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Sample records for aureus iron surface

  1. A Novel Staphylococcus aureus Vaccine: Iron Surface Determinant B Induces Rapid Antibody Responses in Rhesus Macaques and Specific Increased Survival in a Murine S. aureus Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuklin, Nelly A.; Clark, Desmond J.; Secore, Susan; Cook, James; Cope, Leslie D.; McNeely, Tessie; Noble, Liliane; Brown, Martha J.; Zorman, Julie K.; Wang, Xin Min; Pancari, Gregory; Fan, Hongxia; Isett, Kevin; Burgess, Bruce; Bryan, Janine; Brownlow, Michelle; George, Hugh; Meinz, Maria; Liddell, Mary E.; Kelly, Rosemarie; Schultz, Loren; Montgomery, Donna; Onishi, Janet; Losada, Maria; Martin, Melissa; Ebert, Timothy; Tan, Charles Y.; Schofield, Timothy L.; Nagy, Eszter; Meineke, Andreas; Joyce, Joseph G.; Kurtz, Myra B.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; McClements, William; Anderson, Annaliesa S.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, and the rate of resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics, such as methicillin, is increasing; furthermore, there has been an increase in the number of methicillin-resistant S. aureus community-acquired infections. Effective treatment and prevention strategies are urgently needed. We investigated the potential of the S. aureus surface protein iron surface determinant B (IsdB) as a prophylactic vaccine against S. aureus infection. IsdB is an iron-sequestering protein that is conserved in diverse S. aureus clinical isolates, both methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive, and it is expressed on the surface of all isolates tested. The vaccine was highly immunogenic in mice when it was formulated with amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant, and the resulting antibody responses were associated with reproducible and significant protection in animal models of infection. The specificity of the protective immune responses in mice was demonstrated by using an S. aureus strain deficient for IsdB and HarA, a protein with a high level of identity to IsdB. We also demonstrated that IsdB is highly immunogenic in rhesus macaques, inducing a more-than-fivefold increase in antibody titers after a single immunization. Based on the data presented here, IsdB has excellent prospects for use as a vaccine against S. aureus disease in humans. PMID:16552052

  2. Multiprotein heme shuttle pathway in Staphylococcus aureus: iron-regulated surface determinant cog-wheel kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Michael T; Heinrichs, David E; Stillman, Martin J

    2012-10-10

    Iron is a critically important nutrient for all species. Bacteria have evolved specialist survival systems to chelate and transport iron across the wall and membrane into the cytoplasm. One such system in the human pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus involves extracting heme from hemoglobin and then transporting the intact heme across the wall and membrane. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins act in concert to carry out the heme scavenging and subsequent transport. While details of the static heme-binding reaction are currently quite well known, little mechanistic data are available. In this paper, we describe detailed time-resolved mass spectral and magnetic circular dichroism spectral data recorded as heme is transferred unidirectionally from holo-IsdA to apo-IsdE via IsdC. The electrospray mass spectral data simultaneously monitor the concentrations of six protein species involved in the trans-wall transport of the extracted heme and show for the first time the mechanistic details of heme transfer that is key to the Staphylococcus aureus Isd heme-scavenging system. Bimolecular kinetic analysis of the ESI-mass spectral data shows that heme transfer from IsdA to IsdC is very fast, whereas the subsequent heme transfer from IsdC to IsdE is slower. Under limiting IsdC conditions, the IsdC intermediary cycles between heme-free and heme-containing forms until either all heme has been transferred from holo-IsdA or no further apo-IsdE is available. The data show that a unique role for IsdC is acting as the central cog-wheel that facilitates heme transfer from IsdA to IsdE.

  3. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  4. A fully human monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) with functional activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Tim; Smith, Sharon; Pancari, Greg; Clark, Desmond; Hampton, Richard; Secore, Susan; Towne, Victoria; Fan, Hongxia; Wang, Xin-Min; Wu, Xiaoqing; Ernst, Robin; Harvey, Barrett R; Finnefrock, Adam C; Wang, Fubao; Tan, Charles; Durr, Eberhard; Cope, Leslie; Anderson, Annaliesa; An, Zhiqiang; McNeely, Tessie

    2010-01-01

    A fully human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1) specific for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the Cambridge Antibody Technology (CAT) scFv antibody library. As compared to previously described IsdB specific murine monoclonals, CS-D7 has a unique, non-overlapping binding site on IsdB, and exhibits increased in vivo activity. The antibody recognizes a conformational epitope spanning amino acids 50 to 285 and has a binding affinity of 340 (± 75) pM for IsdB. CS-D7 bound to a wide variety of S. aureus strains, but not to an isdB deletion mutant. The antibody mediated opsonophagocytic (OP) killing in vitro and mediated significant protection in vivo. In a murine lethal sepsis model, the antibody conferred protection from death when dosed prior to challenge, but not when dosed after challenge. Importantly, in a central venous catheter (CVC) model in rats, the antibody reduced bacteremia and prevented colonization of indwelling catheters. Protection was observed when rats were dosed with CS-D7 prior to challenge as well as post challenge. IsdB is currently being investigated for clinical efficacy against S. aureus infection, and the activity of this human IsdB specific antibody supplements the growing body of evidence to support targeting this antigen for vaccine development.

  5. Iron-Regulated Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman Requires ica and the Secreted Protein Emp▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp. PMID:18268030

  6. Iron-regulated biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman requires ica and the secreted protein Emp.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp.

  7. Evaluation of some Staphylococcus aureus iron-regulated proteins as vaccine targets.

    PubMed

    Ster, Céline; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Diarra, Moussa S; Jacques, Mario; Malouin, François; Lacasse, Pierre

    2010-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of infections, including bovine mastitis. Previously, 54 genes from S. aureus that were up-regulated in an iron-restricted medium and in mice were identified. Seven of those genes were selected from five iron-acquisition systems (isd, feo, sir, sst, and fhu), and the proteins were evaluated as potential vaccine targets to prevent bovine mastitis. The antigenicity of the recombinant proteins obtained with each studied gene was evaluated in rabbits and/or cattle. Immune sera were used to test the bacterial accessibility of the native proteins. All the proteins were immunogenic in rabbits or cattle. IsdH, IsdB, FeoB and SstD were expressed on the bacterial surface, with IsdB and IsdH more expressed in an iron-restricted environment. The capacity of antibodies to prevent infection was measured in a mouse mastitis model. Preincubation of S. aureus with serum against IsdH or with the pool of sera against IsdB, SstD and FeoB led to decreased colonization of the mouse mammary glands. Lastly, cattle immunization with IsdH induced a strong and long-lasting immune response with IgG2 production. The protein IsdH appears to be a good vaccine candidate to prevent S. aureus bovine mastitis. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  9. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Si-feng; Jia, Jing-fu; Guo, Xiao-kui; Zhao, Ya-ping; Chen, De-sheng; Guo, Yong-yuan; Zhang, Xian-long

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use. PMID:27994455

  10. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Long

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use.

  11. Involvement of SirABC in Iron-Siderophore Import in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Suzanne E.; Sebulsky, M. Tom; Heinrichs, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus SirA was previously identified as a lipoprotein, and SirB and SirC are thought to encode the transmembrane domains of an ABC transporter. Sir proteins show similarity to iron-siderophore transporters in several bacteria. Here, we show that the iron-regulated sirABC operon is divergently transcribed from the sbn operon that encodes enzymes involved in the synthesis of staphylobactin, a recently described siderophore produced by S. aureus. Mutation of either sirA or sirB increased the resistance of iron-starved S. aureus to streptonigrin and resulted in compromised growth in iron-restricted, but not iron-rich, media. We also demonstrated that sirA and sirB mutants are compromised in the ability to transport iron complexed to staphylobactin but are not compromised for uptake of other iron complexes, such as ferric hydroxamates, ferric enterobactin, or ferric citrate. SirA- and SirB-deficient S. aureus, however, retain the ability to produce staphylobactin. Moreover, we found that transcription from the sbn operon was increased, relative to the wild type, in both sirA and sirB knockout strains, likely in response to an increased level of iron starvation in these cells. These results provide evidence of a role for these proteins in iron import in S. aureus and for full fitness of the bacterium in iron-restricted environments and demonstrate a function for S. aureus genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of an endogenously produced siderophore. PMID:15576785

  12. Iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins of Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; Heilbronner, Simon; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is the only coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species with a locus encoding iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins. In Staphylococcus aureus, the Isd proteins capture heme from hemoglobin and transfer it across the wall to a membrane-bound transporter, which delivers it into the cytoplasm, where heme oxygenases release iron. The Isd proteins of S. lugdunensis are expressed under iron-restricted conditions. We propose that S. lugdunensis IsdB and IsdC proteins perform the same functions as those of S. aureus. S. lugdunensis IsdB is the only hemoglobin receptor within the isd locus. It specifically binds human hemoglobin with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 23 nM and transfers heme on IsdC. IsdB expression promotes bacterial growth in an iron-limited medium containing human hemoglobin but not mouse hemoglobin. This correlates with weak binding of IsdB to mouse hemoglobin in vitro. Unlike IsdB and IsdC, the proteins IsdJ and IsdK are not sorted to the cell wall in S. lugdunensis. In contrast, IsdJ expressed in S. aureus and Lactococcus lactis is anchored to peptidoglycan, suggesting that S. lugdunensis sortases may differ in signal recognition or could be defective. IsdJ and IsdK are present in the culture supernatant, suggesting that they could acquire heme from the external milieu. The IsdA protein of S. aureus protects bacteria from bactericidal lipids due to its hydrophilic C-terminal domain. IsdJ has a similar region and protected S. aureus and L. lactis as efficiently as IsdA but, possibly due to its location, was less effective in its natural host.

  13. Iron Cycling at Corroding Carbon Steel Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure...iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media. Keywords: seawater; iron-oxidizing bacteria ; iron-reducing bacteria ...carbon steel; microbiologically influenced corrosion Introduction Iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) were among the first groups of microorganisms

  14. Human Frataxin: Iron And Ferrochelatase Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bencze, K.Z.; Yoon, T.; Millan-Pacheco, C.; Bradley, P.B.; Pastor, N.; Cowan, J.A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-06-02

    The coordinated iron structure and ferrochelatase binding surface of human frataxin have been characterized to provide insight into the protein's ability to serve as the iron chaperone during heme biosynthesis.

  15. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  16. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  17. Nfu facilitates the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins and participates in virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mashruwala, Ameya A.; Pang, Yun Y.; Rosario-Cruz, Zuelay; Chahal, Harsimranjit K.; Benson, Meredith A.; Anzaldi-Mike, Laura L.; Skaar, Eric P.; Torres, Victor J.; Nauseef, William M.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The acquisition and metabolism of iron (Fe) by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is critical for disease progression. S. aureus requires Fe to synthesize inorganic cofactors called iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, which are required for functional Fe-S proteins. In this study we investigated the mechanisms utilized by S. aureus to metabolize Fe-S clusters. We identified that S. aureus utilizes the Suf biosynthetic system to synthesize Fe-S clusters and we provide genetic evidence suggesting that the sufU and sufB gene products are essential. Additional biochemical and genetic analyses identified Nfu as a Fe-S cluster carrier, which aids in the maturation of Fe-S proteins. We find that deletion of the nfu gene negatively impacts staphylococcal physiology and pathogenicity. A nfu mutant accumulates both increased intracellular non-incorporated Fe and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in DNA damage. In addition, a strain lacking Nfu is sensitive to exogenously supplied ROS and reactive nitrogen species. Congruous with ex vivo findings, a nfu mutant strain is more susceptible to oxidative killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and displays decreased tissue colonization in a murine model of infection. We conclude that Nfu is necessary for staphylococcal pathogenesis and establish Fe-S cluster metabolism as an attractive antimicrobial target. PMID:25388433

  18. Bap, a Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Solano, Cristina; Valle, Jaione; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2001-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation is needed to understand the molecular basis of strain variation and the pathogenic mechanisms implicated in chronic staphylococcal infections. A biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus isolate was used to generate biofilm-negative transposon (Tn917) insertion mutants. Two mutants were found with a significant decrease in attachment to inert surfaces (early adherence), intercellular adhesion, and biofilm formation. The transposon was inserted at the same locus in both mutants. This locus (bap [for biofilm associated protein]) encodes a novel cell wall associated protein of 2,276 amino acids (Bap), which shows global organizational similarities to surface proteins of gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) and gram-positive (Enteroccocus faecalis) microorganisms. Bap's core region represents 52% of the protein and consists of 13 successive nearly identical repeats, each containing 86 amino acids. bap was present in a small fraction of bovine mastitis isolates (5% of the 350 S. aureus isolates tested), but it was absent from the 75 clinical human S. aureus isolates analyzed. All staphylococcal isolates harboring bap were highly adherent and strong biofilm producers. In a mouse infection model bap was involved in pathogenesis, causing a persistent infection. PMID:11292810

  19. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason S.; McBeth, Joyce M.; Ray, Richard I.; Little, Brenda J.; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with three culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media. PMID:24093730

  20. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media.

  1. Unique Heme-Iron Coordination by the Hemoglobin Receptor IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential requirement for life for nearly all organisms. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is able to acquire iron from the heme cofactor of hemoglobin (Hb) released from lysed erythrocytes. IsdB, the predominant Hb receptor of S. aureus, is a cell wall-anchored protein that is composed of two NEAT domains. The N-terminal NEAT domain (IsdB-N1) binds Hb, and the C-terminal NEAT domain (IsdB-N2) relays heme to IsdA for transport into the cell. Here we present the 1.45 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the IsdB-N2–heme complex. While the structure largely conforms to the eight-strand β-sandwich fold seen in other NEAT domains such as IsdA-N and uses a conserved Tyr residue to coordinate heme-iron, a Met residue is also involved in iron coordination, resulting in a novel Tyr-Met hexacoordinate heme-iron state. The kinetics of the transfer of heme from IsdB-N2 to IsdA-N can be modeled as a two-step process. The rate of transfer of heme between the isolated NEAT domains (82 s–1) was found to be similar to that measured for the full-length proteins. Replacing the iron coordinating Met with Leu did not abrogate high-affinity heme binding but did reduce the heme transfer rate constant by more than half. This unusual Met-Tyr heme coordination may also bestow properties on IsdB that help it to bind heme in different oxidation states or extract heme from hemoglobin. PMID:21574663

  2. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of Staphylococcus aureus surface LPXTG-proteins: correlation with agr genotypes and adherence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence

  3. Proteomic and Transcriptomic Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Surface LPXTG-proteins: Correlation with agr Genotypes and Adherence Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence

  4. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  5. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:26926145

  7. Surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus play an important role in experimental skin infection.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Jin, Tao; Josefsson, Elisabet

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin infections that range from mild diseases up to life-threatening conditions. Mechanisms of S. aureus virulence in those infections remain poorly studied. To investigate the impact of S. aureus surface proteins on skin infection, we used mouse models of skin abscess formation and skin necrosis, induced by a subcutaneous injection of bacteria. In the skin abscess model, a sortase-deficient S. aureus strain lacking all of its cell-wall anchored proteins was less virulent than its wild-type strain. Also, strains specifically lacking protein A, fibronecting binding proteins, clumping factor A or surface protein SasF were impaired in their virulence. When a model of dermonecrosis was studied, the S. aureus surface proteins could not be shown to be involved. In summary, surface proteins play an important role in virulence of S. aureus skin abscess infections, but not in formation of skin necrosis.

  8. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty.

  9. Expression of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump Gene norA Is Iron Responsive in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Liang, Haihua; Missiakas, Dominique; Lan, Lefu

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus utilizes efflux transporter NorA to pump out a wide range of structurally dissimilar drugs, conferring low-level multidrug resistance. The regulation of norA expression has yet to be fully understood although past studies have revealed that this gene is under the control of the global transcriptional regulator MgrA and the two-component system ArlRS. To identify additional regulators of norA, we screened a transposon library in strain Newman expressing the transcriptional fusion norA-lacZ for altered β-galactosidase activity. We identify a transposon insertion in fhuB, a gene that encodes a ferric hydroxamate uptake system permease, and propose that the norA transcription is iron responsive. In agreement with this observation, addition of FeCl3 repressed the induction of norA-lacZ, suggesting that bacterial iron uptake plays an important role in regulating norA transcription. In addition, a fur (ferric uptake regulator) deletion exhibited compromised norA transcription and reduced resistance to quinolone compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that fur functions as a positive regulator of norA. A putative Fur box identified in the promoter region of norA was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprint assays. Finally, by employing a siderophore secretion assay, we reveal that NorA may contribute to the export of siderophores. Collectively, our experiments uncover some novel interactions between cellular iron level and norA regulation in S. aureus. PMID:22267518

  10. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Contamination of Environmental Surfaces in Households with Children Infected with Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Singh, Lauren N.; Thompson, Ryley M.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Whitney, Krista; Al-Zubeidi, Duha; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Fraser, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Household environmental surfaces may serve as vectors for acquisition and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among household members, though few studies have evaluated which objects are important MRSA reservoirs. OBJECTIVES Determine the prevalence of environmental MRSA contamination in households of children with MRSA infection; define the molecular epidemiology of environmental, pet, and human MRSA strains within households; and identify factors associated with household MRSA contamination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Fifty households of children with active or recent culture-positive community-associated MRSA infection were enrolled from 2012–13 at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and community pediatric practices affiliated with the Washington University Pediatric and Adolescent Ambulatory Research Consortium. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Participants’ nares, axillae, and inguinal folds were cultured to detect S. aureus colonization. Twenty-one environmental surfaces and pet dogs and cats were cultured. Molecular typing of S. aureus strains was performed by repetitive-sequence polymerase chain reaction to determine strain relatedness within households. RESULTS MRSA was recovered from environmental surfaces in 23 (46%) households, most frequently from the participant’s bed linens (18%), television remote control (16%), and bathroom hand towel (15%). MRSA colonized 12% of dogs and 7% of cats. At least 1 surface was contaminated with a strain type matching the participant’s isolate in 20 (40%) households. Participants colonized with S. aureus had a higher proportion of MRSA-contaminated surfaces (0.15 ± 0.17) than non-colonized participants [0.03± 0.06; mean difference 0.12 (95% CI 0.05, 0.20)]. A greater number of individuals per 1000 ft2 was also associated with a higher proportion of MRSA-contaminated surfaces (β=0.34, p=0.03). The frequency of cleaning household surfaces was not associated with S. aureus

  12. Surface nematic order in iron pnictides

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Kok Wee; Koshelev, Alexei E.

    2016-09-09

    Electronic nematicity plays an important role in iron-based superconductors. These materials have a layered structure and the theoretical description of their magnetic and nematic transitions has been well established in the two-dimensional approximation, i.e., when the layers can be treated independently. However, the interaction between iron layers mediated by electron tunneling may cause nontrivial three-dimensional behavior. Starting from the simplest model for orbital nematic in a single layer, we investigate the influence of interlayer tunneling on the bulk nematic order and a possible preemptive state where this order is only formed near the surface. In addition, we found that themore » interlayer tunneling suppresses the bulk nematicity, which makes favorable the formation of a surface nematic order above the bulk transition temperature. The purely electronic tunneling Hamiltonian, however, favors a nematic order parameter that alternates from layer to layer. The uniform bulk state typically observed experimentally may be stabilized by the coupling with the elastic lattice deformation. Depending on the strength of this coupling, we found three regimes: (i) surface nematic and alternating bulk order, (ii) surface nematic and uniform bulk order, and (iii) uniform bulk order without the intermediate surface phase. Lastly, the intermediate surface-nematic state may resolve the current controversy about the existence of a weak nematic transition in the compound BaFe2As2-xPx .« less

  13. Surface nematic order in iron pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kok Wee; Koshelev, Alexei E.

    2016-09-09

    Electronic nematicity plays an important role in iron-based superconductors. These materials have a layered structure and the theoretical description of their magnetic and nematic transitions has been well established in the two-dimensional approximation, i.e., when the layers can be treated independently. However, the interaction between iron layers mediated by electron tunneling may cause nontrivial three-dimensional behavior. Starting from the simplest model for orbital nematic in a single layer, we investigate the influence of interlayer tunneling on the bulk nematic order and a possible preemptive state where this order is only formed near the surface. In addition, we found that the interlayer tunneling suppresses the bulk nematicity, which makes favorable the formation of a surface nematic order above the bulk transition temperature. The purely electronic tunneling Hamiltonian, however, favors a nematic order parameter that alternates from layer to layer. The uniform bulk state typically observed experimentally may be stabilized by the coupling with the elastic lattice deformation. Depending on the strength of this coupling, we found three regimes: (i) surface nematic and alternating bulk order, (ii) surface nematic and uniform bulk order, and (iii) uniform bulk order without the intermediate surface phase. Lastly, the intermediate surface-nematic state may resolve the current controversy about the existence of a weak nematic transition in the compound BaFe2As2-xPx .

  14. Staphylococcus aureus FepA and FepB proteins drive heme iron utilization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Turlin, Evelyne; Débarbouillé, Michel; Augustyniak, Katarzyna; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Wandersman, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    EfeUOB-like tripartite systems are widespread in bacteria and in many cases they are encoded by genes organized into iron-regulated operons. They consist of: EfeU, a protein similar to the yeast iron permease Ftrp1; EfeO, an extracytoplasmic protein of unknown function and EfeB, also an extracytoplasmic protein with heme peroxidase activity, belonging to the DyP family. Many bacterial EfeUOB systems have been implicated in iron uptake, but a prefential iron source remains undetermined. Nevertheless, in the case of Escherichia coli, the EfeUOB system has been shown to recognize heme and to allow extracytoplasmic heme iron extraction via a deferrochelation reaction. Given the high level of sequence conservations between EfeUOB orthologs, we hypothesized that heme might be the physiological iron substrate for the other orthologous systems. To test this hypothesis, we undertook characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus FepABC system. Results presented here indicate: i) that the S. aureus FepB protein binds both heme and PPIX with high affinity, like EfeB, the E. coli ortholog; ii) that it has low peroxidase activity, comparable to that of EfeB; iii) that both FepA and FepB drive heme iron utilization, and both are required for this activity and iv) that the E. coli FepA ortholog (EfeO) cannot replace FepA in FepB-driven iron release from heme indicating protein specificity in these activities. Our results show that the function in heme iron extraction is conserved in the two orthologous systems.

  15. Surface hardening of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Ovsyannikov, V. E.; Marfitsyn, V. V.; Frolov, V. A.

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of a simple method of chromizing of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron is studied theoretically and proved experimentally. A process for diffusion chromizing of parts from this iron is suggested. When followed by surface hardening the process yields a high-hardness surface layer with abrasive strength comparable to that of white chromium cast iron.

  16. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  17. Tannic acid inhibits Staphylococcus aureus surface colonization in an IsaA-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Payne, David E; Martin, Nicholas R; Parzych, Katherine R; Rickard, Alex H; Underwood, Adam; Boles, Blaise R

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization.

  18. Tannic Acid Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Surface Colonization in an IsaA-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David E.; Martin, Nicholas R.; Parzych, Katherine R.; Rickard, Alex H.; Underwood, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization. PMID:23208606

  19. Are gym surfaces reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus? A point prevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Markley, John Daniel; Edmond, Michael B; Major, Yvette; Bearman, Gonzalo; Stevens, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    We sought to identify staphylococcal contamination of gymnasium surfaces. Various environmental surfaces were cultured at a university fitness center. Ten out of 99 samples yielded Staphylococcus aureus, all of which were methicillin-susceptible. Gym surfaces may be colonized with staphylococci and could play a role in community transmission of staphylococcal species. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Distinct roles of phenol-soluble modulins in spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on wet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L; Becher, Dörte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Dreisbach, Annette

    2013-02-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at identifying factors used by S. aureus cells to spread over wet surfaces, starting either from planktonic or biofilm-associated states. Through proteomics analyses we pinpoint phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) as prime facilitators of the spreading process. To dissect the roles of the eight PSMs produced by S. aureus, these peptides were chemically synthesized and tested in spreading assays with different psm mutant strains. The results show that PSMα3 and PSMγ are the strongest facilitators of spreading both for planktonic cells and cells in catheter-associated biofilms. Compared to the six other PSMs of S. aureus, PSMα3 and PSMγ combine strong surfactant activities with a relatively low overall hydropathicity. Importantly, we show that PSM-mediated motility of S. aureus facilitates the rapid colonization of wet surfaces next to catheters and the colonization of fresh meat.

  1. Distinct Roles of Phenol-Soluble Modulins in Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on Wet Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L.; Becher, Dörte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L.; Back, Jaap Willem; Dreisbach, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at identifying factors used by S. aureus cells to spread over wet surfaces, starting either from planktonic or biofilm-associated states. Through proteomics analyses we pinpoint phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) as prime facilitators of the spreading process. To dissect the roles of the eight PSMs produced by S. aureus, these peptides were chemically synthesized and tested in spreading assays with different psm mutant strains. The results show that PSMα3 and PSMγ are the strongest facilitators of spreading both for planktonic cells and cells in catheter-associated biofilms. Compared to the six other PSMs of S. aureus, PSMα3 and PSMγ combine strong surfactant activities with a relatively low overall hydropathicity. Importantly, we show that PSM-mediated motility of S. aureus facilitates the rapid colonization of wet surfaces next to catheters and the colonization of fresh meat. PMID:23183971

  2. Structure of the Cell Wall Anchor of Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneewind, Olaf; Fowler, Audree; Faull, Kym F.

    1995-04-01

    Many surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and are involved in the pathogenesis of these organisms. A hybrid molecule was designed that, when expressed in Staphylococcus aureus, was anchored to the cell wall and could be released by controlled enzymatic digestion. By a combination of molecular biology and mass spectrometry techniques, the structure of the cell wall anchor of surface proteins in S. aureus was revealed. After cleavage of surface proteins between threonine and glycine of the conserved LPXTG motif, the carboxyl of threonine is amide-linked to the free amino group of the pentaglycine crossbridge in the staphylococcal cell wall.

  3. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and Analysis of Associated Bacterial Communities on Food Industry Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products. PMID:23023749

  4. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and analysis of associated bacterial communities on food industry surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J; García, Pilar

    2012-12-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus transporters Hts, Sir, and Sst capture iron liberated from human transferrin by Staphyloferrin A, Staphyloferrin B, and catecholamine stress hormones, respectively, and contribute to virulence.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Federico C; Marolda, Cristina L; Cheung, Johnson; Buac, Suzana; Heinrichs, David E

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of bloodstream, respiratory tract, and skin and soft tissue infections. In the bloodstream, the iron-binding glycoprotein transferrin circulates to provide iron to cells throughout the body, but its iron-binding properties make it an important component of innate immunity. It is well established that siderophores, with their high affinity for iron, in many instances can remove iron from transferrin as a means to promote proliferation of bacterial pathogens. It is also established that catecholamine hormones can interfere with the iron-binding properties of transferrin, thus allowing infectious bacteria access to this iron pool. The present study demonstrates that S. aureus can use either of two carboxylate-type siderophores, staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B, via the transporters Hts and Sir, respectively, to access the transferrin iron pool. Growth of staphyloferrin-producing S. aureus in serum or in the presence of holotransferrin was not enhanced in the presence of catecholamines. However, catecholamines significantly enhanced the growth of staphyloferrin-deficient S. aureus in human serum or in the presence of human holotransferrin. It was further demonstrated that the Sst transporter was essential for this activity as well as for the utilization of bacterial catechol siderophores. The substrate binding protein SstD was shown to interact with ferrated catecholamines and catechol siderophores, with low to submicromolar affinities. Experiments involving mice challenged intravenously with wild-type S. aureus and isogenic mutants demonstrated that the combination of Hts, Sir, and Sst transport systems was required for full virulence of S. aureus.

  6. Transfer and Decontamination of S. aureus in Transmission Routes Regarding Hands and Contact Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Arinder, Pernilla; Johannesson, Pär; Karlsson, Ingela; Borch, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hand hygiene, cleaning and disinfection are pre-requirements for hygiene management in hospital settings and the food industry. In order to facilitate risk management, different contamination scenarios and interventions need to be evaluated. In the present study data on transfer rates and reductions of Staphylococcus aureus were provided in an experimental set-up using artificial skin. Using this methodology, test persons were not exposed with pathogenic bacteria. An exposure assessment model was developed and applied to evaluate different contamination routes and hygiene interventions. The transfer rates of S. aureus from inoculated VITRO-SKIN® to fomites were calculated from blotting series. The VITRO-SKIN® was more prone to spread bacteria than fomites. When different surfaces were cleaned, the reduction of S. aureus varied between <1 and 7 log CFU. It could not be concluded that a certain coupon material, cleaning agent, cleaning wipe, soiling or humidity consistently resulted in a high or low reduction of S. aureus. The reduction of S. aureus and E. coli during hand washing was evaluated on artificial skin, VITRO-SKIN®. The reduction of E. coli on VITRO-SKIN® was similar to the log reduction obtained when washing human hands. The S. aureus count on a human hand was both calculated in different scenarios describing different contamination routes starting from a contaminated hand using the exposure assessment model, and measured on an experimental setup using VITRO-SKIN® for validation. A linear relationship was obtained between the analysed level of S. aureus and the calculated level. However, the calculated levels of S. aureus on the VITRO-SKIN® in the scenarios were 1-1.5 log lower than the analysed level. One of the scenarios was used to study the effect of interventions like hand washing and cleaning of surfaces.

  7. Transfer and Decontamination of S. aureus in Transmission Routes Regarding Hands and Contact Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Arinder, Pernilla; Johannesson, Pär; Karlsson, Ingela; Borch, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hand hygiene, cleaning and disinfection are pre-requirements for hygiene management in hospital settings and the food industry. In order to facilitate risk management, different contamination scenarios and interventions need to be evaluated. In the present study data on transfer rates and reductions of Staphylococcus aureus were provided in an experimental set-up using artificial skin. Using this methodology, test persons were not exposed with pathogenic bacteria. An exposure assessment model was developed and applied to evaluate different contamination routes and hygiene interventions. The transfer rates of S. aureus from inoculated VITRO-SKIN® to fomites were calculated from blotting series. The VITRO-SKIN® was more prone to spread bacteria than fomites. When different surfaces were cleaned, the reduction of S. aureus varied between <1 and 7 log CFU. It could not be concluded that a certain coupon material, cleaning agent, cleaning wipe, soiling or humidity consistently resulted in a high or low reduction of S. aureus. The reduction of S. aureus and E. coli during hand washing was evaluated on artificial skin, VITRO-SKIN®. The reduction of E. coli on VITRO-SKIN® was similar to the log reduction obtained when washing human hands. The S. aureus count on a human hand was both calculated in different scenarios describing different contamination routes starting from a contaminated hand using the exposure assessment model, and measured on an experimental setup using VITRO-SKIN® for validation. A linear relationship was obtained between the analysed level of S. aureus and the calculated level. However, the calculated levels of S. aureus on the VITRO-SKIN® in the scenarios were 1–1.5 log lower than the analysed level. One of the scenarios was used to study the effect of interventions like hand washing and cleaning of surfaces. PMID:27280772

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A Mediates Interspecies Interactions at the Cell Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Catherine R.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Mishra, Meenu; Hayden, Hillary S.; Radey, Matthew C.; Merrihew, Gennifer; MacCoss, Michael J.; Burns, Jane; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While considerable research has focused on the properties of individual bacteria, relatively little is known about how microbial interspecies interactions alter bacterial behaviors and pathogenesis. Staphylococcus aureus frequently coinfects with other pathogens in a range of different infectious diseases. For example, coinfection by S. aureus with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs commonly in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with higher lung disease morbidity and mortality. S. aureus secretes numerous exoproducts that are known to interact with host tissues, influencing inflammatory responses. The abundantly secreted S. aureus staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binds a range of human glycoproteins, immunoglobulins, and other molecules, with diverse effects on the host, including inhibition of phagocytosis of S. aureus cells. However, the potential effects of SpA and other S. aureus exoproducts on coinfecting bacteria have not been explored. Here, we show that S. aureus-secreted products, including SpA, significantly alter two behaviors associated with persistent infection. We found that SpA inhibited biofilm formation by specific P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, and it also inhibited phagocytosis by neutrophils of all isolates tested. Our results indicate that these effects were mediated by binding to at least two P. aeruginosa cell surface structures—type IV pili and the exopolysaccharide Psl—that confer attachment to surfaces and to other bacterial cells. Thus, we found that the role of a well-studied S. aureus exoproduct, SpA, extends well beyond interactions with the host immune system. Secreted SpA alters multiple persistence-associated behaviors of another common microbial community member, likely influencing cocolonization and coinfection with other microbes. PMID:27222468

  9. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surface waters near industrial hog operation spray fields.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, S M; Myers, K W; Heaney, C D; Larsen, J; Hall, D; Miller, M B; Stewart, J R

    2016-09-15

    Industrial hog operations (IHOs) have been identified as a source of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, few studies have investigated the presence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in the environment near IHOs, specifically surface waters proximal to spray fields where IHO liquid lagoon waste is sprayed. Surface water samples (n=179) were collected over the course of approximately one year from nine locations in southeastern North Carolina and analyzed for the presence of presumptive MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA media. Culture-based, biochemical, and molecular tests, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to confirm that isolates that grew on CHROMagar MRSA media were S. aureus. Confirmed S. aureus isolates were then tested for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and screened for molecular markers of MRSA (mecA, mecC) and livestock adaptation (absence of scn). A total of 12 confirmed MRSA were detected in 9 distinct water samples. Nine of 12 MRSA isolates were also multidrug-resistant (MDRSA [i.e., resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes]). All MRSA were scn-positive and most (11/12) belonged to a staphylococcal protein A (spa) type t008, which is commonly associated with humans. Additionally, 12 confirmed S. aureus that were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) were recovered, 7 of which belonged to spa type t021 and were scn-negative (a marker of livestock-adaptation). This study demonstrated the presence of MSSA, MRSA, and MDRSA in surface waters adjacent to IHO lagoon waste spray fields in southeastern North Carolina. To our knowledge, this is the first report of waterborne S. aureus from surface waters proximal to IHOs.

  10. Chemical Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B Affords Insight into the Molecular Structure, Iron Chelation, and Biological Activity of a Polycarboxylate Siderophore Deployed by the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Julie L H; Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-07-22

    Staphyloferrin B (SB) is a citrate-based polycarboxylate siderophore produced and utilized by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus for acquiring iron when colonizing the vertebrate host. The first chemical synthesis of SB is reported, which enables further molecular and biological characterization and provides access to structural analogues of the siderophore. Under conditions of iron limitation, addition of synthetic SB to bacterial growth medium recovered the growth of the antibiotic resistant community isolate S. aureus USA300 JE2. Two structural analogues of SB, epiSB and SBimide, were also synthesized and employed to investigate how epimerization of the citric acid moiety or imide formation influence its function as a siderophore. Epimerization of the citric acid stereocenter perturbed the iron-binding properties and siderophore function of SB as evidenced by experimental and computational modeling studies. Although epiSB provided growth recovery to S. aureus USA300 JE2 cultured in iron-deficient medium, the effect was attenuated relative to that of SB. Moreover, SB more effectively sequestered the Fe(III) bound to human holo-transferrin, an iron source of S. aureus, than epiSB. SBimide is an imide analogous to the imide forms of other citric acid siderophores that are often observed when these molecules are isolated from natural sources. Here, SBimide is shown to be unstable, converting to native SB at physiological pH. SB is considered to be a virulence factor of S. aureus, a pathogen that poses a particular threat to public health because of the number of drug-resistant strains emerging in hospital and community settings. Iron acquisition by S. aureus is important for its ability to colonize the human host and cause disease, and new chemical insights into the structure and function of SB will inform the search for new therapeutic strategies for combating S. aureus infections.

  11. Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus of Nano-Structured Fluorinated Surfaces, Formed by Different Methods of Ion-Plasma Technology.

    PubMed

    Elinson, V M; Didenko, L V; Shevlyagina, N V; Avtandilov, G A; Gaidarova, A Kh; Lyamin, A N

    2016-11-01

    Colonization of fluorinated surfaces produced by ion-plasma technology by Staphylococcus aureus was studied by scanning electron microscopy and surface energy analysis. It was shown that the intensity of colonization was determined by the surface relief and fluorine content. Formation of nanostructured surfaces accompanied by a sharp decrease in the surface energy prevented adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus cells to the fluorine-containing surface.

  12. An XPS study of the iron surface promoted by potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Perov, V.M.

    1995-03-01

    The surface composition of a model iron-potassium catalytic system in oxidized and reduced states is studied by XPS. It is found that the potassium-to-oxygen atomic ratio for the surface of reduced samples is one. The distributions of elements in subsurface layers of the reduced system are determined by varying the detection angle of emitted electrons and by ion sputtering of the surface. It is shown that potassium and oxygen form a monolayer on the surface of iron crystallites.

  13. Chemical Characterization of a New Surface Antigenic Polysaccharide from a Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Teresa C. M.; Park, James T.

    1971-01-01

    A mutant of Staphylococcus aureus H was isolated by virtue of its inability to agglutinate with antibodies against teichoic acid of S. aureus. Immunological studies revealed that the mutant, S. aureus T, possessed a new surface antigen in addition to having the antigenic determinant of the wild-type strain, the ribitol teichoic acid. The presence of this additional surface component rendered strain T resistant to staphylococcal typing phages, presumably by masking the phage-receptor sites. The polymer was separated from teichoic acid by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and was shown to be composed of two amino sugars, N-acetyl-d-fucosamine and N-acetyl-d-mannosamin uronic acid. Images PMID:5001874

  14. Crystal structure of the heme-IsdC complex, the central conduit of the Isd iron/heme uptake system in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katherine H; Schneider, Sabine; Cockayne, Alan; Paoli, Max

    2007-04-06

    Pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus require iron to survive and have evolved specialized proteins to steal heme from their host. IsdC is the central conduit of the Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) multicomponent heme uptake machinery; staphylococcal cell-surface proteins such as IsdA, IsdB, and IsdH are thought to funnel their molecular cargo to IsdC, which then mediates the transfer of the iron-containing nutrient to the membrane translocation system IsdDEF. The structure of the heme-IsdC complex reveals a novel heme site within an immunoglobulin-like domain and sheds light on its binding mechanism. The folding topology is reminiscent of the architecture of cytochrome f, cellobiose dehydrogenase, and ethylbenzene dehydrogenase; in these three proteins, the heme is bound in an equivalent position, but interestingly, IsdC features a distinct binding pocket with the ligand located next to the hydrophobic core of the beta-sandwich. The iron is coordinated with a tyrosine surrounded by several non-polar side chains that cluster into a tightly packed proximal side. On the other hand, the distal side is relatively exposed with a short helical peptide segment that acts as a lip clasping onto almost half of the porphyrin plane. This structural feature is argued to play a role in the mechanism of binding and release by switching to an open conformation and thus loosening the interactions holding the heme. The structure of the heme-IsdC complex provides a template for the understanding of other proteins, such as IsdA, IsdB, and IsdH, that contain the same heme-binding module as IsdC, known as the NEAT (near transporter) domain.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms are not killed by sodium hypochlorite: implications for infection control.

    PubMed

    Almatroudi, A; Gosbell, I B; Hu, H; Jensen, S O; Espedido, B A; Tahir, S; Glasbey, T O; Legge, P; Whiteley, G; Deva, A; Vickery, K

    2016-07-01

    Dry hospital environments are contaminated with pathogenic bacteria in biofilms, which suggests that current cleaning practices and disinfectants are failing. To test the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite solution against Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Biofilm Reactor was adapted to create a dry-surface biofilm, containing 1.36 × 10(7)S. aureus/coupon, by alternating cycles of growth and dehydration over 12 days. Biofilm was detected qualitatively using live/dead stain confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and quantitatively with sonicated viable plate counts and crystal violet assay. Sodium hypochlorite (1000-20,000parts per million) was applied to the dry-surface biofilm for 10min, coupons were rinsed three times, and residual biofilm viability was determined by CLSM, plate counts and prolonged culture up to 16 days. Isolates before and after exposure underwent minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum eradication concentration (MEC) testing, and one pair underwent whole-genome sequencing. Hypochlorite exposure reduced plate counts by a factor of 7 log10, and reduced biofilm biomass by a factor of 100; however, staining of residual biofilm showed that live S. aureus cells remained. On prolonged incubation, S. aureus regrew and formed biofilms. Post-exposure S. aureus isolates had MICs and MECs that were not significantly different from the parent strains. Whole-genome sequencing of one pre- and post-exposure pair found that they were virtually identical. Hypochlorite exposure led to a 7-log kill but the organisms regrew. No resistance mutations occurred, implying that hypochlorite resistance is an intrinsic property of S. aureus biofilms. The clinical significance of this warrants further study. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of serum proteins in Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to ethylene glycol coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Swen; Yu, Wenqi; Nega, Mulugeta; Chu, Ya-Yun; Zorn, Stefan; Zhang, Fajun; Götz, Friedrich; Schreiber, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion on implants is a first step in the development of chronic foreign body associated infections. Finding strategies to minimize bacterial adhesion may contribute to minimize such infections. It is known that surfaces with oligo-ethylene-glycol (EG3OMe) or poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG2k) terminations decrease unspecific protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. However, little is known about the influence of serum and its components on bacterial adhesion. We therefore prepared two coatings on gold surface with HS-(CH2)11EG3OMe (EG3OMe) and PEG2k-thiol and studied the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA), γ-globulins, and serum on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion. While BSA and lysozyme showed no adherence even when applied at very high concentrations (100 mg/ml), γ-globulins adsorbed already from 10 mg/ml on. The adsorption of γ-globulins was, however, significantly decreased when it was mixed with BSA in a ratio of 3:1, as it is in the serum. Pretreatment of EG3OMe and PEG2k coatings with γ-globulins or serum strongly promoted adherence of S. aureus when resuspended in buffer, suggesting that γ-globulins play a pivotal role in promoting S. aureus adhesion by its IgG binding proteins; the finding that a spa-deletion mutant, lacking the IgG binding protein A, showed decreased adherence corroborated this. Similarly, when S. aureus was pretreated with serum or γ-globulins its adherence was also significantly decreased. Our findings show that particularly γ-globulins bind to the coated surfaces thus mediating adherence of S. aureus via its protein A. As pretreatment of S. aureus with serum or γ-globulins significantly decreased adherence, treatment of patients with γ-globulins before implant surgery might lower the risk of implant-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of engineered surface microtopography on biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kenneth K; Schumacher, James F; Sampson, Edith M; Burne, Robert A; Antonelli, Patrick J; Brennan, Anthony B

    2007-06-01

    The surface of an indwelling medical device can be colonized by human pathogens that can form biofilms and cause infections. In most cases, these biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial therapy and eventually necessitate removal or replacement of the device. An engineered surface microtopography based on the skin of sharks, Sharklet AF, has been designed on a poly(dimethyl siloxane) elastomer (PDMSe) to disrupt the formation of bacterial biofilms without the use of bactericidal agents. The Sharklet AF PDMSe was tested against smooth PDMSe for biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus over the course of 21 days. The smooth surface exhibited early-stage biofilm colonies at 7 days and mature biofilms at 14 days, while the topographical surface did not show evidence of early biofilm colonization until day 21. At 14 days, the mean value of percent area coverage of S. aureus on the smooth surface was 54% compared to 7% for the Sharklet AF surface (p<0.01). These results suggest that surface modification of indwelling medical devices and exposed sterile surfaces with the Sharklet AF engineered topography may be an effective solution in disrupting biofilm formation of S. aureus.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins involved in adaptation to oxacillin identified using a novel cell shaving approach.

    PubMed

    Solis, Nestor; Parker, Benjamin L; Kwong, Stephen M; Robinson, Gareth; Firth, Neville; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-06-06

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for a variety of infections, and some strains are resistant to virtually all classes of antibiotics. Cell shaving proteomics using a novel probability scoring algorithm to compare the surfaceomes of the methicillin-resistant, laboratory-adapted S. aureus COL strain with a COL strain in vitro adapted to high levels of oxacillin (APT). APT displayed altered cell morphology compared with COL and increased aggregation in biofilm assays. Increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics was observed, but adaptation to oxacillin did not confer multidrug resistance. Analysis of the S. aureus COL and APT surfaceomes identified 150 proteins at a threshold determined by the scoring algorithm. Proteins unique to APT included the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) domain-containing MsrR and SACOL2302. Quantitative RT-PCR showed increased expression of sacol2302 in APT grown with oxacillin (>6-fold compared with COL). Overexpression of sacol2302 in COL to levels consistent with APT (+ oxacillin) did not influence biofilm formation or β-lactam resistance. Proteomics using iTRAQ and LC-MS/MS identified 1323 proteins (∼50% of the theoretical S. aureus proteome), and cluster analysis demonstrated elevated APT abundances of LCP proteins, capsule and peptidoglycan biosynthesis proteins, and proteins involved in wall remodelling. Adaptation to oxacillin also induced urease proteins, which maintained culture pH compared to COL. These results show that S. aureus modifies surface architecture in response to antibiotic adaptation.

  19. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius expresses surface proteins that closely resemble those from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Joan A; Smith, Emma J; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2009-09-18

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal of dogs that is implicated in the pathogenesis of canine pyoderma. This study aimed to determine if S. pseudintermedius expresses surface proteins resembling those from Staphylococcus aureus and to characterise them. S. pseudintermedius strain 326 was shown to adhere strongly to purified fibrinogen, fibronectin and cytokeratin 10. It adhered to the alpha-chain of fibrinogen which, along with binding to cytokeratin 10, is the hallmark of clumping factor B of S. aureus, a surface protein that is in part responsible for colonisation of the human nares. Ligand-affinity blotting with cell-wall extracts demonstrated that S. pseudintermedius 326 expressed a cell-wall anchored fibronectin binding protein which recognised the N-terminal 29kDa fragment. The ability to bind fibronectin is an important attribute of pathogenic S. aureus and is associated with the ability of S. aureus to colonise skin of human atopic dermatitis patients. S. pseudintermedius genomic DNA was probed with labelled DNA amplified from the serine-aspartate repeat encoding region of clfA of S. aureus. This probe hybridised to a single SpeI fragment of S. pseudintermedius DNA. In the cell-wall extract of S. pseudintermedius 326, a 180kDa protein was discovered which bound to fibrinogen by ligand-affinity blotting and reacted in a Western blot with antibodies raised against the serine-aspartate repeat region of ClfA and the B-repeats of SdrD of S. aureus. It is proposed that this is an Sdr protein with B-repeats that has an A domain that binds to fibrinogen. Whether it is the same protein that binds cytokeratin 10 is not clear.

  20. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  1. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  2. The effect of copper(II), iron(II) sulphate, and vitamin C combinations on the weak antimicrobial activity of (+)-catechin against Staphylococcus aureus and other microbes.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew C; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Gould, Simon W J; Fielder, Mark D; Naughton, Declan P; Kelly, Alison F

    2012-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to improve the activity of plant compounds with low antimicrobial efficacy. (+)-Catechin, a weak antimicrobial tea flavanol, was combined with putative adjuncts and tested against different species of bacteria. Copper(II) sulphate enhanced (+)-catechin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis or Escherichia coli. Attempts to raise the activity of (+)-catechin against two unresponsive species, S. aureus and E. coli, with iron(II) sulphate, iron(III) chloride, and vitamin C, showed that iron(II) enhanced (+)-catechin against S. aureus, but not E. coli; neither iron(III) nor combined iron(II) and copper(II), enhanced (+)-catechin activity against either species. Vitamin C enhanced copper(II) containing combinations against both species in the absence of iron(II). Catalase or EDTA added to active samples removed viability effects suggesting that active mixtures had produced H(2)O(2)via the action of added metal(II) ions. H(2)O(2) generation by (+)-catechin plus copper(II) mixtures and copper(II) alone could account for the principal effect of bacterial growth inhibition following 30 minute exposures as well as the antimicrobial effect of (+)-catechin-iron(II) against S. aureus. These novel findings about a weak antimicrobial flavanol contrast with previous knowledge of more active flavanols with transition metal combinations. Weak antimicrobial compounds like (+)-catechin within enhancement mixtures may therefore be used as efficacious agents. (+)-Catechin may provide a means of lowering copper(II) or iron(II) contents in certain crop protection and other products.

  3. Identification and Characterization of fhuD1 and fhuD2, Two Genes Involved in Iron-Hydroxamate Uptake in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sebulsky, M. Tom; Heinrichs, David E.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can utilize several hydroxamate siderophores for growth under iron-restricted conditions. Previous findings have shown that S. aureus possesses a cytoplasmic membrane-associated traffic ATPase that is involved in the specific transport of iron(III)-hydroxamate complexes. In this study, we have identified two additional genes, termed fhuD1 and fhuD2, whose products are involved in this transport process in S. aureus. We have shown that fhuD2 codes for a posttranslationally modified lipoprotein that is anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane, while the deduced amino acid sequence predicts the same for fhuD1. The predicted FhuD1 and FhuD2 proteins share 41.0% identity and 56.4% total similarity with each other, 45.9 and 49.1% total similarity with the FhuD homolog in Bacillus subtilis, and 29.3 and 24.6% total similarity with the periplasmic FhuD protein from Escherichia coli. Insertional inactivation and gene replacement of both genes showed that while FhuD2 is involved in the transport of iron(III) in complex with ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, aerobactin, and coprogen, FhuD1 shows a more limited substrate range, capable of only iron(III)-ferrichrome and iron(III)-ferrioxamine B transport in S. aureus. Nucleotide sequences present upstream of both fhuD1 and fhuD2 predict the presence of consensus Fur binding sequences. In agreement, transcription of both genes was negatively regulated by exogenous iron levels through the activity of the S. aureus Fur protein. PMID:11489851

  4. Structure and Hardness of Cast Iron after Surface Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, E. N.

    2005-09-01

    Special features of structure formation in the heat-affected zone of roll-foundry iron with flaked or globular graphite due to surface heat treatment by direct electric (plasma) arc are considered. The influence of the parameters of the process on the composition, structure, and properties of the hardened zone is studied. Treatment modes ensuring a structure with enhanced hardness and wear resistance in the surface layer of iron are determined.

  5. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  6. Nature of the Elimination of the Penicillinase Plasmid from Staphylococcus aureus by Surface-Active Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sonstein, Stephen A.; Baldwin, J. N.

    1972-01-01

    Growth of Stapylococcus aureus in various ionic surface-active agents resulted in loss of the ability to produce penicillinase, whereas growth in nonionic surface-active agents had no effect on penicillinase production. The curing effect of various alkyl sulfates was found to be dependent upon the chain length. Curing by surface-active agents could be inhibited by magnesium. Reciprocal transduction experiments showed that curing by a surface-active agent was a property of the plasmid, not of the bacterial strain in which the plasmic resides. PMID:4204903

  7. Copper Reduction and Contact Killing of Bacteria by Iron Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Salima; Kumar, Ranjeet; Solioz, Marc

    2015-09-01

    The well-established killing of bacteria by copper surfaces, also called contact killing, is currently believed to be a combined effect of bacterial contact with the copper surface and the dissolution of copper, resulting in lethal bacterial damage. Iron can similarly be released in ionic form from iron surfaces and would thus be expected to also exhibit contact killing, although essentially no contact killing is observed by iron surfaces. However, we show here that the exposure of bacteria to iron surfaces in the presence of copper ions results in efficient contact killing. The process involves reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+) by iron; Cu(+) has been shown to be considerably more toxic to cells than Cu(2+). The specific Cu(+) chelator, bicinchoninic acid, suppresses contact killing by chelating the Cu(+) ions. These findings underline the importance of Cu(+) ions in the contact killing process and infer that iron-based alloys containing copper could provide novel antimicrobial materials. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels. PMID:27512392

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Jones, Jace W; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels.

  10. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  11. Role of Staphylococcus aureus surface adhesins in orthopaedic device infections: are results model-dependent?

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Landon, G C; Patti, J M; Nguyen, L L; Fernau, R C; McDevitt, D; Greene, C; Foster, T; Klima, M

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial colonisation of prosthetic material can lead to clinical infection or implant failure, or both, often requiring removal of the device. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to bioprosthetic materials is mediated by adhesins belonging to the MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognising adhesive matrix molecules) family of microbial cell surface proteins. The objective of this study was to compare the virulence of a mutant strain of S. aureus Newman that possesses all three fibrinogen-, fibronectin- and collagen-binding MSCRAMMs (MSCRAMM-positive strain) with that of a mutant strain that lacks all three types of MSCRAMMs (MSCRAMM-negative strain) in a rabbit model of orthopaedic device-related infection. After a hole was drilled into the knee joint of each animal, a group of 10 rabbits was inoculated with the MSCRAMM-positive strain and another group of 10 rabbits received the MSCRAMM-negative strain. A stainless steel screw was then placed into the drilled hole. Two weeks later, the rabbits were killed and serum samples, bone tissue and implants were harvested for bacteriological and histopathological evaluation. No significant difference in infection rates was demonstrated between the two groups. The ability to delineate the role of S. aureus surface adhesins in causing orthopaedic device-related infection could be model-dependent.

  12. Surface-associated proteins from Staphylococcus aureus demonstrate potent bone resorbing activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, S; Song, Y; Meghji, S; Reddi, K; Harris, M; Ross, A; Poole, S; Wilson, M; Henderson, B

    1995-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with rapid bone destruction in conditions such as osteomyelitis, bacterial arthritis, and infected orthopedic implant failure. How this bacterium induces bone destruction has not been defined. In studies of the role of oral Gram-negative bacteria in periodontal pathology, we have established that cell surface-associated proteins (SAPs) are potent stimulators of bone resorption. The surface-associated components from S. aureus have now been isolated and demonstrated to be extremely potent stimulators of bone resorption in the murine calvarial bone resorption assay. Bone resorption appears to be due to proteins, is not the result of contamination with lipoteichoic acid or muramyl dipeptide, and is potently inhibited by indomethacin and can be completely blocked by high concentrations of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist or TN3-19.12, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to murine TNF. The SAP fraction can stimulate fibroblasts or monocytes to release osteolytic cytokines, but only at high concentrations. Fractionation of the SAPs by high performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that a number of fractions were osteolytically active. The most active contained a heterodimeric protein of molecular weight 32-36 kD. The presence of this osteolytically active surface-associated fraction may account for the bone resorption associated with local infection with S. aureus.

  13. Screening and characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from ophthalmology clinic surfaces: a proposed surveillance tool

    PubMed Central

    Reem, Rachel E.; Van Balen, Joany; Hoet, Armando E.; Cebulla, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To screen environmental surfaces of an outpatient ophthalmic clinic for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA); to identify the most commonly contaminated surfaces; and to phenotype and genotype all collected isolates Design A single institution, one-year prospective environmental study Methods Commonly touched surfaces from examination rooms and common areas were targeted and sampled on a quarterly basis for one year. Samples were collected using electrostatic cloths and swabs. S. aureus was isolated using non-selective and selective media. Morphological characteristics and standard biological testing were used to confirm staphylococcal species. S. aureus isolates were phenotypically (Kirby-Bauer method) and genotypically characterized (mecA confirmation, SCCmec typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis). Dendrogram analysis was used to establish genetic relatedness between the isolates. Results Of 112 total samples, 27 (24%) and 5 (4%) were MSSA- and MRSA-positive, respectively. Both community-associated (SCCmec IV, USA300) and hospital-associated (SCCmec II, USA100) MRSA isolates were found. No single surface remained consistently positive with the same isolate over time and molecular analysis demonstrated high levels of diversity among isolates. Doorknobs, slit-lamp head/chinrests, and computer keyboards were frequently contaminated. Conclusions The proposed surveillance protocol successfully allowed the detection of both MSSA and MRSA contaminating important high-touch surfaces in a representative ophthalmology clinic. Frequently contaminated surfaces must be targeted for routine cleaning and disinfection as a there is a constant introduction of clones over time. Hence, other clinics may consider implementing and adapting surveillance tools, as the one here described, to help them control these important nosocomial pathogens. PMID:24412125

  14. Thin film lubrication of hexadecane confined by iron and iron oxide surfaces: A crucial role of surface structure.

    PubMed

    Ta, D T; Tieu, A K; Zhu, H T; Kosasih, B

    2015-10-28

    A comparative analysis of thin film lubrication of hexadecane between different iron and its oxide surfaces has been carried out using classical molecular dynamic simulation. An ab initio force-field, COMPASS, was applied for n-hexadecane using explicit atom model. An effective potential derived from density functional theory calculation was utilized for the interfacial interaction between hexadecane and the tribo-surfaces. A quantitative surface parameterization was introduced to investigate the influence of surface properties on the structure, rheological properties, and tribological performance of the lubricant. The results show that although the wall-fluid attraction of hexadecane on pure iron surfaces is significantly stronger than its oxides, there is a considerable reduction of shear stress of confined n-hexadecane film between Fe(100) and Fe(110) surfaces compared with FeO(110), FeO(111), Fe2O3(001), and Fe2O3(012). It was found that, in thin film lubrication of hexadecane between smooth iron and iron oxide surfaces, the surface corrugation plays a role more important than the wall-fluid adhesion strength.

  15. Thin film lubrication of hexadecane confined by iron and iron oxide surfaces: A crucial role of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ta, D. T.; Tieu, A. K.; Zhu, H. T. Kosasih, B.

    2015-10-28

    A comparative analysis of thin film lubrication of hexadecane between different iron and its oxide surfaces has been carried out using classical molecular dynamic simulation. An ab initio force-field, COMPASS, was applied for n-hexadecane using explicit atom model. An effective potential derived from density functional theory calculation was utilized for the interfacial interaction between hexadecane and the tribo-surfaces. A quantitative surface parameterization was introduced to investigate the influence of surface properties on the structure, rheological properties, and tribological performance of the lubricant. The results show that although the wall-fluid attraction of hexadecane on pure iron surfaces is significantly stronger than its oxides, there is a considerable reduction of shear stress of confined n-hexadecane film between Fe(100) and Fe(110) surfaces compared with FeO(110), FeO(111), Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001), and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(012). It was found that, in thin film lubrication of hexadecane between smooth iron and iron oxide surfaces, the surface corrugation plays a role more important than the wall-fluid adhesion strength.

  16. Surface hardening of two cast irons by friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasufumi; Kikuchi, Toshifumi; Kiguchi, Shoji; Nogi, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Friction Stir Processing (FSP) was applied to the surface hardening of cast irons. Flake graphite cast iron (FC300) and nodular graphite cast iron (FCD700) were used to investigate the validity of this method. The matrices of the FC300 and FC700 cast irons are pearlite. The rotary tool is a 25mm diameter cylindrical tool, and the travelling speed was varied between 50 and 150mm/min in order to control the heat input at the constant rotation speed of 900rpm. As a result, it has been clarified that a Vickers hardness of about 700HV is obtained for both cast irons. It is considered that a very fine martensite structure is formed because the FSP generates the heat very locally, and a very high cooling rate is constantly obtained. When a tool without an umbo (probe) is used, the domain in which graphite is crushed and striated is minimized. This leads to obtaining a much harder sample. The hardness change depends on the size of the martensite, which can be controlled by the process conditions, such as the tool traveling speed and the load. Based on these results, it was clarified that the FSP has many advantages for cast irons, such as a higher hardness and lower distortion. As a result, no post surface heat treatment and no post machining are required to obtain the required hardness, while these processes are generally required when using the traditional methods.

  17. Self-disinfecting surfaces and activity against Staphyloccocus aureus ATCC 6538 under real-life conditions.

    PubMed

    Brühwasser, C; Heinrich, H; Lass-Flörl, C; Mayr, A

    2017-10-01

    Environmental surface contamination provides a potential reservoir for pathogens to cause infections. As such, self-disinfecting surfaces have been developed to possibly reduce exogenous transmission. Five different self-disinfecting surfaces were evaluated for activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 under real-life conditions using the dry inoculation method. Various antimicrobial effects were detected. However, following disinfection with alcoholic wipes, these effects disappeared. Further development is necessary to produce self-disinfecting surfaces that are stable in the presence of hospital disinfectants, as it is impossible to guarantee that self-disinfecting surfaces in healthcare settings will not be exposed to disinfectants. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Superoxide Dismutase Capable of Functioning with Iron or Manganese Promotes the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Calprotectin and Nutritional Immunity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Yuritzi M; Barwinska-Sendra, Anna; Tarrant, Emma; Skaar, Eric P; Waldron, Kevin J; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a devastating mammalian pathogen for which the development of new therapeutic approaches is urgently needed due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance. During infection pathogens must overcome the dual threats of host-imposed manganese starvation, termed nutritional immunity, and the oxidative burst of immune cells. These defenses function synergistically, as host-imposed manganese starvation reduces activity of the manganese-dependent enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). S. aureus expresses two SODs, denoted SodA and SodM. While all staphylococci possess SodA, SodM is unique to S. aureus, but the advantage that S. aureus gains by expressing two apparently manganese-dependent SODs is unknown. Surprisingly, loss of both SODs renders S. aureus more sensitive to host-imposed manganese starvation, suggesting a role for these proteins in overcoming nutritional immunity. In this study, we have elucidated the respective contributions of SodA and SodM to resisting oxidative stress and nutritional immunity. These analyses revealed that SodA is important for resisting oxidative stress and for disease development when manganese is abundant, while SodM is important under manganese-deplete conditions. In vitro analysis demonstrated that SodA is strictly manganese-dependent whereas SodM is in fact cambialistic, possessing equal enzymatic activity when loaded with manganese or iron. Cumulatively, these studies provide a mechanistic rationale for the acquisition of a second superoxide dismutase by S. aureus and demonstrate an important contribution of cambialistic SODs to bacterial pathogenesis. Furthermore, they also suggest a new mechanism for resisting manganese starvation, namely populating manganese-utilizing enzymes with iron.

  19. A Superoxide Dismutase Capable of Functioning with Iron or Manganese Promotes the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Calprotectin and Nutritional Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Emma; Skaar, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a devastating mammalian pathogen for which the development of new therapeutic approaches is urgently needed due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance. During infection pathogens must overcome the dual threats of host-imposed manganese starvation, termed nutritional immunity, and the oxidative burst of immune cells. These defenses function synergistically, as host-imposed manganese starvation reduces activity of the manganese-dependent enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). S. aureus expresses two SODs, denoted SodA and SodM. While all staphylococci possess SodA, SodM is unique to S. aureus, but the advantage that S. aureus gains by expressing two apparently manganese-dependent SODs is unknown. Surprisingly, loss of both SODs renders S. aureus more sensitive to host-imposed manganese starvation, suggesting a role for these proteins in overcoming nutritional immunity. In this study, we have elucidated the respective contributions of SodA and SodM to resisting oxidative stress and nutritional immunity. These analyses revealed that SodA is important for resisting oxidative stress and for disease development when manganese is abundant, while SodM is important under manganese-deplete conditions. In vitro analysis demonstrated that SodA is strictly manganese-dependent whereas SodM is in fact cambialistic, possessing equal enzymatic activity when loaded with manganese or iron. Cumulatively, these studies provide a mechanistic rationale for the acquisition of a second superoxide dismutase by S. aureus and demonstrate an important contribution of cambialistic SODs to bacterial pathogenesis. Furthermore, they also suggest a new mechanism for resisting manganese starvation, namely populating manganese-utilizing enzymes with iron. PMID:28103306

  20. Understanding trichloroethylene chemisorption to iron surfaces using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianliu; Luo, Jing; Blowers, Paul; Farrell, James

    2008-03-15

    This research investigated the thermodynamic favorability and resulting structures for chemical adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) to metallic iron using periodic density functional theory (DFT). Three initial TCE positions having the plane defined by HCC atoms parallel to the iron surface resulted in formation of three different chemisorption complexes between carbon atoms in TCE and the iron surface. The Cl-bridge initial configuration with the HCC plane of TCE perpendicular to the iron surface did not result in C-Fe bond formation. The most energetically favorable complex formed at the C-bridge site where the initial configuration had the C=C bond in TCE at a bridge site between adjacent iron atoms. In the C-bridge complex, one C atom formed two a bonds to different Fe atoms, while the second C atom formed a sigma bond with a second Fe atom. Surface complexation atthe C-bridge site resulted in scission of all three C-Cl bonds and also resulted in a shortening of the C==C bond to a distance intermediate between a double and a triple bond. Initial configurations with the C==C bond adsorbed at top or hollow sites on the iron surface resulted in formation of C-Fe a bonds between a single C and two adjacent Fe atoms, and the scission of only two C==Cl bonds. Bond angles and bond lengths indicated that there were no changes in bond order of the C==C bond for top and hollow adsorption. Chemisorption at the C-bridge site had an activation energy of 49 kJ/mol and an early transition state where all three C-CI bonds were activated. The early transition state and the loss of all three Cl atoms upon chemisorption are consistent with most experimental observations that TCE undergoes complete dechlorination in one interaction with the iron surface. The absence of chemisorption and scission of only two C--Cl bonds at the Cl-bridge site is consistent with experimental observations that trace amounts of chloroacetylene may also be produced from reactions of TCE with iron.

  1. Nanorough titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus via nano adhesion points.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Roth, Martin; Yu, Wenqi; Horn, Uwe; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Microbial adhesion to natural and synthetic materials surfaces is a key issue e.g. in food industry, sewage treatment and most importantly in the biomedical field. The current development and progress in nanoscale structuring of materials surfaces to control microbial adhesion requires an advanced understanding of the microbe-material-interaction. This study aimed to investigate the nanostructure of the microbe-material-interface and link it to microbial adhesion kinetics as function of titanium surface nanoroughness to gain new insight into controlling microbial adhesion via materials' surface nanoroughness. Adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was statistically significantly reduced (p≤0.05) by 55.6 % and 40.5 %, respectively, on physical vapor deposited titanium thin films with a nanoroughness of 6nm and the lowest surface peak density compared to 2nm with the highest surface peak density. Cross-sectioning of the microbial cells with a focused ion beam (FIB) and SEM imaging provided for the first time direct insight into the titanium-microbe-interface. High resolution SEM micrographs gave evidence that the surface peaks are the loci of initial contact between the microbial cells and the material's surface. In a qualitative model we propose that the initial microbial adhesion on nanorough surfaces is controlled by the titanium surface peak density via nano adhesion points. This new understanding will help towards the design of materials surfaces for controlling microbial adhesion.

  2. Surface magnetic canting of iron films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsumoto, Masuaki; Oda, Katsuro; Okano, Tatsuo; Zhang, Xiao Wei; Kishimoto, Shunji; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2011-07-01

    The magnetization direction of α-Fe thin films was investigated by means of quantum-beat spectroscopy using nuclear resonant scattering in the glancing-incidence regime and conversion-electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The CEMS results show that the mean magnetization of the films is in plane. Quantum-beat data, on the other hand, reveal that perpendicular components are present in the magnetization at the film surfaces, indicating that the magnetization cants from the in-plane to the perpendicular direction near the surfaces.

  3. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus growth on Ti alloy nanostructured surfaces through the addition of Sn.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Nathália C; Geilich, Benjamin M; Oliveira, Haroldo G; Caram, Rubens; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    β-type Ti alloys containing Nb are exciting materials for numerous orthopedic and dental applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties. To improve their cytocompatibility properties (such as increasing bone growth and decreasing infection), the surfaces of such materials can be optimized by adding elements and/or nanotexturing through anodization. Because of the increasing prevalence of orthopedic implant infections, the objective of this in vitro study was to add Sn and create unique nanoscale surface features on β-type Ti alloys. Nanotubes and nanofeatures on Ti-35Nb and Ti-35Nb-4Sn alloys were created by anodization in a HF-based electrolyte and then heat treated in a furnace to promote amorphous structures and phases such as anatase, a mixture of anatase-rutile, and rutile. Samples were characterized by SEM, which indicated different morphologies dependent on the oxide content and method of modification. XPS experiments identified the oxide content which resulted in a phase transformation in the oxide layer formed onto Ti-35Nb and Ti-35Nb-4Sn alloys. Most importantly, regardless of the resulting nanostructures (nanotubes or nanofeatures) and crystalline phase, this study showed for the first time that adding Sn to β-type Ti alloys strongly decreased the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus; a bacteria which commonly infects orthopedic implants leading to their failure). Thus, this study demonstrated that β-type Ti alloys with Nb and Sn have great promise to improve numerous orthopedic applications where infection may be a concern.

  4. Free surface damage induced by irradiation of BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, Aleksandr V.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of bcc iron samples on the character of structural changes near the free surface irradiated with ions was studied in the framework of a molecular dynamics method. Irradiation of the (111) surface leads to the formation of craters surrounded by atoms escaped on the surface (adatoms). In the case of the (110) surface irradiation, a vacancy-type dislocation loop with the Burgers vector a <100> or a/2 <111> was formed. The number of adatoms and survived point defects was greater in the sample with the (110) surface than in the sample with the (111) surface for the atomic displacement cascade energies lower than 20 keV. The influence of the irradiated surface orientation on the number of generated point defects decreased with the increasing atomic displacement cascade energy.

  5. Iron migration from the anode surface in alumina electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Elena N.; Drozdova, Tatiana N.; Ponomareva, Svetlana V.; Kirik, Sergei D.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys used as an anode in high-temperature alumina electrolysis in the melt of NaF/KF/AlF3 electrolyte has been considered. Ni, Si, Cu, Cr, Mn, Al, Ti in the amount of up to 10% have been tested as the dopants to an anode alloys. The composition of the corrosion products has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. It has been established that the anode corrosion is induced by a surface electrochemical polarization and iron atom oxidation. Iron ions come into an exchange interaction with the fluoride components of the melted electrolyte, producing FeF2. The last interacts with oxyfluoride species transforming into the oxide forms: FeAl2O4, Fe3O4, Fe2O3. Due to the low solubility, the iron oxides are accumulated in the near-electrode sheath. The only small part of iron from anode migrates to cathode that makes an production of high purity aluminum of a real task. The alloy dopants are also subjected to corrosion in accordance with electromotive series resulting corrosion tunnels on the anode surface. The oxides are final compounds which collect in the same area. The corrosion products form an anode shell which is electronic conductor at electrolysis temperature. The electrolysis of alumina occurs beyond the corrosion shell. The rate limiting step in the corrosion is the electrolyte penetration through corrosion shell to the anode surface. The participation of the released oxygen in the corrosion has not been observed.

  6. Properties of Diamond Composite Films Grown on Iron Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-22

    surface area is designed to be approximately 50 -75 % of the total substrate surface . Figure 2 depicts a cross sectional view of the diamond and 3...in OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant # N0001489Jl848 R&T Code 413n003 Technical Report No. 2 Properties of Diamond Composite Films grown on Iron... Surfaces bv T.P. Ona ano k.P.H. Chanq Preoared tor DIuoiicatlon in the Applied Physics Letters D TIC 0% ELECTE Northwestern University FEBO41991 Department

  7. Phagocytosis escape by a Staphylococcus aureus protein that connects complement and coagulation proteins at the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kuipers, Annemarie; Freitag, Claudia M; Jongerius, Ilse; Medina, Eva; van Rooijen, Willemien J; Spaan, András N; van Kessel, Kok P M; Höök, Magnus; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2013-01-01

    Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a 'capsule'-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein.

  8. Phagocytosis Escape by a Staphylococcus aureus Protein That Connects Complement and Coagulation Proteins at the Bacterial Surface

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Eva; van Rooijen, Willemien J.; Spaan, András N.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Höök, Magnus; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a ‘capsule’-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein. PMID:24348255

  9. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  10. Zinc-dependent mechanical properties of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-forming surface protein SasG.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-01-12

    Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SasG promotes cell-cell adhesion during the accumulation phase of biofilm formation, but the molecular basis of this interaction remains poorly understood. Here, we unravel the mechanical properties of SasG on the surface of living bacteria, that is, in its native cellular environment. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of living bacteria reveals that Zn(2+) strongly increases cell wall rigidity and activates the adhesive function of SasG. Single-cell force measurements show that SasG mediates cell-cell adhesion via specific Zn(2+)-dependent homophilic bonds between β-sheet-rich G5-E domains on neighboring cells. The force required to unfold individual domains is remarkably strong, up to ∼500 pN, thus explaining how SasG can withstand physiological shear forces. We also observe that SasG forms homophilic bonds with the structurally related accumulation-associated protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis, suggesting the possibility of multispecies biofilms during host colonization and infection. Collectively, our findings support a model in which zinc plays a dual role in activating cell-cell adhesion: adsorption of zinc ions to the bacterial cell surface increases cell wall cohesion and favors the projection of elongated SasG proteins away from the cell surface, thereby enabling zinc-dependent homophilic bonds between opposing cells. This work demonstrates an unexpected relationship between mechanics and adhesion in a staphylococcal surface protein, which may represent a general mechanism among bacterial pathogens for activating cell association.

  11. Fermi surface and electron correlation effects of ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Rotenberg, Eli; Blaha, P.; Claessen, R.

    2005-10-01

    The electronic band structure of bulk ferromagnetic iron is explored by angle-resolved photoemission for electron correlation effects. Fermi surface cross sections as well as band maps are contrasted with density functional calculations. The Fermi vectors and band parameters obtained from photoemission and their prediction from band theory are analyzed in detail. Generally good agreement is found for the Fermi surface. A bandwidth reduction for shallow bands of ˜30% is observed. Additional strong quasiparticle renormalization effects are found near the Fermi level, leading to a considerable mass enhancement. The role of electronic correlation effects and the electronic coupling to magnetic excitations is discussed in view of the experimental results.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance detection of E. coli and methicillin-resistant S. aureus using bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Nancy; Sacher, Edward; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Meunier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are key elements in preventing resultant life-threatening illnesses, such as hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and septicemia. In this report, we describe the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for the biodetection of pathogenic bacteria, using bacteriophages as the recognition elements. T4 bacteriophages were used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was used to detect MRSA. We found that the system permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 10(3) colony forming units/milliliter, in less than 20 min. This system promises to become a diagnostic tool for bacteria that cause major public concern for food safety, bioterrorism, and nosocomial infections.

  13. [Investigation of the virulence genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from biomaterial surfaces].

    PubMed

    Sudağidan, Mert; Cavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Bacakoğlu, Feza

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococci are the most important agents of nosocomial infections originating from biomaterials. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of virulence genes and their phenotypic expressions in 11 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from the surfaces of clinically used biomaterials of 48 thorasic intensive-care unit patients. By the use of specific primers, the presence of genes encoding the attachment and biofilm production (icaA, icaC, bap), methicillin resistance (mecA), enterotoxins A-E (sea, seb, sec, sed, see), toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst), exfoliative toxins A and B (eta and etb), alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb), staphylococcal exotoxin-like protein-1 (set1), proteases (sspA, sspB, aur, serine proteaz gene), lipase (geh) and the regulatory genes (sarA and agrCA) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phenotypic properties of the isolates such as biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility, extracellular protease and lipase production were also evaluated. None of the isolates were found to be biofilm and/or slime producers, however, all strains were found to have icaA gene which is responsible for biofilm formation. Nevertheless the presence of icaC and bap genes that are also responsible for biofilm formation were not detected. All the strains have had mecA gene and were resistant to oxacillin, penicilin G and gentamicin, while 10 were also resistant to erythromycin and nine were also resistant to ofloxacin. The isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and co-trimoxazole. Screening of toxin and regulatory genes revealed that all the strains harboured sea, set1, hla, hlb and sarA genes. The phenotypic tests for the determination of extracellular protease production revealed that all the strains formed very weak zones on skim milk and milk agar plates, and yielded negative results on casein agar plates. Furthermore, all strains were found to harbour sspA, sspB, aur and serine

  14. Surface functionalization of dopamine coated iron oxide nanoparticles for various surface functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Jennifer; Xu, Yaolin; Lovas, Kira; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2017-04-01

    We present effective conjugation of four small molecules (glutathione, cysteine, lysine, and Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane) onto dopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. Conjugation of these molecules could improve the surface functionality of nanoparticles for more neutral surface charge at physiological pH and potentially reduce non-specific adsorption of proteins to nanoparticles surfaces. The success of conjugation was evaluated with dynamic light scattering by measuring the surface charge changes and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for surface chemistry analysis. The stability of dopamine-coated nanoparticles and the ability of conjugated nanoparticles to reduce the formation of protein corona were evaluated by measuring the size and charge of the nanoparticles in biological medium. This facile conjugation method opens up possibilities for attaching various surface functionalities onto iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces for biomedical applications.

  15. Holographic surface gratings in iron-doped lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, S. S.; Curley, M. J.; Kukhtarev, N. V.; Fields, A.; Adamovsky, G.; Smith, C. C.; Moore, L. E.

    2001-08-13

    Surface gratings associated with holographic volume gratings in photorefractive crystals of iron-doped lithium niobate have been studied using diffraction of a reflected probe beam and high-resolution phase-shifted interferometric profilometry. Both techniques show that the surface gratings exist in the form of periodical corrugations of the same period as that of the volume grating. The maximum amplitude of the periodical surface relief measured by both techniques is close to 6.5 nm. We also demonstrated that the periodical electric forces on the surface were capable of assembling polystyrene microspheres along the fringes of the grating. Large amplitude of the periodic electric field (1.6 x 10{sup 4}V/cm) is associated with the photogalvanic effect. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  17. Construction of super-hydrophobic iron with a hierarchical surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqing; Bin, Jiping; Wang, Xian; Wang, Menglei; Peng, Chaoyi; Xing, Suli; Xiao, Jiayu; Zeng, Jingcheng; Xiao, Ximei; Fu, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Wettability of an iron surface is crucial for the wide applications of iron in practice. In this work, a hierarchical structure highly similar to that of the underside of a bamboo leaf was constructed on an iron surface via the template method and controllable etching. After modification by stearic acid, the iron surface with hierarchical structure showed excellent water repellency, with an average contact angle of 156° and a sliding angle of 3°. X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are applied to examine the chemical components of an iron surface.

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from surfaces and personnel at a hospital laundry facility.

    PubMed

    Michael, K E; No, D; Roberts, M C

    2016-09-01

    Examine a clinical laundry facility for the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on environmental surfaces and among personnel. Nasal and face samples along with surface samples were collected four times in 2015. MRSA isolates were confirmed using standardized biochemical assays and molecular characterization. MRSA was identified in 33/120 (28%) samples from the dirty and 3/120 (3%) samples from the clean environmental areas. MRSA isolates included: (dirty) ST5 SCCmec type II, ST8 SCCmec type IV, ST231 SCCmec type II, ST239 SCCmec type III, ST239 SCCmec type IV, ST256 SCCmec type IV and (clean) ST5 SCCmec type II and ST8 SCCmec type IV. Five different employees were MRSA positive, 4/8 (50%) from the dirty: and 1/15 (6·7%) from the clean, but there was a 10-fold higher MRSA carriage 6/22 (27%) dirty vs 1/38 (2·6%) clean when all 50 human samples were combined. MRSA prevalence was significantly higher (28 vs 3%) in dirty vs clean areas within the laundry facility suggesting a greater risk for personnel on the dirty side. This is the first report of isolation and characterization of MRSA from surfaces and personnel from a clinical laundry facility. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Microstructural study of surface melted and chromium surface alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh; Ebrahimi, M.; Ghasemi, H. M.; Shahripour, A.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, ductile iron was surface melted and chromium surface alloyed via pre-placing of ferrochromium powder with different thicknesses and subsequently surface melting by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as micro-hardness testing and X-ray diffraction analysis were used for characterization of the treated samples. Surface melting and chromium surface alloying resulted in formation of ledeburitic structure and high chromium white cast iron in the treated layers, respectively. It was also noticed that hardness of the treated layers was considerably higher than that of the base material. Increasing thickness of ferrochromium layer increased the amount of M7C3 carbides and hardness of the alloyed layer.

  20. Chromium boron surfaced nickel-iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, James M. (Inventor); Friedrich, Leonard A. (Inventor); Freling, Melvin (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Chromium boron diffusion coatings on nickel iron alloys uniquely provide them with improvement in high cycle fatigue strength (up to 30%) and erosion resistance (up to 15 times), compared to uncoated alloy. The diffused chromium layer extends in two essential concentration zones to a total depth of about 40.times.10.sup.-6 m, while the succeeding boron layer is limited to 50-90% of the depth of the richest Cr layer nearest the surface. Both coatings are applied using conventional pack diffusion processes.

  1. Surface ocean iron fertilization: The role of airborne volcanic ash and iron-flux into the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgun, N.; Duggen, S.; Croot, P.; Dietze, H.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is a limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary production (MPP) in vast areas in the surface ocean. Hence, atmospheric supply of iron to the surface ocean can affect marine biogeochemical cycles, associated ocean-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and eventually climate development. Airborne volcanic ash from volcanic eruptions can be an important atmospheric iron-source in the surface ocean by releasing bio-available iron while settling through in the surface ocean. Here we present new data from time-dependent geochemical experiments with pristine (unhydrated) volcanic ash samples and natural seawater by means of Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry. Our results demonstrate that volcanic ash mobilizes significant amounts of soluble Fe within 60 minutes of contact with natural seawater. Depending on the amount of volcanic ash deposited offshore during major volcanic eruptions and the amount of iron that ash can release on contact with seawater, the calculated increase in the surface ocean Fe levels range from several nanomolar up to several hundred nanomolar (nM). Only 2 nM increase in iron concentrations can stimulate massive diatom blooms in the oceanic regions in which MPP is limited by the availability of iron (the iron-limited oceanic areas) (Wells, 2003). Therefore volcanic ash should be able to significantly affect marine phytoplankton growth in an ash fall area, acting as an iron fertilizer. Based on our new iron-release data and marine sediment core data we provide the first estimate of the flux of Fe from volcanic ash into the Pacific Ocean that covers more than 60 percent of the iron-limited oceanic regions. Our calculations show that the flux of Fe from volcanic ash is comparable to the order of magnitude of the flux of Fe from aeolian dust. Our study shows that volcanic ash is a major and so far underestimated atmospheric iron-source for the oceans and therefore an important component in marine biogeochemical iron cycles. Wells, M.L.: The level of iron

  2. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evandro Leite; Meira, Quênia Gramile Silva; de Medeiros Barbosa, Isabella; Athayde, Ana Júlia Alves Aguiar; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 × 2 cm) when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 °C. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L) and peracetic acid (30 mg/L) in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers.

  3. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Evandro Leite; Meira, Quênia Gramile Silva; de Medeiros Barbosa, Isabella; Athayde, Ana Júlia Alves Aguiar; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 × 2 cm) when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 °C. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L) and peracetic acid (30 mg/L) in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers. PMID:24948915

  4. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  5. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  6. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  7. High potential of adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces by opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Dallel, Ines; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Janel, Sébastien; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-02-01

    Orthodontic and other oral appliances act as reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can easily become resistant to antibiotics and cause systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy patients with orthodontic appliances, to adhere to biotic (HeLa cells) and abiotic surfaces (polystyrene and dental alloy). Adhesive ability to polystyrene was tested by crystal violet staining and quantitative biofilm production on dental alloy surfaces was evaluated by MTT reduction assay. In addition, the presence of icaA and icaD genes was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Qualitative biofilm production revealed that 70.6% of strains were slime producers. The metabolic activity of S. aureus biofilms on dental alloy surfaces was high and did not differ between tested strains. Moreover, all the isolates were adhesive to HeLa cells and 94% of them harbor icaA and icaD genes. Considerable adhesion and internalization capacity to the epithelial HeLa cells and strong biofilm production abilities together, with a high genotypic expression of icaA/icaD genes are an important equipment of S. aureus to colonize orthodontic appliances and eventually to disseminate towards other body areas.

  8. Surface-bound iron: a metal ion buffer in the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus?

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Böttger, Lars H; Weerasinghe, Aruna J; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Matzanke, Berthold F; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Küpper, Frithjof C; Carrano, Carl J

    2014-02-01

    Although the iron uptake and storage mechanisms of terrestrial/higher plants have been well studied, the corresponding systems in marine algae have received far less attention. Studies have shown that while some species of unicellular algae utilize unique mechanisms of iron uptake, many acquire iron through the same general mechanisms as higher plants. In contrast, the iron acquisition strategies of the multicellular macroalgae remain largely unknown. This is especially surprising since many of these organisms represent important ecological and evolutionary niches in the coastal marine environment. It has been well established in both laboratory and environmentally derived samples, that a large amount of iron can be 'non-specifically' adsorbed to the surface of marine algae. While this phenomenon is widely recognized and has prompted the development of experimental protocols to eliminate its contribution to iron uptake studies, its potential biological significance as a concentrated iron source for marine algae is only now being recognized. This study used an interdisciplinary array of techniques to explore the nature of the extensive and powerful iron binding on the surface of both laboratory and environmental samples of the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus and shows that some of this surface-bound iron is eventually internalized. It is proposed that the surface-binding properties of E. siliculosus allow it to function as a quasibiological metal ion 'buffer', allowing iron uptake under the widely varying external iron concentrations found in coastal marine environments.

  9. Surface-bound iron: a metal ion buffer in the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus?

    PubMed Central

    Carrano, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the iron uptake and storage mechanisms of terrestrial/higher plants have been well studied, the corresponding systems in marine algae have received far less attention. Studies have shown that while some species of unicellular algae utilize unique mechanisms of iron uptake, many acquire iron through the same general mechanisms as higher plants. In contrast, the iron acquisition strategies of the multicellular macroalgae remain largely unknown. This is especially surprising since many of these organisms represent important ecological and evolutionary niches in the coastal marine environment. It has been well established in both laboratory and environmentally derived samples, that a large amount of iron can be ‘non-specifically’ adsorbed to the surface of marine algae. While this phenomenon is widely recognized and has prompted the development of experimental protocols to eliminate its contribution to iron uptake studies, its potential biological significance as a concentrated iron source for marine algae is only now being recognized. This study used an interdisciplinary array of techniques to explore the nature of the extensive and powerful iron binding on the surface of both laboratory and environmental samples of the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus and shows that some of this surface-bound iron is eventually internalized. It is proposed that the surface-binding properties of E. siliculosus allow it to function as a quasibiological metal ion ‘buffer’, allowing iron uptake under the widely varying external iron concentrations found in coastal marine environments. PMID:24368501

  10. Human methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: potential associations with antibiotic resistance persistence and surface polysaccharide antigens.

    PubMed

    Babra, Charlene; Tiwari, Jully; Costantino, Paul; Sunagar, Raju; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Hegde, Nagendra; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2014-07-01

    The development of persistent antibiotic resistance by human methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains and substantial association with poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG) in biofilms is reported in this investigation. Sixteen of 31 MSSA strains under study were found to have developed resistance to one or more antibiotics, with four strains, two of which did not produce biofilms, showing resistance to cefoxitin, undetectable by mecA amplification. Antibiotic resistance displayed by 13/14 biofilm-forming S. aureus isolates remained persistent for 4 weeks prior to reverting back to the original antibiotic susceptibility, prompting a suggestion of determining antibiograms for clinical S. aureus isolates subcultured from biofilms developed in vitro as well as planktonic subcultures prepared from the site of infection. While there was correlation of antibiotic resistance with biofilm formation confirming previous reports, this is the first time that persistence of the biofilm-associated antibiotic resistance by S. aureus as planktonic cells is reported. Among the two methods used for assessment of biofilm formation, the tissue culture plate (TCP) method revealed that almost all strains were strong or moderate biofilm producers whereas only 19/31 strains were biofilm producers using the Congo Red agar (CRA) method indicating the superiority of the TCP method in detecting biofilm producers. We also observed no association between biofilm formation and major capsule types. However, substantial, although not absolute, association of biofilm formation with PNAG was observed, warranting continued identification of additional surface-associated polysaccharide and/or protein antigens associated with biofilm formation for development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus infections regardless of capsular phenotype.

  11. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  12. Surface-water iron supplies in the Southern Ocean sustained by deep winter mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sallée, Jean-Baptiste; Bowie, Andrew R.; Lévy, Marina; Swart, Sebastiaan; Boyd, Philip W.

    2014-04-01

    Low levels of iron limit primary productivity across much of the Southern Ocean. At the basin scale, most dissolved iron is supplied to surface waters from subsurface reservoirs, because land inputs are spatially limited. Deep mixing in winter together with year-round diffusion across density surfaces, known as diapycnal diffusion, are the main physical processes that carry iron-laden subsurface waters to the surface. Here, we analyse data on dissolved iron concentrations in the top 1,000 m of the Southern Ocean, taken from all known and available cruises to date, together with hydrographic data to determine the relative importance of deep winter mixing and diapycnal diffusion to dissolved iron fluxes at the basin scale. Using information on the vertical distribution of iron we show that deep winter mixing supplies ten times more iron to the surface ocean each year, on average, than diapycnal diffusion. Biological observations from the sub-Antarctic sector suggest that following the depletion of this wintertime iron pulse, intense iron recycling sustains productivity over the subsequent spring and summer. We conclude that winter mixing and surface-water iron recycling are important drivers of temporal variations in Southern Ocean primary production.

  13. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  14. Binding of oxygen on vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces: Reactivity of iron and sulfur surface sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlich, A. G.; Nesbitt, H. W.; Bancroft, G. M.; Szargan, R.

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) has been used to study the interaction of oxygen with vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces. Especially valence band spectra obtained with 30 eV photon energy were analyzed to provide a mechanism of the incipient steps of pyrite oxidation. These spectra are far more sensitive to the oxidation than sulfur or iron core level spectra. It is shown that oxygen is adsorbed on Fe(II) surface sites restoring the octahedral coordination of the Fe(II) sites. This process leads to the removal of two surface states in the valence band which are located at the low and high binding energy sides of the outer valence band, respectively. The existence of these surface states which have been proposed by calculations is experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is shown, that the sulfur sites are more reactive than expected. Sulfite like species are already formed after the lowest oxygen exposure of 10 L. This oxidation occurs at sulfur sites neighboring the Fe(II) surface sites. Oxidation of the S2 - surface sites which were considered as the most reactive species in former studies is second. No iron(III) oxides are formed during oxygen exposure, supporting the assumption that water plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of pyrite surfaces.

  15. The differential detection of methicillin-resistant, methicillin-susceptible and borderline oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Nancy; Mouawad, Flaviana; Lévesque, Simon; Sacher, Edward; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Meunier, Michel

    2013-11-15

    Two hundred fifty Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates were studied to determine their susceptibilities to β-lactam antibiotics. Among these isolates, 16 were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), 207 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 27 were borderline oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (BORSA). Currently, the reported mechanism of methicillin resistance in S. aureus is the production of a distinctive penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which exhibits low affinity toward β-lactams. A surface plasmon resonance biosensor was evaluated for its ability to identify MRSA and to distinguish these strains from MSSA and BORSA, by specifically detecting PBP2a. We found that the system permits label-free, real-time, specific detection of pathogens for concentrations as low as 10 colony forming units/milliliter (CFU/ml), in less than 20 min. This system promises to become a diagnostic tool for bacteria that cause major public concern in clinical settings.

  16. Vaccine potential of poly-1-6 beta-D-N-succinylglucosamine, an immunoprotective surface polysaccharide of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Mckenney, D; Pouliot, K; Wang, Y; Murthy, V; Ulrich, M; Döring, G; Lee, J C; Goldmann, D A; Pier, G B

    2000-09-29

    Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis are among the most common causes of nosocomial infection, and S. aureus is also of major concern to human health due to its occurrence in community-acquired infections. These staphylococcal species are also major pathogens for domesticated animals. We have previously identified poly-N-succinyl beta-1-6 glucosamine (PNSG) as the chemical form of the S. epidermidis capsular polysaccharide/adhesin (PS/A) which mediates adherence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) to biomaterials, serves as the capsule for strains of CoNS that express PS/A, and is a target for protective antibodies. We have recently found that PNSG is made by S. aureus as well, where it is an environmentally regulated, in vivo-expressed surface polysaccharide and similarly serves as a target for protective immunity. Only a minority of fresh human clinical isolates of S. aureus elaborate PNSG in vitro but most could be induced to do so under specific in vitro growth conditions. However, by immunofluorescence microscopy, S. aureus cells in infected human sputa and lung elaborated PNSG. The ica genes, previously shown to encode proteins in CoNS that synthesize PNSG, were found by PCR in all S. aureus strains examined, and immunogenic and protective PNSG could be isolated from S. aureus. Active and passive immunization of mice with PNSG protected them against metastatic kidney infections after intravenous inoculation with eight phenotypically PNSG-negative S. aureus. Isolates recovered from kidneys expressed PNSG, but expression was lost with in vitro culture. Strong antibody responses to PNSG were elicited in S. aureus infected mice, and a PNSG-capsule was observed by electron microscopy on isolates directly plated from infected kidneys. PNSG represents a previously unidentified surface polysaccharide of S. aureus that is elaborated during human and animal infection and is a prominent target for protective antibodies.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus SufT: an essential iron-sulphur cluster assembly factor in cells experiencing a high-demand for lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Roberts, Christina A; Bhatt, Shiven; May, Kerrie L; Carroll, Ronan K; Shaw, Lindsey N; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of the domain of unknown function 59 (DUF59) and has a role in the maturation of iron-sulphur (Fe-S) proteins. We report that SufT is essential for S. aureus when growth is heavily reliant upon lipoamide-utilizing enzymes, but dispensable when this reliance is decreased. LipA requires Fe-S clusters for lipoic acid (LA) synthesis and a ΔsufT strain had phenotypes suggestive of decreased LA production and decreased activities of lipoamide-requiring enzymes. Fermentative growth, a null clpC allele, or decreased flux through the TCA cycle diminished the demand for LA and rendered SufT non-essential. Abundance of the Fe-S cluster carrier Nfu was increased in a ΔclpC strain and a null clpC allele was unable to suppress the LA requirement of a ΔsufT Δnfu strain. Over-expression of nfu suppressed the LA requirement of the ΔsufT strain. We propose a model wherein SufT, and by extension the DUF59, is essential for the maturation of holo-LipA in S. aureus cells experiencing a high demand for lipoamide-dependent enzymes. The findings presented suggest that the demand for products of Fe-S enzymes is a factor governing the usage of one Fe-S cluster assembly factor over another in the maturation of apo-proteins. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Designed synthesis and surface engineering strategies of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Jiang, Chang Zhong; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold great promise for future biomedical applications because of their magnetic properties as well as other intrinsic properties such as low toxicity, colloidal stability, and surface engineering capability. Numerous related studies on iron oxide NPs have been conducted. Recent progress in nanochemistry has enabled fine control over the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide NPs. This review examines various synthetic approaches and surface engineering strategies for preparing naked and functional iron oxide NPs with different physicochemical properties. Growing interest in designed and surface-engineered iron oxide NPs with multifunctionalities was explored in in vitro/in vivo biomedical applications, focusing on their combined roles in bioseparation, as a biosensor, targeted-drug delivery, MR contrast agents, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This review outlines the limitations of extant surface engineering strategies and several developing strategies that may overcome these limitations. This study also details the promising future directions of this active research field.

  19. Iron-oxo clusters biomineralizing on protein surfaces: Structural analysis of Halobacterium salinarum DpsA in its low- and high-iron states

    PubMed Central

    Zeth, Kornelius; Offermann, Stefanie; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the Dps-like (Dps, DNA-protecting protein during starvation) ferritin protein DpsA from the halophile Halobacterium salinarum was determined with low endogenous iron content at 1.6-Å resolution. The mechanism of iron uptake and storage was analyzed in this noncanonical ferritin by three high-resolution structures at successively increasing iron contents. In the high-iron state of the DpsA protein, up to 110 iron atoms were localized in the dodecameric protein complex. For ultimate iron storage, the archaeal ferritin shell comprises iron-binding sites for iron translocation, oxidation, and nucleation. Initial iron–protein interactions occur through acidic residues exposed along the outer surface in proximity to the iron entry pore. This narrow pore permits translocation of ions toward the ferroxidase centers via two discrete steps. Iron oxidation proceeds by transient formation of tri-iron ferroxidase centers. Iron storage by biomineralization inside the ferritin shell occurs at two iron nucleation centers. Here, a single iron atom provides a structural seed for iron-oxide cluster formation. The clusters with up to five iron atoms adopt a geometry that is different from natural biominerals like magnetite but resembles iron clusters so far known only from bioinorganic model compounds. PMID:15365182

  20. Dopamine Serves as a Stable Surface Modifier for Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xiaomin; Hu, Juan; Wang, Lirong; Gao, Jinhao; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2013-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are an important class of nanomaterials in a broad range of biomedical applications because of their superparamagnetism and biocompatibility. The success of biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles relies on the particles' surface functionalization, which requires robust and versatile surface anchors. Here, we report on a detailed examination of the dopamine-based surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles. We used dopamine (2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine) and L-dopa (3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine) as two surface modifiers and chose Fe2O3 hollow nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as two representative substrates. Optical and TEM images showed that iron oxide nanoparticles dispersed very well in water after surface modification. The analysis of the UV-Vis spectra indicated that dopamine and L-dopa are stable after being immobilized on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles when the pH value of the environment is about 7. The magnetic properties analysis further showed that the blocking temperature of the dopamine- or L-dopa-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles hardly changed over 20 days, confirming long-term stability of these surface modified nanoparticles. Cell assay indicated that these dopamine- or L-dopa-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were biocompatible. These results confirm that dopamine serves as a stable modifier and a robust anchor to functionalize iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  1. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  2. Antibacterial efficacy of a novel plasma reactor without an applied gas flow against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus on diverse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, C M; Malik, M A; Heller, L C

    2016-12-01

    The use of nonthermal plasma in the clinic has gained recent interest, as the need for alternative or supplementary strategies are necessary for preventing multi-drug resistant infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of a novel plasma reactor based on a high current version of sliding discharge and operated by nanosecond voltage pulses without an applied gas flow. This modification is advantageous for both portability and convenience. Bacterial inactivation was determined within a chamber by direct quantification of colony Jing units. Plasma exposure significantly inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis following a 1-min application (p<0.001). S. epidermidis was more susceptible to the plasma after a 5-min exposure compared to E. coli. Temperature and pH measurements taken immediately before and after plasma exposure determined neither heat nor pH changes play a role in bacterial inactivation. Because of the notable effect on S. epidermidis, the effect of plasma exposure on several isolates and strains of the related opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus was quantified. While S. aureus isolates and strains were efficiently inactivated on an agar surface, subsequent testing on other clinically relevant surfaces demonstrated that the inactivation level, although significant, was reduced. This reduction appeared to depend on both the surface texture and the surface moisture content. These findings suggest this novel plasma source lacking an applied gas flow has potential application for surface bacterial decontamination.

  3. Spatial and Seasonal Variability in Soluble Iron Deposition and Contribution to Sea-surface Iron Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Drewniak, B.; Ito, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent comparison of the iron (Fe) distributions from 13 global ocean biogeochemistry models reveals substantial inter-model variability in the input fluxes of soluble iron (sFe). It leads to a wide range of the Fe residence times across the models, and has important implications for predicting response of ecosystems and global carbon cycling to perturbations of Fe supply. Progress in reducing the uncertainty in the Fe sources has been made including the atmospheric deposition of soluble Fe. In the present study, we examine the spatial and seasonal variability in predicted sFe deposition from 6 CMIP5 models, all including dust sources with a fixed Fe solubility, compared with chemical transport model simulations. Three CMIP5 models (CESM1, HadGEM2 and GFDL-ESM2M) predict the largest Fe deposition in the subtropical NE Atlantic and the Arabian Sea, while more Fe is predicted by the other three models (MPI-ESM, CNRM-CM5 and IPSL-CSM5A) to deposit to the mid latitude North Pacific and the Mediterranean Sea. Sensitivity studies with a chemical transport model suggest that inclusion of dust Fe dissolution schemes and combustion sFe sources modifies the predicted sFe deposition in both magnitude and spatial distribution, and the uncertainty is comparable to the inter-model variability due to the dust sources alone. Furthermore, we show that the model differences in sFe deposition are not reflected consistently on the predicted sea-surface dissolved Fe (dFe). In addition to better agreement in the global mean dFe suggested in the previous studies, the spatial and seasonal variability in the dFe distributions across the models is shown to be decreased. Locations with high concentrations of dFe are generally not co-located with large deposition of sFe. But the extent of the dFe distribution deviated from the sFe deposition vary significantly from one model to another. This implies that response of sea-surface dFe distributions to anthropogenic influences (through dust Fe

  4. Droplet impinging behavior on surfaces: Part II - Water on aluminium and cast iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangavi, S.; Balaji, S.; Mithran, N.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Droplet cooling of metal surfaces is an important area of research in industrial applications such as material quenching, nozzle spraying, etc. Fluids (water) act as an excellent agent in heat transfer to remove excess heat in various processes by convection and conduction. Such cooling process varies the material properties. The bubbles formed during droplet impinging on the surface act as heat sink and causes variation of height and spreading radius of the droplet with increase in temperature. In the present work, an experimental study of the droplet impinging behavior on Aluminium and Cast iron surfaces is reported. The water droplets are made to fall on the surface of the specimens from a specific height, which also influences the spreading radius. The effect of temperature on droplet height and droplet spreading radius is detailed.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Yoshiki; Kelley, Kathryn A.; Wang, Xiaogang; Wang, Linhui; Park, Wan Beom; Birtel, Johannes; Saslowsky, David; Lee, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA) mutant (ΔtagO) failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl) tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin. PMID:26201029

  6. Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marwan; Khelissa, Oussama; Ibrahim, Ali; Benoliel, Corinne; Heliot, Laurent; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction of some extreme-pressure type lubricating compounds with an iron surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    An iron surface was exposed to the extreme-pressure type lubricant benzyl chloride, dichlorophenyl phosphine, dichlorophenyl phosphine sulfide, ophenyl phosphine oxide. Iron, in the sputter-cleaned state, was exposed to these materials statically and during dynamic friction experiments. With benzyl chloride only chlorine adsorbed to the surface, and with dichlorophenyl phosphine no adsorption occurred, while the addition of sulfur to that same molecular structure resulted in the promotion of carbon and chlorine adsorption. substitution of oxygen for sulfur in the dichlorobenzyl phosphine molecule resulted in carbon, chlorine, and oxygen adsorption. With none of the phosphorus containing molecules was phosphorus detected on the surface. Sliding in an atmosphere of benzyl chloride promoted adsorption of chlorine to the iron surface. Increases in load resulted in a decrease in the surface concentration of iron chloride.

  8. Friction-induced surface activity of some hydrocarbons with clean and oxide-covered iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on a clean and oxide-covered iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and accordingly friction. In contrast with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  9. Friction induced surface activity of some simple organic chlorides and hydrocarbons with iron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on an iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons and organic chlorides. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene, ethyl chloride, methyl chloride and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical-mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon and organic chlorides with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction-induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and, accordingly, friction. Unlike results with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction-induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  10. Friction induced surface activity of some simple organic chlorides and hydrocarbons with iron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on an iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons and organic chlorides. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene, ethyl chloride, methyl chloride and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical-mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon and organic chlorides with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction-induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and, accordingly, friction. Unlike results with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction-induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  11. The Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Does Not Depend on Surface Ferric Reductases for Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Franziska; Safyan, Abu; Wisgott, Stephanie; Brunke, Sascha; Kasper, Lydia; Hube, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a crucial virulence determinant for many bacteria and fungi, including the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata. While the diverse strategies used by C. albicans for obtaining iron from the host are well-described, much less is known about the acquisition of this micronutrient from host sources by C. glabrata – a distant relative of C. albicans with closer evolutionary ties to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which nonetheless causes severe clinical symptoms in humans. Here we show that C. glabrata is much more restricted than C. albicans in using host iron sources, lacking, for example, the ability to grow on transferrin and hemin/hemoglobin. Instead, C. glabrata is able to use ferritin and non-protein-bound iron (FeCl3) as iron sources in a pH-dependent manner. As in other fungal pathogens, iron-dependent growth requires the reductive high affinity (HA) iron uptake system. Typically highly conserved, this uptake mechanism normally relies on initial ferric reduction by cell-surface ferric reductases. The C. glabrata genome contains only three such putative ferric reductases, which were found to be dispensable for iron-dependent growth. In addition and in contrast to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, we also detected no surface ferric reductase activity in C. glabrata. Instead, extracellular ferric reduction was found in this and the two other fungal species, which was largely dependent on an excreted low-molecular weight, non-protein ferric reductant. We therefore propose an iron acquisition strategy of C. glabrata which differs from other pathogenic fungi, such as C. albicans, in that it depends on a limited set of host iron sources and that it lacks the need for surface ferric reductases. Extracellular ferric reduction by a secreted molecule possibly compensates for the loss of surface ferric reductase activity in the HA iron uptake system. PMID:28642757

  12. Effect of growth temperature, surface type and incubation time on the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marwan; Chataigne, Gabrielle; Ferreira-Theret, Pauline; Benoliel, Corinne; Drider, Djamel; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of the environmental conditions such as the temperature change, incubation time and surface type on the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants. The antibiofilm assays were performed against biofilms grown at 20 °C, 30 °C and 37 °C, on the stainless steel and polycarbonate, during 24 and 48 h. The involvement of the biofilm matrix and the bacterial membrane fluidity in the resistance of sessile cells were investigated. Our results show that the efficiency of disinfectants was dependent on the growth temperature, the surface type and the disinfectant product. The increase of growth temperature from 20 °C to 37 °C, with an incubation time of 24 h, increased the resistance of biofilms to cationic antimicrobials. This change of growth temperature did not affect the major content of the biofilm matrix, but it decreased the membrane fluidity of sessile cells through the increase of the anteiso-C19 relative amount. The increase of the biofilm resistance to disinfectants, with the rise of the incubation time, was dependent on both growth temperature and disinfectant product. The increase of the biofilm age also promoted increases in the matrix production and the membrane fluidity of sessile cells. The resistance of S. aureus biofilm seems to depend on the environment of the biofilm formation and involves both extracellular matrix and membrane fluidity of sessile cells. Our study represents the first report describing the impact of environmental conditions on the matrix production, sessile cells membrane fluidity and resistance of S. aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron by cell-surface sequestration and internalization of human holo-transferrin.

    PubMed

    Boradia, Vishant Mahendra; Malhotra, Himanshu; Thakkar, Janak Shrikant; Tillu, Vikas Ajit; Vuppala, Bhavana; Patil, Pravinkumar; Sheokand, Navdeep; Sharma, Prerna; Chauhan, Anoop Singh; Raje, Manoj; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar

    2014-08-28

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), which requires iron for survival, acquires this element by synthesizing iron-binding molecules known as siderophores and by recruiting a host iron-transport protein, transferrin, to the phagosome. The siderophores extract iron from transferrin and transport it into the bacterium. Here we describe an additional mechanism for iron acquisition, consisting of an M.tb protein that drives transport of human holo-transferrin into M.tb cells. The pathogenic strain M.tb H37Rv expresses several proteins that can bind human holo-transferrin. One of these proteins is the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, Rv1436), which is present on the surface of M.tb and its relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Overexpression of GAPDH results in increased transferrin binding to M.tb cells and iron uptake. Human transferrin is internalized across the mycobacterial cell wall in a GAPDH-dependent manner within infected macrophages.

  14. Polymers' surface interactions with molten iron: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, M. Hussein N.; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2014-10-01

    Environmental concerns are the chief drive for more innovative recycling techniques for end-of-life polymeric products. One attractive option is taking advantage of C and H content of polymeric waste in steelmaking industry. In this work, we examined the interaction of two high production polymers i.e. polyurethane and polysulfide with molten iron using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. We demonstrate that both polymers can be used as carburizers for molten iron. Additionally, we found that light weight H2 and CHx molecules were released as by-products of the polymer-molten iron interaction. The outcomes of this study will have applications in the carburization of molten iron during ladle metallurgy and waste plastic injection in electric arc furnace.

  15. Molecular Correlates of Host Specialization in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Herron-Olson, Lisa; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Musser, James M.; Kapur, Vivek

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of Staphylococcus aureus isolates that are recovered from either serious infections in humans or from mastitis in cattle represent genetically distinct sets of clonal groups. Moreover, population genetic analyses have provided strong evidence of host specialization among S. aureus clonal groups associated with human and ruminant infection. However, the molecular basis of host specialization in S. aureus is not understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced the genome of strain ET3-1, a representative isolate of a common bovine mastitis-causing S. aureus clone. Strain ET3-1 encodes several genomic elements that have not been previously identified in S. aureus, including homologs of virulence factors from other Gram-positive pathogens. Relative to the other sequenced S. aureus associated with human infection, allelic variation in ET3-1 was high among virulence and surface-associated genes involved in host colonization, toxin production, iron metabolism, antibiotic resistance, and gene regulation. Interestingly, a number of well-characterized S. aureus virulence factors, including protein A and clumping factor A, exist as pseudogenes in ET3-1. Whole-genome DNA microarray hybridization revealed considerable similarity in the gene content of highly successful S. aureus clones associated with bovine mastitis, but not among those clones that are only infrequently recovered from bovine hosts. Conclusions/Significance Whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses revealed a set of molecular genetic features that distinguish clones of highly successful bovine-associated S. aureus optimized for mastitis pathogenesis in cattle from those that infect human hosts or are only infrequently recovered from bovine sources. Further, the results suggest that modern bovine specialist clones diverged from a common ancestor resembling human-associated S. aureus clones through a combination of foreign DNA acquisition and gene decay. PMID:17971880

  16. A Comparative Study of Iron Uptake Mechanisms in Marine Microalgae: Iron Binding at the Cell Surface Is a Critical Step1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sutak, Robert; Botebol, Hugo; Blaiseau, Pierre-Louis; Léger, Thibaut; Bouget, François-Yves; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We investigated iron uptake mechanisms in five marine microalgae from different ecologically important phyla: the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, the prasinophyceae Ostreococcus tauri and Micromonas pusilla, and the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Among these species, only the two diatoms were clearly able to reduce iron, via an inducible (P. tricornutum) or constitutive (T. pseudonana) ferrireductase system displaying characteristics similar to the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) flavohemoproteins proteins. Iron uptake mechanisms probably involve very different components according to the species, but the species we studied shared common features. Regardless of the presence and/or induction of a ferrireductase system, all the species were able to take up both ferric and ferrous iron, and iron reduction was not a prerequisite for uptake. Iron uptake decreased with increasing the affinity constants of iron-ligand complexes and with increasing ligand-iron ratios. Therefore, at least one step of the iron uptake mechanism involves a thermodynamically controlled process. Another step escapes to simple thermodynamic rules and involves specific and strong binding of ferric as well as ferrous iron at the cell surface before uptake of iron. Binding was paradoxically increased in iron-rich conditions, whereas uptake per se was induced in all species only after prolonged iron deprivation. We sought cell proteins loaded with iron following iron uptake. One such protein in O. tauri may be ferritin, and in P. tricornutum, Isip1 may be involved. We conclude that the species we studied have uptake systems for both ferric and ferrous iron, both involving specific iron binding at the cell surface. PMID:23033141

  17. The importance of kinetics and redox in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the surface ocean.

    PubMed

    Croot, Peter L; Heller, Maija I

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that Iron (Fe) is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model and/or its successor the biotic ligand model. Similarly most field work on iron biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a "snap-shot" in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, dry and wet, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring in new iron to the system and alter the equilibrium between iron species and phases. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the complexation kinetics of iron in the surface ocean to identify the important role of weak iron binding ligands (i.e., those that cannot maintain iron in solution indefinitely at seawater pH: α(FeL) < α(Fe)') in allowing transient increases in iron solubility in response to iron deposition events. Experiments with the thermal [Formula: see text] source SOTS-1 also

  18. The Importance of Kinetics and Redox in the Biogeochemical Cycling of Iron in the Surface Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Croot, Peter L.; Heller, Maija I.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that Iron (Fe) is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model and/or its successor the biotic ligand model. Similarly most field work on iron biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a “snap-shot” in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, dry and wet, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring in new iron to the system and alter the equilibrium between iron species and phases. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the complexation kinetics of iron in the surface ocean to identify the important role of weak iron binding ligands (i.e., those that cannot maintain iron in solution indefinitely at seawater pH: αFeL < αFe′) in allowing transient increases in iron solubility in response to iron deposition events. Experiments with the thermal O2- source SOTS-1 also indicate the short

  19. Growth of Aerobic Ripening Bacteria at the Cheese Surface Is Limited by the Availability of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions. PMID:22367081

  20. Growth of aerobic ripening bacteria at the cheese surface is limited by the availability of iron.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Christophe; Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions.

  1. The Extracellular Matrix of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms Comprises Cytoplasmic Proteins That Associate with the Cell Surface in Response to Decreasing pH

    PubMed Central

    Foulston, Lucy; Elsholz, Alexander K. W.; DeFrancesco, Alicia S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus involves the formation of an extracellular matrix, but the composition of this matrix has been uncertain. Here we report that the matrix is largely composed of cytoplasmic proteins that reversibly associate with the cell surface in a manner that depends on pH. We propose a model for biofilm formation in which cytoplasmic proteins are released from cells in stationary phase. These proteins associate with the cell surface in response to decreasing pH during biofilm formation. Rather than utilizing a dedicated matrix protein, S. aureus appears to recycle cytoplasmic proteins that moonlight as components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25182325

  2. Iron at the cell surface controls DNA synthesis in CCl 39 cells.

    PubMed

    Alcain, F J; Löw, H; Crane, F L

    1994-08-30

    Treatment of CCl 39 cells with the impermeable iron II chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS) inhibits both DNA synthesis and transplasma membrane electron transport. The inhibition persists when the BPS is removed, and the extract from 10(6) cells contains up to 1.28 nmoles iron II chelated to BPS. The BPS iron II chelate itself is not inhibitory. Both DNA synthesis and electron transport are restored by addition of microM iron II or iron III compounds to extracted cells. Other impermeable chelators for iron II give similar inhibition, whereas the iron III-specific Tiron or copper-specific bathocuproine sulfonate do not inhibit. The inhibition differs from the permeable iron III chelator inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase, because inhibition of DNA synthesis by the permeable chelators is reversed when chelator is removed. The response to growth factors also differs, with no impermeable chelator inhibition on 10% fetal calf serum contrasting to inhibition by permeable chelators. DNA synthesis with both activation of tyrosine kinase with EGF plus insulin or by thrombin or ceruloplasmin led to protein kinase C activation as inhibited by the impermeable chelators. It is proposed that an iron available on the cell surface is required for DNA synthesis and plasma membrane electron transport.

  3. A cell-surface receptor for lipocalin 24p3 selectively mediates apoptosis and iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Devireddy, Laxminarayana R; Gazin, Claude; Zhu, Xiaochun; Green, Michael R

    2005-12-29

    The lipocalin mouse 24p3 has been implicated in diverse physiological processes, including apoptosis due to interleukin-3 (IL-3) deprivation and iron transport. Here we report cloning of the 24p3 cell-surface receptor (24p3R). Ectopic 24p3R expression confers on cells the ability to undergo either iron uptake or apoptosis, dependent upon the iron content of the ligand: Iron-loaded 24p3 increases intracellular iron concentration without promoting apoptosis; iron-lacking 24p3 decreases intracellular iron levels, which induces expression of the proapoptotic protein Bim, resulting in apoptosis. Intracellular iron delivery blocks Bim induction and suppresses apoptosis due to 24p3 addition or IL-3 deprivation. We find, unexpectedly, that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein activates expression of 24p3 and represses 24p3R expression, rendering BCR-ABL(+) cells refractory to secreted 24p3. By inhibiting BCR-ABL, imatinib induces 24p3R expression and, consequently, apoptosis. Our results reveal an unanticipated role for intracellular iron regulation in an apoptotic pathway relevant to BCR-ABL-induced myeloproliferative disease and its treatment.

  4. Haem Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus NEAT Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-01

    Successful pathogenic organisms have developed mechanisms to thrive under extreme levels of iron restriction. Haem-iron represents the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is a significant source of iron for some bacterial pathogens. NEAT (NEAr Transporter) domains are found exclusively in a family of cell surface proteins in Gram-positive bacteria. Many NEAT domain-containing proteins, including IsdA in Staphylococcus aureus, are implicated in haem binding. Here, we show that overexpression of IsdA in S. aureus enhances growth and an inactivation mutant of IsdA has a growth defect, compared with wild type, when grown in media containing haem as the sole iron source. Furthermore, the haem-binding property of IsdA is contained within the NEAT domain. Crystal structures of the apo-IsdA NEAT domain and in complex with haem were solved and reveal a clathrin adapter-like beta-sandwich fold with a large hydrophobic haem-binding pocket. Haem is bound with the propionate groups directed at the molecular surface and the iron is co-ordinated solely by Tyr(166). The phenol groups of Tyr(166) and Tyr(170) form an H-bond that may function in regulating haem binding and release. An analysis of IsdA structure-sequence alignments indicate that conservation of Tyr(166) is a predictor of haem binding by NEAT domains.

  5. Iron (II) sorption to mineral surfaces in uranyl and silicate rich media

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler A. Sullens; Cynthia-May S. Gong; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - The unique composition of the Yucca Mountain repository site, which contains large concentrations of silicate in an oxidative environment, has required extensive research into compound formation involving uranium and iron(II) under such conditions. The possibility of uranium leakage from within the containment vessels into the near-field ground water, as well as iron leaching from the vessel itself, necessitates study of the individual contributions of these elements for compound formation. By mimicking the known silicate concentration found in surrounding ground water and varying concentrations of both uranyl and iron(II), subsequent precipitation of uranyl silicate phases has shown evidence of iron(II) sorption to the available sites on the mineral surface. The mineralization seems to be driven by the formation of uranyl silicate, in contrast to iron(III)-control of precipitation in the oxidated system. We present characterization of this system using ICP-AES/MS, EDAX, XRD, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  6. Oxygen and sulfur interactions with a clean iron surface and the effect of rubbing contact on these interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the nature of the chemical interactions of oxygen and sulfur with iron when surfaces are stationary and also during sliding in a vacuum environment. Various gases that contained sulfur, oxygen, or both were adsorbed to iron at 23 C. The gases included oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Friction experiments were conducted with a hemispherical rider sliding on a rotating disk. An Auger cylindrical mirror analyzer was used to monitor the iron surface chemistry. The results of this study indicate that oxygen will completely displace sulfide films from iron surfaces. Organic thiols containing sulfur, such as methyl mercaptan, adsorb to an iron surface dissociatively. Only sulfur is detected on the iron surface. Sliding inhibits the formation of sulfide films on iron with the adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. With oxygen and sulfur dioxide, the sliding process does not affect adsorption behavior.

  7. Oxygen and sulfur interactions with a clean iron surface and the effect of rubbing contact on these interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the nature of the chemical interactions of oxygen and sulfur with iron when surfaces are stationary and also during sliding in a vacuum environment. Various gases that contained sulfur, oxygen, or both were adsorbed to iron at 23 C. The gases included oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Friction experiments were conducted with a hemispherical rider sliding on a rotating disk. An Auger cylindrical mirror analyzer was used to monitor the iron surface chemistry. The results of this study indicate that oxygen will completely displace sulfide films from iron surfaces. Organic thiols containing sulfur, such as methyl mercaptan, adsorb to an iron surface dissociatively. Only sulfur is detected on the iron surface. Sliding inhibits the formation of sulfide films on iron with the adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. With oxygen and sulfur dioxide, the sliding process does not affect adsorption behavior.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Perturbs Iron Trafficking in the Epithelium to Grow on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shumin; Noto, Jennifer M.; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) injects the CagA effector protein into host epithelial cells and induces growth factor-like signaling, perturbs cell-cell junctions, and alters host cell polarity. This enables Hp to grow as microcolonies adhered to the host cell surface even in conditions that do not support growth of free-swimming bacteria. We hypothesized that CagA alters host cell physiology to allow Hp to obtain specific nutrients from or across the epithelial barrier. Using a polarized epithelium model system, we find that isogenic ΔcagA mutants are defective in cell surface microcolony formation, but exogenous addition of iron to the apical medium partially rescues this defect, suggesting that one of CagA's effects on host cells is to facilitate iron acquisition from the host. Hp adhered to the apical epithelial surface increase basolateral uptake of transferrin and induce its transcytosis in a CagA-dependent manner. Both CagA and VacA contribute to the perturbation of transferrin recycling, since VacA is involved in apical mislocalization of the transferrin receptor to sites of bacterial attachment. To determine if the transferrin recycling pathway is involved in Hp colonization of the cell surface, we silenced transferrin receptor expression during infection. This resulted in a reduced ability of Hp to colonize the polarized epithelium. To test whether CagA is important in promoting iron acquisition in vivo, we compared colonization of Hp in iron-replete vs. iron-deficient Mongolian gerbils. While wild type Hp and ΔcagA mutants colonized iron-replete gerbils at similar levels, ΔcagA mutants are markedly impaired in colonizing iron-deficient gerbils. Our study indicates that CagA and VacA act in concert to usurp the polarized process of host cell iron uptake, allowing Hp to use the cell surface as a replicative niche. PMID:21589900

  9. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis and surface coating techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Chao; Zhu, Zan-Zan; Hou, Yang-Long; Subbu, S. Venkatraman; Xu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most popular magnetic nanoparticles used in biomedical applications due to their low cost, low toxicity, and unique magnetic property. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), usually exhibit a superparamagnetic property as their size goes smaller than 20 nm, which are often denoted as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and utilized for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapy, and etc. This review article gives a brief introduction on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in terms of their fundamentals of magnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and drug delivery, as well as the synthesis approaches, surface coating, and application examples from recent key literatures. Because the quality and surface chemistry play important roles in biomedical applications, our review focuses on the synthesis approaches and surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We aim to provide a detailed introduction to readers who are new to this field, helping them to choose suitable synthesis methods and to optimize the surface chemistry of iron oxide nanoparticles for their interests.

  10. The effect of iron and copper impurities on the wettability of sphalerite (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Darren J; Bredow, Thomas; Chandra, Anand P; Cavallaro, Giuseppe P; Gerson, Andrea R

    2011-07-15

    The effect of impurities in the zinc sulfide mineral sphalerite on surface wettability has been investigated theoretically to shed light on previously reported conflicting results on sphalerite flotation. The effect of iron and copper impurities on the sphalerite (110) surface energy and on the water adsorption energy was calculated with the semi-empirical method modified symmetrically orthogonalized intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MSINDO) using the cyclic cluster model. The effect of impurities or dopants on surface energies is small but significant. The surface energy increases with increasing surface iron concentration while the opposite effect is reported for increasing copper concentration. The effect on adsorption energies is much more pronounced with water clearly preferring to adsorb on an iron site followed by a zinc site, and copper site least favorable. The theoretical results indicate that a sphalerite (110) surface containing iron is more hydrophilic than the undoped zinc sulfide surface. In agreement with the literature, the surface containing copper (either naturally or by activation) is more hydrophobic than the undoped surface. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Water-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles with high stability and selective surface functionality.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Qin, Ying; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Bao, Yuping

    2011-07-19

    The water dispensability and stability of high quality iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized in organic solvents are major issues for biomedical and biological applications. In this paper, a versatile approach for preparing water-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles with great stability and selective surface functionality (-COOH, -NH(2), or -SH) was demonstrated. The hydrophobic nanoparticles were first synthesized by the thermal decomposition of an iron oleate complex in organic solvent. Subsequently, the hydrophobic coatings of nanoparticles were replaced with poly(acrylic acid) , polyethylenimine, or glutathione, yielding charged nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Two parameters were found to be critical for obtaining highly stable nanoparticle dispersions: the original coating and the surfactant-to-nanoparticle ratio. These charged nanoparticles exhibited different stabilities in biological buffers, which were directly influenced by the surface coatings. This report will provide significant practical value in exploring the biological or biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  12. Studies of the reactivity of the ferrihydrite surface by iron isotopic exchange and Mossbauer spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, B.A.; Davis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    A combination of chemical and spectroscopic techniques were employed to gain further insight into the structural nature of sites at the ferrihydrite surface. The kinetics of iron isotopic exchange demonstrated that there are at least two types of iron sites in ferrihydrite. One population of sites, referred to as labile sites, approached iron isotopic equilibrium within 24 hr in 59Fe-NTA solutions, while the second population of sites, referred to as non-labile, exhibited a much slower rate of isotopic exchange. Labile sites are more reactive (with respect to iron isotopic exchange) because they have fewer neighboring Fe octahedra and are therefore bound less strongly to the ferrihydrite structure. The labile population of sites probably is composed of end sites of the dioctahedral chain structure of 2-line ferrihydrite, which is a subset of the entire population population of surface sites. -from Authors

  13. Iron oxide surface-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron by monochloramine: implications of oxide type and carbonate on reactivity.

    PubMed

    Vikesland, Peter J; Valentine, Richard L

    2002-02-01

    The maintenance of monochloramine residuals in drinking water distribution systems is one technique often used to minimize microbial outbreaks and thereby maintain the safety of the water. Reactions between oxidizable species and monochloramine can however lead to undesirable losses in the disinfectant residual. Previous work has illustrated that the Fe(II) present within distribution systems is one type of oxidizable species that can exert a monochloramine demand. This paper extends this prior work by examining the kinetics of the reactions between Fe(II) and monochloramine in the presence of a variety of iron oxide surfaces. The identity of the iron oxide plays a significant role in the rate of these reactions. Surface area-normalized initial rate coefficients (k(init)) obtained in the presence of each oxide at pH approximately 6.9 exhibit the following trend in catalytic activity: magnetite > goethite > hematite approximately = lepidocrocite > ferrihydrite. The differences in the activity of these oxides are hypothesized to result from variations in the amount of Fe(II) sorbed to each of the oxides and to dissimilarities in the surface site densities of the oxides. The implications of carbonate on Fe(II) sorption to iron oxides are also examined. Comparing Fe(II) sorption isotherms for goethite obtained under differential carbonate concentrations, it is apparent that as the carbonate concentration (C(T,CO3)) increased from 0 to 11.7 mM that the Fe(II) sorption edge (50% sorption) shifts from a pH of approximately 5.8 to a pH of 7.8. This shift is hypothesized to be the result of the formation of aqueous and surface carbonate-Fe(II) complexes and to competition between carbonate and Fe(II) for surface sites. The implications of these changes are then discussed in light of the variable oxide studies.

  14. Catechol versus bisphosphonate ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles: towards multi-functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guénin, Erwann; Lalatonne, Yoann; Bolley, Julie; Milosevic, Irena; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Motte, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    We report an investigation of the ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in water. For this purpose we compared two strong chelating agents on the iron oxide surface containing catechol and bisphosphonate moieties. Interactions between the coating agents (catechol/bisphosphonate) and the nanoparticle's surface were studied by FTIR and DFT calculations. Ligand exchange experiments were performed using sonication and the exchange yield was characterized by FTIR and EDX. This methodology allowed introducing bisphosphonates with various functionalities (alkyne or biotin) permitting multi-functionalization.

  15. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  16. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  17. Changes Found on Run-In and Scuffed Surfaces of Steel Chrome Plate, and Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, J. N.; Godfrey, Douglas

    1947-01-01

    A study was made of run-in and scuffed steel, chrome-plate, and cast-iron surfaces. X-ray and electron diffraction techniques, micro-hardness determinations, and microscopy were used. Surface changes varied and were found to include three classes: chemical reaction, hardening, and crystallite-size alteration. The principal chemical reactions were oxidation and carburization.

  18. Association of uranium with iron oxides typically formed on corroding steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dodge, C J; Francis, A J; Gillow, J B; Halada, G P; Eng, C; Clayton, C R

    2002-08-15

    Decontamination of metal surfaces contaminated with low levels of radionuclides is a major concern at Department of Energy facilities. The development of an environmentally friendly and cost-effective decontamination process requires an understanding of their association with the corroding surfaces. We investigated the association of uranium with the amorphous and crystalline forms of iron oxides commonly formed on corroding steel surfaces. Uranium was incorporated with the oxide by addition during the formation of ferrihydrite, goethite, green rust II, lepidocrocite, maghemite, and magnetite. X-ray diffraction confirmed the mineralogical form of the oxide. EXAFS analysis at the U L(III) edge showed that uranium was present in hexavalent form as a uranyl oxyhydroxide species with goethite, maghemite, and magnetite and as a bidentate inner-sphere complex with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Iron was present in the ferric form with ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, and maghemite; whereas with magnetite and green rust II, both ferrous and ferric forms were present with characteristic ferrous:total iron ratios of 0.65 and 0.73, respectively. In the presence of the uranyl ion, green rust II was converted to magnetite with concomitantreduction of uranium to its tetravalent form. The rate and extent of uranium dissolution in dilute HCl depended on its association with the oxide: uranium present as oxyhydroxide species underwent rapid dissolution followed by a slow dissolution of iron; whereas uranium present as an inner-sphere complex with iron resulted in concomitant dissolution of the uranium and iron.

  19. Thermal surface free energy and stress of iron

    PubMed Central

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    Absolute values of surface energy and surface stress of solids are hardly accessible by experiment. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of both parameters for the (001) and (110) surface facets of body-centered cubic Fe from first-principles modeling taking into account vibrational, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom. The monotonic decrease of the surface energies of both facets with increasing temperature is mostly due to lattice vibrations and magnetic disorder. The surface stresses exhibit nonmonotonic behaviors resulting in a strongly temperature dependent excess surface stress and surface stress anisotropy. PMID:26439916

  20. Thermal surface free energy and stress of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2015-10-01

    Absolute values of surface energy and surface stress of solids are hardly accessible by experiment. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of both parameters for the (001) and (110) surface facets of body-centered cubic Fe from first-principles modeling taking into account vibrational, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom. The monotonic decrease of the surface energies of both facets with increasing temperature is mostly due to lattice vibrations and magnetic disorder. The surface stresses exhibit nonmonotonic behaviors resulting in a strongly temperature dependent excess surface stress and surface stress anisotropy.

  1. Identification of ORF636 in phage phiSLT carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes, acting as an adhesion protein for a poly(glycerophosphate) chain of lipoteichoic acid on the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Jun; Narita-Yamada, Sachiko; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The temperate phage phiSLT of Staphylococcus aureus carries genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Here, we identify ORF636, a constituent of the phage tail tip structure, as a recognition/adhesion protein for a poly(glycerophosphate) chain of lipoteichoic acid on the cell surface of S. aureus. ORF636 bound specifically to S. aureus; it did not bind to any other staphylococcal species or to several gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus proliferation and biofilm formation on zinc oxide nanoparticle PVC composite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seil, Justin T; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    Conventional particulate zinc oxide (ZnO) is a known antibacterial agent. Studies have shown that reducing the size of ZnO particles to nanoscale dimensions further enhances their antibacterial properties. Polymers, like all biomaterials, run the risk of harboring bacteria which may produce an antibiotic-resistant biofilm. The addition of ZnO nanoparticles to form a polymer composite material may thus reduce undesirable bacteria activity. The purpose of the present in vitro study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of ZnO nanoparticles when incorporated into a traditional polymeric biomaterial. For this purpose, Staphylococcus aureus were seeded at a known cell density onto coverslips coated with a film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with varying concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles. Samples were cultured for 24 or 72 h. Methods of analysis, including optical density readings and crystal violet staining, indicated a reduced presence of a biofilm on ZnO nanoparticle polymer composites compared to pure polymer controls. Live/dead bacteria assays provided images to confirm the reduced presence of active bacteria on samples with zinc oxide nanoparticles. Conditioning of the cell culture medium by the composites was also investigated by measuring concentrations of elemental zinc (Zn(2+)) and bacteria growth in the presence of conditioned medium. This study demonstrated that the development of ZnO polymer composites may improve biomaterial effectiveness for numerous applications, such as endotracheal tubes, catheter and implanted biomaterials, which are prone to bacterial infection.

  3. Localized surface plasmon resonance-based hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles for detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaoli; Du, ChunLei; Fu, Yongqi

    2009-09-01

    A triangular hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles array was proposed for the purpose of biosensing in this paper. Constructing the hybrid nanoparticles, an Au thin film is capped on the Ag nanoparticles which are attached on glass substrate. The hybrid nanoparticles array was designed by means of finite-difference and time-domain (FDTD) algorithm-based computational numerical calculation and optimization. Sensitivity of refractive index of the hybrid nanoparticles array was obtained by the computational calculation and experimental detection. Moreover, the hybrid nanoparticles array can prevent oxidation of the pure Ag nanoparticles from atmosphere environment because the Au protective layer was deposited on top of the Ag nanoparticles so as to isolate the Ag particles from the atmosphere. We presented a novel surface covalent link method between the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect-based biosensors with hybrid nanoparticles array and the detected target molecules. The generated surface plasmon wave from the array carries the biological interaction message into the corresponding spectra. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), a small protein toxin was directly detected at nanogramme per milliliter level using the triangular hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles. Hence one more option for the SEB detection is provided by this way.

  4. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Merriman, Joseph A.; King, Jessica M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD). EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins. PMID:27144398

  5. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections. Images PMID:2394841

  6. Synthesis of nanoscale reaction pits network on zerovalent iron powder surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-man; Chen, Yun-chieh; Chiu, Kong-hwa; Yak, Hwa Kwang

    2006-03-01

    A neat and efficient method for controllable and reproducible synthesis of coral-shaped matrix containing abundant nanoscale reaction pits on micrometer-size zerovalent iron powder is described with the study of etching capability of dilute hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids with concentration ranges from 1 N to 6 N. Characterizations of surface morphology show that the specific surface area of this matrix increases up to 170 times that of the untreated iron powder, and that the reduction efficiency of a PCB congener in subcritical water is enhanced fivefold from 18% for the untreated iron to 92% for that with 170 times its surface area. The nanoscale pits may be a basis for enhancement of reaction cross-section via restriction of molecule mobility in the pits.

  7. Preparation of Reduced Iron Powders from Mill Scale with Microwave Heating: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qianxu; Zhu, Hongbo; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasa Kannan, C.; Chen, Jian; Dai, Linqing; Liu, Peng

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of the reduced iron powder has been attempted with mill scale as the iron-bearing material and with wood charcoal as the reducing agent through microwave heating. The response surface methodology (RSM) is used to optimize the process conditions, with wood charcoal, process temperature, and holding time being the three process parameters. The regressed model equation eliminating the insignificant parameters through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to optimize the process conditions. The optimum process parameters for the preparation of reduced iron powders have been identified to be the wood charcoal of 13.8 pct, a process temperature of 1391 K (1118 °C), and a holding time of 43 minutes. The optimum conditions resulted in reduced iron powders with a total iron content of 98.60 pct and a metallization ratio of 98.71 pct. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used to estimate the elemental contents of the reduced iron powder, which meets the specification of the HY100.23 first-class iron powder standard. Additionally X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were performed and the results are compiled.

  8. Climatically sensitive transfer of iron to maritime Antarctic ecosystems by surface runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, Andy; Nowak, Aga; Sabacka, Marie; Jungblut, Anne; Navarro, Francisco; Pearce, David; Ávila-Jiménez, María Luisa; Convey, Peter; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2017-02-01

    Iron supplied by glacial weathering results in pronounced hotspots of biological production in an otherwise iron-limited Southern Ocean Ecosystem. However, glacial iron inputs are thought to be dominated by icebergs. Here we show that surface runoff from three island groups of the maritime Antarctic exports more filterable (<0.45 μm) iron (6-81 kg km-2 a-1) than icebergs (0.0-1.2 kg km-2 a-1). Glacier-fed streams also export more acid-soluble iron (27.0-18,500 kg km-2 a-1) associated with suspended sediment than icebergs (0-241 kg km-2 a-1). Significant fluxes of filterable and sediment-derived iron (1-10 Gg a-1 and 100-1,000 Gg a-1, respectively) are therefore likely to be delivered by runoff from the Antarctic continent. Although estuarine removal processes will greatly reduce their availability to coastal ecosystems, our results clearly indicate that riverine iron fluxes need to be accounted for as the volume of Antarctic melt increases in response to 21st century climate change.

  9. Climatically sensitive transfer of iron to maritime Antarctic ecosystems by surface runoff

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Andy; Nowak, Aga; Sabacka, Marie; Jungblut, Anne; Navarro, Francisco; Pearce, David; Ávila-Jiménez, María Luisa; Convey, Peter; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2017-01-01

    Iron supplied by glacial weathering results in pronounced hotspots of biological production in an otherwise iron-limited Southern Ocean Ecosystem. However, glacial iron inputs are thought to be dominated by icebergs. Here we show that surface runoff from three island groups of the maritime Antarctic exports more filterable (<0.45 μm) iron (6–81 kg km−2 a−1) than icebergs (0.0–1.2 kg km−2 a−1). Glacier-fed streams also export more acid-soluble iron (27.0–18,500 kg km−2 a−1) associated with suspended sediment than icebergs (0–241 kg km−2 a−1). Significant fluxes of filterable and sediment-derived iron (1–10 Gg a−1 and 100–1,000 Gg a−1, respectively) are therefore likely to be delivered by runoff from the Antarctic continent. Although estuarine removal processes will greatly reduce their availability to coastal ecosystems, our results clearly indicate that riverine iron fluxes need to be accounted for as the volume of Antarctic melt increases in response to 21st century climate change. PMID:28198359

  10. Surface iron inhibits quartz-induced cytotoxic and inflammatory responses in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghiazza, Mara; Scherbart, Agnes M; Fenoglio, Ivana; Grendene, Francesca; Turci, Francesco; Martra, Gianmario; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F; Fubini, Bice

    2011-01-14

    The mechanism of enhancement/inhibition of quartz toxicity induced by iron is still unclear. Here the amount of iron on a fibrogenic quartz (Qz) was increased by wet impregnation (Fe(NO(3))(3) 0.67 and 6.7 wt %). X-ray diffraction (XRD), XRF diffuse reflectance, UV-vis, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies revealed dispersed ferric ions, and hematite aggregates at the higher loading. Surface features relevant to pathogenicity and cell responses were compared not only to the original quartz but also to reference quartz DQ12. Surface charge (ζ-potential) was more negative on the original and low-loaded specimen than on the high-loaded one. DQ12 had a less negative ζ-potential than Qz, ascribed to the absence of aluminium present in Qz (1.7 wt %). All quartz specimens were able to generate HO(•) radicals, iron-loaded samples being more reactive than original quartz. Iron deposition inhibited the rupture of a C-H bond. All quartzes were phagocytized by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ cell line NR8383) to the same extent, irrespective of their surface state. Conversely, iron loading increased AMΦ viability (evaluated by cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis). Qz was found to be much less cytotoxic than DQ12. The induction of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses (evaluated by HO-1 mRNA expression and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression) revealed a reduction in inflammogenicity upon iron loading and a more inflammogenic potency of DQ12 ascribed to undissociated SiOH interacting via H-bonding with cell membrane components. The results suggest that besides aluminium also iron at the quartz surface may have an inhibitory effect on adverse health responses.

  11. Bathophenanthrolene disulfonic acid and sodium dithionite effectively remove surface-bound iron from Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Gangloff, M B; Van Campen, D R; Miller, D D; Wien, E M; Norvell, W A

    1995-07-01

    Iron uptake by Caco-2 cell monolayers is commonly assessed by incubating the cells under radiolabeled iron solutions, removing the radiolabeled solution, rinsing to stop uptake and measuring the radioactivity retained by the cells. It is therefore essential to differentiate between iron that is nonspecifically bound to the cell surface from that which has been taken up by the cell. We report here on a method for removal of surface-bound iron from Caco-2 cell monolayers. We used a 140 mmol/L NaCl, 10 mmol/L PIPES, pH 6.7 solution containing 5.0 mmol/L sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) and 5.0 mmol/L bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid to reduce, remove and chelate iron bound to the cell surface. We validated our method by demonstrating the removal of 97% of an insoluble iron complex from the apical surface of Caco-2 cell monolayers. Our data indicate that the removal solution does not damage the apical membrane and thereby does not have access to intracellular iron; thus only surface bound iron is removed. The remaining cell-associated iron represents that which has been transported into the cell. We present data on the uptake and nonspecific binding of iron from iron complexes of both ferrous and ferric forms, and show that iron removal treatment resulted in uptake measurements that agree more closely with accepted principles of iron uptake by intestinal epithelium. The iron removal method used in this study should provide investigators with a valuable tool for accurately determining iron uptake by epithelial cells in culture.

  12. Reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene with zero-valent iron: Surface profiling microscopy and rate enhancement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gotpagar, J.; Lyuksyutov, S.; Cohn, R.; Grulke, E.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    1999-11-23

    Mechanistic aspects of the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene using zerovalent iron are studied with three different surface characterization techniques. These include scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the pretreatment of an iron surface by chloride ions causes enhancement in the initial degradation rates. This enhancement was attributed to the increased roughness of the iron surface due to crevice corrosion obtained by pretreatment. The results indicate that the fractional active site concentration for the reactive sorption of trichloroethylene is related to the number of defects/abnormalities present on the surface of the iron. This was elucidated with the help of atomic force microscopy. Two possible mechanisms include (1) a direct hydrogenation in the presence of defects acting as catalyst and (2) an enhancement due to the two electrochemical cells operating in proximity to each other. The result of this study has potential for further research to achieve an increase in the reaction rates by surface modifications in a practical scenario.

  13. Behavior Of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) Subjected To Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; Fagoaga, I.; Liceaga, J. F.; Sanz Justes, Pedro; Jasnowski, Kazie S.

    1989-03-01

    The near surface microstructure of 3 austempered ductile irons has been modified using laser surface melting (LSM). A white cast iron layer was produced to depths of up to 500 microns. The microstructure of this region varied depending upon the parameters used. A heat affected zone (HAZ) appeared at an abrupt transition between the LSM zone and the substrate. The size of the HAZ, which varied between 20 and 200 microns was predominately affected by the pass velocity in the range of energies used. The hardness profiles showed large variations in the Haz probably due to varing tempering effects from the subsequent passes.

  14. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus MF 31 on the Top and Cut Surfaces of Southern Custard Pies

    PubMed Central

    Preonas, D. L.; Nelson, A. I.; Ordal, Z. John; Steinberg, M. P.; Wei, L. S.

    1969-01-01

    A Staphylococcus strain was inoculated on the top and cut surfaces of freshly baked Southern custard pies which were then packaged in a pasteboard carton and held at 30 C. Daily plate counts of surface sections 0.3 inch (0.76 cm) in thickness were made. The top surface inoculum showed a 24-hr lag time. This was due to the protective action of a top cakelike layer as shown by homogenization of the mix and coating of the surface. Substitution of all sweeteners with dextrose completely inhibited growth on the top surface. Further addition of dextrose to lower water activity (Aw) to 0.9 prevented growth on the cut surface as well, but such pies were organoleptically unacceptable. Growth on the top surface could also be prevented by 80 μg of undissociated sorbic acid per g in combination with 100 μg of undissociated propionic acid per g in the baked pie. Growth on the cakelike top surface was always retarded longer than on the cut surface provided the packaging allowed evaporation of surface moisture. Reducing the Aw of a different type of cream pie to 0.907 prevented top surface growth. It was concluded that baked cream pies with a cakelike top layer could be marketed with a “refrigerate after opening” label, provided the package maintains the moisture gradient caused by the surface skin and either a combination of 80 μg of undissociated sorbic acid per g and 100 μg undissociated propionic acid per g is present in the baked pie or the Aw of the baked pie is 0.920 or lower. Images PMID:5803631

  15. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus MF31 on the top and cut surfaces of Southern custard pies.

    PubMed

    Preonas, D L; Nelson, A I; Ordal, Z J; Steinberg, M P; Wei, L S

    1969-07-01

    A Staphylococcus strain was inoculated on the top and cut surfaces of freshly baked Southern custard pies which were then packaged in a pasteboard carton and held at 30 C. Daily plate counts of surface sections 0.3 inch (0.76 cm) in thickness were made. The top surface inoculum showed a 24-hr lag time. This was due to the protective action of a top cakelike layer as shown by homogenization of the mix and coating of the surface. Substitution of all sweeteners with dextrose completely inhibited growth on the top surface. Further addition of dextrose to lower water activity (Aw) to 0.9 prevented growth on the cut surface as well, but such pies were organoleptically unacceptable. Growth on the top surface could also be prevented by 80 mug of undissociated sorbic acid per g in combination with 100 mug of undissociated propionic acid per g in the baked pie. Growth on the cakelike top surface was always retarded longer than on the cut surface provided the packaging allowed evaporation of surface moisture. Reducing the Aw of a different type of cream pie to 0.907 prevented top surface growth. It was concluded that baked cream pies with a cakelike top layer could be marketed with a "refrigerate after opening" label, provided the package maintains the moisture gradient caused by the surface skin and either a combination of 80 mug of undissociated sorbic acid per g and 100 mug undissociated propionic acid per g is present in the baked pie or the Aw of the baked pie is 0.920 or lower.

  16. Global transcriptional response of Staphylococcus aureus to rhein, a natural plant product.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Xiang, Hua; Fan, Junwen; Wang, Dacheng; Yang, Feng; Guo, Na; Jin, Qi; Deng, Xuming

    2008-06-30

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most important pathogens in humans and animals, multiply resistant strains are increasingly widespread, new agents are needed for the treatment of S. aureus. Rhein (RH), a natural plant product, has been reported to have potential antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, but the response mechanisms of S. aureus to RH are still poorly understood. RH showed good in vitro antibacterial activity against all 21 tested S. aureus strains in this experiment. We performed commercial Affymetrix GeneChips to determine the overall transcriptional response of S. aureus ATCC25923 triggered by the treatment of subinhibitory concentrations of RH at one time point 45 min. A total of 88 genes were identified to be differentially regulated by RH. Of these, 28 transporter genes were differentially regulated by RH; RH stress elevated the transcription of genes (srtB and isdABCDEFGI) encoding iron-regulated surface determinants system and genes (nrdIEF and nrdDG) involved in ribonucleotide reductase systems; but RH repressed genes (pflAB, nirBDR, narGH, ldh1, COL-SA0660, COL-SA2363 and COL-SA2386) responsible for anaerobic respiration and fermentation. To our knowledge, this genome-wide transcriptomics approach revealed first insights into the response of S. aureus to RH challenge.

  17. Survival of Staphylococcus aureus exposed to UV radiation on the surface of ceramic tiles coated with TiO2.

    PubMed

    Szczawiński, J; Tomaszewski, H; Jackowska-Tracz, A; Szczawińska, M E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the antimicrobial activity of UV radiation of wavelength 253.7 nm (used in typical germicidal lamps) against Staphylococcus aureus on the surfaces of conventionally produced white ceramic wall tiles (matt and shiny) and the same tiles coated with TiO2 using three different methods: RF diode sputtering, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) and spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD). Results clearly indicate that the bactericidal action of UV radiation is much stronger on the surfaces of tiles coated with TiO2 than on the tiles uncovered. The strongest bactericidal effect of UV radiation was found for film prepared by APCVD. Results of experiments for shiny and matt tiles did not differ statistically. The use of ceramic wall tiles coated with TiO2 films in hospitals, veterinary clinics, laboratories, food processing plants and other places where UV radiation is applied for disinfection should greatly improve the efficiency of this treatment.

  18. Immobilization of Bioactive Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) on the Surface of Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Ghaedmohammadi, Samira; Rigi, Garshasb; Zadmard, Reza; Ricca, Ezio; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2015-08-01

    Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) is a 40-60 kDa cell-wall component, composed of five homologous immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding domains folded into a three-helix bundle. Each of these five domains is able to bind Igs from many different mammalian species. Recombinant SpA is widely used as a component of diagnostic kits for the detection and purification of IgGs from serum or other biological fluids. In this study, purified SpA was adsorbed and covalently linked to Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores are extremely stable cell forms and are considered as an attractive platform to display heterologous proteins. A sample containing about 36 μg of SpA was covalently immobilized on the surface of 4 × 10(10) spores. Spore-bound SpA retained its IgG-binding activity, even after seven consecutive binding and washing steps, suggesting that it can be recycled and utilized several times. FACS analysis revealed that spores with covalently attached SpA had significantly improved fluorescence intensities when compared to those of spores with adsorbed SpA, suggesting that the covalent approach is more efficient than sole adsorption regarding protein attachment to the spore surface.

  19. Oxygen and sulfur interactions with a clean iron surface and the effect of rubbing contact on these interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    The interaction of sulfur and oxygen with an iron surface was studied with Auger spectroscopy analysis both statically and during sliding-friction experiments in a vacuum environment. Oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide were adsorbed to an iron surface. Results indicate that sulfide films formed on clean iron surfaces are completely displaced by oxygen. Hydrocarbons containing sulfur, such as methyl mercaptan, adsorb dissociatively. Less sulfur is adsorbed during sliding with hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan than in the absence of sliding. With both oxygen and sulfur dioxide, sliding did not affect the amount of material adsorbed to iron.

  20. The susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus CIP 65.8 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9721 cells to the bactericidal action of nanostructured Calopteryx haemorrhoidalis damselfly wing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vi Khanh; Geeganagamage, Nipuni Mahanamanam; Baulin, Vladimir A; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Tobin, Mark J; Luque, Pere; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured insect wing surfaces have been reported to possess the ability to resist bacterial colonization through the mechanical rupture of bacterial cells coming into contact with the surface. In this work, the susceptibility of physiologically young, mature and old Staphylococcus aureus CIP 65.8 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9721 bacterial cells, to the action of the bactericidal nano-pattern of damselfly Calopteryx haemorrhoidalis wing surfaces, was investigated. The results were obtained using several surface characterization techniques including optical profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, synchrotron-sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, water contact angle measurements and antibacterial assays. The data indicated that the attachment propensity of physiologically young S. aureus CIP 65.8(T) and mature P. aeruginosa ATCC 9721 bacterial cells was greater than that of the cells at other stages of growth. Both the S. aureus CIP 65.8(T) and P. aeruginosa ATCC 9721 cells, grown at the early (1 h) and late stationary phase (24 h), were found to be most susceptible to the action of the wings, with up to 89.7 and 61.3% as well as 97.9 and 97.1% dead cells resulting from contact with the wing surface, respectively.

  1. Sol-gel method as a way of carbonyl iron powder surface modification for interaction improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, P.; Kolman, K.; Pigłowski, J.; Kaleta, J.; Krzak, J.

    2015-03-01

    This article presents a method for modification of carbonyl iron particles' surface (CIP), (d50=4-9 μm) by silica coatings obtained using the sol-gel method. Reaction parameters were determined to obtain dry magnetic powder with homogeneous silica coatings without further processing and without any by-product in the solid or liquid phase. This approach is new among the commonly used methods of silica coating of iron particles. No attempt has been made to cover a carbonyl iron surface by silica in a waste-free method, up to date. In the current work two different silica core/shell structures were made by the sol-gel process, based on different silica precursors: tetraethoxy-silane (TEOS) and tetramethoxy-silane (TMOS). The dependence between the synthesis procedure and thickness of silica shell covering carbonyl iron particles has been described. Surface morphology of the modified magnetic particles and the coating thickness were characterized with the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determination of the physicochemical structure of the obtained materials was performed by the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the infrared technique (IR). The surface composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, distribution of particle size was measured using light microscopy. The new, efficient process of covering micro-size CIP with a nanometric silica layer was shown. Results of a performed analysis confirm the effectiveness of the presented method.

  2. Electromagnetic characteristics of surface modified iron nanowires at x-band frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. F.; Yang, R. B.; Lin, W. S.; Jian, Z. J.; Tsay, C. Y.; Wu, S. H.; Lin, H. M.; Choi, S. T.; Lin, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Surface modified iron nanowire nanoparticles were prepared via reduction of iron salts (FeCl3. 6H2O) under an applied magnetic field. To minimize the surface oxidation, dextran (0.05 and 0.25 wt. %) was added during the process and formed a thin passive layer over iron nanowires with alcohol and acetone used to wash iron nanowires. The complex permittivity (ɛ'-jɛ'') and permeability (μ'-jμ″) of absorbers are measured by a cavity perturbation method from 7 to 14 GHz. In the present study, the iron nanowire prepared with 0.25 wt. % dextran and washed by acetone (D25AC) exhibited the best microwave absorption performance. Depending on the test frequency, D25AC possessed the largest permittivity loss ranged from 0.14 to 0.17 and relatively small permeability loss (<0.05). Its high permittivity dissipation is responsible for the excellent microwave absorption performance where the reflection loss was-7.7 dB at a matching frequency of 9.0 GHz.

  3. On surface energy and the hydrogen embrittlement of iron and steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tromans, D. . Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of iron and steels is examined on the basis of changes in surface energy due to adsorption effects, as first proposed by Petch. Attention is directed towards the development of a suitable adsorption isotherm for iron that adequately describes interactions between the surface and a mobile hydrogen solute in the metal lattice. Hydrogen induced changes in surface energy are analyzed for the unstressed lattice, and in the presence of very high localized tensile stresses. It is concluded that the high stresses are necessary to produce a sufficient decrease in surface energy to promote cracking, and that embrittlement proceeds by the formation of microcracks within the metal. The study includes the effects of changes in the concentration (activity) of hydrogen in the metal lattice and the influence of microstructure.

  4. Changes in the Expression of Biofilm-Associated Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Food-Environmental Isolates Subjected to Sublethal Concentrations of Disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Cincarova, Lenka; Polansky, Ondrej; Babak, Vladimir; Kulich, Pavel; Kralik, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Sublethal concentrations (sub-MICs) of certain disinfectants are no longer effective in removing biofilms from abiotic surfaces and can even promote the formation of biofilms. Bacterial cells can probably adapt to these low concentrations of disinfectants and defend themselves by way of biofilm formation. In this paper, we report on three Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formers (strong B+++, moderate B++, and weak B+) that were cultivated with sub-MICs of commonly used disinfectants, ethanol or chloramine T, and quantified using Syto9 green fluorogenic nucleic acid stain. We demonstrate that 1.25-2.5% ethanol and 2500 μg/mL chloramine T significantly enhanced S. aureus biofilm formation. To visualize differences in biofilm compactness between S. aureus biofilms in control medium, 1.25% ethanol, or 2500 μg/mL chloramine T, scanning electron microscopy was used. To describe changes in abundance of surface-exposed proteins in ethanol- or chloramine T-treated biofilms, surface proteins were prepared using a novel trypsin shaving approach and quantified after dimethyl labeling by LC-LTQ/Orbitrap MS. Our data show that some proteins with adhesive functions and others with cell maintenance functions and virulence factor EsxA were significantly upregulated by both treatments. In contrast, immunoglobulin-binding protein A was significantly downregulated for both disinfectants. Significant differences were observed in the effect of the two disinfectants on the expression of surface proteins including some adhesins, foldase protein PrsA, and two virulence factors.

  5. The effectiveness of three home products in cleaning and disinfection of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli on home environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, N; Brouillette, N; Tenaglia, K; Gore, R; Marshall, J

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate three products for: (i) cleaning effectiveness on two common household surfaces, and (ii) disinfection effectiveness against two common bacteria. Products included conventional ('bleach'), environmentally preferable (EP), do-it-yourself (DIY: distilled white vinegar, club soda, tea tree oil), 24-h old DIY, and individual DIY components in dilution. For cleaning ceramic, no product was effective (≥85% removal of Hucker's soil), however, DIY performed better than EP and bleach. On stainless, only DIY failed to meet the standard. For disinfection, bleach and EP achieved ≥5·00 log10 reductions under all conditions. DIY and components were more active against Escherichia coli than Staphylococcus aureus but only fresh DIY and 50% vinegar achieved ≥5·00 log10 reductions. EP is an effective alternative to bleach. DIY may be an adequate alternative for cleaning ceramic and for household use, where complete elimination of micro-organisms is unnecessary; however, it must be freshly prepared each day. This is the first report of performance of purportedly safer alternatives for both cleaning and disinfection for use in home health care. The EP product and DIY are potential alternatives for some household uses. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Protection against Escherichia coli infection by antibody to the Staphylococcus aureus poly-N-acetylglucosamine surface polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Cerca, Nuno; Maira-Litrán, Tomás; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Grout, Martha; Goldmann, Donald A.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2007-01-01

    Poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) is a surface polysaccharide produced by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyloccus epidermidis and is an effective target for opsonic and protective Ab for these two organisms. Recently, it has been found that Escherichia coli produces an exo-polysaccharide, designated polyglucosamine, that is biochemically indistinguishable from PNAG. We analyzed 30 E. coli strains isolated from urinary tract and neonatal bloodstream infections for the pga locus, PNAG antigen production, and susceptibility to opsonic killing and protection from lethal infection by Ab to PNAG. Twenty-six of 30 strains carried the pga locus, 25 of 30 expressed immunologically detectable PNAG, and 21 of 30 could be killed by rabbit IgG specific for the deacetylated form of the staphylococcal PNAG. Ab to staphylococcal PNAG protected mice against lethality from five different E. coli strains expressing PNAG. PNAG expression by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms could make this antigen a conserved vaccine target for multiple pathogenic species of bacteria. PMID:17446272

  7. Self Assembly of Biogenic Surfactants at Mineral Surfaces and Their Effect on Biological Iron Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microorganisms exude biogenic surfactants to modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral-water interfaces. Surfactants with negatively charged hydrophilic head groups interact strongly with oppositely charged mineral surfaces such as iron or aluminum oxides. Surfactant self assembly at mineral surfaces can result in the formation of admicelles that have a significant effect on the surface charge and hydrophobicity. These effects are exploited by microorganisms to facilitate attachment to mineral surfaces. Similarly, plants exude surfactants into the rhizosphere and change the surface tension and flow of soil water. Other surface active compounds that are typically found in soils and surface waters are humic substances and fatty acids that are produced by degradation of biomass. In general, surface active compounds are ubiquitous in natural systems. In this study we investigated how surfactants influence bio-mineral interactions using the example of siderophore promoted iron acquisition. Siderophore promoted iron acquisition involves the adsorption of a biogenic iron specific ligand (i.e. the siderophore) to iron oxides and the subsequent siderophore promoted iron oxide dissolution. The hypothesis of this project is that the modification of the iron oxide surface charge and hydrophobicity by adsorbed surfactants will have an important effect on siderophore adsorption and dissolution kinetics. We approached this subject by investigating the adsorption of a natural surfactant (rhamnolipids: RhL) and the synthetic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate: SDS) on goethite (α-FeOOH, a common pedogenic iron oxide) and observing the effect of surfactant self assembly on the properties of the mineral water interface. We observed fast adsorption kinetics at pH 3 and slow adsorption at pH 6. The adsorbed surfactants reversed the surface potential of goethite (as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility measurements) at soluble surfactant concentrations below 10 μM (SDS

  8. Ascorbate-Promoted Surface Iron Cycle for Efficient Heterogeneous Fenton Alachlor Degradation with Hematite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Hou, Xiaojing; Jia, Falong; Song, Fahui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-03-15

    This study reports the H2O2 activation with different hematite nanocrystals and ascorbate ions for the herbicide alachlor degradation at pH 5. We found that hematite nanoplates (HNPs) exposed with {001} facets exhibited better catalytic performance than hematite nanocubes (HNCs) exposed with {012} facets, which was attributed to the formation of inner-sphere iron-ascorbate complexes on the hematite facets. The 3-fold undercoordination Fe cations of {001} facet favors the formation of inner-sphere iron-ascorbate complexes, while the 5-fold undercoordination Fe cations of {012} facet has stereo-hindrance effect, disfavoring the complex formation. The surface area normalized alachlor degradation rate constant (23.3 × 10(-4) min(-1) L m(-2)) of HNPs-ascorbate Fenton system was about 2.6 times that (9.1 × 10(-4) min(-1) L m(-2)) of HNCs-ascorbate counterpart. Meanwhile, the 89.0% of dechlorination and 30.0% of denitrification in the HNPs-ascorbate Fenton system were also significantly higher than those (60.9% and 13.1%) of the HNCs-ascorbate one. More importantly, the reductive dissolution of hematite by ascorbate was strongly coupled with the subsequent H2O2 decomposition by surface bound ferrous ions through surface iron cycle on the hematite facets in the hematite-ascorbate Fenton systems. This coupling could significantly inhibit the conversion of surface bound ferrous ions to dissolved ones, and thus account for the stability of hematite nanocrystals. This work sheds light on the internal relationship between iron geochemical cycling and contaminants degradation, and also inspires us to utilize surface iron cycle of widely existent hematite for environmental remediation.

  9. Anchoring of surface proteins to the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. III. Lipid II is an in vivo peptidoglycan substrate for sortase-catalyzed surface protein anchoring.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adrienne M; Ton-That, Hung; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Schneewind, Olaf

    2002-05-03

    Surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus are anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan by a mechanism requiring a C-terminal sorting signal with an LPXTG motif. Surface proteins are first synthesized in the bacterial cytoplasm and then transported across the cytoplasmic membrane. Cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide of the cytoplasmic surface protein P1 precursor generates the extracellular P2 species, which is the substrate for the cell wall anchoring reaction. Sortase, a membrane-anchored transpeptidase, cleaves P2 between the threonine (T) and the glycine (G) of the LPXTG motif and catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of threonine and the amino group of cell wall cross-bridges. We have used metabolic labeling of staphylococcal cultures with [(32)P]phosphoric acid to reveal a P3 intermediate. The (32)P-label of immunoprecipitated surface protein is removed by treatment with lysostaphin, a glycyl-glycine endopeptidase that separates the cell wall anchor structure. Furthermore, the appearance of P3 is prevented in the absence of sortase or by the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. (32)P-Labeled cell wall anchor species bind to nisin, an antibiotic that is known to form a complex with lipid II. Thus, it appears that the P3 intermediate represents surface protein linked to the lipid II peptidoglycan precursor. The data support a model whereby lipid II-linked polypeptides are incorporated into the growing peptidoglycan via the transpeptidation and transglycosylation reactions of cell wall synthesis, generating mature cell wall-linked surface protein.

  10. Adsorption of sulfur on the iron (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, S.; Sasaki, K.

    The surface structures and the kinetics of sulfur adsorption on the Fe(001) surface were systematically investigated by means of LEED, AES and Δφ techniques in a wide temperature range (-190°C to 400°C). Sulfur was deposited by direct evaporation. In addition to the five structures reported so far, a new antiphase domain structure denoted as (√2 × 3√2)R45° was found at a coverage of 0.67 monolayer, where the first adsorbed layer was completed. A mixing of domain sizes was observed as a transition structure between 0.6 and 0.67 monolayers. The LEED patterns of these transition structures were kinematically simulated. From a comparison with the observed patterns, it was found that these were typically represented by such domain sequences as -2-3-2-2-3-2- with considerable misarrangement. Attention has also been focused on the inspection of low coverage structures other than c(2×2) below 0.5 monolayer with the aim of a full understanding of the interactions between adatoms on the surfaces. As a result, the presence of the p(2×2) structure was suggested at low coverages (-0.2 ML). The saturation coverages of chalcogen on the Fe(001) surfaces were also discussed in connection with the final structures in the first adsorbed layers.

  11. A microbial-mineralization approach for syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Naoki; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2013-04-02

    Of minerals and microbes: A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach was used to facilitate the syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area, such as 253 m(2)g(-1) for maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) and 148 m(2)g(-1) for hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)). These iron oxides can be applied to electrode material of lithium-ion batteries, adsorbents, and catalysts. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Removal of contaminants from aqueous solution by reaction with iron surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S.R.; Lai, H.F.; Roberson, M.J.; Hunt, M.L.; Amrhein, C.; Giancarlo, L.C.; Flynn, G.W.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2000-03-07

    Irrigation drainage and industrial wastewaters often contain elevated levels of toxic oxyanions and oxycations such as selenate, chromate, and uranyl. A potential remediation method is to react contaminated water with zero-valent iron, which transforms the mobile contaminants into immobile forms. In this work, iron foil was exposed to aqueous solutions containing the relevant ions, and the reacted surfaces were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). STM images collected in situ show that the protrusions on the foil surface associated with iron oxides are smoothed out by the reaction. XPS indicates that partially reduced Se(IV) and Cr(III) are adsorbed on the surface, while uranium is deposited as U(VI), i.e., without reduction. More Se and Cr are deposited when the atmospheric gases are removed from solution because of the elimination of a competing process in which dissolved O{sub 2} increases the thickness of the iron oxide overlayer to the point where the reduction reaction is quenched. The amount of U deposited is greatly increased when the atmospheric gases are removed because of the elimination of dissolved CO{sub 2}, which can form carbonate complexes with uranium.

  13. Surface reactions of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2005-06-30

    Despite the fact that carbon dioxide is an abundant atmospheric gas with profound environmental implications, there is little information on the reaction of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-oxide interface. In this study, the chemistry of carbon dioxide at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is investigated with FTIR spectroscopy. As shown here, the thin water layer on the iron oxide surface plays an important role in the surface chemistry of carbon dioxide. In particular, adsorbed water enhances CO(2) uptake, undergoes isotope exchange with CO(2) in O(18)-labeled experiments, and influences the chemical nature of the predominant adsorbed product on the surface from bicarbonate to carbonate. The resultant thin water film is acidic in nature from the reaction of CO(2). The IR spectrum recorded of adsorbed carbonate at the adsorbed water-iron oxide interface is remarkably similar to that at the bulk liquid water-iron oxide interface. Since reactions in thin water films estimated to be approximately 2 layers will play a role in a number of environmental processes, it is essential to understand the chemistry of these "wet" interfaces with atmospheric gases.

  14. Water-Mediated Proton Hopping on an Iron Oxide Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Grabow, Lars C.; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefen; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H3O+-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO2(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

  15. Correlation between reduction of surface hydrophobicity of S. aureus and the decrease in its adhesiveness induced by subinhibitory concentrations of brodimoprim.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Reggio, S

    1995-11-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are involved in the mechanism of adhesion of a variety of bacteria to host tissues. Bacterial attachment to human cells is modulated by a change in interfacial free energy and this is correlated with surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells. In S. aureus (one ATCC25923+four clinical isolates) hydrophobicity before and after incubation with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of brodimoprim (BMP), a dimethyoxypyrimidine recently entered clinical practice, was measured by sessile drop technique as the contact angle. BMP is a new molecule derived from trimethoprim by substitution of the OCH3 group in position 4 of the benzyl-ring with a bromine atom. Bacterial adhesiveness of the same S. aureus strains was measured under the same experimental conditions. BMP significantly decreased the surface hydrophobicity of S. aureus strains at one-half MIC and one-quarter MIC. At sub-MICs concentrations BMP also reduced the adhesiveness to human epithelial buccal cells but this effect was significant down to one-sixteenth MIC. The two phenomena are correlated and hydrophobicity is involved in bacterial adhesiveness but the molecular mechanisms for the two phenomena do not completely overlap, with adhesiveness the more complex and based on a system involving both the bacteria and the epithelial cells with their specific surface characteristics.

  16. The effect of Virkon S fogging on survival of Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus on surfaces in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Dunowska, Magdalena; Morley, Paul S; Hyatt, Doreene R

    2005-02-25

    The objective of the study was to determine the disinfection efficacy of aerosolizing (cold fogging) Virkon S on survival of Stahpylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica on different surfaces. Two experiments were conducted in different locations. Salmonella enterica and S. aureus were grown in broth culture and then seeded into pre-marked areas in each location and allowed to dry. Virkon S (1%) was aerosolized into the rooms (approximately 1L of per 30 m(3)). Samples were collected pre- and post-fogging for quantitative cultures to evaluate the efficacy of aerial disinfection. The reduction of S. enterica or S. aureus counts ranged from 3.40 to 0.95 log(10) (Salmonella) or 4.92 to 0.02 log(10) (Staphylococcus). The greatest reduction was evident in samples collected from non-porous horizontal surfaces, which were not obstructed from the air flow. These results indicate that fogging with Virkon S could be beneficial in routine disinfection of pre-cleaned surfaces. The benefits of routine use of cold fogging with Virkon S in veterinary hospital settings would include its wide-range antimicrobial action and minimal working-men power required to disinfect large areas. Also, fogging would potentially minimize microbial contamination in the hard to reach areas.

  17. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    DOE PAGES

    Antony, Jiji; Nutting, Joseph; Baer, Donald R.; ...

    2006-01-01

    Nmore » anoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7 ∘ C . Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.« less

  18. Iron oxide and hydroxide precipitation from ferrous solutions and its relevance to Martian surface mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey-Dowty, J.; Moskowitz, B.; Crerar, D.; Hargraves, R.; Tanenbaum, L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine if the ubiquitousness of a weak magnetic component in all Martian surface fines tested with the Viking Landers can be attributed to ferric iron precipitation in aqueous solution under oxidizing conditions at neutral pH. Ferrous solutions were mixed in deionized water and various minerals were added to separate liquid samples. The iron-bearing additives included hematite, goethite, magnetite, maghemite, lepidocrocite and potassium bromide blank at varying concentrations. IR spectroscopic scans were made to identify any precipitates resulting from bubbling oxygen throughout the solutions; the magnetic properties of the precipitates were also examined. The data indicated that the lepidocrocite may have been preferentially precipitated, then aged to maghemite. The process would account for the presumed thin residue of maghemite on the present Martian surface, long after abundant liquid water on the Martian surface vanished.

  19. Iron oxide and hydroxide precipitation from ferrous solutions and its relevance to Martian surface mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey-Dowty, J.; Moskowitz, B.; Crerar, D.; Hargraves, R.; Tanenbaum, L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine if the ubiquitousness of a weak magnetic component in all Martian surface fines tested with the Viking Landers can be attributed to ferric iron precipitation in aqueous solution under oxidizing conditions at neutral pH. Ferrous solutions were mixed in deionized water and various minerals were added to separate liquid samples. The iron-bearing additives included hematite, goethite, magnetite, maghemite, lepidocrocite and potassium bromide blank at varying concentrations. IR spectroscopic scans were made to identify any precipitates resulting from bubbling oxygen throughout the solutions; the magnetic properties of the precipitates were also examined. The data indicated that the lepidocrocite may have been preferentially precipitated, then aged to maghemite. The process would account for the presumed thin residue of maghemite on the present Martian surface, long after abundant liquid water on the Martian surface vanished.

  20. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  1. Surfaces of a colloidal iron nanoparticle in its chemical environment: a DFT description.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram; Poteau, Romuald; Lachaize, Sébastien; Gerber, Iann C

    2014-10-07

    Describing and understanding surface chemistry on the atomic scale is of primary importance in predicting and rationalize nanoparticle morphology as well as their physical and chemical properties. Here we present the results of comprehensive density functional theory studies on the adsorption of several small organic species, representing the major species (H2, Cl2, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, and CH3COOH), present in the reaction medium during colloidal iron nanoparticle synthesis on various low-index iron surface models, namely, (100), (110), (111), (211), and (310). All of the tested ligands strongly interact with the proposed surfaces. Surface energies are calculated and ligand effects on the morphologies are presented, including temperature effects, based on a thermodynamic approach combined with the Wulff construction scheme. The importance of taking into account vibrational contributions during the calculation of surface energies after adsorption is clearly demonstrated. More importantly, we find that thermodynamic ligand effects can be ruled out as the unique driving force in the formation of recently experimentally observed iron cubic nanoparticles.

  2. Cohesive Relations for Surface Atoms in the Iron-Technetium Binary System

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Iron-technetium alloys are of relevance to the development of waste forms for disposition of radioactive technetium-99 obtained from spent nuclear fuel. Corrosion of candidate waste forms is a function of the local cohesive energy () of surface atoms. A theoretical model for calculating is developed. Density functional theory was used to construct a modified embedded atom (MEAM) potential for iron-technetium. Materials properties determined for the iron-technetium system were in good agreement with the literature. To explore the relationship between local structure and corrosion, MEAM simulations were performed on representative iron-technetium alloys and intermetallics. Technetium-rich phases have lower , suggesting thatmore » these phases will be more noble than iron-rich ones. Quantitative estimates of based on numbers of nearest neighbors alone can lead to errors up to 0.5 eV. Consequently, atomistic corrosion simulations for alloy systems should utilize physics-based models that consider not only neighbor counts, but also local compositions and atomic arrangements.« less

  3. Vaccine protection of leukopenic mice against Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts-α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)-are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI.

  4. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  5. Surface reactivity, cytotoxicity, and transforming potency of iron-covered compared to untreated refractory ceramic fibers.

    PubMed

    Elias, Zoé; Poirot, Odile; Danière, Marie-Céleste; Terzetti, Francine; Binet, Stéphane; Tomatis, Maura; Fubini, Bice

    2002-12-13

    Untreated and iron-coated refractory ceramic fibers (RCFs) 1, 3, and 4 were examined for their potential to generate free radicals and to catalyze hydrogen peroxide decomposition in cell-free assays and were compared for cytotoxic and transforming potencies in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell system. Coating with a high quantity of iron increased the capability of RCFs to generate hydroxyl radicals and to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. In the SHE cells, the untreated RCFs had varying ability to induce inhibition of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity (as measured by the colony-forming efficiency, CE) and morphological transformation, in a concentration-dependent manner. According to cytotoxic and transforming potencies, they ranged as follows: RCF3 > RCF1 > RCF4. The lethal concentration 50 (LC50; decrease of CE to 50% of controls after 7 d of treatment) expressed per number of RCF3 and RCF1/cm(2) of culture dish was 2.5 x 10(4) and 3.7 x 10(4), respectively, whereas RCF4 was not cytotoxic up to the highest concentration tested (23.7 x 10(4) fibers/cm(2)). At LC50, RCF3 was 1.4-fold more transforming than RCF1, and the weakest, RCF4, induced less than 1% transformation. Iron coating of RCF1 and RCF3 markedly attenuated their cytostatic, cytotoxic, and transforming potencies without a linear concentration-transformation relationship. In contrast, iron coating of RCF4 affected slightly its low transforming potency, although the growth inhibitory effect was reduced. The observed decrease rather than increase in the cytotoxic and transforming potencies of the active samples RCF1 and RCF3 by their coating with large amounts of ferric iron suggests that it is not the quantity or any form of iron on the surface of fibers but the iron, even in trace, in a particular redox and coordinate state that might play a role in the fiber's surface reactivity with regard to the biological material. Surface chemical functions involved in the interaction with the cell

  6. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Recovered from Humans, Environmental Surfaces, and Companion Animals in Households of Children with Community-Onset Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Morelli, John J; Hogan, Patrick G; Sullivan, Melanie L; Muenks, Carol E; Wang, Jeffrey W; Thompson, Ryley M; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from 110 households of children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Cultures were obtained from household members, household objects, and dogs and cats, yielding 1,633 S. aureus isolates. The S. aureus isolates were heterogeneous, although more than half were methicillin resistant. The highest proportion of MRSA was found in bathrooms. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antibiotics prescribed in outpatient settings.

  8. Interaction of Aqueous Chromium Ions with Iron Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Amonette, James E.; Rustad, James R.; Kendelewicz, Thomas; Liu, Ping; Doyle, C. S.; Grolimund, D.; Foster, Nancy S.; Joyce, Stephen A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2000-05-01

    To gain a more fundamental understanding of abiotic processes controlling reduction reactions of aqueous chromate and dichromate ions (Cr(VI)aq) in subsurface environments, we carried out molecular-level experimental and modeling studies of the interaction of water and Cr(VI)aq with well-characterized single crystal samples of synthetic and natural hematite and magnetite. A reductionist approach was adopted in which simplified model systems of increasing complexity were studied. Photoemission spectroscopy (PES), photo-electron diffraction, and vacuum STM were used to characterize the composition, atomic structure, and morpho-logy of clean surfaces of ?-Fe?O?(0001) and Fe?O?(100) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on single crystal substrates of ?-Al?O?(0001) and MgO(100), respectively.

  9. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  10. Interaction of Fe(II) with phosphate and sulfate on iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Wang, Zimeng; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-06-01

    Sulfate and phosphate, oxoanions common in natural systems, affect iron oxide growth and dissolution processes, the adsorption behavior of divalent cations, and iron oxide phase transformations. These oxoanions may thus influence Fe(II) adsorption behavior and subsequently alter the mechanisms and products of Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization processes, such as trace metal repartitioning. In this study, the macroscopic and molecular-scale effects of the coadsorption of Fe(II) and sulfate or phosphate onto Fe(III) oxide surfaces were investigated. Macroscopic adsorption edges show that both sulfate and phosphate increase Fe(II) adsorption and that Fe(II) increases sulfate and phosphate adsorption. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows that the cooperative adsorption behavior of oxoanions and aqueous Fe(II) likely results from a combination of ternary complexation and electrostatic interactions. Surface complexation modeling requires the inclusion of ternary complexes to simulate all conditions of the macroscopic data, further suggesting that these oxoanions and Fe(II) form ternary complexes on Fe(III) oxide surfaces. Despite clear evidence in previous research for Fe(II) oxidation upon adsorption on iron oxide surfaces, this work shows that Fe(II) also displays macroscopic and molecular-scale behaviors associated with divalent (i.e., non-oxidative) cation adsorption. Prior work has shown that metal release from iron oxides caused by ET-AE reactions is directly proportional to the macroscopically-determined Fe(II) surface coverage. Predicting the effects of sulfate and phosphate on processes controlled by ET-AE reactions at redox interfaces, such as mineral phase transformations and trace element repartitioning, may thus not require the explicit consideration of electron transfer processes.

  11. Difference of EGCg adhesion on cell surface between Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli visualized by electron microscopy after novel indirect staining with cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Motokazu; Shigemune, Naofumi; Tsugukuni, Takashi; Tokuda, Hajime; Miyamoto, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    We developed a novel method using indirect staining with cerium chloride for visualization of the catechin derivative epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) on the surface of particles, i.e., polystyrene beads and bacterial cells, by electron microscopy. The staining method is based on the fact that in an alkaline environment, EGCg produces hydrogen peroxide, and then hydrogen peroxide reacts with cerium, resulting in a cerium hydroperoxide precipitate. This precipitate subsequently reacts with EGCg to produce larger deposits. The amount of precipitate is proportional to the amount of EGCg. Highly EGCg-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and EGCg-resistant Escherichia coli were treated with EGCg under various pH conditions. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that the amount of deposits on S. aureus increased with an increase in EGCg concentration. After treating bacterial cells with 0.5mg/mL EGCg (pH 6.0), attachment of EGCg was significantly lower to E. coli than to S. aureus. This is the first report that shows differences in affinity of EGCg to the cell surfaces of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria by electron microscopy.

  12. Gated Hall effect of nanoplate devices reveals surface-state-induced surface inversion in iron pyrite semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Kaiser, Nicholas S; Jin, Song

    2014-12-10

    Understanding semiconductor surface states is critical for their applications, but fully characterizing surface electrical properties is challenging. Such a challenge is especially crippling for semiconducting iron pyrite (FeS2), whose potential for solar energy conversion has been suggested to be held back by rich surface states. Here, by taking advantage of the high surface-to-bulk ratio in nanostructures and effective electrolyte gating, we develop a general method to fully characterize both the surface inversion and bulk electrical transport properties for the first time through electrolyte-gated Hall measurements of pyrite nanoplate devices. Our study shows that pyrite is n-type in the bulk and p-type near the surface due to strong inversion and yields the concentrations and mobilities of both bulk electrons and surface holes. Further, solutions of the Poisson equation reveal a high-density of surface holes accumulated in a 1.3 nm thick strong inversion layer and an upward band bending of 0.9-1.0 eV. This work presents a general methodology for using transport measurements of nanostructures to study both bulk and surface transport properties of semiconductors. It also suggests that high-density of surface states are present on surface of pyrite, which partially explains the universal p-type conductivity and lack of photovoltage in polycrystalline pyrite.

  13. Outermost-cell-surface changes in an encapsulated strain of Staphylococcus aureus after preservation by freeze-drying.

    PubMed Central

    Ohtomo, T; Yamada, T; Yoshida, K

    1988-01-01

    The effects of drying time during freeze-drying on the outermost cell surface of an encapsulated strain of Staphylococcus aureus S-7 (Smith, diffuse) were investigated, with special attention paid to capsule and slime production. To quantify capsule and slime production, capsule antigen production and cellular characteristics such as growth type in serum-soft agar, cell volume index, and clumping factor reaction were examined. After freeze-drying the colonial morphology of strain S-7 was altered from a diffuse to a compact type in serum-soft agar. In accordance with these changes, the titer of the clumping factor reaction increased while the cell volume index, capsule and slime production, and capsule antigen production were markedly decreased in parallel with the period of freeze-drying. The ability of the strain to adhere to collagen, fibrinogen, and soybean lectin was also compared before and after freeze-drying. Fibrinogen levels slightly increased when 10% skim milk and 2% honey were used as cryoprotective agents and showed a remarkable increase when 0.05 M phosphate buffer was used as a control. Also, the ability of strain S-7 to adhere to soybean lectin declined, whereas no changes were observed for collagen under any conditions. Strain S-7 was phage nontypable before freeze-drying but the number of typable cells increased after freeze-drying; phage-typable cells reacted to phage 52 alone after 5 h of freeze-drying, but additional cells also proved to be phage typable to phage 42E after 10 h. Electron micrographs indicated that strain S-7, an encapsulated strain, was converted to an unencapsulated state after freeze-drying.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3202630

  14. Accessible reactive surface area and abiotic redox reactivity of iron oxyhydroxides in acidic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehlau, Jennifer H.; Toner, Brandy M.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in low pH and high ionic strength solutions was quantified to assess abiotic contributions to oxidation-reduction chemistry in acidic brine environments, such as mine groundwater seepage, lakes in Western Australia, and acid mine drainage settings, which are of global interest for their environmental impacts and unique geomicrobiology. Factors expected to influence accessible and reactive surface area, including Fe(II) adsorption and aggregate size, were measured as a function of pH and CaCl2 concentration and related to the kinetics of redox reactions in aqueous suspensions of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), and ferrihydrite (Fe10O14(OH)2) nanoparticles. Aqueous conditions and iron oxyhydroxides were chosen based on characterization of natural iron-rich mine microbial mats located in Soudan Underground Mine State Park, Minnesota, USA. Quinone species were used as redox sensors because they are well-defined probes and are present in natural organic matter. Fe(II) adsorption to the iron oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces from aqueous solution was measurable only at pH values above 4 and either decreased or was not affected by CaCl2 concentration. Concentrations at or above 0.020 M CaCl2 in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) induced particle aggregation. Assessment of Fe(II) adsorption and particle aggregation in acidic brine suggested that accessible reactive surface area may be limited in acidic brines. This was supported by observations of decreasing benzoquinone reduction rate by adsorbed Fe(II) at high CaCl2 concentration. In contrast, the hydroquinone oxidation rate increased at high CaCl2 concentrations, which may be due to suppressed adsorption of Fe(II) generated by the reaction. Results suggest that iron geochemical cycling in acidic brine environments will be substantially different than for iron oxyhydroxides in low-saline waters with circumneutral pH. These findings have implications for acidic

  15. Temperature and pyoverdine-mediated iron acquisition control surface motility of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Matilla, Miguel A; Ramos, Juan L; Duque, Estrella; de Dios Alché, Juan; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Ramos-González, María Isabel

    2007-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is unable to swarm at its common temperature of growth in the laboratory (30 degrees C) but exhibits surface motility similar to swarming patterns in other Pseudomonas between 18 degrees C and 28 degrees C. These motile cells show differentiation, consisting on elongation and the presence of surface appendages. Analysis of a collection of mutants to define the molecular determinants of this type of surface movement in KT2440 shows that while type IV pili and lipopolysaccharide O-antigen are requisites flagella are not. Although surface motility of flagellar mutants was macroscopically undistinguishable from that of the wild type, microscopy analysis revealed that these mutants move using a distinct mechanism to that of the wild-type strain. Mutants either in the siderophore pyoverdine (ppsD) or in the FpvA siderophore receptor were also unable to spread on surfaces. Motility in the ppsD strain was totally restored with pyoverdine and partially with the wild-type ppsD allele. Phenotype of the fpvA strain was not complemented by this siderophore. We discuss that iron influences surface motility and that it can be an environmental cue for swarming-like movement in P. putida. This study constitutes the first report assigning an important role to pyoverdine iron acquisition in en masse bacterial surface movement.

  16. Activity of essential oil-based microemulsions against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms developed on stainless steel surface in different culture media and growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Raffaella, Campana; Casettari, Luca; Fagioli, Laura; Cespi, Marco; Bonacucina, Giulia; Baffone, Wally

    2017-01-16

    Food safety is a fundamental concern for both consumers and the food industry, especially as the numbers of reported cases of food-associated infections continue to increase. Industrial surfaces can provide a suitable substrate for the development and persistence of bacterial organized in biofilms that represent a potential source of food contamination. The negative consumer perception of chemical disinfectants has shifted the attention to natural substances, such as plant extracts. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using the essential oils (EOs) in the fight against S. aureus biofilms. First, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC), Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MBIC), Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) of eleven EOs against S. aureus were determined. Cinnamomum cassia and Salvia officinalis EOs showed the greatest antibacterial properties with 1.25% MIC and MBC, 1.25% MBIC and 2.5% MBEC respectively. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed cinnamaldehyde (82.66%) and methoxy cinnamaldehyde (10.12%) as the most abundant substances of C. cassia, while cis-thujone (23.90%), camphor (19.22%) and 1.8-cineole (10.62%) of S. officinalis. Three different microemulsions, formulated with C. cassia, S. officinalis or both, were finally tested against S. aureus biofilms in different culture media and growth conditions, causing a >3 logarithmic reductions in S. aureus 24h-old biofilms and desiccated biofilms, and up to 68% of biofilm removal after 90min of exposure. The obtained data suggest the potential use of EOs, alone or in combination, for the formulation of sanitizers as alternative or in support in the disinfection of contaminated surfaces.

  17. Formation of iron-oxide nanorods on the surface of silicon by using annealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Nitin; Kumari, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis of iron-oxide nanorods on silicon (Si) substrates. The nanorods were formed by annealing an iron chloride solution on the surface of a Si at 950 °C in the presence of a reducing gas (H2) and a diluting gas (Ar). The surface morphologies of the nanorods were investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and their compositions and structural characterization were investigated by elemental using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The HRTEM study shows a crystalline formation of the nanorods. The electron diffraction pattern along the viewing (111) direction and the HRTEM result shows an interplanar distance equal to 2.17 Å, which is nearly equal to the standard value 2.3 Å of FeO. The as-fabricated nanorods can be used for many technological applications.

  18. Magnetoadsorption and magnetodesorption of NO on iron oxides: Role of magnetism and surface structures of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Sumio; Uchiyama, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Katsumi )

    1991-10-03

    The magnetic field effects on NO adsorption on iron oxides were observed at 303 K. Ferrimagnetic magnetite and maghemite showed magnetic field induced adsorption (magnetoadsorption); i.e., NO adsorption was promoted with an increase in external magnetic field (1-7.6 kG). Hematite (parasitic ferromagnetism) also showed magnetoadsorptivity. Antiferromagnetic iron oxyhydroxides ({alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-FeOOH) showed magnetic field induced desorption (magnetodesorption). On the other hand, an antiferromagnetic NiO and a ferrimagnetic {delta}-FeOOH exhibited magnetoadsorptivity and magnetodesorptivity, respectively. The magnetoadsorptivity of magnetites depended on the preheating conditions and that of {delta}-FeOOH was independent of its magnetism susceptibility. The results suggest that surface sites and porosity, i.e., adsorption state of NO, rather than solid magnetism would play an important role in the magnetic interactions between solid surfaces and NO molecules under a magnetic field.

  19. Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles and their conjuntion with water soluble polymers for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Huong, Nguyen; Thi Kieu Giang, Lam; Thanh Binh, Nguyen; Minh, Le Quoc

    2009-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) coated with suitable bio-compatible substances have been used in biomedicine, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), tissue engineering, and hyperthermia and drug delivery. In this study, we describe the synthesis of SPION and its surface modification for in-vitro experiments. The particle diameter and structure were estimated by FESEM, TEM, XRD analyses. The saturation magnetization was characterized. SPION with a mean size of 12 nm have been prepared under N2 atmosphere, with support of natural polymeric starch, by controlling chemical coprecipitation of magnetite phase from aqueous solutions containing suitable salts ratios of Fe2+ and Fe3+. The surface of SPION-nanoparticles was treated with a coordinatable agent for higher dispersion ability in water and remaining the superparamagnetic behavior. The prepared iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with starch, dextran, PEG or MPEG to extend the application potential in the quite different engineering field of nano biomedicine.

  20. Sol–gel method as a way of carbonyl iron powder surface modification for interaction improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Małecki, P.; Kolman, K.; Pigłowski, J.; Kaleta, J.; Krzak, J.

    2015-03-15

    This article presents a method for modification of carbonyl iron particles’ surface (CIP), (d{sub 50}=4–9 µm) by silica coatings obtained using the sol–gel method. Reaction parameters were determined to obtain dry magnetic powder with homogeneous silica coatings without further processing and without any by-product in the solid or liquid phase. This approach is new among the commonly used methods of silica coating of iron particles. No attempt has been made to cover a carbonyl iron surface by silica in a waste-free method, up to date. In the current work two different silica core/shell structures were made by the sol–gel process, based on different silica precursors: tetraethoxy-silane (TEOS) and tetramethoxy-silane (TMOS). The dependence between the synthesis procedure and thickness of silica shell covering carbonyl iron particles has been described. Surface morphology of the modified magnetic particles and the coating thickness were characterized with the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determination of the physicochemical structure of the obtained materials was performed by the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the infrared technique (IR). The surface composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, distribution of particle size was measured using light microscopy. The new, efficient process of covering micro-size CIP with a nanometric silica layer was shown. Results of a performed analysis confirm the effectiveness of the presented method. - Highlights: • Proper covering CIP by sol–gel silica layer avoids agglomeration. • A new solid waste-free method of CIP coating is proposed. • Examination of the properties of modified CIP in depends on washing process. • Coatings on CIP particles doesn’t change the magnetic properties of particles.

  1. Volcanic ash as an iron-fertilizer in ocean surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgun, N.; Duggen, S.; Croot, P.; Dietze, H.; Schacht, U.; Oskarsson, N.; Siebe, C.; Auer, A.

    2007-12-01

    Surface ocean fertilisation with iron may affect the marine primary productivity, C-cycles and eventually climate development. Volcanic ash has the potential to release iron on contact with seawater and to stimulate phytoplankton growth (1,2) but the relative importance of volcanism at destructive plate margins (subduction zones, SZ) and intraplate volcanic settings (ocean islands at hot spots) remains unknown. Here we present new results from geochemical experiments with natural seawater and numerous volcanic ash samples from SZ volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire (Alaska, Japan, Kamchatka, Northern and Central America and Papua New Guinea) and hot spot volcanoes (on Iceland and Hawaii). The release of iron as a function of time was determined in situ in seawater by means of Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry. Our experiments show that: A) volcanic ash from both SZ and hot spot volcanic areas mobilise significant amounts of iron, B) with the highest mobilisation rates within the first 10-20 minutes and C) indicate that volcanic ash from hot spot volcanoes mobilise less iron than volcanic ash from SZ. We propose that the higher iron-mobilisation potential of SZ volcanic ash results from higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases that seem to be involved in the formation of Fe-bearing soluble salt coatings (condensed gases and adsorbed aerosols) on ash particles (1,2,3). Higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases thus appear to be linked to the recycling of seawater through subduction of oceanic lithosphere at destructive plate margins. Together, taking into account differences in ash-fluxes from SZ and hot spot volcanoes into the oceans, our study suggests that SZ volcanic ash plays a more important role for the global surface ocean iron budget than ash from volcanoes in hot spot areas. 1 Frogner, Gislason, Oskarsson (2001). Geology, 29, 487-490. 2 Duggen, Croot, Schacht, Hofmann (2007) Geoph. Res. Letters 34, 5. 3 Oskarsson (1980), J. Volc. and Geoth. Res. 8, 251-266.

  2. Analysis of Novel Iron-Regulated, Surface-Anchored Hemin-Binding Proteins in Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Courtni E.; Burgos, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources during growth in iron-depleted environments, and recent studies have shown that the surface-exposed HtaA protein binds both hemin and Hb and also contributes to the utilization of hemin iron. Conserved (CR) domains within HtaA and in the associated hemin-binding protein, HtaB, are required for the ability to bind hemin and Hb. In this study, we identified and characterized two novel genetic loci in C. diphtheriae that encode factors that bind hemin and Hb. Both genetic systems contain two-gene operons that are transcriptionally regulated by DtxR and iron. The gene products of these operons are ChtA-ChtB and ChtC-CirA (previously DIP0522-DIP0523). The chtA and chtB genes are carried on a putative composite transposon associated with C. diphtheriae isolates that dominated the diphtheria outbreak in the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. ChtA and ChtC each contain a single N-terminal CR domain and exhibit significant sequence similarity to each other but only limited similarity with HtaA. The chtB and htaB gene products exhibited a high level of sequence similarity throughout their sequences, and both proteins contain a single CR domain. Whole-cell binding studies as well as protease analysis indicated that all four of the proteins encoded by these two operons are surface exposed, which is consistent with the presence of a transmembrane segment in their C-terminal regions. ChtA, ChtB, and ChtC are able to bind hemin and Hb, with ChtA showing the highest affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that specific tyrosine residues within the ChtA CR domain were critical for hemin and Hb binding. Hemin iron utilization assays using various C. diphtheriae mutants indicate that deletion of the chtA-chtB region and the chtC gene has no affect on the ability of C. diphtheriae to use hemin or Hb as iron sources; however, a chtB htaB double mutant exhibits a significant decrease in hemin iron use

  3. Analysis of novel iron-regulated, surface-anchored hemin-binding proteins in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Allen, Courtni E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Michael P

    2013-06-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources during growth in iron-depleted environments, and recent studies have shown that the surface-exposed HtaA protein binds both hemin and Hb and also contributes to the utilization of hemin iron. Conserved (CR) domains within HtaA and in the associated hemin-binding protein, HtaB, are required for the ability to bind hemin and Hb. In this study, we identified and characterized two novel genetic loci in C. diphtheriae that encode factors that bind hemin and Hb. Both genetic systems contain two-gene operons that are transcriptionally regulated by DtxR and iron. The gene products of these operons are ChtA-ChtB and ChtC-CirA (previously DIP0522-DIP0523). The chtA and chtB genes are carried on a putative composite transposon associated with C. diphtheriae isolates that dominated the diphtheria outbreak in the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. ChtA and ChtC each contain a single N-terminal CR domain and exhibit significant sequence similarity to each other but only limited similarity with HtaA. The chtB and htaB gene products exhibited a high level of sequence similarity throughout their sequences, and both proteins contain a single CR domain. Whole-cell binding studies as well as protease analysis indicated that all four of the proteins encoded by these two operons are surface exposed, which is consistent with the presence of a transmembrane segment in their C-terminal regions. ChtA, ChtB, and ChtC are able to bind hemin and Hb, with ChtA showing the highest affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that specific tyrosine residues within the ChtA CR domain were critical for hemin and Hb binding. Hemin iron utilization assays using various C. diphtheriae mutants indicate that deletion of the chtA-chtB region and the chtC gene has no affect on the ability of C. diphtheriae to use hemin or Hb as iron sources; however, a chtB htaB double mutant exhibits a significant decrease in hemin iron use

  4. Surface complexation of ferrous iron and carbonate on ferrihydrite and the mobilization of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Appelo, C A J; Van Der Weiden, M J J; Tournassat, C; Charlet, L

    2002-07-15

    Surface complexation models are commonly used to predict the mobility of trace metals in aquifers. For arsenic in groundwater, surface complexation models cannot be used because the database is incomplete. Both carbonate and ferrous iron are often present at a high concentration in groundwater and will influence the sorption of arsenic, but the surface complexation constants are absent in the database of Dzombak and Morel. This paper presents the surface complexation constants for carbonate and ferrous iron on ferrihydrite as derived for the double-layer model. For ferrous iron the constants were obtained from published data supplemented by new experiments to determine the sorption on the strong sites of ferrihydrite. For carbonate the constants were derived from experiments by Zachara et al., who employed relatively low concentrations of carbonate. The double-layer model, optimized for low concentrations, was tested against sorption experiments of carbonate on goethite at higher concentration by Villalobos and Leckie, and reasonable agreement was found. Sorption was also estimated using linear free energy relations (LFER), and results compared well with our derived constants. Model calculations confirm that sorption of particularly carbonate at common soil and groundwater concentrations reduces the sorption capacity of arsenic on ferrihydrite significantly. The displacing effect of carbonate on sorbed arsenate and arsenite has been overlooked in many studies. It may be an important cause for the high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh. Sediments containing high amounts of sorbed arsenic are deposited in surface water with low carbonate concentrations. Subsequently the sediments become exposed to groundwater with a high dissolved carbonate content, and arsenic is mobilized by displacement from the sediment surface.

  5. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins. PMID:27517714

  6. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins.

  7. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION.

  8. Solution and inhibition of iron in neutral solution in the presence of a nonstoichiometric surface oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oshe, E.K.; Fokin, M.N.; Zimina, T.Y.

    1986-07-01

    This paper suggests a mechanism of solution and passivation of iron in neutral solution in the presence of a surface oxide. The influence of sodium tungstate on these processes is discussed and it is shown that the oxyanion WO/sup 2 -//sub 4/ possesses electron-acceptor properties. Using the photoelectric data the authors make an estimate of the quantity of tungstate ion adsorbed on the oxide surface for a protective concentration of the inhibitors. If the centers of preferential adsorption are anion vacancies, the minimal quantity of adsorbed tungstate giving complete protection corresponds to the initial concentration of vacancies in the absence of the inhibitor.

  9. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phosphate during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) bearing groundwater are among the key unknowns in P retention processes in surface waters in delta areas where the shallow groundwater is typically pH-neutral to slightly acid, anoxic, iron-rich. We developed an experimental field set-up to study the dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation and mechanisms of P immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. The exfiltrating groundwater was captured in in-stream reservoirs constructed in the ditch. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we quantified Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes across the seasons. This study showed that seasonal changes in climatic conditions affect the Fe(II) oxidation process. In winter time the dissolved iron concentrations in the in-stream reservoirs reached the levels of the anaerobic groundwater. In summer time, the dissolved iron concentrations of the water in the reservoirs are low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into the reservoirs. Higher discharges, lower temperatures and lower pH of the exfiltrated groundwater in winter compared to summer shifts the location of the redox transition zone

  10. Facile fabrication of iron-based superhydrophobic surfaces via electric corrosion without bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qinghe; Liu, Hongtao; Chen, Tianchi; Wei, Yan; Wei, Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surface is of wide application in the field of catalysis, lubrication, waterproof, biomedical materials, etc. The superhydrophobic surface based on hard metal is worth further study due to its advantages of high strength and wear resistance. This paper investigates the fabrication techniques towards superhydrophobic surface on carbon steel substrate via electric corrosion and studies the properties of as-prepared superhydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic properties were characterized by a water sliding angle (SA) and a water contact angle (CA) measured by the Surface tension instrument. A Scanning electron microscope was used to analyze the structure of the corrosion surface. The surface compositions were characterized by an Energy Dispersive Spectrum. The Electrochemical workstation was used to measure its anti-corrosion property. The anti-icing performance was characterized by a steam-freezing test in Environmental testing chamber. The SiC sandpaper and 500 g weight were used to test the friction property. The research result shows that the superhydrophobic surface can be successfully fabricated by electrocorrosion on carbon steel substrate under appropriate process; the contact angle of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface can be up to 152 ± 0.5°, and the sliding angle is 1-2°; its anti-corrosion property, anti-icing performance and the friction property all show an excellent level. This method provides the possibility of industrialization of superhydrophobic surface based on iron substrate as it can prepare massive superhydrophobic surface quickly.

  11. Changes in the Expression of Biofilm-Associated Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Food-Environmental Isolates Subjected to Sublethal Concentrations of Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Polansky, Ondrej; Babak, Vladimir; Kulich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Sublethal concentrations (sub-MICs) of certain disinfectants are no longer effective in removing biofilms from abiotic surfaces and can even promote the formation of biofilms. Bacterial cells can probably adapt to these low concentrations of disinfectants and defend themselves by way of biofilm formation. In this paper, we report on three Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formers (strong B+++, moderate B++, and weak B+) that were cultivated with sub-MICs of commonly used disinfectants, ethanol or chloramine T, and quantified using Syto9 green fluorogenic nucleic acid stain. We demonstrate that 1.25–2.5% ethanol and 2500 μg/mL chloramine T significantly enhanced S. aureus biofilm formation. To visualize differences in biofilm compactness between S. aureus biofilms in control medium, 1.25% ethanol, or 2500 μg/mL chloramine T, scanning electron microscopy was used. To describe changes in abundance of surface-exposed proteins in ethanol- or chloramine T-treated biofilms, surface proteins were prepared using a novel trypsin shaving approach and quantified after dimethyl labeling by LC-LTQ/Orbitrap MS. Our data show that some proteins with adhesive functions and others with cell maintenance functions and virulence factor EsxA were significantly upregulated by both treatments. In contrast, immunoglobulin-binding protein A was significantly downregulated for both disinfectants. Significant differences were observed in the effect of the two disinfectants on the expression of surface proteins including some adhesins, foldase protein PrsA, and two virulence factors. PMID:27868063

  12. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  13. The hydrophobicity and roughness of a nasoenteral tube surface influences the adhesion of a multi-drug resistant strain of Staphylococcus Aureus.

    PubMed

    Lima, J C; Andrade, N J; Soares, N F F; Ferreira, S O; Fernandes, P E; Carvalho, C C P; Lopes, J P; Martins, J F L

    2011-04-01

    IN THIS STUDY, WE EXAMINED THE PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NASOENTERAL FEEDING TUBES MADE FROM TWO DIFFERENT TYPES OF POLYMER: silicone materials and polyurethane. The internal surfaces of the nasoenteral feeding tubes were analyzed for their hydrophobicity, roughness, microtopography, rupture-tension and ability to stretch. We also studied the adhesion of an isolated, multi-drug resistant strain of S. aureus to these polymers. The polyurethane nasoenteral tube, which was classified as hydrophilic, was more resistant to rupture-tension and stretching tests than the silicone tube, which was classified as hydrophobic. Additionally, the polyurethane tube had a rougher surface than the silicone tube. Approximately 1.0 log CFU.cm(-2) of S. aureus cells adhered to the tubes and this number was not statistically different between the two types of surfaces (p > 0.05). In future studies, new polymers for nasoenteral feeding tubes should be tested for their ability to support bacterial growth. Bacterial adhesion to these polymers can easily be reduced through modification of the polymer's physicochemical surface characteristics.

  14. The hydrophobicity and roughness of a nasoenteral tube surface influences the adhesion of a multi-drug resistant strain of Staphylococcus Aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lima, J.C.; Andrade, N.J.; Soares, N.F.F.; Ferreira, S.O.; Fernandes, P.E.; Carvalho, C.C.P.; Lopes, J.P.; Martins, J.F.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physiochemical properties of nasoenteral feeding tubes made from two different types of polymer: silicone materials and polyurethane. The internal surfaces of the nasoenteral feeding tubes were analyzed for their hydrophobicity, roughness, microtopography, rupture-tension and ability to stretch. We also studied the adhesion of an isolated, multi-drug resistant strain of S. aureus to these polymers. The polyurethane nasoenteral tube, which was classified as hydrophilic, was more resistant to rupture-tension and stretching tests than the silicone tube, which was classified as hydrophobic. Additionally, the polyurethane tube had a rougher surface than the silicone tube. Approximately 1.0 log CFU.cm-2 of S. aureus cells adhered to the tubes and this number was not statistically different between the two types of surfaces (p > 0.05). In future studies, new polymers for nasoenteral feeding tubes should be tested for their ability to support bacterial growth. Bacterial adhesion to these polymers can easily be reduced through modification of the polymer’s physicochemical surface characteristics. PMID:24031660

  15. Iron and Ecosystem Response to Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Interactions in the North Pacific Ocean Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Elrod, V. A.; Fitzwater, S. E.; Plant, J. N.; Chavez, F. P.; Tanner, S. J.; Gordon, R. M.; Westphal, D. L.; Perry, K. D.; Karl, D. M.

    2002-12-01

    Here, we report measurements of iron and aluminum in surface and subsurface waters during March and May of 2001 on transects between central California and Hawaii. A large cloud of Asian dust was detected during April 2001 and there was a clear signal in surface water iron due to aerosol deposition on the May transect. Iron and aluminum concentrations increased synchronously by 0.5 and 2 nM along the southern portion of the transect from background values in March (0.1 to 0.2 nM Fe). Elevated iron concentrations were found to a depth of 100 m. These changes occurred in a ratio that is close to the crustal abundance ratio of the metals, which indicates a soil aerosol source. Soil aerosol concentrations along the transect were estimated using the real-time Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS). The NAAPS results and direct observations of aerosol iron concentration at Mauna Loa Observatory on Hawaii indicate low aerosol concentrations near Hawaii and a large meridional gradient with maximum concentrations in the boundary layer north of 30° N. However, the change in surface water iron and aluminum concentration was highest south of 25° N, near Hawaii. This suggests that the iron and aluminum concentration changes were the result of local processes, rather than a reflection of the broad-scale distribution of aerosol. Anomalously low wind velocities (1 m/s) at the start of the May transit produced a thin (5-10 m), warm surface layer. We suggest that this trapped aerosol at the surface during daylight and led to the iron concentration increase, perhaps through photochemical reduction of particulate iron. Iron concentrations then decreased to background on the day that trade winds returned. A mass balance calculation suggests that the solubility of aerosol iron would have to be near 100% to support the observed increase during the 5 day period of low winds. The absence of a significant increase in particulate iron concentration lends support. While the

  16. Mars surface weathering products and spectral analogs: Palagonites and synthetic iron minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    There are several hypotheses regarding the formation of Martian surface fines. These surface fines are thought to be products of weathering processes occurring on Mars. Four major weathering environments of igneous rocks on Mars have been proposed; (1) impact induced hydrothermal alterations; (2) subpermafrost igneous intrusion; (3) solid-gas surface reactions; and (4) subaerial igneous intrusion over permafrost. Although one or more of these processes may be important on the Martian surface, one factor in common for all these processes is the reaction of solid or molten basalt with water (solid, liquid, or gas). These proposed processes, with the exception of solid-gas surface reactions, are transient processes. The most likely product of transient hydrothermal processes are layer silicates, zeolites, hydrous iron oxides and palagonites. The long-term instability of hydrous clay minerals under present Martian conditions has been predicted; however, the persistence of such minerals due to slow kinetics of dehydration, or entrapment in permafrost, where the activity of water is high, can not be excluded. Anhydrous oxides of iron (e.g., hematite and maghemite) are thought to be stable under present Martian surface conditions. Oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals associated with Martian basalts has been proposed. Weathering of sulfide minerals leads to a potentially acidic permafrost and the formation of Fe(3) oxides and sulfates. Weathering of basalts under acidic conditions may lead to the formation of kaolinite through metastable halloysite and metahalloysite. Kaolinite, if present, is thought to be a thermodynamically stable phase at the Martian surface. Fine materials on Mars are important in that they influence the surface spectral properties; these fines are globally distributed on Mars by the dust storms and this fraction will have the highest surface area which should act as a sink for most of the absorbed volatiles near the surface of Mars. Therefore

  17. Mars surface weathering products and spectral analogs: Palagonites and synthetic iron minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    There are several hypotheses regarding the formation of Martian surface fines. These surface fines are thought to be products of weathering processes occurring on Mars. Four major weathering environments of igneous rocks on Mars have been proposed; (1) impact induced hydrothermal alterations; (2) subpermafrost igneous intrusion; (3) solid-gas surface reactions; and (4) subaerial igneous intrusion over permafrost. Although one or more of these processes may be important on the Martian surface, one factor in common for all these processes is the reaction of solid or molten basalt with water (solid, liquid, or gas). These proposed processes, with the exception of solid-gas surface reactions, are transient processes. The most likely product of transient hydrothermal processes are layer silicates, zeolites, hydrous iron oxides and palagonites. The long-term instability of hydrous clay minerals under present Martian conditions has been predicted; however, the persistence of such minerals due to slow kinetics of dehydration, or entrapment in permafrost, where the activity of water is high, can not be excluded. Anhydrous oxides of iron (e.g., hematite and maghemite) are thought to be stable under present Martian surface conditions. Oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals associated with Martian basalts has been proposed. Weathering of sulfide minerals leads to a potentially acidic permafrost and the formation of Fe(3) oxides and sulfates. Weathering of basalts under acidic conditions may lead to the formation of kaolinite through metastable halloysite and metahalloysite. Kaolinite, if present, is thought to be a thermodynamically stable phase at the Martian surface. Fine materials on Mars are important in that they influence the surface spectral properties; these fines are globally distributed on Mars by the dust storms and this fraction will have the highest surface area which should act as a sink for most of the absorbed volatiles near the surface of Mars. Therefore

  18. Reaction of carbon and water as catalyzed by nickel and iron surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The individual steps of the reaction of carbon and water to produce CO and H/sub 2/ were quantified on nickel and iron surfaces using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface graphite and carbide, two metastable surface carbon forms, were prepared by dehydrogenation of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and served as reactant carbon. UPS of the graphite monolayer in contact with the metal yielded a valence electronic structure that could be interpreted in terms of the bulk band structure of graphite. The CO formation step is rate limiting in the uncatalyzed H/sub 2/O gasification reaction of graphite. The nickel surface in contact with graphitic carbon lowers the barrier for the CO formation step. The catalytic action occurs directly without isolated prior breaking of carbon-carbon bonds. The estimated activation energy for the direct reaction was 44 kcal/mole. The fully carbided surfaces of Ni and Fe were active for H/sub 2/O dissociation with an estimated activation energy between 5.0 and 10.0 kcal/mole. A different catalytic reaction cycle involving carbon-carbon bond breaking followed by oxidation of the carbide is energetically more demanding. The activation energy for direct carbon-carbon bond breaking was estimated between 65-70 kcal/mole on both nickel and iron. Following this demanding step, the reaction between carbidic carbon and oxygen proceeded on nickel and iron with estimated activation energies of 31 and 39 kcal/mole, respectively. This indirect carbide reaction cycle changed the energetics of the steam gasification of carbon.

  19. Magnetic properties of bcc Iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment: electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram; Gerber, Iann C

    2015-01-14

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of low-indexed iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment on these properties. We have considered the (1 0 0), (1 1 0), (1 1 1), (2 1 1) and (3 1 0) surfaces, both, bare and with the presence of adsorbates. These were chosen to mimic realistic chemical synthesis environments, being H, Cl, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, or CH3COOH. We have found an increased magnetization at all bare surfaces. Upon H adsorption the magnetization is generally reduced, but still above the bulk value. All other ligands and their dissociated parts alter the magnetic properties of the surfaces only weakly. Our calculations do not indicate that ligands are responsible for experimental observations of Fe nanoparticles with average magnetizations below the bulk value.

  20. Magnetic properties of bcc Iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment: electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Guntram; Gerber, Iann C.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of low-indexed iron surfaces and the influence of the chemical environment on these properties. We have considered the (1 0 0), (1 1 0), (1 1 1), (2 1 1) and (3 1 0) surfaces, both, bare and with the presence of adsorbates. These were chosen to mimic realistic chemical synthesis environments, being H, Cl, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, or CH3COOH. We have found an increased magnetization at all bare surfaces. Upon H adsorption the magnetization is generally reduced, but still above the bulk value. All other ligands and their dissociated parts alter the magnetic properties of the surfaces only weakly. Our calculations do not indicate that ligands are responsible for experimental observations of Fe nanoparticles with average magnetizations below the bulk value.

  1. Recent progress on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, surface functional strategies and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Wu, Zhaohui; Yu, Taekyung; Jiang, Changzhong; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in the preparation, microstructure, and magnetic properties of bare and surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs); their corresponding biological application was also discussed. In order to implement the practical in vivo or in vitro applications, the IONPs must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of IONPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The new functionalized strategies, problems and major challenges, along with the current directions for the synthesis, surface functionalization and bioapplication of IONPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and the prospects in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:27877761

  2. Recent progress on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, surface functional strategies and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Wu, Zhaohui; Yu, Taekyung; Jiang, Changzhong; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in the preparation, microstructure, and magnetic properties of bare and surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs); their corresponding biological application was also discussed. In order to implement the practical in vivo or in vitro applications, the IONPs must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of IONPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The new functionalized strategies, problems and major challenges, along with the current directions for the synthesis, surface functionalization and bioapplication of IONPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and the prospects in these research areas are also discussed.

  3. Improvement of integrated technology for restoring surfaces of steel and iron parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarelnyk, V.; Martsynkovskyy, V.; Sarzhanov, A.; Pavlov, A.; Gerasimenko, V.; Sarzhanov, B.

    2017-08-01

    There have been proposed new technical solutions including operations of applying coatings onto worn surfaces of steel and cast iron parts by electro-erosive alloying method (EEA). In this case, the EEA coatings are applied in two stages. At the first stage, there is applied a layer on the conditions providing the greatest thickness and continuity of the surfaces obtained. At the second stage, the operation is performed by the same electrode and on the conditions of the discharge energy and productivity corresponding thereto, which provide for the formation of the surface having a roughness value being about 2-4 times higher than that at the previous stage. At least one layer of a metal polymer material (MPM) is applied on the surface formed by the above said EEA method, with this layer having been reinforced by at least one wire reinforcement layer before polymerization.

  4. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  5. Directional, Broad, and Fixed Angle Surface Plasmon Coupled Fluorescence from Iron Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed angle surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (SPCF) from iron thin films is demonstrated for the first time. The optimum thickness of the iron thin films was determined to be 15 nm using Fresnel calculations. The angles of minimum reflectivity for light at 496–814 nm were predicted to occur at a fixed and broad range of angles of 60–70°. Experimental corroboration of these predictions were undertaken by employing fluorescein isothiocyanate (emission peak at 517 nm), rhodamine B (580 nm), zinc phthalocyanine (710 nm), and IR 780 dye (814 nm). SPCF emission from all four fluorophores was directional, p-polarized, and observed at a fixed angle of ∼65°. PMID:20657700

  6. Surface Behavior of Iron Sulfide Ore during Grinding with Alumina Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Reyes P.; Elia, Palácios B.; Patiño, Francisco C.; Escudero, Ramiro G.; Mizraim, Uriel Flores G.; Reyes, Iván A. D.; Palazuelos, Laura Angeles

    This research was conducted to study the oxidation and surface modification of pyrite in an inert mill and alumina grinding media at different pH values. The extent and progress of the oxidation function of milling time, by measuring some physicochemical variables, zeta potential (ZP), infrared analysis and monitoring. The results indicate pyrite oxidation during grinding, releasing iron and sulfur ions to the solution increasing its concentration with the initial pH and the milling time, the ORP and DO decrease the grinding time, on the other hand presents negative values ZP pH of 9, 11 and 12, whereas at pH 5, 7 and 13, the ZP is positive, FTIR generally detect the presence of free sulfate ion molecule 1084 cm-1, goethite with the absorption band at about 794 cm-1, also occurs in a band assigned to 470 cm-1 lepidocrocite oxy iron hydroxide γ- FeOOH, nucleated species or formed during milling.

  7. Ligand effects on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron: Role of surface complexation.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojie; Chen, Zhihao; Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Shujuan

    2017-05-01

    Surface passivation is a key limiting factor in the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) for water remediation. Addition of ligands is a useful approach to overcome this issue. In this work, a small amount of acetylacetone (AA) (0.5 mM) was found highly efficient to enhance the reduction of nitrate by ZVI at near neutral conditions (pH 6.0) with the formation of considerable black coating on ZVI. At an initial nitrate concentration of 20 mg N/L, the pseudo first-order reduction rate constant of nitrate in the ZVI-AA-NO3(-) system was 0.0991 h(-1), which was 52 times higher than that in the ZVI-NO3(-) system. Under otherwise identical conditions, the other five ligands, including EDTA, formate, acetate, oxalate, and phosphate, had negligible effects. Based on the pKa values of these ligands and the final species of iron, the ligand effects on nitrate reduction by ZVI were summarized from three aspects: (1) the ability to offer potentially dissociable protons from the ligands; (2) the complexation ability to eliminate iron (hydr)oxide precipitates from the surface of ZVI; and (3) the ability to lower down the redox potentials of iron species. The good performance of AA in these three aspects makes it advantage over the other ligands. A cycle test up to six runs demonstrates that AA could continuously take effect in the ZVI system. The results here point out the potential of AA as an effective ligand in ZVI system for enhanced contaminant transformation.

  8. Gamma-cyclodextrin/usnic acid thin film fabricated by MAPLE for improving the resistance of medical surfaces to Staphylococcus aureus colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, Florin; Grumezescu, Valentina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Curuţiu, Carmen; Diţu, Lia Mara; Socol, Gabriel; Ficai, Anton; Truşcă, Roxana; Holban, Alina Maria

    2015-05-01

    This study reports on the successful deposition of γ-cyclodextrin/usnic acid (γCD/UA) thin film by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) as anti-adherent coating on medical surfaces against microbial colonization. The obtained results demonstrate that these bioactive thin films inhibit Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation at all stages, starting with their initiation. The antibiofilm effect was constant along the bacterial incubation time. Furthermore, the γCD/UA coatings show a great biocompatibility which means that this material is suitable for the development of modern medical devices with antimicrobial properties.

  9. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  10. Effect of thiamine hydrochloride on the redox reactions of iron at pyrite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.; Oliver, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation is a part of our studies on the electro chemical aspects of pyrite bioleaching involving Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Previously (1,2) we have examined the effect of T. ferrooxidans and their metabolic products on the redox reactions of Fe[sup 2+]/Fe[sup 3+] couple at the pyrite surface. Results obtained suggest that beyond 1. 5 days during their growth in a batch fermenter, the bacteria and their metabolic products completely cover the pyrite surface and shut down all electron transfer across the electrode-solution interface. In addition, it has been observed that the bacteria serve as the nucleation site for jarosite formation, which is found detrimental to bioleaching. In the present work we have focussed on the effect of the presence of vitamins on the redox chemistry of iron. Our examination of the effect of the presence of thiamine hydrochloride in the redox behavior of Fe[sup 2+]/Fe[sup 3+] at the pyrite surface has revealed that thiamine hydrochloride does not undergo chemical interaction with ferrous or ferric iron. However, it may adsorb onto the pyrite surface causing polarization of the pyrite electrode.

  11. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Recovered from Humans, Environmental Surfaces, and Companion Animals in Households of Children with Community-Onset Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, John J.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Sullivan, Melanie L.; Muenks, Carol E.; Wang, Jeffrey W.; Thompson, Ryley M.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from 110 households of children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Cultures were obtained from household members, household objects, and dogs and cats, yielding 1,633 S. aureus isolates. The S. aureus isolates were heterogeneous, although more than half were methicillin resistant. The highest proportion of MRSA was found in bathrooms. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antibiotics prescribed in outpatient settings. PMID:26248385

  12. Friction and transfer of copper, silver, and gold to iron in the presence of various adsorbed surface films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the noble metals copper, silver, and gold and two binary alloys of these metals contacting iron in the presence of various adsorbates including, oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride. A pin on disk specimen configuration was used with a load of 100 grams, sliding velocity of 60 mm/min; at 25 C with the surfaces saturated with the adsorbates. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor surface films. Results of the experiments indicate that friction and transfer characteristics are highly specific with respect to both the noble metal and surface film present. With all three metals and films transfer of the noble metal to iron occurred very rapidly. With all metals and films transfer of the noble metal to iron continuously increased with repeated passes except for silver and copper sliding on iron sulfide.

  13. Anomalous surface segregation behaviour of some 3d elements in ferromagnetic iron.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Michèle; Gupta, Raju P

    2013-10-16

    The segregation of Cr in Fe is known to be anomalous since the barrier for surface segregation of Cr is not determined by the topmost surface layer, as one would expect, but rather by the subsurface layer where the energy of segregation is much larger and endothermic. This has been attributed to a complex interaction involving the antiferromagnetism of Cr and the ferromagnetism of Fe. We report in this paper the results of our ab initio electronic structure calculations on the segregation behaviour of all the 3d elements on the (1 0 0) surface of ferromagnetic iron in the hope of better understanding this phenomenon. We find a similar behaviour for the segregation of the next antiferromagnetic 3d element Mn in Fe, where the subsurface layer is also found to block the segregation of Mn to the surface. On the other hand, ferromagnetic Co exhibits a normal segregation behaviour. The elements Sc, Cu and Ni do not form solid solutions with ferromagnetic iron. The early elements Ti and V are non-magnetic in their metallic states, but are strongly polarized by Fe, and develop magnetic moments which are aligned antiferromagnetically to those of Fe atoms. While the subsurface layer blocks the segregation of Ti to the surface, no blocking behaviour is found for the segregation of V. The segregation behaviour of all these elements is strongly correlated with the displacement of the solute atoms on the surface of Fe. The elements showing anomalous segregation behaviour are all displaced upwards on the surface, while those showing normal segregation are pulled inwards. These results indicate that the antiferromagnetism of the segregating element plays the key role in the anomalous segregation behaviour in Fe.

  14. Surface chemistry and catalysis on well-defined epitaxial iron-oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Werner; Ranke, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Metal-oxide-based catalysts are used for many important synthesis reactions in the chemical industry. A better understanding of the catalyst operation can be achieved by studying elementary reaction steps on well-defined model catalyst systems. For the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in the presence of steam both unpromoted and potassium promoted iron-oxide catalysts are active. Here we review the work done over unpromoted single-crystalline FeO(1 1 1), Fe3O4(1 1 1) and α- Fe2O3(0 0 0 1) films grown epitaxially on Pt(1 1 1) substrates. Their geometric and electronic surface structures were characterized by STM, LEED, electron microscopy and electron spectroscopic techniques. In an integrative approach, the interaction of water, ethylbenzene and styrene with these films was investigated mainly by thermal desorption and photoelectron emission spectroscopy. The adsorption-desorption energetics and kinetics depend on the oxide surface terminations and are correlated to the electronic structures and acid-base properties of the corresponding oxide phases, which reveal insight into the nature of the active sites and into the catalytic function of semiconducting oxides in general. Catalytic studies, using a batch-reactor arrangement at high gas pressures and post-reaction surface analysis, showed that only α- Fe2O3(0 0 0 1) containing surface defects is catalytically active, whereas Fe3O4(1 1 1) is always inactive. This can be related to the elementary adsorption and desorption properties observed in ultrahigh vacuum, which indicates that the surface chemical properties of the iron-oxide films do not change significantly across the “pressure-gap”. A model is proposed according to which the active site involves a regular acidic surface site and a defect site next to it. The results on metal-oxide surface chemistry also have implications for other fields such as environmental science, biophysics and chemical sensors.

  15. Pyrrhotite: an Iron Sulfide Mineral Formed During Growth of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria at a Hematite Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geesey, G.; Reardon, C.; Neal, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many bacteria are capable of respiring on sulfate and other oxidized forms of sulfur under anaerobic conditions. The hydrogen sulfide that is formed during dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) readily reacts with metals in the surrounding environment to form insoluble metal sulfides. Iron oxides are common substrata for colonization by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sedimentary aquatic systems as well as in subsurface environments. While numerous studies have characterized iron sulfides formed during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by suspended populations of these bacteria in the presence of soluble iron, not much is known about those formed in the presence of biofilm populations associated with solid phase iron, particularly crystalline forms such as hematite. Under the latter conditions, we have observed the formation of the iron sulfide pyrrhotite, typically present in very low abundance in sediments and ore deposits compared to pyrite. The formation of pyrrhotite over pyrite is favored at low redox potential and sulfide activity, conditions we hypothesize are achieved at an iron oxide surface colonized by biofilm-forming SRB. Higher levels of hydrogenase activity by hematite surface-associated SRB than suspended cell populations likely promotes the low redox potential that favors pyrrhotite formation. The tendency for SRB in nature to associate with mineral particle surfaces, including iron oxides, suggests that some pyrrotite may have originated through biotic reactions. A comparison of the fine structure of pyrrhotite formed through these biotic processes with that formed under abiotic processes may reveal differences that provide a signature for biotically-derived pyrrhotite in the biosphere.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of biogenically produced spherical Se-nanomaterials embedded in organic material against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Elena; Presentato, Alessandro; Zonaro, Emanuele; Lemire, Joseph A; Demeter, Marc; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J; Lampis, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to prevent the formation of pathogenic biofilms on hydroxyapatite (HA)-based clinical devices and surfaces, we present a study evaluating the antimicrobial efficacy of Spherical biogenic Se-Nanostructures Embedded in Organic material (Bio Se-NEMO-S) produced by Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 in comparison with two different chemical selenium nanoparticle (SeNP) classes. These nanomaterials have been studied as potential antimicrobials for eradication of established HA-grown biofilms, for preventing biofilm formation on HA-coated surfaces and for inhibition of planktonic cell growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 12934 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Bio Se-NEMO resulted more efficacious than those chemically produced in all tested scenarios. Bio Se-NEMO produced by B. mycoides SelTE01 after 6 or 24 h of Na2 SeO3 exposure show the same effective antibiofilm activity towards both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains at 0.078 mg ml(-1) (Bio Se-NEMO6 ) and 0.3125 mg ml(-1) (Bio Se-NEMO24 ). Meanwhile, chemically synthesized SeNPs at the highest tested concentration (2.5 mg ml(-1) ) have moderate antimicrobial activity. The confocal laser scanning micrographs demonstrate that the majority of the P. aeruginosa and S. aureus cells exposed to biogenic SeNPs within the biofilm are killed or eradicated. Bio Se-NEMO therefore displayed good antimicrobial activity towards HA-grown biofilms and planktonic cells, becoming possible candidates as new antimicrobials. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 +/- 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90-110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach described

  18. Pumice from volcanoes: Its possible role for the iron and silica budget of the surface ocean and diatom growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschner, C.; Olgun, N.; Duggen, S.; Croot, P.; Dietze, H.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can inject pumice in major amounts into the oceans. Pumice can swim in seawater as pumice rafts or single pieces for years and contain relatively high concentrations of iron and silica, mainly found in seawater-reactive, metastable glass. Yet it is unknown to what extent pumice can release iron and silica, important for diatom growth, to surface ocean water. We examined the release of iron and silica of pumice from Central American volcanoes in contact with natural seawater by means of Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry and standard photometry. Based on our data we focus on evaluating how pumice from volcanoes in Central America may have contributed to the budget of the key nutrients iron and silica in the Central Pacific Ocean. Our study also provides new constraints on the importance of pumice for the marine biogeochemical iron- and silica-cycle.

  19. Effect of graphite on folded metal occurrence in honed surfaces of grey and compacted cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Vale, João Luiz; da Silva, Carlos Henrique; Pintaúde, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Grey cast iron (GCI) and compacted graphite iron (CGI) are the most employed materials to manufacture cylinder liners. The use of diamond tools to hone the surfaces resulted in an increase of the so-called folded metal occurrence. This irregularity can reduce the performance of engines and investigations to understand it have been made. In this sense, the current study aims to correlate the variation of graphite and the folded metal occurrence. Different samples of GCI and CGI were extracted directly of engine blocks, resulting in four metallurgical conditions. Topographical analysis was conducted in an optical interferometer and a dedicated routine to count the folded metal was developed using 3D images. Folded metal occurrence can be associated to a specific region of topography and to an increase in the graphite area fraction. Experimental evidences were provided revealing cross-sectional images of grooves using a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the present investigation shows that a larger amount of folded metal was related to the microstructure of thicker walls of compact graphite iron.

  20. Adsorption of poly(vinyl formamide-co-vinyl amine) (PVFA-co-PVAm) polymers on zinc, zinc oxide, iron, and iron oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Susan; Simon, Frank; Baumann, Giesela; Hietschold, Michael; Seifert, Andreas; Spange, Stefan

    2011-12-06

    The adsorption of poly(vinyl formamide) (PVFA) and the statistic copolymers poly(vinyl formamide-co-vinyl amine) (PVFA-co-PVAm) onto zinc and iron metal particles as well as their oxides was investigated. The adsorbates were characterized by means of XPS, DRIFT spectroscopy, wet chemical analysis, and solvatochromic probes. Dicyano-bis-(1,10-phenanthroline)-iron(II) (1), 3-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-7-phenyl-benzo-[1,2-b:4,5-b']difuran-2,6-dione (2), and 4-tert-butyl-2-(dicyano-methylene)-5-[4-(diethylamino)-benzylidene]-Δ(3)-thiazoline (3) as solvatochromic probes were coadsorbed onto zinc oxide to measure various effects of surface polarity. The experimental findings showed that the adsorption mechanism of PVFA and PVFA-co-PVAm strongly depends on the degree of hydrolysis of PVFA and pH values and also on the kind of metal or metal oxide surfaces that were employed as adsorbents. The adsorption mechanism of PVFA/PVFA-co-PVAm onto zinc oxide and iron oxide surfaces is mainly affected by electrostatic interactions. Particularly in the region of pH 5, the adsorption of PVFA/PVFA-co-PVAm onto zinc and iron metal particles is additionally influenced by redox processes, dissolution, and complexation reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Iron Oxide Surface Chemistry: Effect of Chemical Structure on Binding in Benzoic Acid and Catechol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Korpany, Katalin V; Majewski, Dorothy D; Chiu, Cindy T; Cross, Shoronia N; Blum, Amy Szuchmacher

    2017-03-28

    The excellent performance of functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in nanomaterial and biomedical applications often relies on achieving the attachment of ligands to the iron oxide surface both in sufficient number and with proper orientation. Toward this end, we determine relationships between the ligand chemical structure and surface binding on magnetic IONPs for a series of related benzoic acid and catechol derivatives. Ligand exchange was used to introduce the model ligands, and the resultant nanoparticles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated internal reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nanoparticle solubility behavior. An in-depth analysis of ligand electronic effects and reaction conditions reveals that the nature of ligand binding does not solely depend on the presence of functional groups known to bind to IONPs. The structure of the resultant ligand-surface complex was primarily influenced by the relative positioning of hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups within the ligand and whether or not HCl(aq) was added to the ligand-exchange reaction. Overall, this study will help guide future ligand-design and ligand-exchange strategies toward realizing truly custom-built IONPs.

  2. Toxicity of bare and surfaced functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles towards microalgae.

    PubMed

    Toh, Pey Yi; Tai, Wan Yii; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, Jit Kang; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of bare iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and surface functionalization iron oxide nanoparticles (SF-IONPs) to the growth of freshwater microalgae Chlorella sp. This study is important due to the increased interest on the application of the magnetic responsive IONPs in various fields, such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, and microalgae harvesting. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of IONPs was mainly contributed by the indirect light shading effect from the suspending nanoparticles which is nanoparticles concentration-dependent, direct light shading effect caused by the attachment of IONPs on cell and the cell aggregation, and the oxidative stress from the internalization of IONPs into the cells. The results showed that the layer of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) tended to mask the IONPs and hence eliminated oxidative stress toward the protein yield but it in turn tended to enhance the toxicity of IONPs by enabling the IONPs to attach on cell surfaces and cause cell aggregation. Therefore, the choice of the polymer that used for surface functionalize the IONPs is the key factor to determine the toxicity of the IONPs.

  3. Surface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas-flow physiological saline.

    PubMed

    Nie, F L; Zheng, Y F

    2012-07-01

    Conventional microcrystalline pure iron (MC-Fe) becomes a new candidate as biodegradable metals, which has the insufficient physical feature and inferior biodegradation behavior. Novel bulk nanocrystalline pure iron (NC-Fe) was fabricated via equal channel angular pressing technique in the present work to overcome these problems. The contact angle test with water and glycerol droplets shows a smaller angle (though >90°) of NC-Fe than that of MC-Fe, which implies a lower surface energy of NC-Fe. The surface roughness of NC-Fe increased greatly than that of MC-Fe. A further comparative study of corrosion and electrochemistry performance between NC-Fe and its original MC-Fe was investigated in physiological saline with different dissolved oxygen concentration, aiming to in vitro simulate the corrosion process of coronary stent occurred in physiological environment. The electrochemical impedance spectra analysis and anodic polarization measurements indicated that the NC-Fe exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the MC-Fe; meanwhile obvious enhanced corrosion resistance with the decrement of dissolved oxygen concentration was observed. Related equivalent circuit model and surface reconstruction process were further discussed, and the degradation mechanism of the MC-Fe and NC-Fe were finally established. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Iron on the Surface of Mercury: From Contradiction to Convergence? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, D. T.; Robinson, M. S.; Denevi, B. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Lawrence, D. J.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Gillis-Davis, J. J.; Domingue, D. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Feldman, W. C.; Evans, L. G.; Rhodes, E. A.; McCoy, T. J.; Nittler, L.; Vilas, F.; Izenberg, N. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    This contribution surveys the various Earth-based and spacecraft remote-sensing methods employed to provide data for estimating the Fe content of Mercury's surface. Iron is a major element that is important for understanding planetary formation and subsequent geochemical and petrological evolution. The innermost planet has a high average density and an iron-rich core inferred to make up at least 60% of its mass, the highest fraction among the terrestrial planets. In contrast to its high bulk Fe content, the results of middle-ultraviolet and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, which are sensitive to ferrous iron in silicates, suggest that Mercury's surface FeO abundance is low compared with many lunar samples. Measurements of mid-infrared emission spectroscopy, microwave opacity and extreme-ultraviolet albedo have also been interpreted to indicate surface Fe abundance on Mercury equivalent to a few wt.% FeO, similar to or lower than typical lunar highlands. For comparison, the silicate portions of Venus, Earth, Mars, and the eucrite parent body are thought to have FeO abundances of about 8, 8, 18, and 20 wt.%, respectively. However, the planet's visible albedo, color relationships among geological units, and data returned by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer are consistent with higher surface abundances of Fe on Mercury. For example, the thermal neutron absorption (which is dominated by Fe, Ti, Sm, and Gd depending on their concentrations) measured during the first two Mercury flybys is similar to that of soils from Luna 16 and 24, and is sufficiently high to require as much as 18 wt.% FeO and a few wt.% TiO2, or 11 to 21 wt.% ilmenite. Consideration of the form of Fe sensed by the various techniques can lead to partial resolution of the apparent contradictions: reflectance spectroscopy cannot unambiguously determine the amount of ferrous iron in opaque oxides, whereas neutron spectroscopy can measure Fe in any chemical state, but only if the other

  5. Surface chemical heterogeneity of bacteriogenic iron oxides from a subterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raul E; Smith, D Scott; Pedersen, Karsten; Ferris, F Grant

    2003-12-15

    This study quantifies the surface chemical heterogeneity of bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) and its end-members (2-line ferrihydrite and intermixed intact and fragmented bacteria). On a dry weight basis, BIOS consisted of 64.5 +/- 1.8% ferrihydrite and 34.5 +/- 1.8% organic matter. Enrichment of Al, Cu, Cr, Mn, Sr, and Zn was shown in the solid versus the aqueous phase (1.9 < log Kd < 4.2). Within the solid-phase Al (69.5%), Cu (78.7%), and Zn (77.9%) were associated with the bacteria, whereas Cr (59.8%), Mn (99.8%), and Sr (79.4%) preferred ferrihydrite. Acid-base titration data from the BIOS and bacteria were fitted using FOCUS pKa spectroscopy. The bacteria spectrum with pKa's of 4.18 +/- 0.37, 4.80 +/- 0.54, 6.98 +/- 0.45, and 9.75 +/- 0.68 was similar to discrete and continuous spectra for intact and fragmented bacteria. The BIOS spectrum recorded pKa's of 4.27 +/- 0.51, 6.61 +/- 0.51, 7.89 +/- 1.10, and 9.65 +/- 0.66 and was deconvoluted to remove overlapping binding site contributions from the bacteria. The resulting residual iron oxide spectrum coincided with discrete MUSIC spectra for goethite and lepidocrocite with pKa values of 4.10 +/- 0.43, 6.53 +/- 0.45, 7.81 +/- 0.76, and 9.51 +/- 0.68. Surface site density analysis showed that acidic sites (pKa < 6) were contributed by the bacteria (37%), whereas neutral sites (6 < pKa < 8) were characteristic of the iron oxide fraction (35%). Basic sites (8 < pKa) were higher in the bacteria (57%), than in the BIOS (44%) or iron oxide fractions (47%). This analysis suggested a high degree of bacterial group masking and a similarity between the BIOS and goethite surface reactivity. An understanding of the BIOS surface chemical heterogeneity and inherent proton and metal binding capacity was obtained through the use of FOCUS apparent pKa spectroscopy.

  6. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  7. Surface hardness increasing of iron alloys by nitrogen-deuterium ion implanting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.

    2004-12-01

    In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to study the deuterium and hydrogen oxygen etching effect in nitrogen-implanted iron alloys. A suitable deuterium-nitrogen mixture can increase the surface original steel hardness up to ˜40%. In similar conditions, hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures improves the hardness by ˜10%. On deuteration, the main change is the reduction of the zero-point energy of the hydrides bond. Due to this, the lower scission energy of hydrogen-metal bonds as compared with deuterium-metal bonds determines the favorable effect of deuterium on the nitriding process.

  8. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  9. Effects of dust deposition on iron cycle in the surface Mediterranean Sea: results from a mesocosm seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, T.; Guieu, C.; Leblond, N.

    2010-04-01

    Soil dust deposition is recognized as a major source of iron to the open ocean at global and regional scales. However, the processes that control the speciation and cycle of iron in the surface ocean after dust deposition are poorly documented mainly due to the logistical difficulties to investigate in-situ, natural dust events. The development of clean mesocosms in the frame of the DUNE project (a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem) was a unique opportunity to investigate these processes at the unexplored scale of one dust deposition event. During the DUNE1 mesocosm seeding experiment, iron stocks (dissolved and particulate concentrations in the water column) and fluxes (export of particulate iron in sediment traps) were followed during 8 days after an artificial dust seeding mimicking a wet deposition of 10 g m-2. The addition of dust at the surface of the mesocosms was immediately followed by a decrease of dissolved iron [dFe] concentration in the 0-10 m water column. This decrease was likely due to dFe scavenging on settling dust particles and mineral organic aggregates. The scavenging ratio of dissolved iron on dust particles averaged 0.37 ± 0.12 nmol mg-1. Batch dissolution experiments conducted in parallel to the mesocosm experiment showed a increase (up to 600%) in dust iron dissolution capacity in dust-fertilized waters compared to control conditions. This study gives evidences of complex and unexpected effects of dust deposition on surface ocean biogeochemistry: (1) large dust deposition events may be a sink for surface ocean dissolved iron and (2) successive dust deposition events may induce different biogeochemical responses in the surface ocean.

  10. Effects of dust deposition on iron cycle in the surface Mediterranean Sea: results from a mesocosm seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, T.; Guieu, C.; Leblond, N.

    2010-11-01

    Soil dust deposition is recognized as a major source of iron to the open ocean at global and regional scales. However, the processes that control the speciation and cycle of iron in the surface ocean after dust deposition are poorly documented mainly due to the logistical difficulties to investigate in-situ, natural dust events. The development of clean mesocosms in the frame of the DUNE project (a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem) was a unique opportunity to investigate these processes at the unexplored scale of one dust deposition event. During the DUNE-1-P mesocosm seeding experiment, iron stocks (dissolved and particulate concentrations in the water column) and fluxes (export of particulate iron in sediment traps) were followed during 8 days after an artificial dust seeding mimicking a wet deposition of 10 g m-2. The addition of dust at the surface of the mesocosms was immediately followed by a decrease of dissolved iron [dFe] concentration in the 0-10 m water column. This decrease was likely due to dFe scavenging on settling dust particles and mineral organic aggregates. The scavenging ratio of dissolved iron on dust particles averaged 0.37 ± 0.12 nmol mg-1. Batch dissolution experiments conducted in parallel to the mesocosm experiment showed a increase (up to 600%) in dust iron dissolution capacity in dust-fertilized waters compared to control conditions. This study gives evidences of complex and unexpected effects of dust deposition on surface ocean biogeochemistry: (1) large dust deposition events may be a sink for surface ocean dissolved iron and (2) successive dust deposition events may induce different biogeochemical responses in the surface ocean.

  11. Surface ocean-lower atmosphere interactions in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and the ecosystem response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Elrod, Virginia A.; Fitzwater, Steve E.; Plant, Joshua N.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Tanner, Sara J.; Gordon, R. Michael; Westphal, Douglas L.; Perry, Kevin D.; Wu, Jingfeng; Karl, David M.

    2003-06-01

    Here we report measurements of iron and aluminum in surface and subsurface waters during late March and late May of 2001 on transects between central California and Hawaii. A large cloud of Asian dust was detected during April 2001, and there was a clear signal in surface water iron due to aerosol deposition on the May transect. Iron and aluminum concentrations increased synchronously by 0.5 and 2 nM along the southern portion of the transect, which includes the Hawaii Ocean Time series (HOT) station, from background values in March (0.1 to 0.2 nM Fe). These changes occurred in a ratio that is close to the crustal abundance ratio of the metals, which indicates a soil aerosol source. A vertical profile of dissolved iron was also measured at the HOT station in late April and this profile also shows a large increase near the surface. Direct observations of aerosol iron concentration at Mauna Loa Observatory on Hawaii indicate that aerosol concentrations were significantly lower than climatological values during this period. Soil aerosol concentrations along the transect were estimated using the real-time Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS). The NAAPS results show a large meridional gradient with maximum concentrations in the boundary layer north of 30°N. However, the deposition of iron and aluminum to surface waters was highest south of 25°N, near Hawaii. There were only weak signals in the ecosystem response to the aerosol deposition.

  12. Characterization of Aluminum-Based-Surface Matrix Composites with Iron and Iron Oxide Fabricated by Friction Stir Processing.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Essam R I; Tash, Mahmoud M

    2016-06-23

    Surface composite layers were successfully fabricated on an A 1050-H24 aluminum plate by dispersed iron (Fe) and magnetite (Fe₃O₄) particles through friction stir processing (FSP). Fe and Fe₃O₄ powders were packed into a groove of 3 mm in width and 1.5 mm in depth, cut on the aluminum plate, and covered with an aluminum sheet that was 2-mm thick. A friction stir processing (FSP) tool of square probe shape, rotated at a rate of 1000-2000 rpm, was plunged into the plate through the cover sheet and the groove, and moved along the groove at a travelling speed of 1.66 mm/s. Double and triple passes were applied. As a result, it is found that the Fe particles were homogenously distributed in the whole nugget zone at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm after triple FSP passes. Limited interfacial reactions occurred between the Fe particles and the aluminum matrix. On the other hand, the lower rotation speed (1000 rpm) was not enough to form a sound nugget when the dispersed particles were changed to the larger Fe₃O₄. The Fe₃O₄ particles were dispersed homogenously in a sound nugget zone when the rotation speed was increased to 1500 rpm. No reaction products could be detected between the Fe₃O₄ particles and the aluminum matrix. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the Fe-dispersed nugget zone was higher than that of the Fe₃O₄-dispersed nugget zone. Moreover, there were good agreement between the obtained saturation magnetization values relative to that of pure Fe and Fe₃O₄ materials and the volume content of the dispersed particles in the nugget zone.

  13. Characterization of Aluminum-Based-Surface Matrix Composites with Iron and Iron Oxide Fabricated by Friction Stir Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Essam R. I.; Tash, Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface composite layers were successfully fabricated on an A 1050-H24 aluminum plate by dispersed iron (Fe) and magnetite (Fe3O4) particles through friction stir processing (FSP). Fe and Fe3O4 powders were packed into a groove of 3 mm in width and 1.5 mm in depth, cut on the aluminum plate, and covered with an aluminum sheet that was 2-mm thick. A friction stir processing (FSP) tool of square probe shape, rotated at a rate of 1000–2000 rpm, was plunged into the plate through the cover sheet and the groove, and moved along the groove at a travelling speed of 1.66 mm/s. Double and triple passes were applied. As a result, it is found that the Fe particles were homogenously distributed in the whole nugget zone at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm after triple FSP passes. Limited interfacial reactions occurred between the Fe particles and the aluminum matrix. On the other hand, the lower rotation speed (1000 rpm) was not enough to form a sound nugget when the dispersed particles were changed to the larger Fe3O4. The Fe3O4 particles were dispersed homogenously in a sound nugget zone when the rotation speed was increased to 1500 rpm. No reaction products could be detected between the Fe3O4 particles and the aluminum matrix. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the Fe-dispersed nugget zone was higher than that of the Fe3O4-dispersed nugget zone. Moreover, there were good agreement between the obtained saturation magnetization values relative to that of pure Fe and Fe3O4 materials and the volume content of the dispersed particles in the nugget zone. PMID:28773629

  14. Controls on Arsenic Retention in Surface and Subsurface Environments: Resolving the Impact of Iron Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated in increasing aqueous As concentrations. Confounding processes controlling the release of As, reductive transformation of ferrihydrite, a common Fe(III) (hydr)oxide, has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. Elucidating the processes controlling As desorption and subsequent migration in surface and subsurface environments and how environmental factors (for example, availability of labile carbon and duration/extent of flooding) affect these processes will allow predictions to be made regarding long-term stability of As in soil and sediment. In turn, this can aid in evaluating the likelihood of having measurable As in groundwater. To better resolve these processes, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands pre-sorbed with As(III) at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB) Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN- 32. We reveal that upon iron reduction, transformation of As-bearing ferrihydrite results in As(III) retention. However, over time there is a shift from reductive transformation to reductive dissolution of the As-bearing Fe phase(s) coupled with prolonged release of As to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that arsenic retention may increase or decrease depending on the type of iron oxide, secondary iron transformations, and duration of reducing conditions. Immediately following a transition to anaerobic conditions there is potential for As retention on newly formed ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxide phases; however prolonged reduction will result in both the dissolution of ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxides and release of aqueous arsenic.

  15. Experimental Oxidation of Iron Sulphides from Intertidal Surface Sediments: Stable Isotope Effects (S, O, C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersbach, F.; Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Segl, M.

    2009-04-01

    Top intertidal sediments show a pronounced zone of activities of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Iron sulfides may be formed, but a substantial part is reoxidized to sulfate. Microbial or chemical reoxidation can be further enhanced by a resuspension of surface sediments by tidal currents or storms. The rates of the different processes depend on the site-secific sedimentological properties (e.g., grain size, iron and sulphur contents etc.). In the present study 3 different areas of the German Wadden Sea were studied: a mud flat in the Jade Bay, and sandy sediments in the intertidals of Spiekeroog and Sylt islands. The latter site is part of an in-situ lugworm-exclusion experiment. The goal was the experimental and field investigation of the fate of iron sulfides and the formation of sulphate upon resuspension of intertidal surface sediments in oxygenated seawater. All sites were geochemically analyzed for dissolved and solid phase iron, manganese, sulphur and carbon phases/species, and sulphate reduction rates were measured using radiotracers. Dissolved chloride and grain sizes analysis where additionally carried out. TOC, S and metal phase contents were higher in mud compared to sandy sediments. Field results demonstrate gross but only minor net sulphide production and a downcore increases in FeS contents, due to intense sulphide oxidation at the surface. Pyrite, on the other hand, was abundant through the sediments due to continuous sediment reworking. The fate of iron-sulphides and accumulation of sulphate as a function of time was followed in batch experiments using dark suspensions of surface sediments in site-bottom waters at room temperature. During the experiments, each sample was shaken continuously under exposition to oxygen, and sub-samples were taken at the beginning and after discrete time intervalls. A very fast oxidation rate of AVS led to a complete exhaustion within a day, whereas Cr(II)-reducible sulfur was inititially built up and then decreased

  16. The lipoprotein components of the Isd and Hts transport systems are dispensable for acquisition of heme by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wright, John A; Nair, Sean P

    2012-04-01

    Heme is a key molecule for Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in many aspects of oxidative metabolism. Crucially, heme is required for the activity of cytochromes of the electron transport chain. Staphylococcus aureus is able to obtain heme either through biosynthesis or through acquisition from the host. Clinically persistent 'small colony variant' (SCV) forms of S. aureus are frequently deficient for heme biosynthesis, and disruption of the hemB gene produces stable heme-auxotrophic strains that reproduce many SCV phenotypes. We sought to address the role of heme transport in SCVs by deleting components of the two described heme import systems, the iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) and heme transport system (Hts) in wild-type S. aureus and hemB mutant backgrounds. Analysis of the growth of S. aureus hemB strains either singly or doubly deficient in isdE and htsA in the presence and absence of heme or hemoglobin revealed that S. aureus is able to obtain exogenous heme in the absence of these transporter components. These data suggest the presence of additional, as yet unidentified transporter components that enable S. aureus to internalize exogenous heme and contradict the proposed model that IsdE can transfer heme to the HtsBC permease. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface charge and dosage dependent potential developmental toxicity and biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles in pregnant CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Di Bona, Kristin R; Xu, Yaolin; Ramirez, Paul A; DeLaine, Javeia; Parker, Courtney; Bao, Yuping; Rasco, Jane F

    2014-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their potential applications, such as drug delivery, biomedical imaging, and photocatalysis. Due to their small size and the potential to cross the placental barrier, the risk to pregnant women and the developing fetus from exposure to nanoparticles is of great concern. The developmental toxicity and biodistribution of a single dose versus multiple doses of iron oxide nanoparticles with positive or negative surface charges were investigated in vivo. Multiple doses of positively-charged nanoparticles given over several days resulted in significantly increased fetal deaths and accumulation of iron in the fetal liver and placenta. These results indicate both positively and negatively charged iron oxide nanoparticles have the ability to cross the placenta and accumulate in the fetus, though greater bioaccumulation and toxicity was observed with a positively-charged surface coating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A meta-analysis of the rates of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus contamination on the surfaces of environmental objects that health care workers frequently touch.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dongxin; Ou, Qianting; Lin, Jialing; Peng, Yang; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2017-04-01

    Health care workers may potentially spread Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) to patients by contaminated high-touch items. We aimed to determine the pooled rates of S aureus and MRSA contamination and influencing factors. A literature search of the PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, Ovid, and Scopus databases was performed. Pooled contamination rates were determined using random effect models. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were conducted to identify factors potentially influencing the rates of S aureus and MRSA contamination. Sensitivity and publication bias analyses were performed. Thirty-eight studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled contamination rates were 15.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8%-21.1%) for S aureus and 5.0% (95% CI, 2.7%-7.7%) for MRSA. The subgroup analyses indicated that the pooled rate of S aureus contamination was significantly higher for studies conducted in South America, in developing countries, and during 2010-2015. The pooled rate of MRSA contamination was significantly higher for studies conducted in Africa. The meta-regression analysis suggested that the pooled rate of S aureus contamination was lower for studies conducted in developed countries (odds ratio, 0.664; 95% CI, 0.509-0.867; P = .004). No bias was found in the publication of the rates of S aureus and MRSA contamination. S aureus and MRSA contamination statuses of high-touch items are worrisome and should be paid greater attention. Developing country status was a risk factor for S aureus contamination. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and surface engineering of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Mona

    2005-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with appropriate surface chemistry have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation, etc. All these biomedical and bioengineering applications require that these nanoparticles have high magnetization values and size smaller than 100 nm with overall narrow particle size distribution, so that the particles have uniform physical and chemical properties. In addition, these applications need special surface coating of the magnetic particles, which has to be not only non-toxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. To this end, most work in this field has been done in improving the biocompatibility of the materials, but only a few scientific investigations and developments have been carried out in improving the quality of magnetic particles, their size distribution, their shape and surface in addition to characterizing them to get a protocol for the quality control of these particles. Nature of surface coatings and their subsequent geometric arrangement on the nanoparticles determine not only the overall size of the colloid but also play a significant role in biokinetics and biodistribution of nanoparticles in the body. The types of specific coating, or derivatization, for these nanoparticles depend on the end application and should be chosen by keeping a particular application in mind, whether it be aimed at inflammation response or anti-cancer agents. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, or nucleotides and can be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumour using an external magnetic field or can be heated in alternating magnetic fields for use in hyperthermia. This review discusses the synthetic chemistry, fluid stabilization and

  20. Surface water enhances the uptake and photoreactivity of gaseous catechol on solid iron(III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2014-01-01

    Uptake and photoreactivity of catechol-Fe complexes are investigated at the gas/solid interface under humid and dry conditions, along with the nature of the hydrogen-bonding network of adsorbed water. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for organics in aerosols. Iron chloride was used to distinguish ionic mobility from binding to coordinated iron(III) in hematite. Studies were conducted using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy as a function of irradiation time. Results show that adsorbed water at 30% relative humidity (RH), not light, increases the concentration of adsorbed catechol by a factor of 3 over 60 min relative to dry conditions. Also, our data show that, at 30% RH and under light and dark conditions, growth factors describing the concentration of adsorbed catechol are very similar suggesting that light does not significantly enhance the uptake of catechol vapor on FeCl3. Surface water also enhances the initial photodecay kinetics of catechol-Fe complexes at 30% RH by a factor of 10 relative to control experiments (RH < 1%, or no FeCl3 under humid conditions). Absorptions assigned to carbonyl groups were not observed with irradiation time, which was explained by the dominance of FeCl(2+) species relative to FeOH(2+) in the highly acidic "quasi-liquid" phase at 30% RH. Clear differences in the hydrogen-bonding network upon gaseous catechol uptake are observed in the dark and light and during the photodecay of adsorbed catechol. The implications of these results on our understanding of interfacial processes in aged iron-containing surfaces are discussed.

  1. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: adsorption behavior and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun; He, Mengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl3, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O2 in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb-Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0-1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((2)E) between Sb and HFO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mössbauer effect study of corrosion processes at iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching Lin, Mou; Barnes, R. G.; Furtak, T. E.

    1982-05-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy coupled with electrochemical measurements has been used to study in situ the effects of chloride ions on a passivated iron surface in boric acid-sodium borate buffer solution at a pH of 8.4. The Mössbauer spectrum of the oxide film formed after breakdown of the passive film by aggressive chloride ions consists of a doublet with line-width of 0.51±0.03 mm/sec, isomer shift of 0.35±0.02 mm/sec relative to the metallic iron, and quadrupole splitting of 0.79±0.01 mm/sec. The quadrupole splitting differs from that of the passive film in which it is 0.94±0.06 mm/sec with line-widths of 0.55±0.08 mm/sec, and an isomer shift of 0.36±0.01 mm/sec. However, these parameters are essentially the same as those of the dried passive film and correlate well with those of superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3. The Mössbauer spectra of oxide films grown in chloride-containing solution and of films exposed to the air for several days are similar to those of films after chemical breakdown. The introduction of chloride ions appear to stabilize the formation of γ-Fe2O3 and to exclude the incorporation of water and formation of di-oxy or di-hydroxy bridging bonds which are crucial to the passivity of the iron surface.

  3. Spin-polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy study of Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yasushi; Kurahashi, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Taku; Sun, Xia; Wang, Zhongping

    2007-03-01

    The electron spin polarization at the interface between nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic medias is one of the essential factors that may alter the spin transport phenomena. To investigate fundamental aspects of induced spin polarization we have examined the adsorbate-covered magnetic surfaces by means of spin polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy (SPMDS). Use of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms in triplet states moving at thermal energies gives rise to the ultimate surface sensitivity. Although Xenon can adsorb on surfaces at low temperatures by the van der Waals force, no electron exchange with surfaces, especially no spin interaction, is expected because of its closed shell structure. SPMDS spectra measured for Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces show three prominent peaks that are the same as those previously reported for other surfaces by D. M. Oro, et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49 (1994) 4703]. Two peaks (^2P1/2, ^2P3/2) at higher kinetic energies exhibit clear spin asymmetries while the other low energy peak has no appreciable spin asymmetry. The spin asymmetries will be discussed on the basis of spin polarization and deexcitation processes of metastable atoms.

  4. The Role of Iron-Bearing Minerals in NO2 to HONO Conversion on Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mulu A; Bish, David L; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Engelhard, Mark H; Raff, Jonathan D

    2016-08-16

    Nitrous acid (HONO) accumulates in the nocturnal boundary layer where it is an important source of daytime hydroxyl radicals. Although there is clear evidence for the involvement of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on surfaces as a source of HONO, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used coated-wall flow tube measurements of NO2 reactivity on environmentally relevant surfaces (Fe (hydr)oxides, clay minerals, and soil from Arizona and the Saharan Desert) and detailed mineralogical characterization of substrates to show that reduction of NO2 by Fe-bearing minerals in soil can be a more important source of HONO than the putative NO2 hydrolysis mechanism. The magnitude of NO2-to-HONO conversion depends on the amount of Fe(2+) present in substrates and soil surface acidity. Studies examining the dependence of HONO flux on substrate pH revealed that HONO is formed at soil pH < 5 from the reaction between NO2 and Fe(2+)(aq) present in thin films of water coating the surface, whereas in the range of pH 5-8 HONO stems from reaction of NO2 with structural iron or surface complexed Fe(2+) followed by protonation of nitrite via surface Fe-OH2(+) groups. Reduction of NO2 on ubiquitous Fe-bearing minerals in soil may explain HONO accumulation in the nocturnal boundary layer and the enhanced [HONO]/[NO2] ratios observed during dust storms in urban areas.

  5. Surface hardening of a ductile-cast iron roll using high-energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Dongwoo; Lee, Sunghak; Koo, Yangmo; Kwon, Soon-Ju

    1997-07-01

    The effects of high-energy electron beam irradiation on surface hardening and microstructural modification in a ductile cast iron (DCI) roll are investigated in this study. The DCI roll samples were irradiated by using an electron accelerator (1.4 MeV), and then their microstructures and hardnesses were examined. Upon irradiation, the unirradiated microstructure containing graphites and the tempered bainite matrix was changed to martensite, ledeburite, and retained austenite, together with the complete or partial dissolution of graphites. This microstructural modification improved greatly the surface hardness due to transformation of martensite whose amount and type were determined by heat input during irradiation. In order to investigate these complex microstructures, a simulation test including thermal cycles of abrupt heating and quenching was carried out. The simulation results indicated that the irradiated surface was heated up to about 1100 °C to 1200 °C and then quenched to room temperature, which was enough to obtain surface hardening through martensitic transformation. Thermal analysis of the irradiated surface layer was also carried out using a finite difference method to understand the surface hardening of the DCI roll and to compare with the simulation test results.

  6. Aqueous Aggregation Behavior of Engineered Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effects of Oxidative Surface Aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Mittelman, Anjuliee M; Liu, Di; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H; Abriola, Linda M; Pennell, Kurt D; Fortner, John D

    2016-12-06

    For successful aqueous-based applications, it is necessary to fundamentally understand and control nanoparticle dispersivity and stability over a range of dynamic conditions, including variable ionic strengths/types, redox chemistries, and surface ligand reactivity/degradation states (i.e., surface aging). Here, we quantitatively describe the behavior of artificially aged, oleic acid (OA) bilayer coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) under different scenarios. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), used here as a model oxidant under both dark and light ultraviolet (UVA) conditions, was employed to "age" materials, to varying degrees, without increasing ionic strength. Short-term stability experiments indicate that OA-IONPs, while stable in the dark, are effectively destabilized when exposed to UVA/H2O2/•OH based oxidation processes. Compared to bicarbonate, phosphate (1.0 mM) has a net stabilizing effect on OA-IONPs under oxidative conditions, which can be attributed to (surface-based) functional adsorption. Corresponding aggregation kinetics in the presence of monovalent (Na(+)) and divalent cations (Ca(2+)) show that attachment efficiencies (α) are strongly dependent on the cation concentrations/types and degree of surface aging. Taken together, our findings directly highlight the need to understand the critical role of particle surface transformation(s), via oxidative aging, among other routes, with regard to the ultimate stability and environmental fate of surface functionalized engineered nanoparticles.

  7. Moessbauer Effect Studies of Crystalline and Amorphous Iron-Based Alloys and of Corrosion Processes at Iron Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mou Ching

    In Part I of this thesis, Mossbauer effect spectroscopy has been used to measure the temperature dependence of the ('57)Fe effective magnetic hyperfine field, H(,eff), and isomer shift, (delta), across the entire Fe(,3)Al(,x)Si(,1 -x) system (0 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 1) from77K to the Curie temperature, the latter also being determined from these measurements. The observed dependence of H(,eff) and (delta) on Al concentration can be qualitatively understood in terms of the calculated band structure of Fe(,3)Si. ('57)Fe Mossbauer spectra have been obtained at both liquid nitrogen and room temperatures for a series of metallic glasses Fe(,82)B(,18-x)Be(,x) with 0 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 6 in Part II. The width of the probability distribution function of the effective magnetic hyperfine field remains approximately constant at a value of 80 kOe for all samples. However, the most probable value of the effective magnetic hyperfine field at liquid nitrogen temperature initially increases with Be content, but starts to decrease as x exceeds four. The isomer shift has a value of -0.032 mm/sec for samples with x (LESSTHEQ) 4 but changes to -0.050 mm/sec for samples with x > 4. The crystallization products obtained upon annealing the samples were identified. In the last part of this thesis, Mossbauer spectroscopy coupled with electrochemical measurements has been used to study in situ the effects of chloride ions on a passivated iron surface in boric acid-sodium borate buffer solution at a pH of 8.4. The Mossbauer spectrum of the oxide film formed after breakdown of the passive film by aggressive chloride ions consists of a doublet with line-width of 0.51 (+OR-) 0.03 mm/sec, isomer shift of 0.35 (+OR-) 0.02 mm/sec relative to the metallic iron, and quadrupole splitting of 0.79 (+OR-) 0.01 mm/sec. The quadrupole splitting differs from that of the passive film which has line-widths of 0.55 (+OR-) 0.08 mm/sec, an isomer shift of 0.36 (+OR-) 0.01 mm/sec, and a quadrupole

  8. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it was used as the major method of identifying possible mineral analogs of the Martian surface. A summary of proposed Martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite were suggested as Mars soil analog materials.

  9. Three-Dimensional Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Surface Antigen-Manganese Transporter MntC

    SciTech Connect

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Green, Bruce A.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Matsuka, Yury V.

    2013-08-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn2 +-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn2 +-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn2 +-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium–hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn2 +.

  10. The role of SO42- surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresintsi, S.; Simeonidis, K.; Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P.; Mitrakas, M.

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO42- in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO42-) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO4 precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO42- presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3-12). Physically sorbed SO42-, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO4. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer.

  11. Structure and magnetic properties of ultrathin iron films deposited on the CoGa(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balster, Torsten; Kovacs, Domokos A.; Pflitsch, Christian; Verheij, Laurens K.; David, Rudolf; Franchy, René

    2002-11-01

    Epitaxial bcc α-Fe(100) films are grown on the (100) surface of a CoGa crystal. The misfit between the Fe and the CoGa lattices is very small (<0.5%). Both, at room temperature and at 550 K layer by layer growth is found with thermal energy helium atom scattering (TEAS). The TEAS experiments show that iron films grown at 550 K on reconstructed c(4×2) CoGa(100) are smooth. The iron films are stable up to a temperature of 650 K. The magnetic properties of the Fe films are investigated with the magneto-optical Kerr effect. Fe films with a thickness in excess of 1.1-1.3 ML are ferromagnetic at 300 K, with the easy axis for magnetization oriented parallel to the surface. It is found that the coercive field Hc is sensitive to the order of the film. Upon annealing at 550-600 K subsequent to deposition, the coercive field, measured around room temperature, increases. The ordering of the film appeared to have no effect on the remanent magnetization. For a 1.7 ML Fe film a Curie temperature of 525 K is measured. At higher coverage the Curie temperature increases to above 600 K. The coercive field Hc is found to approach zero at a 50-100 K lower temperature.

  12. A Heme-responsive Regulator Controls Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Holly A; Marolda, Cristina L; Pinter, Tyler B; Stillman, Martin J; Heinrichs, David E

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a multitude of mechanisms by which it can obtain iron during growth under iron starvation conditions. It expresses an effective heme acquisition system (the iron-regulated surface determinant system), it produces two carboxylate-type siderophores staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B (SB), and it expresses transporters for many other siderophores that it does not synthesize. The ferric uptake regulator protein regulates expression of genes encoding all of these systems. Mechanisms of fine-tuning expression of iron-regulated genes, beyond simple iron regulation via ferric uptake regulator, have not been uncovered in this organism. Here, we identify the ninth gene of the sbn operon, sbnI, as encoding a ParB/Spo0J-like protein that is required for expression of genes in the sbn operon from sbnD onward. Expression of sbnD-I is drastically decreased in an sbnI mutant, and the mutant does not synthesize detectable SB during early phases of growth. Thus, SB-mediated iron acquisition is impaired in an sbnI mutant strain. We show that the protein forms dimers and tetramers in solution and binds to DNA within the sbnC coding region. Moreover, we show that SbnI binds heme and that heme-bound SbnI does not bind DNA. Finally, we show that providing exogenous heme to S. aureus growing in an iron-free medium results in delayed synthesis of SB. This is the first study in S. aureus that identifies a DNA-binding regulatory protein that senses heme to control gene expression for siderophore synthesis.

  13. A Heme-responsive Regulator Controls Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B in Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    PubMed Central

    Laakso, Holly A.; Marolda, Cristina L.; Pinter, Tyler B.; Stillman, Martin J.; Heinrichs, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a multitude of mechanisms by which it can obtain iron during growth under iron starvation conditions. It expresses an effective heme acquisition system (the iron-regulated surface determinant system), it produces two carboxylate-type siderophores staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B (SB), and it expresses transporters for many other siderophores that it does not synthesize. The ferric uptake regulator protein regulates expression of genes encoding all of these systems. Mechanisms of fine-tuning expression of iron-regulated genes, beyond simple iron regulation via ferric uptake regulator, have not been uncovered in this organism. Here, we identify the ninth gene of the sbn operon, sbnI, as encoding a ParB/Spo0J-like protein that is required for expression of genes in the sbn operon from sbnD onward. Expression of sbnD–I is drastically decreased in an sbnI mutant, and the mutant does not synthesize detectable SB during early phases of growth. Thus, SB-mediated iron acquisition is impaired in an sbnI mutant strain. We show that the protein forms dimers and tetramers in solution and binds to DNA within the sbnC coding region. Moreover, we show that SbnI binds heme and that heme-bound SbnI does not bind DNA. Finally, we show that providing exogenous heme to S. aureus growing in an iron-free medium results in delayed synthesis of SB. This is the first study in S. aureus that identifies a DNA-binding regulatory protein that senses heme to control gene expression for siderophore synthesis. PMID:26534960

  14. Staphylococcus aureus surface contamination of mobile phones and presence of genetically identical strains on the hands of nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Katsuse Kanayama, Akiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Intetsu

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from mobile phones and palms and fingers of users. Genetically identical isolates were detected from mobile phones and their user and multiple users, which is consistent with mobile phones serving as reservoirs of infection in the health care environment. These findings reinforce the need for hand hygiene prior to patient contact as the most effective intervention for preventing health care-associated infection. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Strategy for Surface Modification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Lung Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Zhang, Chunfu; Li, Shunzi; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Yang, Su-Geun; Tian, Ruhai; Minna, John D.; Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as versatile ultra-sensitive nanoprobes for cellular and molecular imaging of cancer. In this study, we report a one-step procedure for the surface functionalization of SPIO nanoparticles with a lung cancer-targeting peptide. The hydrophobic surfactants on the as-synthesized SPIO are displaced by the peptide containing a poly(ethylene glycol)-tethered cysteine residue through ligand exchange. The resulting SPIO particles are biocompatible and demonstrate high T2 relaxivity. The nanoprobes are specific in targeting αvβ6–expressing lung cancer cells as demonstrated by MR imaging and Prussian blue staining. This facile surface chemistry and the functional design of the proposed SPIO system may provide a powerful nanoplatform for the molecular diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:20505790

  16. Resolving the two-dimensional self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles on a liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiayang; Zhang, Datong; Lu, Chenguang; Lee, Seung Whan; Ye, Fan; Herman, Irving P.

    2015-03-01

    In situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to monitor the self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in alkanes that are drop-cast on a diethylene glycol liquid surface. We found that the surface separations of NP cores in 2D superlattices (SLs) are generally farther apart than in 3D SLs with corresponding NPs. At these separations, the van der Waals (vdW) energy is smaller than the Brownian motion energy and so the previous 3D vdW force driven self-assembly models fail to explain the stable closed-packed structure. Strong ligand-ligand interactions likely bind the structure after the upper solvent dries. Entropy effects are found not to be the likely driving force for the observed close packing structures.

  17. Hemoglobin Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Kelly; Hernandez, Margarita; Boles, Blaise R.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization is an important risk factor for community and nosocomial infection. Despite the importance of S. aureus to human health, molecular mechanisms and host factors influencing nasal colonization are not well understood. To identify host factors contributing to nasal colonization, we collected human nasal secretions and analyzed their ability to promote S. aureus surface colonization. Some individuals produced secretions possessing the ability to significantly promote S. aureus surface colonization. Nasal secretions pretreated with protease no longer promoted S. aureus surface colonization, suggesting the involvement of protein factors. The major protein components of secretions were identified and subsequent analysis revealed that hemoglobin possessed the ability to promote S. aureus surface colonization. Immunoprecipitation of hemoglobin from nasal secretions resulted in reduced S. aureus surface colonization. Furthermore, exogenously added hemoglobin significantly decreased the inoculum necessary for nasal colonization in a rodent model. Finally, we found that hemoglobin prevented expression of the agr quorum sensing system and that aberrant constitutive expression of the agr effector molecule, RNAIII, resulted in reduced nasal colonization of S. aureus. Collectively our results suggest that the presence of hemoglobin in nasal secretions contributes to S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:21750673

  18. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. [Effect of iron plaque formation of root surface on as uptake by rice seedlings grown on different types of soils].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Lin, Xian-yong; Cheng, Wang-da

    2010-02-01

    The objective of study was to investigate the effect of the amount of iron plaque of root surface on As uptake by rice seedlings grown on 14 types of soils. These results indicated that there were significant differences in the amounts of iron plaque (1.15-61.97 mg/g) formed on rice root surface among different soils. The amount of non-crystalloid Fe oxide in different submerged soils is one of main influencing factors. There was a significant positive correlation between As concentrations in iron plaque (0-1376 mg/kg) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.85, n=14, p < 0.05), but no significant correlation with the extractable As concentration of 14 types of soils. There were also significant positive correlation between As concentrations in shoot (0.400-12.98 mg/kg) and root (3.860-576.2 mg/kg) and the amounts of iron plaque respectively but not significant correlation with the extractable As concentrations of 14 types of soils (r = 0.88, n=14, p < 0.05; r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between specific arsenic uptake (0.005-0.670 mg/g) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between shoot-As% and the amount of iron plaque. These results showed that the iron plaque on root surface was the pool of As in rhizosphere and increased As uptake but did not affect As transportation from rice root to shoot.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282) contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation. PMID:19796381

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-Liang; Siu, L K; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Ma, Ling; Chiang, Wen-Gin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chen, Tyen-Po

    2009-10-01

    Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282) contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Sæderup, Kirstine Lindhardt; Stødkilde, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Dickson, Claire F; Etzerodt, Anders; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Fago, Angela; Gell, David; Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2016-11-11

    Hemolysis is a complication in septic infections with Staphylococcus aureus, which utilizes the released Hb as an iron source. S. aureus can acquire heme in vitro from hemoglobin (Hb) by a heme-sequestering mechanism that involves proteins from the S. aureus iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system. However, the host has its own mechanism to recapture the free Hb via haptoglobin (Hp) binding and uptake of Hb-Hp by the CD163 receptor in macrophages. It has so far remained unclear how the Isd system competes with this host iron recycling system in situ to obtain the important nutrient. By binding and uptake studies, we now show that the IsdH protein, which serves as an Hb receptor in the Isd system, directly interferes with the CD163-mediated clearance by binding the Hb-Hp complex and inhibiting CD163 recognition. Analysis of truncated IsdH variants including one or more of three near iron transporter domains, IsdH(N1), IsdH(N2), and IsdH(N3), revealed that Hb binding of IsdH(N1) and IsdH(N2) accounted for the high affinity for Hb-Hp complexes. The third near iron transporter domain, IsdH(N3), exhibited redox-dependent heme extraction, when Hb in the Hb-Hp complex was in the oxidized met form but not in the reduced oxy form. IsdB, the other S. aureus Hb receptor, failed to extract heme from Hb-Hp, and it was a poor competitor for Hb-Hp binding to CD163. This indicates that Hb recognition by IsdH, but not by IsdB, sterically inhibits the receptor recognition of Hb-Hp. This function of IsdH may have an overall stimulatory effect on S. aureus heme acquisition and growth. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. CD66b Overexpression and Loss of C5a Receptors as Surface Markers for Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Neutrophil Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Norbert; Grüger, Thomas; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Zinserling, Jörg; Zündorf, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes constitute the main component of innate immunity in the clearance of bacterial infections. However, during systemic inflammation, immunoparalysis may occur resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. This study presents a new in vitro model for analyzing the dysfunction of human peripheral blood neutrophils resulting from the interaction with Staphylococcus aureus components in whole blood. After induction of a massive complement activation by S. aureus supernatant, the neutrophils exhibit a reduced phagocytic capacity resulting in a dramatic reduction of the antibacterial activity similar to that of neutrophils isolated from septic patients. The number of phagocytozing neutrophils is drastically reduced as well as the phagocytic capacity designated by a significantly lower number of ingested microbes. This dysfunction correlates with the loss of complement component 5a receptor 1 from the neutrophil cell surface and can be further characterized by a C5a-induced CD66b overexpression. The presented in vitro model offers a new platform for preclinical testing of immunosuppressive drugs and delivers new information for the understanding of neutrophil dysfunctions under the conditions described. PMID:26176669

  4. The RNA targetome of Staphylococcus aureus non-coding RNA RsaA: impact on cell surface properties and defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, Arnaud; Moreau, Karen; Chicher, Johana; Geissmann, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Romby, Pascale; Marzi, Stefano; Caldelari, Isabelle

    2017-04-03

    The virulon of Staphyloccocus aureus is controlled by intricate connections between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators including proteins and small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). Many of the sRNAs regulate gene expression through base-pairings with mRNAs. However, characterization of the direct sRNA targets in Gram-positive bacteria remained a difficult challenge. Here, we have applied and adapted the MS2-affinity purification approach coupled to RNA sequencing (MAPS) to determine the targetome of RsaA sRNA of S. aureus, known to repress the synthesis of the transcriptional regulator MgrA. Several mRNAs were enriched with RsaA expanding its regulatory network. Besides mgrA, several of these mRNAs encode a family of SsaA-like enzymes involved in peptidoglycan metabolism and the secreted anti-inflammatory FLIPr protein. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, these mRNAs were validated as direct RsaA targets. Quantitative differential proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains corroborated the MAPS results. Additionally, it revealed that RsaA indirectly activated the synthesis of surface proteins supporting previous data that RsaA stimulated biofilm formation and favoured chronic infections. All together, this study shows that MAPS could also be easily applied in Gram-positive bacteria for identification of sRNA targetome.

  5. Surface Hydrophilicity and Functional Group-Driven Iron(III) Hydroxide Nucleation on Organic-Coated Substrates in Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Lee, B.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Jun, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Homogeneous and heterogeneous iron hydroxide nanoparticle nucleation can occur continuously in both natural and complex aqueous systems. Iron oxide nanoparticles can act as sinks and/or carriers for heavy metal contaminants; therefore, it is important to develop a better understanding of factors affecting their formation. Organic coatings are ubiquitous in aqueous environments where they can exist on mineral surfaces (e.g., biofilm), as nanoparticle surface coatings (e.g., natural organic matter), or be introduced as coagulants in water treatment systems. These surface coatings could influence the formation of iron oxide nanoparticles and thus, the mobility of aqueous contaminants. Therefore, to better understand the fate and transport of contaminants in complex aqueous environments, we need more accurate information about mechanisms governing heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation and growth of iron(III) hydroxide nanoparticles in the presence of organic surface coatings. In this work, we used a unique measurement technique allowing for simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and grazing incidence (GISAXS) analysis to monitor nanoparticle nucleation in solution and at substrate surfaces. Clean quartz, and polyaspartate- and alginate-coated substrates were chosen as model substrates to represent mineral coatings, engineered organic coatings and natural organic coatings. Polyaspartate was determined to be the most negatively charged substrate and quartz to be the least negatively charged substrate; however, after 2 h of reaction, the total nanoparticle volume calculations—determined from GISAXS—indicate that precipitation of positively-charged iron(III) hydroxide nanoparticles is 10 times higher on the quartz substrate than on the polyaspartate substrate. This implies that electrostatics do not govern iron(III) hydroxide nucleation. Furthermore, homogeneous nucleation approximately 250 μm above the substrate surface was highest in the presence of the

  6. The ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting and subjected to the different types of surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, Patrycja; Junka, Adam; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Smutnicka, Danuta; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus aureus, is the leading etiologic agent of limb and life-threatening biofilm-related infections in the patients following the orthopaedic implantations. The aim of the present paper is to estimate the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-7Nb) scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and subjected to the different types of surface modifications, including ultrasonic cleaning and chemical polishing. The results obtained indicate significantly the decreased ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the surface of scaffolds subjected to the chemical polishing in comparison to the scaffolds cleaned ultrasonically. The data provided can be useful for future applications of the SLM technology in production of Ti-6Al-7Nb medical implants.

  7. Biogeochemistry of the coupled manganese-iron-sulfur cycles of intertidal surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosselmann, K.; Boettcher, M. E.; Billerbeck, M.; Walpersdorf, E.; Debeer, D.; Brumsack, H.-J.; Huettel, M.; Joergensen, B. B.

    2003-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of the coupled iron-manganese-sulfur-carbon cycles was studied in temperate intertidal surface sediments of the German Wadden Sea (North Sea). Coastal sampling sites include sand, mixed and mud flats with different organic matter and metal contents and permeability reflecting different hydrodynamic regimes. The field study focusses on the influence of temperature, organic matter load, and sediment types on the dynamics of biogeochemical reactions on different time scales (season, day-night, tidal cycles). One of the main interests was related to the cycling of metals (Mn, Fe) in relation to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Pore water profiles were investigated by sediment sectioning and high resolution gel sampling techniques. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured using radiolabeled sulfate with the whole core incubation technique and the spatial distribution of bacterial activity was visualised by using "2D-photoemulsion-monitoring technique". The biogeochemical sulfur cycle was additionally characterised by the stable isotope ratios (S,O) of different sulfur species (e.g., SO_4, AVS, pyrite). Element transfers (metals, nutrients) across the sediment-water interface were additionally quantified by the application of benthic flux chambers. Microbial sulfate reduction was generally highest in the suboxic zone of the surface sediments indicating its potential importance for the mobilization of iron and manganese. In organic matter poor permeable sediments tidal effects additionally influence the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved redox-sensitive metals. In organic matter-rich silty and muddy sediments, temperature controlled the microbial sulfate reduction rates. Depth-integrated sulfate reduction rates in sandy sediments were much lower and controlled by both temperature and organic matter. Formation of anoxic sediment surfaces due to local enhanced organic matter load (so-called "black spots") may create windows

  8. Contamination of environmental surfaces by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in rooms of inpatients with MRSA-positive body sites.

    PubMed

    Kurashige, E Jessica Ohashi; Oie, Shigeharu; Furukawa, H

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can contaminate environmental surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of patients with MRSA colonization/infection. There have been many studies in which the presence or absence of MRSA contamination was determined but no studies in which MRSA contamination levels were also evaluated in detail. We evaluated MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces (overbed tables, bed side rails, and curtains) in the rooms of inpatients from whom MRSA was isolated via clinical specimens. We examined the curtains within 7-14 days after they had been newly hung. The environmental surfaces were wiped using gauze (molded gauze for wiping of surface bacteria; 100% cotton, 4cm×8cm) moistened with sterile physiological saline. The MRSA contamination rate and mean counts (range) were 25.0% (6/24 samples) and 30.6 (0-255)colony-forming units (cfu)/100cm(2), respectively, for the overbed tables and 31.6% (6/19 samples) and 159.5 (0-1620)cfu/100cm(2), respectively, for the bed side rails. No MRSA was detected in 24 curtain samples. The rate of MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces was high for the overbed tables and bed side rails but low for the curtains. Therefore, at least until the 14th day of use, frequent disinfection of curtains may be not necessary.

  9. Modification of the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to enable their safe application in humans

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Cindy; Maurizi, Lionel; Gaber, Timo; Hoff, Paula; Broschard, Thomas; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Combined individually tailored methods for diagnosis and therapy (theragnostics) could be beneficial in destructive diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Nanoparticles are promising candidates for theragnostics due to their excellent biocompatibility. Nanoparticle modifications, such as improved surface coating, are in development to meet various requirements, although safety concerns mean that modified nanoparticles require further review before their use in medical applications is permitted. We have previously demonstrated that iron oxide nanoparticles with amino-polyvinyl alcohol (a-PVA) adsorbed on their surfaces have the unwanted effect of increasing human immune cell cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that this immune response was caused by free-floating PVA. The aim of the present study was to prevent unwanted immune reactions by further surface modification of the a-PVA nanoparticles. After cross-linking of PVA to nanoparticles to produce PVA-grafted nanoparticles, and reduction of their zeta potential, the effects on cell viability and cytokine secretion were analyzed. PVA-grafted nanoparticles still stimulated elevated cytokine secretion from human immune cells; however, this was inhibited after reduction of the zeta potential. In conclusion, covalent cross-linking of PVA to nanoparticles and adjustment of the surface charge rendered them nontoxic to immune cells, nonimmunogenic, and potentially suitable for use as theragnostic agents. PMID:27877036

  10. Surface plasmon resonance-induced photoactivation of gold nanoparticles as bactericidal agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Ilie, Ioana; Matea, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Kalman, Ersjebet; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Teodora

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other bacteria are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, and much of this mortality is due to the rise of antibiotic-resistant organisms as a result of natural selection. Gold nanoparticles synthesized using the standard wet chemical procedure were photoexcited using an 808 nm 2 W laser diode and further administered to MRSA bacteria. Flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, contrast phase microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemical staining were used to examine the interaction of the photoexcited gold nano-particles with MRSA bacteria. We show here that phonon–phonon interactions following laser photoexcitation of gold nanoparticles exhibit increased MRSA necrotic rates at low concentrations and short incubation times compared with MRSA treated with gold nanoparticles alone. These unique data may represent a step forward in the study of bactericidal effects of various nanomaterials, with applications in biology and medicine. PMID:24711697

  11. Correlation between surface physicochemical properties and the release of iron from stainless steel AISI 304 in biological media.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Karlsson, Maria-Elisa; Blomberg, Eva; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Stainless steel is widely used in biological environments, for example as implant material or in food applications, where adsorption-controlled ligand-induced metal release is of importance from a corrosion, health, and food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to elucidate potential correlations between surface energy and wettability of stainless steel surfaces and the release of iron in complexing biological media. This was accomplished by studying changes in surface energies calculated from contact angle measurements, surface oxide composition (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and released iron (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy) for stainless steel grade AISI 304 immersed in fluids containing bovine serum albumin or citric acid, and non-complexing fluids such as NaCl, NaOH, and HNO3. It was shown that the surface wettability and polar surface energy components were all influenced by adventitious atmospheric carbon (surface contamination of low molecular weight), rather than differences in surface oxide composition in non-complexing solutions. Adsorption of both BSA and citrate, which resulted in ligand-induced metal release, strongly influenced the wettability and the surface energy, and correlated well with the measured released amount of iron.

  12. Comparison of Dey and Engley (D/E) neutralizing medium to Letheen medium and standard methods medium for recovery of Staphylococcus aureus from sanitized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dey, B P; Engley, F B

    1995-01-01

    The ability of Dey and Engley (D/E) Neutralizing Medium to recover Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 from tile surfaces exposed to a commercial phenol (Mikro-Bac) and a quaternary ammonium compound (Mikro-Quat) was compared to recovery with Letheen Medium. Standard Methods Medium was used as a control recovery medium. Organisms were exposed to both antimicrobials for varying time periods, then were recovered by swab and Rodac plate on both test media. The recovery by either procedure was significantly higher with Dey and Engley (D/E) Neutralizing Medium than with Letheen and Standard Methods Medium. The D/E Medium shows promise for evaluating antimicrobial chemicals used in environmental sanitation.

  13. Superhydrophobic surface fabricated on iron substrate by black chromium electrodeposition and its corrosion resistance property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Feng, Haitao; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on iron substrate is carried out through 20 min black chromium electrodeposition, followed by immersing in 0.05 M ethanolic stearic acid solution for 12 h. The resultant superhydrophobic complex film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), disperse Spectrometer (EDS), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle (CA), sliding angle (SA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and its corrosion resistance property is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the fabricated superhydrophobic film has excellent water repellency (CA, 158.8°; SA, 2.1°) and significantly high corrosion resistance (1.31 × 106 Ω cm-2) and excellent corrosion protection efficiency (99.94%).

  14. Synthesis of ultrasmall magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and study of their colloid and surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Goloverda, Galina; Jackson, Barry; Kidd, Clayton; Kolesnichenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles of Fe3O4 (4 nm) were synthesized by high-temperature hydrolysis of chelated iron (II) and (III) diethylene glycol alkoxide complexes in a solution of the parent alcohol (H2DEG) without using capping ligands or surfactants: [Fe(DEG)Cl2]2- + 2[Fe(DEG)Cl3]2- + 2H2O + 2OH- → Fe3O4 + 3H2DEG + 8Cl- The obtained particles were reacted with different small-molecule polydentate ligands, and the resulting adducts were tested for aqueous colloid formation. Both the carboxyl and α-hydroxyl groups of the hydroxyacids are involved in coordination to the nanoparticles’ surface. This coordination provides the major contribution to the stability of the ligand-coated nanoparticles against hydrolysis. PMID:20161232

  15. Determination of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements in lunar surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, L. I.; Simonova, L. V.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution regularities of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements were investigated in basaltoid rocks of lunar and terrestrial origin. Samples of various regolith zones taken in the area of the Sea of Fertility were analyzed, along with samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks of the East African Rift for their content of the trace admixtures listed. Data obtained on the abundance of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, cobalt, nickel, chromium, and vanadium in Luna 16 lunar surface material were compared with the abundance of these elements in samples of lunar rocks returned by Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14, with the exception of scandium; its content in the latter samples was considerably higher.

  16. Determination of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements in lunar surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, L. I.; Simonova, L. V.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution regularities of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements were investigated in basaltoid rocks of lunar and terrestrial origin. Samples of various regolith zones taken in the area of the Sea of Fertility were analyzed, along with samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks of the East African Rift for their content of the trace admixtures listed. Data obtained on the abundance of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, cobalt, nickel, chromium, and vanadium in Luna 16 lunar surface material were compared with the abundance of these elements in samples of lunar rocks returned by Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14, with the exception of scandium; its content in the latter samples was considerably higher.

  17. A Case Study on the Strata Movement Mechanism and Surface Deformation Regulation in Chengchao Underground Iron Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanwen; Chen, Congxin; Ma, Tianhui; Liu, Hongyuan; Tang, Chunan

    2017-04-01

    The regular pattern of surface deformation and the mechanism of underground strata movement, especially in iron mines constructed with the block caving method, have a great influence on infrastructure on the surface, so they are an important topic for research. Based on the engineering geology conditions and the surface deformation and fracture features in Chengchao Iron Mine, the mechanism of strata movement and the regular pattern of surface deformation in the footwall were studied by the geomechanical method, and the following conclusions can be drawn: I. The surface deformation process is divided into two stages over time, i.e., the chimney caving development stage and the post-chimney deformation stage. Currently, the surface deformation in Chengchao Iron Mine is at the post-chimney deformation stage. II. At the post-chimney deformation stage, the surface deformation and geological hazards in Chengchao Iron Mine are primarily controlled by the NWW-trending joints, with the phenomenon of toppling deformation and failure on the surface. Based on the surface deformation characteristics in Chengchao Iron Mine, the surface deformation area can be divided into the following four zones: the fracture extension zone, the fracture closure zone, the fracture formation zone and the deformation accumulation zone. The zones on the surface can be determined by the surface deformation characteristics. III. The cantilever beams near the chimney caving area, caused by the NWW-trending joints, have been subjected to toppling failure. This causes the different deformation and failure mechanisms in different locations of the deep rock mass. The deep rock can be divided into four zones, i.e., the fracture zone, fracture transition zone, deformation zone and undisturbed zone, according to the different deformation and failure mechanisms. The zones in the deep rock are the reason for the zones on the surface, so they can be determined by the zones on the surface. Through these

  18. New Surface Radiolabeling Schemes of Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) for Biodistribution Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and 10 easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), wasmore » between 90 110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate 15 functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi/mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-20 radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and 25 detection techniques. The radiolabeling

  19. New Surface Radiolabeling Schemes of Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) for Biodistribution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, Jim; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and 10 easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90 110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate 15 functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi/mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-20 radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and 25 detection techniques. The

  20. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies†

    PubMed Central

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90–110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of –35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg–1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low-level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach

  1. Pathways of ferrous iron mineral formation upon sulfidation of lepidocrocite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellige, Katrin; Pollok, Kilian; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Behrends, Thilo; Peiffer, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    The interaction between S(-II) and ferric oxides exerts a major control for the sulphur and iron cycle and in particular for the carbon and electron flow in many aquatic systems. It is regarded to be a key reaction leading ultimately to pyrite formation, the pathways still remaining unresolved. We have studied the reaction between lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH, 21-42 mmol L-1) and dissolved S(-II) (3-9 mmol L-1) in batch experiments at pH 7 in a glove box using TEM, XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and wet chemistry extraction to explore the nanocrystalline products forming at different time steps in close contact to the lepidocrocite surface. S(0) and acid extractable Fe(II) (Fe(II)HCl) were the main products detected by wet chemistry extraction. The reaction could be divided into three steps: a rapid (<15 min) consumption of dissolved S(-II), formation of S(0) and the build-up of an Fe(II)HCl pool. Then in the absence of dissolved S(-II) concentrations of S(0) and Fe(II)HCl increased only slightly. TEM measurements revealed the occurrence of a mackinawite rim covering the lepidocrocite crystals and being separated from the lepidocrocite surface by an interfacial magnetite layer that can be regarded as a steady state product of the interaction between lepidocrocite and mackinawite. A significant fraction of Fe(II) was formed in excess to FeS within the first 2 h. The amount of this fraction increased with decreasing ratio between dissolved S(-II) concentration and the concentration of surface sites, which we attributed to a kinetic decoupling of S(-II) oxidation and Fe(II) detachment from the lepidocrocite surface. At low ratios, S(-II) seems to transfer electrons to lepidocrocite faster then stoichiometric amounts of FeS could. After 2 days Fe(II)HCl and S(0) started to decrease resulting in pyrite formation accompanied by traces of magnetite. TEM measurements indicated that mackinawite completely dissolved and precipitation of pyrite occurred dislocated from the

  2. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies.

    PubMed

    Nallathamby, Prakash D; Mortensen, Ninell P; Palko, Heather A; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T

    2015-04-21

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90-110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with (14)C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg(-1) of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach

  3. Effects of surface chemistry and size on iron oxide nanoparticle delivery of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Christopher

    The discovery of RNA interference and the increasing understanding of disease genetics have created a new class of potential therapeutics based on oligonucleotides. This therapeutic class includes antisense molecules, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA modulators such as antagomirs (antisense directed against microRNA) and microRNA mimics, all of which function by altering gene expression at the translational level. While these molecules have the promise of treating a host of diseases from neurological disorders to cancer, a major hurdle is their inability to enter cells on their own, where they may render therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology is the engineering of materials at the nanometer scale and has gained significant interest for nucleic acid delivery due to its biologically relevant length-scale and amenability to multifunctionality. While a number of nanoparticle vehicles have shown promise for oligonucleotide delivery, there remains a lack of understanding of how nanoparticle coating and size affect these delivery processes. This dissertation seeks to elucidate some of these factors by evaluating oligonucleotide delivery efficiencies of a panel of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying cationic coatings and sizes. A panel of uniformly-sized nanoparticles was prepared with surface coatings comprised of various amine groups representing high and low pKas. A separate panel of nanoparticles with sizes of 40, 80, 150, and 200 nm but with the same cationic coating was also prepared. Results indicated that both nanoparticle surface coating and nanoparticle hydrodynamic size affect transfection efficiency. Specific particle coatings and sizes were identified that gave superior performance. The intracellular fate of iron oxide nanoparticles was also tracked by electron microscopy and suggests that they function via the proton sponge effect. The research presented in this dissertation may aid in the rational design of improved nanoparticle delivery vectors for

  4. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  5. Surface materials map of Afghanistan: iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Dudek, Kathleen B.; Livo, Keith E.

    2012-01-01

    This map shows the distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of HyMap imaging spectrometer data of Afghanistan. Using a NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) WB-57 aircraft flown at an altitude of ~15,240 meters or ~50,000 feet, 218 flight lines of data were collected over Afghanistan between August 22 and October 2, 2007. The HyMap data were converted to apparent surface reflectance, then further empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap data was compared to the spectral features of reference entries in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, ice, and snow. This map shows the spatial distribution of iron-bearing minerals and other materials having diagnostic absorptions at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. These absorptions result from electronic processes in the minerals. Several criteria, including (1) the reliability of detection and discrimination of minerals using the HyMap spectrometer data, (2) the relative abundance of minerals, and (3) the importance of particular minerals to studies of Afghanistan's natural resources, guided the selection of entries in the reference spectral library and, therefore, guided the selection of mineral classes shown on this map. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated. Minerals having similar spectral features were less easily discriminated, especially where the minerals were not particularly abundant and (or) where vegetation cover reduced the absorption strength of mineral features. Complications in reflectance calibration also affected the detection and identification of minerals.

  6. Iron geochemistry in surface sediments of a temperate semi-enclosed bay, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mao-Xu; Huang, Xiang-Li; Yang, Gui-Peng; Chen, Liang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) speciation and microbial reducible Fe(III) oxides (MR-Fe(III)) in surface sediments of semi-enclosed Jiaozhou Bay were quantified to reveal Fe geochemistry in the settings subjected to anthropogenic perturbations. Results indicate that sedimentary Fe in the bay is mainly of natural weathering source, without appreciable anthropogenic Fe inputs, as indicated by a generally good linear coupling of total Fe to aluminum. Among the three highly reactive Fe(III) (Fe(III)HR) pools, well crystalline Fe(III) oxides (Fe(III)wc) were always the predominant phase, followed by poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides (Fe(III)pc), and amorphous Fe(III) oxides (Fe(III)am) were only of minor importance. The dominance of non-sulfidized Fe(II) over sulfidized Fe in the sediments points to the importance of microbial iron(III) reduction (MIR) in the free sulfide-starved conditions. High riverine inputs of TOC leads to outliers in the Fe(III)HR versus total organic carbon (TOC) ratio compared the rest of the bay. OM-dependent MIR as the common driving force has rendered all Fe(II)-bearing phases linearly coupled to TOC. MR-Fe(III) in the surface sediments covered all Fe(III)am and a fraction of less reactive Fe(III) phases, while Fe(III)wc was at most a minor contributor. Highly reactive Fe appears to be enriched to some extent in the temperate semi-enclosed bay, as in the wet-tropical counterparts.

  7. Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Marilyn C.; Soge, Olusegun O.; No, David

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n = 296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n = 294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n = 85), and the local community (n = 130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment. PMID:23577006

  8. Transfer of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from retail pork products onto food contact surfaces and the potential for consumer exposure.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather L; Niebuhr, Steven E; Dickson, James S

    2013-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen that has developed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and has been isolated at low population numbers in retail meat products. The objectives of this study were to estimate the potential transfer of MRSA from contaminated retail pork products to food contact surfaces and to estimate the potential for human exposure to MRSA by contact with those contaminated surfaces. Pork loins, bacon, and fresh pork sausage were inoculated with a four-strain mixed MRSA culture over a range of populations from approximately 4 to 8 log, vacuum packaged, and stored for 2 weeks at 5°C to simulate normal packaging and distribution. Primary transfer was determined by placing inoculated products on knife blades, cutting boards, and a human skin model (pork skin) for 5 min. Secondary transfer was determined by placing an inoculated product on the contact surface, removing it, and then placing the secondary contact surface on the initial contact surface. A pork skin model was used to simulate transfer to human skin by placing it into contact with the contact surface. The percentages of transfer for primary transfer from the inoculated products to the cutting board ranged from 39 to 49%, while the percentages of transfer to the knife ranged from 17 to 42%. The percentages of transfer from the inoculated products to the pork skin ranged from 26 to 36%. The secondary transfer percentages ranged from 2.2 to 5.2% across all products and contact surfaces. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences in the amounts of transfer between transfer surfaces and across cell concentrations.

  9. Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Soge, Olusegun O; No, David

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n = 296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n = 294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n = 85), and the local community (n = 130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment.

  10. Dissolved Iron in the Australian Sector of the Southern Ocean During Spring: Implications for the Seasonal Cycle of Iron in Antarctic Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedwick, P. N.; Bowie, A. R.; Ussher, S. J.; Mackey, D. J.; Trull, T. W.; Worsfold, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    Colorimetric flow injection analysis was used to measure dissolved iron (<0.4 μm, dFe) in upper-ocean (<400 m depth) water samples collected from the CLIVAR SR3 section (~142°E) between Tasmania and Antarctica in November-December 2001. These are the first such data for this region during austral spring, and include results from two stations occupied in melting pack ice, as well as one station near the 61°S SOIREE site, occupied twice. Combining these new results with data from a March 1998 cruise and the February 1999 SOIREE campaign allows us to infer seasonal (spring-fall) changes in dFe concentrations in surface waters of our study region, assuming interannual variability is small. The data suggest a seasonal drawdown of ~0.1-0.2 nM dFe in the Subantarctic Zone waters (~47°S); a seasonal accumulation of ~0.1 nM dFe in near-surface (~25 m) waters and a drawdown of ~0.05 nM dFe in deeper (~50-300 m) waters of the Subantarctic Front (~51°S); and little or no seasonal dFe drawdown (~0.05 nM or less) in surface waters south of the Subantarctic Front, where dFe concentrations were uniformly low (~0.1 nM). Thus, if winter mixing provides a significant vertical resupply of dFe to Antarctic surface waters, our results suggest that most of this winter reserve of dissolved iron is removed from the upper water column very early in the growing season. In addition, our new data provide no evidence of significant iron inputs to surface waters from melting sea ice, which may explain the lack of ice-edge algal blooms in this sector of the Southern Ocean, as inferred from ocean-color satellite images.

  11. Effects of blending of desalinated and conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and its release from corroding surfaces and pre-existing scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Desormeaux, Erik; Meyerhofer, Paul; Luckenbach, Heidi; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined effects of blending desalinated water with conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and release from corroding metal surfaces and pre-existing scales exposed to waters having varying fractions of desalinated water, alkalinities, pH values and orthophosphate levels. The presence of desalinated water resulted in markedly decreased 0.45 μm-filtered soluble iron concentrations. However, higher fractions of desalinated water in the blends were also associated with more fragile corroding surfaces, lower retention of iron oxidation products and release of larger iron particles in the bulk water. SEM, XRD and XANES data showed that in surface water, a dense layer of amorphous ferrihydrite phase predominated in the corrosion products. More crystalline surface phases developed in the presence of desalinated water. These solid phases transformed from goethite to lepidocrocite with increased fraction of desalinated water. These effects are likely to result from a combination of chemical parameters, notably variations of the concentrations of natural organic matter, calcium, chloride and sulfate when desalinated and conventionally treated waters are blended.

  12. A study on the fabrication of superhydrophobic iron surfaces by chemical etching and galvanic replacement methods and their anti-icing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunquan; Zeng, Xingrong; Li, Hongqiang; Lai, Xuejun

    2015-08-01

    Hierarchical structures on iron surfaces were constructed by means of chemical etching by hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution or the galvanic replacement by silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. The superhydrophobic iron surfaces were successfully prepared by subsequent hydrophobic modification with stearic acid. The superhydrophobic iron surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and water contact angle (WCA). The effects of reactive concentration and time on the microstructure and the wetting behavior were investigated. In addition, the anti-icing properties of the superhydrophobic iron surfaces were also studied. The FTIR study showed that the stearic acid was chemically bonded onto the iron surface. With the HCl concentration increase from 4 mol/L to 8 mol/L, the iron surface became rougher with a WCA ranging from 127° to 152°. The AgNO3 concentration had little effect on the wetting behavior, but a high AgNO3 concentration caused Ag particle aggregates to transform from flower-like formations into dendritic crystals, owing to the preferential growth direction of the Ag particles. Compared with the etching method, the galvanic replacement method on the iron surface more favorably created roughness required for achieving superhydrophobicity. The superhydrophobic iron surface showed excellent anti-icing properties in comparison with the untreated iron. The icing time of water droplets on the superhydrophobic surface was delayed to 500 s, which was longer than that of 295 s for untreated iron. Meanwhile, the superhydrophobic iron surface maintained superhydrophobicity after 10 icing and de-icing cycles in cold conditions.

  13. Recent advances on surface engineering of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Naregalkar, Rohan R; Vaidya, Vikas Deep; Gupta, Mona

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with appropriate surface coatings are increasingly being used clinically for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, drug delivery, tissue repair, cell and tissue targeting and transfection. This is because of the nontoxicity and biocompatibility demand that mainly iron oxide-based materials are predominantly used, despite some attempts to develop 'more magnetic nanomaterials' based on cobalt, nickel, gadolinium and other compounds. For all these applications, the material used for surface coating of the magnetic particles must not only be nontoxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs and an external magnetic field can be applied to trap them in the target site. By attaching the targeting molecules, such as proteins or antibodies, at particles surfaces, the latter may be directed to any cell, tissue or tumor in the body. In this review, different polymers/molecules that can be used for nanoparticle coating to stabilize the suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles under in vitro and in vivo situations are discussed. Some selected proteins/targeting ligands that could be used for derivatizing magnetic nanoparticles are also explored. We have reviewed the various biomedical applications with some of the most recent uses of magnetic nanoparticles for early detection of cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

  14. A Facile Surface Passivation of Hematite Photoanodes with Iron Titanate Cocatalyst for Enhanced Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Nguyen, Nhat Truong; Schmuki, Patrik

    2016-08-23

    The surface modification of semiconductor photoelectrodes with passivation overlayers has attracted great attention as an effective strategy to improve the charge separation and charge transfer processes across the semiconductor-electrolyte interface. In this work, a thin Fe2 TiO5 layer was decorated on nanostructured hematite nanoflake and nanocoral photoanodes (by thermal oxidation of iron foils) by a facile water-based solution method. Photoelectrochemical measurements show that the Fe2 O3 /Fe2 TiO5 heterostructure exhibits an obvious enhancement in photoelectrochemical water oxidation performance compared to the pristine hematite. For example, at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (VRHE ) in 1 m KOH under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2) ) illumination, a 4-8× increase in the water oxidation photocurrent is achieved for Fe2 O3 /Fe2 TiO5 , and a considerable cathodic shift of the onset potential up to 0.53-0.62 VRHE is obtained. Moreover, the performance of the Fe2 O3 /Fe2 TiO5 heterostructure can be further improved by decoration with a SnOx layer. The enhancement in photocurrent can be attributed to the synergistic effect of Fe2 TiO5 /SnOx overlayers passivating surface states, and thus reducing surface electron-hole recombination. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Using Iron-Manganese Co-Oxide Filter Film to Remove Ammonium from Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruifeng; Huang, Tinglin; Wen, Gang; Chen, Yongpan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Beibei

    2017-01-01

    An iron-manganese co-oxide filter film (MeOx) has been proven to be a good catalyst for the chemical catalytic oxidation of ammonium in groundwater. Compared with groundwater, surface water is generally used more widely and has characteristics that make ammonium removal more difficult. In this study, MeOx was used to remove ammonium from surface water. It indicated that the average ammonium removal efficiency of MeOx was greater than 90%, even though the water quality changed dramatically and the water temperature was reduced to about 6–8 °C. Then, through inactivating microorganisms, it showed that the removal capability of MeOx included both biological (accounted for about 41.05%) and chemical catalytic oxidation and chemical catalytic oxidation (accounted for about 58.95%). The investigation of the characterizations suggested that MeOx was formed by abiotic ways and the main elements on the surface of MeOx were distributed homogenously. The analysis of the catalytic oxidation process indicated that ammonia nitrogen may interact with MeOx as both ammonia molecules and ammonium ions and the active species of O2 were possibly •O and O2−. PMID:28753939

  16. Existence of a Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Strain Isolated in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Messad, Nourreddine; Prajsnar, Tomasz K.; Lina, Gerard; O’Callaghan, David; Foster, Simon J.; Renshaw, Steve A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Bes, Michèle; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Vandenesch, François; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic bacterium capable of causing a wide range of severe diseases when it gains access to underlying tissues. Paradoxically, S. aureus is a common inhabitant of the skin microflora and colonizes the nares and other human mucosa. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic basis for the differences in the pathogenic versus colonizing potential of S. aureus isolated from diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). By performing optical map comparisons of a collection of S. aureus strains isolated from DFUs, we brought to light a prophage present in noninfecting bacteria. The phage, namely ROSA-like, was localized in a hotspot region ΦNM2 near the locus isd, the iron surface determinant system. The integrated phage significantly reduces the virulence of the strain and increases the biofilm formation. DFUs seem to be a specific niche of this colonizing strain. The ROSA-like phage represents the first description of a mobile element present mainly in S. aureus isolated from DFUs, which modulates the relationship of the bacteria with its human host. This phage appears to attenuate bacterial virulence and promote colonization. PMID:25901094

  17. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4+ T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia. PMID:26865417

  18. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-02-11

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4(+) T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia.

  19. Sustaining reactivity of Fe(0) for nitrate reduction via electron transfer between dissolved Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Han, Luchao; yang, Li; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Xuexiang; Chen, Zhan; Hu, Chun

    2016-05-05

    The mechanism of the effects of Fe(2+)(aq) on the reduction of NO3(-) by Fe(0) was investigated. The effects of initial pH on the rate of NO3(-) reduction and the Fe(0) surface characteristics revealed Fe(2+)(aq) and the characteristics of minerals on the surface of Fe(0) played an important role in NO3(-) reduction. Both NO3(-) reduction and the decrease of Fe(2+)(aq) exhibited similar kinetics and were promoted by each other. This promotion was associated with the types of the surface iron oxides of Fe(0). Additionally, further reduction of NO3(-) produced more surface iron oxides, supplying more active sites for Fe(2+)(aq), resulting in more electron transfer between Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides and a higher reaction rate. Using the isotope specificity of (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, it was verified that the Fe(2+)(aq) was continuously converted into Fe(3+) oxides on the surface of Fe(0) and then converted into Fe3O4 via electron transfer between Fe(2+) and the pre-existing surface Fe(3+) oxides. Electrochemistry measurements confirmed that the spontaneous electron transfer between the Fe(2+) and structural Fe(3+) species accelerated the interfacial electron transfer between the Fe species and NO3(-). This study provides a new insight into the interaction between Fe species and contaminants and interface electron transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerous Iron-Rich Particles Lie on the Surface of Erionite Fibers from Rome (Oregon, USA) and Karlik (Cappadocia, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Croce, Alessandro; Allegrina, Mario; Rinaudo, Caterina; Gaudino, Giovanni; Yang, Haining; Carbone, Michele

    2015-10-01

    Erionite samples from Rome, Oregon (USA) and Karlik, Cappadocia (Turkey) were analyzed by environmental scanning electron microscopy (E-SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to verify the chemical composition of this mineral phase, and the presence of iron in particular. By means of backscattered electron images, a large number of particles/grains were observed on the surface of the erionite fibers from both locations. The particles were found to be micrometric on samples from Rome and submicrometric on samples from Karlik, and always lighter than the hosting crystal in appearance. In different areas of the same fiber or bundle of fibers, several EDS spectra were recorded. Iron was detected only when a light particle was lying in the path of the electron beam. Iron was never identified in the EDS spectra acquired on the flat erionite surface. The results from E-SEM/EDS were confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, showing bands ascribing to hematite—Fe2O3, goethite—FeO(OH), or jarosite—KFe3(3+)(SO4)2(OH)6 when the laser beam was addressed on the light particles observed on the fiber surface. The evidence that iron is on the surface of erionite fibers, rather than being part of the crystalline structure, may be relevant for the carcinogenic potential of these fibers.

  1. Surface design of core-shell superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles drives record relaxivity values in functional MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Maity, Dipak; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Sedenkova, Veronika; Tucek, Jiri; Safarova, Klara; Polakova, Katerina; Tomankova, Katerina; Diwoky, Clemens; Stollberger, Rudolf; Machala, Libor; Zboril, Radek

    2012-12-04

    Core-shell hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, surface functionalized with either terephthalic acid or 2-amino terephthalic acid, showed large negative MRI contrast ability, validating the advantage of using low molecular weight and π-conjugated canopies for engineering functional nanostructures with superior performances.

  2. IlsA, a unique surface protein of Bacillus cereus required for iron acquisition from heme, hemoglobin and ferritin.

    PubMed

    Daou, Nadine; Buisson, Christophe; Gohar, Michel; Vidic, Jasmina; Bierne, Hélène; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina

    2009-11-01

    The human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus belongs to the B. cereus group that includes bacteria with a broad host spectrum. The ability of these bacteria to colonize diverse hosts is reliant on the presence of adaptation factors. Previously, an IVET strategy led to the identification of a novel B. cereus protein (IlsA, Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein), which is specifically expressed in the insect host or under iron restrictive conditions in vitro. Here, we show that IlsA is localized on the surface of B. cereus and hence has the potential to interact with host proteins. We report that B. cereus uses hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, but not transferrin and lactoferrin. In addition, affinity tests revealed that IlsA interacts with both hemoglobin and ferritin. Furthermore, IlsA directly binds heme probably through the NEAT domain. Inactivation of ilsA drastically decreases the ability of B. cereus to grow in the presence of hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, indicating that IlsA is essential for iron acquisition from these iron sources. In addition, the ilsA mutant displays a reduction in growth and virulence in an insect model. Hence, our results indicate that IlsA is a key factor within a new iron acquisition system, playing an important role in the general virulence strategy adapted by B. cereus to colonize susceptible hosts.

  3. Cell tagging with clinically approved iron oxides: feasibility and effect of lipofection, particle size, and surface coating on labeling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Lars; Persigehl, Thorsten; Wall, Alexander; Schwindt, Wolfram; Tombach, Bernd; Fobker, Manfred; Poremba, Christopher; Ebert, Wolfgang; Heindel, Walter; Bremer, Christoph

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of lipofection, particle size, and surface coating on labeling efficiency of mammalian cells with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs). Institutional Review Board approval was not required. Different human cell lines (lung and breast cancer, fibrosarcoma, leukocytes) were tagged by using carboxydextran-coated SPIOs of various hydrodynamic diameters (17-65 nm) and a dextran-coated iron oxide (150 nm). Cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of iron (0.01-1.00 mg of iron [Fe] per milliliter), including or excluding a transfection medium (TM). Cellular iron uptake was analyzed qualitatively at light and electron microscopy and was quantified at atomic emission spectroscopy. Cell visibility was assessed with gradient- and spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Effects of iron concentration in the medium and of lipofection on cellular SPIO uptake were analyzed with analysis of variance and two-tailed Student t test, respectively. Iron oxide uptake increased in a dose-dependent manner with higher iron concentrations in the medium. The TM significantly increased the iron load of cells (up to 2.6-fold, P < .05). For carboxydextran-coated SPIOs, larger particle size resulted in improved cellular uptake (65 nm, 4.37 microg +/- 0.08 Fe per 100 000 cells; 17 nm, 2.14 microg +/- 0.06 Fe per 100 000 cells; P < .05). Despite larger particle size, dextran-coated iron oxides did not differ from large carboxydextran-coated particles (150 nm, 3.81 microg +/- 0.46 Fe per 100 000 cells; 65 nm, 4.37 microg +/- 0.08 Fe per 100 000 cells; P > .05). As few as 10 000 cells could be detected with clinically available MR techniques by using this approach. Lipofection-based cell tagging is a simple method for efficient cell labeling with clinically approved iron oxide-based contrast agents. Large particle size and carboxydextran coating are preferable for cell tagging with endocytosis- and lipofection-based methods. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  4. Effects of photodynamic laser and violet-blue led irradiation on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide attached to moderately rough titanium surface: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Nosi, Daniele; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2017-03-10

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This study investigates the in vitro efficacy of photodynamic treatment (PDT) with methylene blue (MB) photoactivated with λ 635 nm diode laser and of λ 405 nm violet-blue LED phototreatment for the reduction of bacterial biofilm and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) adherent to titanium surface mimicking the bone-implant interface. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm grown on titanium discs with a moderately rough surface was subjected to either PDT (0.1% MB and λ 635 nm diode laser) or λ 405 nm LED phototreatment for 1 and 5 min. Bactericidal effect was evaluated by vital staining and residual colony-forming unit count. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, discs coated with Escherichia coli LPS were treated as above before seeding with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Both PDT and LED phototreatment induced a statistically significant (p < 0.05 or higher) reduction of viable bacteria, up to -99 and -98% (5 min), respectively. Moreover, besides bactericidal effect, PDT and LED phototreatment also inhibited LPS bioactivity, assayed as nitrite formation, up to -42%, thereby blunting host inflammatory response. Non-invasive phototherapy emerges as an attractive alternative in the treatment of peri-implantitis to reduce bacteria and LPS adherent to titanium implant surface without causing damage of surface microstructure. Its efficacy in the clinical setting remains to be investigated.

  5. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Contamination in Bedside Surfaces of a Hospital Ward and the Potential Effectiveness of Enhanced Disinfection with an Antimicrobial Polymer Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, John W. M.; Chung, Terence W. K.; Loke, Alice Y.

    2015-01-01

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced from 4.4 ± 8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07 ± 0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards. PMID:25768241

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination in bedside surfaces of a hospital ward and the potential effectiveness of enhanced disinfection with an antimicrobial polymer surfactant.

    PubMed

    Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

    2015-03-11

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced from 4.4±8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07±0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards.

  7. Neutron Scattering as a Probe of Fermi Surface Nesting in Iron-Based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity in the iron-based compounds is induced by suppressing a magnetically ordered phase by doping, pressure, or disorder, so it is no surprise that neutron scattering has had an important role in the field, elucidating both the origin of magnetic fluctuations and their role in the unconventional superconductivity. Our investigations of BaFe2As2 doped with potassium, sodium, and phosphor, can be interpreted within the framework of weakly correlated itinerant magnetism, in which Fermi surface nesting between hole pockets at the zone center and electron pockets at the zone boundary is responsible for both the magnetic (SDW) order and the superconductivity. Resonant spin excitations that occur when the superconducting energy gap changes sign on different parts of the Fermi surface were initially observed by inelastic neutron scattering in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 representing the first phase-sensitive evidence of s+/--symmetry. We have since shown that the resonance splits into two with hole-doping because of the growing mismatch in the hole and electron Fermi surface volumes, accompanied by a decrease in the binding energy of the resonance and its spectral weight in accordance with RPA theory. A detailed examination of the phase diagram close to the critical phase boundary for SDW order has identified a new phase that is further evidence of the role of Fermi surface nesting in generating magnetic order. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  8. Surface reactivity of hydroxyapatite nanocoatings deposited on iron oxide magnetic spheres toward toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huihui; Masse, Sylvie; Zhang, Hao; Hélary, Christophe; Li, Laifeng; Coradin, Thibaud

    2014-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite and magnetite are two environmentally-friendly mineral phases that have fruitful properties for remediation process. The formation of magnetic core@sorbent shell nanostructures should provide efficient materials for toxic metal removal from aqueous media. However the nanoscale confinement of hydroxyapatite may influence its reactivity. Fe3O4@Hydroxyapatite nanocomposites were prepared by surface-controlled precipitation of hydroxyapatite layers from 10 nm to 150 nm in thickness on iron oxide spheres. The surface reactivity of the core-shell particles toward selected inorganic ions of environmental relevance (Pb(II), Y(III), Eu(III), Sb(III)) was studied by batch sorption experiments, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The reactivity of the hydroxyapatite coating varied from partial cation exchange to dissolution/transformation of the shell. The nature and extent of the reactions depended significantly on the hydroxyapatite layer structure but was not significantly influenced by the magnetic core. These novel nanocomposites should be useful for environmental applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of neutral-surface iron oxide nanoparticles on cellular uptake and signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Lucia; Choi, Suk Jin; Park, In Suh; Han, Jee Young; Chu, Young Chae; Choi, Eun Sook; Na, Kun; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been applied widely to biomedical fields. However, the relationship between the physicochemical properties of IONPs and their biological behavior is not fully understood yet. We prepared 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS)-coated IONPs, which have a neutral hydrophobic surface, and compared their biological behavior to that of Resovist (ferucarbotran), a commercialized IONP formulation modified with carboxymethyl dextran. The rate of MPS-IONP uptake by human aortic endothelial cells (HAoECs) was higher than ferucarbotran uptake, indicating that the neutral hydrophobic nature of MPS-IONPs allowed them to be absorbed more readily through the plasma membrane. However, the signaling pathways activated by MPS-IONPs and ferucarbotran were comparable, suggesting that surface charge is not a key factor for inducing changes in HAoECs. In vivo fate analysis showed that MPS-IONPs accumulated for longer periods in tissues than hydrophilic ferucarbotran. These findings could enlarge our understanding of NP behavior for advanced applications in the biomedical field. PMID:27695320

  10. Surface and interfacial engineering of iron oxide nanoplates for highly efficient magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Wu, Changqiang; Liu, Hanyu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Wang, Lirong; Xu, Ye; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-03-24

    Magnetic resonance angiography using gadolinium-based molecular contrast agents suffers from short diagnostic window, relatively low resolution and risk of toxicity. Taking into account the chemical exchange between metal centers and surrounding protons, magnetic nanoparticles with suitable surface and interfacial features may serve as alternative T1 contrast agents. Herein, we report the engineering on surface structure of iron oxide nanoplates to boost T1 contrast ability through synergistic effects between exposed metal-rich Fe3O4(100) facets and embedded Gd2O3 clusters. The nanoplates show prominent T1 contrast in a wide range of magnetic fields with an ultrahigh r1 value up to 61.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Moreover, engineering on nanobio interface through zwitterionic molecules adjusts the in vivo behaviors of nanoplates for highly efficient magnetic resonance angiography with steady-state acquisition window, superhigh resolution in vascular details, and low toxicity. This study provides a powerful tool for sophisticated design of MRI contrast agents for diverse use in bioimaging applications.

  11. Effect of surface functionalisation on the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Aysan, Ayse Beyza; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Ulbrich, Pavel; Šoltys, Marek; Zadražil, Aleš; Štěpánek, František

    2017-05-01

    The combination of nanoparticles with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can have benefits such as easier sample handling or higher sensitivity, but also drawbacks such as loss of colloidal stability or inhibition of the PCR. The present work systematically investigates the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with the PCR in terms of colloidal stability and potential PCR inhibition due to interaction between the PCR components and the nanoparticle surface. Several types of MIONs with and without surface functionalisation by sodium citrate, dextran and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) were prepared and characterised by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Colloidal stability in the presence of the PCR components was investigated both at room temperature and under PCR thermo-cycling. Dextran-stabilized MIONs show the best colloidal stability in the PCR mix at both room and elevated temperatures. Citrate- and APTES-stabilised as well as uncoated MIONs show a comparable PCR inhibition near the concentration 0.1mgml(-1) while the inhibition of dextran stabilized MIONs became apparent near 0.5mgml(-1). It was demonstrated that the PCR could be effectively carried out even in the presence of elevated concentration of MIONs up to 2mgml(-1) by choosing the right coating approach and supplementing the reaction mix by critical components, Taq DNA polymerase and Mg(2+) ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Wang; Bingbing, Lin; Taipeng, Shen; Jun, Wu; Fuhua, Hao; Chunchao, Xia; Qiyong, Gong; Huiru, Tang; Bin, Song; Hua, Ai

    2016-07-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ɛ-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside amphiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (M s) and T 2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with decreased interparticle spacing. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB933903), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2012BAI23B08), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20974065, 51173117, and 50830107).

  13. Effects of Amines on the Surface Charge Poperties of Iron Oxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Benezeth, Pascale; Wesolowski, David J; Palmer, Donald; Machesky, Michael L.

    2009-07-01

    Specific studies detailing the effects of amines, used as pH control agents for corrosion inhibition in power plants, on the surface charge of iron oxides provide data to assess the mechanism of how these amines impact deposition rate. The current study was undertaken in order to determine accurately the dissociation constants of the relevant amines at Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) operating conditions and to investigate the effect of sorption of two of these amines (morpholine and dimethylamine) by magnetite. The acid-dissociation equilibria of morpholine (MOR), dimethylamine (DMA) and ethanolamine (ETA) were measured potentiometrically with a hydrogen-electrode concentration cell (HECC) from 0 to 290 C in sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate (NaTr) solutions at ionic strengths up to 1 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. Magnetite surface titrations were performed at an ionic strength of 0.03 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} (NaTr medium) in the presence or absence of morpholine and dimethylamine buffers over a wide range of pH and total amine concentrations at 150-250 C.

  14. Phenol adsorption on surface-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles: modeling of the kinetics, isotherm, and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon Uk; Mahanty, Biswanath; Ha, Hun Moon; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2016-06-01

    Phenol adsorption from aqueous solution was carried out using uncoated and methyl acrylic acid (MAA)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs), having size <10 nm, as adsorbents. Batch adsorption studies revealed that the phenol removal efficiency of MAA-coated NPs (950 mg g-1) is significantly higher than that of uncoated NPs (550 mg g-1) under neutral to acidic conditions. However, this improvement disappears above pH 9. The adsorption data under optimized conditions (pH 7) were modeled with pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetics and subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. The analysis determined that pseudo-second-order kinetics and the Freundlich model are appropriate for both uncoated and MAA-coated NPs (all R 2 > 0.98). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of pristine and phenol-adsorbed NPs revealed core-level binding energy and charge for Fe(2 s) and O(1 s) on the NP surfaces. The calculations suggest that phenol adsorption onto MAA-coated NPs is a charge transfer process, where the adsorbate (phenol) acts as an electron donor and the NP surface (Fe, O) as an electron acceptor. However, a physisorption process appears to be the relevant mechanism for uncoated NPs.

  15. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2016-01-29

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 10(7) MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen.

  16. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 107 MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen. PMID:26826226

  17. The nucleation, growth and thermal stability of iron clusters on a TiO2(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, Ewa; Spiridis, Nika; Socha, Robert Piotr; Wolanin, Barbara; Korecki, Józef

    2017-09-01

    The nucleation and initial growth of Fe on the (1 × 1) rutile TiO2(110) substrate as a function of coverage and annealing temperature were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The deposition of 0.03 ML-0.3 ML (monolayer) of Fe resulted in the growth of one-, two- and three-dimensional iron clusters. Surface annealing at 373 K and 473 K resulted in a moderate sintering of the Fe clusters, whereas annealing at higher temperatures led to Fe incorporation into the substrate. The analysis of the Fe 2p core excitations showed that even after room temperature processes, iron was partially oxidized at the iron/titania interface.

  18. Reflectance Spectroscopy of Palagonite and Iron-Rich Montmorillonite Clay Mixtures: Implications for the Surface Composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, James; Handy, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Mixtures of a Hawaiian palagonite and an iron-rich, montmorillonite clay (15.8 +/- 0.4 wt% Fe as Fe2O3) were evaluated as Mars surface spectral analogs from their diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of the 2.2 microns absorption band in the reflectance spectrum of clays and its absence in the Mars spectrum have been interpreted as indicating that highly crystalline aluminous hydroxylated clays cannot be a major mineral component of the soil on Mars. The palagonite sample used in this study does not show this absorption feature in its spectrum. In mixtures of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite, the 2.2 microns Al-OH clay lattice band is not seen below 15 wt% montmorillonite. This suggests the possibility that iron-rich montmorillonite clay may be present in the soil of Mars at up to 15 wt% in combination with palagonite, and remain undetected in remotely sensed spectra of Mars.

  19. A biological switch at the ocean surface as a cause of laminations in a Precambrian iron formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, K.; Pinti, D. L.; Orberger, B.; Cloquet, C.; Jayananda, M.; Soyama, H.

    2016-07-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) exhibit alternating silica- and iron-rich laminae, potentially reflecting the dynamics of the paleo-environments in which they were formed, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Here the formation of a 2.7-2.9 Ga BIF from Dharwar Craton, India, is deciphered by analyzing the inter-band variations of the redox-sensitive isotope biomarkers, 15N/14N and 56Fe/54Fe. Organic matter with δ15N values as high as + 12.0 ± 0.8 ‰ appears to be trapped in silica. Iron oxides exhibit systematically positive δ56Fe values, ranging between + 0.80 ± 0.05 ‰ and + 1.67 ± 0.02 ‰. Compared to the iron-rich bands, silica-rich bands, which show higher δ56Fe values, exhibit an order of magnitude higher concentrations of 15N-rich organic nitrogen, normalized by the abundances of its host silica. The presence of 15N-rich organic matter may imply the emergence of a modern-like biological nitrogen cycle that requires the formation of oxidized nitrogen compounds. The higher concentration of 15N-rich organic nitrogen for the silica-rich bands possibly suggests that the photosynthetic activity was higher during the formation periods of these bands. The heavier iron isotope compositions of the silica-rich bands cannot be explained alone by iron oxidation through probable pathways. The relative 56Fe-enrichment in silica-rich bands is explained here by the progressive dissolution of iron oxides to the ocean, through iron reduction by 15N-rich organic matter actively produced at the ocean surface. The formation of iron-rich bands possibly corresponds to periods of reduced biological productivity, when precipitated iron was not effectively dissolved to the ocean. The observed shift in the organic concentration between Fe- and Si-rich bands could be the switch that triggered the BIF laminations. This shift could conceivably represent periodic fluctuations in the oxygen generation, which possibly occurred over periods of millennia, at the dawn of the

  20. Controls on dissolved cobalt in surface waters of the Sargasso Sea: Comparisons with iron and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, R. U.; Sedwick, P. N.; Bibby, T. S.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Church, T. M.; Johnson, R. J.; Macey, A. I.; Marsay, C. M.; Sholkovitz, E. R.; Ussher, S. J.; Worsfold, P. J.; Lohan, M. C.

    2012-06-01

    Dissolved cobalt (dCo), iron (dFe) and aluminum (dAl) were determined in water column samples along a meridional transect (˜31°N to 24°N) south of Bermuda in June 2008. A general north-to-south increase in surface concentrations of dFe (0.3-1.6 nM) and dAl (14-42 nM) was observed, suggesting that aerosol deposition is a significant source of dFe and dAl, whereas no clear trend was observed for near-surface dCo concentrations. Shipboard aerosol samples indicate fractional solubility values of 8-100% for aerosol Co, which are significantly higher than corresponding estimates of the solubility of aerosol Fe (0.44-45%). Hydrographic observations and analysis of time series rain samples from Bermuda indicate that wet deposition accounts for most (>80%) of the total aeolian flux of Co, and hence a significant proportion of the atmospheric input of dCo to our study region. Our aerosol data imply that the atmospheric input of dCo to the Sargasso Sea is modest, although this flux may be more significant in late summer. The water column dCo profiles reveal a vertical distribution that predominantly reflects `nutrient-type' behavior, versus scavenged-type behavior for dAl, and a hybrid of nutrient- and scavenged-type behavior for dFe. Mesoscale eddies also appear to impact on the vertical distribution of dCo. The effects of biological removal of dCo from the upper water column were apparent as pronounced sub-surface minima (21 ± 4 pM dCo), coincident with maxima in Prochlorococcus abundance. These observations imply that Prochlorococcus plays a major role in removing dCo from the euphotic zone, and that the availability of dCo may regulate Prochlorococcus growth in the Sargasso Sea.

  1. A mild hand cleanser, alkyl ether sulphate supplemented with alkyl ether carboxylic acid and alkyl glucoside, improves eczema on the hand and prevents the growth of Staphylococcus aureus on the skin surface.

    PubMed

    Fukui, S; Morikawa, T; Hirahara, M; Terada, Y; Shimizu, M; Takeuchi, K; Takagi, Y

    2016-12-01

    Washing the hands using cleansers with antiseptic materials is the most popular method for hand hygiene and helps maintain health by preventing food poisoning and bacterial infections. However, repeated hand washing tends to induce eczema of the hand, such as dryness, cracking and erythema. Moreover, eczema on the hand leads to increased levels in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on the skin surface in contrast to expectations. Thus, mild hand cleansers which induce less eczema even with repeated washings are desired. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of a hand cleanser formulated with alkyl ether sulphate (AES), alkyl ether carboxylic acid (AEC) and alkyl glucoside (AG) that contains isopropyl methylphenol (IPMP) on skin symptoms and S. aureus levels. Eczema of the hand and the presence of S. aureus on the skin surface were analysed prior to and following 4 weeks of usage of the hand cleanser. A soap-based hand cleanser with IPMP was used as a reference cleanser. Eczema and cutaneous conditions were evaluated by visual grading, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum moisture-retention ability (MRA) and skin surface pH. The repeated use of the soap-based hand cleanser significantly worsened the hand dryness, scaling and cracks on the tips of the fingers and significantly increased the TEWL and decreased the MRA. In contrast, usage of the test cleanser only induced a significant increase in skin dryness but did not induce skin scaling or cracking and did not increase TEWL or decrease the MRA. Corresponding to these changes in skin symptoms, the presence of S. aureus increased the following use of the reference cleanser but not the test cleanser. There was no significant difference in skin surface pH between the two cleansers. Moreover, the increase in S. aureus was significantly correlated to the worsening of skin dryness and scaling. These results suggest that not only antimicrobial activity but also the mildness, which minimizes cutaneous effects

  2. Temporal fluctuations in grain size, organic materials and iron concentrations in intertidal surface sediment of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomson-Becker, E. A.; Luoma, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of the oxidized surface sediment in an estuary fluctuate temporally in response to physical forces and apparently-fluctuating inputs. These characteristics, which include grain size and concentrations of organic materials and iron, will influence both trace-metal geochemistry and bioavailability. Temporal trends in the abundance of fine particles, total organic carbon content (TOC), absorbance of extractable organic material (EOM), and concentration of extractable iron in the sediment of San Francisco Bay were assessed using data sets containing approximately monthly samples for periods of two to seven years. Changes in wind velocity and runoff result in monthly changes in the abundance of fine particles in the intertidal zone. Fine-grained particles are most abundant in the late fall/early winter when runoff is elevated and wind velocities are low; particles are coarser in the summer when runoff is low and wind velocities are consistently high. Throughout the bay, TOC is linearly related to fine particle abundance (r = 0.61). Temporal variability occurs in this relationship, as particles are poor in TOC relative to percent of fine particles in the early rainy season. Iron-poor particles also appear to enter the estuary during high runoff periods; while iron is enriched on particle surfaces in the summer. Concentrations of extractable iron and absorbance of EOM vary strongly from year to year. Highest absorbances of EOM occurred in the first year following the drought in 1976-77, and in 1982 and 1983 when river discharge was unusually high. Extractable-iron concentrations were also highest in 1976-77, but were very low in 1982 and 1983. ?? 1985 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  3. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B at femtomolar levels with a miniature integrated two-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor.

    PubMed

    Naimushin, Alexei N; Soelberg, Scott D; Nguyen, Di K; Dunlap, Lucinda; Bartholomew, Dwight; Elkind, Jerry; Melendez, Jose; Furlong, Clement E

    2002-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors offer the capability for continuous real-time monitoring. The commercial instruments available have been large in size, expensive, and not amenable to field applications. We report here an SPR sensor system based on a prototype two-channel system similar to the single channel Spreeta devices. This system is an ideal candidate for field use. The two-channel design provides a reference channel to compensate for bulk refractive index (RI), non-specific binding and temperature variations. The SPR software includes a calibration function that normalizes the response from both channels, thus enabling accurate referencing. In addition, a temperature-controlled enclosure utilizing a thermo-electric module based on the Peltier effect provides the temperature stability necessary for accurate measurements of RI. The complete SPR sensor system can be powered by a 12V battery. Pre-functionalized, disposable, gold-coated thin glass slides provide easily renewable sensor elements for the system. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), a small protein toxin was directly detectable at sub-nanomolar levels and with amplification at femtomolar levels. A regeneration procedure for the sensor surface allowed for over 60 direct detection cycles in a 1-month period.

  4. The effects of diode laser on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide adherent to titanium oxide surface of dental implants. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This in vitro study aims at providing the experimental basis for possible use of diode laser (λ 808 nm) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was grown for 48 h on titanium discs with porous surface corresponding to the bone-implant interface and then irradiated with a diode laser (λ 808 nm) in noncontact mode with airflow cooling for 1 min using a Ø 600-μm fiber. Setting parameters were 2 W (400 J/cm(2)) for continuous wave mode; 22 μJ, 20 kHz, 7 μs (88 J/cm(2)) for pulsed wave mode. Bactericidal effect was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and counting the residual colony-forming units. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, the titanium discs were coated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), laser-irradiated and seeded with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Diode laser irradiation in both continuous and pulsed modes induced a statistically significant reduction of viable bacteria and nitrite levels. These results indicate that in addition to its bactericidal effect laser irradiation can also inhibit LPS-induced macrophage activation and thus blunt the inflammatory response. The λ 808-nm diode laser emerges as a valuable tool for decontamination/detoxification of the titanium implant surface and may be used in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

  5. On the Chemical Synthesis and Physical Properties of Iron Pyrite, Especially the (100) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, Hector Alexander

    Given that iron pyrite (cubic FeS2, fool's gold) is a semiconductor with a ˜1 eV band gap, it has long been investigated for use in technological applications, especially photovoltaics. Unfortunately, numerous measurements indicate that it's properties, as currently synthesized at least, do not allow for effective devices. Photovoltages far below theoretical expectation are found as well as below band gap optical absorption. From a scientific standpoint, our understanding of the cause of these observations, the form of the density of states for instance, remains mired in uncertainty. In this work we have attempted to gain insight into this problem by creating ensembles of pyrite nanocrystals that can then be treated and measured with well-developed wet-chemical nanocrystal techniques. Specifically, we interpret the existing literature to advocate that the surface states of this material dominate its observed electrical properties. In an effort to better understand the most prevalent surface, the (100) face, we developed a synthesis that nucleates small (< 20 nm) pyrite nanoparticles and then changes chemical conditions to grow all other faces besides {100} to extinction, creating ˜37 nm nanocubes. The optical properties of these nanocubes are measured and the phenomenon of resonance light scattering (RLS) is observed. This phenomenon, along with the poor colloidal dispersibility of these nanocubes is then used to promote the idea that an unusual dynamic electronic phenomenon exists on these surfaces. This phenomenon is found to be passivated by introducing charged ligands to the surfaces of these particles. Additionally, after this surface treatment, two very sharp absorption features are observed at 0.73 and 0.88 eV. In connection with recent theoretical work, these transitions are taken as evidence that the (100) surface of pyrite is spin-polarized with each absorption peak being the signal of band edge absorption across a spin-selected direct band gap. A

  6. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Independent Cases of Bacteremia Display Increased Bacterial Fitness and Novel Immune Evasion Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R. L.; Haigh, R. D.; Pascoe, B.; Sheppard, S. K.; Price, F.; Jenkins, D.; Rajakumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion. PMID:26056388

  7. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two independent cases of bacteremia display increased bacterial fitness and novel immune evasion phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Richards, R L; Haigh, R D; Pascoe, B; Sheppard, S K; Price, F; Jenkins, D; Rajakumar, K; Morrissey, J A

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion.

  8. Influence of different synthesis approach on doping behavior of silver nanoparticles onto the iron oxide-silica coreshell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmed, Norsuria; Jiang, Hua; Heczko, Oleg; Söderberg, Outi; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2012-08-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles with the crystallite size ranging from 13-24 nm were successfully doped onto the surface of iron oxide-silica coreshell particles. In the process, iron oxide particles having a size distribution within 8-19 nm were prepared by using a reverse co-precipitation method followed by the formation of iron oxide-core with silica shell (with 50-150 nm diameter of silica spheres) by using a modified Stöber method. The reduction of Ag ions was done at room temperature in a solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone and ethanol by using mechanical and ultrasonic mixing. Four different synthesis approaches were used in doping of Ag nanoparticles. The phase, morphology, optical and magnetic properties of the synthesized powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope, UV-visible spectrometer (UV-Vis) and vibrating sample magnetometer. Spherical morphology of the Ag nanoparticles was found to deposit on the iron oxide-silica surfaces. The particle size distribution is depending on the synthesis approach used. The UV-Vis absorption peak at 404-410 nm of wavelength confirmed the existence of the Ag nanoparticles.

  9. The Effect of Sputtering Parameters and Doping of Copper on Surface Free Energy and Magnetic Properties of Iron and Iron Nitride Nano Thin Films on Polymer Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Waheed; Wang, Qun; Jin, Xin; Feng, Tangfeng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to deposit thin films on PET polymer substrate and examine the functional properties systematically. Their properties have been studied as a function of the N2-Ar flow rates, deposition time span and Cu doping. Iron nitride film deposited on both sides exhibits ferromagnetic phases, γ′-Fe4N and ε-Fe3N co-existed, shows negligible magnetic anisotropy. Other samples show the evolution of N-rich (FeN, Fe2N) and N-poor (Fe16N2, Fe3N, Fe4N) phases under different deposition time conditions. XPS analysis and free energy calculations confirmed that co-sputtered Fe-Cu thin films are more stable than layer deposited counterparts. From VSM results it is evident that the dominant phase, changes steadily from the ferromagnetic α-Fe (N) to the paramagnetic ξ-Fe2N with the increase of nitrogen flow rates and the ordering of the nitrogen atoms. Binding energy increases steadily from 733 eV to 740 eV with the increasing thickness of thin films from 74 nm to 94 nm. It was observed that surface energy decreases as the contact angle of glycol increases and changes the thin film surface from polar to nonpolar. TEM images indicate that cubic γ′-Fe4N and ε-Fe3N nano particles oriented in preferred directions dispersed uniformly in the amorphous iron nitride matrix. PMID:28772577

  10. The Effect of Sputtering Parameters and Doping of Copper on Surface Free Energy and Magnetic Properties of Iron and Iron Nitride Nano Thin Films on Polymer Substrate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waheed; Wang, Qun; Jin, Xin; Feng, Tangfeng

    2017-02-22

    The objective of this study was to deposit thin films on PET polymer substrate and examine the functional properties systematically. Their properties have been studied as a function of the N₂-Ar flow rates, deposition time span and Cu doping. Iron nitride film deposited on both sides exhibits ferromagnetic phases, γ'-Fe₄N and ε-Fe₃N co-existed, shows negligible magnetic anisotropy. Other samples show the evolution of N-rich (FeN, Fe₂N) and N-poor (Fe16N₂, Fe₃N, Fe₄N) phases under different deposition time conditions. XPS analysis and free energy calculations confirmed that co-sputtered Fe-Cu thin films are more stable than layer deposited counterparts. From VSM results it is evident that the dominant phase, changes steadily from the ferromagnetic α-Fe (N) to the paramagnetic ξ-Fe₂N with the increase of nitrogen flow rates and the ordering of the nitrogen atoms. Binding energy increases steadily from 733 eV to 740 eV with the increasing thickness of thin films from 74 nm to 94 nm. It was observed that surface energy decreases as the contact angle of glycol increases and changes the thin film surface from polar to nonpolar. TEM images indicate that cubic γ'-Fe₄N and ε-Fe₃N nano particles oriented in preferred directions dispersed uniformly in the amorphous iron nitride matrix.

  11. Surface ocean iron fertilization: The role of airborne volcanic ash from subduction zone and hot spot volcanoes and related iron fluxes into the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgun, Nazlı; Duggen, Svend; Croot, Peter Leslie; Delmelle, Pierre; Dietze, Heiner; Schacht, Ulrike; Óskarsson, Niels; Siebe, Claus; Auer, Andreas; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Surface ocean iron (Fe) fertilization can affect the marine primary productivity (MPP), thereby impacting on CO2 exchanges at the atmosphere-ocean interface and eventually on climate. Mineral (aeolian or desert) dust is known to be a major atmospheric source for the surface ocean biogeochemical iron cycle, but the significance of volcanic ash is poorly constrained. We present the results of geochemical experiments aimed at determining the rapid release of Fe upon contact of pristine volcanic ash with seawater, mimicking their dry deposition into the surface ocean. Our data show that volcanic ash from both subduction zone and hot spot volcanoes (n = 44 samples) rapidly mobilized significant amounts of soluble Fe into seawater (35-340 nmol/g ash), with a suggested global mean of 200 ± 50 nmol Fe/g ash. These values are comparable to the range for desert dust in experiments at seawater pH (10-125 nmol Fe/g dust) presented in the literature (Guieu et al., 1996; Spokes et al., 1996). Combining our new Fe release data with the calculated ash flux from a selected major eruption into the ocean as a case study demonstrates that single volcanic eruptions have the potential to significantly increase the surface ocean Fe concentration within an ash fallout area. We also constrain the long-term (millennial-scale) airborne volcanic ash and mineral dust Fe flux into the Pacific Ocean by merging the Fe release data with geological flux estimates. These show that the input of volcanic ash into the Pacific Ocean (128-221 × 1015 g/ka) is within the same order of magnitude as the mineral dust input (39-519 × 1015 g/ka) (Mahowald et al., 2005). From the similarity in both Fe release and particle flux follows that the flux of soluble Fe related to the dry deposition of volcanic ash (3-75 × 109 mol/ka) is comparable to that of mineral dust (1-65 × 109 mol/ka). Our study therefore suggests that airborne volcanic ash is an important but hitherto underestimated atmospheric source for

  12. Evolution of the Fermi surface topology in doped 122 iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lihua; Li, Jian; Tai, Yuan-Yen; Graf, Matthias J.; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Ting, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the minimum two-orbital model and the phase diagram recently proposed by Tai [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/103/67001 103, 67001 (2013)] for both electron- and hole-doped 122 iron-based superconducting compounds, we use the Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations to perform a comprehensive investigation of the evolution of the Fermi surface (FS) topology in the presence of the collinear spin-density-wave (SDW) order as the doping is changed. In the parent compound, the ground state is the SDW order, where the FS is not completely gapped, and two types of Dirac cones, one electron-doped and the other hole-doped emerge in the magnetic Brillouin zone. Our findings are qualitatively consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and magnetoresistivity measurements. We also examine the FS evolution of both electron- and hole-doped cases and compare them with measurements, as well as with those obtained by other model Hamiltonians.

  13. Real-time redox speciation of iron in estuarine and coastal surface waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhu, Yong; Feng, Sichao

    2015-03-17

    An automated, shipboard-use system was developed for real-time speciation of iron in coastal surface waters. It comprised a towed Fish underway sampler and a modified reverse flow injection analysis system with a liquid waveguide capillary flow cell-spectrophotometric detection device. The detection was based on the reaction between ferrozine and Fe(II). The detection limits of 0.3 and 0.7 nM were achieved for Fe(II) and Fe(II+III), together with their respective dynamic linear ranges of 0.5-250 and 0.9-250 nM. The system was successfully deployed and run consecutively for about 1 week during a cruise in August 2009 to the East China Sea off the Changjiang Estuary. The distribution of operationally defined field dissolvable Fe(II) and Fe(II+III) (expressed as Fea(II) and Fea(II+III)) in these areas was obtained, which showed that both Fea(II) and Fea(II+III) concentrations decreased with salinity when there were relatively high Fea(II) concentrations (up to about 120 nM) near shore. A distinct distribution of Fea(II) to Fea(II+III) ratios was also revealed, with a ratio of 0.58 in the water off Changjiang Estuary and 0.19 in the open ocean.

  14. Carbonyl iron powder surface modification of magnetorheological elastomers for vibration absorbing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Yu, Miao; Zhu, Mi; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    With excellent characteristic of magnetic-control stiffness, magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) is well suited as a spring element of vibration absorber. To improve the vibration attenuation performance of MRE vibration absorbers, this paper expects to improve the mechanical strength and reduce the loss factor of MRE by interface modification. The surface of carbonyl iron powder (CIP) was modified with silica coating by a simple and convenient approach. Several MRE samples, with different proportions of modified CIPs were fabricated under a constant magnetic field. The morphology and composition of modified CIP were characterized by scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The results indicated that the modified CIPs were coated with uniform and continuous silica, which can make a better combination between particle and matrix. The tensile strength, magnetorheological properties and the damping properties of the MRE samples were tested by material testing machine and rheometer. The experimental results demonstrated that the loss factor of the MRE which incorporated with modified CIPs decreased markedly, and the tensile strength of such material has been much improved, at the same time this kind of MRE kept high MR effect. It is expected that this MRE material will meet the requirements of vibration absorber.

  15. Characteristic two-dimensional Fermi surface topology of high-Tc iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Ishiga, Toshihiko; Tsubota, Koji; Jabuchi, Taihei; Sonoyama, Junki; Iba, Keita; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nohara, Minoru; Ono, Kanta; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2014-03-14

    Unconventional Cooper pairing originating from spin or orbital fluctuations has been proposed for iron-based superconductors. Such pairing may be enhanced by quasi-nesting of two-dimensional electron and hole-like Fermi surfaces (FS), which is considered an important ingredient for superconductivity at high critical temperatures (high-Tc). However, the dimensionality of the FS varies for hole and electron-doped systems, so the precise importance of this feature for high-Tc materials remains unclear. Here we demonstrate a phase of electron-doped CaFe2As2 (La and P co-doped CaFe2As2) with Tc = 45 K, which is the highest Tc found for the AEFe2As2 bulk superconductors (122-type; AE = Alkaline Earth), possesses only cylindrical hole- and electron-like FSs. This result indicates that FS topology consisting only of two-dimensional sheets is characteristic of both hole- and electron-doped 122-type high-Tc superconductors.

  16. Cell-surface signaling in Pseudomonas: stress responses, iron transport, and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Llamas, María A; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo; Lamont, Iain L

    2014-07-01

    Membrane-spanning signaling pathways enable bacteria to alter gene expression in response to extracytoplasmic stimuli. Many such pathways are cell-surface signaling (CSS) systems, which are tripartite molecular devices that allow Gram-negative bacteria to transduce an extracellular stimulus into a coordinated transcriptional response. Typically, CSS systems are composed of the following: (1) an outer membrane receptor, which senses the extracellular stimulus; (2) a cytoplasmic membrane-spanning protein involved in signal transduction from the periplasm to the cytoplasm; and (3) an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor that initiates expression of the stimulus-responsive gene(s). Members of genus Pseudomonas provide a paradigmatic example of how CSS systems contribute to the global control of gene expression. Most CSS systems enable self-regulated uptake of iron via endogenous (pyoverdine) or exogenous (xenosiderophores, heme, and citrate) carriers. Some are also implicated in virulence, biofilm formation, and cell-cell interactions. Incorporating insights from the well-characterized alginate regulatory circuitry, this review will illustrate common themes and variations at the level of structural and functional properties of Pseudomonas CSS systems. Control of the expression and activity of ECF sigma factors are central to gene regulation via CSS, and the variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing these processes will be discussed.

  17. Fermi surface deformation in a simple iron-based superconductor, FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, Amalia; Watson, Matthew; Kim, Timur; Haghighirad, Amir; McCollam, Alix; Hoesch, Moritz; Schofield, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field superconductivity is the identification of the normal state out of which superconductivity emerges. FeSe is one of the simplest and most intriguing iron-based superconductors, since in its bulk form it undergoes a structural transition before it becomes superconducting, whereas its single-layer form is believed to be a high-temperature superconductor. The nature of the structural transition, occurring in the absence of static magnetism, is rather unusual and how the electronic structure is stabilized by breaking of the rotational symmetry is the key to understand the superconductivity in bulk FeSe. Here we report angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on FeSe that gives direct access to the band structure and orbital-dependent effects. We complement our studies on bulk FeSe with low-temperature angular-dependent quantum oscillation measurements using applied magnetic fields that are sufficiently strong to suppress superconductivity and reach the normal state. These studies reveal a strong deformation of Fermi surface through the structural transition driven by electronic correlations and orbital-dependent effects. . This work was supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1), Diamond Light Source, UK and HFML, Nijmegen.

  18. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  19. Displaying structural property and inheritance of cast iron surfacing on steel base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shveev, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite inclusions heredity in deposited layer from remelted special cast iron billets was established. The possibility of controlling the structural state and the quality of the deposited layer due to technological parameters of welding and heat treatment of parts is shown. Ways of improving cast iron wear resistance durability are proposed.

  20. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  1. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  2. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  3. Structural Studies of Liquid Surface Self-Assembled Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Jacob

    The phenomenon of self--assembly has become increasingly relevant due to the role it can play in nanofabrication and the emergence of macro-scale structure. This phenomenon has been seen in a broad range of material systems. For example, iron oxide nanoparticles undergo self-assembly into well-ordered monolayer films of macroscopic size at an air-water interface. It is this system that is the topic of the work herein. The self-assembly process is the result of the van der Waals forces between the constituent particles. For roughly spherical particles the monolayer is a 2D hexagonal close packed lattice. Using a variety of X-Ray scattering techniques including Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction (GID), X-Ray Reflectivity (XR), and Grazing Incidence X-Ray Off-Specular Scattering (GIXOS) the structure of some of the emergent characteristics of these films is studied. Namely, the microscale multilayering that occurs when these films are laterally compressed, exhibits varying morphologies which depend on the size of the constituent particles. Additionally, when these films are formed from bi-dispersed mixtures containing 10 and 20 nm particles, the particles phase separate into well--ordered patches during the self-assembly process. The domain sizes of these phase separated regions are at most a factor of 2-3 times smaller than that of a film comprising only mono-dispersed particles, and their degree of disorder is comparable. Finally, using these iron oxide nanoparticle monolayers as a test system, a novel analysis is demonstrated that allows a direct comparison between Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of ex-situ films and GID measurements of in-situ films: the results demonstrate that structural information comparable to that contained in the GID measurements can be obtained by Fourier transform analysis of the SEM images taken of the film after it has been transferred to a silicon substrate. Furthermore this comparison suggests that the Langmuir-Schaefer method of

  4. Surface catalysis of uranium(VI) reduction by iron(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger, Emmanuelle; Charlet, Laurent; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    1999-10-01

    Colloidal hematite (α-Fe2O3) is used as model solid to investigate the kinetic effect of specific adsorption interactions on the chemical reduction of uranyl (UVIO22+) by ferrous iron. Acid-base titrations and Fe(II) and uranyl adsorption experiments are performed on hematite suspensions, under O2- and CO2-free conditions. The results are explained in terms of a constant capacitance surface complexation model of the hematite-aqueous solution interface. Two distinct Fe(II) surface complexes are required to reproduce the data: (≡FeIIIOFeII)+ (or ≡FeIIIOFeII(OH2)n+) and ≡FeIIIOFeIIOH0 (or ≡FeIIIOFeII(OH2)n-1OH0). The latter complex represents a significant fraction of total adsorbed Fe(II) at pH > 6.5. Uranyl binding to the hematite particles is characterized by a sharp adsorption edge between pH 4 and pH 5.5. Because of the absence of competing aqueous carbonate complexes, uranyl remains completely adsorbed at pH > 7. A single mononuclear surface complex accounts for the adsorption of uranyl over the entire range of experimental conditions. Although thermodynamically feasible, no reaction between uranyl and Fe(II) is observed in homogeneous solution at pH 7.5, for periods of up to three days. In hematite suspensions, however, surface-bound uranyl reacts on a time scale of hours. Based on Fourier Transformed Infrared spectra, chemical reduction of U(VI) is inferred to be the mechanism responsible for the disappearance of uranyl. The kinetics of uranyl reduction are quantified by measuring the decrease with time of the concentration of U(VI) extractable from the hematite particles by NaHCO3. In the presence of excess Fe(II), the initial rate of U(VI) reduction exhibits a first-order dependence on the concentration of adsorbed uranyl. The pseudo-first-order rate constant varies with pH (range, 6-7.5) and the total (dissolved + adsorbed) concentration of Fe(II) (range, 2-160 μM). When analyzing the rate data in terms of the calculated surface speciation, the

  5. Cobalt and iron segregation and nitride formation from nitrogen plasma treatment of CoFeB surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, E. C.; Michalak, D. J.; Veyan, J. F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2017-02-01

    Cobalt-iron-boron (CoFeB) thin films are the industry standard for ferromagnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junction devices and are closely related to the relevant surfaces of CoFe-based catalysts. Identifying and understanding the composition of their surfaces under relevant processing conditions is therefore critical. Here we report fundamental studies on the interaction of nitrogen plasma with CoFeB surfaces using infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and low energy ion scattering. We find that, upon exposure to nitrogen plasma, clean CoFeB surfaces spontaneously reorganize to form an overlayer comprised of Fe2N3 and BN, with the Co atoms moved well below the surface through a chemically driven process. Subsequent annealing to 400 °C removes nitrogen, resulting in a Fe-rich termination of the surface region.

  6. Longitudinal study of the contamination of air and of soil surfaces in the vicinity of pig barns by livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jochen; Friese, Anika; Klees, Sylvia; Tenhagen, Bernd A; Fetsch, Alexandra; Rösler, Uwe; Hartung, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    During 1 year, samples were taken on 4 days, one sample in each season, from pigs, the floor, and the air inside pig barns and from the ambient air and soil at different distances outside six commercial livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA)-positive pig barns in the north and east of Germany. LA-MRSA was isolated from animals, floor, and air samples in the barn, showing a range of airborne LA-MRSA between 6 and 3,619 CFU/m(3) (median, 151 CFU/m(3)). Downwind of the barns, LA-MRSA was detected in low concentrations (11 to 14 CFU/m(3)) at distances of 50 and 150 m; all upwind air samples were negative. In contrast, LA-MRSA was found on soil surfaces at distances of 50, 150, and 300 m downwind from all barns, but no statistical differences could be observed between the proportions of positive soil surface samples at the three different distances. Upwind of the barns, positive soil surface samples were found only sporadically. Significantly more positive LA-MRSA samples were found in summer than in the other seasons both in air and soil samples upwind and downwind of the pig barns. spa typing was used to confirm the identity of LA-MRSA types found inside and outside the barns. The results show that there is regular airborne LA-MRSA transmission and deposition, which are strongly influenced by wind direction and season, of up to at least 300 m around positive pig barns. The described boot sampling method seems suitable to characterize the contamination of the vicinity of LA-MRSA-positive pig barns by the airborne route.

  7. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to the Surface of a Reticular Heavyweight Polypropylene Mesh Soaked in a Combination of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Bayon, Yves; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Presoaking meshes for hernia repair with antiseptics prior to implantation could decrease the adhesion of microorganisms to the material surface and reduce the risk of antibiotic resistances. In this work, we evaluate chlorhexidine and allicin (natural antiseptic not yet tested for these purposes) against vancomycin as antiseptics to be used in the pretreatment of a heavyweight polypropylene mesh using an in vitro model of bacterial contamination. Solutions of saline, vancomycin (40 µg/mL), allicin (1,000 µg/mL), chlorhexidine (2%-0.05%) and the combination allicin-chlorhexidine (900 µg/mL-0.05%) were analyzed with agar diffusion tests in the presence of 106 CFU Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923. Additionally, sterile fragments of Surgipro (1 cm2) were soaked with the solutions and cultured onto contaminated agar plates for 24/48/72 h. The antimicrobial material DualMesh Plus was utilized as positive control. At every time, the inhibition zones were measured and the bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface quantified (sonication, scanning electron microscopy). Cytotoxicity of the treatments was examined (alamarBlue) using rabbit skin fibroblasts. The largest zones of inhibition were created by allicin-chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine was more effective than vancomycin, and allicin lost its effectiveness after 24 h. No bacteria adhered to the surface of the DualMesh Plus or the meshes soaked with vancomycin, chlorhexidine and allicin-chlorhexidine. On the contrary, saline and allicin allowed adherence of high loads of bacteria. Vancomycin had no toxic effects on fibroblasts, while allicin and chlorhexidine exerted high toxicity. Cytotoxicity was significantly reduced with the allicin-chlorhexidine combination. The use of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, alone or combined with others like allicin, could represent an adequate prophylactic strategy to be used for hernia repair materials because soaking with these agents provides the mesh with similar antibacterial

  8. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-03-30

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin's activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types.

  9. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A.D.; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin’s activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types. PMID:27043625

  10. Environmental application of millimeter-scale sponge iron (s-Fe(0)) particles (II): the effect of surface copper.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Runlong; Li, Guohua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yanyan; Wei, Dongyang; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-04-28

    To enhance the catalytic reactivity of millimeter-scale particles of sponge iron (s-Fe(0)), Cu(2+) ions were deposited on the surface of s-Fe(0) using a simple direct reduction reaction, and the catalytic properties of the bimetallic system was tested for removal of rhodamine B (RhB) from an aqueous solution. The influence of Cu(0) loading, catalyst dosage, particle size, initial RhB concentration, and initial pH were investigated, and the recyclability of the catalyst was also assessed. The results demonstrate that the 3∼5 millimeter s-Fe(0) particles (s-Fe(0)(3∼5mm)) with 5wt% Cu loading gave the best results. The removal of RhB followed two-step, pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. Cu(0)-s-Fe(0) showed excellent stability after five reuse cycles. Cu(0)-s-Fe(0) possesses great advantages compared to nanoscale zero-valent iron, iron power, and iron flakes as well as its bimetals. The surface Cu(0) apparently catalyzes the production of reactive hydrogen atoms for indirect reaction and generates Fe-Cu galvanic cells that enhance electron transfer for direct reaction. This bimetallic catalyst shows great potential for the pre-treatment of recalcitrant wastewaters. Additionally, some oxides containing iron element are selected to simulate the adsorption process. The results prove that the adsorption process of FeOOH, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 played minor role for the removal of RhB.

  11. Bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles for groundwater decontamination: effect of groundwater constituents on surface deactivation.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2014-12-01

    The incorporation of catalytic metals on iron nanoparticles to form bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) generates a class of highly reactive materials for degrading chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, TCE) in groundwater. Successful implementation of BNPs to groundwater decontamination relies critically on the stability of surface reactive sites of BNPs in groundwater matrices. This study investigated the effect of common groundwater solutes on TCE reduction with Ni-Fe (with Ni at 2 wt.%) bimetallic nanoparticles (herein denoted as Ni-Fe BNPs). Batch experiments involving pre-exposing the nanoparticles to various groundwater solutions for 24 h followed by reactions with TCE solutions were conducted. The results suggest that the deactivation behavior of Ni-Fe BNPs differs significantly from that of the well-studied Pd-Fe BNPs. Specifically, Ni-Fe BNPs were chemically stable in pure water. Mild reduction in TCE reaction rates were observed for Ni-Fe BNPs pre-exposed to chloride (Cl(-)), bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), sulfite (SO3(2-)) and humic acid solutions. Nitrate (NO3(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)) and phosphate (HPO4(2-)) may cause moderate to severe deactivation at elevated concentrations (>1 mM). Product analysis and surface chemistry investigations using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) reveal that NO3(-) decreased particle reactivity mainly due to progressive formation of passivating oxides, whereas SO4(2-) and phosphate elicited rapid deactivation as a result of specific poisoning of the surface nickel sites. At similar levels, phosphate is the most potent deactivation agent among the solutes examined in this study. While our findings point out the desirable quality of Ni-Fe nanoparticles, particularly their greater electrochemical stability compared to Pd-Fe BNPs, its susceptibility to chemical poisoning at high levels of complexing ligands is also noted. Groundwater chemistry is therefore an important factor to consider when

  12. Iron Sulfides and Sulfur Species Produced at (001) Hematite Surfaces in the Presence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David E.; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (a-Fe2O3) dissolution is affected and hydrogen sulfide, the product of sulfate reduction is released. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H2S to form insoluble iron sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies consistent with the iron sulfides having a pyrrhotite structure (Fe2p3/2 708.4 eV; S2p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. X-ray diffraction suggests an unidentifiable crystal structure at the hematite surface develops within 3 months, HRTEM confirms the presence of a hexagonal structure again suggesting the formation of pyrrhotite. The identification of pyrrhotite is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969; Herbert et al 1998). The apparent differences in stoiciometries may be related to the availability of Fe2+(aq.) at the mineral surface through respiratory iron reduction by subsurface bacteria. The significance of pyrrhotite and polysulfide production in relation to the S- and Fe-cycles and to trace metal bioavailability is discussed.

  13. Optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser melting of gray cast iron at different spot sizes for enhanced surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhishamuddin, A. R.; Aqida, S. N.; Rahim, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of gray cast iron using different laser spot size with an aims to eliminate graphite phase and achieve minimum surface roughness and maximum depth of molten zone and microhardness properties. The laser processing was conducted using JK300HPS Nd:YAG twin lamp laser source pulse TEM00 mode, 50 W average power, 1064 nm wavelength and different laser spot sizes of 1.0 mm, 1.2 mm, 1.4 mm and 1.7 mm. Three controlled parameter were peak power (Pp), pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and traverse speed (v). Increasing spot size the parameter setting where peak power is increased and pulse repetition frequency and traverse speed is decreased. The modified surface of laser surface melting was characterized for metallographic study, surface roughness and hardness. Metallographic study and surface morphology were conducted using optical microscope while hardness properties were measured using Vickers scale. Surface roughness was measured using a 2D stylus profilometer. From metallographic study, the graphite phase was totally eliminated from the molten zone and formed white zone. This phenomenon affected hardness properties of the modified surface where maximum hardness of 955.8 HV0.1 achieved. Optimization of laser surface modification was conducted for minimum surface roughness and maximum depth of modified layer and hardness properties. From the optimization, the higher desirability is 0.902. The highest depth of molten zone obtain from spot size 1.4 mm at 132 µm and the highest hardness is 989 HV0.1 at laser's spot size 1.0 mm. The surface roughness increased when the spot size increased from 3.10 µm to 7.31 µm. These finding indicate potential application of enhanced gray cast iron in high wear resistance automotive components such as cylinder liner and break disc.

  14. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  15. Investigation of the tribology behaviour of the graphene nanosheets as oil additives on textured alloy cast iron surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dan; Cai, Zhen-bing; Shen, Ming-xue; Li, Zheng-yang; Zhu, Min-hao

    2016-11-01

    Tribological properties of graphene nanosheets (GNS) as lubricating oil additives on textured surfaces were investigated using a UMT-2 tribotester. The lubricating fluids keeping a constant temperature of 100 °C were applied to a GCr15 steel ball and an RTCr2 alloy cast iron plate with various texture designs (original surface, dimple density of 22.1%, 19.6% and 44.2%). The oil with GNS adding showed good tribological properties (wear reduced 50%), especially on the textured surfaces (the reduction in wear was high at over 90%). A combined effect between GNS additives and laser surface texturing (LST) was revealed, which is not a simple superposition of the two factors mentioned. A mechanism is proposed to explain for these results -the graphene layers sheared at the sliding contact interfaces, and form a protective film, which is closely related with the GNS structures and surface texture patterns.

  16. Carbon disulfide mediated self-assembly of Laccase and iron oxide nanoparticles on gold surfaces for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Almeida, I; Henriques, F; Carvalho, M D; Viana, A S

    2017-01-01

    A simple one-step methodology was explored to prepare enzyme-modified nanostructured electrodes for the development of biosensing interfaces. Magnetite type nanoparticles conjugated with Laccase were immobilized on gold surfaces. This approach relies on the reaction between carbon disulfide and amine groups of biomolecules to form dithiocarbamate (DTC) moieties, as well as on the strong affinity between sulfur species and metals. Special emphasis was given to demonstrate DTC formation in aqueous solution and further attachment to iron oxide nanoparticles and to gold electrodes. UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed the functionalization of nanoparticles by DTC using a model secondary amine (N-hexylmethylamine). The direct attachment of modified iron oxide nanoparticles (with ca. 20 or 40nm mean sizes) to gold electrodes was investigated using the hormone epinephrine, with well-known electrochemical properties. A high amount of immobilized epinephrine and a facilitated redox conversion was observed for modified electrodes containing iron oxide nanoparticles. The success of this simple and robust method was confirmed by X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy. Finally, the catalytic activity of modified gold with iron oxide nanoparticles and Laccase was evaluated toward 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS). Chronoamperometric studies revealed a significant catalytic activity of immobilized Laccase in the presence of the nanoparticles, in particular for the largest ones (40nm), with a sensitivity for ABTS oxidation of 100mAM(-1)cm(-2). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  18. Application of Response Surface Methodology on Leaching of Iron from Partially Laterised Khondalite Rocks: A Bauxite Mining Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ranjita; Bhima Rao, R.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, response surface methodology (RSM) is used for a quadratic model that continuously controls the process parameters. This model is used to optimize the removal of iron oxide from Partially Laterised Khondalite (PLK) rocks which is influenced by several independent variables namely acid concentration, time and temperature. Second order response functions are produced for leaching of iron oxide from PLK rocks-a bauxite mining waste. In RSM, Box-Behnken design is used for the process optimization to achieve maximum removal of iron oxide. The influence of the process variables of leaching of iron oxide is presented in the form of 3-D response graphs. The results of this investigation reveals that 3 M hydrochloric acid concentration, 240 min time and 373 K temperature are found to be the best conditions for removal of 99% Fe2O3. The product obtain at this condition contain 80% brightness which is suitable for ceramic and filler industry applications. The novelity of the work is that the waste can be a value added product after suitable physical beneficiation and chemical treatment.

  19. Environmental application of millimetre-scale sponge iron (s-Fe(0)) particles (III): The effect of surface silver.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Yu, Yunjiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Sukun; Liu, Runlong; Fu, Jianping; Han, Jinglei; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-12-15

    To enhance the dechlorination reactivity of millimetric sponge iron (s-Fe(0)), a facile one-pot method was used to decorate s-Fe(0) with Ag(+) ions under ambient conditions. The results recorded by X-ray diffraction patterns, X-ray photoelectron spectra and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the growth of Ag(0) was dominated primarily by (111) plane with a mean length of ∼20 nm. The roles of Ag(0) loading, catalyst dosage, particle size, initial pH and contaminant concentration were assessed during the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP). Catalyst recyclability was also studied. The results revealed that 3-5mm s-Fe(0) particles with 5 wt% Ag(0) loading exhibited the best performance with a dose of 3.0 g per 60 mL PCP solution. In addition, the dechlorination of PCP followed two-step, pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and Ag(0)-s-Fe(0) was advantageous compared with bimetals of nanoscale zero-valent iron, iron power and iron flakes. The dechlorination mechanism of PCP over Ag(0)-s-Fe(0) was attributed to the surface Ag(0) decoration, which catalyzed the formation of reactive hydrogen atoms for indirect reaction, and the direct electron transfer via Fe-Ag(0) galvanic cells for direct reaction. This suggests that Ag-based bimetals of s-Fe(0) have great potential in the pretreatment of organic halogen compounds in aqueous solution.

  20. The Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surface Charge on Antigen Cross-Presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yongbin; Xing, Yun; Ren, Hongyan; Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guangjie; Urba, Walter J.; Hu, Qingang; Hu, Hongming

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have been explored for different kinds of applications in biomedicine, mechanics, and information. Here, we explored the synthetic SPIO NPs as an adjuvant on antigen cross-presentation ability by enhancing the intracellular delivery of antigens into antigen presenting cells (APCs). Particles with different chemical modifications and surface charges were used to study the mechanism of action of antigen delivery. Specifically, two types of magnetic NPs, γFe2O3/APTS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) NPs and γFe2O3/DMSA (meso-2, 3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid) NPs, with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution were prepared. Then, the promotion of T-cell activation via dendritic cells (DCs) was compared among different charged antigen coated NPs. Moreover, the activation of the autophagy, cytosolic delivery of the antigens, and antigen degradation mediated by the proteasome and lysosome were measured. Our results indicated that positive charged γFe2O3/APTS NPs, but not negative charged γFe2O3/DMSA NPs, enhanced the cross-presentation ability of DCs. Increased cross-presentation ability induced by γFe2O3/APTS NPs was associated with increased cytosolic antigen delivery. On the contrary, γFe2O3/DMSA NPs was associated with rapid autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that antigen delivered in cytoplasm induced by positive charged particles is beneficial for antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. NPs modified with different chemistries exhibit diverse biological properties and differ greatly in their adjuvant potentials. Thus, it should be carefully considered many different effects of NPs to design effective and safe adjuvants.

  1. Improvement of electrochemical activity of LiMnPO4-based cathode by surface iron enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Tao; Bi, Yujing; Liu, Meng; Yang, Wenchao; Peng, Zhe; Wang, Deyu

    2017-02-01

    LiMnPO4 has attracted massive interests due to its appropriate redox potential and the success of its iron comparative in the lithium ion batteries. The bulk substitution has been widely used to address the poor electrochemical activity of LiMnPO4, which is much lower than that of LiFePO4. In this work, we compare the performance of the core-shell structure and the homogeneous substitution with the same Mn/Fe molar ratio of LiMn0.8Fe0.2PO4. The core-shell phosphate material after carbon coating is composed of a core part of quasi-single LiMnPO4 phase, and a 3-4 nm shell layer of quasi-single LiFePO4-phase, separated by the phase boundary with 1-2 nm thickness. It is interesting to reveal that the core-shell samples exhibit capacities of 156.4, 144.5, 128.2 mAh g-1 under 0.1C, 1C and 5C respectively, which are 5-10% higher than that of the homogenous substituted LiMn0.8Fe0.2PO4 at the corresponding rates, while both of these samples present excellent cyclic stability, still retaining ∼95% of the initial capacities after 1000 cycles under 1C discharging rate. Our results demonstrate that the main reason for LiMnPO4's poor electrochemical activity should be emphasized on the surface polarization, whereas the tardiness on bulk transportation is not as serious as it was presumed.

  2. The Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surface Charge on Antigen Cross-Presentation.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongbin; Xing, Yun; Ren, Hongyan; Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guangjie; Urba, Walter J; Hu, Qingang; Hu, Hongming

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have been explored for different kinds of applications in biomedicine, mechanics, and information. Here, we explored the synthetic SPIO NPs as an adjuvant on antigen cross-presentation ability by enhancing the intracellular delivery of antigens into antigen presenting cells (APCs). Particles with different chemical modifications and surface charges were used to study the mechanism of action of antigen delivery. Specifically, two types of magnetic NPs, γFe2O3/APTS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) NPs and γFe2O3/DMSA (meso-2, 3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid) NPs, with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution were prepared. Then, the promotion of T-cell activation via dendritic cells (DCs) was compared among different charged antigen coated NPs. Moreover, the activation of the autophagy, cytosolic delivery of the antigens, and antigen degradation mediated by the proteasome and lysosome were measured. Our results indicated that positive charged γFe2O3/APTS NPs, but not negative charged γFe2O3/DMSA NPs, enhanced the cross-presentation ability of DCs. Increased cross-presentation ability induced by γFe2O3/APTS NPs was associated with increased cytosolic antigen delivery. On the contrary, γFe2O3/DMSA NPs was associated with rapid autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that antigen delivered in cytoplasm induced by positive charged particles is beneficial for antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. NPs modified with different chemistries exhibit diverse biological properties and differ greatly in their adjuvant potentials. Thus, it should be carefully considered many different effects of NPs to design effective and safe adjuvants.

  3. Occurrence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey and broiler barns and contamination of air and soil surfaces in their vicinity.

    PubMed

    Friese, A; Schulz, J; Zimmermann, K; Tenhagen, B-A; Fetsch, A; Hartung, J; Rösler, U

    2013-04-01

    The emission of microorganisms, especially resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from poultry farms is of public interest, and its occurrence and relevance are controversially discussed. So far, there are limited data on this issue. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA inside and outside previously tested MRSA-positive poultry barns in Germany. In total, five turkey and two broiler fattening farms were investigated four and three times, respectively. In a longitudinal study during one fattening period, samples were collected from animals, the animals' environment inside the barn, including the air, and the barns' surroundings, such as ambient air and boot swabs of ground surfaces at different distances from the barn. Moreover, a cross-sectional study was carried out once inside the barns on five turkey and four broiler farms during the last third of the fatting period. In the cross-sectional study, LA-MRSA was detected in the air of most barns (7 of 9, 77.8%), as well as in many samples originating from animals, with detections levels of 50 to 54% in broiler and 62 to 77% in turkey farms. In the longitudinal study, LA-MRSA was found in the ambient air outside two turkey barns and on the ground surface on the downwind side of many (44.4%) turkey and broiler farms. The same spa types of isolates were observed inside and outside the barns. Transmission of MRSA within poultry farms, as well as emission via the airborne route, seems to be possible.

  4. Occurrence of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey and Broiler Barns and Contamination of Air and Soil Surfaces in Their Vicinity

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, J.; Zimmermann, K.; Tenhagen, B.-A.; Fetsch, A.; Hartung, J.; Rösler, U.

    2013-01-01

    The emission of microorganisms, especially resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from poultry farms is of public interest, and its occurrence and relevance are controversially discussed. So far, there are limited data on this issue. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA inside and outside previously tested MRSA-positive poultry barns in Germany. In total, five turkey and two broiler fattening farms were investigated four and three times, respectively. In a longitudinal study during one fattening period, samples were collected from animals, the animals' environment inside the barn, including the air, and the barns' surroundings, such as ambient air and boot swabs of ground surfaces at different distances from the barn. Moreover, a cross-sectional study was carried out once inside the barns on five turkey and four broiler farms during the last third of the fatting period. In the cross-sectional study, LA-MRSA was detected in the air of most barns (7 of 9, 77.8%), as well as in many samples originating from animals, with detections levels of 50 to 54% in broiler and 62 to 77% in turkey farms. In the longitudinal study, LA-MRSA was found in the ambient air outside two turkey barns and on the ground surface on the downwind side of many (44.4%) turkey and broiler farms. The same spa types of isolates were observed inside and outside the barns. Transmission of MRSA within poultry farms, as well as emission via the airborne route, seems to be possible. PMID:23417001

  5. Free radical generation in the toxicity of inhaled mineral particles: the role of iron speciation at the surface of asbestos and silica.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, I; Prandi, L; Tomatis, M; Fubini, B

    2001-01-01

    Free radical generation at the particle/biological fluid interface is one of the chemical processes that contributes to pathogenicity. In order to investigate the role played by iron, fibres of crocidolite asbestos have been modified by thermal treatments to alter their surface iron content. Two radical mechanisms, HO* from H2O2 and cleavage of a C-H bond, which are both active on the original fibres, have been tested on the modified fibres. C-H cleavage is dependent on Fe(II) abundance and location and is suppressed by surface oxidation while HO* release appears independent of the oxidation state of iron. Quartz specimens with different levels of iron impurities have been tested in a similar manner. A commercially available quartz (Min-U-Sil 5) containing trace levels of iron is also active in both tests, but reactivity is not fully suppressed by treatment with desferrioxamine, which should remove/inactivate iron. The radical yield attained is close to the level produced by a pure quartz dust, suggesting the presence of active sites other than iron. Ascorbic acid reacts with both crocidolite and quartz, with subsequent depletion of the level of antioxidant defences when particle deposition occurs in the lung lining layer. Following treatment with ascorbic acid the radical yield increases with quartz, but decreases with asbestos. Selective removal of iron and silicon from the surface may account for the differences in behaviour of the two particulates.

  6. Design and stabilisation of a high area iron molybdate surface for the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Stephanie; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Gibson, Emma K; Wells, Peter P

    2016-07-04

    The performance of Mo-enriched, bulk ferric molybdate, employed commercially for the industrially important reaction of the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde, is limited by a low surface area, typically 5-8 m(2) g(-1). Recent advances in the understanding of the iron molybdate catalyst have focused on the study of MoOx@Fe2O3 (MoOx shell, Fe2O3 core) systems, where only a few overlayers of Mo are present on the surface. This method of preparing MoOx@Fe2O3 catalysts was shown to support an iron molybdate surface of higher surface area than the industrially-favoured bulk phase. In this research, a MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst of even higher surface area was stabilised by modifying a haematite support containing 5 wt% Al dopant. The addition of Al was an important factor for stabilising the haematite surface area and resulted in an iron molybdate surface area of ∼35 m(2) g(-1), around a 5 fold increase on the bulk catalyst. XPS confirmed Mo surface-enrichment, whilst Mo XANES resolved an amorphous MoOx surface monolayer supported on a sublayer of Fe2(MoO4)3 that became increasingly extensive with initial Mo surface loading. The high surface area MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst proved amenable to bulk characterisation techniques; contributions from Fe2(MoO4)3 were detectable by Raman, XAFS, ATR-IR and XRD spectroscopies. The temperature-programmed pulsed flow reaction of methanol showed that this novel, high surface area catalyst (3ML-HSA) outperformed the undoped analogue (3ML-ISA), and a peak yield of 94% formaldehyde was obtained at ∼40 °C below that for the bulk Fe2(MoO4)3 phase. This work demonstrates how core-shell, multi-component oxides offer new routes for improving catalytic performance and understanding catalytic activity.

  7. The role of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Tresintsi, S.; Simeonidis, K.; Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P.; Mitrakas, M.

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO{sub 4} precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3–12). Physically sorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO{sub 4}. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer. - Graphical abstract: An analytical methodology for the accurate quantification of sulfate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the diffuse layer, the Stern layer and the structure of iron oxy-hydroxides used as arsenic removal agents. - Highlights: • Quantification of sulfate ions presence in FeOOH surface compartments. • Preparation pH defines the distribution of sulfates. • XPS and FTIR verify the presence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure, the Stern layer the diffuse layer of FeOOH. • Chemically adsorbed sulfates control the arsenic removal efficiency of iron oxyhydroxides.

  8. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The iron budget in ocean surface waters in the 20th and 21st centuries: projections by the Community Earth System Model version 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, K.; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K.; Doney, S. C.; Bryan, F. O.; Tsumune, D.; Yoshida, Y.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the simulated iron budget in ocean surface waters in the 1990s and 2090s using the Community Earth System Model version 1 and the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 future CO2 emission scenario. We assumed that exogenous iron inputs did not change during the whole simulation period; thus, iron budget changes were attributed solely to changes in ocean circulation and mixing in response to projected global warming. The model simulated the major features of ocean circulation and dissolved iron distribution for the present climate reasonably well. Detailed iron budget analysis revealed that roughly 70% of the iron supplied to surface waters in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions is contributed by ocean circulation and mixing processes, but the dominant supply mechanism differed in each HNLC region: vertical mixing in the Southern Ocean, upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific, and deposition of iron-bearing dust in the subarctic North Pacific. In the 2090s, our model projected an increased iron supply to HNLC surface waters, even though enhanced stratification was predicted to reduce iron entrainment from deeper waters. This unexpected result could be attributed largely to changes in the meridional overturning and gyre-scale circulations that intensified the advective supply of iron to surface waters, especially in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The simulated primary and export productions in the 2090s decreased globally by 6% and 13%, respectively, whereas in the HNLC regions, they increased by 11% and 6%, respectively. Roughly half of the elevated production could be attributed to the intensified iron supply. The projected ocean circulation and mixing changes are consistent with recent observations of responses to the warming climate and with other Coupled Model Intercomparison Project model projections. We conclude that future ocean circulation and mixing changes will likely elevate the iron supply to HNLC surface waters and will

  10. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Hall, G.S.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar.

  11. Molecular analysis of long-term biofilm formation on PVC and cast iron surfaces in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruyin; Zhu, Junge; Yu, Zhisheng; Joshi, DevRaj; Zhang, Hongxun; Lin, Wenfang; Yang, Min

    2014-04-01

    To understand the impacts of different plumbing materials on long-term biofilm formation in water supply system, we analyzed microbial community compositions in the bulk water and biofilms on faucets with two different materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cast iron, which have been frequently used for more than10 years. Pyrosequencing was employed to describe both bacterial and eukaryotic microbial compositions. Bacterial communities in the bulk water and biofilm samples were significantly different from each other. Specific bacterial populations colonized on the surface of different materials. Hyphomicrobia and corrosion associated bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus spp., Aquabacterium spp., Limnobacter thiooxidans, and Thiocapsa spp., were the most dominant bacteria identified in the PVC and cast iron biofilms, respectively, suggesting that bacterial colonization on the material surfaces was selective. Mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were common potential pathogenic bacteria occurred in the biofilm samples, but their abundance was different in the two biofilm bacterial communities. In contrast, the biofilm samples showed more similar eukaryotic communities than the bulk water. Notably, potential pathogenic fungi, i.e., Aspergillus spp. and Candida parapsilosis, occurred in similar abundance in both biofilms. These results indicated that microbial community, especially bacterial composition was remarkably affected by the different pipe materials (PVC and cast iron).

  12. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance.

    PubMed

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-08-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles.

  13. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance

    PubMed Central

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P.; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles. PMID:19394687

  14. Towards advanced structural analysis of iron oxide clusters on the surface of γ-Al2O3 using EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubnov, Alexey; Roppertz, Andreas; Kundrat, Matthew D.; Mangold, Stefan; Reznik, Boris; Jacob, Christoph R.; Kureti, Sven; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-11-01

    Iron oxide centres are structurally investigated in 0.1% Fe/γ-Al2O3, which is known as highly active catalyst, for instance in the oxidation of CO. The sample was characterised by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in terms of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analyses evidenced high dispersion of the iron oxide entities without significant presence of bulk-like aggregates associated with the low Fe content of the catalyst. A library of structural models of Al2O3-supported surface Fe was created as input for EXAFS fitting. Additionally, several model structures of Fe substituting Al ions in bulk γ-Al2O3 were created with optimised geometry based on density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. From EXAFS refinement of the best 8 out of 24 models, it was found that the trivalent Fe ions are coordinated by 4-5 oxygen atoms and are located on octahedral lattice sites of the exposed surfaces of γ-Al2O3. These iron oxide species exist mainly as a mixture of monomeric and binuclear species and due to the low concentration represent suitable model systems as alternative to single crystal systems for structure-function relationships.

  15. Protection of mice against Staphylococcus aureus infection by a recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Delfani, Somayeh; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Amani, Jafar; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. An effective vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections is urgently required due to the dramatic increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this report, we evaluated a newly recombinant protein composed of selected antigenic regions of clumping factor A (ClfA), iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and gamma hemolysin B (HlgB) of S. aureus and sequence coding for hydrophobic linkers between three domains. The recombinant gene was constructed in pET-28a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. In addition, sequence coding for a His(6)-tag was added followed by a hybrid procedure of nickel chelate protein purification. Immunization of BALB/c mice with the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg evoked antigen-specific antibodies that could opsonize S. aureus cells, enhancing in vitro phagocytosis by macrophages. Vaccination with the recombinant protein also reduced the bacterial load recovered from mice spleen samples and increased survival following the intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic S. aureus compared to the control mice. Our results showed that the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg is a promising vaccine candidate for the prevention of S. aureus bacteremia infections.

  16. Corrosion inhibition of Eleusine aegyptiaca and Croton rottleri leaf extracts on cast iron surface in 1 M HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy; Poonkuzhali, Kaliyaperumal; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and corrosion inhibition activities of Eleusine aegyptiaca (E. aegyptiaca) and Croton rottleri (C. rottleri) leaf extracts on cast iron corrosion in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution were studied first time by weight loss and electrochemical techniques viz., Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results obtained from the weight loss and electrochemical methods showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with inhibitor concentrations. It was found that the extracts acted as mixed-type inhibitors. The addition of halide additives (KCl, KBr, and KI) on the inhibition efficiency has also been investigated. The adsorption of the inhibitors on cast iron surface both in the presence and absence of halides follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The inhibiting nature of the inhibitors was supported by FT-IR, UV-vis, Wide-angle X-ray diffraction and SEM methods.

  17. Prebiotic Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercaptopropanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-Dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron (III) hydroxide oxide yielded polydisulfide polymers. This polymerization occured readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron (III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micro mole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the mineral phase. Reactions at higher dithiol concentrations with the same ratio of dithiol to mineral gave a higher yield of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis will be discussed.

  18. Prebiotic Polymerization: Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercapto-1- Propanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the FE(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to FE(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  19. Prebiotic polymerization: Oxidative polymerization of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the Fe(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to Fe(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  20. Prebiotic Polymerization: Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercapto-1- Propanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the FE(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to FE(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  1. Prebiotic polymerization: Oxidative polymerization of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the Fe(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to Fe(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  2. Prebiotic Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercaptopropanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-Dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron (III) hydroxide oxide yielded polydisulfide polymers. This polymerization occured readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron (III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micro mole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the mineral phase. Reactions at higher dithiol concentrations with the same ratio of dithiol to mineral gave a higher yield of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis will be discussed.

  3. Triclosan Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:24713325

  4. Prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Mohini; Wozniak, Daniel J; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus colonizes both artificial and tissue surfaces in humans causing chronic persistent infections that are difficult to cure. It is a notorious pathogen due to its antibiotic recalcitrance and phenotypic adaptability, both of which are facilitated by its ability to develop biofilms. S. aureus biofilms challenge conventional anti-infective approaches, most notably antibiotic therapy. Therefore there is an unmet need to develop and include parallel approaches that target S. aureus biofilm infections. This review discusses two broad anti-infective strategies: (1) preventative approaches (anti-biofilm surface coatings, the inclusion of biofilm-specific vaccine antigens); and (2) approaches aimed at eradicating established S. aureus biofilms, particularly those associated with implant infections. Advances in understanding the distinct nature of S. aureus biofilm development and pathogenesis have led to growing optimism in S. aureus biofilm targeted anti-infective strategies. Further research is needed however, to see the successful administration and validation of these approaches to the diverse types of infections caused by S. aureus biofilms from multiple clinical strains. PMID:26646248

  5. Potential ecological and human health risks of heavy metals in surface soils associated with iron ore mining in Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Diami, Siti Merryan; Kusin, Faradiella Mohd; Madzin, Zafira

    2016-10-01

    The composition of heavy metals (and metalloid) in surface soils of iron ore mine-impacted areas has been evaluated of their potential ecological and human health risks. The mining areas included seven selected locations in the vicinity of active and abandoned iron ore-mining sites in Pahang, Malaysia. Heavy metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Co, Pb, Cr, Ni, and Cd and metalloid As were present in the mining soils of the studied area, while Cu was found exceeding the soil guideline value at all sampling locations. However, the assessment of the potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated low ecological risk (RI between 44 and 128) with respect to Cd, Pb, Cu, As, Zn, Co, and Ni in the surface soils. Contributions of potential ecological risk [Formula: see text]by metal elements to the total potential ecological RI were evident for Cd, As, Pb, and Cu. Contribution of Cu appears to be consistently greater in the abandoned mining area compared to active iron ore-mining site. For non-carcinogenic risk, no significant potential health risk was found to both children and adults as the hazard indices (HIs) were all below than 1. The lifetime cancer risk (LCR) indicated that As has greater potential carcinogenic risk compared to other metals that may induce carcinogenic effects such as Pb, Cr, and Cd, while the LCR of As for children fell within tolerable range for regulatory purposes. Irrespective of carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic risk, greater potential health risk was found among children (by an order of magnitude higher for most metals) compared to adults. The hazard quotient (HQ) and cancer risk indicated that the pathways for the risk to occur were found to be in the order of ingestion > dermal > inhalation. Overall, findings showed that some metals and metalloid were still present at comparable concentrations even long after cessation of the iron ore-mining activities.

  6. Surface catalysis of uranium(VI) reduction by iron(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Liger, E.; Charlet, L.; Van Cappellen, P.

    1999-10-01

    Colloidal hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is used as model solid to investigate the kinetic effect of specific adsorption interactions on the chemical reduction of uranyl (U{sup VI}O{sub 2}{sup 2+}) by ferrous iron. Acid-base titrations and Fe(II) and uranyl adsorption experiments are performed on hematite suspensions, under O{sub 2}- and CO{sub 2}-free conditions. The results are explained in terms of a constant capacitance surface complexation model of the hematite-aqueous solution interface. Two distinct Fe(II) surface complexes are required to reproduce the data: ({equivalent{underscore}to}Fe{sup III}OFe{sup II}){sup +} (or {equivalent{underscore}to}Fe{sup III}OFe{sup II}(OH{sub 2}){sub n}{sup +}) and {equivalent{underscore}to}Fe{sup III}OFe{sup II}OH{sup 0} (or {equivalent{underscore}to}Fe{sup III}OFe{sup II}(OH{sub 2}){sub n{minus}1}OH{sup 0}). The latter complex represents a significant fraction of total adsorbed Fe(II) at pH {gt} 6.5. Uranyl binding to the hematite particles is characterized by a sharp adsorption edge between pH 4 and pH 5.5. Because of the absence of competing aqueous carbonate complexes, uranyl remains completely adsorbed at pH {gt} 7. A single mononuclear surface complex accounts for the adsorption of uranyl over the entire range of experimental conditions. Although thermodynamically feasible, no reaction between uranyl and Fe(II) is observed in homogeneous solution at pH 7.5, for periods of up to three days. In hematite suspensions, however, surface-bound uranyl reacts on a time scale of hours. Based on Fourier Transformed Infrared spectra, chemical reduction of U(VI) is inferred to be the mechanism responsible for the disappearance of uranyl. The kinetics of uranyl reduction are quantified by measuring the decrease with time of the concentration of U(VI) extractable from the hematite particles by NaHCO{sub 3}. In the presence of excess Fe(II), the initial rate of U(VI) reduction exhibits a first-order dependence on the

  7. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Slippery liquid-infused porous surface based on perfluorinated lubricant/iron tetradecanoate: Preparation and corrosion protection application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengsheng; Qiu, Ri; Song, Hongqing; Wang, Peng; Shi, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanfang

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion and fouling have been two major enemies for materials immersed in seawater. Fluid including gas and liquid as coating for marine corrosion protection has attracted much attention, since it can also exert antifouling capability in seawater environment. Combining gas and solid phases, superhydrophobic surface is promising to protect the underlying metal from corrosion. However, the intrinsically short sustainability in underwater environment has hindered its practical application, so that its corrosion protection ability is only temporary. Originated from liquid and solid phases, slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS) has spurred wide interest due to its prominent performance in different fields. However, the exploration of corrosion protection efficiency from SLIPS remains rare. In this research, SLIPS is constructed onto steel surface via a facile two-step protocol. First, based on a dissolution-deposition strategy, iron tetradecanoate is formed by an electrochemical route. After that, fluid lubricant is infused onto the deposit, whose rough surface acts as the reservoir to entrap the fluid to form a static liquid coating. Compared to the bare and hydrophobic deposit covering low alloy steel, the SLIPS composed perfluorinated lubricant and iron tetradecanoate endows good corrosion protection property.

  9. Controllable synthesis, characterization, and magnetic properties of nanoscale zerovalent iron with specific high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiliang; Kanel, Sushil Raj; Park, Hosik; Ryu, Anna; Choi, Heechul

    2009-04-01

    This article reports a novel approach for the controllable synthesis of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles with specific high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas. Borohydride reduction is a primary and effective liquid phase reduction method for the synthesis of zerovalent iron nanoparticles. However, previous methods for synthesizing NZVI did not suggest a standard technique for controlling the size of particles during the synthesis process; in addition, previous literature generally reported that NZVI had a BET surface area of <37 m2/g. In this communication, a novel approach for the controllable synthesis of NZVI particles with specific high BET surface areas is presented. As a result, the BET surface areas of the NZVI particles synthesized increased to 47.49 and 62.48 m2/g, and the particle sizes decreased to 5-40 and 3-30 nm. Additionally, the physical and chemical properties of the synthesized NZVI particles were investigated by a series of characterizations, and magnetic analysis indicated that the synthesized NZVI particles had super-paramagnetic properties.

  10. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to the Surface of a Reticular Heavyweight Polypropylene Mesh Soaked in a Combination of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Bayon, Yves; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Presoaking meshes for hernia repair with antiseptics prior to implantation could decrease the adhesion of microorganisms to the material surface and reduce the risk of antibiotic resistances. In this work, we evaluate chlorhexidine and allicin (natural antiseptic not yet tested for these purposes) against vancomycin as antiseptics to be used in the pretreatment of a heavyweight polypropylene mesh using an in vitro model of bacterial contamination. Methods Solutions of saline, vancomycin (40 µg/mL), allicin (1,000 µg/mL), chlorhexidine (2%-0.05%) and the combination allicin-chlorhexidine (900 µg/mL-0.05%) were analyzed with agar diffusion tests in the presence of 106 CFU Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923. Additionally, sterile fragments of Surgipro (1 cm2) were soaked with the solutions and cultured onto contaminated agar plates for 24/48/72 h. The antimicrobial material DualMesh Plus was utilized as positive control. At every time, the inhibition zones were measured and the bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface quantified (sonication, scanning electron microscopy). Cytotoxicity of the treatments was examined (alamarBlue) using rabbit skin fibroblasts. Results The largest zones of inhibition were created by allicin-chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine was more effective than vancomycin, and allicin lost its effectiveness after 24 h. No bacteria adhered to the surface of the DualMesh Plus or the meshes soaked with vancomycin, chlorhexidine and allicin-chlorhexidine. On the contrary, saline and allicin allowed adherence of high loads of bacteria. Vancomycin had no toxic effects on fibroblasts, while allicin and chlorhexidine exerted high toxicity. Cytotoxicity was significantly reduced with the allicin-chlorhexidine combination. Conclusions The use of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, alone or combined with others like allicin, could represent an adequate prophylactic strategy to be used for hernia repair materials because soaking with these agents provides

  11. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transfer between iron minerals and quinones: estimating the reduction potential of the Fe(II)-goethite surface from AQDS speciation.

    PubMed

    Orsetti, Silvia; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2013-12-17

    Redox reactions at iron mineral surfaces play an important role in controlling biogeochemical processes of natural porous media such as sediments, soils and aquifers, especially in the presence of recurrent variations in redox conditions. Ferrous iron associated with iron mineral phases forms highly reactive species and is regarded as a key factor in determining pathways, rates, and extent of chemically and microbially driven electron transfer processes across the iron mineral-water interface. Due to their transient nature and heterogeneity a detailed characterization of such surface bound Fe(II) species in terms of redox potential is still missing. To this end, we used the nonsorbing anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as a redox probe and studied the thermodynamics of its redox reactions in heterogeneous iron systems, namely goethite-Fe(II). Our results provide a thermodynamic basis for and are consistent with earlier observations on the ability of AQDS to "shuttle" electrons between microbes and iron oxide minerals. On the basis of equilibrium AQDS speciation we reported for the first time robust reduction potential measurements of reactive iron species present at goethite in aqueous systems (EH,Fe-GT ≈ -170 mV). Due to the high redox buffer intensity of heterogeneous mixed valent iron systems, this value might be characteristic for many iron-reducing environments in the subsurface at circumneutral pH. Our results corroborate the picture of a dynamic remodelling of Fe(II)/Fe(III) surface sites at goethite in response to oxidation/reduction events. As quinones play an essential role in the electron transport systems of microbes, the proposed method can be considered as a biomimetic approach to determine "effective" biogeochemical reduction potentials in heterogeneous iron systems.

  13. Surface interactions between nanoscale iron and organic material: Potential uses in water treatment process units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Max

    Membrane systems are among the primary emergent technologies in water treatment process units due to their ease of use, small physical footprint, and high physical rejection. Membrane fouling, the phenomena by which membranes become clogged or generally soiled, is an inhibitor to optimal efficiency in membrane systems. Novel, composite, and modified surface materials must be investigated to determine their efficacy in improving fouling behavior. Ceramic membranes derived from iron oxide nanoparticles called ferroxanes were coated with a superhydrophillic, zwitterionic polymer called poly (sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) to form a composite ceramic-polymeric membrane. Membrane samples with and without polySBMA coating were subjected to fouling with a bovine serum albumin solution and fouling was observed by measuring permeate flux at 10 mL intervals. Loss of polySBMA was measured using total organic carbon analysis, and membrane samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The coated membrane samples decreased initial fouling rate by 27% and secondary fouling rate by 24%. Similarly, they displayed a 30% decrease in irreversible fouling during the initial fouling stage, and a 27% decrease in irreversible fouling in the secondary fouling stage; however, retention of polySBMA sufficient for improved performance was not conclusive. The addition of chemical disinfectants into drinking water treatment processes results in the formation of compounds called disinfection by-products (DBPs). The formation of DBPs occurs when common chemical disinfectants (i.e. chlorine) react with organic material. The harmful effects of DBP exposure require that they be monitored and controlled for public safety. This work investigated the ability of nanostructured hematite derived from ferroxane nanoparticles to remove organic precursors to DBPs in the form of humic acid via adsorption processes. The results show that p

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Surface Grafted Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and Poly(Carboxylic Acid)– Iron Particles via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sutrisno, Joko; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    This research relates to the preparation and characterization of surface grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(carboxylic acid)–micron-size iron particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface grafted polymers–iron particles result in multifunctional materials which can be used in biomedical applications. The functionalities consist of cell targeting, imaging, drug delivery, and immunological response. The multifunctional materials are synthesized in two steps. First, surface grafting is used to place polymer molecules on the iron particles surface. The second step, is conjugation of the bio-molecules onto the polymer backbone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of polymers on the iron particles. The thickness of the grafted polymers and glass transition temperature of the surface grafted polymers were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The covalent bond between grafted polymers and iron particles caused higher glass transition temperature as compared with non-grafted polymers. The ability to target the bio-molecule and provide fluorescent imaging was simulated by conjugation of rat immunoglobulin and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-rat. The fluorescence intensity was determined using flow cytometry and conjugated IgG-FITC anti-rat on iron particles which was imaged using a fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25382869

  15. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Surface coatings that promote rapid release of peptide-based AgrC inhibitors for attenuation of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Adam H; Stacy, Danielle M; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Kratochvil, Michael J; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of life-threatening infections. The pathogenicity of this organism is attributed to its ability to produce a range of virulence factors and toxins, including the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). While many S. aureus infections can be treated using conventional antibiotics, strains resistant to these bactericidal agents have emerged. Approaches that suppress pathogenicity through mechanisms that are nonbactericidal (i.e., antivirulence approaches) could provide new options for treating infections, including those caused by resistant strains. Here, we report a nonbactericidal approach to suppressing pathogenicity based on the release of macrocyclic peptides (1 and 2) that inhibit the agr quorum sensing (QS) circuit in group-III S. aureus. It is demonstrated that these peptides can be immobilized on planar and complex objects (on glass slides, nonwoven meshes, or within absorbent tampons) using the rapidly dissolving polymer carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Peptide-loaded CMC films released peptide rapidly (<5 min) and promoted strong (>95%) inhibition of the agr QS circuit without inducing cell death when incubated in the presence of a group-III S. aureus gfp-reporter strain. Peptide 1 is among the most potent inhibitors of QS in S. aureus reported to date, and the group-III QS circuit regulates production of TSST-1, the primary cause of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). These results thus suggest approaches to treat the outer covers of tampons, wound dressings, or other objects to suppress toxin production and reduce the severity of TSS in clinical and personal care contexts. Because peptide 1 also inhibits QS in S. aureus groups-I, -II, and -IV, this approach could also provide a pathway for attenuation of QS and associated virulence phenotypes in a broader range of contexts. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  18. Surface Functionalization of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for MRI Applications – Effect of Anchoring Group and Ligand Exchange Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles synthesized from thermal decomposition of iron salts must be rendered hydrophilic for their application as MRI contrast agents. This process requires refunctionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles with a hydrophilic organic coating such as polyethylene glycol. Two parameters were found to influence the magnetic behavior and relaxivity of the resulting hydrophilic iron oxide nanoparticles: the functionality of the anchoring group and the protocol followed for the functionalization. Nanoparticles coated with PEGs via a catecholate-type anchoring moiety maintain the saturation magnetization and relaxivity of the hydrophobic magnetite precursor. Other anchoring functionalities, such as phosphonate, carboxylate, and dopamine decrease the magnetization and relaxivity of the contrast agent. The protocol for functionalizing the nanoparticles also influences the magnetic behavior of the material. Nanoparticles refunctionalized according to a direct biphasic protocol exhibit higher relaxivity than those refunctionalized according to a two-step procedure which first involves stripping the nanoparticles. This research presents the first systematic study of both the binding moiety and the functionalization protocol on the relaxivity and magnetization of water-soluble coated iron oxide nanoparticles used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:21861279

  19. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Coated with a Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotide and a Cationic Peptide: Exploring Four Different Ways of Surface Functionalization

    <