-01

    We reported an association between elevated vancomycin MIC and 30-day mortality in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), including patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) treated with flucloxacillin. A detailed analysis of comorbidities and disease severity scores in the same cohort of patients was performed to ascertain if unknown clinical parameters may have influenced these results. The association between elevated vancomycin MIC and 30-day mortality in SAB remained significant (p 0.001) on multivariable logistic regression analysis even when accounting for clinical factors. In addition, the association persisted when restricting analysis to patients with MSSA bacteraemia treated with flucloxacillin. This suggests that elevated vancomycin MIC is associated with but not causally linked to an organism factor that is responsible for increased mortality.

  7. A Review of the Methods for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Gu, Huajie; Hao, Liling; Ye, Hua; Gong, Wenhui; Wang, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Food safety has attracted extensive attention around the world, and food-borne diseases have become one of the major threats to health. Staphylococcus aureus is a major food-borne pathogen worldwide and a frequent contaminant of foodstuffs. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by some S. aureus strains will lead to staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) outbreaks. The most common symptoms caused by ingestion of SEs within food are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and cramps. Children will suffer SFP by ingesting as little as 100 ng of SEs, and only a few micrograms of SEs are enough to cause SPF in vulnerable populations. Therefore, it is a great challenge and of urgent need to detect and identify SEs rapidly and accurately for governmental and non-governmental agencies, including the military, public health departments, and health care facilities. Herein, an overview of SE detection has been provided through a comprehensive literature survey. PMID:27348003

  8. Structural Insights into the Anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Activity of Ceftobiprole*

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Andrew L.; Gretes, Michael C.; Safadi, Susan S.; Danel, Franck; de Castro, Liza; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an antibiotic-resistant strain of S. aureus afflicting hospitals and communities worldwide. Of greatest concern is its development of resistance to current last-line-of-defense antibiotics; new therapeutics are urgently needed to combat this pathogen. Ceftobiprole is a recently developed, latest generation cephalosporin and has been the first to show activity against MRSA by inhibiting essential peptidoglycan transpeptidases, including the β-lactam resistance determinant PBP2a, from MRSA. Here we present the structure of the complex of ceftobiprole bound to PBP2a. This structure provides the first look at the molecular details of an effective β-lactam-resistant PBP interaction, leading to new insights into the mechanism of ceftobiprole efficacy against MRSA. PMID:22815485

  9. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  10. Detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from recreational beach using the mecA gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Aisya; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Water samples were collected in triplicates from three different locations choosen from the recreational beach of Teluk Kemang, Port Dickson as sampling station including main area of recreation activity for the public. Bacteria were isolated from the water and cultured. Out of 286 presumptive Staphylococcus aureus enumerated by using culture method, only 4 (1.4 %) confirmed as Meticillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) based on PCR detection of mecA gene. Interestingly, all of MRSA detections were found at the main area of recreational activity. Our results suggested that public beaches may be reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors and PCR using the mecA gene is the fastest way to detect this pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins in microbial broth and milk by Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Justyna; Podkowik, Magdalena; Bystroń, Jarosław; Bania, Jacek

    2016-10-17

    Twenty Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene, including one carrying also sec gene and 11 sea gene, were grown in BHI+YE broth and milk and were tested for SEA, SEC and SEH production. All strains decreased pH of BHI+YE broth at 24h and increased them at 48h. Seventeen S. aureus strains grown in milk changed pH for no >0.3 unit until 48h. Three other S. aureus strains significantly decreased pH during growth in milk. All S. aureus produced SEH in BHI+YE broth in amounts ranging from 95 to 1292ng/ml, and from 170 to 4158ng/ml at 24 and 48h, respectively. SEH production in milk by 17 strains did not exceed 23ng/ml at 24h and 36ng/ml at 48h. Three S. aureus strains able to decrease milk pH produced 107-3029ng/ml and 320-4246ng/ml of SEH in milk at 24 and 48h, respectively. These strains were grown in milk and BHI+YE broth with pH stabilized at values near neutral leading to a significant decrease of SEH production. Representative weak SEH producers were grown in milk at reduced pH resulting in moderate increase in SEH production. SEA was produced in milk by 10S. aureus strains at 24-151ng/ml at 24h, and 31-303ng/ml at 48h. SEA production in milk was higher or comparable as in BHI+YE broth in 3 strains and lower for remaining strains. Production of SEC by sec-positive S. aureus strains was lower in milk than in BHI+YE broth, ranging from 131 to 2319ng/ml at 24 and 48h in milk and 296-30,087ng/ml in BHI+YE at 24 and 48h. Both lacE and lacG transcripts involved in lactose metabolism were significantly up-regulated in milk in strong SEH producers. In these strains hld, rot and sarA transcripts were up-regulated in milk as compared to weak SEH producers. Stabilization of milk pH at a value of raw milk significantly down-regulated hld, rot and sarA RNA in strong SEH producers. Milk was generally found unfavorable for enterotoxin production. However, certain S. aureus strains were not restricted in SEH and SEA expression in milk, unlike SEC which remained down

  12. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region.

  13. Comparative virulence studies and transcriptome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zahid; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Huang, Lingli; Hao, Haihong; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted to check the prevalence of methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animals and animal-derived food products but limited data are available regarding their virulence and associated gene expression profile. In the present study, antibiotic resistance and virulence of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus animal isolates were determined in vitro by agar dilution, biofilm formation, adhesion, invasion and intracellular survivability assays. In addition, the pathogenicity of these isolates was examined in a murine model of S. aureus sepsis. MRSA1679a, a strain isolated from chicken, was observed to be highly virulent, in cell culture and in mouse model, and exhibited extensive resistant profile. Comparative gene expression profile of MRSA1679a and the reference human MRSA strain (ATCC 29213) was performed using Illumina-based transcriptome and RT-qPCR analyses. Several virulence elements including 22 toxin genes were detected in MRSA animal-isolate. In addition, we observed enhanced expression of crucial virulence regulators, such as sarA and KdpDE in MRSA animal-isolate compared to the human isolate. Collectively, gene expression profile including several virulence and drug-resistance factors confirmed the unique and highly virulent determinants of the MRSA strain of poultry origin which warrants further attention due to significant threat to public health. PMID:27739497

  14. Preventing Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and sepsis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus colonization of intravascular catheters: a retrospective multicenter study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hetem, David J; de Ruiter, Susanne C; Buiting, Anton G M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Thijsen, Steven F; Vlaminckx, Bart J M; Wintermans, Robert G F; Bonten, Marc J M; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel B

    2011-07-01

    Two previous studies in tertiary care hospitals identified Staphylococcus aureus colonization of intravascular (IV) catheters as a strong predictor of subsequent S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), even in the absence of clinical signs of systemic infection. Bacteremia was effectively prevented by timely antibiotic therapy. We conducted this study to corroborate the validity of these findings in non-university hospitals.Using the laboratory information management systems of the clinical microbiology departments in 6 Dutch hospitals, we identified patients who had IV catheters from which S. aureus was cultured between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2008. Patients with demonstrated SAB between 7 days before catheter removal and 24 hours after catheter removal were excluded. We extracted clinical and demographic patient data from the patients' medical records. The primary risk factor was initiation of anti-staphylococcal antibiotic therapy within 24 hours, and the primary endpoint was SAB >24 hours after IV catheter removal. Subsequently, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all observational studies evaluating the effect of antibiotic therapy for S. aureus IV catheter tip colonization.In the current study, 18 of the 192 included patients developed subsequent SAB, which was associated with not receiving antibiotic therapy within 24 hours (odds ratio [OR], 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-15.6) and with documented exit-site infection (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.2-9.3). When we combined these results with results of a previous study in a university hospital, a third risk factor was also associated with subsequent SAB, namely corticosteroid therapy (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). We identified 3 other studies, in addition to the present study, in a systematic review. In the meta-analysis of these studies, antibiotic therapy yielded an absolute risk reduction of 13.6% for subsequent SAB. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 episode of SAB was 7.4.We conclude that

  15. Population structure analyses of Staphylococcus aureus at Tygerberg Hospital, South Africa, reveals a diverse population, a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes, and unique local methicillin-resistant S. aureus clones.

    PubMed

    Oosthuysen, W F; Orth, H; Lombard, C J; Sinha, B; Wasserman, E

    2014-07-01

    Studies reporting on the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in South Africa have focused only on methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This study describes the population structure of S. aureus, including methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolated from patients at Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Western Cape province. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), agr typing and SCCmec typing were used to characterize strains. Of 367 non-repetitive S. aureus isolates collected over a period of 1 year, 56 (15.3%) were MRSA. Skin and soft tissue infections were the most frequent source (54.8%), followed by bone and joint (15.3%) and respiratory tract infections (7.7%). For strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminative method, and resulted in 31 pulsotypes (n = 345, 94.0%), as compared with 16 spa clonal complexes (CCs) (n = 344, 93.4%). Four MLST CCs were identified after eBURST of sequence types (STs) of selected isolates. One hundred and sixty isolates (MSSA, n = 155, 42.2%) were PVL-positive, and agr types I-IV and SCCmec types I-V were identified. Our S. aureus population consisted of genotypically diverse strains, with PVL being a common characteristic of MSSA. MSSA and MRSA isolates clustered in different clones. However, the dominant MRSA clone (ST612) also contained an MSSA isolate, and had a unique genotype. Common global epidemic MRSA clones, such as ST239-MRSA-III and ST36-MRSA-II, were identified. A local clone, ST612-MRSA-IV, was found to be the dominant MRSA clone.

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus). Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB). Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis) were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4%) S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8%) that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6%) strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40%) to erythromycin, 18 (51.4%) to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8%) to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and CoNS species

  17. [Investigation of the efficacy of some disinfectants against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. isolates].

    PubMed

    Eryılmaz, Müjde; Akın, Ahmet; Arıkan Akan, Ozay

    2011-07-01

    Nosocomial infections which exhibit an increasing trend worldwide, are important contributors to morbidity and mortality. Most bacteria that cause nosocomial infections can retain their viability even after exposure to disinfectants in routine practice. This study was conducted to determine the susceptibilities of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. isolates to various disinfectants. A total of 30 S.aureus [16 were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), 14 were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA)] and 21 Enterococcus spp. (13 E.faecalis, 7 E.faecium, 1 non-typable Enterococcus spp.) strains isolated from clinical samples of hospitalized patients as nosocomial infection agents in the Central Microbiology Laboratory of Ibn-i Sina Hospital, Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, were included in the study. Glutaraldehyde (2% wt/vol), chlorhexidine gluconate (4% wt/vol), 2-propanol (70% vol/vol), povidone iodine (7.5% wt/vol), povidone iodine (10% wt/vol) and hydrogen peroxide (3% wt/vol) susceptibilities of the isolates were investigated by quantitative suspension test at contact times of 3, 5, and 10 minutes. All of the isolates were found susceptible to glutaraldehyde (2%), chlorhexidine gluconate (4%), povidone iodine (7.5%), povidone iodine (10%) and 2-propanol (70%) at all tested contact times. However, 12 S.aureus (5 MSSA, 7 MRSA) and 3 enterococci (2 E.faecium, 1 E.faecalis) isolates were found susceptible to hydrogen peroxide (3%) at 3 minutes contact time; 11 S.aureus (4 MSSA, 7 MRSA) and 7 E.faecalis isolates were found susceptible at 5 minutes contact time, and 6 S.aureus (4 MSSA, 2 MRSA) and 3 enterococci (1 E.faecium, 2 E.faecalis) isolates were found susceptible at 10 minutes contact time. One MSSA and 8 enterococci (4 E.faecium, 3 E.faecalis, 1 Enterococcus spp.) isolates were found resistant to hydrogen peroxide (3%) at 10 minutes contact time. In conclusion, glutaraldehyde (2%), chlorhexidine gluconate (4%), povidone iodine (7.5%), povidone

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus). Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB). Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis) were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4%) S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8%) that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6%) strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40%) to erythromycin, 18 (51.4%) to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8%) to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and CoNS species

  19. Endolysin LysSA97 is synergistic with carvacrol in controlling Staphylococcus aureus in foods.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoonjee; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-03-06

    LysSA97 is an endolysin encoded by the bacteriophage SA97, the genome sequence of which has been recently revealed. LysSA97 has lytic activity against a variety of Staphylococcus strains that cause foodborne illness. In order to improve its potential as a biocontrol agent against Staphylococcus, various types of essential oil-derived active compounds were tested in combination with LysSA97; carvacrol exhibited significant synergistic effects when combined with LysSA97. The synergistic antimicrobial activity between endolysin and carvacrol in food products, including milk and beef, were investigated. While LysSA97 (376nM) and carvacrol (3.33mM) showed 0.8±0.2 and 1.0±0.0logCFU/mL reduction in Staphylococcus aureus cells, respectively; when applied alone in bacterial culture, the cocktail containing both at the same concentrations exhibited a bacterial decrease of 4.5±0.2logCFU/mL. The synergistic activity of carvacrol was also reproduced in combination with other endolysins, and their cooperative bactericidal effects were validated in ten additional S. aureus strains, including two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), suggesting the wide application of carvacrol as a bactericidal agent coupled with endolysin. When LysSA97 and carvacrol were used in combination in foods, the synergistic activity appeared to be influenced by the total lipid content of foods, and bacteria in skim milk were more drastically inactivated than those in whole milk. Therefore, this is the first report demonstrating that endolysin and carvacrol act synergistically to inactivate S. aureus in food products.

  20. Fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in impetigo contagiosa and secondarily infected atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Alsterholm, Mikael; Flytström, Ingela; Bergbrant, Ing-Marie; Faergemann, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Fusidic acid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (FRSA) has been identified as a causative agent in outbreaks of impetigo and its emergence has been associated with increased use of topical fusidic acid. The frequency of FRSA in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been less extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial spectrum and frequency of FRSA in patients with impetigo or secondarily infected AD. A prospective study in our clinic in 2004 to 2008 included 38 patients with impetigo and 37 with secondarily infected AD. S. aureus was the predominant finding in all groups (bullous impetigo 92% (12/13), impetigo 76% (19/25) and secondarily infected AD 89% (33/37)). Seventy-five percent of S. aureus were fusidic acid resistant in bullous impetigo, 32% in impetigo and 6.1% in secondarily infected AD (bullous impetigo vs. AD p < 0.0001, impetigo vs. AD p < 0.05). We then performed a retrospective patient record review including all patients with impetigo or secondarily infected AD seen at the clinic during the first and last year of the prospective study. In the first year 33% (19/58) of the S. aureus isolates were fusidic acid-resistant in impetigo and 12% (5/43) in secondarily infected AD (p < 0.05). In the last year corresponding values were 24% (6/25) for impetigo and 2.2% (1/45) for AD (p < 0.01). In summary, the prospective study and the patient record review both showed higher FRSA levels in impetigo than in AD. FRSA levels were persistently low in AD. Continued restrictive use of topical fusidic acid is advised to limit an increase in FRSA levels in dermatology patients.

  1. Biofilm formation in invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates is associated with the clonal lineage.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Preneshni R; Karayem, Karayem; Hoek, Kim G P; Harvey, Justin; Wasserman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the genetic background of Staphylococcus aureus to biofilm formation is poorly understood. We investigated the association between the genetic background and the biofilm forming ability of clinical invasive S. aureus isolates. Secondary objectives included investigating any correlation with biofilm formation and methicillin resistance or the source of bacteraemia. The study was conducted at a 1300-bed tertiary hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. S. aureus isolates obtained from blood cultures between January 2010 and January 2012 were included. Genotypic characterization was performed by PFGE, spa typing, SCCmec typing and MLST. Thirty genotypically unique strains were assessed for phenotypic biofilm formation with the microtitre plate assay. All isolates were tested in triplicate and an average optical density, measured at a wavelength of 490 nm, was determined. The biofilm forming ability of isolates with A490 ≤ 0.17 were considered non-adherent, A490 > 0.17 'weak positive' and A490 > 0.34 'strong positive'. Fifty seven percent of isolates formed biofilms. Weak biofilm formation occurred in 40% (n = 12) and strong biofilm formation in 17% (n = 5) of isolates. All 5 isolates capable of strong biofilm formation belong to one spa clonal complex (spa-CC 064). Strains from spa-CC 064 were capable of higher biofilm formation than other spa clonal complexes (p = 0.00002). These 5 strains belonged to MLST CC5 and CC8. Biofilm formation correlates with the spa clonal lineage in our population of invasive S. aureus strains. Biofilm formation did not correlate with methicillin resistance and was not related to the source of bacteraemia.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence markers in methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abdullah; Raji, Adeola; Garaween, Ghada; Soge, Olusegun; Rey-Ladino, Jose; Al-Kattan, Wael; Shibl, Atef; Senok, Abiola

    2016-04-01

    Most Staphylococcus aureus infections occur in previously colonized persons who also act as reservoirs for continued dissemination. This study aimed to investigate the carriage of antimicrobial resistance and virulence markers in S. aureus isolates associated with nasal colonization. The study was conducted from December 2013-April 2014. Nasal swabs were collected and questionnaires administered to 97 medical students in Riyadh Saudi Arabia. Bacterial culture, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed by conventional methods and chromogenic agar was used for methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) screening. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray. Thirty two students (43%) had S. aureus nasal carriage (MSSA = 31; MRSA = 1). Seventeen clonal complexes (CC) were identified namely: CC15-MSSA (n = 5), CC1-MSSA-SCCfus (n = 4), CC8-MSSA (n = 3), CC22-MSSA (n = 3), CC25-MSSA (n = 3), CC101-MSSA (n = 2). Other CC found as single isolates were CC5-MSSA, CC6-MSSA, CC30-MSSA, CC45-MSSA, CC96-MSSA, CC188-MSSA, CC398-MSSA, CC942-MSSA/PVL+, CC1290-MSSA, ST2482-MSSA, CC80-MRSA-IV/PVL+. The CC1-SCCfus isolates harbored the Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) with ccrA-1; ccrB-1 and ccrB-3 genes plus the putative fusidic acid resistance marker Q6GD50. One MSSA isolate was genotyped as coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp with an irregular composite SCCmec element. Majority of the isolates harbored various virulence genes including the hemolysin, enterotoxin, and exfoliative genes as well as various adhesive protein producing genes. Although there was low carriage of MRSA, the MSSA isolates harbored various resistance and virulence genes including those usually seen in MRSA isolates. The presence of isolates with incomplete SCCmec elements plus putative resistance and virulence genes is of concern.

  3. In Vivo Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Cefquinome in an Experimental Mouse Model of Staphylococcus Aureus Mastitis following Intramammary Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Chen, Mei-Ren; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Gui-Lin; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains the major cause of morbidity of bovine mastitis worldwide leading to massive economic losses. Cefquinome is a fourth generation cephalosporin, which preserves susceptibility and antibacterial activity against S. aureus. This work aims to study the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling following intramammary administration of cefquinome against S. aureus mastitis. The mouse model of S. aureus mastitis was developed for the PK/PD experiments. The plasma PK characteristics after intramammary injection of cefquinome at various single doses of 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg per gland (both fourth pairs of glands: L4 and R4) were calculated using one-compartment and first-order absorption model. PD study was investigated based on twenty-one intermittent dosing regimens, of which total daily dose ranged from 25 to 4800 μg per mouse and dosage intervals included 8, 12 or 24 h. The sigmoid Emax model of inhibitory effect was employed for PK/PD modeling. The results of PK/PD integration of cefquinome against S. aureus suggested that the percentage of duration that drug concentration exceeded the minimal inhibitory concentration (%T>MIC) and the ratio of area under time-concentration curve over MIC (AUC/MIC) are important indexes to evaluate the antibacterial activity. The PK/PD parameters of %T>MIC and AUC0-24/MIC were 35.98% and 137.43 h to obtain a 1.8 logCFU/gland reduction of bacterial colony counts in vivo, against S. aureus strains with cefquinome MIC of 0.5μg/ml. PMID:27218674

  4. Performance of CHROMagar Selective Medium and Oxacillin Resistance Screening Agar Base for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Detecting Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kluytmans, Jan; Van Griethuysen, Arjanne; Willemse, Piet; Van Keulen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Two new selective media, oxacillin resistance screening agar base (ORSAB) and CHROMagar Staph aureus (CSA), were evaluated for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and for screening of methicillin resistance by addition of antimicrobial agents to these media. A well-defined collection consisting of 1,140 staphylococci was used. A total of 624 were S. aureus, of which 358 were methicillin susceptible and 266 were methicillin resistant, and 516 were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were selected based on the results of phage typing; 247 different types were included in the analysis. For identification of S. aureus, both media performed better after 24 h than after 48 h. The sensitivities at 24 h were comparable (CSA, 98.6%; ORSAB, 97.1%), but the specificity of CSA was significantly higher (CSA, 97.1%; ORSAB, 92.1%). For screening of methicillin resistance, antibiotic supplements were added to both media. The sensitivity was lower after 24 h (CSA, 58.6%; ORSAB, 84.2%) and increased significantly after 48 h (CSA, 77.5%; ORSAB, 91.4%). At both time intervals ORSAB was significantly more sensitive than CSA. However, the specificities of both media were high after 24 h (CSA, 99.1%; ORSAB, 98.3%) and decreased significantly after 48 h of incubation (CSA, 94.7%; ORSAB, 95.5%). In conclusion, for identification of S. aureus, CSA is more accurate than ORSAB because of a significantly higher specificity. For screening of MRSA, ORSAB performs better than CSA, but the usefulness in clinical practice is limited because a significant number of strains are not detected. PMID:12089266

  5. A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunguang; Schaack, Dominik; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K; Sarukhanyan, Edita; Giese, Anne; Pagels, Martin; Romanov, Natalie; Pané-Farré, Jan; Fuchs, Stephan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-02-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a refined strain comparison combining ribosomal RNA, MLST markers, and looking at highly-conserved regions shared between strains. This analysis shows three sub-clades (A-C) for S. aureus. As calculations are complex and strain annotation is quite time consuming we compare here key representatives of each clade with each other: model strains COL, USA300, Newman, and HG001 (clade A), model strain N315 and Mu50 (clade B) and ED133 and MRSA252 (clade C). We look at these individual proteomes and compare them to a background of 64 S. aureus strains. There are overall 13,284 S. aureus proteins not part of the core proteome which are involved in different strain-specific or more general complexes requiring detailed annotation and new experimental data to be accurately delineated. By comparison of the eight representative strains, we identify strain-specific proteins (e.g., 18 in COL, 105 in N315 and 44 in Newman) that characterize each strain and analyze pathogenicity islands if they contain such strain-specific proteins. We identify strain-specific protein repertoires involved in virulence, in cell wall metabolism, and phosphorylation. Finally we compare and analyze protein complexes conserved and well-characterized among S. aureus (a total of 103 complexes), as well as predict and analyze several individual protein complexes, including structure modeling in the three clades.

  6. A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chunguang; Schaack, Dominik; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K.; Sarukhanyan, Edita; Giese, Anne; Pagels, Martin; Romanov, Natalie; Pané-Farré, Jan; Fuchs, Stephan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a refined strain comparison combining ribosomal RNA, MLST markers, and looking at highly-conserved regions shared between strains. This analysis shows three sub-clades (A–C) for S. aureus. As calculations are complex and strain annotation is quite time consuming we compare here key representatives of each clade with each other: model strains COL, USA300, Newman, and HG001 (clade A), model strain N315 and Mu50 (clade B) and ED133 and MRSA252 (clade C). We look at these individual proteomes and compare them to a background of 64 S. aureus strains. There are overall 13,284 S. aureus proteins not part of the core proteome which are involved in different strain-specific or more general complexes requiring detailed annotation and new experimental data to be accurately delineated. By comparison of the eight representative strains, we identify strain-specific proteins (e.g., 18 in COL, 105 in N315 and 44 in Newman) that characterize each strain and analyze pathogenicity islands if they contain such strain-specific proteins. We identify strain-specific protein repertoires involved in virulence, in cell wall metabolism, and phosphorylation. Finally we compare and analyze protein complexes conserved and well-characterized among S. aureus (a total of 103 complexes), as well as predict and analyze several individual protein complexes, including structure modeling in the three clades. PMID:28248218

  7. Wall teichoic acids mediate increased virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Stefanie; Schade, Jessica; Keinhörster, Daniela; Weller, Nicola; George, Shilpa E; Kull, Larissa; Bauer, Jochen; Grau, Timo; Winstel, Volker; Stoy, Henriette; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Kolata, Julia; Wolz, Christiane; Bröker, Barbara M; Weidenmaier, Christopher

    2017-01-23

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are the cause of a severe pandemic consisting primarily of skin and soft tissue infections. The underlying pathomechanisms have not been fully understood and we report here a mechanism that plays an important role for the elevated virulence of CA-MRSA. Surprisingly, skin abscess induction in an animal model was correlated with the amount of a major cell wall component of S. aureus, termed wall teichoic acid (WTA). CA-MRSA exhibited increased cell-wall-associated WTA content (WTA(high)) and thus were more active in inducing abscess formation via a WTA-dependent and T-cell-mediated mechanism than S. aureus strains with a WTA(low) phenotype. We show here that WTA is directly involved in S. aureus strain-specific virulence and provide insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms that could guide the development of novel anti-infective strategies.

  8. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis.

  9. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, F; Alabi, A S; Peters, G; Becker, K

    2014-07-01

    Research on African Staphylococcus aureus has been largely neglected in the past, despite the cultural and geographical diversity in Africa, which has a significant impact on the epidemiology of this pathogen. The polarity between developed urban societies and remote rural populations (e.g. Pygmies), combined with close contact with animals (e.g. livestock and domestic animals, and wildlife), makes the epidemiology of S. aureus on the African continent unique and fascinating. Here, we try to draw an epidemiological picture of S. aureus colonization and infection in Africa, and focus on the wide spread of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive isolates, the emergence of the hypervirulent methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clone USA300, and the dissemination of the typical African clone MRSA sequence type 88.

  10. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization drives inflammation in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Kong, Heidi H.; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17fl/flSox9-Cre mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotic specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. PMID:25902485

  11. Environmental Staphylococcus aureus contamination in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Gharsa, Haythem; Dziri, Raoudha; Klibi, Naouel; Chairat, Sarra; Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen; Bellaaj, Ridha; Slama, Karim Ben

    2016-12-01

    One hundred hospital environment samples were obtained in 2012 in a Tunisian hospital and tested for Staphylococcus aureus recovery. Antimicrobial resistance profile and virulence gene content were determined. Multilocus-sequence-typing (MLST), spa-typing, agr-typing and SmaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates typed as: ST247-t052-SCCmecI-agrI were recovered from the intensive care unit (ICU). Ten samples contained methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and these samples were collected in different services, highlighting the presence of the tst gene encoding the toxic shock syndrome toxin as well as the lukED, hla, hlb, hld and hlgv virulence genes in some of the isolates. In conclusion, we have shown that the hospital environment could be a reservoir contributing to dissemination of virulent S. aureus and MRSA.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus in Antarctica: carriage and attempted eradication.

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The carriage of Staphylococcus aureus was studied in a group of 28 men living in a totally isolated environment for a year. Initially, nasal, axillary and perineal swabs were taken at weekly intervals, but from week 24 throat swabs were taken from known nasal carriers. Several attempts were made during the study to eradicate S. aureus. Eight subjects consistently carried their own phage type throughout the study, despite the application of antibacterial agents. In three subjects strains were isolated late in the study of a phage type which had either not been isolated before in this study, or had not been found for a prolonged period. Nine of the 12 nasal carriers also yielded S. aureus from the throat. It is apparent that following attempted eradication, S. aureus may seem to disappear, only to reappear some time later; 'eradication' in this case would be an erroneous appellation. PMID:3794322

  13. [Recovery of Staphylococcus aureus after acid injury in milk products].

    PubMed

    Assis, E M; De Carvalho, E P; Asquieri, E R; Robbs, P G

    1994-01-01

    The growth behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in fresh Cheese (Minas and Muzzarella) during their shelf-life was studied. The possible injury of this microorganism caused by the increasing acidity was also investigated. Raw milk was inoculated with 10(6) cells/ml (S. aureus FRIA-100) and the cheese production was performed according to normal procedures. Minas and muzzarella cheese were stored at 7 degrees C for 40 and 60 days, respectively. At 2-3 days intervals, the following analysis were performed: acidity, pH, S. aureus counting using agar Baird Parker by the traditional methods and by the method recommended by the American Public Health Association to evaluate the reparation of injured cells. We had a secure indication of the presence of injured S. aureus when acidity was in the range of 0.7 to 0.8% expressed in lactic acid and when the cycle was 1.3 log higher than the traditional one.

  14. Regulatory Requirements for Staphylococcus aureus Nitric Oxide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Melinda R.; Weiss, Andy; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to resist host innate immunity augments the severity and pervasiveness of its pathogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO˙) is an innate immune radical that is critical for the efficient clearance of a wide range of microbial pathogens. Exposure of microbes to NO˙ typically results in growth inhibition and induction of stress regulons. S. aureus, however, induces a metabolic state in response to NO˙ that allows for continued replication and precludes stress regulon induction. The regulatory factors mediating this distinctive response remain largely undefined. Here, we employ a targeted transposon screen and transcriptomics to identify and characterize five regulons essential for NO˙ resistance in S. aureus: three virulence regulons not formerly associated with NO˙ resistance, SarA, CodY, and Rot, as well as two regulons with established roles, Fur and SrrAB. We provide new insights into the contributions of Fur and SrrAB during NO˙ stress and show that the S. aureus ΔsarA mutant, the most sensitive of the newly identified mutants, exhibits metabolic dysfunction and widespread transcriptional dysregulation following NO˙ exposure. Altogether, our results broadly characterize the regulatory requirements for NO˙ resistance in S. aureus and suggest an intriguing overlap between the regulation of NO˙ resistance and virulence in this well-adapted human pathogen. IMPORTANCE The prolific human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is uniquely capable of resisting the antimicrobial radical nitric oxide (NO˙), a crucial component of the innate immune response. However, a complete understanding of how S. aureus regulates an effective response to NO˙ is lacking. Here, we implicate three central virulence regulators, SarA, CodY, and Rot, as major players in the S. aureus NO˙ response. Additionally, we elaborate on the contribution of two regulators, SrrAB and Fur, already known to play a crucial role in S. aureus NO˙ resistance. Our study

  15. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Uninfected Children in Botswana: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michael J A; Fischer, Rebecca S B; Mannathoko, Naledi; Muthoga, Charles; McHugh, Erin; Essigmann, Heather; Brown, Eric L; Steenhoff, Andrew P

    2017-02-06

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). A major risk factor for staphylococcal infection is S. aureus colonization of the anterior nares. We sought to define risk factors for S. aureus carriage and characterize antimicrobial resistance patterns in children in Botswana. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two clinical sites in southern Botswana. Patients under 18 years of age underwent two nasal swabs and brief interviews, 4 weeks apart. Standard microbiological techniques were used. For persistent carriers, S. aureus was isolated from swabs at both time points, and for intermittent carriers, S. aureus was isolated from only one swab. Poisson regression with robust variance estimator was used to compare prevalence of carriage and the resistance phenotypes. Among 56 enrollees, prevalence of S. aureus colonization was 55% (N = 31), of whom 42% (N = 13) were persistent carriers. Of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children, 64% (N = 9) were carriers. Risk factors for nasal carriage included a history of tuberculosis (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02, 2.51; P = 0.040) and closer proximity to health care (PR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.80, 0.99; P = 0.048). Prior pneumonia was more common among persistent rather than intermittent carriers (PR = 2.64; 95% CI = 1.64, 4.23; P < 0.001). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) prevalence was 13%. Of isolates tested, 16% were resistant to three or more drugs (N = 7/44). In summary, children in southern Botswana are frequently colonized with S. aureus Antibiotic resistance, especially MRSA, is also widespread. Antibiotic recommendations for treatment of staphylococcal infections in SSA should take cognizance of these resistance patterns.

  16. Adaptive upregulation of Clumping Factor A (ClfA) by S. aureus in the obese, type 2 diabetic host mediates increased virulence.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Christopher W; Schott, Eric M; Jensen, Sarah E; Zukoski, Jacob; Benvie, Abigail M; Refaai, Majed A; Kates, Stephen L; Schwarz, Edward M; Zuscik, Michael J; Gill, Steven R; Mooney, Robert A

    2017-03-20

    Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes (T2D) are important risk factors for infection following orthopaedic implant surgery. Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogen in bone infections, adapts to multiple environments to survive and evade host immune responses. Whether adaptation of S. aureus to the unique environment of the obese/T2D host accounts for its increased virulence and persistence in this population is unknown. Thus, we assessed implant-associated osteomyelitis in normal versus high fat-diet obese/T2D mice and found that S. aureus infection was more severe, including increases in bone abscesses relative to non-diabetic controls. S. aureus isolated from bone of obese/T2D mice displayed marked upregulation of four adhesion genes (clfA, clfB, bbp, and sdrC), all with binding affinity for fibrin(ogen). Immunostaining of infected bone revealed increased fibrin deposition surrounding bacterial abscesses in obese/T2D mice. In vitro coagulation assays demonstrated a hypercoagulable state in obese/T2D mice that was comparable to that of diabetic patients. S. aureus with an inactivating mutation in clumping factor A (clfA) showed a reduction in bone infection severity that eliminated the effect of obesity/T2D, while infections in control mice were unchanged. In infected mice that overexpress plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), S. aureusclfA expression and fibrin-encapsulated abscess communities in bone were also increased, further linking fibrin deposition to S. aureus expression of clfA and infection severity. Together, these results demonstrate an adaptation by S. aureus to obesity/T2D with increased expression of clfA that is associated with the hypercoagulable state of the host and increased virulence of S. aureus.

  17. Differentiation of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in staphylococcal isolates from prepared and frozen foods by combined arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction and DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Maria G; Jordano, Rafael; Aranda, Emilio; Benito, Maria J; Córdoba, Juan J

    2003-06-01

    In prepared and frozen flamenquín and hake fish fingers Staphylococcus aureus as sanitary hazards have been detected. In the present work, a combined method that includes an arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and a mixed DNA probe hybridisation designed for the enterotoxigenic genes sea, seb, sec, and sed will be assayed to differentiate enterotoxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species isolated during the processing of prepared and frozen foods. From the protocols tested for the AP-PCR, the highest number of amplification bands showing the best resolution was achieved at 30 degrees C annealing and 35 degrees C extension temperatures. Several staphylococci identified by a biochemical test as S. aureus showed in the AP-PCR analysis different banding patterns to the references S. aureus. The isolates, were investigated by slot blot hybridisation for genes encoding A, B, C, and D staphylococcal enterotoxins to determine their enterotoxigenic potential. Several isolates characterised by the AP-PCR analysis as S. aureus hybridised with the DNA probe mixture. The combined AP-PCR and DNA probe hybridisation assayed was able to differentiate toxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species from prepared and frozen foods. This method could be considered as microbial quality assurance in these products.

  18. Interferon-γ enhances both the anti-bacterial and the pro-inflammatory response of human mast cells to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swindle, Emily J; Brown, Jared M; Rådinger, Madeleine; DeLeo, Frank R; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2015-01-01

    Human mast cells (huMCs) are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses where they release mediators including amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS), eicosanoids and cytokines. We have reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enhances FcγR-dependent ROS production. The aim of this study was to extend these observations by investigating the effect of IFN-γ on the biological responses of huMCs to Staphylococcus aureus. We found that exposure of huMCs to S. aureus generated intracellular and extracellular ROS, which were enhanced in the presence of IFN-γ. IFN-γ also promoted bacteria killing, β-hexosaminidase release and eicosanoid production. Interferon-γ similarly increased expression of mRNAs encoding CCL1 to CCL4, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor-α and CXCL8 in S. aureus-stimulated huMCs. The ability of IFN-γ to increase CXCL8 and GM-CSF protein levels was confirmed by ELISA. Fibronectin or a β1 integrin blocking antibody completely abrogated IFN-γ-dependent S. aureus binding and reduced S. aureus-dependent CXCL8 secretion. These data demonstrate that IFN-γ primes huMCs for enhanced anti-bacterial and pro-inflammatory responses to S. aureus, partially mediated by β1 integrin. PMID:26288256

  19. Incidence and Risk Factors of Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in HIV-Infected Individuals in Comparison to HIV-Uninfected Individuals: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kotpal, Ruchi; S, Krishna Prakash; Bhalla, Preena; Dewan, Richa; Kaur, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV infection attending the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre in a teaching hospital and compare the prevalence with HIV-uninfected individuals. A case-control study was conducted among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals and an equal number of age-group and sex-matched HIV-uninfected individuals, and nasal swabs were collected from both the samples. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected through individual interviews. Ethical aspects were respected. A total of 100 individuals participated in the study, and 22 (44%) of the 50 HIV-infected cases were colonized by S aureus, including 19 (86.4%) methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) and 3 (13.6%) methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). Only 12 (24%) strains were isolated from 50 HIV-uninfected individuals, with 11 being MSSA and 1 being MRSA. This difference in the isolation rate was statistically significant (P = .035). The 2 most commonly encountered risk factors in both the groups appeared to be history of tuberculosis and history of surgical procedures but none being statistically significant (P = .093 and P = .996). All the strains of S aureus were sensitive to mupirocin. The study concluded that HIV-infected individuals are at a higher risk of carriage as compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. By eliminating carriage in immunocompromised individuals, infections due to S aureus can also be minimized.

  20. Exploring the transcriptome of Staphylococcus aureus in its natural niche.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Jáuregui, Ruy; Medina, Eva; Oxley, Andrew Pa; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-09-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen and commensal, where the human nose is the predominant reservoir. To better understand its behavior in this environmental niche, RNA was extracted from the anterior nares of three documented S. aureus carriers and the metatranscriptome analyzed by RNAseq. In addition, the in vivo transcriptomes were compared to previously published transcriptomes of two in vitro grown S. aureus strains. None of the in vitro conditions, even growth in medium resembling the anterior nares environment, mimicked in vivo conditions. Survival in the nose was strongly controlled by the limitation of iron and evident by the expression of iron acquisition systems. S. aureus populations in different individuals clearly experience different environmental stresses, which they attempt to overcome by the expression of compatible solute biosynthetic pathways, changes in their cell wall composition and synthesis of general stress proteins. Moreover, the expression of adhesins was also important for colonization of the anterior nares. However, different S. aureus strains also showed different in vivo behavior. The assessment of general in vivo expression patterns and commonalities between different S. aureus strains will in the future result in new knowledge based strategies for controlling colonization.

  1. Colorimetric Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Contaminated Solutions without Purification.

    PubMed

    Tiet, Pamela; Clark, Karen C; McNamara, James O; Berlin, Jacob M

    2017-01-18

    Current water quality monitoring methods rely on growth-based measurements to detect fecal indicator bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and enterococci, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). These growth-based measurements, however, can take days to complete. This is a significant limitation in the evaluation of contaminated food and water sources. Various methods for selective in vitro detection of S. aureus have also been reported; however, these strategies, such as ELISA, agar-diffusion, PCR, or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, all require overnight culturing or sophisticated instrumentation. There is a pressing need for a portable, simple diagnostic for S. aureus. Here, we demonstrate that oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Oligo-AuNPs) can be designed to rapidly and selectively detect S. aureus with a colorimetric readout. We have functionalized a chemically modified 11-mer sequence onto AuNPs and have found that aggregation occurs in the presence of S. aureus supernantants. The particles can be stored as a lyophilized powder and reconstituted at time of use, and this has been tested in biologically relevant samples such as creek and ocean water. This approach requires minimal sample preparation and requires no extraneous instrumentation, leading to a rapid and simple diagnostic read-out that could be used in field tests to monitor food and water sources.

  2. Exploring the transcriptome of Staphylococcus aureus in its natural niche

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Jáuregui, Ruy; Medina, Eva; Oxley, Andrew PA; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen and commensal, where the human nose is the predominant reservoir. To better understand its behavior in this environmental niche, RNA was extracted from the anterior nares of three documented S. aureus carriers and the metatranscriptome analyzed by RNAseq. In addition, the in vivo transcriptomes were compared to previously published transcriptomes of two in vitro grown S. aureus strains. None of the in vitro conditions, even growth in medium resembling the anterior nares environment, mimicked in vivo conditions. Survival in the nose was strongly controlled by the limitation of iron and evident by the expression of iron acquisition systems. S. aureus populations in different individuals clearly experience different environmental stresses, which they attempt to overcome by the expression of compatible solute biosynthetic pathways, changes in their cell wall composition and synthesis of general stress proteins. Moreover, the expression of adhesins was also important for colonization of the anterior nares. However, different S. aureus strains also showed different in vivo behavior. The assessment of general in vivo expression patterns and commonalities between different S. aureus strains will in the future result in new knowledge based strategies for controlling colonization. PMID:27641137

  3. Comparison of bactericidal activities of various disinfectants against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yoshimura, S; Katsuno, Y; Takada, H; Ito, M; Takahashi, M; Yahazaki, F; Iriyama, J; Ishigo, S; Asano, Y

    1993-01-01

    Various disinfectants were compared in terms of the duration of bactericidal activity against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), among S. aureus isolated in our hospital. Strains of S. aureus which showed minimum inhibitory concentrations of cloxacillin of less than 1.56 micrograms/ml and of 3.13 micrograms/ml or higher were designated MSSA and MRSA respectively. There was no difference in sensitivity to disinfectants between MSSA and MRSA. There was a great variation in the duration of bactericidal activity of chlorhexidine gluconate against these species with the majority requiring contact times of between 2 minutes and over 20 minutes. All strains except for one strain of MRSA were killed within 20 seconds after disinfection with benzalkonium chloride. All strains were killed within 20 seconds after disinfection with alkyldiaminoethylglycine hydrochloride or povidone-iodine.

  4. Genotyping and DNA microarray based characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbit carcasses.

    PubMed

    Merz, Axel; Stephan, Roger; Johler, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause staphylococcal food poisoning. Although the organism is frequently detected on rabbit carcasses, little is known about the characteristics of S. aureus strains contaminating rabbit meat. In this study, 137 S. aureus isolates originating from 137 rabbit carcasses were spa typed and characterized by DNA microarray. The isolates were assigned to CC5, CC7, CC8, CC15, CC96, CC101, CC121, and ST890, and to 13 spa types (t056, t085, t091, t160, t179, t681, t741, t745, t1190, t1773, t4770, t8456, t14871). Enterotoxin genes detected included sea, sed, sej, and ser. In addition, the egc operon, encoding the newly described staphylococcal enterotoxins SEG/SEI/SElM/SElN/SElO/SElU, was found in all isolates except those of t091. While none of the examined isolates presented genes conferring methicillin, vancomycin, or aminoglycoside resistance, we frequently detected blaZ/I/R conferring resistance to penicillin. The isolates represented a heterogeneous group assigned to clonal lineages detected among humans and animals, with two spa types exclusively associated with rabbit meat (t4770, t8456).

  5. Repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Cheung, Ambrose

    2008-03-01

    The regulatory locus sae is a two-component system in Staphylococcus aureus that regulates many important virulence factors, including alpha-toxin (encoded by hla) at the transcriptional level. The SarA homologs Rot and SarT were previously shown to be repressors of hla in selected S. aureus backgrounds. To delineate the interaction of rot and sae and the contribution of sarT to hla expression, an assortment of rot and sae isogenic single mutants, a rot sae double mutant, and a rot sae sarT markerless triple mutant were constructed from wild-type strain COL. Using Northern blot analysis and transcriptional reporter gene green fluorescent protein, fusion, and phenotypic assays, we found that the repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae. A rot sae sarT triple mutant was not able to rescue the hla defect of the rot sae double mutant. Among the three sae promoters, the distal sae P3 promoter is the strongest in vitro. Interestingly, the sae P3 promoter activities correlate with hla expression in rot, rot sae, and rot sae sarT mutants of COL. Transcriptional study has also shown that rot repressed sae, especially at the sae P3 promoter. Collectively, our data implicated the importance of sae in the rot-mediated repression of hla in S. aureus.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of THAM Trisphenylguanide against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alan J.; Shepard, Joyce B.; Wilkinson, Royce A.; Watkins, Robert L.; Walton, Sarah K.; Radke, Amanda R.; Wright, Thomas J.; Awel, Milat B.; Cooper, Catherine; Erikson, Elizabeth; Labib, Mohamed E.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Teintze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential antibacterial activity of three series of compounds synthesized from 12 linear and branched polyamines with 2–8 amino groups, which were substituted to produce the corresponding guanides, biguanides, or phenylguanides, against Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity was measured for each compound by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration against the bacteria, and the toxicity towards mammalian cells was determined. The most effective compound, THAM trisphenylguanide, was studied in time-to-kill and cytoplasmic leakage assays against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, USA300) in comparison to chlorhexidine. Preliminary toxicity and MRSA challenge studies in mice were also conducted on this compound. THAM trisphenylguanide showed significant antibacterial activity (MIC ∼1 mg/L) and selectivity against MRSA relative to all the other bacteria examined. In time-to-kill assays it showed increased antimicrobial activity against MRSA versus chlorhexidine. It induced leakage of cytoplasmic content at concentrations that did not reduce cell viability, suggesting the mechanism of action may involve membrane disruption. Using an intraperitoneal mouse model of invasive MRSA disease, THAM trisphenylguanide reduced bacterial burden locally and in deeper tissues. This study has identified a novel guanide compound with selective microbicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including a methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain. PMID:24840307

  7. Haplotype Association Mapping Identifies a Candidate Gene Region in Mice Infected With Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicole V; Ahn, Sun Hee; Deshmukh, Hitesh; Levin, Mikhail K; Nelson, Charlotte L; Scott, William K; Allen, Andrew; Fowler, Vance G; Cowell, Lindsay G

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to Staphylococcus aureus has a variety of outcomes, from asymptomatic colonization to fatal infection. Strong evidence suggests that host genetics play an important role in susceptibility, but the specific host genetic factors involved are not known. The availability of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for inbred Mus musculus strains means that haplotype association mapping can be used to identify candidate susceptibility genes. We applied haplotype association mapping to Perlegen SNP data and kidney bacterial counts from Staphylococcus aureus-infected mice from 13 inbred strains and detected an associated block on chromosome 7. Strong experimental evidence supports the result: a separate study demonstrated the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 7 using consomic mice. The associated block contains no genes, but lies within the gene cluster of the 26-member extended kallikrein gene family, whose members have well-recognized roles in the generation of antimicrobial peptides and the regulation of inflammation. Efficient mixed-model association (EMMA) testing of all SNPs with two alleles and located within the gene cluster boundaries finds two significant associations: one of the three polymorphisms defining the associated block and one in the gene closest to the block, Klk1b11. In addition, we find that 7 of the 26 kallikrein genes are differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant mice, including the Klk1b11 gene. These genes represent a promising set of candidate genes influencing susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. Fatal endocarditis with methicilin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus and major complications: rhabdomyolysis, pericarditis, and intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Anca Meda; Azamfirei, Leonard; Szalman, Krisztina; Szekely, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. Case: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review. The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome. The strains recovered from sequential blood culture sets and pericardial fluid were MSSA negative for genes encoding for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-1 and Panton–Valentine leukocidin. C, G, and I enterotoxin genes were detected. Conclusions: This case with unusually severe evolution underlines the limited ability of vancomycin to control some MSSA infections, possibly due to potential involvement of SA virulence factors, hence the importance of clinical vigilance for community SAB cases. PMID:27741135

  9. Detection and identification of methicillin resistant and sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus using tandem measurements.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Rajesh; Sorokulova, Iryna; Olsen, Eric; Globa, Ludmila; Pustovyy, Oleg; Moore, Timothy; Chin, Bryan; Barbaree, James; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2012-09-01

    Discrimination of methicillin resistant (MRSA) and sensitive (MSSA) strains of Staphylococcus aureus, was achieved by the specially selected lytic bacteriophage with a wide host range of S. aureus strains and a penicillin-binding protein (PBP 2a) specific antibody. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was employed to analyze bacteria-phage interactions. The lytic phages were transformed into phage spheroids by exposure to water-chloroform interface. Phage spheroid monolayers were transferred onto QCM-D sensors by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Biosensors were tested in the flow mode with bacterial water suspensions, while collecting frequency and energy dissipation changes. Bacteria-spheroid interactions resulted in decreased resonance frequency and an increase in dissipation energy for both MRSA and MSSA strains. Following the bacterial binding, these sensors were further exposed to a flow of the penicillin-binding protein (PBP 2a) specific antibody conjugated latex beads. Sensors tested with MRSA responded to PBP 2a antibody beads; while sensors examined with MSSA gave no response. This experimental difference establishes an unambiguous discrimination between methicillin resistant and sensitive S. aureus strains. Both free and immobilized bacteriophages strongly inhibit bacterial growth on solid/air interfaces and in water suspensions. After lytic phages are transformed into spheroids, they retain their strong lytic activity and demonstrate high bacterial capture efficiency. The phage and phage spheroids can be used for screening and disinfection of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Other applications may include use on biosensors, bacteriophage therapy, and antimicrobial surfaces.

  10. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. Identification of virulence genes carried by bacteriophages obtained from clinically isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karasartova, Djursun; Cavusoglu, Zeynep Burcin; Turegun, Buse; Ozsan, Murat T; Şahin, Fikret

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages play an important role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) either by carrying accessory virulence factors or several superantigens. Despite their importance, there are not many studies showing the actual distribution of the virulence genes carried by the prophages obtained from the clinically isolated Staphylococcus. In this study, we investigated prophages obtained from methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from hospital- and community-associated (HA-CA) infections for the virulence factors. In the study, 43 phages isolated from 48 MRSA were investigated for carrying toxin genes including the sak, eta, lukF-PV, sea, selp, sek, seg, seq chp, and scn virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. Restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to analyze phage genomes to investigate the relationship between the phage profiles and the toxin genes' presence. MRSA strains isolated from HA infections tended to have higher prophage presence than the MRSA strains obtained from the CA infections (97% and 67%, respectively). The study showed that all the phages with the exception of one phage contained one or more virulence genes in their genomes with different combinations. The most common toxin genes found were sea (83%) followed by sek (77%) and seq (64%). The study indicates that prophages encode a significant proportion of MRSA virulence factors.

  12. Molecular Events for Promotion of Vancomycin Resistance in Vancomycin Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiwen; Peng, Huagang; Rao, Xiancai

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been used as the last resort in the clinical treatment of serious Staphylococcus aureus infections. Vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) was discovered almost two decades ago. Aside from the vancomycin-intermediate phenotype, VISA strains from the clinic or laboratory exhibited common characteristics, such as thickened cell walls, reduced autolysis, and attenuated virulence. However, the genetic mechanisms responsible for the reduced vancomycin susceptibility in VISA are varied. The comparative genomics of vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA)/VISA pairs showed diverse genetic mutations in VISA; only a small number of these mutations have been experimentally verified. To connect the diversified genotypes and common phenotypes in VISA, we reviewed the genetic alterations in the relative determinants, including mutations in the vraTSR, graSR, walKR, stk1/stp1, rpoB, clpP, and cmk genes. Especially, we analyzed the mechanism through which diverse mutations mediate vancomycin resistance. We propose a unified model that integrates diverse gene functions and complex biochemical processes in VISA upon the action of vancomycin. PMID:27790199

  13. The Antibacterial Activity of Date Syrup Polyphenols against S. aureus and E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Taleb, Hajer; Maddocks, Sarah E.; Morris, R. Keith; Kanekanian, Ara D.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived products such as date syrup (DS) have demonstrated antibacterial activity and can inhibit bacteria through numerous different mechanisms, which may be attributed to bioactive compounds including plant-derived phenolic molecules. DS is rich in polyphenols and this study hypothesized that DS polyphenols demonstrate inherent antimicrobial activity, which cause oxidative damage. This investigation revealed that DS has a high content of total polyphenols (605 mg/100 g), and is rich in tannins (357 mg/100 g), flavonoids (40.5 mg/100 g), and flavanols (31.7 mg/100 g) that are known potent antioxidants. Furthermore, DS, and polyphenols extracted from DS, the most abundant bioactive constituent of DS are bacteriostatic to both Gram positive and Gram negative Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. It has further been shown that the extracted polyphenols independently suppress the growth of bacteria at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 and 20 mg/mL for E. coli and S. aureus, and have observed that DS behaves as a prooxidant by generating hydrogen peroxide that mediates bacterial growth inhibition as a result of oxidative stress. At sub-lethal MIC concentrations DS demonstrated antioxidative activity by reducing hydrogen peroxide, and at lethal concentrations DS demonstrated prooxidant activity that inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. The high sugar content naturally present in DS did not significantly contribute to this effect. These findings highlight that DS’s antimicrobial activity is mediated through hydrogen peroxide generation in inducing oxidative stress in bacteria. PMID:26952177

  14. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Tønnesen, E K; Jensen, K H; Damgaard, B M; Heegaard, P M H; Halekoh, U; Lauridsen, C

    2010-11-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC), major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II) density, lymphocyte CD4:CD8 ratio and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in vitro responsiveness. Sixteen pigs were included in the study, and randomly assigned into four groups (n = 4): "SHAM" pigs had their infra-renal aorta exposed by laparotomy; "CLEAN" pigs had an aortic graft inserted; "LOW" and "HIGH" pigs had an aortic graft inserted and, subsequently, S. aureus were inoculated on the graft material (5 × 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU] and 1 × 10(6) CFU, respectively). Biomarkers were evaluated prior to surgery and on day 2, 5, 7, and 14 post-operatively in blood samples. Of all biomarkers evaluated, CRP was superior for diagnosing S. aureus AVPGI in pigs, with a sensitivity of 0.86 and a specificity of 0.75.

  15. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  16. Skin and soft tissue infections in intercontinental travellers and the import of multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Europe.

    PubMed

    Nurjadi, D; Friedrich-Jänicke, B; Schäfer, J; Van Genderen, P J J; Goorhuis, A; Perignon, A; Neumayr, A; Mueller, A; Kantele, A; Schunk, M; Gascon, J; Stich, A; Hatz, C; Caumes, E; Grobusch, M P; Fleck, R; Mockenhaupt, F P; Zanger, P

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is emerging globally. Treatment of infections is complicated by increasing antibiotic resistance. We collected clinical data and swabs of returnees with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) at 13 travel-clinics in Europe (www.staphtrav.eu). Sixty-two percent (196/318) SSTI patients had S. aureus-positive lesions, of which almost two-thirds (122/196) were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive. PVL was associated with disease severity, including hospitalization for SSTI (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.5-18.2). In returnees with SSTI, longer travel and more intense population contact were risk factors for nasal colonization with PVL-positive S. aureus. Imported S. aureus frequently proved resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21%), erythromycin (21%), tetracycline (20%), ciprofloxacin (13%), methicillin (12%) and clindamycin (8%). Place of exposure was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with predominant resistance phenotypes and spa genotypes: Latin America (methicillin; t008/CC24/304), Africa (tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; t084/CC84, t314/singleton, t355/CC355), South Asia (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin; t021/CC21/318), South-East Asia (clindamycin; t159/CC272). USA300-like isolates accounted for 30% of all methicillin-resistant S. aureus imported to Europe and were predominantly (71%) acquired in Latin America. Multi-resistance to non-β-lactams were present in 24% of imports and associated with travel to South Asia (ORcrude 5.3, 95% CI 2.4-11.8), even after adjusting for confounding by genotype (ORadjusted 3.8, 95% 1.5-9.5). Choosing randomly from compounds recommended for the empiric treatment of severe S. aureus SSTI, 15% of cases would have received ineffective antimicrobial therapy. These findings call for the development of regionally stratified guidance on the antibiotic management of severe imported S. aureus disease and put the infected and colonized traveller at the centre of interventions against the

  17. Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia and Predictors of Early and Late Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bassetti, Matteo; Peghin, Maddalena; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Carnelutti, Alessia; Righi, Elda; Del Giacomo, Paola; Ansaldi, Filippo; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Cauda, Roberto; Sartor, Assunta; Spanu, Teresa; Scarparo, Claudio; Tumbarello, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and to evaluate the risk factors associated with early (7-day) and late (30-day) mortality. We performed an observational study including all consecutive episodes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia diagnosed at two Italian university hospitals during 2010–2014. A total of 337 patients were included. Mean age was 69 years (range, 57–78) and 65% were males. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was identified in 132/337 (39%)cases. Overall 7- and 30-day mortality were 13% and 26%, respectively. Early mortality was associated with increased Charlson scores (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5), MRSA bacteremia (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4–8.1), presentation with septic shock (OR 13.5, 95% CI 5.4–36.4), and occurrence of endocarditis (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.4–14.6). Similar risk factors were identified for late mortality, including increased Charlson scores (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1–1.4), MRSA bacteremia (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2–3.9), presentation with septic shock (OR 4, 95%CI 1.7–9.7), occurrence of endocarditis (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.4–10.2) as well as Child C cirrhosis (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.1–14.4) and primary bacteremia (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.3–5). Infectious disease consultation resulted in better outcomes both at 7 (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.05–0.4) and at 30 days (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.7). In conclusion, our study highlighted high rates of MRSA infection in nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Multiple comorbidities, disease severity and methicillin-resistance are key factors for early and late mortality in this group. In patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, infectious disease consultation remains a valuable tool to improve clinical outcome. PMID:28152067

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Phytochemicals against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and Their Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Joana; Abreu, Ana C.; Borges, Anabela; Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bacteria can be resistant to multiple antibiotics and we are fast approaching a time when antibiotics will not work on some bacterial infections. New antimicrobial compounds are urgently necessary. Plants are considered the greatest source to obtain new antimicrobials. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of four phytochemicals—7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC), indole-3-carbinol (I3C), salicylic acid (SA) and saponin (SP)—against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, either as planktonic cells or as biofilms. These bacteria are commonly found in hospital-acquired infections. Some aspects on the phytochemicals mode of action, including surface charge, hydrophobicity, motility and quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) were investigated. In addition, the phytochemicals were combined with three antibiotics in order to assess any synergistic effect. 7-HC and I3C were the most effective phytochemicals against E. coli and S. aureus. Both phytochemicals affected the motility and quorum-sensing (QS) activity, which means that they can play an important role in the interference of cell-cell interactions and in biofilm formation and control. However, total biofilm removal was not achieved with any of the selected phytochemicals. Dual combinations between tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and I3C produced synergistic effects against S. aureus resistant strains. The overall results demonstrates the potential of phytochemicals to control the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. In addition, the phytochemicals demonstrated the potential to act synergistically with antibiotics, contributing to the recycling of old antibiotics that were once considered ineffective due to resistance problems. PMID:25437810

  19. Distribution of virulence genes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from stable nasal carriers.

    PubMed

    Nashev, Dimitar; Toshkova, Katia; Salasia, S Isrina O; Hassan, Abdulwahed A; Lämmler, Christoph; Zschöck, Michael

    2004-04-01

    In the present study, we report data on virulence determinants of Staphylococcus aureus from stable nasal carriers, emphasizing on the genes encoding fibronectin (fnbA, fnbB) and collagen (cna) adhesive molecules. Of the 44 S. aureus isolates included, 32 isolates (16 pairs) were cultured from the anterior nares of 16 healthy carriers, eight isolates (four pairs) were collected from the nose of four patients with recurrent skin infections and four isolates were obtained from the infection site of these patients. The period between the two nasal swabs taken was 3-5 days. The persistency of carriage could be demonstrated by the indistinguishable genotypic characteristics of the S. aureus isolates in each pair. This could be shown by determination of gene polymorphisms of coa gene and the X-region and IgG-binding region encoding segments of spa gene. In addition, the isolates within the pairs showed identical toxin patterns. This was determined by PCR amplification of the genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA to SEJ) and TSST-1. The genotypic properties also yielded an identity between persistent nasal carriage isolates and the corresponding skin infection isolates of the four patients. In addition, all S. aureus nasal and skin infection isolates were positive for gene fnbA, fnbB and cna could be found with a high frequency. Among the 44 isolates investigated, 16 isolates (36.7%) harbored gene fnbB and 21 isolates (47.7%) gene cna. The data in the present study showed a relatively wide distribution of the genes fnb and cna among the investigated isolates, indicating that the persistent carriage of strains harboring these virulence determinants may increase the risk for subsequent invasive infections in carriers.

  20. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal samples of healthy farm animals and pets in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A total of 261 healthy farm and pet animals (75 cattle, 52 goats, 100 dogs, and 34 cats) from different regions of Tunisia were screened for Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. Molecular typing of isolates (by spa- and multilocus sequence-typing) was performed, and their antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes were determined by PCR and sequencing. S. aureus isolates were detected in 17 of 261 tested samples (6.5%). All S. aureus isolates recovered were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), and one isolate/sample was further studied. Eight different spa types were detected (t189, t279, t582, t701, t1166, t1268, t1534, and t1773), and eight different sequence types were identified (ST6, ST15, ST45, ST133, ST188, ST700 [clonal complex CC130], ST2057, and a new ST2121). MSSA from pets (six isolates) showed resistance to (number of isolates, resistance gene): penicillin (six, blaZ), tetracycline (one, tet[M]), erythromycin one, erm[A]), streptomycin (one, ant[6]-Ia), and ciprofloxacin (one). All isolates from farm animals showed susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, except for two penicillin-resistant isolates. Five S. aureus isolates from goats and cats harbored the lukF/lukS-PV genes, encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and six isolates from goats harbored the tst virulence gene. In addition, diverse combinations of enterotoxin genes were detected, including two variants of the egc cluster. Goats and cats could represent a reservoir of important toxin genes, with potential implications in animal and human health.

  1. Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Cortney R.; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K.; Lehman, Mckenzie K.; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Steinke, Laurey; Sadykov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus must rapidly adapt to a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources during invasion of a host. Within a staphylococcal abscess, preferred carbon sources such as glucose are limiting, suggesting that S. aureus survives through the catabolism of secondary carbon sources. S. aureus encodes pathways to catabolize multiple amino acids, including those that generate pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate, and oxaloacetate. To assess amino acid catabolism, S. aureus JE2 and mutants were grown in complete defined medium containing 18 amino acids but lacking glucose (CDM). A mutation in the gudB gene, coding for glutamate dehydrogenase, which generates 2-oxoglutarate from glutamate, significantly reduced growth in CDM, suggesting that glutamate and those amino acids generating glutamate, particularly proline, serve as the major carbon source in this medium. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed this supposition. Furthermore, a mutation in the ackA gene, coding for acetate kinase, also abrogated growth of JE2 in CDM, suggesting that ATP production from pyruvate-producing amino acids is also critical for growth. In addition, although a functional respiratory chain was absolutely required for growth, the oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP concentration were significantly lower during growth in CDM than during growth in glucose-containing media. Finally, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that expression levels of genes coding for the enzymes that synthesize glutamate from proline, arginine, and histidine are repressed by CcpA and carbon catabolite repression. These data show that pathways important for glutamate catabolism or ATP generation via Pta/AckA are important for growth in niches where glucose is not abundant, such as abscesses within skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:28196956

  2. Transposase-Mediated Excision, Conjugative Transfer and Diversity of ICE6013 in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sansevere, Emily A; Luo, Xiao; Park, Joo Youn; Yoon, Sunghyun; Seo, Keun Seok; Robinson, D Ashley

    2017-01-30

    ICE6013 represents one of two families of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) identified in the pan-genome of the human and animal pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus Here we investigate the excision and conjugation functions of ICE6013 and further characterize the diversity of this element. ICE6013 excision is not significantly affected by growth, temperature, pH or UV exposure and does not depend on recA The IS30-like DDE transposase (Tpase; orf1 and orf2) of ICE6013 must be uninterrupted for excision to occur, whereas disruption of three other orfs on the element significantly affect the level of excision. We demonstrate that ICE6013 conjugatively transfers to different S. aureus backgrounds at frequencies approaching that of the conjugative plasmid pGO1. Excision is required for conjugation, not all S. aureus backgrounds are successful recipients, and transconjugants acquire the ability to transfer ICE6013 Sequencing of chromosomal integration sites in serially passaged transconjugants revealed a significant integration site preference for a 15 bp AT-rich palindromic consensus sequence, which surrounds the 3 bp target site that is duplicated upon integration. Sequence analysis of ICE6013 from different host species of S. aureus and from eight other species of staphylococci, identifies seven divergent subfamilies of ICE6013 that include sequences previously classified as a transposon, plasmid and various ICEs. In summary, these results indicate that the IS30-like Tpase functions as the ICE6013 recombinase, and that ICE6013 is a diverse family of mobile genetic elements that mediate conjugation in staphylococci.

  3. PCR detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from raw and pasteurized milk.

    PubMed

    Rall, V L M; Vieira, F P; Rall, R; Vieitis, R L; Fernandes, A; Candeias, J M G; Cardoso, K F G; Araújo, J P

    2008-12-10

    Milk is considered a nutritious food because it contains several important nutrients including proteins and vitamins. Conversely, it can be a vehicle for several pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to analyze the frequency of genes encoding the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI and SEJ in S. aureus strains isolated from raw or pasteurized bovine milk. S. aureus was found in 38 (70.4%) out of 54 raw milk samples at concentrations of up to 8.9 x 10(5) CFU/ml. This microorganism was present in eight samples of pasteurized milk before the expiration date and in 11 samples analyzed on the expiration date. Of the 57 strains studied, 68.4% were positive for one or more genes encoding the enterotoxins, and 12 different genotypes were identified. The gene coding for enterotoxin A, sea, was the most frequent (16 strains, 41%), followed by sec (8 strains, 20.5%), sed (5 strains, 12.8%), seb (3 strains, 7.7%) and see (2 strains, 5.1%). Among the genes encoding the other enterotoxins, seg was the most frequently observed (11 strains, 28.2%), followed by sei (10 strains) and seh and sej (3 strains each). With the recent identification of new SEs, the perceived frequency of enterotoxigenic strains has increased, suggesting that the pathogenic potential of staphylococci may be higher than previously thought; however, further studies are required to assess the expression of these new SEs by S. aureus, and their impact in foodborne disease. The quality of Brazilian milk is still low, and efforts from the government and the entire productive chain are required to attain consumer safety.

  4. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Strain Collected from a Patient with Cutaneous Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Crawford, Katrina; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2014-01-01

    We describe a cutaneous abscess caused by catalase-negative methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus in a patient who was concomitantly colonized with virulent USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Sequencing of the katA gene demonstrated a thymine insertion leading to a frameshift mutation and premature truncation of catalase to 21 amino acids. PMID:24131694

  5. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients from Malakand, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Madzgalla, S; Syed, M A; Khan, M A; Rehman, S S; Müller, E; Reissig, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S

    2016-09-01

    Comparatively few studies have been published describing Staphylococcus aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Central Asia including Pakistan. Here, we report the genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains (that include both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from community- and hospital-acquired skin and soft-tissue infections in a tertiary care hospital in the Malakand district of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. Forty-five isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were characterized by microarray hybridization. Twenty isolates (44 %) were MRSA, whereas 22 (49 %) were PVL-positive. Fourteen isolates (31 %) harboured both mecA and PVL genes. The dominant clones were CC121-MSSA (n = 15, 33 %) and the PVL-positive "Bengal Bay Clone" (ST772-MRSA-V; n = 13, 29 %). The PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300" was found once. The pandemic ST239-MRSA-III strain was absent, although it has previously been observed in Pakistan. These observations require a re-assessment of schemes for initial antibiotic therapy to cover MRSA and they emphasise the need for a rapid and non-molecular test for PVL.

  6. Control of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island excision.

    PubMed

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Martí, Miguel; Chen, John; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Penadés, José R

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are a group of related 15-17 kb mobile genetic elements that commonly carry genes for superantigen toxins and other virulence factors. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain phages and their efficient encapsidation into specific small-headed phage-like infectious particles. Previous work demonstrated that chromosomal integration depends on the SaPI-encoded recombinase, Int. However, although involved in the process, Int alone was not sufficient to mediate efficient SaPI excision from chromosomal sites, and we expected that SaPI excision would involve an Xis function, which could be encoded by a helper phage or by the SaPI, itself. Here we report that the latter is the case. In vivo recombination assays with plasmids in Escherichia coli demonstrate that SaPI-coded Xis is absolutely required for recombination between the SaPI att(L) and att(R) sites, and that both sites, as well as their flanking SaPI sequences, are required for SaPI excision. Mutational analysis reveals that Xis is essential for efficient horizontal SaPI transfer to a recipient strain. Finally, we show that the master regulator of the SaPI life cycle, Stl, blocks expression of int and xis by binding to inverted repeats present in the promoter region, thus controlling SaPI excision.

  7. Inhibition of major integrin αV β3 reduces Staphylococcus aureus attachment to sheared human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, C J; Garciarena, C D; Watkin, R L; McHale, T M; McLoughlin, A; Claes, J; Verhamme, P; Cummins, P M; Kerrigan, S W

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds and impairs function of vascular endothelial cells (EC). We investigated the molecular signals triggered by S. aureus adhesion to EC. Inhibition of the EC integrin αVβ3 reduces S. aureus binding and rescues EC function. αVβ3 blockade represents an attractive target to treat S. aureus bloodborne infections.

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:26926145

  9. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections.

  10. Cartography of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Transcripts: Detection, Orientation and Temporal Expression during Growth Phase and Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Marie; Hernandez, David; Farinelli, Laurent; Deluen, Cécile; Linder, Patrick; Gaspin, Christine; Romby, Pascale; Schrenzel, Jacques; Francois, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterial opportunist responsible for a wide spectrum of infections. The severity of these infections is highly variable and depends on multiple parameters including the genome content of the bacterium as well as the condition of the infected host. Clinically and epidemiologically, S. aureus shows a particular capacity to survive and adapt to drastic environmental changes including the presence of numerous antimicrobial agents. Mechanisms triggering this adaptation remain largely unknown despite important research efforts. Most studies evaluating gene content have so far neglected to analyze the so-called intergenic regions as well as potential antisense RNA molecules. Principal Findings Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we performed an inventory of the whole transcriptome of S. aureus strain N315. In addition to the annotated transcription units, we identified more than 195 small transcribed regions, in the chromosome and the plasmid of S. aureus strain N315. The coding strand of each transcript was identified and structural analysis enabled classification of all discovered transcripts. RNA purified at four time-points during the growth phase of the bacterium allowed us to define the temporal expression of such transcripts. A selection of 26 transcripts of interest dispersed along the intergenic regions was assessed for expression changes in the presence of various stress conditions including pH, temperature, oxidative shocks and growth in a stringent medium. Most of these transcripts showed expression patterns specific for the defined stress conditions that we tested. Conclusions These RNA molecules potentially represent important effectors of S. aureus adaptation and more generally could support some of the epidemiological characteristics of the bacterium. PMID:20505759

  11. Phenotypic and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Ekiti State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Kukoyi, Olayinka Oluwatoyin; Taiwo, Samuel Sunday; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele; Bolaji, Oloyede Samuel; Adegoke, Abiodun Adebimpe; Makanjuola, Olufunmilola Bamidele; Ogbolu, David Olusoga; Alli, Oyebode Terry

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The characteristics and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Staphylococcus aureus differs according to geographical regions and in relation to antibiotic usage. The aim of this study was to determine the biochemical characteristics of the prevalent S. aureus from Ekiti State, Nigeria, and to evaluate three commonly used disk diffusion methods (cefoxitin, oxacillin, and methicillin) for the detection of methicillin resistance in comparison with mecA gene detection by polymerase chain reaction. Materials and methods A total of 208 isolates of S. aureus recovered from clinical specimens were included in this study. Standard microbiological procedures were employed in isolating the strains. Susceptibility of each isolate to methicillin (5 μg), oxacillin (1 μg), and cefoxitin (30 μg) was carried out using the modified Kirby–Bauer/Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute disk diffusion technique. They were also tested against panels of antibiotics including vancomycin. The conventional polymerase chain reaction method was used to detect the presence of the mecA gene. Results Phenotypic resistance to methicillin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin were 32.7%, 40.3%, and 46.5%, respectively. The mecA gene was detected in 40 isolates, giving a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) prevalence of 19.2%. The S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin (82.7%) and tetracycline (65.4%), but largely susceptible to erythromycin (78.8% sensitive), pefloxacin (82.7%), and gentamicin (88.5%). When compared to the mecA gene as the gold standard for MRSA detection, methicillin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin gave sensitivity rates of 70%, 80%, and 100%, and specificity rates of 76.2%, 69.1%, and 78.5% respectively. Conclusion When compared with previous studies employing mecA polymerase chain reaction for MRSA detection, the prevalence of 19.2% reported in Ekiti State, Nigeria in this study is an indication of gradual rise in the prevalence of MRSA in Nigeria. A cefoxitin (30

  12. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Lisa R; Haack, Sheridan K; Johnson, Heather E; Brennan, Angela K; Isaacs, Natasha M; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA+femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci 'excellent' recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  15. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFI, Masoud; POURMAND, Mohammad Reza; FALLAH, Fatemeh; HASHEMI, Ali; MASHHADI, Rahil; NAZARI-ALAM, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern as well as the phenotypic and genotypic biofilm formation ability of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: A total of 39 isolates of S. aureus were collected from patients with UTI. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion. We used the Modified Congo red agar (MCRA) and Microtiter plate methods to assess the ability of biofilm formation. All isolates were examined for determination of biofilm related genes, icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap using PCR method. Results: Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and chloramphenicol were the most effective agents against S. aureus isolates. Overall, 69.2% of S. aureus isolates were biofilm producers. Resistance to four antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P=0.001), tetracycline (57.7% vs. 42.3%, P=0.028), erythromycin and ciprofloxacin (56% vs. 44%, P=0.017) was higher among biofilm producers than non-biofilm producers. The icaA, fnbA and clfA genes were present in all S. aureus isolates. However, bap gene was not detected in any of the isolates. Conclusion: Our findings reinforce the role of biofilm formation in resistance to antimicrobial agents. Trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole and doxycycline may be used as an effective treatment for UTI caused by biofilm producers S. aureus. Our results suggest that biofilm formation is not dependent to just icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap genes harbor in S. aureus strains. PMID:27252918

  16. C55 bacteriocin produced by ETB-plasmid positive Staphylococcus aureus strains is a key factor for competition with S. aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Shammi, Fariha; Oogai, Yuichi; Nakamura, Norifumi; Sugai, Motoyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Exfoliative toxin (ET) produced by Staphylococcus aureus is closely associated with the onset of bullous impetigo. To date, three ETs (ETA, ETB and ETD) have been identified. The gene encoding ETB is located in a plasmid designated pETB. Bacteriocin synthesis genes are also located in this plasmid and pETB-positive strains reportedly produce the C55 bacteriocin. In this study, the antibacterial activity against S. aureus strains of the bacteriocin produced by the pETB-positive strain TY4 was investigated. This bacteriocin demonstrated antibacterial activity against all pETB-negative but not pETB-positive strains, including TY4. Additionally, a TY4- strain from which the pETB plasmid had been deleted exhibited susceptibility to the bacteriocin. Further experiments revealed that two immunity factors (orf 46-47 and orf 48) downstream of the bacteriocin synthesis genes in the pETB plasmid are associated with immunity against the bacteriocin produced by TY4. The TY4- with orf46-47 strain exhibited complete resistance to bacteriocin, whereas the TY4- with orf48 strain exhibited partial resistance. Whether bacteriocin affects the proportion of each strain when co-cultured with S. aureus strains was also investigated. When TY4 or TY4- was co-cultured with 209P strain, which is susceptible to the bacteriocin, the proportion of 209P co-cultured with TY4 was significantly less than when 209P was co-cultured with TY4-, whereas the proportion of TY4- with orf46-48 co-cultured with TY4 was greater than with TY4-. These results suggest that the C55 bacteriocin produced by pETB-positive strains affects the proportion of each strain when pETB-positive and -negative strains co-exist.

  17. Differential innate immune responses of a living skin equivalent model colonized by Staphylococcus epidermidis or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Holland, Diana B; Bojar, Richard A; Farrar, Mark D; Holland, Keith T

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal on skin, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is a transient pathogen. The aim was to determine whether the skin's innate defence systems responded differently to these microorganisms. Differential gene expression of a human skin equivalent (SE) model was assessed by microarray technology, in response to colonization by S. epidermidis or S. aureus. Only a small number of transcripts were significantly (P<0.0001) increased (12) or decreased (35) with gene expression changes of >2-fold on SEs colonized with S. epidermidis compared with controls (no colonization). Expression of one innate defence gene, pentraxin 3 (PTX3), was upregulated, while psoriasin, S100A12, S100A15, beta defensin 4, beta defensin 3, lipocalin 2 and peptidoglycan recognition protein 2 were downregulated. In contrast, large numbers of transcripts were significantly increased (480) or decreased (397) with gene expression changes of >2-fold on SEs colonized with S. aureus compared with controls. There was upregulation in gene expression of many skin defence factors including Toll-like receptor 2, beta defensin 4, properdin, PTX3, proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-17C, IL-20, IL-23A and chemokines IL-8, CCL4, CCL5, CCL20 and CCL27. These differences may partly explain why S. epidermidis is a normal skin resident and S. aureus is not.

  18. Beyond the Chromosome: The Prevalence of Unique Extra-Chromosomal Bacteriophages with Integrated Virulence Genes in Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R.; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  19. Use of atmospheric non-thermal plasma as a disinfectant for objects contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Burts, Monica L.; Alexeff, Igor; Meek, Eric T.; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    Background Health-care associated infections due to methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are increasing worldwide despite current infection control measures. Novel methods for disinfection of MRSA would be useful. Methods We tested the effectiveness of atmospheric, non-thermal plasma discharge at killing S. aureus, including USA300 strains, and at disinfecting experimentally contaminated hospital pagers. Results Exposure of S. aureus to plasma at different concentrations and for varying lengths of time resulted in up to a 4–5 log10 kill on tryptic soy agar plates within 10 minutes and was not toxic to epithelial cells. USA300 strains of MRSA were more resistant to plasma-based killing than other tested strains. Disinfection of hospital pagers experimentally coated with clinically relevant amounts of MRSA could be achieved in as little as 30 seconds. Conclusions Generation of plasma is a promising method for disinfection of objects or surfaces that warrants further study in hospital settings. The USA300 strains of S. aureus may be more resistant to disinfection than other strains. PMID:19559504

  20. Effectiveness of commercial and experimental termite monitors for the desert subterranean termite Heterotermes aureus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in southern Arizona.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul B; Carrière, Yves

    2011-08-01

    In Arizona, the subterranean termite Heterotermes aureus (Snyder) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) is the most economically important termite pest. We report here the evaluation of several commercial and experimental monitoring stations to capture and monitor H. aureus. In total, 12 monitoring stations we