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  1. [Fetal death caused by myocarditis and isolated congenital auriculoventricular block].

    PubMed

    Herreman, G; Ferme, I; Morel, S; Batisse, J; Vuon, N P; Meyer, O

    1985-09-07

    A 26-year old woman gave birth, at term, to a child with isolated complete heart block. A second pregnancy was interrupted by foetal death. Among other immunological abnormalities, this young woman had an antibody resembling the anti-SS-B antibody. At pathological examination the foetus' heart was found to be free of malformation but presented with subacute myocarditis associated with microcalcifications of the conductive tissue. Such findings suggest that an incipient myocarditis may either result in foetal death or lead to fibrosis of conduction pathways with isolated complete heart block.

  2. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  3. Fetal akinesia.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E; Donnenfeld, A E

    1995-03-01

    Normal fetal growth and development during pregnancy is highly dependent upon adequate fetal movement. Limitation of movement, regardless of the underlying cause, can result in a particular pattern of abnormal fetal morphogenesis. This phenotype is termed the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS). The etiology of fetal akinesia may be generally classified into one of five categories: neuropathy, myopathy, restrictive dermopathy, teratogen exposure, or restricted movement due to intrauterine constraint. In this article, the differential diagnosis of fetal akinesia is systematically reviewed and information regarding prenatal diagnosis, prognosis, perinatal management, and recurrence risks are discussed.

  4. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  5. Fetal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S V S; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2013-07-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition.

  6. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The electrical activities of the heart causes weak changes of the magnetic field, which can be recorded as magnetocardiogram (MCG). Fetal cardiac magnetic activity is measured in the order of less than 10 pT. An advance of the novel technology of a superconducting quantum interference device enabled the first recording of fetal MCG (FMCG) in 1974. In Japan, FMCG instrument (MC6400, Hitachi High-Technologies Ltd) was approved as a diagnostic tool by Japanese Government in 2003 owing to the cooperative studies of Tsukuba University, National Cardiovascular Center and Hitachi Ltd. FMCG offers similar information to a fetal electrocardiogram, which is difficult to be recorded because the fetal skin is covered with fatty caseous vernix of weak electrical conductivity in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic flux can pass through the fat layer, and thus FMCG can measure the electrical activity of the fetal heart. Besides FMCG has far higher resolutions in time domain than echocardiography does. The amplitude of FMCG signals depends on the size of fetal heart and the distance between the sensors and the fetal heart. The amplitudes of the QRS, P and T waves increases with gestational age. Since the amplitudes of P and T waves are often weak, averaging of FMCG signals is needed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Current-arrow map is a useful mapping technique even in FMCG. FMCG has been applied in the prenatal diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias such as bradyarrhythmia (atrioventricular block, long QT syndrome, etc), tachyarrhythmia (supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation and WPW syndrome, etc) and extrasystoles. Fetal cardiomegaly with myocardial abnormalities can be also diagnosed by FMCG. Applications of FMCG for fetal heart rate monitoring using beat-to-beat variability have been also studied to obtain better information on fetal well-beings.

  7. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  8. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  9. Fetal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... needle placement during certain prenatal tests, such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Determine fetal position before ... home. Accessed Aug. 11, 2015. Ghidini A. Diagnostic amniocentesis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 11, ...

  10. Fetal echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Fetal echocardiography is a test that uses sound waves ( ultrasound ) to evaluate the baby's heart for ... moved over the area. The probe sends out sound waves, which bounce off the baby's heart and ...

  11. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  12. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P

    1997-09-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is a new, alternative method for prenatal surveillance. The fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) registers the magnetic field produced by conduction currents in the fetal heart. Compared to the fetal electrocardiogram, the propagation of magnetic fields is relatively undisturbed by surrounding tissue. The FMCG thus has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and can be acquired earlier pregnancy. Also, the high temporal resolution of the signal permits a significantly more precise determination of fetal heart rate parameters than fetal ultrasound. FMCG registration using a biomagnetometer is noninvasive and can be performed as of the second trimeter. It can be used to examine signal morphology, cardiac time intervals, heart rate variability as well as cardiac magnetic fields. To date, arrhythmic activity has been observed in the form of supraventricular and ventricular ectopies as well as atrial flutter, atrio-ventricular block, atrial tachycardia and Torsades de Pointes tachycardia. We also report here on the presence of short episodes of bradycardia in the second trimester of normal pregnancy. Measurement of the magnetic field strength at various locations above the abdomen has allowed the reconstruction of the fetal cardiac magnetic field and the determination of its relation to the position of the fetus. Signal averaging has permitted the precise examination of signal amplitude and cardiac time intervals and has shown that they increase in the course of pregnancy. Heart rate variability could be quantified in the time and frequency domain as well as using parameters of nonlinear dynamics. The results demonstrated an increase of variability and complexity over gestational age. Furthermore spectral analysis of fetal heart arte data could be associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as, with respiration. Although the studies presenting these results have involved only limited numbers of observations, they

  13. Fetal Macrosomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... previously been diagnosed with diabetes, after childbirth your health care provider will test you for the condition. During future pregnancies, you'll be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of gestational diabetes — a type ... health care provider suspects fetal macrosomia during your pregnancy, you ...

  14. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  15. Fetal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, F W; Turshen, M

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that "small-for-dates" infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960.Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy.

  16. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  17. Fetal yawning.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral patterns have been considered as indicators of nervous system development. Moreover, the capacity of 4-dimensional sonography to evaluate complex facial expressions allows recognition of common behaviors with which one can appreciate the prenatal functional development of the central nervous system. Using yawning as an example, we review this interpretation on the basis of knowledge derived from phylogeny and ontogeny. As a flip-flop switch, the reciprocal interactions between sleep- and wake-promoting brain regions allow the emergence of distinct states of arousal. By its ontogenic links with REM sleep, yawning appears to be a behavior which causes arousal reinforcement through the powerful stretching and the neuromuscular connections induced. Yawning indicates a harmonious progress in the development of both the brainstem and the peripheral neuromuscular function, testifying to the induction of an ultradian rhythm of vigilance. The lack of fetal yawn, frequently associated with lack of swallowing (associated or not with retrognathia), may be a key to predicting brainstem dysfunction after birth. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  19. Aquaporins in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Nora; Damiano, Alicia E

    2017-01-01

    Water homeostasis during fetal development is of crucial physiologic importance. The successful formation and development of the placenta is critical to maintain normal fetal growth and homeostasis. The expression of several aquaporins (AQPs ) was found from blastocyst stages to term placenta and fetal membranes. Therefore, AQPs are proposed to play important roles in normal pregnancy, fetal growth, and homeostasis of amniotic fluid volume, and water handling in other organs. However, the functional importance of AQPs in fetal development remains to be elucidated.

  20. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  1. Assessment of fetal neurodevelopment via fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Ronald T

    2004-11-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) offers unique capabilities for assessment of fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal behavior, which are fundamental aspects of neurodevelopment. The most important attribute of fMCG for FHR monitoring is its high precision, which allows accurate assessment of beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability (FHRV), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Using mathematical indices to assess FHRV, we find that short- and long-term FHRV both increase during gestation but not in the same manner. The largest increases in short-term FHRV occur during the last trimester, while the largest increases in long-term FHRV occur early on, with smaller changes occurring during the last trimester. The fMCG also allows assessment of fetal activity. This results from the high sensitivity of the signal to the position and orientation of the fetal heart. FMCG actograms are therefore specific for fetal trunk movement, which are thought to be more important than isolated extremity movements and other small fetal movements. The ability to assess FHR, FHRV, and fetal trunk movement simultaneously makes fMCG a valuable tool for neurodevelopment research.

  2. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  3. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders with similar signs and symptoms. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders The range of consequences from drinking alcohol during pregnancy are collectively called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, as not all signs and symptoms are ...

  4. Fetal behavioral teratology.

    PubMed

    Visser, Gerard H A; Mulder, Eduard J H; Tessa Ververs, F F

    2010-10-01

    Ultrasound studies of fetal motor behavior provide direct – in vivo – insight in the functioning of the motor component of the fetal central nervous system. In this article, studies are reviewed showing changes in the first timetable of appearance of fetal movements, changes in quality and/or quantity of movements and disturbances in the development of fetal behavioral states in case of endogenous malfunctions, maternal diseases and exogenous behavioral teratogens.

  5. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  6. Fetal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G B; Fauza, Dario O

    2009-06-01

    Attempts at harnessing the prospective benefits of the therapeutic use of fetal cells or tissues date many decades before the modern era of transplantation. The first reported transplantation of human fetal tissue took place in 1922. Fetal cells or tissues also have been used as helpful investigational tools since the 1930s. Still, it was only in the last three decades that fetal tissue transplantation in people has started to lead to favorable outcomes, yet by and large anecdotally. This article offers an outlook on a relatively new dimension in fetal cell-based therapies, namely the engineering of tissues in the laboratory, along with its prospective applications.

  7. Ethics of fetal tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Giudice, L; Raffin, T A

    1993-09-01

    Now that the Clinton Administration has overturned the ban on federal funding for fetal tissue transplantation, old ethical issues renew their relevance and new ethical issues arise. Is fetal tissue transplantation necessary and beneficial? Are fetal rights violated by the use of fetal tissue in research? Is there a moral danger that the potential of fetal tissue donation will encourage elective abortions? Should pregnant women be allowed to designate specific fetal transplant recipients? What criteria should be used to select fetal tissue transplants? Whose consent should be required for the use of fetal tissue for transplantation? We review the current state of clinical research with fetal tissue transplantation, the legal history of fetal tissue research, the major arguments against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation, and the new postmoratorium ethical dilemmas. We include recommendations for guidelines to govern the medical treatment of fetal tissue in transplantation.

  8. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  10. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  11. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  12. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the gold standard for the treatment of congenital malformations has been planned delivery at tertiary care center with attempted post-natal repair or amelioration of the lesion. Over the last few decades however, rapid advances in imaging and instrumentation technology combined with superior knowledge of fetal pathophysiology has led to the development of novel intrauterine interventions for most common fetal anomalies. Great success has already been seen the treatment of previous devastating anomalies such as myelomeningocele (MMC), congenital cystic malformations of the lung, twin-twin transfusion, and sacrococcygeal teratomas. Although still limited, these innovative techniques have unique potential to improve outcomes in the most devastating fetal anomalies. PMID:27867946

  13. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems ...

  14. [Paradigms of fetal ethology].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2006-03-19

    In utero, the fetus is protected against biological and social influences of the outside world. This circumstance offers an opportunity for sonographic investigation of inherited fetal behavior free of extraneous effects. Observation of fetal activities with ultrasound permits the recognition of certain uniform features of fetal behavior. Immediately after birth, the neonate continues repeating those activities that he/she became accustomed to in the womb. Later these become modified by environmental influences. Nonetheless, basic inherited behavioral characteristics continue to be expressed and may remain recognizable even during adulthood. Some aspects of adult behavior may derive from experience acquired during fetal life. These include the hand-face reflex, various types of facial expression, such as smiling, crying, yawning, grimaces of dissatification and desperation as well as sticking out one's tongue.

  15. Evolution of fetal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Avni, F E; Cos, T; Cassart, M; Massez, A; Donner, C; Ismaili, K; Hall, M

    2007-02-01

    The authors wish to highlight the evolution that has occurred in fetal ultrasound in recent years. A first significant evolution lies in the increasing contribution of first trimester ultrasound for the detection of fetal anomalies. Malformations of several organs and systems have been diagnosed during the first trimester. Furthermore the systematic measurement of the fetal neck translucency has led to increasing rate of detection of aneuploidies and heart malformations. For several years now, three-dimensional (3D) and 4D ultrasound (US) have been used as a complementary tool to 2D US for the evaluation of fetal morphology. This brings an improved morphologic assessment of the fetus. Applications of the techniques are increasing, especially for the fetal face, heart and extremities. The third field where fetal US is continuously providing important information is the knowledge of the natural history of diseases. This has brought significant improvement in the postnatal management of several diseases, especially urinary tract dilatation and broncho-pulmonary malformation.

  16. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  17. Fetal bile salt metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, R. A.; Lester, R.; Piasecki, G. J.; Klein, P. D.; Greco, R.; Jackson, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    Bile salt metabolism was studied in fetal dogs 1 wk before term. The size and distribution of the fetal bile salt pool were measured, and individual bile salts were identified. The hepatic excretion of endogenous bile salts was studied in bile fistula fetuses, and the capacity of this excretory mechanism was investigated by the i.v. infusion of a load of sodium taurocholate-14C up to 20 times the endogenous pool size. The total fetal bile salt pool was 30.9±2.7 μmoles, of which two-thirds was in the fetal gallbladder. Expressed on a body weight basis, this was equal to approximately one-half the estimated pool size in the adult dog (119.2±11.3 vs. 247.5±33.1 μmoles/kg body wt). Measurable quantities of bile salt were found in small bowel (6.0±1.8 μmoles), large bowel (1.1±0.3 μmoles), liver (1.2±0.5 μmoles), and plasma (0.1±0.03 μmoles). Plasma bile salt levels were significantly greater in fetal than in maternal plasma (1.01±0.24 μg/ml vs. 0.36±0.06 μg/ml; P < 0.05). Fetal hepatic bile salt excretion showed a fall over the period of study from 2.04±0.34 to 0.30±0.07 μmoles/hr. The maximal endogenous bile salt concentration in fetal hepatic bile was 18.7±1.5 μmoles/ml. The concentration in fetal gallbladder bile was 73.9±8.6 μmoles/ml; and, in those studies in which hepatic and gallbladder bile could be compared directly, the gallbladder appeared to concentrate bile four- to fivefold. Taurocholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate were present in fetal bile, but no free bile salts were identified. The presence of deoxycholate was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography and gas liquid chromatography, and the absence of microorganisms in fetal gut suggests that it was probably transferred from the maternal circulation. After infusion of a taurocholate load, fetal hepatic bile salt excretion increased 30-fold, so that 85-95% of the dose was excreted by the fetal liver during the period of observation. Placental transfer accounted

  18. Micronutrients and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Fall, Caroline H D; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Rao, Shobha; Davies, Anna A; Brown, Nick; Farrant, Hannah J W

    2003-05-01

    Fetal undernutrition affects large numbers of infants in developing countries, with adverse consequences for their immediate survival and lifelong health. It manifests as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), defined as birth weight <10th percentile, which probably underestimates the number failing to achieve full growth potential. Birth weight is a crude measure of the dynamic process of fetal growth and does not capture effects of fetal undernutrition on body composition and the development of specific tissues. The link between maternal nutrition and fetal nutrition is indirect. The fetus is nourished by a complex supply line that includes the mother's diet and absorption, endocrine status and metabolism, cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy and placental function. Micronutrients are essential for growth, and maternal micronutrient deficiency, frequently multiple in developing countries, may be an important cause of IUGR. Supplementation of undernourished mothers with micronutrients has several benefits but there is little hard evidence of improved fetal growth. However, this has been inadequately tested. Most trials have only used single micronutrients and many were inconclusive because of methodological problems. Several food-based studies (some uncontrolled) suggest benefits from improving maternal dietary quality with micronutrient-dense foods. One trial of a multivitamin supplement (HIV-positive mothers, Tanzania) showed increased birth weight and fewer fetal deaths. Well-conducted randomized controlled trials of adequate sample size and including measures of effectiveness are needed in populations at high risk of micronutrient deficiency and IUGR and should include food-based interventions and better measurements of fetal growth, maternal metabolism, and long-term outcomes in the offspring.

  19. ALTERATIONS IN MATERNAL-FETAL CELLULAR TRAFFICKING AFTER FETAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Bautista, Geoanna; Gonzales, Kelly D.; Nijagal, Amar; Busch, Michael P.; Kim, CJ; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Hanmin; Hirose, Shinjiro; Rand, Larry; Miniati, Douglas; Farmer, Diana L.; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose Bi-directional trafficking of cells between the mother and the fetus is routine in pregnancy and a component of maternal-fetal tolerance. Changes in fetal-to-maternal cellular trafficking have been reported in prenatal complications, but maternal-to-fetal trafficking has never been studied in the context of fetal intervention. We hypothesized that patients undergoing open fetal surgery would have altered maternal-fetal cellular trafficking. Methods Cellular trafficking was analyzed in patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) who underwent open fetal surgical repair (n=5), MMC patients who had routine postnatal repair (n=6), and normal term patients (n=9). As a control for the fetal operation, trafficking was also analyzed in patients who were delivered by an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure (n=6). Microchimerism in maternal and cord blood was determined using quantitative real-time PCR for non-shared alleles. Results Maternal-to-fetal trafficking was significantly increased in patients who underwent open fetal surgery for MMC compared to normal controls, postnatal MMC repair, and EXIT patients. There were no differences in fetal-to-maternal cell trafficking between groups. Conclusion Patients undergoing open fetal surgery for MMC have elevated levels of maternal microchimerism. These results suggest altered trafficking and/or increased proliferation of maternal cells in fetal blood and may have important implications for preterm labor. PMID:22703775

  20. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies.

  1. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  2. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  3. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  4. Fetal blood testing (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing is performed during labor to test the blood pH of the baby which can determine its well-being during delivery. A small puncture is made in the scalp and fetal blood droplets are collected in a thin glass tube. ...

  5. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  8. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  9. MRI of the Fetal Brain.

    PubMed

    Weisstanner, C; Kasprian, G; Gruber, G M; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the possibilities for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the fetal brain. For brain pathologies, fetal MRI is usually performed when an abnormality is detected by previous prenatal ultrasound, and is, therefore, an important adjunct to ultrasound. The most commonly suspected brain pathologies referred to fetal MRI for further evaluation are ventriculomegaly, missing corpus callosum, and abnormalities of the posterior fossa. We will briefly discuss the most common indications for fetal brain MRI, as well as recent advances.

  10. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mulder, E J; Beemer, F A; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-07-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and growth but not until the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Prominent at that time were prolonged periods of fetal quiescence and very low heart rate variability, together with abnormally executed body movements of short duration. Retarded femoral development and jerky abrupt fetal body movements (abnormal movement quality) were already present in the early second trimester of pregnancy. Facial anomalies emerged despite the presence of fetal mouth movements. The clinical features of RD were only partly explained by present knowledge of skin development and the fetal akinesia deformation sequence hypothesis. Quantitative assessment of fetal movements proved to be a poor early marker for antenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  11. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  12. Fetal congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Soon-Cen; Liu, Min-Chang; Se, Tung-Yi

    2007-03-01

    To report a rare fetal congenital lung anomaly characterized by over inflation of a pulmonary lobe. A 28-year-old systemic lupus erythematous mother, gravida 1 para 0, who had normal prenatal care in our department, was admitted for labor pain and an abnormal fetal heart location was noted incidentally during labor. The baby showed rib retraction in room air but no obvious cyanotic change after delivery. Both the fetus chest X-ray and ultrasound showed a hyperechogenic tumor in the left thoracic cavity with a right-side-shifted heart and trachea. Computed tomography showed a hypodense and multiseptal tumor in the left thoracic cavity with right-sided shift of the heart and trachea. It was a soft, solid tumor in the parenchyma of the left lung and the histopathology confirmed it to be benign congenital lobar emphysema. The favorable outcome in both asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic children suggests that a nonsurgical approach should be considered for these patients.

  13. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  14. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  15. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  16. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  17. Intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alison G; Spain, Janine

    2015-06-01

    Intrapartum fetal monitoring to assess fetal well-being during the labor and delivery process has been a central component of intrapartum care for decades. Today, electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) is the most common method used to assess the fetus during labor without substantial evidence to suggest a benefit. A Cochrane review of 13 trials, which included over 37,000 women, found that continuous EFM provided no significant improvement in perinatal death rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.23] or cerebral palsy rate (RR 1.75; 95% CI, 0.84-3.63) as compared with intermittent auscultation; however, there was a significant decrease in neonatal seizures (RR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80). In addition, there was a significant increase in cesarean delivery (RR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.07) and operative vaginal delivery (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Despite the lack of scientific support to suggest that EFM reduces adverse neonatal outcomes, its use is almost universal in the hospital setting and very likely has contributed to the rise in cesarean rate.

  18. The fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid; Acharya, Ganesh

    2004-12-30

    Accumulating data on the human fetal circulation shows the similarity to the experimental animal physiology, but with important differences. The human fetus seems to circulate less blood through the placenta, shunt less through the ductus venosus and foramen ovale, but direct more blood through the lungs than the fetal sheep. However, there are substantial individual variations and the pattern changes with gestational age. The normalised umbilical blood flow decreases with gestational age, and, at 28 to 32 weeks, a new level of development seems to be reached. At this stage, the shunting through the ductus venosus and the foramen ovale reaches a minimum, and the flow through the lungs a maximum. The ductus venosus and foramen ovale are functionally closely related and represent an important distributional unit for the venous return. The left portal branch represents a venous watershed, and, similarly, the isthmus aorta an arterial watershed. Thus, the fetal central circulation is a very flexible and adaptive circulatory system. The responses to increased afterload, hypoxaemia and acidaemia in the human fetus are equivalent to those found in animal studies: increased ductus venosus and foramen ovale shunting, increased impedance in the lungs, reduced impedance in the brain, increasingly reversed flow in the aortic isthmus and a more prominent coronary blood flow.

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation for facilitation of tests of fetal wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelvin H; Smyth, Rebecca M D; Wei, Xing

    2013-12-07

    Acoustic stimulation of the fetus has been suggested to improve the efficiency of antepartum fetal heart rate testing. To assess the advantages and disadvantages of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials assessing the merits of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. All review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Authors of published and unpublished trials were contacted for further information. Altogether 12 trials with a total of 6822 participants were included. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation reduced the incidence of non-reactive antenatal cardiotocography test (nine trials; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.81). Vibroacoustic stimulation compared with mock stimulation evoked significantly more fetal movements when used in conjunction with fetal heart rate testing (one trial, RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.29). Vibroacoustic stimulation offers benefits by decreasing the incidence of non-reactive cardiotocography and reducing the testing time. Further randomised trials should be encouraged to determine not only the optimum intensity, frequency, duration and position of the vibroacoustic stimulation, but also to evaluate the efficacy, predictive reliability, safety and perinatal outcome of these stimuli with cardiotocography and other tests of fetal wellbeing.

  1. Scarless fetal healing. Therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to call attention to the fetal wound healing process as a blueprint for ideal tissue repair. Wound healing in the fetus is fundamentally different from healing in the adult. Fetal tissue repair occurs rapidly and in the absence of scar formation. Because scarring and fibrosis dominate some diseases in every area of medicine, an understanding of fetal wound healing should help develop therapeutic strategies to avert the devastating consequences of excessive scar formation. PMID:1731647

  2. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. [Fetal pulmonary artery blood flow depending on fetal lung maturity].

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Arkadiusz; Lech, Tomasz; Obcowska-Lech, Marta; Sobański, Andrzej; Sipiński, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung maturity by evaluating the elasticity of lung tissue, Dynamic Lung Score (DLS) has been being performed since 1986 in ObGyn Department in Tychy (Medical University of Silesia). The lung elasticity is evaluated on the cross sections of fetal thorax, on the level of heart ventricles. The result of the evaluation is given as the three degree scale, in which I degree indicates the lack of elasticity and fetal lung immaturity, II degrees indicates partially expressed elasticity, corresponding with incomplete maturity of lung tissue, and III degrees represents full elasticity and indicates complete maturity of fetal lungs. This study was designed to compare fetal pulmonary artery blood flow with the maturity of fetal lung tissue evaluated during the ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung tissue elasticity. The examination was performed on pregnant women, beginning on 27th week gestation. During the examination the mean Pulsatility Index was decreased, particularly in fetuses with II degrees lung maturity. The Resistance Index (RI) was found to be stable and independent of gestational age. In the group with I degree lung maturity (DLS I), the mean PI = 2.643 (+/- 0.229), mean RI = 0.879 (+/- 0.036), in DLS II group PI = 2.039 (+/- 0.262), RI = 0.868 (+/- 0.037), and in DLS III group PI = 2,500 (+/- 0.100), RI = 0.900 (+/- 0.100). Comparing the ultrasonographic evaluation of fetal lung maturity with fetal pulmonary artery blood flow allows more accurate assessment of fetal lung maturity. Fetal lung maturity can not be evaluated univocally on the basis of blood flow assessment. Because of the divergence of blood flow parameters further studies including bigger population seem to be necessary for verification of the results and for establishing the reference values.

  4. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of monitoring? • How is auscultation performed? • How is electronic fetal monitoring performed? • How is external monitoring performed? • ... method of periodically listening to the fetal heartbeat. Electronic fetal monitoring is a procedure in which instruments ...

  5. Is fetal analgesia necessary during prenatal surgery?

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Vannuccini, S; Petraglia, F

    2017-03-24

    Fetal anesthesia is still matter of debate: some authors hypothesize that several intrauterine endogenous neuroinhibitors (ENIn) anesthetize the fetus, keeping it in a constant state of sleep, and making pharmacological fetal anaesthesia useless for fetal surgery.

  6. Assessment of fetal heart disorder by means of fetal magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łozińska, Maria; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2006-10-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is new method for investigations of electrical activity of the fetal heart. The idea and build of system for magnetic signal registration is described. Two cases of premature atrial contraction and complete AV block diagnosis by means of magnetic field recording system are described.

  7. Fetal breathing movements: antepartum monitoring of fetal condition.

    PubMed

    Manning, F A; Platt, L D

    1979-08-01

    Until recently, the relative inaccessibility of the human fetus to physical assessment has made antepartum assessment of its condition difficult. The development of methods for accurate antepartum fetal heart rate monitoring and the subsequent study of heart rate responses to various stimuli have resulted in a significant improvement in accuracy of antepartum fetal surveillance. The development of real time B-mode ultrasound enables the clinician to assess many additional fetal biophysical variables including fetal breathing movements. In our observations, the combination of heart rate and fetal breathing assessment has produced a significant improvement in differentiating the normal from the compromised fetus. The addition of other biophysical variables (tone, movements and amniotic fluid volume) have further refined the ability to identify the fetus at risk. At this point, we have evaluated only a few of many possible variables. It seems probable that, as other fetal biophysical variables are included with the overall assessment, for example fetal reflexes or fetal biophysical response to exogenous stimuli, the identification of the fetus at risk and the quantitation of the magnitude of risk will become increasingly more precise.

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancratz, Diane R.

    This literature review defines Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and considers their causes, diagnoses, prevalence, and educational ramifications. Effects of alcohol during each of the trimesters of pregnancy are summarized. Specific diagnostic characteristics of FAS are listed: (1) growth deficiency, (2) a…

  9. Fetal Antecedents of Infant Temperament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined fetal heart rate and movement in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through birth and at age 6 months. Found that more active fetuses were more difficult, unpredictable, unadaptable, and active as infants that were less active fetuses, and that higher fetal heart rate was associated with lower emotional tone, activity level, and…

  10. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  11. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  12. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  13. Feto-fetal transfusion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galea, P; Scott, J M; Goel, K M

    1982-01-01

    Out of 42 pairs of liveborn monochorial twins there were 32 pairs with vascular anastomoses. Of these, 11 pairs had feto-fetal transfusion syndrome. There were another 8 pairs of stillborn twin fetuses with vascular communications and in these chronic feto-fetal transfusion syndrome might have resulted in intrauterine death. PMID:6890328

  14. Impact of fetal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, John M

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease is now well established for a wide range of cardiac anomalies. Diagnosis of congenital heart disease during fetal life not only identifies the cardiac lesion but may also lead to detection of associated abnormalities. This information allows a detailed discussion of the prognosis with parents. For continuing pregnancies, appropriate preparation can be made to optimize the postnatal outcome. Reduced morbidity and mortality, following antenatal diagnosis, has been reported for coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and transposition of the great arteries. With regard to screening policy, most affected fetuses are in the “low risk” population, emphasizing the importance of appropriate training for those who undertake such obstetric anomaly scans. As a minimum, the four chamber view of the fetal heart should be incorporated into midtrimester anomaly scans, and where feasible, views of the outflow tracts should also be included, to increase the diagnostic yield. Newer screening techniques, such as measurement of nuchal translucency, may contribute to identification of fetuses at high risk for congenital heart disease and prompt referral for detailed cardiac assessment. PMID:20300268

  15. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dörrie, Nora; Föcker, Manuel; Freunscht, Inga; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is one of the most prevalent and modifiable risk factors for somatic, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities. Affected individuals exhibit a wide range of such features referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). These are characterized by a more or less specific pattern of minor facial dysmorphic features, growth deficiency and central nervous system symptoms. Nevertheless, whereas the diagnosis of the full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome does not pose a major challenge, only a tentative diagnosis of FASD can be reached if only mild features are present and/or maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy cannot be verified. The respective disorders have lifelong implications. The teratogenic mechanisms induced by PAE can lead to various additional somatic findings and structural abnormalities of cerebrum and cerebellum. At the functional level, cognition, motor coordination, attention, language development, executive functions, memory, social perception and emotion processing are impaired to a variable extent. The long-term development is characterized by disruption and failure in many domains; an age-adequate independency is frequently not achieved. In addition to primary prevention, individual therapeutic interventions and tertiary prevention are warranted; provision of extensive education to affected subjects and their caregivers is crucial. Protective environments are often required to prevent negative consequences such as delinquency, indebtedness or experience of physical/sexual abuse.

  16. A history of fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jancelewicz, Tim; Harrison, Michael R

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 3 decades, fetal surgery for congenital disease has evolved from merely a fanciful concept to a medical field in its own right. Techniques for open hysterotomy, minimal-access hysteroscopy, and image-guided percutaneous fetal access have become well established, first in animal models and subsequently in humans. At the same time, major advances in fetal imaging and diagnosis, anesthesia, and tocolysis have allowed fetal intervention to become a vital tool for subsets of patients who would otherwise endure significant morbidity and mortality. This article offers a concise overview of the history of fetal surgery, from its tumultuous early days to its current status as an important means for the early treatment of potentially devastating congenital anomalies.

  17. [Fetal audition. Myth or reality].

    PubMed

    Chelli, D; Chanoufi, B

    2008-10-01

    Fetal sensory abilities have been considered for a long time as a philosophical question. The aim of this review is to investigate the scientifically proven knowledge about fetal audition. Fetal audition seems to depend on gestational age and sound characteristics. The onset of human fetal hearing is observed at about 26-28 weeks gestational age. Noises from the placenta, the maternal organs and the maternal voice play a major role as current in utero auditory stimuli. Many studies demonstrate that the fetus forms memories of his hearing experiences allowing some authors to use the term "fetal learning". The fetus can memorize not only his mother's voice but also more complex acoustic external sounds with a big ability of discrimination. Moreover, most studies strengthen the hypothesis of an implicit musical ability of the human brain.

  18. Fetal and Maternal Outcomes in Pregnancies Complicated with Fetal Macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Alsammani, Mohamed Alkahatim; Ahmed, Salah Roshdy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fetal macrosomia remains a considerable challenge in current obstetrics due to the fetal and maternal complications associated with this condition. Aim: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of fetal macrosomia and associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality in the Al Qassim Region of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This register-based study was conducted from January 1, 2011 through December 30, 2011 at the Maternity and Child Hospital, Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Macrosomia was defined as birth weight of 4 kg or greater. Malformed babies and those born dead were excluded. Results: The total number of babies delivered was 9241; of these, 418 were macrosomic. Thus, the prevalence of fetal macrosomia was 4.5%. The most common maternal complications were postpartum hemorrhage (5 cases, 1.2%), perineal tear (7 cases, 1.7%), cervical lacerations (3 cases, 0.7%), and shoulder dystocia (40 cases, 9.6%) that resulted in 4 cases of Erb's palsy (0.96%), and 6 cases of bone fractures (1.4%). The rate of cesarean section among women delivering macrosomic babies was 47.6% (199), while 52.4% (219) delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Despite extensive efforts to reduce fetal and maternal complications associated with macrosomia, considerable fetal and maternal morbidity remain associated with this condition. PMID:22754881

  19. Fetal acoustic stimulation test for early intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, M; Hanwellage, K

    2011-03-01

    The fetal acoustic stimulation test (FAST) is a simple cost effective screening test for antenatal fetal monitoring. The aim of the study was to evaluate the FAST as a screening test for early intrapartum fetal well being. An initial non stress test (NST) followed by a FAST using corometric model 146 was carried out in 486 participants in early labour with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies and > 32 weeks gestation. A repeat NST was recorded in the participants who had an initial non reactive NST. The results of the NST and FAST were compared with fetal outcome. Maternal perception of fetal movements after FAST, results of NST before and after FAST, and the babies' 5 minute APGAR scores were measured. Of the 486 participants 413 (85%) noticed fetal movements after FAST. Initial NST was non reactive in 203 (42%) but 149 (31%) became reactive after FAST. Compared to the NST, FAST had a better sensitivity (97% vs 62%, p < 0.001), specificity (100% vs 87%, p = 0.017), positive predictive value (100% vs 98%, p = 0.024), negative predictive value (79% vs 17%, p < 0.001) and accuracy (99%vs 64%, p < 0.001) in predicting 5 minute APGAR < 7 in the baby. FAST is a reliable screening test for assessing fetal well being in early labour. It complements the NST and is better than the NST alone.

  20. [A new method in fetal heart electrophysiology - fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Wacker-Gussmann, A; Lim, M; Henes, J; Preissl, H; Abele, H; Kiefer, I

    2011-06-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is used as a non-invasive method for registering the electrophysiological fetal heart activity. Superconducting quantum interference device-based magnetometers are currently used to make fMCG recordings. In contrast to fetal ECG, this method is independent of signal loss due to isolating factors such as, especially, the vernix caesaroa between the 27th and 34th weeks of gestation. We report about a term newborn with a third degree AV block, examined by this method.

  1. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  2. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer D.; Warren, Kenneth R.; Hewitt, Brenda G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty years ago, alcohol was not commonly recognized as a teratogen, an agent that can disrupt the development of a fetus. Today, we understand that prenatal alcohol exposure induces a variety of adverse effects on physical, neurological, and behavioral development. Research supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has contributed to the identification of the range and prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), as well as methods for prevention and treatment of FASD. The worldwide prevalence and high personal and societal costs of FASD speak to the importance of this research. This article briefly examines some of the ways that NIAAA has contributed to our understanding of FASD, the challenges that we still face, and how this research is translated into changes in public policy. PMID:23579942

  3. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  4. The Future of Fetal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    J, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is the most common obstetric procedure, and yet it remains a frustrating technology, plagued by false-positive results and miscommunication between providers. A new generation of invasive and noninvasive monitoring technologies is under development and entering the clinic, including the STAN monitor (Neoventa Medical, Mölndal, Sweden), which improves monitoring accuracy by incorporating a proxy of the fetal ST-segment. New noninvasive fetal electrocardiography and uterine contraction monitoring technologies will bring novel metrics and potentially improved safety to obstetrics in coming years. PMID:23483429

  5. Fetal malposition: impact and management.

    PubMed

    Caughey, Aaron B; Sharshiner, Rita; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2015-06-01

    Fetal malposition, either occiput posterior or transverse (OT), leads to greater risk of cesarean delivery, prolonged labor, and increased perinatal morbidity. Historically, there is a known association between epidural use and malposition that was assumed to be due to the increased discomfort of laboring with a fetus in the occiput posterior position. However, evidence now suggests that the epidural itself may contribute to fetal malposition by impacting the probability of internal rotation. Fetal malposition may be impacted by manual rotation. Manual rotation has been associated with greater rates of delivering in the occiput anterior position and lower rates of cesarean delivery.

  6. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  7. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  9. Indices and detectors for fetal MCG actography.

    PubMed

    Lutter, William J; Wakai, Ronald T

    2011-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this study, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity.

  10. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, Suhas G; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M; Jobe, Alan H; Chougnet, Claire A

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial nontraditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection-related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis-induced injury in different fetal compartments. As chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Mowrey, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system and method for detecting and processing acoustic fetal heart signals transmitted by different signal transmission modes. One signal transmission mode, the direct contact mode, occurs in a first frequency band when the fetus is in direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. Another signal transmission mode, the fluid propagation mode, occurs in a second frequency band when the fetus is in a recessed position with no direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. The second frequency band is relatively higher than the first frequency band. The fetal heart monitoring system and method detect and process acoustic fetal heart signals that are in the first frequency band and in the second frequency band.

  12. Difficult Decisions: Fetal Cell Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, techniques used, and details of the issues involved in the controversial issue of fetal cell transplantation are discussed. Questions for use in class discussion are provided. Suggestions for beginning a discussion are provided with accompanying questions. (CW)

  13. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis

    PubMed Central

    Kallapur, Suhas G.; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M.; Jobe, Alan H.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, GI tract, brain and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial non-traditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis induced injury in different fetal compartments. Since chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. PMID:24390922

  14. Fetal programming of renal function.

    PubMed

    Dötsch, Jörg; Plank, Christian; Amann, Kerstin

    2012-04-01

    Results from large epidemiological studies suggest a clear relation between low birth weight and adverse renal outcome evident as early as during childhood. Such adverse outcomes may include glomerular disease, hypertension, and renal failure and contribute to a phenomenon called fetal programming. Other factors potentially leading to an adverse renal outcome following fetal programming are maternal diabetes mellitus, smoking, salt overload, and use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy. However, clinical data on the latter are scarce. Here, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms of fetal programming, including reduced nephron number via diminished nephrogenesis and other renal (e.g., via the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and non-renal (e.g., changes in endothelial function) alterations. It appears likely that the outcomes of fetal programming may be influenced or modified postnatally, for example, by the amount of nutrients given at critical times.

  15. Fast fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lall, Chandana; Aisen, Alex A; Rajesh, Arumugam; Cohen, Mervyn D

    2005-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a problem-solving tool when ultrasonic findings are equivocal. The role of fetal MRI has increased as obstetricians become aware of its potential and in utero therapy for anomalies becomes increasingly sophisticated. In this pictorial essay, we present a wide range of anomalies diagnosed or confirmed using MRI and discuss findings that help in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Fetal Safety of Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Bahat Dinur, Anat; Koren, Gideon; Matok, Ilan; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Uziel, Elia; Gorodischer, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are largely used in pregnancy for different bacterial infections. Their fetal safety has been studied by several groups, yielding opposing results. In particular, there have been studies claiming an association between macrolides and cardiovascular malformations. Exposure in early infancy has been associated with pyloric stenosis and intussusception. This has led to an avoidance in prescribing macrolides to pregnant women in several Scandinavian countries. The Objectives of the present study was to investigate the fetal safety of this class of drug by linking a large administrative database of drug dispensing and pregnancy outcome in Southern Israel. A computerized database of medications dispensed from 1999 to 2009 to all women registered in the Clalit health maintenance organization in southern Israel was linked with two computerized databases containing maternal and infant hospitalization records. Also, medical pregnancy termination data were analyzed. The following confounders were controlled for: maternal age, ethnicity, maternal pregestational diabetes, parity, and the year the mother gave birth or went through medical pregnancy termination. First- and third-trimester exposures to macrolide antibiotics as a group and to individual drugs were analyzed. During the study period there were 105,492 pregnancies among Clalit women that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 104,380 ended in live births or dead fetuses and 1,112 in abortion due to medical reasons. In the first trimester of pregnancy, 1,033 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between macrolides and either major malformations [odds ratio (OR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84 to 1.38)] or specific malformations, after accounting for maternal age, parity, ethnicity, prepregnancy diabetes, and year of exposure. During the third trimester of pregnancy, 959 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between such exposure and perinatal

  17. Fetal ocular measurements by MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Bing; Kasprian, Gregor; Hodge, Jacqueline C; Jiang, Xiao Li; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    To present fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ocular measurement ranges by gestational age (GA) in normal and growth-restricted fetuses. A total of 298 pregnant women from the 18th to the 39th week of gestation were imaged using MRI. Ocular measurements including binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), transverse ocular diameter (OD) and anterior-posterior (AP) OD were measured. The curve estimation analyses for linear, logarithmic and quadratic models were performed. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were compared with that of the normal fetuses. The fetal eye resembles an ellipsoid with significantly longer OD and shorter AP (t = - 22.07, p < 0.001). The quadratic model was the best model in predicting growth of the fetal BOD, IOD, OD and AP. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with IUGR were significantly different from that of the normal fetuses (BOD: t = 3.58, p < 0.001; IOD: t = 5.73, p < 0.001; OD: t = 3.52, p < 0.001; AP: t = 2.19, p < 0.05). Fetal ocular growth can be readily assessed by fetal MRI. Using the normative data provided in this study, fetal ocular anomalies may be detected. Ocular size is frequently reduced in the condition of IUGR, with potential pathologic impact on postnatal vision.

  18. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-05

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  20. [Experience with fetal pulsoxymetry].

    PubMed

    Koltai, M; Csécsei, K; Kovatsits, B

    2000-07-30

    The authors have had the opportunity to do research on an embryonic pulsoxymetre in twenty cases when traditional cardiotocographic observation and clinical symptoms had indicated intrauterine risk. The results obtained have been compared with those of a control group where embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation was not effected. The comparison was effected using the same criteria. The experiment aimed at defining how specific embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation may be if used as a screening method as well as whether its application would decrease the number of Cesarian sections. During the process of pulsoxymetrical observation, with positive change of the embryonic heart function with clear as well as meconium stained amniotic fluid, if the embryonic oxygen saturation reached levels over 30%, no Cesarian section was performed. At a saturation level under 30%, two Cesarian sections were required. In the control group without pulsoxymetrical analysis four Cesarian sections had to be performed. The oxygen saturation level of the umbilical cord artery blood of babies who underwent pulsoxymetrical observation and of those born with a Cesarian delivery were almost the same, the blood pH level was acidotic. On conclusion uterine pulsoxymetrical observation objectively reflects the intrauterine distress through fetal blood oxygenation and consequently, influences the number of Cesarian sections.

  1. Noninvasive Fetal ECG analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Gari D.; Silva, Ikaro; Behar, Joachim; Moody, George B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important advances achieved in the field of adult electrocardiography signal processing, the analysis of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) remains a challenge. Currently no gold standard database exists which provides labelled FECG QRS complexes (and other morphological parameters), and publications rely either on proprietary databases or a very limited set of data recorded from few (or more often, just one) individuals. The PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013 enables to tackle some of these limitations by releasing a set of NI-FECG data publicly to the scientific community in order to evaluate signal processing techniques for NI-FECG extraction. The Challenge aim was to encourage development of accurate algorithms for locating QRS complexes and estimating the QT interval in noninvasive FECG signals. Using carefully reviewed reference QRS annotations and QT intervals as a gold standard, based on simultaneous direct FECG when possible, the Challenge was designed to measure and compare the performance of participants’ algorithms objectively. Multiple challenge events were designed to test basic FHR estimation accuracy, as well as accuracy in measurement of inter-beat (RR) and QT intervals needed as a basis for derivation of other FECG features. This editorial reviews the background issues, the design of the Challenge, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. PMID:25071093

  2. Screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Rink, Britton D; Norton, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Screening is currently recommended in pregnancy for a number of genetic disorders, chromosomal aneuploidy, and structural birth defects in the fetus regardless of maternal age or family history. There is an overwhelming array of sonographic and maternal serum-based options available for carrying out aneuploidy risk assessment in the first and/or second trimester. As with any screening test, the patient should be made aware that a "negative" test or "normal" ultrasound does not guarantee a healthy baby and a "positive" test does not mean the fetus has the condition. The woman should have both pre- and post-test counseling to discuss the benefits, limitations, and options for additional testing. Rapid advancements of genetic technologies have made it possible to screen for the common aneuploidies traditionally associated with advanced maternal age with improved levels of accuracy beyond serum and ultrasound based testing. Prenatal screening for fetal genetic disorders with cell-free DNA has transformed prenatal care with yet unanswered questions related to the financial, ethical, and appropriate application in the provision of prenatal risk assessment.

  3. Fetal testosterone and empathy.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    In animals, fetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organizing the brain and in later social behavior. In humans, exposure to atypical levels of prenatal androgens may result in masculine behavior and ability patterns. Normal inter-individual variation in fT levels has also been correlated with later sex-typed behavior. In the current study, 38 children (24 male, 14 female), whose fT was analyzed in amniotic fluid, were followed up at age 4. They were asked to describe cartoons with 2 moving triangles whose interactions with each other suggested social relationships and psychological motivations. Females used more mental and affective state terms to describe the cartoons than males. fT was not associated with the frequency of mental or affective state terms. Females also used more intentional propositions than males. fT was negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions, taking sex differences into account. fT was also negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions when males were examined separately. Males used more neutral propositions than females. fT was directly correlated with the frequency of neutral propositions, taking sex differences into account. This relationship was not seen when males and females were examined separately. These findings implicate fT in human social development. The relevance of our findings to the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism is also discussed.

  4. Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labour.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James P

    2015-12-21

    Hypoxaemia during labour can alter the shape of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform, notably the relation of the PR to RR intervals, and elevation or depression of the ST segment. Technical systems have therefore been developed to monitor the fetal ECG during labour as an adjunct to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring with the aim of improving fetal outcome and minimising unnecessary obstetric interference. To compare the effects of analysis of fetal ECG waveforms during labour with alternative methods of fetal monitoring. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (latest search 23 September 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing fetal ECG waveform analysis with alternative methods of fetal monitoring during labour. One review author independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. One review author assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Seven trials (27,403 women) were included: six trials of ST waveform analysis (26,446 women) and one trial of PR interval analysis (957 women). The trials were generally at low risk of bias for most domains and the quality of evidence for ST waveform analysis trials was graded moderate to high. In comparison to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring alone, the use of adjunctive ST waveform analysis made no obvious difference to primary outcomes: births by caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96 to 1.08; six trials, 26,446 women; high quality evidence); the number of babies with severe metabolic acidosis at birth (cord arterial pH less than 7.05 and base deficit greater than 12 mmol/L) (average RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.20; six trials, 25,682 babies; moderate quality evidence); or babies with neonatal encephalopathy (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.22; six trials, 26,410 babies; high quality evidence). There were, however, on average

  5. Fetal maceration and retention of fetal bones in a mare.

    PubMed

    Burns, T E; Card, C E

    2000-09-15

    A 19-year-old Quarter Horse mare was evaluated because of bloody vaginal discharge that was apparent immediately following breeding. On transrectal ultrasonography, it was evident that the uterus was filled with fluid containing echogenic particles; linear hyperechoic structures were also visible. Endoscopy was performed, which revealed a number of bones adhered to the cranial wall and floor of the right uterine horn as well as purulent fluid in both uterine horns. Bacterial endometritis and fetal maceration were diagnosed. The mare was treated with antibiotics, and the fetal bones were manually removed from the uterus. Fetal maceration with intrauterine retention of bones is rare in mares. Use of hysteroscopy supplements ultrasonography in the diagnosis of uncommon conditions of the uterus. Macerated bones may be adhered to the endometrium, thereby requiring manual removal.

  6. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  7. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  8. Fetal tissue engineering: diaphragmatic replacement.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Marler, J J; Koka, R; Forse, R A; Mayer, J E; Vacanti, J P

    2001-01-01

    Prosthetic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been associated with high complication rates. This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to diaphragmatic replacement. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of skeletal muscle specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal myoblasts were suspended in a collagen hydrogel submitted to controlled radial tension. The construct was then placed in a bioreactor. After birth, all animals underwent creation of 2 diaphragmatic defects. One defect was repaired with the autologous-engineered construct placed in between 2 acellular supporting membranes and the other with an identical construct but without any cells. Each animal was its own control (graft, n = 10). Animals were killed at different time-points postimplantation for histologic examination. Statistical analysis was by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Fetal myoblasts expanded up to twice as fast as neonatal cells. Hydrogel-based radial tension enhanced construct architecture by eliciting cell organization within the scaffold. No eventration was present in 4 of 5 engineered constructs but in 0 of 5 acellular grafts (P<.05). At harvest, engineered constructs were thick and histologically resembled normal skeletal muscle, whereas acellular grafts were thin, floppy, and showed low cell density with increased fibrosis. Unlike acellular grafts, engineered cellular diaphragmatic constructs are anatomically and histologically similar to normal muscle. Fetal tissue engineering may be a viable alternative for diaphragmatic replacement.

  9. Fetal nutrition and adult disease.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, K M; Barker, D J

    2000-05-01

    Recent research suggests that several of the major diseases of later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes, originate in impaired intrauterine growth and development. These diseases may be consequences of "programming," whereby a stimulus or insult at a critical, sensitive period of early life has permanent effects on structure, physiology, and metabolism. Evidence that coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes are programmed came from longitudinal studies of 25,000 UK men and women in which size at birth was related to the occurrence of the disease in middle age. People who were small or disproportionate (thin or short) at birth had high rates of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal glucose-insulin metabolism. These relations were independent of the length of gestation, suggesting that cardiovascular disease is linked to fetal growth restriction rather than to premature birth. Replication of the UK findings has led to wide acceptance that low rates of fetal growth are associated with cardiovascular disease in later life. Impaired growth and development in utero seem to be widespread in the population, affecting many babies whose birth weights are within the normal range. Although the influences that impair fetal development and program adult cardiovascular disease remain to be defined, there are strong pointers to the importance of the fetal adaptations invoked when the maternoplacental nutrient supply fails to match the fetal nutrient demand.

  10. Fetal risk in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cheri P; Goodman, Lawrence H

    2012-02-01

    It is not uncommon to encounter situations in which radiologic examinations are necessary for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of an expectant mother. The potential deleterious health consequences to the developing embryo and fetus from in utero irradiation include fetal death, congenital malformations, growth retardation, and carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. The likelihood of each effect is greatly dependent on the radiation dose and the gestational age of the conceptus at the time of exposure. In general, the average fetal doses from diagnostic imaging are <50 mGy (5 rad) and have not been associated with any significant adverse fetal effects. However, each case should be evaluated on an individual basis, and the risks should be explained to the patient before the examination. In addition, every effort should be made to reduce the fetal dose to as low as reasonably achievable. The biological effects of in utero radiation exposure, estimated fetal doses from various radiologic examinations, and general guidelines regarding diagnostic imaging during pregnancy will be discussed in this article. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Two cases of fetal goiter

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Ashish; Reddy, Murli Manohar; Panchani, Roopal; Varma, Tarun; Gupta, Nitinranjan; Tripathi, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior fetal neck masses are rarely encountered. Careful routine ultrasound screening can reveal intrauterine fetal goiters (FGs). The incidence of goitrous hypothyroidism is 1 in 30,000-50,000 live births. The consequences of both FG and impaired thyroid function are serious. Aims and Objectives: To emphasize role of ultrasound in both invasive and non-invasive management of FG. Materials and Methods: Two pregnant patients, during second trimester, underwent routine antenatal ultrasound revealing FG, were investigated and managed. Results: Case 1: Revealed FG with fetal hypothyroidism. Intra-amniotic injection l-thyroxine given. Follow-up ultrasound confirmed the reduction of the goiter size. At birth, thyroid dyshormogenesis was suspected and neonate discharged on 50 mcg levothyroxine/day with normal growth and development so far. Case 2: Hypothyroid mother with twin pregnancy revealed FG, in twin 1, confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 × 1.63 cm). The other twin had no thyroid swelling. Cordocentesis confirmed hypothyroidism in twin 1. Maternal thyroxine dose increased as per biochemical parameters leading to reduction in FG size. Mother delivered preterm and none of the twins had thyroid swelling. Fetal euthyroidism was confirmed on biochemical screening. Conclusion: FG during pregnancy should be thoroughly evaluated, diagnosed and immediately treated; although in utero options for fetal hypothyroidism management are available, emphasis should be laid on non-invasive procedures. Newer and better resolution techniques in ultrasonography are more specific and at the same time are less harmful. PMID:23565428

  12. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  13. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor); Wynkoop, Mark W. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. H. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system preferably comprising a backing plate having a generally concave front surface and a generally convex back surface, and at least one sensor element attached to the concave front surface for acquiring acoustic fetal heart signals produced by a fetus within a body. The sensor element has a shape that conforms to the generally concave back surface of the backing plate. In one embodiment, the at least one sensor element comprises an inner sensor, and a plurality of outer sensors surrounding the inner sensor. The fetal heart monitoring system can further comprise a web belt, and a web belt guide movably attached to the web belt. The web belt guide being is to the convex back surface of the backing plate.

  14. Fetal effects of psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Amy L; Ponder, Kathryn L; Padbury, James F; Lester, Barry M

    2009-09-01

    Psychoactive drug use by pregnant women has the potential to effect fetal development; the effects are often thought to be drug-specific and gestational age dependent. This article describes the effects of three drugs with similar molecular targets that involve monoaminergic transmitter systems: cocaine, methamphetamine, and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used to treat maternal depression during pregnancy. We propose a possible common epigenetic mechanism for their potential effects on the developing child. We suggest that exposure to these substances acts as a stressor that affects fetal programming, disrupts fetal placental monoamine transporter expression and alters neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter system development. We also discuss neurobehavioral techniques that may be useful in the early detection of the effects of in utero drug exposure.

  15. [Fetal macrosomia: mode of delivery].

    PubMed

    Tatarova, S; Popov, I; Khristova, P

    2004-01-01

    This study was provided among 1847 deliveries from January, 1 to December, 31, 2003. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" and the mode of delivery. We found that among the cases with birth weight > or = 4000 g and antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" the rate of cesarean section was fourfold higher than among the cases without such a diagnosis. There weren't statistically significant correlation between the cases with antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia " and the cases with estimated birth weight < or = 3999g in reference to the mother's age and weight, parity, fundal height and abdominal circumference. There are insignificant differences between both of groups in reference to gestacional age and birth.

  16. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  17. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  18. Fetal heart and uterine contraction monitor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fetal heart monitor and uterine contraction monitor provide a continuous record of the baby's heart rate and the mother's contraction rate as labor progresses. This device can provide early warning of fetal distress.

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163096.html Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem: Report Countries with highest alcohol ... 000 children worldwide are born each year with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a new report finds. The syndrome refers ...

  20. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  1. Verification of fetal brain responses by coregistration of fetal ultrasound and fetal magnetoencephalography data.

    PubMed

    Micheli, C; McCubbin, J; Murphy, P; Eswaran, H; Lowery, C L; Ortiz, E; Preissl, H

    2010-01-15

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is used to study neurological functions of the developing fetus by measuring magnetic signals generated by electrical sources within the fetal brain. For this aim either auditory or visual stimuli are presented and evoked brain activity or spontaneous activity is measured at the sensor level. However a limiting factor of this approach is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of recorded signals. To overcome this limitation, advanced signal processing techniques such as spatial filters (e.g., beamformer) can be used to increase SNR. One crucial aspect of this technique is the forward model and, in general, a simple spherical head model is used. This head model is an integral part of a model search approach to analyze the data due to the lack of exact knowledge about the location of the fetal head. In the present report we overcome this limitation by a coregistration of volumetric ultrasound images with fMEG data. In a first step we validated the ultrasound to fMEG coregistration with a phantom and were able to show that the coregistration error is below 2 cm. In the second step we compared the results gained by the model search approach to the exact location of the fetal head determined on pregnant mothers by ultrasound. The results of this study clearly show that the results of the model search approach are in accordance with the location of the fetal head.

  2. Gestational diabetes affects fetal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Massa, Valentina; Terraneo, Laura; Samaja, Michele; Doi, Patrizia; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in the preservation of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Gestational diabetes mellitus represents a risk for fetal morbidity and mortality. The present study focuses on the autophagy process in human diabetic placenta and fetal pancreas, compared with controls. Analysis of the autophagy markers LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 suggests an impairment of the autophagy process in diabetic placentas. Results indicate an association between gestational diabetes and autophagy, emphasizing the importance of unravelling the mechanisms regulating this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  4. Fetal origins of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barker, D J

    1999-04-01

    Low birthweight, thinness and short body length at birth are now known to be associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life. The fetal origins hypothesis proposes that these diseases originate through adaptations which the fetus makes when it is undernourished. These adaptations may be cardiovascular, metabolic or endocrine. They permanently change the structure and function of the body. Prevention of the diseases may depend on prevention of imbalances in fetal growth or imbalances between prenatal and postnatal growth, or imbalances in nutrient supply to the fetus.

  5. A Sensitive Magnetocardiograph for Fetal Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract-To use fetal magnetocardiography for diagnostic purposes, it is important to know the requirements for the instrument. One of the... magnetocardiography , fetal arrhythmia I. INTRODUCTION The fetal magnetocardiograph is intended to measure magnetic fields arising from currents generated in... Magnetocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmia” Br. J. Obstet. Gynaecol., 1999, 106, pp. 1200-1208. [2] T. Menéndes, S. Achenbach, E

  6. The fetal patient – ethical aspects of fetal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deprest, J.; Toelen, J.; Debyser, Z.; Rodrigues, C.; Devlieger, R.; De Catte, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Mieghem, T.; Naulaers, G.; Vandevelde, M.; Claus, F.; Dierickx, K.

    2011-01-01

    The pregnant patient is a vulnerable subject, and even more so when a serious fetal condition is diagnosed. (Invasive) fetal therapy should only be offered when there is a good chance that the life of the fetus will be saved, or irreversible damage by the disease or disability is prevented. Following diagnosis of a potentially treatable condition, the patient needs to be referred to a center with sufficient expertise in diagnosis and all therapeutic options. Preferences of the physician towards one or another antenatal intervention is not at stake prior to that moment. When fetal therapy is justified, it should be offered with full respect for maternal choice and individual assessment and perception of potential risks, and should be at the location where there is sufficient expertise. For therapies of unproven benefit, the absence of evidence must be disclosed, and therapy should only be undertaken with full voluntary consent of the mother. These ought to be undertaken within well designed and approved trials and only by experts in the treatment modality. Potential risks and eventual morbidities in case of therapeutic failure should be part of the counselling, neither should fetal therapy be presented as an alternative to termination of pregnancy PMID:24753868

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  9. Practice Bulletin No. 173: Fetal Macrosomia.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    Suspected fetal macrosomia is encountered commonly in obstetric practice. As birth weight increases, the likelihood of labor abnormalities, shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, and permanent injury to the neonate increases. The purpose of this document is to quantify those risks, address the accuracy and limitations of methods for estimating fetal weight, and suggest clinical management for a pregnancy with suspected fetal macrosomia.

  10. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  13. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  14. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  15. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  16. Fetal growth restriction: current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Caetano, Ana Carolina Rabachini; Zamarian, Ana Cristina Perez; Mazzola, Jaqueline Brandão; Silva, Carolina Pacheco; Marçal, Vivian Macedo Gomes; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2017-05-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition that affects 5-10% of pregnancies and is the second most common cause of perinatal mortality. This review presents the most recent knowledge on FGR and focuses on the etiology, classification, prediction, diagnosis, and management of the condition, as well as on its neurological complications. The Pubmed, SCOPUS, and Embase databases were searched using the term "fetal growth restriction". Fetal growth restriction (FGR) may be classified as early or late depending on the time of diagnosis. Early FGR (<32 weeks) is associated with substantial alterations in placental implantation with elevated hypoxia, which requires cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are high. Late FGR (≥32 weeks) presents with slight deficiencies in placentation, which leads to mild hypoxia and requires little cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are lower. The diagnosis of FGR may be clinical; however, an arterial and venous Doppler ultrasound examination is essential for diagnosis and follow-up. There are currently no treatments to control FGR; the time at which pregnancy is interrupted is of vital importance for protecting both the mother and fetus. Early diagnosis of FGR is very important, because it enables the identification of the etiology of the condition and adequate monitoring of the fetal status, thereby minimizing risks of premature birth and intrauterine hypoxia.

  17. Fetal programming and environmental exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment. It is likely that epigenctic (“above the genome”) changes are responsible for modifying gene expression in the developing fetus, and these modifications can have long-lasting health impacts. Determining which epigenetic regulators are most vital in embryonic development will improve pregnancy outcomes and our ability to treat and prevent disorders that emerge later in life. “Fetal Programming and Environmental Exposures: Implications for Prenatal Care and Preterm Birth’ began with a keynote address by Frederick vom Saal, who explained that low-level exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) perturbs hormone systems in utero and can have negative effects on fetal development. vom Saal presented data on the LOC bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking compound found in many plastics. He suggested that low-dose exposure to LOCs can alter the development process and enhance chances of acquiring adult diseases, such as breastcancer, diabetes, and even developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder (ADHD).’ Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs

  18. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although “normal” hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart’s development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation. PMID:20712587

  20. [Fetal alcohol syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cahuana, A; Krauel, J; Molina, V; Lizárraga, I; Alfonso, H

    1977-01-01

    A case of fetal alcohol syndrome is reported in a intrauterine growth retarded female newborn with dysmorphic features and congenital cardiopathy whose mother suffered from a chronic ethylism during pregnancy. Authors compare this case findings with the reported revisions of other authors.

  1. [Prenatal diagnosis and management of fetal megacystis].

    PubMed

    El Fekih, Chiraz; Ouerdiane, Nadia; Mourali, Mechaal; Oueslati, Seddik; Oueslati, Boujemaa; Binous, Naoufel; Chaabène, Mounira; Ben Zineb, Nabil

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal megacystis particularly in the first trimester requires assessement of pronostic and aetiologycal criteria. Report a new case. we report a case of severe megacystis in female fetus diagnosed at 23 weeks of gestation. There are no other associated ultrasound findings. Fetal karyotyping was normal (46XX). Termination of pregnancy for medical indications was realised because of progressive enlargement of the fetal bladder. Post-mortem examination shown megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. Fetal megacystis is a severe condition when diagnosed early in pregnancy. Ultrasonography follow-up and fetal karyotyping are important to evaluate prognosis.

  2. Fetal neurosurgery: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Runyon, Timothy; Farmer, Diana L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital CNS abnormalities have been targets for prenatal intervention since the founding of fetal surgery 30 years ago, but with historically variable results. Open fetal neurosurgery for myelomenigocele has demonstrated the most promising results of any CNS malformation. Improvements in the understanding of congenital diseases and in fetal surgical techniques have reopened the door to applying fetal surgery to other congenital CNS abnormalities. Advances in gene therapy, bioengineering and neonatal neuroprotection will aid in the future expansion of fetal neurosurgery to other CNS disorders. PMID:21709818

  3. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features. PMID:27413248

  4. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  6. Scarless fetal skin wound healing update.

    PubMed

    Lo, David D; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Nauta, Allison; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2012-09-01

    Scar formation, a physiologic process in adult wound healing, can have devastating effects for patients; a multitude of pathologic outcomes, affecting all organ systems, stems from an amplification of this process. In contrast to adult wound repair, the early-gestation fetal skin wound heals without scar formation, a phenomenon that appears to be intrinsic to fetal skin. An intensive research effort has focused on unraveling the mechanisms that underlie scarless fetal wound healing in an attempt to improve the quality of healing in both children and adults. Unique properties of fetal cells, extracellular matrix, cytokine profile, and gene expression contribute to this scarless repair. Despite the great increase in knowledge gained over the past decades, the precise mechanisms regulating scarless fetal healing remain unknown. Herein, we describe the current proposed mechanisms underlying fetal scarless wound healing in an effort to recapitulate the fetal phenotype in the postnatal environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Maternal buprenorphine treatment and fetal neurobehavioral development.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lauren M; Velez, Martha; McConnell, Krystle; Spencer, Nancy; Tuten, Michelle; Jones, Hendree E; King, Van L; Gandotra, Neeraj; Milio, Lorraine A; Voegtline, Kristin; DiPietro, Janet A

    2017-05-01

    Gestational opioid use/misuse is escalating in the United States; however, little is understood about the fetal effects of medications used to treat maternal opioid use disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of maternal buprenorphine administration on longitudinal fetal neurobehavioral development. Forty-nine buprenorphine-maintained women who attended a substance use disorder treatment facility with generally uncomplicated pregnancies underwent fetal monitoring for 60 minutes at times of trough and peak maternal buprenorphine levels. Data were collected at 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks gestation. Fetal neurobehavioral indicators (ie, heart rate, motor activity, and their integration [fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling]) were collected via an actocardiograph, digitized and quantified. Longitudinal data analysis relied on hierarchic linear modeling. Fetal heart rate, heart rate variability, and heart rate accelerations were significantly reduced at peak vs trough maternal buprenorphine levels. Effects were significant either by or after 28 weeks gestation and tended to intensify with advancing gestation. Fetal motor activity and fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling were depressed from peak to trough at 36 weeks gestation. Polysubstance exposure did not significantly affect fetal neurobehavioral parameters, with the exception that fetuses of heavier smokers moved significantly less than those of lighter smokers at 36 weeks gestation. By the end of gestation, higher maternal buprenorphine dose was related to depression of baseline fetal cardiac measures at trough. Maternal buprenorphine administration has acute suppressive effects on fetal heart rate and movement, and the magnitude of these effects increases as gestation progresses. Higher dose (≥13 mg) appears to exert greater depressive effects on measures of fetal heart rate and variability. These findings should be balanced against comparisons to gestational methadone effects

  8. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate is presented. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  9. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  10. Management of fetal pain during invasive fetal procedures. A review.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Deprest, J; Missant, C; Van de Velde, M

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, fetal stress and analgesia draw more and more attention. Evidence that fetuses show a significant endocrinological and hemodynamical response to invasive stimuli, and that these responses can be blocked by analgesia, suggests that fetuses experience a stress response, even if this does not signify they experience "pain". Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that experiences of pain of a fetus will be "remembered" by the developing nervous system, perhaps for the entire life of the individual, which can probably lead to abnormal behavioural patterns or altered nociception. But up to now, the entire mechanism of fetal stress response and the optimal analgesic drug, dose and route of administration is not so clear.

  11. [Biochemical aspects of fetal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Biringer, K; Danko, J; Dókus, K; Mat'asová, K; Zibolen, M; Pullmann, R

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate validity of biochemical diagnostic methods of fetal hypoxia. A case-control study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovak Republic. We included 67 patients, and they were retrospectively divided into group of controls (n=36), and studied group (n=31) according to pH in umbilical artery (UA) <7.15. Acid-base parameters were assessed with Rapidlab 248, Bayer Healthcare LLC, East Walpole, USA. We determined criterion for metabolic acidosis (MAC) as pH UA <7.15, resp. base deficit (BD) UA >12 mmol/l. Postpartal lactate concentration in umbilical vein (UV) and UA was determined with lactatemeter Accutrend Lactate, Roche Diagnostics, Switzerland. Quantitative assessment of fetal human protein S100B was provided with ELISA (Sangtec 100 ELISA, DiaSorin Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota, USA). Fetal erythropoietin concentration in UV was examined with immunoenzymatic assessment Access EPO (Beckman Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA). histograms, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's rho; statistical significance: p<0.05, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, Area Under the Curve. The best correlation was between fetal acid-base parameters and lactate in UA (p<0.0005). Significant correlation was between EPO in UV, and protein S100B in UV (p<0.05). EPO in UV significantly correlated with lactate in UA (p<0.05). Correlation between EPO in UV and protein S100B was not significant. According to ROC curves in prediction of fetal hypoxia, we found an excellent accuracy (AUC>0.9) for lactate in UA, good accuracy (AUC>0.7) had EPO in UV. Results for protein S100B were not significant. The highest sensitivity had EPO in UV, while the highest specificity has had lactate in UA. An indisputable evidence of labor management quality is the fetal metabolic status. On the basis of our results, the suitable clinical markers are lactate and EPO, in addition to acid-base parameters.

  12. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  13. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  14. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO₂) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO₂ was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO₂ was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO₂ was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO₂ without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO₂ in any condition of the fetus.

  15. Fetal origins of adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina

    2010-09-01

    According to the fetal origin of adult diseases hypothesis, the intrauterine environment through developmental plasticity may permanently influence long-term health and disease. Therefore, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), due either to maternal, placental, or genetic factors, may permanently alter the endocrine-metabolic status of the fetus, driving an insulin resistance state that can promote survival at the short term but that facilitates the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in adult life, especially when the intrauterine nutrient restriction is followed by a postnatal obesogenic environment. Furthermore, an energy-rich environment during fetal programming may also drive the development of excess abdominal fat and type 2 diabetes in later life, demonstrating that both intrauterine nutrient restriction as well as intrauterine nutrient excessive supply may predispose for the development of adult diabetes. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fröschl, Barbara; Brunner-Ziegler, Sophie; Wirl, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most avoidable handicap of newborns. It describes prenatal damages which result from the alcohol consumption of the mother. These can be: reduced body length and weight (pre- and postnatal), microcephaly, musculoskeletal, mental and statomotoric developmental retardations and impaired coordinative ability. There are preventive measures of which the efficiency is examined. Already, short counseling interviews, so-called short interventions, increase the abstinence of pregnant women. PMID:24009646

  17. Fetal programming in meat production.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Wang, Bo; Fu, Xing; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient fluctuations during the fetal stage affects fetal development, which has long-term impacts on the production efficiency and quality of meat. During the early development, a pool of mesenchymal progenitor cells proliferate and then diverge into either myogenic or adipogenic/fibrogenic lineages. Myogenic progenitor cells further develop into muscle fibers and satellite cells, while adipogenic/fibrogenic lineage cells develop into adipocytes, fibroblasts and resident fibro-adipogenic progenitor cells. Enhancing the proliferation and myogenic commitment of progenitor cells during fetal development enhances muscle growth and lean production in offspring. On the other hand, promoting the adipogenic differentiation of adipogenic/fibrogenic progenitor cells inside the muscle increases intramuscular adipocytes and reduces connective tissue, which improves meat marbling and tenderness. Available studies in mammalian livestock, including cattle, sheep and pigs, clearly show the link between maternal nutrition and the quantity and quality of meat production. Similarly, chicken muscle fibers develop before hatching and, thus, egg and yolk sizes and hatching temperature affect long-term growth performance and meat production of chicken. On the contrary, because fishes are able to generate new muscle fibers lifelong, the impact of early nutrition on fish growth performance is expected to be minor, which requires further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  20. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  1. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  2. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  3. Haemodynamic assessment of fetal heart arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lingman, G; Dahlström, J A; Eik-Nes, S H; Marsál, K; Ohlin, P; Ohrlander, S

    1984-07-01

    The effects of fetal heart arrhythmias were examined serially in two pregnancies by three non-invasive methods: fetal ECG, fetal phonocardiography and ultrasonic measurement of fetal blood flow. In a case of supraventricular arrhythmia, there was evidence suggesting that the stroke volume varied with ventricular filling according to the Frank-Starling law. In a case of total atrioventricular block the mean blood flow in the fetal descending aorta and in the umbilical vein was within the normal range. Blood flow velocity in the inferior vena cava of the fetus reflected atrial contractions. In the phonocardiogram, a phenomenon similar to 'bruit de canon' was found. Both pregnancies had good outcomes and subsequent development of the infants was normal except for the persisting dysrhythmias. The two cases exemplify how fetal heart function can be assessed in utero.

  4. Maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Tang, Alvin; Levy, Denis; Grossfeld, Paul; Kashani, Iraj; Shaughnessy, Robin; Rothman, Abraham

    2002-02-01

    The maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography may be deleterious in the face of newly diagnosed congenital heart disease. This questionnaire-based study prospectively examined the psychological impact of both normal and abnormal fetal echocardiography. Normal fetal echocardiography decreased maternal anxiety, increased happiness, and increased the closeness women felt toward their unborn children. In contrast, when fetal echocardiography detected congenital heart disease, maternal anxiety typically increased, and mothers commonly felt less happy about being pregnant. However, among women who had recently delivered infants with congenital heart disease, those who had had fetal echocardiography during the pregnancy felt less responsible for their infants' defects and tended to have improved their relationships with the infants' fathers after the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Further study of the psychological and medical impact of fetal echocardiography will be necessary to define and optimize the clinical value of this powerful diagnostic tool.

  5. Fetal alcohol exposure: consequences, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Dawn; Waterman, Emily Hubbard; Caughey, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy is prevalent, with as many as 12% of pregnant women consuming alcohol. Alcohol intake may vary from an occasional drink, to weekly binge drinking, to chronic alcohol use throughout pregnancy. Whereas there are certain known consequences from fetal alcohol exposure, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, other effects are less well defined. Craniofacial dysmorphologies, abnormalities of organ systems, behavioral and intellectual deficits, and fetal death have all been attributed to maternal alcohol consumption. This review article considers the theoretical mechanisms of how alcohol affects the fetus, including the variable susceptibility to fetal alcohol exposure and the implications of ethanol dose and timing of exposure. Criteria for diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome are discussed, as well as new methods for early detection of maternal alcohol use and fetal alcohol exposure, such as the use of fatty acid ethyl esters. Finally, current and novel treatment strategies, both in utero and post utero, are reviewed.

  6. Fetal tissue banking: standards and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Newman-Gage, H

    1996-04-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in collection and study of fetal tissues for the purpose of understanding normal ontogeny, as well as aberrant processes in development. As the unique features and capabilities of fetal tissues have become elucidated, it is evident that fetal tissues could potentially be used to ameliorate adult degenerative diseases through transplantation. Indeed, there has been significant work surrounding the transplantation of fetal-derived hematopoietic stem cells, islet cells, and central nervous system cells. Many involved with collection and transplantation of fetal tissues seem poised on the edge of the federal regulatory playing field. This article discusses the history of regulations related to cellular and tissue-derived products and current regulatory issues facing cell and tissue banks in the United States from the tissue bank perspective and focuses on these issues as they relate to the use of cells derived from fetal tissue.

  7. Successful delivery of fetus with fetal inherited thrombophilia after two fetal deaths.

    PubMed

    Juras, Josip; Ivanisević, Marina; Oresković, Slavko; Mihaljević, Slobodan; Vujić, Goran; Delmis, Josip

    2013-12-01

    A pregnant woman with inherited thrombophilia (factor II mutation--20210A) had two late pregnancy losses. The first pregnancy was not well documented, but the second pregnancy was complicated by fetal thrombophilia and umbilical artery thrombosis, proven after fetal death. During the third pregnancy enoxaparine was introduced in the therapy and early amniocentesis was performed. Fetal thrombophilia was proven again. Early delivery was induced and performed with no complications, resulting in a live healthy infant. A history of miscarriages or recurrent fetal loss should raise suspicion of thrombophilia as a potential cause. It is debatable whether amniocentesis in pursuit of fetal thrombophilia should be performed and whether this will lead to a better perinatal outcome. When fetal thrombophilia is diagnosed, an earlier induction of delivery should be considered, taking into account the fetal extrauterine viability. The aforementioned approach of early delivery in cases of inherited fetal thrombophilia could be a possible solution for better perinatal outcomes.

  8. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (<10th percentile) and large (>90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of

  9. Fetal movements as a predictor of health.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jonathan; Nowlan, Niamh C; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Shaw, Caroline J; Lees, Christoph C

    2016-09-01

    The key determinant to a fetus maintaining its health is through adequate perfusion and oxygen transfer mediated by the functioning placenta. When this equilibrium is distorted, a number of physiological changes, including reduced fetal growth, occur to favor survival. Technologies have been developed to monitor these changes with a view to prolong intrauterine maturity while reducing the risks of stillbirth. Many of these strategies involve complex interpretation, for example Doppler ultrasound for fetal blood flow and computerized analysis of fetal heart rate changes. However, even with these modalities of fetal assessment to determine the optimal timing of delivery, fetal movements remain integral to clinical decision-making. In high-risk cohorts with fetal growth restriction, the manifestation of a reduction in perceived movements may warrant an expedited delivery. Despite this, there has been little evolution in the development of technologies to objectively evaluate fetal movement behavior for clinical application. This review explores the available literature on the value of fetal movement analysis as a method of assessing fetal wellbeing, and demonstrates how interdisciplinary developments in this area may aid in the improvement of clinical outcomes. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG).

  10. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence in previable fetuses.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Kalousek, D K

    1988-01-01

    We reviewed the morphologic findings of 948 previable fetuses and identified the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) in 16 cases. In eight fetuses who had joint contractures, micrognathia, and pulmonary hypoplasia, the cause of fetal akinesia could be attributed to an abnormal intrauterine environment restricting fetal movement. The other eight fetuses had pterygia across the immobilized joints, in addition to main manifestations of FADS. Since most of the fetuses with pterygia were of only 8-9 weeks developmental age, we suggest that embryonic onset of immobility interferes with limb development and results in joint fixation and pterygium formation, in contrast to fetal-onset immobility, which causes joint contractures alone.

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Facts and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Maria; Cook, Martha

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) including characteristics, incidence, current government programs, successful local programs, and implications for school administrators. (DB)

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Facts and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Maria; Cook, Martha

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) including characteristics, incidence, current government programs, successful local programs, and implications for school administrators. (DB)

  13. Intrapulmonary perfluorooctyl bromide instillation in fetal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Muensterer, Oliver J; Klis, Verena J; Till, Holger; Bergmann, Florian; Metzger, Roman; Simbruner, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Instilling perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) into the fetal lung may lead to alveolar distension. The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety of PFOB instillation into fetal lungs and to determine the radiographic distribution and tissue concentration of PFOB in New Zealand white rabbits. Sibling fetuses of pregnant (day 27) New Zealand white rabbits were randomized to intratracheal instillation of 1 mL PFOB with tracheal ligation, instillation without ligation, and unmanipulated controls. The maternal animals were killed directly after instillation, at 3 or 6 hours (n = 10 each). For each study cohort, we determined fetal lung/body weight (FLBW) ratios, the radiographic distribution of PFOB, as well as pulmonary PFOB and water content by tissue distillation. PFOB concentrations in maternal and fetal tissues were assessed by gas chromatography. The relative amount of fetal lung PFOB recovered by fractional distillation was highest in ligated (25%) and lower in unligated lungs (9%). Extrapulmonary PFOB was found in the fetal brain (2.0 +/- 0.7 ppm), but not in any other fetal or maternal tissues. Mean FLBW ratios were highest in ligated fetuses, followed by unligated fetuses and controls. PFOB partially displaced fetal lung water. PFOB was visible in the lungs of all treated fetuses. Fetal survival between manipulated and unmanipulated fetuses did not differ. After prenatal intrapulmonary instillation, some PFOB remains in the lung, even if the trachea is not ligated, and may exert distending pressure on the alveoli.

  14. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    PubMed

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Unexplained fetal loss: the fetal side of thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi; Saccucci, Franca; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Cecati, Monia; Nocchi, Linda; Lorenzi, Sara; Emanuelli, Monica

    2010-06-01

    Carrier status of the fetus for factor V polymorphism or double homozygosity for mutant alleles of the PAI-1 4 G/4 G and MTHFR T677 T polymorphisms must be considered risk factors for intrauterine fetal death. The clinical implications of these data need to be addressed in a prospective study to confirm our preliminary data and to answer the question of whether or not double homozygous individuals should be treated with low molecular-weight heparin and/or low-dose aspirin.

  16. Is there a relationship between fetal brain function and the fetal behavioral state? A fetal MEG-study.

    PubMed

    Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Raufer, Julia; Brändle, Johanna; Münßinger, Jana; Abele, Harald; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert

    2013-09-01

    Fetal magnetography enables the recording of biomagnetic fetal signals, including fetal heart and fetal brain signals. These signals allow the determination of fetal behavioral states and functional brain signals with auditory evoked responses (AER). In the current study, we investigated how the behavioral state influences the AER and how stimulation affects fetal state. One hundred and four fetuses in three age groups (28-31 weeks, 32-35 weeks and 36-41 weeks) were recorded with and without auditory stimulation. Both sessions were scored for fetal states. The AER latency was determined for each state separately. Forty-five additional subjects were recorded with two sessions of 10 min without stimulation to investigate a possible time effect on state changes. The state distribution was significantly different between stimulation and no stimulation conditions. The AER latencies were significantly shorter in active sleep (P=0.013) and active wakefulness (P=0.004) compared to quiet sleep. Auditory stimulation has an effect on fetal states. The state information should be taken into account for the analysis of AER latencies.

  17. Atomic Gradiometers for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Deland, Zack; Wahl, Colin; Bulatowicz, Michael; Wakai, Ron; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present results on development of 87 Rb atomic magnetometers configured as magnetic field gradiometers for fetal Magnetocardiography (fMCG). Operating in the Spin Exchange Relaxation Free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers have a sensitivity 1 fT /√{ Hz} . Magnetic field gradient measurements significantly reduce the interference of uniform background fields. In fMCG applications, the field from the mother's heart is one such background and cannot be passively shielded. We report schemes for implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  18. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  19. Fetal intracranial teratoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Hart

    2014-01-01

    A literature and institutional review of fetal intracranial teratomas yielded 90 tumors. The mean age at ultrasound diagnosis was 32 weeks, ranging from 21 to 41 weeks. Males and females were equally affected. The average, maximum tumor size was 10 cm, varying between 3.5 and 23 cm. Forty-two percent of patients died within the first week of life. Death rate was exceptionally high before 30 weeks gestation where almost half the affected fetuses expired. The overall survival rate for 90 fetuses with intracranial teratoma was only 7.8%.

  20. Characteristics of children whose siblings have fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kvigne, Valborg L; Leonardson, Gary R; Borzelleca, Joseph; Neff-Smith, Martha; Welty, Thomas K

    2009-03-01

    To describe the clinical features of American Indian children born just before and just after a sibling with fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome. Two retrospective case-control studies were conducted of Northern Plains American Indian children with fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome identified from 1981 to 1993 by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 760.71. Compared with the controls, the 39 siblings born just before children with fetal alcohol syndrome (study 1) and 30 siblings born just before children with incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome (study 2) had more facial dysmorphology (23.1% and 16.7%, respectively), growth delay (38.5% and 10.0%), and central nervous system impairment (48.7% and 33.3%). The 20 siblings born just after children with fetal alcohol syndrome (study 1) and 22 siblings born just after children with incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome (study 2) had more facial dysmorphology (20.0% and 9.1%, respectively), growth delay (45.0% and 22.7%), and central nervous system impairment (50.0% and 31.8%) than the control siblings. The "before" siblings had characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome that could have predicted that the next child was at risk for fetal alcohol syndrome. The "after" siblings had better outcomes than the previous siblings with fetal alcohol syndrome, a finding that was associated with a decrease in maternal alcohol consumption during the after-sibling pregnancy.

  1. Characterization of fetal arrhythmias by means of fetal magnetocardiography in three cases of difficult ultrasonographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Comani, Silvia; Liberati, Marco; Mantini, Dante; Gabriele, Elisabetta; Brisinda, Donatella; Di Luzio, Silvano; Fenici, Riccardo; Romani, Gian Luca

    2004-12-01

    Characterization of ultrasound detected fetal arrhythmias is generally performed by means of M-mode and pulsed Doppler echocardiography (fECHO), sonographic techniques that allow only indirect and approximate reconstruction of the true electrophysiological events that occur in the fetal heart. Several studies demonstrated the ability of fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) to identify fetal arrhythmias. We report on three women, studied after the 32nd gestational week, who were referred for fMCG because of unsatisfying fetal cardiac visualization with fECHO due to maternal obesity, fetus in constant dorsal position hiding the fetal heart, intrauterine growth retardation, and oligohydramnios. Minor pericardial effusion was present in the third patient and digoxin therapy was given. FMCG were recorded with a 77-channel MCG system working in a shielded room. Independent Component Analysis (FastICA algorithm) was used to reconstruct fetal signals. The good quality of the retrieved fetal signals allowed real-time detection of arrhythmias and their classification as supraventricular extrasystoles (SVE), with/without aberrant ventricular conduction and/or atrioventricular block. The time course of the fetal cardiac rhythm was reconstructed for the entire recording duration; hence, fetal heart rate variability could be studied in time and frequency. Since isolated extrasystoles may progress to more hazardous supraventricular tachycardias, the noninvasive antenatal characterization of, even transient, fetal arrhythmias and their monitoring during pregnancy can be of great clinical impact.

  2. Measurement of cardiac contractility using fetal isovolumetric contraction time in fetal tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yasuyuki; Athayde, Neil; Tokunaga, Shoji; Trudinger, Brian

    2011-02-01

    The isovolumetric contraction time (ICT) is known to be an index of cardiac contractility. In this study, we examined the relationship between the fetal ICT and fetal heart rate (FHR) and evaluated the usefulness of ICT in the assessment of fetal cardiac contractility in cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia. Seven cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia between 32 and 40 weeks' gestation were included in this study. The fetal ICT was measured using a continuous Doppler device and digital filters. The relationship between the fetal ICT and FHR was analyzed using the Spearman's rank correlation test in each fetus. Based on the FHR and ultrasound findings of hydrops at the measurement of ICT, the obtained data were divided into three groups: normal, tachyarrhythmia only and hydrops. The clinical usefulness of ICT was assessed using the random effect model. In 7 fetuses, a total of 60 data points were obtained. A significant correlation between fetal ICT and FHR was not noted in each fetus. The ICT of the hydrops group was significantly prolonged compared with those of the normal and tachyarrhythmia-only groups (p < 0.01). An association between the fetal ICT and FHR is not noted and the fetal ICT might have some utility to detect impaired fetal cardiac contractility even in fetuses with tachyarrhythmia.

  3. [Evolution of electronic fetal monitoring in labor].

    PubMed

    Dell'Anna, A; Portuesi, A; Angioli, R

    2014-04-01

    Intrapartum fetal hypoxia remains an important cause of neonatal permanent handicap and death, and in many cases it is related to lack of optimal fetal surveillance. In the last 40 years cardiotocography (CTG) has been routinely used for fetal monitoring yet this technique lacks reproducibility and its interpretation by healthcare professionals remains an important variable. Indeed, this technology not only does not improve clinically important outcomes, but also, on the contrary, leads to an increase in the number of caesarean sections carried out. Recent research has focused the attention on specific components of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) tracings, such as ST-segment analysis (STAN) or fetal pulse oximetry (FPO). Fetal ST-segment analysis and pulse oximetry provide important parameters when used in addition to CTG, but their combined use obviously does not eliminate CTG interpretation limits. Although continuous electronic fetal monitoring is now ubiquitously utilized in modern practice, risks and benefits associated with its use are worth analysing. The analysis of the research and clinical practices carried out in the past several decades may provide useful insights into the current use of electronic fetal monitoring and new system associated procedures (STAN and FPO), which have influenced what has now become a routine modern obstetric practice.

  4. Aspects of Fetal Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Jongsma, Henk W.; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Ninety-three pregnant women were recruited to assess fetal learning and memory, based on habituation to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation of fetuses of 30-38 weeks gestational age (GA). Each habituation test was repeated 10 min later to estimate the fetal short-term memory. For Groups 30-36, both measurements were replicated in a second session…

  5. Advances in evaluating the fetal skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Ann-Edwidge; Brown, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss aspects of the prenatal diagnosis of fetal skeletal malformations, concentrating on the advantages offered by different imaging techniques and the approaches that are of value in evaluating a suspected skeletal dysplasia. We also briefly address the findings in some of the commoner malformations of the fetal skeleton that may be encountered. PMID:24868173

  6. Fetal deaths in Brazil: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barbeiro, Fernanda Morena dos Santos; Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Tauffer, Mariana Girão; Ferreira, Mariana de Souza Santos; da Silva, Fagner Paulo; Ventura, Patrícia Mendonça; Quadros, Jesirée Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the frequency of and factors associated with fetal death in the Brazilian scientific literature. METHODS A systematic review of Brazilian studies on fetal deaths published between 2003 and 2013 was conducted. In total, 27 studies were analyzed; of these, 4 studies addressed the quality of data, 12 were descriptive studies, and 11 studies evaluated the factors associated with fetal death. The databases searched were PubMed and Lilacs, and data extraction and synthesis were independently performed by two or more examiners. RESULTS The level of completeness of fetal death certificates was deficient, both in the completion of variables, particularly sociodemographic variables, and in defining the underlying causes of death. Fetal deaths have decreased in Brazil; however, inequalities persist. Analysis of the causes of death indicated maternal morbidities that could be prevented and treated. The main factors associated with fetal deaths were absent or inadequate prenatal care, low education level, maternal morbidity, and adverse reproductive history. CONCLUSIONS Prenatal care should prioritize women that are most vulnerable (considering their social environment or their reproductive history and morbidities) with the aim of decreasing the fetal mortality rate in Brazil. Adequate completion of death certificates and investment in the committees that investigate fetal and infant deaths are necessary. PMID:25902565

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: An International Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    1987-01-01

    Describes Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in infants, caused by mothers' consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Both disabilities found in relatively high proportions of American Indian children. Discusses impact of disabilities on education. Discusses parent education programs in United States and abroad. (TES)

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: An International Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    1987-01-01

    Describes Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in infants, caused by mothers' consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Both disabilities found in relatively high proportions of American Indian children. Discusses impact of disabilities on education. Discusses parent education programs in United States and abroad. (TES)

  9. Future perspectives in intrapartum fetal surveillance.

    PubMed

    Devoe, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    Electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) has aided intrapartum fetal surveillance for more than four decades. In spite of numerous trials comparing EFM with standard fetal heart rate (FHR) auscultation, it remains unclear that this modality has led to improved perinatal outcomes, especially lower rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A variety of ancillary methods have been developed to improve the accuracy of EFM for predicting fetal compromise. At present, a limited number of studies have shown that the addition of fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis to visual interpretation of FHR patterns resulted in better fetal outcomes. However, the shortcomings of visual interpretation of FHR patterns persist. Although automated systems for FHR analysis have been developed, they have not been widely used or proven to enhance the value of intrapartum fetal surveillance. This article discusses future directions for novel intrapartum fetal surveillance systems that leverage the long experience gained from EFM to enhance the level of risk assessment and prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sonography in Fetal Birth Weight Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Oyekan, O. O.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of fetal birth weight is an important factor in the management of high risk pregnancies. The information and knowledge gained through this study, comparing a combination of various fetal parameters using computer assisted analysis, will help the obstetrician to screen the high risk pregnancies, monitor the growth and development,…

  11. Aspects of Fetal Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Jongsma, Henk W.; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Ninety-three pregnant women were recruited to assess fetal learning and memory, based on habituation to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation of fetuses of 30-38 weeks gestational age (GA). Each habituation test was repeated 10 min later to estimate the fetal short-term memory. For Groups 30-36, both measurements were replicated in a second session…

  12. Fetal Brain Behavior and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on prenatal brain development, detailing the functions controlled by the medulla, pons, and midbrain, and the implications for cognitive development. Concludes that fetal cognitive motor activity, including auditory discrimination, orienting, the wake-sleep cycle, fetal heart rate accelerations, and defensive reactions,…

  13. Fetal tissue transplant research: ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Farnam, C R

    1996-01-01

    The transplant of cells from fetal tissue shows promise as a therapy for certain diseases. The use and research of fetal tissue, and methods of obtaining the tissue, have raised ethical dilemmas. Consideration must be given concerning the mother, the fetus, and the tissue recipient.

  14. Fetal pain, abortion, viability, and the Constitution.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Sayeed, Sadath

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, the Nebraska state legislature passed a new abortion restricting law asserting a new, compelling state interest in preventing fetal pain. In this article, we review existing constitutional abortion doctrine and note difficulties presented by persistent legal attention to a socially derived viability construct. We then offer a substantive biological, ethical, and legal critique of the new fetal pain rationale.

  15. Fetal Brain Behavior and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on prenatal brain development, detailing the functions controlled by the medulla, pons, and midbrain, and the implications for cognitive development. Concludes that fetal cognitive motor activity, including auditory discrimination, orienting, the wake-sleep cycle, fetal heart rate accelerations, and defensive reactions,…

  16. Sonography in Fetal Birth Weight Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Oyekan, O. O.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of fetal birth weight is an important factor in the management of high risk pregnancies. The information and knowledge gained through this study, comparing a combination of various fetal parameters using computer assisted analysis, will help the obstetrician to screen the high risk pregnancies, monitor the growth and development,…

  17. Fetal hemoglobin silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Oneal, Patricia A.; Gantt, Nicole M.; Schwartz, Joseph D.; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Lee, Y. Terry; Moroney, John W.; Reed, Christopher H.; Schechter, Alan N.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2006-01-01

    Interruption of the normal fetal-to-adult transition of hemoglobin expression should largely ameliorate sickle cell and beta-thalassemia syndromes. Achievement of this clinical goal requires a robust understanding of gamma-globin gene and protein silencing during human development. For this purpose, age-related changes in globin phenotypes of circulating human erythroid cells were examined from 5 umbilical cords, 99 infants, and 5 adult donors. Unexpectedly, an average of 95% of the cord blood erythrocytes and reticulocytes expressed HbA and the adult beta-globin gene, as well as HbF and the gamma-globin genes. The distribution of hemoglobin and globin gene expression then changed abruptly due to the expansion of cells lacking HbF or gamma-globin mRNA (silenced cells). In adult reticulocytes, less than 5% expressed gamma-globin mRNA. These data are consistent with a “switching” model in humans that initially results largely from gamma- and beta-globin gene coexpression and competition during fetal development. In contrast, early postnatal life is marked by the rapid accumulation of cells that possess undetectable gamma-globin mRNA and HbF. The silencing phenomenon is mediated by a mechanism of cellular replacement. This novel silencing pattern may be important for the development of HbF-enhancing therapies. PMID:16735596

  18. Monitoring fetal development with magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Padhye, N S; Brazdeikis, A; Verklan, M T

    2004-01-01

    Fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) is useful for noninvasive assessment of the status of the autonomic nervous system of the developing fetus. In this pilot study we acquired fetal magnetocardiograms (fMCG) in a magnetically shielded environment. Each recording was of 5-minute duration and was subsequently repeated in a high-frequency noise environment to examine the feasibility of conducting future recordings in clinical environments that lack facilities for magnetic shielding. The fMCG (n=17) were recorded at 9 spatial locations above the pregnant abdomen at 26 to 35 weeks gestational age (GA) by a second-order SQUID gradiometer. The signal-to-noise was adequate for reliable QRS detection even in the noisy environment, especially for GA >/= 30. The total spectral power of the RR-series, as well as band powers at low (0.05 to 0.25 Hz) and high (0.25 to 1.00 Hz) frequencies independently exhibited an increasing trend with GA. There was no evidence of bias in spectral power due to lack of shielding. These results provide experimental evidence supporting further studies in magnetically unshielded environments and may have an important implication for future clinical use of fMCG in the assessment of fHRV.

  19. HTS magnetometers for fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wakai, R T; Paulson, D N; Schwartz, B

    2004-11-30

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUID sensors have adequate magnetic field sensitivity for adult magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements, but it remains to be seen how well they perform for fetal MCG (fMCG), where the heart signals are typically ten times smaller than the adult signals. In this study, we assess the performance of a prototype HTS SQUID system; namely, a three-SQUID gradiometer formed from three vertically-aligned HTS dc-SQUID magnetometers integrated into a fiberglass liquid nitrogen dewar of diameter 12.5 cm and height 30 cm. Axial gradiometers with short or long baseline, as well as a second order gradiometer, can be formed out of these magnetometers via electronic subtraction. The calibrated magnetometer sensitivities at 1 kHz are 109 fT/square root of Hz, 155 fT/square root of Hz and 51 fT/square root of Hz. Direct comparison is made between the HTS SQUID system and a LTS SQUID system by making recordings with both systems during the same session on adult and fetal subjects. Although the fMCG could be resolved with the HTS SQUID system in most near-term subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio was relatively low and the system could not be operated outside of a shielded room.

  20. Arthrogryposis and fetal hypomobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Goknur; Topaloglu, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Arthrogryposis is a heterogeneous condition, evident from birth, which can be defined as multiple contractures of the joints. The etiology is multifold: genetic disorders of the central or peripheral nervous system, or of the connective tissue leading to decreased fetal movements, and vascular and environmental causes. The problem begins in utero. There may be overlapping conditions between sporadic, syndromic, neurogenic, myopathic and metabolic types. The workup should include a family tree. Systemic involvement, for example of the renal and pulmonary systems, may be encountered in associated syndromes. Motor neuron disorders leading to the condition are the most commonly seen type. Fetal or neonatal akinesia/hypokinesia is at the severe end of the spectrum, in which there is literally intrauterine limitation of movement. Children with amyplasia are born with little or diminished muscle bulk of the extremities. Distal arthrogryposis is almost always a dominantly inherited condition. A multidisciplinary care approach is required in order to provide optimum healthcare. The management team should include a nutritionist and a physiotherapist. Genetic counseling is possible in most instances. A truly genetic cause can be identified in more than 50% of cases. Survivors, though handicapped, can lead near normal lives.

  1. Fetal sex and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Challis, J; Newnham, J; Petraglia, F; Yeganegi, M; Bocking, A

    2013-02-01

    Rates of preterm birth vary between different populations and ethnic groups. Epidemiologic studies have suggested that the incidence of preterm birth is also higher in pregnancies carrying a male fetus; the male:female difference is greater in earlier preterm pregnancy. Placental or chorion trophoblast cells from pregnancies with a male fetus produced more pro-inflammatory TNFα in response to LPS stimulation and less anti-inflammatory IL-10 and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) than cells from pregnancies with a female fetus, more prostaglandin synthase (PTGS-2) and less prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). These results suggest that in the presence of a male fetus the trophoblast has the potential to generate a more pro-inflammatory environment. Maturation of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and expression of placental genes, particularly 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 are also expressed in a sex dependent manner, consistent with the sex-biasing influences on gene networks. Sex differences in these activities may affect clinical outcomes of pre- and post-dates pregnancies and fetal/newborn wellbeing. These factors need consideration in studies of placental function and in the development of personalized strategies for the diagnosis of preterm labor and postnatal health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism: diagnostic and therapeutic approachment

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism may occur in mothers with Graves’ disease. Fetal thyrotoxicosis manifestation is observed with the transition of TSH receptor stimulating antibodies to the fetus from the 17th–20th weeks of pregnancy and with the fetal TSH receptors becoming responsive after 20 weeks. The diagnosis is confirmed by fetal tachycardia, goiter and bone age advancement in pregnancy and maternal treatment is conducted in accordance. The probability of neonatal hyperthyroidism is high in the babies of mothers that have ongoing antithyroid requirement and higher antibody levels in the last months of pregnancy. Clinical manifestation may be delayed by 7–17 days because of the antithyroid drugs taken by the mother. Neonatal hyperthyroidism symptoms can be confused with sepsis and congenital viral infections. Herein, the diagnosis and therapeutic approach are reviewed in cases of fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism. PMID:28439194

  3. Fetal motor activity and maternal cortisol

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    The contemporaneous association between maternal salivary cortisol and fetal motor activity was examined at 32 and 36 weeks gestation. Higher maternal cortisol was positively associated with the amplitude of fetal motor activity at 32 weeks, r(48) = .39, p < .01, and 36 weeks, r(77)=.27, p < .05, and the amount of time fetuses spent moving at 32 weeks during the 50 minute observation period, r(48) = 33, p < .05. Observation of periods of unusually intense fetal motor activity were more common in fetuses of women with higher cortisol, Mann-Whitney U = 58.5. There were no sex differences in fetal motor activity, but the associations between maternal cortisol and fetal motor amplitude and overall movement were significantly stronger for male than female fetuses. PMID:19630038

  4. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Ngamprasertwong, Pornswan; Dong, Min; Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms that maternal heart rate has an

  5. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A.; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Methods Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. Results A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. Conclusions For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms

  6. Segmented independent component analysis for improved separation of fetal cardiac signals from nonstationary fetal magnetocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Luiz O.; Guzo, Mauro G.; Moraes, Eder R.; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T.; Comani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetocardiograms (fMCGs) have been successfully processed with independent component analysis (ICA) to separate the fetal cardiac signals, but ICA effectiveness can be limited by signal nonstation-arities due to fetal movements. We propose an ICA-based method to improve the quality of fetal signals separated from fMCG affected by fetal movements. This technique (SegICA) includes a procedure to detect signal nonstationarities, according to which the fMCG recordings are divided in stationary segments that are then processed with ICA. The first and second statistical moments and the signal polarity reversal were used at different threshold levels to detect signal transients. SegICA effectiveness was assessed in two fMCG datasets (with and without fetal movements) by comparing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signals extracted with ICA and with SegICA. Results showed that the SNR of fetal signals affected by fetal movements improved with SegICA, whereas the SNR gain was negligible elsewhere. The best measure to detect signal nonstationarities of physiological origin was signal polarity reversal at threshold level 0.9. The first statistical moment also provided good results at threshold level 0.6. SegICA seems a promising method to separate fetal cardiac signals of improved quality from nonstationary fMCG recordings affected by fetal movements. PMID:25781658

  7. Association of gestational age with the option of pregnancy termination for fetal abnormalities incompatible with neonatal survival.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Flavia; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; Pinto, Vânia Lopes; Melo, Patrícia de Souza; Abrahão, Anelise Riedel

    2016-01-01

    o Paulo (SP), com prontuários de mulheres com fetos portadores de anomalias incompatíveis com a sobrevida neonatal na gestação atual. A amostra constituiu-se de 94 prontuários. Para análise estatística dos dados, utilizou-se o programa Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), versão 19. A população foi de mulheres adultas jovens, com escolaridade compatível com o Ensino Médio completo/incompleto, empregadas, com renda familiar entre um e três salários mínimo, solteiras, que não faziam uso de tabaco, bebidas alcoólicas ou de drogas ilícitas. Verificou-se que mulheres com maior idade gestacional na ocasião do diagnóstico fetal (p=0,0066) e/ou na chegada ao serviço especializado (p=0,0018) apresentaram menor percentual de interrupção gestacional. Por apresentarem características diferentes daquelas classicamente consideradas de alto risco gestacional, é possível que essas mulheres não tenham sido facilmente identificadas durante a classificação de risco gestacional, o que pode ter colaborado para o diagnóstico tardio de patologias fetais. O diagnóstico precoce possibilita acesso à assistência multiprofissional especializada em tempo adequado para aconselhamento do casal sobre a possibilidade de solicitação de autorização judicial para a interrupção gestacional.

  8. Effects of Maternal and Fetal Characteristics on Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Zhongyi; Gao, Ya; Yuan, Yuying; Guo, Yulai; Zhou, Lijun; Liao, KaiKai; Wang, Jun; Du, Bole; Hou, Yumei; Chen, Zhonglin; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Hongyun; Yu, Cong; Zhao, Lijian; Lau, T K; Jiang, Fuman; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    To study factors that influence the concentration of cell-free fetal DNA (fetal fraction) using a large clinical data set of pregnancies with male fetus. A retrospective analysis of 23 067 pregnancies that received noninvasive prenatal testing from January 2012 to October 2013, including 22 650 normal singleton pregnancies (control group) and 417 pregnancies with aneuploidy, twin pregnancy, or various maternal conditions including preexisting hypertension, preexisting diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and carrier of the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus (HBsAg; study group). Multiples of the median (MoM) analysis was performed in the control group to derive gestation and body mass index (BMI)-corrected fetal fraction. The effects of study group conditions on fetal fraction were examined by calculating the ratio of MoM (RMoM) values. Fetal fraction showed a positive correlation with gestational age (r(2) = .10, P < .001) and increased rapidly after the 21 weeks of gestation (r(2) = .26, P < .001). Negative association with maternal BMI was found with fetal fraction (r(2) = .04, P < .001). In study group, fetal fraction was higher among pregnant women with a trisomy 21 fetus (RMoM = 1.24, P < .001) and lower among trisomy 18 (RMoM = 0.84, P < .001). A 1.6-fold incensement of fetal fraction was observed in twin fetuses comparing to singleton pregnancy (RMoM = 1.62, P < .001). Women with preexisting hypertension had significantly lower fetal fraction (RMoM = 0.85, P = .02). Preexisting diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or carrier of HBsAg did not affect fetal fraction. The fetal fraction was affected by fetal aneuploidy, maternal BMI, and the number of gestation. Maternal preexisting of hypertension appeared to reduce fetal fraction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Modeling photon transport in transabdominal fetal oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Vishnoi, Gargi; Choe, Regine; Chance, Britton

    2000-07-01

    The possibility of optical oximetry of the blood in the fetal brain measured across the maternal abdomen just prior to birth is under investigated. Such measurements could detect fetal distress prior to birth and aid in the clinical decision regarding Cesarean section. This paper uses a perturbation method to model photon transport through a 8- cm-diam fetal brain located at a constant 2.5 cm below a curved maternal abdominal surface with an air/tissue boundary. In the simulation, a near-infrared light source delivers light to the abdomen and a detector is positioned up to 10 cm from the source along the arc of the abdominal surface. The light transport [W/cm2 fluence rate per W incident power] collected at the 10 cm position is Tm equals 2.2 X 10-6 cm-2 if the fetal brain has the same optical properties as the mother and Tf equals 1.0 X 10MIN6 cm-2 for an optically perturbing fetal brain with typical brain optical properties. The perturbation P equals (Tf - Tm)/Tm is -53% due to the fetal brain. The model illustrates the challenge and feasibility of transabdominal oximetry of the fetal brain.

  10. Fetal RHD genotyping after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thurik, Florentine F; Page-Christiaens, Godelieve C M L; Ait Soussan, Aicha; Ligthart, Peter C; Cheroutre, Goedele M A F; Bossers, Bernadette; Veldhuisen, Barbera; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Haas, Masja

    2016-08-01

    Fetal RHD genotyping allows targeted diagnostic testing, fetal surveillance, and eventually intrauterine treatment to D-alloimmunized pregnant women who carry an RHD+ fetus. However, false-positive and false-negative results of noninvasive prenatal fetal RHD genotyping have been described due to a variety of causes. In this case report we present two cases where noninvasive fetal RHD typing was complicated by a previous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We describe two women with a history of allogeneic BMT in early childhood. Both were born D+ and received a transplant of their D- male sibling. Anti-D were detected during pregnancy in one of them. The biologic father of this pregnancy was D+. In both cases polymerase chain reaction procedures specific for RHD on maternal plasma DNA were positive whereas a D- neonate was born in one case (Case 1). False-positive results of noninvasive fetal RHD genotyping occur in D+ women transplanted with marrow of a D- donor, due to circulating cell-free DNA originating from nonhematopoietic tissue. The cases highlight that health care professionals and laboratories should be aware that allogeneic BMT can be a cause for false-positive results in fetal RHD genotyping with cell-free DNA in maternal plasma, and likewise the wrong fetal sex can be reported in the case of a male donor and a female fetus. Based on one of the cases we also recommend giving D- blood products to young female patients who receive a BMT of D- donors. © 2016 AABB.

  11. Fetal tissue engineering: chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Terada, Shinichi; Hannouche, Didier; Ochoa, Erin R; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2003-08-01

    This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to chest wall reconstruction. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of elastic and hyaline cartilage specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal chondrocytes were seeded onto synthetic scaffolds, which then were placed in a bioreactor. After birth, fetal cartilage constructs (n = 10) were implanted in autologous fashion into the ribs of all lambs (n = 6) along with identical, but acellular scaffolds, as controls (n = 6). Engineered and acellular specimens were harvested for analysis at 4 to 12 weeks postimplantation. Standard histology and matrix-specific staining were performed both before implantation and after harvest on all constructs. Regardless of the source of chondrocytes, all fetal constructs resembled hyaline cartilage, both grossly and histologically, in vitro. In vivo, engineered implants retained hyaline characteristics for up to 10 weeks after implantation but remodeled into fibrocartilage by 12 weeks postoperatively. Mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates surrounding residual PGA/PLLA polymer fibers were noted in all specimens but most prominently in the acellular controls. Engineered fetal cartilage can provide structural replacement for at least up to 10 weeks after autologous, postnatal implantation in the chest wall. Fetal tissue engineering may prove useful for the treatment of severe congenital chest wall defects at birth.

  12. Adiponectin Enhances Mouse Fetal Fat Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liping; Yoo, Hyung sun; Madon, Alysha; Kinney, Brice; Hay, William W.; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Maternal obesity increases offspring birth weight and susceptibility to obesity. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a prominent function in maintaining energy homeostasis. In contrast to adults, neonatal blood adiponectin levels are positively correlated with anthropometric parameters of adiposity. This study was designed to investigate the role of adiponectin in maternal obesityenhanced fetal fat deposition. By using high-fat diet–induced obese mouse models, our study showed that maternal obesity increased fetal fat tissue mass, with a significant elevation in fetal blood adiponectin. However, adiponectin gene knockout (Adipoq−/−) attenuated maternal obesity-induced high fetal fat tissue mass. We further studied the effects of fetal adiponectin on fetal fat deposition by using a cross breeding approach to create Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− offspring, whereas maternal adiponectin was null. Adipoq−/+ offspring had more fat tissue mass at both birth and adulthood. Significantly high levels of lipogenic genes, such as sterol regulatory element–binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase, were detected in the livers of Adipoq−/+ fetuses. In addition, expression of genes for placental fatty acid transport was significantly increased in Adipoq−/+ fetuses. Together, our study indicates that adiponectin enhances fetal fat deposition and plays an important role in maternal obesity-induced high birth weight. PMID:22872236

  13. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  14. Neurodevelopment after fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Baschat, Ahmet A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can emerge as a complication of placental dysfunction and increases the risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Marked elevations of umbilical artery (UA) Doppler resistance that set the stage for cardiovascular and biophysical deterioration with subsequent preterm birth characterize early-onset FGR. Minimal, or absent UA Doppler abnormalities and isolated cerebral Doppler changes with subtle deterioration and a high risk for unanticipated term stillbirth are characteristic for late-onset FGR. Nutritional deficiency manifested in lagging head growth is the most powerful predictor of developmental delay in all forms of FGR. Extremes of blood flow resistance and cardiovascular deterioration, prematurity and intracranial hemorrhage increase the risks for psychomotor delay and cerebral palsy. In late-onset FGR, regional cerebral vascular redistribution correlates with abnormal behavioral domains. Irrespective of the phenotype of FGR, prenatal tests that provide precise and independent stratification of risks for adverse neurodevelopment have yet to be determined.

  15. Atrioventricular block during fetal life

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lindsey E.; Simpson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular (AV) block occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 live births and is known to result in significant mortality and morbidity both during fetal life and postnatally. Complete AV block can occur as a result of an immune or a non-immune mediated process. Immune mediated AV block is a multifactorial disease, but is associated with the trans-placental passage of maternal autoantibodies (anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB). These autoantibodies attach to and subsequently damage the cardiomyocytes and conduction tissue in susceptible fetuses. In this report, we examine the evidence in reference to means of assessment, pathophysiology, and potential prenatal therapy of atrioventricular block. PMID:26136631

  16. Atomic Magnetometry for fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Walker, Thad; Wakai, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    We present results of using an array of atomic magnetometers in detecting fetal Magnetocardiograms(fMCG). The array consists of four 87-Rb atomic magnetometers operating in the spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. They have a demonstrated sensitivity of 5 - 10 fT /√{ Hz } -limited by the Johnson noise of the magnetic shielding. We report measurements of fMCG on gestational ages as small as 21 weeks and describe the technical challenges and design features that make the measurements possible. We present a method for minimizing the impact of AC Stark Shifts on the magnetometer array performance by relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms from a pumping region to an AC Stark shift free active region. This work was supported by the NIH.

  17. Fetal pain: an infantile debate.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, S W G

    2001-02-01

    The question of whether a fetus can experience pain is an immense challenge. The issue demands consideration of the physical and psychological basis of being and the relation between the two. At the center of this debate is the question of how it is that we are conscious, a question that has inspired the writing of some of our most brilliant contemporary philosophers and scientists, with one commentary suggesting surrender. In my earlier review I attempted to draw together the various strands of thinking that had attacked the question of fetal pain and relate them back to the bigger question of consciousness. In their vituperative response, Benatar and Benatar bite off my finger before looking to where I am pointing. I will examine each of their criticisms.

  18. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  19. Fetal alcohol syndrome: neuropsychiatric phenomics.

    PubMed

    Burd, Larry; Klug, Marilyn G; Martsolf, John T; Kerbeshian, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common developmental disorder with impairments in multiple neuropsychiatric spheres of varying severity. Few population-derived studies of the behavioral phenotype are available. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders in three groups: subjects who met criteria for FAS (n=152); subjects who met criteria for partial FAS/ARND (n=150); and referred subjects who did not meet criteria for either FAS or partial FAS/ARND (n=86). Each subject had a standardized evaluation by a medical geneticist. All subjects were from North Dakota. We found increases in the prevalence rates of neuropsychiatric disorders in subjects with FAS compared to subjects with partial FAS/ARND and the lowest rates in the group that did not meet criteria for either FAS or partial FAS/ARND. Comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder occurred in 73% of cases with FAS, in 72% cases with partial FAS/ARND, and in 36% subjects who did not meet criteria for either. For other neuropsychiatric disorders, a similar distribution of comorbidity was found. This study supports the concept of a continuum of impairment resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. The presence of complex cognitive, behavioral, and physical symptomatology in the affected subjects with prenatal alcohol exposure would seem to fit well under the diagnostic rubric of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Diagnosis and long-term management will require increasing access to multidisciplinary child development teams including mental health professionals who treat children and adolescents. Adults will require care primarily from teams with expertise in mental health and developmental disabilities.

  20. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I.; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M.; Parker, Corette B.; Silver, Robert M.; Dudley, Donald J.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Saade, George R.; Koch, Matthew A.; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W.; Conway, Deborah L.; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Methods and findings Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (<10th percentile) and large (>90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner

  1. Fetal akinesia sequence caused by nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lammens, M; Moerman, P; Fryns, J P; Lemmens, F; van de Kamp, G M; Goemans, N; Dom, R

    1997-04-01

    Nine patients with the characteristic signs of fetal akinesia sequence (polyhydramnion, multiple joint contractures and lung hypoplasia) are described. In 8 of the 9 patients nemaline myopathy could be demonstrated with histology. The ninth patient presented the same phenotype as his 4 affected siblings in whom the nemaline myopathy could be histologically proven. Seven of the patients belonged to 2 families; the other 2 patients were isolated cases. In one fetal case nemaline myopathy was documented at week 22 of gestation. These observations demonstrate that nemaline myopathy can cause the fetal akinesia sequence, with onset of first symptoms as early as the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy.

  2. Fetal Surgery for Myelomeningocele: Trials and Tribulations

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N.Scott

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for in utero repair of myelomeningocele (MMC) in the context of pathologic observations, animal models, and outcomes from the initial experience with human fetal myelomeningocele repair is presented. This has now culminated in a randomized trial, Management of Myelomeningocele Study (the MOMS Trial), the findings of which are listed. The story is focused on the milestone contributions of members of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) on the road to successful fetal surgery for spina bifida. This is now performed in selected patients and presents an additional therapeutic alternative for expectant mothers carrying a fetus with MMC. PMID:22325376

  3. [Advanced MRI techniques of the fetal brain].

    PubMed

    Schöpf, V; Dittrich, E; Berger-Kulemann, V; Kasprian, G; Kollndorfer, K; Prayer, D

    2013-02-01

    Evaluation of the normal and pathological fetal brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI of the fetal brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used in clinical practice, all other methods are used at a research level. Serving as standard methods in the future. Combined structural and functional data for all gestational ages will allow more specific insight into the developmental processes of the fetal brain. This gain of information will help provide a common understanding of complex spatial and temporal procedures of early morphological features and their impact on cognitive and sensory abilities.

  4. Medical legal issues in fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schifrin, Barry S; Cohen, Wayne R

    2007-06-01

    Despite almost universal fetal monitoring during labor, debates over its role and benefits persist in the medical community and in obstetric negligence lawsuits. Irrespective, there is widespread agreement that improvement in perinatal outcome is possible and that the events of labor contribute significantly to perinatal hazards. Timely application and proper interpretation of the fetal heart rate pattern in concert with evaluations of the maternal condition and the feasibility of safe vaginal delivery permit an evaluation of the quality of care and the preventability of fetal injury whether in peer review or in malpractice cases.

  5. Doppler colour flow imaging of fetal intracerebral arteries relative to fetal behavioural states in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Noordam, M J; Hoekstra, F M; Hop, W C; Wladimiroff, J W

    1994-09-30

    In 14 normally developing term fetuses, the relationship between the blood flow velocity waveforms at cerebral arterial level (internal carotid artery, anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery) and fetal behavioural states was studied using Doppler colour flow imaging. Behavioural state dependent changes in absolute flow velocities occurred in all vessels, except for the middle cerebral artery. These changes suggest preferential blood flow to the left heart resulting in increased flow to the cerebrum during fetal behavioural state 2F (active sleep) when compared with fetal behavioural state 1F (quiet sleep). The middle cerebral artery supplies the neocerebrum. This developing part of the cerebrum does not seem to take part in the regulation of fetal behaviour. In the internal carotid artery, an inverse relationship between peak systolic velocity and fetal heart rate could be established, which can be explained by a shorter rapid filling phase at raised fetal heart rate according to the Frank-Starling Law.

  6. Free Amino-acid Concentrations in Fetal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, F.; Robins, S. P.; Forfar, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    The pattern of free amino-acid concentrations in maternal venous plasma, fetal umbilical arterial plasma, fetal urine, and amniotic fluid at 15 to 20 weeks' gestation has been determined. Free amino-acid concentrations were greater in fetal plasma than in maternal plasma, amniotic fluid, or fetal urine. The ratios of amino-acid concentrations in fetal umbilical arterial plasma and urine indicate that the fetal kidney can effectively conserve amino-acids, possibly reaching an adult level of competence in this respect. There was little correlation between amino-acid concentrations in the fluids analysed with the exception of that between amniotic fluid and fetal urine. PMID:5472758

  7. Abnormal fetal-maternal interactions: an evolutionary value?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Jimmy

    2012-08-01

    There is clinical and ultrasonographic evidence that "abnormal fetal-maternal interactions" or "fetal-maternal conflicts" may be central to the mechanisms of injury in pregnancy complications such as fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, fetal death, gestational diabetes, and a subset of patients with preterm parturition. This conceptual framework integrates abnormalities in the placental bed, placental vasculature, and other areas of fetal-maternal interactions with pregnancy complications in light of their possible evolutionary value.

  8. Piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Kulier, Regina

    2012-06-13

    Piracetam is thought to promote the metabolism of brain cells when they are hypoxic. It has been used to prevent adverse effects of fetal distress. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of piracetam for suspected fetal distress in labour on method of delivery and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (15 February 2012). Randomised trials of piracetam compared with placebo or no treatment for suspected fetal distress in labour. Both review authors assessed eligibility and trial quality. One study of 96 women was included. Piracetam compared with placebo was associated with a trend to reduced need for caesarean section (risk ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 1.03). There were no statistically significant differences between the piracetam and placebo group for neonatal morbidity (measured by neonatal respiratory distress) or Apgar score. There is not enough evidence to evaluate the use of piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

  9. Special Tests for Monitoring Fetal Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy, such as fetal growth problems, Rh sensitization , or high blood pressure • Decreased movement of the ... A pregnancy that extends beyond 42 weeks. Rh Sensitization: A condition in which an Rh-negative mother ...

  10. Micronutrients in fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    McArdle, H J; Ashworth, C J

    1999-01-01

    The roles that the different vitamins and minerals play in fetal growth and development are reviewed, primarily with respect to growth and differentiation in humans; but, as appropriate, data provided from animal and cellular studies are also considered.

  11. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  12. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  13. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  14. [Effect of music on fetal behaviour].

    PubMed

    Malinova, M; Malinova, M

    2004-01-01

    Antenatal music stimulation shown to elicit fetal heart rate and body movement responses, indicating that prenatal experience with music influences auditory functional development. The slower tempo resulted in less movement variation.

  15. Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Kleihauer-Betke stain; Flow cytometry - fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution; Rh incompatibility - erythrocyte distribution ... slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor ...

  16. Fetal magnetocardiography: Methods for rapid data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, John C.; Flynn, Edward R.; Quinn, A.; Weir, A.; Shahani, U.; Bain, R. J. P.; Maas, P.; Donaldson, G. B.

    1997-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardigraphy (fMCG) provides a unique method for noninvasive observations of the fetal heart. Electrical currents generated by excitable tissues within the fetal heart yield measurable external magnetic fields. Measurements are performed with superconducting quantum interference devices inductively coupled to magnetometer or gradiometer coils, and the resulting signals are converted to digital form in the data acquisition system. The measured fields are usually contaminated by fetal and maternal movements (usually respiration), other physiological fields such as skeletal muscle contraction, the maternal cardiac signal, and environmental electromagnetic fields. Sensitivity to relatively distant sources, both physiological and environmental, is substantially reduced by the use of magnetic gradiometers. Other contaminants may be removed by proper signal conditioning which may be automatically applied using "black box" algorithms that are transparent to the user and highly efficient. These procedures can rapidly reduce the complex signal plus noise waveforms to the desired fMCG with minimal operator interference.

  17. Fetal diffusion imaging: pearls and solutions.

    PubMed

    Kasprian, Gregor; Del Río, Maria; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-12-01

    Recently, diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging of the fetus has evolved from a basic research application to an important diagnostic imaging tool in fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Although technically challenging and still plagued with several sources of artifacts, DWI can add clinically important information, which cannot be provided by any other prenatal imaging modality. Its potential to noninvasively probe tissue structures on the basis of Brownian molecular motion enables the detection of early changes associated with acute fetal diseases, as well as structural alterations of functionally diverse compartments of different fetal organs. In this article, the current clinical applications of fetal brain and body DWI are outlined, as well as its current limitations.

  18. Diagnostic pitfalls in fetal brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Al-Mukhtar, Ali; Kasprian, Gregor; Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Recent technological advances in fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and increased reliability of MRI in depicting abnormalities and lesions, especially in the central nervous system, are increasingly bringing up challenging issues with regard to accurate diagnosis. There are also pitfalls not only attributable to image acquisition but also in clinical interpretation. The misinterpretation of findings because of insufficient knowledge about fetal brain development as visualized by MRI may also be regarded as an important limitation of fetal MRI. We provide an overview of the most common pitfalls experienced in fetal MRI in routine practice, demonstrate how to identify some of the factors that lead to imaging misinterpretation, and suggest ways to tackle these problems, with an emphasis on MR techniques and image calibration.

  19. Fetal origins of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xita, Nektaria; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2010-09-01

    The natural history of metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which shares many components of metabolic syndrome, may originate in intrauterine life. Evidence from epidemiological observations, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest that the nutritional, hormonal, and metabolic environment afforded by the mother may permanently program differentiating target tissues of the offspring toward the development of metabolic syndrome/PCOS phenotype in adult life. The mechanisms of fetal programming are not well understood. Thus, the altered tissue differentiation may be the result of fetal adaptive responses representing homeostatic adaptations due to alterations in fetal nutrition. Also, tissues under the influence of androgen excess may be directed toward a more masculine phenotype with regard to reproductive, neuroendocrine, and metabolic traits, while the importance of epigenetics in fetal origin of metabolic syndrome/PCOS cannot be overlooked.

  20. Erythropoietin elevation in the chronically hyperglycemic fetal lamb

    SciTech Connect

    Philipps, A.F. Widness, J.A.; Garcia, J.F.; Raye, J.R.; Swartz, R.

    1982-05-01

    The effects of chronic fetal glucose infusion upon fetal oxygenation and endogenous erythropoietin (Ep) production were studied using the chronically catheterized fetal lamb. Fetal glucose infusion at rates between 5 and 20 mg/kg/min resulted in sustained fetal hyperglycemia. During glucose infusion (maximal glucose concentration achieved = 55.4 +/- 3.7 mg/dl) fetal arterial oxygen contents fell from 5.8 +/- 0.9 to 4.2 +/- 1.0 ml/dl while no changes were observed in simultaneously sampled, noninfused twins. Although plasma insulin concentration rose in the infused fetuses, the elevations were inconstant and no relationship between fetal plasma insulin concentration and decrement in fetal oxygen content was evident. The changes in plasma Ep concentration were noted prior to any significant fetal metabolic acidosis (as evidence of tissue hypoxia) and no changes in plasma Ep concentration were observed in simultaneously sampled noninfused twins. No relationship was apparent between fetal arterial plasma insulin and Ep concentrations. Since neither fetal anemia nor hemodilution occurred in these preparations, glucose-induced fetal hyposemia is the likely mechanism behind elevated fetal Ep concentrations in these experiments. Similarities between this animal model and human fetuses and infants of diabetic mothers suggest that chronic in utero hypoxemia may be a common feature responsible for such diverse abnomalities as polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and late fetal demise. The mechanism behind the glucose-induced fetal hypoxemia is not known.

  1. Diagnosis and management of common fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Roland; Stambach, Dominik; Jaeggi, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are detected in at least 2% of unselected pregnancies during routine obstetrical scans. Most common are transient, brief episodes of a slow or fast heart rate or of an irregular heart rhythm. Less common are prolonged or persistent abnormalities such as supraventricular tachycardia and complete heart block which may lead to low cardiac output, fetal hydrops and demise. The objectives of this review are to update the reader on the diagnosis and management of the more common arrhythmias. PMID:23960639

  2. Fetal MR imaging of Kniest dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Zeynep; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Laor, Tal; Tinkle, Bradley T

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of Kniest dysplasia, a rare form of the type II collagenopathies, with prenatal MRI. Sonography revealed only short limbs in the fetus. Fetal MRI findings included enlarged hyaline cartilaginous structures with abnormally high T2 signal intensity, delayed ossification of the pubic and ischial bones, and platyspondyly. By delineating the cartilaginous abnormalities, fetal MRI can contribute to the prenatal diagnosis of chondrodysplasias.

  3. Fetal akinesia and multiple perinatal fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Blackburn, W R; Wertelecki, W

    1995-02-13

    Two newborn infants with fetal akinesia sequence were noted to have multiple perinatal fractures of the long bones. The radiographic manifestations are characterized by gracile ribs, thin long bones, and multiple diaphyseal fractures. Consistent histopathologic changes of bone are irregular with focal areas of extreme diaphyseal thinning, thin and long marrow spicules, and with or without callous formation at fracture sites. Pathogenic mechanisms of bone fractures in fetal akinesia sequence and the differential diagnoses of congenital/perinatal bone fractures are discussed.

  4. Fetal toxicology of environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Koren, G

    1995-04-01

    During the past decade, new evidence has been collected regarding the fetal risks of environmental tobacco smoke. Throughout gestation, the unborn baby is exposed to increasing concentrations of nicotine through maternal blood and gastrointestinal and skin absorption of the nicotine in the amniotic fluid. Recent research shows measurable concentrations of cotinine in the hair of infants born to passively smoking mothers. This exposure has been recently associated with effects on fetal growth.

  5. Impact of oxidative stress in fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Loren P; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring.

  6. Fetal dose estimates for CT pelvimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.M.; Shearer, D.R.

    1989-04-01

    Fetal and maternal dose estimates for computed tomographic pelvimetry have been obtained from phantom measurements. Use of routine abdomen imaging techniques may result in localized fetal doses in excess of 13 mGy (1.3 rad). With the use of a low-exposure (40-mAs) technique, it is possible to obtain images of acceptable quality for the necessary measurements. The resulting dose to the fetus is approximately 2.3 mGy (0.23 rad).

  7. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, P.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.

    2006-10-01

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise.

  8. Integrated Approach for Fetal QRS Detection

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, R. B.; Hatton, Jeff O.; Lowery, Curtis L.; Preissl, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography provides reliable signals of the fetal heart dynamics with high temporal resolution that can be used in a clinical setting. We present a robust Hilbert transform method for extraction of the fetal heart rate. Our method may be applied to signals derived from a single channel or an array of channels. In the case of multichannel data, the channels can be combined to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the extraction of fetal heart data. The method is inherently insensitive to fetal position or movement and, in addition, can be automated. We demonstrate that the determination of R-wave timing is relatively insensitive to waveform morphology. The method can also be applied if the data were preprocessed by independent component analysis (ICA). We compared the Hilbert method, ICA, ICA + Hilbert, and raw signals and found that the Hilbert method gave the best overall performance. We demonstrated that there were approximately 171 errors in 46 789 fetal heart beats. PMID:18713688

  9. Cadmium increases human fetal germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Angenard, Gaëlle; Muczynski, Vincent; Coffigny, Hervé; Pairault, Catherine; Duquenne, Clotilde; Frydman, René; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2010-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental pollutant and a major constituent of tobacco smoke. Adverse effects of this heavy metal on reproductive function have been identified in adults; however, no studies have examined its effects on human reproductive organs during development. Using our previously developed organ culture system, we investigated the effects of cadmium chloride on human gonads at the beginning of fetal life, a critical stage in the development of reproductive function. Human fetal gonads were recovered during the first trimester (711 weeks postconception) and cultured with or without Cd. We used different concentrations of Cd and compared results with those obtained with mouse fetal gonads at similar stages. Cd, at concentrations as low as 1 microM, significantly decreased the germ cell density in human fetal ovaries. This correlated with an increase in germ cell apoptosis, but there was no effect on proliferation. Similarly, in the human fetal testis, Cd (1 microM) reduced germ cell number without affecting testosterone secretion. In mouse fetal gonads, Cd increased only female germ cell apoptosis. This is the first experimental demonstration that Cd, at low concentrations, alters the survival of male and female germ cells in humans. Considering data demonstrating extensive human exposure, we believe that current environmental levels of Cd could be deleterious to early gametogenesis.

  10. The Use of Fetal Noninvasive Electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the severe complications of pregnancy that leads to fetal deterioration. The aim was to survey the validity of fetal distress diagnostics in case of Doppler ultrasonic umbilical vein and arteries blood flow velocity investigation and ECG parameters analysis obtained from maternal abdominal signal before labor in preeclamptic patients. Fetal noninvasive ECG and umbilical arterial and venous Doppler investigation were performed in 120 patients at 34-40 weeks of gestation. And 30 of them had physiological gestation and were involved in Group I. In Group II 52 pregnant women with mild-moderate PE were observed. 38 patients with severe PE were monitored in Group III. The most considerable negative correlation was determined in pair Apgar score 1 versus T/QRS (R = -0.50; p < 0.05). So the increased T/QRS ratio was the most evident marker of fetal distress. Fetal noninvasive ECG showed sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 98.4% and, therefore, was determined as more accurate method for fetal monitoring.

  11. The Use of Fetal Noninvasive Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the severe complications of pregnancy that leads to fetal deterioration. The aim was to survey the validity of fetal distress diagnostics in case of Doppler ultrasonic umbilical vein and arteries blood flow velocity investigation and ECG parameters analysis obtained from maternal abdominal signal before labor in preeclamptic patients. Fetal noninvasive ECG and umbilical arterial and venous Doppler investigation were performed in 120 patients at 34–40 weeks of gestation. And 30 of them had physiological gestation and were involved in Group I. In Group II 52 pregnant women with mild-moderate PE were observed. 38 patients with severe PE were monitored in Group III. The most considerable negative correlation was determined in pair Apgar score 1 versus T/QRS (R = −0.50; p < 0.05). So the increased T/QRS ratio was the most evident marker of fetal distress. Fetal noninvasive ECG showed sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 98.4% and, therefore, was determined as more accurate method for fetal monitoring. PMID:27006859

  12. Fetal ventriculomegaly: Diagnosis, treatment, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pisapia, Jared M; Sinha, Saurabh; Zarnow, Deborah M; Johnson, Mark P; Heuer, Gregory G

    2017-07-01

    Fetal ventriculomegaly (VM) refers to the enlargement of the cerebral ventricles in utero. It is associated with the postnatal diagnosis of hydrocephalus. VM is clinically diagnosed on ultrasound and is defined as an atrial diameter greater than 10 mm. Because of the anatomic detailed seen with advanced imaging, VM is often further characterized by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fetal VM is a heterogeneous condition with various etiologies and a wide range of neurodevelopmental outcomes. These outcomes are heavily dependent on the presence or absence of associated anomalies and the direct cause of the ventriculomegaly rather than on the absolute degree of VM. In this review article, we discuss diagnosis, work-up, counseling, and management strategies as they relate to fetal VM. We then describe imaging-based research efforts aimed at using prenatal data to predict postnatal outcome. Finally, we review the early experience with fetal therapy such as in utero shunting, as well as the advances in prenatal diagnosis and fetal surgery that may begin to address the limitations of previous therapeutic efforts.

  13. Fetal growth potential and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2004-02-01

    Although the association of fetal growth restriction and adverse pregnancy outcomes is well known, lack of sensitivity limits its clinical value. To a large extent, this limitation is a result of traditionally used method to define growth restriction by comparing fetal or birth weight to population norms. The use of population norms, by virtue of their inability to fully consider individual variation, results in high false positive and negative rates. An alternative, calculating fetal individually optimal growth potential, based on physiological determinants of individual growth, is superior in predicting adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Impairment of fetal growth potential identifes some adverse pregnancy outcomes that are not associated with growth restrction defined by population norms. When compared with traditional population-based norms, fetal growth potential is a better predictor of several important adverse outcomes of pregnancy which include: stillbirth, neonatal mortality and morbidity, and long-term adverse neonatal outcomes like neonatal encephalopathy, cerebral palsy and cognitive abilities. Impairment of individual growth potential is also strongly associated with spontaneous preterm delivery. Although definitive interventional trials have not been conducted as yet to validate the clinical value of fetal growth potential, many observational studies, conducted in various populations, indicate its significant promise in this respect.

  14. Effects of melanocortins on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Simamura, Eriko; Shimada, Hiroki; Shoji, Hiroki; Otani, Hiroki; Hatta, Toshihisa

    2011-06-01

    Melanocortins, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α-, β-, and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) are produced in the placenta and secreted into embryos/fetuses. ACTH concentrations are higher in fetal plasma than in maternal plasma and peak at mid-gestation in rats, whereas ACTH production starts in the anterior lobe of the fetal pituitary at later stages. Melanocortin receptors (MC1-5R), receptors for ACTH and α-, β- and γ-MSH, are expressed in various adult organs. The specific function of these receptors has been well examined in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the HPA axis-like network in the skin, and anti-inflammatory effects for white blood cells have also been investigated. MC2R and/or MC5R are also expressed in the testis, lung, kidney, adrenal, liver, pancreas, brain and blood cells at different stages in mouse and rat embryos/fetuses. Melanocortins in embryos and fetuses promote maturation of the HPA axis and also contribute to the development of lung, testis, brain and blood cells. Recently, a unique ACTH function was revealed in fetuses: placental ACTH, which is secreted by the maternal leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and induces LIF secretion from fetal nucleated red blood cells. Finally, the maternal LIF-placental ACTH-fetal LIF signal relay regulates the LIF level and promotes neurogenesis in fetuses, which suggests that ACTH acts as a signal transducer or effector for fetal development in the maternal-fetal signal pathway.

  15. EXIT procedure for fetal neck masses.

    PubMed

    Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Olutoye, Olutoyin A

    2012-06-01

    The ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT procedure) can be life-saving for fetuses with large neck masses. Advances in fetal imaging and access to prenatal care have improved the ability to anticipate and plan for the treatment of these fetuses. This review will highlight advances in imaging techniques, modification of anesthesia and case selection for the EXIT procedure. Long-term maternal and fetal outcomes will also be discussed. There have been relatively few articles published on this subject in the past 18 months. A better understanding of the effect of inhalational anesthetics on fetal cardiac function and some insight into the pharmacokinetics of narcotics while on uteroplacental support has been gained. Imaging characteristics that may improve patient selection have been proposed. The long-term outcomes of mothers undergoing fetal surgical procedures in general and specifically those undergoing EXIT procedures suggest that the EXIT procedure can be performed with minimal maternal morbidity in skilled hands. Furthermore, long-term neonatal outcomes appear to be improving, but further studies are needed. The EXIT procedure can be performed safely in a skilled multidisciplinary setting with minimal maternal and fetal morbidity and excellent fetal outcomes. Recent reports have helped further identify which fetuses will benefit from the EXIT procedure.

  16. Fetal and Neonatal Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are substances commonly encountered in every setting and condition in the modern world. It is virtually impossible to avoid the contact with these chemical compounds in our daily life. Molecules defined as endocrine disruptors constitute an extremely heterogeneous group and include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants and their by-products. Natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens) also act as endocrine disruptors. Different from adults, children are not exposed only to chemical toxins in the environment but may also be exposed during their intrauterine life. Hundreds of toxic substances, which include neuro-immune and endocrine toxic chemical components that may influence the critical steps of hormonal, neurological and immunological development, may affect the fetus via the placental cord and these substances may be excreted in the meconium. Children and especially newborns are more sensitive to environmental toxins compared to adults. Metabolic pathways are immature, especially in the first months of life. The ability of the newborn to metabolize, detoxify and eliminate many toxins is different from that of the adults. Although exposures occur during fetal or neonatal period, their effects may sometimes be observed in later years. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects of these substances on the endocrine system and to provide evidence for preventive measures. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22672860

  17. Fetal echocardiography in ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Repondek-Liberska, M; Janiak, K; Wloch, A

    2000-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is an extremely rare congenital abnormality occurring in 5.5 to 7.9 per 1 million live births with high lethality. Between January 1995 and October 1997 eight cases of ectopia cordis were diagnosed at our institute before birth. On the basis of echocardiography the fetal heart anatomy was categorized as either normal heart anatomy (NHA; n = 3) or congenital heart defect (CHD; n = 5). In the majority of cases (seven of eight) other abnormalities were present. Some reports have described ectopia cordis being diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy. In our study group the average gestational age at diagnosis was 26 weeks. The prenatal diagnosis of isolated ectopia cordis is easy; counseling the patient, the perinatal management including term, place, and method of delivery, and optimal care of the newborn are more difficult. Ectopia cordis is a malformation that pediatricians rarely encounter, even at pediatric cardiology centers. Much more frequently it is a problem for sonographers and obstetricians; however, pediatric cardiologists should be aware of diagnostic algorithm for such cases, especially when additional abnormalities are present.

  18. [Fetal bone and joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2008-12-21

    The article discusses the physiology and pathology of fetal bone and joint development and functions. The bones provide static support for the body. The skull and the bones of spinal column encase the central and part of the peripheral nervous system. The ribs and the sternum shield the heart and the lungs, while the bones of the pelvis protect the intraabdominal organs. Pathological changes of these bony structures may impair the functions of the respective systems or internal organs. Movements of the bones are brought about by muscles. The deriving motions are facilitated by joints. Bony anomalies of the extremities limit their effective functions. Apart from skeletal and joint abnormalities, akinesia may also be caused by neurological, muscular and skin diseases that secondarily affect the functions of bones and joints. Such pathological changes may lead to various degrees of physical disability and even to death. Some of the mentioned anomalies are recognizable in utero by ultrasound. The diagnosis may serve as medical indication for abortion in those instances when the identified abnormality is incompatible with independent life.

  19. Neurodevelopmental changes of fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Curtis L; Hardman, Mary P; Manning, Nirvana; Hall, R Whit; Anand, K J S; Clancy, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    Pain in the developing fetus is controversial because of the difficulty in measuring and interpreting pain during gestation. It has received increased attention lately because of recently introduced legislation that would require consideration of fetal pain during intentional termination of pregnancy. During development, sensory fibers are abundant by 20 weeks; a functional spinal reflex is present by 19 weeks; connections to the thalamus are present by 20 weeks; and connections to subplate neurons are present by 17 weeks with intensive differentiation by 25 weeks. These cells are important developmentally, but decline as a result of natural apoptosis. Mature thalamocortical projections are not present until 29 to 30 weeks, which has led many to believe the fetus does not experience emotional "pain" until then. Pain requires both nociception and emotional reaction or interpretation. Nociception causes physiologic stress, which in turn causes increases in catecholamines, cortisol, and other stress hormones. Physiological stress is different from the emotional pain felt by the more mature fetus or infant, and this stress is mitigated by pain medication such as opiates. The plasticity of the developing brain makes it vulnerable to the stressors that cause long-term developmental changes, ultimately leading to adverse neurological outcomes. Whereas evidence for conscious pain perception is indirect, evidence for the subconscious incorporation of pain into neurological development and plasticity is incontrovertible. Scientific data, not religious or political conviction, should guide the desperately needed research in this field. In the meantime, it seems prudent to avoid pain during gestation.

  20. Steroidogenesis in fetal bovine gonads.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, M M; Liptrap, R M; Basrur, P K

    1988-01-01

    Gonadal steroidogenesis in bovine fetuses of 40 to 125 days gestation was examined using histochemical procedures and radioimmunoassay on gonadal cultures to determine the physiological correlates of gonadal morphogenesis in cattle. Gonadal morphology and the in vitro secretion patterns were distinct between the sexes by 45 days when testes secreted significantly higher levels of testosterone and androstenedione and lower levels of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol that the ovaries (p less than 0.0001). It would appear that the main steroid route in the ovaries of 45 to 70 day old fetuses is the androstenedione to estrone to 17 beta-estradiol pathway. The high estrone secretion and the decreasing levels of 17 beta-estradiol and testosterone in the ovaries of 70 to 125 day fetuses suggest an inhibition of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. It is postulated that this shift in steroid biosynthetic pathways may be related to the change in cellular events from mitosis to meiosis in fetal ovaries. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:3196968

  1. The promise of fetal cells in maternal blood.

    PubMed

    Choolani, Mahesh; Mahyuddin, Aniza P; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2012-10-01

    Delaying childbirth increases the proportion of advanced maternal age pregnancies. This increases the number of pregnancies requiring invasive prenatal testing. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies and monogenic disorders requires fetal cells obtained through invasive procedures (i.e. chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis). These procedures carry a risk of fetal loss, which causes anxiety to at-risk couples. Intact fetal cells entering maternal circulation have raised the possibility of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. Rarity of fetal cells, however, has made it challenging. Fetal nucleated red blood cells are ideal candidate target cells because they have limited lifespan, contain true representation of fetal genotype, contain specific fetal cell identifiers (embryonic and fetal globins), and allow interrogation with chromosomal fluorescence in-situ hybridisation and possibly with array comparative genomic hybridisation. The utility of fetal nucleated red blood cells in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis has not reached clinical application because of the inconsistencies in enrichment strategies and rarity of cells.

  2. Defining Normal and Abnormal Fetal Growth: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Merialdi, Mario; Platt, Lawrence D.; Kramer, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Normal fetal growth is a critical component of a healthy pregnancy and influences the long-term health of the offspring. However, defining normal and abnormal fetal growth has been a long-standing challenge in clinical practice and research. The authors review various references and standards that are widely used to evaluate fetal growth, and discuss common pitfalls of current definitions of abnormal fetal growth. Pros and cons of different approaches to customize fetal growth standards are described. The authors further discuss recent advances towards an integrated definition for fetal growth restriction. Such a definition may incorporate fetal size with the status of placental health measured by maternal and fetal Doppler velocimetry and biomarkers, biophysical findings and genetics. Although the concept of an integrated definition appears promising, further development and testing are required. An improved definition of abnormal fetal growth should benefit both research and clinical practice. PMID:20074690

  3. Association between maternal-fetal HLA-DR relationships and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Hoff, C; Peevy, K J; Spinnato, J A; Giattina, K; Peterson, R D

    1993-12-01

    To determine whether maternal-fetal human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigenic relationships are associated with differential fetal growth in weight. A cohort of 659 primigravid women were enrolled in this study in the prepartum period and their neonates were subsequently examined. Anthropometric, maternal cigarette smoking behavior, health, pregnancy, and delivery data were collected; serogenetic typing was conducted on maternal and cord bloods to determine maternal and neonatal HLA antigenic phenotypes. Women and their neonates were assigned to one of the four different types of maternal-fetal relationships existing at each of the HLA-A, B, DR, and DQ loci. Birthweights were treated quantitatively and qualitatively (neonates classified as growth-retarded or normal). After controlling for other factors influencing birthweight (e.g., smoking, maternal body size), significantly lower birthweight trends (P < .01) were found when neonates expressed a single HLA-DR antigen and their mothers expressed a second HLA-DR antigen that was foreign (allogeneic) to their neonate. Our findings supports the hypothesis that lack of maternal immune exposure to fetal HLA antigens is associated with a slowing of fetal growth. However, in this situation slowed fetal growth is most likely to occur when the fetus is potentially exposed to maternal HLA-DR alloantigens. We believe this sheds new light on immunologic events at the maternal-fetal interface influencing fetal growth. We present one possible explanation to account for this finding.

  4. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects-- Support for Teachers and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Susanna V.; Norton, Terry L.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews genesis of fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects in children. Identifies physical characteristics and behavioral indicators found and provides three checklists of observable signs for both disorders. Recommends seven steps for educators to follow in seeking assistance with these conditions. (DLH)

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects-- Support for Teachers and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Susanna V.; Norton, Terry L.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews genesis of fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects in children. Identifies physical characteristics and behavioral indicators found and provides three checklists of observable signs for both disorders. Recommends seven steps for educators to follow in seeking assistance with these conditions. (DLH)

  6. Preschool Teacher Attitude and Knowledge Regarding Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Faite R-P.

    The Centers for Disease Control estimate that each year more than 8,000 Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) babies are born, and that many more babies go undiagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE), a less severe condition. FAS and FAE have been identified as major contributors to poor memory, shorter attention spans, lower IQs, diminished achievement…

  7. Parent Knowledge of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Michigan Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Faite R-P.

    This paper presents results of a survey of 297 parents in Michigan regarding their knowledge of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE), including their knowledge of the characteristics that typify alcohol-related birth defects and prevention measures. Parents surveyed had children in preschool regular education, preschool…

  8. Videofetoscopically assisted fetal tissue engineering: skin replacement.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Fishman, S J; Mehegan, K; Atala, A

    1998-02-01

    Treatment of several congenital anomalies is frequently hindered by lack of enough tissue for surgical reconstruction in the neonatal period. The purposes of this study were (1) introduction of a novel concept in perinatal surgery, involving minimally invasive harvest of fetal tissue, which is then processed through tissue engineering techniques in vitro while pregnancy is allowed to continue, so that, at delivery, the newborn can benefit from having autologous, expanded tissue promptly available for surgical implantation at birth; (2) analysis of the progress of an engineered fetal skin graft with time, after implantation in the neonate; and (3) study of the effects of current tissue engineering techniques on fetal keratinocytes and fetal dermal fibroblasts. Ten 90- to 95-day-gestation fetal lambs underwent surgical creation of two large paramedian excisional skin defects on the posterior body wall. Subsequently, fetal skin specimens no larger than 1.5 x 1.5 cm were videofetoscopically harvested. Fetal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts were then separately cultivated and expanded in vitro for 45 to 50 days, resulting in a total of approximately 250 to 300 million cells. Seven to 10 days before fetal delivery, all cells were seeded in two layers on a 16 to 20-cm2, 3-mm thick biodegradable polyglycolic acid polymer matrix. One to 4 days after delivery, the autologous engineered skin was implanted over one of two previously created skin defects. The second skin defect region received an absorbable polymer scaffold without cells as a control. If necessary, the original skin wounds were further amplified before implantation. Each animal provided at least one time-point for histological analysis of both types of repair through excisional biopsies performed at weekly intervals, up to 8 weeks postimplantation. Normal skin specimens were also used as controls. Fetal and neonatal survival rates were 100%. Based on previous postnatal skin engineering studies, fetal dermal

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan.

  10. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  11. Relationship of Unkeratinized Skin to Bovine Fetal Mummification: An Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hubbert, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed in support of the hypothesis that immature unkeratinized fetal skin must be present if bovine fetal mummification is to occur. The reduction in fetal and amniotic fluid is considered to be the result of intrafetal (fetal death) or prefetal (caruncular damage) effects on the normal net fluid flow from the maternal circulation through the fetal circulation and then across the fetal skin into the amniotic cavity. As the skin is keratinized permeability is reduced drastically thus limiting fluid loss from the fetus. PMID:4274827

  12. Boy or Girl? Maternal Psychological Correlates of Knowing Fetal Sex

    PubMed Central

    Kotila, Letitia E.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound provides a reliable, convenient way to determine fetal sex, but not all expectant mothers pursue this knowledge. We used logistic regression to investigate whether maternal personality, parenting perfectionism, and gender role beliefs were associated with knowing fetal sex in a recent sample of first-time expectant mothers. We also tested whether conscientiousness and extraversion moderated the association between gender role beliefs and knowing fetal sex. Mothers who were more open to experience were less likely to know fetal sex, whereas mothers high in parenting perfectionism were more likely to know fetal sex. Conscientious mothers who espoused more egalitarian gender role beliefs were less likely to know fetal sex. PMID:26279598

  13. Boy or Girl? Maternal Psychological Correlates of Knowing Fetal Sex.

    PubMed

    Kotila, Letitia E; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J; Kamp Dush, Claire M

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound provides a reliable, convenient way to determine fetal sex, but not all expectant mothers pursue this knowledge. We used logistic regression to investigate whether maternal personality, parenting perfectionism, and gender role beliefs were associated with knowing fetal sex in a recent sample of first-time expectant mothers. We also tested whether conscientiousness and extraversion moderated the association between gender role beliefs and knowing fetal sex. Mothers who were more open to experience were less likely to know fetal sex, whereas mothers high in parenting perfectionism were more likely to know fetal sex. Conscientious mothers who espoused more egalitarian gender role beliefs were less likely to know fetal sex.

  14. Amniocentesis for Fetal Lung Maturity: Will It Become Obsolete?

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Stephen; Sherman, Craig; Lewis, David; Owens, Sheri; Bodie, Frankie; McCathran, C Eric; Holliday, Nicolette

    2013-01-01

    Amniocentesis for fetal lung maturity has historically been performed for many reasons: uterine and placental complications, maternal comorbidities, fetal issues, and even obstetric problems. Even though the risks associated with third trimester amniocentesis are extremely low, complications have been documented, including preterm labor, placental abruptions, intrauterine rupture, maternal sepsis, fetal heart rate abnormalities, and fetal-maternal hemorrhage. This review presents the types of tests for fetal lung maturity, presents the indications and tests utilized, and discusses recommendations for when amniocentesis for fetal lung maturity may be appropriate. PMID:24826202

  15. Relationship of unkeratinized skin to bovine fetal mummification: an hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, W T

    1974-04-01

    Evidence is reviewed in support of the hypothesis that immature unkeratinized fetal skin must be present if bovine fetal mummification is to occur. The reduction in fetal and amniotic fluid is considered to be the result of intrafetal (fetal death) or prefetal (caruncular damage) effects on the normal net fluid flow from the maternal circulation through the fetal circulation and then across the fetal skin into the amniotic cavity. As the skin is keratinized permeability is reduced drastically thus limiting fluid loss from the fetus.

  16. Sex differences in fetal habituation.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Peter G; Dornan, James C; Lynch, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    There is some evidence for sex differences in habituation in the human fetus, but it is unknown whether this is due to differences in central processing (habituation) or in more peripheral processes, sensory or motor, involved in the response. This study examined whether the sex of the fetus influenced auditory habituation at 33 weeks of gestation, and whether this was due to differences in habituation or in the sensory or motor components using a set of four experiments. The first experiment found that female fetuses required significantly fewer stimulus presentations to habituate than males. The second experiment revealed no difference in the spontaneous motor behaviour of male and female fetuses. The third experiment examined auditory intensity thresholds for the stimuli used to habituate the fetus. No differences in thresholds were found between males and females, although there was inter-individual variability in thresholds. A final experiment, using stimuli individualized for that particular fetus' auditory intensity threshold, found that female fetuses habituated faster than males. In combination, the studies reveal that habituation in the human fetus is affected by sex and this is due to a difference in central 'information processing' of the stimuli rather than peripheral aspects of the response. It is argued that male and female fetuses present different neurobehavioural developmental trajectories, with females more advanced at 33 weeks than males. This study suggests that research examining prenatal behaviour should consider the factor of fetal sex. This may be particularly pertinent where there is an intention to use the results diagnostically. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Fetal carotid blood flow during videofetoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Fishman, S J

    1998-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding has been reported as one of the complications of both open and minimally invasive fetal surgery and putatively attributed to intraoperative fluctuations of carotid blood flow. The aim of this study was to look at fetal carotid blood flow and its relationship with umbilical blood flow, blood pressure, oxygen delivery, and acid-base status in the fetus at various intraamniotic pressures with both liquid and gas media during fetoscopic surgery. Six 115- to 130-day-gestation ewes underwent continuous invasive systemic blood pressure monitoring in the descending aorta. A hysterotomy was performed. A 6-mm ultrasonic blood flow probe was placed around the common umbilical artery at its origin from the fetal aorta. This was followed by placement of a double-lumen, 4F catheter in the fetal descending aorta through a femoral artery. A 4-mm ultrasonic blood flow probe was then placed around the fetal left common carotid artery. A pressure-monitoring, multiperforated catheter was placed inside the amniotic cavity. The fetus was repositioned inside the uterus, which was then closed. The abdominal wall was closed loosely. No further manipulation was performed for 1 hour. Intraamniotic pressure was raised from 0 to 30 mm Hg at 5-mm Hg intervals by infusing either warmed saline or medical air. Common umbilical artery and left carotid artery blood flows, blood pressure, blood gases, bicarbonate, sodium, and hematocrit were recorded in all fetuses at each 5-mm Hg interval. Maternal systemic blood pressure, O2 saturation, and temperature were kept constant. Carotid blood flow remained stable within the intra-amniotic pressure range studied (0 to 30 mm Hg), despite the significant drop in common umbilical artery blood flow uniformly observed above 20 mm Hg when saline was infused and above 15 mm Hg when air was infused. There was fetal hypoxemia and hypercarbia concomitant with decreased common umbilical artery blood flow (however, without fetal acidosis, because

  18. Recent advances in fetal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Suzanne M K; Rahim, Ahad A; Chan, Jerry K Y; David, Anna L; Peebles, Donald M; Coutelle, Charles; Waddingtont, Simon N

    2011-04-01

    Over the first decade of this new millennium gene therapy has demonstrated clear clinical benefits in several diseases for which conventional medicine offers no treatment. Clinical trials of gene therapy for single gene disorders have recruited predominantly young patients since older subjects may have suffered irrevocablepathological changes or may not be available because the disease is lethal relatively early in life. The concept of fetal gene therapy is an extension of this principle in that diseases in which irreversible changes occur at or beforebirth can be prevented by gene supplementation or repair in the fetus or associated maternal tissues. This article ccnsiders the enthusiasm and skepticism held for fetal gene therapy and its potential for clinical application. It coversa spectrum of candidate diseases for fetal gene therapy including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, thalassemia, congenital protein C deficiency and cystic fibrosis. It outlines successful and not-so-successful examples of fetal gene therapy in animal models. Finally the application and potential of fetal gene transfer as a fundamental research tool for developmental biology and generation of somatic transgenic animals is surveyed.

  19. Probabilistic Source Separation for Robust Fetal Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) techniques are widely used to extract signals of interest from a mixture with other signals, such as extracting fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from noninvasive recordings on the maternal abdomen. These BSS techniques, however, typically lack possibilities to incorporate any prior knowledge on the mixing of the source signals. Particularly for fetal ECG signals, knowledge on the mixing is available based on the origin and propagation properties of these signals. In this paper, a novel source separation method is developed that combines the strengths and accuracy of BSS techniques with the robustness of an underlying physiological model of the fetal ECG. The method is developed within a probabilistic framework and yields an iterative convergence of the separation matrix towards a maximum a posteriori estimation, where in each iteration the latest estimate of the separation matrix is corrected towards a tradeoff between the BSS technique and the physiological model. The method is evaluated by comparing its performance with that of FastICA on both simulated and real multichannel fetal ECG recordings, demonstrating that the developed method outperforms FastICA in extracting the fetal ECG source signals. PMID:24363776

  20. Magnetocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P; Hailer, B; Bader, W; Geissler, J; Trowitzsch, E; Grönemeyer, D H

    1999-11-01

    To examine the possible use of magnetocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. Investigation of routinely examined pregnant women, as well as women referred because of arrhythmias or other reasons. Sixty-three women between the 13th and 42nd week of pregnancy. Recording of 189 fetal magnetocardiograms, of which 173 traces (92%) demonstrated sufficient fetal signal strength to permit evaluation. After digital subtraction of the maternal artefact, all fetal complexes were identified and the recording was examined for arrhythmic events. Short bradycardic episodes, not associated with any pathological condition, were found in 26% of all recordings, usually in mid-pregnancy. In 12 cases, isolated extrasystoles of no clinical importance could be identified. There were nine traces which revealed multiple arrhythmias including ventricular and supraventricular ectopic beats, bigeminy and trigeminy, sino-atrial block and atrio-ventricular conduction disturbances. Furthermore, two cases with tachycardia were found. Magnetocardiography offers a simple noninvasive method for examination of the fetal cardiac electrophysiological signal. It may thus be useful in the identification and classification of clinically relevant arrhythmia and aid in decisions concerning treatment.

  1. Umbilical cord stricture and intrauterine fetal death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Arbuckle, S; Hocking, G; Billson, V

    1995-01-01

    Umbilical cord stricture is an uncommon but distinctive condition associated with intrauterine fetal death. Although cases have been reported periodically since the last century, there has been considerable speculation as to whether the condition is real or a postmortem artifact. In the present study, 25 cases reported since 1925 are reviewed and 8 new cases are described. Clinically, a decrease in fetal movements is usually the only symptom during the second or third trimester of pregnancy and fetal death occurs soon after. The women's age, health, and previous history have shown no link with this condition, but a higher incidence is noted in twin pregnancies. Morphologically, most infants are macerated and an extremely narrow segment of umbilical cord is usually seen at the fetal end and rarely at the placental end or in multiple sites along the cord. Absence of Wharton's jelly, stenosis, or obliteration of cord vessels at the narrow segment and intravascular cord thrombosis are the major pathological features. The findings of this study support the view that the condition can cause fetal death and alerts both pathologists and clinicians to the important features identifying this cause of perinatal wastage.

  2. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Fauza, Dario O; Barnewolt, Carol; Brown, Stephen D; Jennings, Russell W

    2002-03-01

    This study was aimed at examining the feasibility of fetal tracheal occlusion guided exclusively by ultrasonography and at establishing the technical principles of this procedure based on current instrumentation and ultrasound technology. Time-dated pregnant ewes underwent a small laparotomy and partial uterine exposure. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, a steerable guide wire was fed into the fetal tracheal lumen. An 8F catheter then was fed around the guide wire into the trachea. This was followed by intratracheal placement of a 2F coaxial angiographic catheter, connected to a detachable silicone balloon at its extremity, which then was inflated with saline and delivered locally. Euthanasia was performed at term. Complete tracheal occlusion was achieved in all fetuses (n = 7) intraoperatively. Operating time needed for tracheal occlusion, once access to the amniotic cavity was established, varied widely, but could be as short 1 minute. Tracheal lumen dimensions outgrew balloon diameter in 57.1% of fetuses (4 of 7), resulting in balloon dislodgment in those animals. No balloon rupture was observed. (1) Accurate access to the fetal trachea and local delivery of an occlusive detachable silicone balloon are consistently feasible exclusively under real-time ultrasound guidance with commercially available instrumentation. (2) Balloon dimensions are determining factors of displacement risk and must be selected carefully before tracheal delivery. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion may be a preferable alternative to surgical intervention for treatment of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine J

    2011-02-01

    Fetal developmental anomalies consist of central nervous system malformations, brain injury, and tumors. Overlap is often seen especially between malformation and injury because malformation may be genetically determined or related to external causative agent, whereas brain injury may be, on one hand, caused by malformation as with intracranial vascular malformation and, on another, can cause brain malformation when cerebral insult occurs during organogenesis and histogenesis. The goal of this review was not to describe by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) all fetal developmental anomalies encountered in utero; it is most likely to focus on fetal brain anomalies that either are most commonly seen in fetal tertiary care facility or are extremely challenging for MRI. Consequently, the potential of advanced MR techniques such as proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging is also described especially when a challenge is highlighted. This review is therefore organized in subchapters as follows. The first section gives the place of MRI in prenatal development and cites the standard protocol and the advanced techniques. The rules of fetal brain MRI, the challenge and pitfalls, and the selection of MRI cases follow as 3 subchapters. Also, abnormalities are described as 3 separate subchapters entitled ventriculomegalies (hydrocephalus), malformations, and brain injury.

  4. Adjustable fetal phantom for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubán, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2009-05-01

    As the measuring head of a fetal pulse oximeter must be attached to the head of the fetus inside the mother's uterus during labor, testing, and developing of fetal pulse oximeters in real environment have several difficulties. A fetal phantom could enable evaluation of pulse oximeters in a simulated environment without the restrictions and difficultness of medical experiments in the labor room. Based on anatomic data we developed an adjustable fetal head phantom with three different tissue layers and artificial arteries. The phantom consisted of two arteries with an inner diameter of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. An electronically controlled pump produced pulse waves in the arteries. With the phantom we investigated the sensitivity of a custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter at different pulsation intensity and artery diameters. The results showed that the oximeter was capable of identifying 4% and 2% changes in diameter between the diastolic and systolic point in arteries of over 0.2 and 0.4 mm inner diameter, respectively. As the structure of the phantom is based on reported anatomic values, the results predict that the investigated custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter has sufficient sensitivity to detect the pulse waves and to calculate the R rate on the fetal head.

  5. Nutritional regulation of the placental lactogen receptor in fetal liver: Implications for fetal metabolism and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Freemark, M.; Comer, M.; Mularoni, T.; D'Ercole, A.J.; Grandis, A.; Kodack, L. )

    1989-09-01

    We have recently identified and purified from fetal liver a distinct receptor that mediates the effects of placental lactogen (PL) on amino acid transport, glycogen synthesis, and somatomedin production in fetal tissues. At present, the factors that regulate the number and affinity of PL receptors in the fetus are unknown. Since maternal nutrition plays a critical role in fetal metabolism and growth, we have examined the role of nutrition in the regulation of the PL receptor in fetal lambs. Pregnant ewes at 123-126 days gestation were fed ad libitum (FED), fasted for 3 days (FASTED), or fasted for 3 days and then refed for an additional 3 days (REFED). The ewes were then killed, and the binding of (125I)ovine (o) PL to hepatic microsomes from the fetal lambs was examined. Maternal fasting caused a 60-75% reduction in the specific binding of oPL to fetal liver; the effect of fasting was reversed in part by refeeding. The decrease in oPL binding resulted from an 80% reduction in the number of fetal oPL-binding sites (Scatchard analysis); there were no changes in the affinity of the oPL receptor (Kd, 0.6 nM), the subunit structure of the receptor, or the degree of occupancy of the receptor in vivo by endogenous fetal hormones. The specific bindings of GH (0.6%), PRL (0.3%), and insulin (35%) to fetal liver were not affected by maternal fasting, indicating that caloric restriction exerted a specific effect on oPL binding in the fetus. The number of fetal oPL-binding sites was positively correlated with the fetal liver glycogen content (r = 0.69; P less than 0.01) and the fetal plasma concentrations of glucose (r = 0.68; P less than 0.01) and insulin-like growth factor-I (r = 0.74; P less than 0.001), suggesting a role for the PL receptor in the regulation of fetal carbohydrate metabolism and growth.

  6. Automatic real-time tracking of fetal mouth in fetoscopic video sequence for supporting fetal surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Xie, Tianliang; Ohya, Jun; Zhang, Bo; Sato, Yoshinobu; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) called fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) was developed to treat severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) via fetoscopy, by which a detachable balloon is placed into the fetal trachea for preventing pulmonary hypoplasia through increasing the pressure of the chest cavity. This surgery is so dangerous that a supporting system for navigating surgeries is deemed necessary. In this paper, to guide a surgical tool to be inserted into the fetal trachea, an automatic approach is proposed to detect and track the fetal face and mouth via fetoscopic video sequencing. More specifically, the AdaBoost algorithm is utilized as a classifier to detect the fetal face based on Haarlike features, which calculate the difference between the sums of the pixel intensities in each adjacent region at a specific location in a detection window. Then, the CamShift algorithm based on an iterative search in a color histogram is applied to track the fetal face, and the fetal mouth is fitted by an ellipse detected via an improved iterative randomized Hough transform approach. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed automatic approach can accurately detect and track the fetal face and mouth in real-time in a fetoscopic video sequence, as well as provide an effective and timely feedback to the robot control system of the surgical tool for FETO surgeries.

  7. Fetal magnetoencephalography: a non-invasive method for the assessment of fetal neuronal maturation.

    PubMed

    Schleussner, E; Schneider, U; Kausch, S; Kähler, C; Haueisen, J; Seewald, H J

    2001-12-01

    To assess the maturation of auditory evoked cortical responses in the human fetus using fetal magnetoencephalography. Prospective case series over a three-year period. Antenatal clinics, university hospital. Singleton pregnancies at 29-40 weeks of gestation. We used a 31-channel-SQUID-biomagnetometer in a magnetically-shielded room to perform fetal magnetoencephalography. To record auditory evoked fields from the fetal brain we applied 500 monotonal bursts generated by a computerised sound generator directly to the maternal abdominal wall near the fetal head. The continuously recorded data sets were analysed stepwise using a specially developed heart artefact rejection software, Fourier filtering, principle component analysis and half split analysis of the averaged data. In 36 of 64 examinations we detected signals of auditory evoked fields comparable to the P2m component in adults. The earliest recording succeeded in the 29th gestational week. The latencies of the auditory evoked responses declined during the third trimester from 300 ms to nearly 150 ms at term. The maturation of different components of the auditory evoked field could be demonstrated from the 31st gestational week onwards. The maturation of a fetal auditory cortical function using fetal magnetoencephalography could be assessed directly for the first time. We believe that this method will add information to current indirect methods of assessing the normal maturation of the human fetal brain.

  8. Evidence of alloreactive T lymphocytes in fetal liver: implications for fetal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Renda, M C; Fecarotta, E; Dieli, F; Markling, L; Westgren, M; Damiani, G; Jakil, C; Picciotto, F; Maggio, A

    2000-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic stem cells for in utero transplantation to create permanent hematochimerism represents a new concept in fetal therapy, although this approach has provided heterogeneous results. In this paper we have undertaken molecular, phenotypic and functional studies aimed at identifying the presence of fully competent T lymphocytes in samples of fetal livers and cord blood. We found mature VDJ TCR beta chain transcripts in fetal liver cells taken from 7 to 16 weeks of gestation and a similar pattern was detected in cord blood cells sampled from 13.5 to 20.5 weeks of gestation. A Vbeta8 gene sequence comparable to that detected in adult PBMC was found in fetal liver samples at 9 or 17 weeks gestation. PreTalpha message was detected in all samples and its expression decreased in fetal blood samples with increasing gestational age while Calpha message appeared at 9.4 weeks and its expression increased during gestational age. T cell clones obtained from fetal liver cells showed a mature TCR alphabeta+, CD8+ phenotype and displayed strong alloreactivity against allo-MHC class I molecules. The presence of alloreactive T lymphocytes may explain the failure to engraft in fetuses older than 13 to 16 weeks and may provide insights into fetal liver transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 135-141.

  9. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes.

  10. Surgery during pregnancy and fetal outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, J.B.; Cohen, E.N.; Brown, B.W.; Wu, M.L.; Whitcher, C.

    1988-01-01

    Information was sought on wives of dentists or female dental assistants who underwent surgery during their pregnancies to determine the effects of anesthesia and surgery on fetal outcome. Occupational exposure to inhalation anesthetics either directly (dental assistants) or indirectly (wives of exposed male dentists) was associated with a significant increase in spontaneous abortion rate over a comparison group during both trimesters. Anesthesia for surgery was also associated with increased fetal loss when administered during the first or second trimesters. The number of congenital abormalities in children born to women who had surgery during pregnancy was not increased. For women surgically exposed to anesthetics and occupationally exposed as well, either directly or indirectly, the risk of spontaneous abortion increased almost threefold above control lvels. The authors conclude that elective surgery should be deferred during early pregnanacy to minimize potential fetal loss.

  11. Fetal magnetocardiography: clinical relevance and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Rijpma, A. P.; Stinstra, J. G.; Borgmann, J.; Holland, H. J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; Peters, M. J.; Flokstra, J.; Quartero, H. W. P.; Rogalla, H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a high- Tc SQUID system for fetal magnetocardiography (fetal MCG) aiming at a system without a magnetically shielded room and cooled by a cryocooler. The targeted SQUID resolution was 50 fT/√Hz (1-100 Hz). The research was performed along three lines: environmental noise suppression, cooling and low- Tc experiments. Environmental noise can be suppressed by forming second-order gradiometers from individual magnetometers. Concerning cooling, we investigated the applicability of commercially available coolers. In the low- Tc experiments, the medical relevance of fetal MCG was clearly shown. However, they also indicated that, in order to fully exploit the medical potential, the targeted resolution has to be 10 fT/√Hz. This increased resolution, in combination with the required high reliability of the sensors, will be hard to realize in high- Tc technology. This paper describes the results of the project and discusses the feasibility of a clinical system.

  12. Fetal leucocyte count in rhesus disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N P; Buggins, A G; Snijders, R J; Noble, P N; Layton, D M; Nicolaides, K H

    1992-01-01

    The effect of fetal anaemia on the total and differential leucocyte counts was studied by examining blood samples obtained by cordocentesis from 177 previously untransfused rhesus affected fetuses at 17-36 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal total leucocyte, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were significantly lower than the corresponding values in normal controls and there were significant associations between the decrease in these cells and the degree of fetal anaemia. Possible mechanisms for leucopenia include (i) stimulation of erythroid progenitor production at the expense of production of myeloid progenitors, (ii) non-specific haemophagocytosis, or (iii) general suppression of haemopoiesis. Further understanding of the underlying mechanism and the implications of leucopenia as well as the previously reported thrombocytopenia and anaemia may provide a basis for improved antenatal and/or postnatal treatment. PMID:1586179

  13. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Falkay, G.; Kovacs, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using {sup 3}H-prazosin and {sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogeneous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycemia of newborns after treatment of premature labor with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  14. [Diagnosis of fetal akinesia except for oligoamnios].

    PubMed

    Fallet-Bianco, C

    1997-09-01

    The term Fetal Akinesia Sequence (FAS) covers a large spectrum of developmental abnormalities resulting from a lack of intra-uterine fetal movements, which share heterogeneous etiologies. Environmental, "extrinsic" causes are easily ruled out. Various neuromuscular disorders, involving the motor unit at any level, constitute the main part of "intrinsic" fetal pathology. We propose a detailed schedule of prospective investigation of FAS, in order to standardize and gather the most pertinent information and to compare a wide panel of accurate data between fetopathological centers. The objective is to improve the understanding of various pathogenetic processes involved in the emergence of FAS, in order to propose better information and genetic counselling to parents, and potentially, to consider a prenatal prevention.

  15. Physiology of the fetal and transitional circulation.

    PubMed

    Finnemore, Anna; Groves, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The fetal circulation is an entirely transient event, not replicated at any point in later life, and functionally distinct from the pediatric and adult circulations. Understanding of the physiology of the fetal circulation is vital for accurate interpretation of hemodynamic assessments in utero, but also for management of circulatory compromise in premature infants, who begin extrauterine life before the fetal circulation has finished its maturation. This review summarizes the key classical components of circulatory physiology, as well as some of the newer concepts of physiology that have been appreciated in recent years. The immature circulation has significantly altered function in all aspects of circulatory physiology. The mechanisms and significance of these differences are also discussed, as is the impact of these alterations on the circulatory transition of infants born prematurely.

  16. Fetal surgery for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Leslie N.

    2008-01-01

    Open spina bifida remains a major source of disability despite an overall decrease in incidence. It is frequently diagnosed prenatally and can thus -- potentially -- be treated by fetal surgery. Animal studies and preliminary human studies strongly suggest that at least a portion of the neurological abnormalities seen in these patients are secondary, and occur in mid-gestation. It is estimated that approximately 400 fetal operations have now been performed for myelomeningocele world wide. Despite this large experience, the technique remains of unproven benefit. Preliminary results suggest that fetal surgery results in reversal of hindbrain herniation (the Chiari II malformation), a decrease in shunt-dependent hydrocephalus, and possibly improvement in leg function, but these findings might be explained by selection bias and changing management indications. A randomized prospective trial (the MOMS trial) is currently being conducted by three centers in the United States, and is estimated to be completed in 2009. PMID:17714997

  17. Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis*

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In the epidemiological literature, the fetal origins hypothesis associated with David J. Barker posits that chronic, degenerative conditions of adult health, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, may be triggered by circumstance decades earlier, in utero nutrition in particular. Economists have expanded on this hypothesis, investigating a broader range of fetal shocks and circumstances and have found a wealth of later-life impacts on outcomes including test scores, educational attainment, and income, along with health. In the process, they have provided some of the most credible observational evidence in support of the hypothesis. The magnitude of the impacts is generally large. Thus, the fetal origins hypothesis has not only survived contact with economics, but has flourished. PMID:25152565

  18. Fetal control of parturition in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2001-01-01

    Among marsupials, the control of birth is best understood in the tammar wallaby. The young is tiny relative to the mother and is highly altricial. Adult female tammar wallabies weigh 5 kg, whereas the neonate weighs about 400 mg. However, despite this small size, there is clear evidence that the fetus provides the signal that sets the timing of birth through several mechanisms. A fetal signal activates a nitric oxide-guanylate cyclase system in the myometrium that may maintain myometrial inactivity, and this is down-regulated at term. There is also up-regulation of prostaglandin (PG) production in the gravid endometrium during the last two days of gestation that parallels increased placental PG synthesis, and a pregnancy-specific up-regulation of oxytocin receptors in the gravid myometrium that increases the responsiveness of the gravid uterus to mesotocin. These changes facilitate parturition, but an acute fetus-derived signal appears to trigger parturition. The fetal signal is probably related to glucocorticoid production. The fetal adrenal matures and is able to synthesize cortisol by Day 22 of the 26-day gestation. The fetal adrenals double in size between Day 24 and term, and their cortisol content increases over 10-fold. The pituitary of the neonate contains presumptive corticotrophs, and the adrenals increase cortisol production in response to adrenocorticotrophin. Prostaglandin E2, which is produced by the placenta, is also a potent stimulant of fetal adrenal cortisol synthesis. Treatment of tammars in late gestation with the cortisol agonist, dexamethasone, triggers birth around 23 h later. There is thus a strong case that fetal adrenal cortisol plays a key role in the preparation for birth and the timing of it. Further studies are in progress to more clearly define the mechanisms behind these actions of cortisol.

  19. Rheology of fetal and maternal blood.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, W H; Danoff, S J; King, R G; Chien, S

    1985-01-01

    Rheological parameters were measured in 10 pairs of mothers and newborns. Whole blood viscosity was similar despite a higher fetal hematocrit (47.0 +/- 5.1 versus 35.5 +/- 12.0%, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.05). When the hematocrit of the suspension of red cells in plasma was adjusted to 45%, the viscosity was significantly lower in the fetal blood over a wide range of shear rates (0.52-208 S-1). The main reason for the lower viscosity in the fetal blood was the lower plasma viscosity as compared to the maternal blood (1.08 +/- 0.05 versus 1.37 +/- 0.08 centipoise, p less than 0.05); this in turn was attributable to a lower total plasma protein concentration (4.74 +/- 0.71 versus 6.47 +/- 0.64 g/dl, p less than 0.05). All protein fractions were lower in the fetal plasma. The assessment of red cell deformability by filtration through polycarbonate sieves revealed that the resistance of a fetal red cell was three times higher than that of a maternal red cell in a 2.6-micron pore, but there was no significant difference in resistance for these red cells in 6.9-micron pores. This higher filtration resistance of fetal red cells through the small pores was mainly due to their large volume (115.4 +/- 10.8 versus 93.5 +/- 5.9 fl, p less than 0.001). Measurements on membrane-free hemoglobin solutions indicated that the internal viscosity of these two types of red cells was not different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  1. Case Studies in Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yee, J.; Parboosingh, I.J.

    1986-01-01

    Subtle changes in the characteristics of the fetal heart rate are currently used to assess the condition of the fetus in late pregnancy and during labour. The authors present three case studies of fetal heart rate monitoring. PMID:21267323

  2. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-minute guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal motor activity (FM), and increased FM-FHR coupling. Attribution of the two fetal cardiac responses to the guided imagery procedure itself, as opposed to simple rest or recumbency, is tempered by the observed pattern of response. Evaluation of correspondence between changes within individual maternal-fetal pairs revealed significant associations between maternal autonomic measures and fetal cardiac patterns, lower umbilical and uterine artery resistance and increased FHR variability, and declining salivary cortisol and FM activity. Potential mechanisms that may mediate the observed results are discussed. PMID:17919804

  3. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  4. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  5. ACMG statement on noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Anthony R; Gross, S J; Best, R G; Monaghan, K G; Bajaj, K; Skotko, B G; Thompson, B H; Watson, M S

    2013-05-01

    Noninvasive assessment of the fetal genome is now possible using next-generation sequencing technologies. The isolation of fetal DNA fragments from maternal circulation in sufficient quantity and sizes, together with proprietary bioinformatics tools, now allows patients the option of noninvasive fetal aneuploidy screening. However, obstetric care providers must become familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of this approach as analysis of cell-free fetal DNA moves into clinical practice. Once informed, clinicians can provide efficient pretest and posttest counseling with the goal of avoiding patient harm. It is in the public's best interest that test results contain key elements and that laboratories adhere to established quality control and proficiency testing standards. The analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation for fetal aneuploidy screening is likely the first of major steps toward the eventual application of whole fetal genome/whole fetal exome sequencing.

  6. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... know exactly how many people have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Several different approaches have been used ...

  7. Adopting and Fostering Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with special needs, such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), brings its own set of challenges. ... Burd, L., Harwood R. Cost of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Am J Med Genet 127C(676): 42- ...

  8. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  9. Fetal magnetocardiogram recordings and Fourier spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P; Anninos, P A; Lüdinghausen, M V; Kotini, A; Galazios, G; Limberis, B

    1999-07-01

    Power spectral analysis of fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) data was evaluated in 64 pregnancies, using the non-invasive one channel superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID), in order to investigate the power spectral amplitude distribution in the frequency range between 2 and 3 Hz. In all cases with normal and uncomplicated pregnancies, the data from the fetal heart and specifically the QRS complexes, were identifiable and unaffected by any maternal cardiac activity and furthermore the power spectral amplitudes, which varied between 120 and 350 fT/Hz, were directly related to gestational age.

  10. [Fetal pain: immediate and long term consequences].

    PubMed

    Houfflin Debarge, Véronique; Dutriez, Isabelle; Pusniak, Benoit; Delarue, Eléonore; Storme, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Several situations are potentially painful for fetuses, such as malformations and invasive procedures. Nociceptive pathways are known to be functional at 26 weeks. Even if it is not possible to evaluate the fetal experience of pain, it is essential to examine its immediate and long-term consequences. As early as the beginning of the second trimester, hemodynamic and hormonal responses are observed following fetal nociceptive stimulation, In experimental studies, long-term changes have been noted in the corticotrop axis, subsequent responses to pain, and behavior after perinatal nociceptive stimulation.

  11. Automatic identification of fetal breathing movements in fetal RR interval time series.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Voss, Anna; Cysarz, Dirk; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2012-03-01

    Fetal breathing movements are associated with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We present an algorithm which processes RR interval time series in the time and frequency domain, identifying spectral peaks with characteristics consistent with fetal RSA. Tested on 50 data sets from the second and third trimester, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 96.1%, false positive rate 35.7%, false negative rate 3.9%. The characteristics of automatically and visually identified episodes were very similar and corresponded the expected changes over gestation. The method is suited for easy and reliable identification of fetal breathing movements.

  12. [Diagnosis of fetal malformations with ultrasound--state of development].

    PubMed

    Fendel, M; Fendel, H

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonography is of great importance for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations and abnormalities. An early diagnosis in the second trimester is of great interest for an intrauterine or an extrauterine therapy planning (the choice of the time and mode of delivery). Defects of the neural tube including hydrocephalus, malformations of the extremities, the gastrointestinal tract, omphaloceles, the urogenital and cardiac system are described. Four cases of fetal malformations are presented: fetal myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, bilateral hydronephrosis and lymphangioma with fetal ascites.

  13. Fetal atrial tachycardia diagnosed by magnetocardiography and direct fetal electrocardiography. A case report of treatment with propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Keisuke; Chiba, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Yoshihito; Kawamata, Kazuya; Miyashita, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    At 26 weeks of gestation, fetal tachyarrhythmias (about 250 bpm) and ascites were detected by ultrasonography, and oral treatment with propranolol (30 mg/day) was commenced. Within 10 h, the fetal heart rate changed to approximately 85 bpm. The averaged fetal magnetocardiogram triggered by R peaks showed P wave and QRS complexes and an extra P wave. In addition, many extra nonconducted P-waves were detected in a fetal direct electrocardiogram. At 27 weeks of gestation, fetal tachycardia occurred again, and arrhythmia was diagnosed as the result of a blocked premature atrial contraction (PAC) with intermittent atrial tachycardia by fetal electrocardiogram. Administration of transplacental propranolol (90 mg/day) resolved the fetal tachyarrhythmias and ascites. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of propranolol for fetal atrial tachycardia.

  14. Fetal Pulmonary Arterial Vascular Impedance Reflects Changes in Fetal Oxygenation at Near-Term Gestation in a Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Arraut, Amaryllis Maria Elpida; Frias, Antonio E.; Hobbs, Theodore R.; McEvoy, Cindy; Spindel, Eliot R.; Rasanen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that fetal pulmonary arterial circulation reacts to changes in fetal oxygenation status at near-term gestation. Study Design: A total of 20 rhesus macaques underwent fetal Doppler ultrasonography at near-term gestation. Right pulmonary artery (RPA), umbilical artery (UA), ductus arteriosus (DA), and ductus venosus (DV) blood velocity waveforms were obtained, and pulsatility index (PI) values were calculated. Fetal right and left ventricular cardiac outputs were determined. Ultrasonographic data were collected during 3 maternal oxygenation states: room air (baseline), hyperoxemia, and hypoxemia. Results: Fetal RPA PI values increased (P < .05) during maternal hypoxemia and decreased (P < .05) during maternal hyperoxemia, compared with baseline. Maternal hyperoxemia increased (P < .05) DA PI values from baseline. Fetal cardiac outputs, UA, and DV PI values were not affected. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that at near-term gestation, fetal pulmonary arterial circulation is a dynamic vascular bed that reflects acute and short-term changes in fetal oxygenation. PMID:22991382

  15. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal vacuum extractor. 884.4340 Section 884.4340....4340 Fetal vacuum extractor. (a) Identification. A fetal vacuum extractor is a device used to... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This...

  16. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal vacuum extractor. 884.4340 Section 884.4340....4340 Fetal vacuum extractor. (a) Identification. A fetal vacuum extractor is a device used to... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This...

  17. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal vacuum extractor. 884.4340 Section 884.4340....4340 Fetal vacuum extractor. (a) Identification. A fetal vacuum extractor is a device used to... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the presence...

  3. Agonist mediated fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The exposure of a developing embryo or fetus to teratogenic alkaloids from plants has the potential to cause developmental defects in livestock due to the inhibition of fetal movement by alkaloids. The mechanism behind the inhibition of fetal movement is the desensitization of fetal muscle-type nico...

  4. 21 CFR 884.2660 - Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. 884.2660... Devices § 884.2660 Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. (a) Identification. A fetal ultrasonic monitor is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from the pregnant...

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streissguth, Ann

    The 14 chapters of this book review the research and offer guidelines for intervention with infants and children having fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE). Chapters are grouped into five sections on the diseases of fetal alcohol, the science of FAS, a life-span approach to FAS, preparing people with FAS for life in the…

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streissguth, Ann

    The 14 chapters of this book review the research and offer guidelines for intervention with infants and children having fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE). Chapters are grouped into five sections on the diseases of fetal alcohol, the science of FAS, a life-span approach to FAS, preparing people with FAS for life in the…

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  8. Sibs with the fetal akinesia sequence, fetal edema, and malformations: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Toriello, H V; Bauserman, S C; Higgins, J V

    1985-06-01

    Pena and Shokeir [J Pediatr 85:373-375. 1974] first described a syndrome characterized by multiple ankyloses, camptodactyly, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia, which was later termed Pena-Shokeir I syndrome. Recent evidence suggests that a more accurate designation for this condition is the fetal akinesia sequence, which is almost certainly a heterogeneous entity. We describe sibs who were diagnosed as having Pena-Shokeir I syndrome but who did not have the muscular or anterior horn cell changes characteristic of other infants with the fetal akinesia sequence. In addition, both sibs had fetal edema, the first sib had coarctation of the aorta, and the second had polydactyly and thyroid hypoplasia. We suggest that this case provides further evidence for heterogeneity in the fetal akinesia sequence and may represent a provisionally unique syndrome.

  9. Adaptation of an articulated fetal skeleton model to three-dimensional fetal image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinder, Tobias; Wendland, Hannes; Wachter-Stehle, Irina; Roundhill, David; Lorenz, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    The automatic interpretation of three-dimensional fetal images poses specific challenges compared to other three-dimensional diagnostic data, especially since the orientation of the fetus in the uterus and the position of the extremities is highly variable. In this paper, we present a comprehensive articulated model of the fetal skeleton and the adaptation of the articulation for pose estimation in three-dimensional fetal images. The model is composed out of rigid bodies where the articulations are represented as rigid body transformations. Given a set of target landmarks, the model constellation can be estimated by optimization of the pose parameters. Experiments are carried out on 3D fetal MRI data yielding an average error per case of 12.03+/-3.36 mm between target and estimated landmark positions.

  10. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Behavioral Teratology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Karge, Belinda D.

    1986-01-01

    The review examines the literature on the behaviorally teratogenic aspects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, including: (1) prevalence of alcohol abuse among women, (2) acute and chronic effects of alcohol on the fetus, (3) genetic susceptibility, (4) neuropathology, (5) correlative conditions, and (6) animal studies. (Author/DB)

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Research Review and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesbach, Linda Sue; Polloway, Edward A.

    Research on fetal alcohol syndrome is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the implications of the syndrome for the development of mental retardation and other handicapping conditions. Attention is given to historical aspects; epidemiology; physiological and behavioral characteristics; and concerns related to diagnosis, prevention, and…

  12. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  13. Focal cerebral mantle disruption in fetal hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter; Muzumdar, Dattatraya P; Sly, Lloyd E; Michaud, Jean

    2007-04-01

    A variety of developmental brain anomalies have been described in individuals with fetal hydrocephalus, regardless of etiology. Examples include callosal dysgenesis, periventricular gray matter heterotopia, hippocampal and white matter hypoplasia, and cortical polygyration. The present report draws attention to another anomaly not reported in previous case series of fetal hydrocephalus: focal cerebral mantle disruption. Neonatal imaging findings (where available) and post-shunt, stable-state magnetic resonance imaging, or pathological findings were reviewed in 77 subjects with fetal hydrocephalus (55 myelomeningocele, 16 sporadic aqueductal stenosis, 6 miscellaneous). Of these, 12 subjects (15.6%) demonstrated a combination of absence of the septum pellucidum and severe thinning or absence of the posteromesial cerebral mantle. On axial sequences, this combination created the illusion of a common ventricle, as in lobar holoprosencephaly. All 12 subjects had massive hydrocephalus at birth, accompanied in 7 by posteromesial ventricular diverticula. Two subjects, and one other subject with distinct lateral ventricles, demonstrated unilateral or bilateral mantle clefts suggestive of schizencephaly. Close radiological (n = 2) or pathological (n = 1) inspection showed that the clefts were only partially lined with gray matter and contained a transverse gliotic membrane. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that massive early fetal hydrocephalus may completely disrupt cerebral mantle formation, particularly in the posteromesial hemispheres.

  14. Fetal magnetocardiography: Methods for rapid data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Flynn, E.R.; Quinn, A.; Weir, A.; Shahani, U.; Bain, R.J.; Maas, P.; Donaldson, G.B.

    1997-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardigraphy (fMCG) provides a unique method for noninvasive observations of the fetal heart. Electrical currents generated by excitable tissues within the fetal heart yield measurable external magnetic fields. Measurements are performed with superconducting quantum interference devices inductively coupled to magnetometer or gradiometer coils, and the resulting signals are converted to digital form in the data acquisition system. The measured fields are usually contaminated by fetal and maternal movements (usually respiration), other physiological fields such as skeletal muscle contraction, the maternal cardiac signal, and environmental electromagnetic fields. Sensitivity to relatively distant sources, both physiological and environmental, is substantially reduced by the use of magnetic gradiometers. Other contaminants may be removed by proper signal conditioning which may be automatically applied using {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} algorithms that are transparent to the user and highly efficient. These procedures can rapidly reduce the complex signal plus noise waveforms to the desired fMCG with minimal operator interference. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Fetal Cardiac Responding: Maturational and Behavioral Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory, Eugene K.; Noonan, John R.

    1984-01-01

    Classified fetuses as accelerators or decelerators based on intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR). Explored the relationship of the classification with gestational age and neonatal behavior in clinically healthy neonates to provide an empirical basis for using FHR in the study of infant behavior. Subjects were 48 "healthy term" or…

  16. Fetal polyol metabolism in copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.; Beal, T. )

    1989-02-09

    Since pregnant rats consuming fructose, copper deficient diets fail to give birth, the relationship between maternal copper deficiency, polyol metabolism and fetal mortality was investigated. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were fed from conception one of the following diets: fructose, copper deficient; fructose, copper adequate; starch, copper deficient or starch, copper adequate. The deficient diets contained 0.6 ug Cu and the adequate 6.0 ug Cu/g diet. Pregnancy was terminated at day 19 of gestation. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were measured in maternal blood, placenta and fetal liver. Fructose consumption during pregnancy resulted in higher levels of fructose and sorbitol in maternal blood when compared to starch. In the fructose dietary groups, the placenta and fetal liver contained extremely high levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol compared to the corresponding metabolites from the starch dietary groups. Copper deficiency further elevated fructose and sorbitol concentrations in the placenta and fetal liver respectively. Since high tissue levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol have been shown to have deleterious effects on cellular metabolism, these data suggest that when fructose was fed during pregnancy the combination of an aberration of carbohydrate metabolism with copper deficiency could be responsible for the pathology and mortality of the developing fetus.

  17. Evaluation of the fetal coronary circulation.

    PubMed

    Baschat, A A; Gembruch, U

    2002-10-01

    Prenatal ultrasound today allows the detailed study of small caliber vascular beds including the fetal coronary arteries and the coronary sinus. The coronary circulation is unique because of its critical role in myocardial metabolism and function and its ability to adapt in many fetal conditions. The ultrasound examination techniques for the evaluation of the fetal coronary circulation are presented. Evaluation of the coronary arteries is primarily achieved by color flow imaging and pulsed wave Doppler. Conditions such as fetal growth restriction, anemia, ductus arteriosus constriction and bradycardia are associated with evidence of enhanced coronary blood flow. These findings suggest that short-term autoregulation and long-term alterations in myocardial flow reserve are present in the human fetus. At present, examination of coronary sinus blood flow has limited clinical utility, while increases of the coronary sinus diameter or attenuation of coronary sinus dynamics may provide useful markers of abnormalities of central venous drainage. Abnormal vascular connections between the coronary arteries and the ventricular cavities may be observed in outflow tract obstructive cardiac lesions. In these conditions prenatal detection of coronary fistulae may have a potential impact on outcome and therefore counseling and perinatal management.

  18. Fetal anaemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, F; Vega, M A; Gómez-Castillo, E; Ruiz-Balda, J A; Omeñaca, F

    1993-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency was diagnosed in an infant by umbilical vessel sampling at 30 weeks' gestation. Although three previous hydropic siblings had been stillborn or died in the neonatal period, this infant survived with transfusion dependent haemolytic anaemia. Prompt fetal diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency is feasible and allows better management of hydrops fetalis due to this disorder. PMID:8285758

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Adolescents and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bert, Cynthia R. Greene; Bert, Minnie

    Persons with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) may be diagnosed at birth based on specific symptoms and anomalies. These are history of prenatal alcohol exposure, mental retardation, central nervous system dysfunctions, growth deficiency, particular physical anomalies, and speech and language anomalies. With aging, cranial and skeletal anomalies become…

  20. The effects of alcohol on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kenneth Lyons

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol has profound effects on many aspects of fetal development. Although alterations of somatic growth and specific minor malformations of facial structure are most characteristic, the effects of alcohol on brain development are most significant in that they lead to substantial problems with neurobehavioral development. Since the initial recognition of the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a number of important observations have been made from studies involving both humans and animals. Of particular importance, a number of maternal risk factors have been identified, which may well be of relevance relative to the development of strategies for prevention of the FAS as well as intervention for those who have been affected. These include maternal age >30 years, ethnic group, lower socioeconomic status, having had a previously affected child, maternal under-nutrition, and genetic background. The purpose of this review is to discuss these issues as well as to set forth a number of questions that have not adequately been addressed relative to alcohol's effect on fetal development. Of particular importance is the critical need to identify the full spectrum of structural defects associated with the prenatal effects of alcohol as well as to establish a neurobehavioral phenotype. Appreciation of both of these issues is necessary to understand the full impact of alcohol on fetal development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Behavioral Teratology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Karge, Belinda D.

    1986-01-01

    The review examines the literature on the behaviorally teratogenic aspects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, including: (1) prevalence of alcohol abuse among women, (2) acute and chronic effects of alcohol on the fetus, (3) genetic susceptibility, (4) neuropathology, (5) correlative conditions, and (6) animal studies. (Author/DB)

  2. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Margaret E.

    This paper provides a discussion of definitions, historical precursors, and prevalence figures for children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and highlights relevant medical and behavioral characteristics. It also addresses the educational implications of working with children with FAS in terms of instruction and curriculum. Educators are urged…

  3. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications and Counseling Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.; Johnson, Norbert

    1983-01-01

    Presents special considerations in counseling fetal alcohol syndrome children and their mothers. Preventive counseling must begin before conception. Adequate education, counseling, testing, treatment, and followup of patients and their families is essential to reduce or eliminate problems associated with maternal alcohol abuse. (JAC)

  4. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)--A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzman, Ian R.

    1982-01-01

    At least 30 percent of newborn children of alcoholic mothers are affected severely by the fetal alcohol syndrome and 40-45 percent show some stigmata. Risks to offspring of mothers who drink occasionally or binge drink are not clear, but the danger is probably greatest in the first trimester of pregnancy. (CMG)

  5. Fetal growth in rats treated with lapachol.

    PubMed

    Felício, André Carvalho; Chang, Cláudia Veiga; Brandão, Marcos Antônio; Peters, Vera Maria; Guerra, Martha de Oliveira

    2002-10-01

    Lapachol is a naphthoquinone well known for its therapeutic potential. Previous studies have shown that lapachol does not interfere with embryonic development during the pre-implantation period. However, when administered during the organogenic period at the same dose level, it induces a high fetal death incidence. To evaluate the effect of lapachol during fetogenesis, 20 pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: vehicle (10 mL of a 50% aqueous ethanol solution/kg body weight) and treated (100 mg of lapachol/kg body weight). Lapachol was administered from the 17th to 20th day of pregnancy. The following variables were analyzed: maternal body weight from 16th to 21st day of pregnancy, food intake from 17th to 21st day of pregnancy, clinical signs of physical discomfort, ovarian weights, implantations, resorptions and mortality indices, fetal and placenta weights, external malformations, and fetal organ weights. Results indicated that lapachol was not toxic to mothers, although it was fetotoxic leading to fetal growth retardation.

  6. Fetal programming of appetite and obesity.

    PubMed

    Breier, B H; Vickers, M H; Ikenasio, B A; Chan, K Y; Wong, W P

    2001-12-20

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders are prevalent health issues in modern society and are commonly attributed to lifestyle and dietary factors. However, the mechanisms by which environmental factors modulate the physiological systems that control weight regulation and the aetiology of metabolic disorders, which manifest in adult life, may have their roots before birth. The 'fetal origins' or 'fetal programming' paradigm is based on the observation that environmental changes can reset the developmental path during intrauterine development leading to obesity and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders later in life. The pathogenesis is not based on genetic defects but on altered genetic expression as a consequence of an adaptation to environmental changes during fetal development. While many endocrine systems can be affected by fetal programming recent experimental studies suggest that leptin and insulin resistance are critical endocrine defects in the pathogenesis of programming-induced obesity and metabolic disorders. However, it remains to be determined whether postnatal obesity is a consequence of programming of appetite regulation and whether hyperphagia is the main underlying cause of the increased adiposity and the development of metabolic disorders.

  7. Noninvasive Prenatal Measurement of the Fetal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H. Christina; Gu, Wei; Wang, Jianbin; Blumenfeld, Yair J.; El-Sayed, Yasser Y.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of prenatal genetic testing requires invasive sampling. Since this poses a risk to the fetus, one must make a decision that weighs the desire for genetic information against the risk of an adverse outcome due to hazards of the testing process. These issues are not required to be coupled, and it would be desirable to discover genetic information about the fetus without incurring a health risk. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to noninvasively sequence the entire prenatal genome. Our results show that molecular counting of parental haplotypes in maternal plasma by shotgun sequencing of maternal plasma DNA allows the inherited fetal genome to be deciphered noninvasively. We also applied the counting principle directly to each allele in the fetal exome by performing exome capture on maternal plasma DNA prior to shotgun sequencing. This approach enables noninvasive exome screening of clinically relevant and deleterious alleles that were paternally inherited or had arisen as de novo germline mutations, and complements the haplotype counting approach to provide a comprehensive view of the fetal genome. Noninvasive determination of the fetal genome may ultimately facilitate the diagnosis of all inherited and de novo genetic disease. PMID:22763444

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications and Counseling Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.; Johnson, Norbert

    1983-01-01

    Presents special considerations in counseling fetal alcohol syndrome children and their mothers. Preventive counseling must begin before conception. Adequate education, counseling, testing, treatment, and followup of patients and their families is essential to reduce or eliminate problems associated with maternal alcohol abuse. (JAC)

  9. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)--A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzman, Ian R.

    1982-01-01

    At least 30 percent of newborn children of alcoholic mothers are affected severely by the fetal alcohol syndrome and 40-45 percent show some stigmata. Risks to offspring of mothers who drink occasionally or binge drink are not clear, but the danger is probably greatest in the first trimester of pregnancy. (CMG)

  10. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  11. National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Through NOFAS Affiliates 0 Comments The number of organizations and advocates dedicated to addressing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders–and their influence and effectiveness–is steadily growing, leading... Read More → 20 Mar NOFAS Launches FASD Justice Task Force 0 Comments Under the guidance of ...

  12. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  13. Ultrasound assessment of fetal cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Crispi, Fàtima; Valenzuela‐Alcaraz, Brenda; Cruz‐Lemini, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fetal heart evaluation with US is feasible and reproducible, although challenging due to the smallness of the heart, the high heart rate and limited access to the fetus. However, some cardiac parameters have already shown a strong correlation with outcomes and may soon be incorporated into clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Cardiac function assessment has proven utility in the differential diagnosis of cardiomyopathies or prediction of perinatal mortality in congenital heart disease. In addition, some cardiac parameters with high sensitivity such as MPI or annular peak velocities have shown promising results in monitoring and predicting outcome in intrauterine growth restriction or congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Conclusion: Cardiac function can be adequately evaluated in most fetuses when appropriate expertise, equipment and time are available. Fetal cardiac function assessment is a promising tool that may soon be incorporated into clinical practice to diagnose, monitor or predict outcome in some fetal conditions. Thus, more research is warranted to further define specific protocols for each fetal condition that may affect cardiac function. PMID:28191192

  14. Maternal Inflammation Disrupts Fetal Neurodevelopment via Increased Placental Output of Serotonin to the Fetal Brain.

    PubMed

    Goeden, Nick; Velasquez, Juan; Arnold, Kathryn A; Chan, Yen; Lund, Brett T; Anderson, George M; Bonnin, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Maternal inflammation during pregnancy affects placental function and is associated with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring. The molecular mechanisms linking placental dysfunction to abnormal fetal neurodevelopment remain unclear. During typical development, serotonin (5-HT) synthesized in the placenta from maternal l-tryptophan (TRP) reaches the fetal brain. There, 5-HT modulates critical neurodevelopmental processes. We investigated the effects of maternal inflammation triggered in midpregnancy in mice by the immunostimulant polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] on TRP metabolism in the placenta and its impact on fetal neurodevelopment. We show that a moderate maternal immune challenge upregulates placental TRP conversion rapidly to 5-HT through successively transient increases in substrate availability and TRP hydroxylase (TPH) enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of exogenous 5-HT and blunting of endogenous 5-HT axonal outgrowth specifically within the fetal forebrain. The pharmacological inhibition of TPH activity blocked these effects. These results establish altered placental TRP conversion to 5-HT as a new mechanism by which maternal inflammation disrupts 5-HT-dependent neurogenic processes during fetal neurodevelopment. The mechanisms linking maternal inflammation during pregnancy with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring are poorly understood. In this study, we show that maternal inflammation in midpregnancy results in an upregulation of tryptophan conversion to serotonin (5-HT) within the placenta. Remarkably, this leads to exposure of the fetal forebrain to increased concentrations of this biogenic amine and to specific alterations of crucially important 5-HT-dependent neurogenic processes. More specifically, we found altered serotonergic axon growth resulting from increased 5-HT in the fetal forebrain. The data provide a new understanding of placental function playing a key

  15. Fetal right ventricular myocardial function is better preserved by fibrillatory arrest during fetal cardiac bypass.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Orlando; Baker, R Scott; Lam, Christopher T; Reed, Casey A; Duffy, Jodie Y; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2010-10-01

    Protection and preservation of fetal myocardial function are important for successful fetal intracardiac repair. Our objective was to determine fetal biventricular cardiac performance after two cardiac-arrest techniques. Three groups of midterm ovine fetuses underwent 90-minute bypass. A control group (no arrest shams, n = 3), and two groups that included 20 minutes of arrest, using fibrillatory (n = 3) or blood cardioplegia (n = 3), were compared. Blood cardioplegia consisted of 4:1 cold blood to crystalloid solution induction every 10 minutes, followed by a warm shot terminal dose before clamp removal. Myocardial function variables from biventricular intracardiac pressure catheters, and 3-axes cardiac sonomicrometry, fetal hemodynamics, and arterial blood gases were continuously recorded. Fetal myocardium was collected for troponin-I analysis at 90 minutes. Statistical analysis was by two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures. Compared with sham, right ventricular myocardial contractility was reduced with plegia but not fibrillation at 90 minutes after arrest: dP/dt max (511 ± 347 vs 1208 ± 239, p < 0.01) and preload-recruitable stroke work (7.2 ± 8.5 vs 32.3 ± 14.6, p < 0.01). Right ventricular end diastolic pressure-volume relationship (ventricular stiffness) worsened by 90 minutes for plegia vs fibrillation (0.84 ± 0.18 vs 0.25 ± 0.16, p < 0.05). There were no differences in left ventricle performance between groups. Fetal heart rate increased in shams by 30 minutes after arrest compared with both arrest groups (p < 0.05). Right ventricular troponin-I degradation increased with plegia, but not fibrillation, compared with sham (p < 0.05). In vivo, fetal right ventricular contractile function deteriorates with a common blood-plegia regimen. Fibrillatory arrest better preserves right ventricular function, the dominant ventricle in fetal life, for short arrest periods. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  16. Maternal Inflammation Disrupts Fetal Neurodevelopment via Increased Placental Output of Serotonin to the Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Goeden, Nick; Velasquez, Juan; Arnold, Kathryn A.; Chan, Yen; Lund, Brett T.; Anderson, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal inflammation during pregnancy affects placental function and is associated with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring. The molecular mechanisms linking placental dysfunction to abnormal fetal neurodevelopment remain unclear. During typical development, serotonin (5-HT) synthesized in the placenta from maternal l-tryptophan (TRP) reaches the fetal brain. There, 5-HT modulates critical neurodevelopmental processes. We investigated the effects of maternal inflammation triggered in midpregnancy in mice by the immunostimulant polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] on TRP metabolism in the placenta and its impact on fetal neurodevelopment. We show that a moderate maternal immune challenge upregulates placental TRP conversion rapidly to 5-HT through successively transient increases in substrate availability and TRP hydroxylase (TPH) enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of exogenous 5-HT and blunting of endogenous 5-HT axonal outgrowth specifically within the fetal forebrain. The pharmacological inhibition of TPH activity blocked these effects. These results establish altered placental TRP conversion to 5-HT as a new mechanism by which maternal inflammation disrupts 5-HT-dependent neurogenic processes during fetal neurodevelopment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanisms linking maternal inflammation during pregnancy with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring are poorly understood. In this study, we show that maternal inflammation in midpregnancy results in an upregulation of tryptophan conversion to serotonin (5-HT) within the placenta. Remarkably, this leads to exposure of the fetal forebrain to increased concentrations of this biogenic amine and to specific alterations of crucially important 5-HT-dependent neurogenic processes. More specifically, we found altered serotonergic axon growth resulting from increased 5-HT in the fetal forebrain. The data provide a new understanding of placental

  17. Fetal cardiac time intervals in healthy pregnancies - an observational study by fetal ECG (Monica Healthcare System).

    PubMed

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Plankl, Cordula; Sewald, Maria; Schneider, Karl-Theo Maria; Oberhoffer, Renate; Lobmaier, Silvia M

    2017-04-28

    Fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) can detect QRS signals in fetuses from as early as 17 weeks' gestation; however, the technique is limited by the minute size of the fetal signal relative to noise ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate precise fetal cardiac time intervals (fCTIs) with the help of a newly developed fetal ECG device (Monica Healthcare System). In a prospective manner we included 15-18 healthy fetuses per gestational week from 32 weeks onwards. The small and wearable Monica AN24 monitoring system uses standard ECG electrodes placed on the maternal abdomen to monitor fECG, maternal ECG and uterine electromyogram (EMG). Fetal CTIs were estimated on 1000 averaged fetal heart beats. Detection was deemed successful if there was a global signal loss of less than 30% and an analysis loss of the Monica AN24 signal separation analysis of less than 50%. Fetal CTIs were determined visually by three independent measurements. A total of 149 fECGs were performed. After applying the requirements 117 fECGs remained for CTI analysis. While the onset and termination of P-wave and QRS-complex could be easily identified in most ECG patterns (97% for P-wave, PQ and PR interval and 100% for QRS-complex), the T-wave was detectable in only 41% of the datasets. The CTI results were comparable to other available methods such as fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Although limited and preclinical in its use, fECG (Monica Healthcare System) could be an additional useful tool to detect precise fCTIs from 32 weeks' gestational age onwards.

  18. Time quantified detection of fetal movements using a new fetal movement algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lowery, C L; Russell, W A; Baggot, P J; Wilson, J D; Walls, R C; Bentz, L S; Murphy, P

    1997-01-01

    Primarily, the objective is to develop an automated ultrasound fetal movement detection system that will better characterize fetal movements. Secondarily, the objective is to develop an improved method of quantifying the performance of fetal movement detectors. We recorded 20-minute segments of fetal movement on 101 patients using a UAMS-developed fetal movement detection algorithm (Russell algorithm) and compared this to a Hewlett-Packard (HP) M-1350-A. Movements were recorded on a second-per-second basis by an expert examiner reviewing videotaped real-time ultrasound images. Videotape (86,592 seconds) was scored and compared with the electronic movement-detection systems. The Russell algorithm detected 95.53% of the discrete movements greater than 5 seconds, while the HP system (M-1350-A) detected only 86.08% of the discrete movements (p = 0.012). Both devices were less efficient at detecting the short discrete movements, obtaining sensitivities of 57.39 and 35.22, respectively. Neither system fully identifies fetal movement based on the second-per-second system. Improved methods of quantifying performance indicated that the Russell algorithm performed better than the HP on these patients.

  19. The "Fetal Reserve Index": Re-Engineering the Interpretation and Responses to Fetal Heart Rate Patterns.

    PubMed

    Eden, Robert D; Evans, Mark I; Evans, Shara M; Schifrin, Barry S

    2017-06-08

    Electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) correlates poorly with neonatal outcome. We present a new metric: the "Fetal Reserve Index" (FRI), formally incorporating EFM with maternal, obstetrical, fetal risk factors, and excessive uterine activity for assessment of risk for cerebral palsy (CP). We performed a retrospective, case-control series of 50 term CP cases with apparent intrapartum neurological injury and 200 controls. All were deemed neurologically normal on admission. We compared the FRI against ACOG Category (I-III) system and long-term outcome parameters against ACOG monograph (NEACP) requirements for labor-induced fetal neurological injury. Abnormal FRI's identified 100% of CP cases and did so hours before injury. ACOG Category III identified only 44% and much later. Retrospective ACOG monograph criteria were found in at most 30% of intrapartum-acquired CP patients; only 27% had umbilical or neonatal pH <7.0. In this initial, retrospective trial, an abnormal FRI identified all cases of labor-related neurological injury more reliably and earlier than Category III, which may allow fetal therapy by intrauterine resuscitation. The combination of traditional EFM with maternal, obstetrical, and fetal risk factors creating the FRI performed much better as a screening test than EFM alone. Our quantified screening system needs further evaluation in prospective trials. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Accumulation of fetal IgG in immunoglobulin injection into the fetal abdominal cavity is proven.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masashi; Matsuda, Hideo; Hasegawa, Yuri; Yoshinaga, Yosuke; Asai, Kazuhiko; Kawashima, Akihiro; Furuya, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    There have been a number of studies on immunoglobulin injection into fetuses or mothers during pregnancy for the treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection. However, no study has examined the effect of injected immunoglobulin on fetal hemodynamics. In this study, we examined the effect of immunoglobulin injection on fetal hemodynamics by retrospectively measuring the concentrations of several igg subclasses in stored umbilical cord blood sera collected during fetal therapy. Five patients who underwent immunoglobulin injection into the fetal abdominal cavity (IFAC) as a fetal therapy during pregnancy were included in this study. Frozen-stored umbilical venous blood samples collected from these patients during IFAC were measured for serum concentrations of each IgG subclass. The largest change was observed in the IgG2 concentration, with a mean increase of 221% following IFAC. The IgG4 concentration also showed a mean increase of 63%. In contrast, the concentration of IgG1, which has the strongest physiological activity of all IgG subclasses examined, only exhibited an overall mean increase of 1.4%. Our results confirmed that immunoglobulins are incorporated into the fetal circulation following IFAC. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The hidden maternal-fetal interface: events involving the lymphoid organs in maternal-fetal tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Taglauer, Elizabeth S.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2010-01-01

    The genetic disparity between the mother and fetus has long enticed immunologists to search for mechanisms of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens. The study of antigen-specific tolerance in murine and human pregnancy has gained new momentum in recent years through the focus on antigen-presenting cells, uterine lymphatics and fetal antigen-specific maternal T cell responses. In mice, we now know that these responses occur within the secondary lymphoid structures as they can be conveniently tracked through the use of defined, often transgenic fetal antigens and maternal T cell receptors. Although the secondary lymphoid organs are sites of both immunization and tolerization to antigens, the immunological processes that occur in response to fetal antigens during the healthy pregnancy must invariably lead to tolerance. The molecular properties of these maternal-fetal tolerogenic interactions are still being unraveled, and are likely to be greatly influenced by tissue-specific microenvironments and the hormonal milieu of pregnancy. In this article, we discuss the events leading to antigen-specific maternal tolerance, including the trafficking of fetal antigens to secondary lymphoid organs, the properties of the antigen-presenting cells that display them to maternal T lymphocytes, and the nature of the ensuing tolerogenic response. Experimental data generated from human biological specimens as well as murine transgenic models are considered. PMID:19876825

  2. Performance of an automatic quantitative ultrasound analysis of the fetal lung to predict fetal lung maturity.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Montse; Cobo, Teresa; Martínez-Terrón, Mònica; Rattá, Giuseppe A; Bonet-Carné, Elisenda; Amat-Roldán, Ivan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the performance of automatic quantitative ultrasound analysis (AQUA) texture extractor to predict fetal lung maturity tests in amniotic fluid. Singleton pregnancies (24.0-41.0 weeks) undergoing amniocentesis to assess fetal lung maturity (TDx fetal lung maturity assay [FLM]) were included. A manual-delineated box was placed in the lung area of a 4-chamber view of the fetal thorax. AQUA transformed the information into a set of descriptors. Genetic algorithms extracted the most relevant descriptors and then created and validated a model that could distinguish between mature or immature fetal lungs using TDx-FLM as a reference. Gestational age at enrollment was (mean [SD]) 32.2 (4.5) weeks. According to the TDx-FLM results, 41 samples were mature and 62 were not. The imaging biomarker based on AQUA presented a sensitivity 95.1%, specificity 85.7%, and an accuracy 90.3% to predict a mature or immature lung. Fetal lung ultrasound textures extracted by AQUA provided robust features to predict TDx-FLM results. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fetal MRI improves diagnostic accuracy in patients referred to a fetal center for suspected esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Ethun, Cecilia G; Fallon, Sara C; Cassady, Christopher I; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Zamora, Irving J; Lee, Timothy C; Welty, Stephen E; Cass, Darrell L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe prenatal imaging characteristics and outcomes of fetuses with suspected esophageal atresia (EA) in order to improve prenatal diagnosis, counseling, and management. The medical records of all patients referred to our multidisciplinary fetal center for suspected EA from January 2003 to April 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-three patients were referred with a prenatal diagnosis of possible EA. Following fetal center evaluation with MRI, EA was deemed unlikely in 6 (18%) fetuses. Of 27 fetuses in whom EA could not be excluded, EA was confirmed postnatally in 15 (56%), excluded in 7 (26%), and unconfirmed in 5 (3 fetal losses; 2 lost to follow-up). Imaging characteristics on fetal MRI associated with the highest positive predictive values (PPV) were an esophageal pouch (100%) and a small stomach (75%). The finding of polyhydramnios had high sensitivity (93%) but low specificity (31%) and PPV (61%) for a diagnosis of EA. Prenatal imaging and fetal center evaluation correctly identify the presence or absence of esophageal atresia in 78% of patients referred on suspicion of this condition. The presence of an esophageal pouch on fetal MRI has significant predictive value for EA. These data may assist with evidence-based prenatal family counseling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abortion and fetal tissue research: some ethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Shorr, A F

    1994-01-01

    Proponents of human fetal tissue research argue that this endeavor is morally separate from abortion. They claim that one's views about the morality of abortion should not effect decisions about the ethics of fetal tissue research and transplantation efforts. In lifting the ban on federal funding for fetal tissue research, President Clinton embraced this logic. However, a careful review of (1) the impact fetal tissue research and transplantation will have on the rate of abortion; (2) the concept of informed consent, and (3) the question of complicity demonstrates that abortion and fetal tissue research are morally connected.

  5. A Case Report of Decreased Fetal Movement During Fetomaternal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Place, Janet C; Plano, Lisa R W

    2015-01-01

    Fetomaternal hemorrhage is a rare, potentially catastrophic event for a fetus.  Leakage of the fetus's blood into the mother's circulation can cause fetal anemia, hydrops, and even death.  The prevailing symptom is decreased fetal movement, and signs can include a sinusoidal electronic fetal monitor pattern, a positive Kleihauer-Betke test, or changes in fetal Doppler blood flow.  A mother's report or perception of decreased fetal movement coupled with a nonreactive nonstress test or abnormal ultrasound findings should prompt an investigation into underlying causes. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. Galactosyltransferase in fetal, neonatal, and adult colon: relationship to differentiation.

    PubMed

    LaMont, J T; Ventola, A

    1978-08-01

    Microsomal galactosyltransferase activity of fetal rat colon increased fourfold between 18 and 22 days of gestation and then more slowly during neonatal life reaching adult levels after 14 days. The Km for uridinediphosphate- (UDP) galactose, pH optimum, cation, and detergent requirements were identical in fetal and adult galactosyltransferase. Cytidine 5'-diphosphate-choline stimulated the adult but not fetal colonic galactosyltrasferase activity by inhibition of UDP-galactose pyrophosphatase. The increase in colonic galactosyltransferase in late fetal development is correlated with our previous observation that incorporation of [3H]galactose is markedly increased during differentiation of the fetal colon.

  7. Pathogenetic mechanisms of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and oligohydramnios sequence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J I; Palacios, J

    1991-09-01

    This article briefly reviews the participation of fetal compression, muscular weakness, and fetal akinesia in the genesis of the anomalies found in fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) and oligohydramnios sequence (OS). Both sequences share phenotypic manifestations, such as arthrogryposis, short umbilical cord, and lung hypoplasia, in relation to decreased intrauterine fetal motility. Other characteristic manifestations found in OS, such as Potter face, and redundant skin, are produced by fetal compression. On the other hand, growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies, micrognathia, long bone hypoplasia, and polyhydramnios found in FADS could be related to intrauterine muscular weakness.

  8. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Prenatal Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Sanín-Blair, José Enrique; Gutiérrez-Márquez, Carolina; Herrera, Diego A; Vossough, Arastoo

    2017-03-14

    Brain lesions and malformations have been described on ultrasonography of prenatal Zika infection; however, there are scarce reports about fetal magnetic resonance (MR) findings. We report 3 cases of fetuses with confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection evaluated by ultrasound and fetal MR. Various morphometric measurements were assessed and brain maturation was calculated with the fetal total maturation score. Fetuses with prenatal Zika virus infection showed retardation in brain maturation indexes evaluated by fetal MR. Brain calcifications were demonstrated by neurosonography in all cases, while fetal MR characterized the specific type of cortical development malformation.

  9. Fetal tissue engineering from amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Kaviani, Amir; Guleserian, Kristine; Perry, Tjörvi E; Jennings, Russell W; Ziegler, Moritz M; Fauza, Dario O

    2003-04-01

    We have recently shown, in an animal model, that amniotic fluid can be a source of cells for fetal tissue engineering. This study was aimed at determining whether fetal tissue constructs could also be engineered from cells normally found in human amniotic fluid. Cells obtained from the amniotic fluid of pregnant women at 15 to 19 weeks of gestation (n=6) were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (Sigma Chemical, St Louis, MO) containing 20% fetal bovine serum and 5 ng/mL basic fibroblast growth factor in a 95% humidified, 5% CO(2) chamber at 37 degrees C. A subpopulation of morphologically distinct cells was then mechanically isolated from the rest and selectively expanded. The lineage of this subpopulation of amniocytes was determined by immunofluorescent staining with antibodies against standard intermediate filaments and surface antigens. Cell proliferation rates were determined by oxidation assay. After cell expansion, colonies of amniocytes were statically and dynamically seeded onto both unwoven, 1-mm-thick polyglycolic acid polymer scaffold and acellular human dermis for 72 hours. The resulting constructs were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Amniocytes stained positively for smooth muscle actin, vimentin, cytokeratin 18, and fibroblast surface protein, and negatively for desmin, cluster of differentiation 31, and von Willebrand's factor (Dako, Carpenteria, CA). These findings are consistent with a mesenchymal, fibroblast-myofibroblast cell lineage. Mesenchymal amniocytes could be rapidly expanded in culture, based on results of the proliferation assay. Scanning electron microscopy of amniocyte constructs revealed dense, confluent layers of cells surrounding the polymer matrices and firm cell adhesion to both PGA and Alloderm (Lifecell Corp, Branchburg, NJ) scaffolds. No evidence of cell death was observed. Subpopulations of fetal mesenchymal cells can be consistently isolated from human amniotic fluid and rapidly expanded in vitro. Human

  10. Periconceptional seafood intake and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, April F; Thompson, Mary Lou; Burbacher, Thomas M; Siscovick, David S; Williams, Michelle A; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports of associations of maternal seafood intake with fetal growth were inconsistent. Further, little is known whether associations differ across seafood subtypes or fetal growth indices. Methods Among 3,141 participants of the Omega study, a pregnancy cohort study, we investigated associations of periconceptional shell-, lean-, and fatty-fish intake with fetal growth indices. We categorized food frequency questionnaire reported seafood intake into frequencies of: <0.2 servings/month, 0.2 servings/month-<0.5 servings/week, 0.5-1 servings/week, and >1 servings/week. We abstracted birthweight, birth length, and head circumference from medical records. Using generalized linear models with a log link, the Poisson family, and robust standard errors, we estimated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for low birthweight (LBW, <2500 g) and linear regression models to estimate mean differences for continuous fetal growth indices across seafood intake categories. Results Medians (interquartile ranges) of shell-, lean-, and fatty-fish intake were 0.3 (0-0.9), 0.5 (0-1.0), and 0.5 (0.1-1.0) servings/week, respectively. Lean fish intake of >1 servings/week (versus <0.2 servings/month) was associated with a 2.2-fold higher risk of LBW [95% CI: 1.2, 4.1]. Shellfish intake of >1 servings/week (versus <0.2 servings/month) was associated with a 0.6 kg/m3 higher mean ponderal index [95% CI: 0.0, 1.2 kg/m3]. There was no evidence for associations of total seafood or seafood subtype intake with other fetal growth indices. Conclusions Higher intakes of lean- and shell-fish were associated with a higher risk of LBW and higher mean ponderal index, respectively. Findings highlight the importance of considerations of seafood subtype in similar investigations. PMID:26147526

  11. Periconceptional Seafood Intake and Fetal Growth.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, April F; Thompson, Mary Lou; Burbacher, Thomas M; Siscovick, David S; Williams, Michelle A; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-09-01

    Previous reports of associations of maternal seafood intake with fetal growth were inconsistent. Further, little is known whether associations differ across seafood subtypes or fetal growth indices. Among 3141 participants of the Omega study, a pregnancy cohort study, we investigated associations of periconceptional shell, lean, and fatty fish intake with fetal growth indices. We categorised food frequency questionnaire reported seafood intake into frequencies of: <0.2 servings/month, 0.2 servings/month -<0.5 servings/week, 0.5-1 servings/week, and >1 servings/week. We abstracted birthweight, birth length, and head circumference from medical records. Using generalised linear models with a log link, the Poisson family, and robust standard errors, we estimated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for low birthweight (LBW, <2500 g) and linear regression models to estimate mean differences for continuous fetal growth indices across seafood intake categories. Medians (interquartile range) of shell, lean, and fatty fish intake were 0.3 (0-0.9), 0.5 (0-1.0), and 0.5 (0.1-1.0) servings/week, respectively. Lean fish intake of >1 servings/week (vs. <0.2 servings/month) was associated with a 2.2-fold higher risk of LBW (95% CI 1.2, 4.1). Shellfish intake of >1 servings/week (vs. <0.2 servings/month) was associated with a 0.6 kg/m(3) higher mean ponderal index (95% CI 0.0, 1.2 kg/m(3) ). There was no evidence for associations of total seafood or seafood subtype intake with other fetal growth indices. Higher intakes of lean fish and shellfish were associated with a higher risk of LBW and higher mean ponderal index, respectively. Findings highlight the importance of considerations of seafood subtype in similar investigations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. MRI of normal fetal brain development.

    PubMed

    Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Krampl, Elisabeth; Ulm, Barbara; Witzani, Linde; Prayer, Lucas; Brugger, Peter C

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the 18th gestational week (GW) to term, and relies primarily on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences. These maturational changes must be interpreted with a knowledge of the histological background and the temporal course of the respective developmental steps. In addition, MR presentation of developing and transient structures must be considered. Signal changes associated with maturational processes can mainly be ascribed to the following changes in tissue composition and organization, which occur at the histological level: (1) a decrease in water content and increasing cell-density can be recognized as a shortening of T1- and T2-relaxation times, leading to increased T1-weighted and decreased T2-weighted intensity, respectively; (2) the arrangement of microanatomical structures to create a symmetrical or asymmetrical environment, leading to structural differences that may be demonstrated by DW-anisotropy; (3) changes in non-structural qualities, such as the onset of a membrane potential in premyelinating axons. The latter process also influences the appearance of a structure on DW sequences. Thus, we will review the in vivo MR appearance of different maturational states of the fetal brain and relate these maturational states to anatomical, histological, and in vitro MRI data. Then, the development of the cerebral cortex, white matter, temporal lobe, and cerebellum will be reviewed, and the MR appearance of transient structures of the fetal brain will be shown. Emphasis will be placed on the appearance of the different structures with the various sequences. In addition, the possible utility of dynamic fetal sequences in assessing spontaneous fetal movements is discussed.

  13. Fetal Eye Movements on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C.; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Methods Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17–40 GW, three age groups [17–23 GW, 24–32 GW, 33–40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. Results In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3–45%. Conclusions In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations. PMID:24194885

  14. Fetal eye movements on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17-40 GW, three age groups [17-23 GW, 24-32 GW, 33-40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3-45%. In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations.

  15. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  16. Fetal alcohol syndrome: overview of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, G I; Patwardhan, R V; Hoyumpa, A M; Schenker, S

    1981-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) has been reviewed briefly in terms of factors which can influence its development and specific mechanisms. FAS was defined arbitrarily to include a wide spectrum ranging from the fully expressed clinical syndrome to growth and developmental impairment seen in fetal and neonatal animals exposed to ethanol. The available evidence suggests that ethanol per se in the absence of nutritional deficit can cause some from of FAS. Acetaldehyde may contribute to the FAS, but there is lack of knowledge concerning the levels of acetaldehyde needed to achieve fetal damage and the effect of this agent on the placenta and its placental transfer to the fetal organs. There is no specific data at this time to incriminate nutritional impairment, although further studies in animal models and man of the role of possible deficiencies of certain vitamins (i.e., folate) and of trace minerals (i.e., zinc) are needed. There is some evidence that alcohol or its metabolites may alter placental transport function. The relevance of this to FAS needs further investigation. The possible additive roles of caffeine, nicotine and other drugs on fetal development and viability deserve more consideration. The specific mechanism(s) of FAS are unknown. Of those considered--mutagenic (paternal) effect, abnormal protein synthesis, altered cerebral neurotransmitter balance, hormonal and other effects--impairment of protein synthesis at present seems best documented, but all clearly require further evaluation. When specific mechanisms are investigated it will be essential also to determine the dose-response relationship and the effects of a given dose of alcohol at various stages of gestation.

  17. Fetal Growth and Timing of Parturition in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sun, Wenyu; Troendle, James

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies indicate that either the fetus or the intrauterine environment, both of which set the pattern for fetal growth, may affect the timing of parturition. The authors examined the association between fetal growth and timing of spontaneous onset of labor in humans among low-risk white US women with singleton pregnancies (1987–1991). They restricted the data to pregnancies which had a reliable date of the last menstrual period, normal fetal growth in the first half of pregnancy, and no history of or current pregnancy complications that might have impaired fetal growth (n = 3,360). Subjects received ultrasound examinations at 15–22 and 31–35 weeks’ gestation. Fetal growth was adjusted for parity, fetal sex, and maternal prepregnancy weight and height. Results showed that slower or faster fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy resulted in substantially lower or higher birth weight, respectively. However, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy, even at extremes (2 standard deviations below or above the mean), did not have a meaningful impact on the timing of parturition; neither did fetal growth acceleration or deceleration in late pregnancy. Thus, in low-risk pregnancies where fetal growth is normal in early gestation, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy does not affect the timing of normal parturition. PMID:18775925

  18. Fetal growth and timing of parturition in humans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sun, Wenyu; Troendle, James

    2008-10-15

    Animal studies indicate that either the fetus or the intrauterine environment, both of which set the pattern for fetal growth, may affect the timing of parturition. The authors examined the association between fetal growth and timing of spontaneous onset of labor in humans among low-risk white US women with singleton pregnancies (1987-1991). They restricted the data to pregnancies which had a reliable date of the last menstrual period, normal fetal growth in the first half of pregnancy, and no history of or current pregnancy complications that might have impaired fetal growth (n = 3,360). Subjects received ultrasound examinations at 15-22 and 31-35 weeks' gestation. Fetal growth was adjusted for parity, fetal sex, and maternal prepregnancy weight and height. Results showed that slower or faster fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy resulted in substantially lower or higher birth weight, respectively. However, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy, even at extremes (2 standard deviations below or above the mean), did not have a meaningful impact on the timing of parturition; neither did fetal growth acceleration or deceleration in late pregnancy. Thus, in low-risk pregnancies where fetal growth is normal in early gestation, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy does not affect the timing of normal parturition.

  19. Clinical outcome and circulatory effects of fetal cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Lingman, G; Lundström, N R; Marsál, K

    1986-01-01

    By means of abdominal fetal ECG and non-invasive ultrasound blood flow studies 113 cases of fetal cardiac arrhythmia were classified according to the origin of arrhythmia. Pregnancy outcome was characterized by an increased frequency of fetal distress and heart malformation, and increased fetal and neonatal mortality. The following types of arrhythmia were identified: supraventricular extrasystoles (n = 84), paroxysmal tachycardia (n = 6), sinus bradycardia (n = 3), atrial flutter (n = 1), ventricular extrasystoles (n = 14), and atrioventricular block (n = 5). In 37 cases the combined Doppler and real-time ultrasound technique was used to measure fetal aortic blood flow as a means of studying the circulatory effects of the arrhythmia. Increased peak velocity, rising slope and acceleration were found in the first post-pausal beat after a supraventricular extrasystole or a missed beat; this supports the validity of Frank-Starling law for the fetal heart and suggests that a strong relationship exists between these variables and myocardial contractility. In two cases of intra-uterine heart failure, the effect of digoxin treatment in utero on the fetal aortic flow variables was studied, results indicating a positive inotropic effect of the drug on the fetal myocardium. The estimation of fetal aortic volume blood flow in cases of fetal cardiac arrhythmia is useful for early detection of fetal cardiac failure, and for monitoring the effects of intra-uterine treatment.

  20. Engineered fetal cartilage: structural and functional analysis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Terada, Shinichi; Hannouche, Didier; Ochoa, Erin R; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2002-12-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the structure and function of engineered fetal cartilage in vitro. Chondrocytes from ovine specimens of fetal elastic, fetal hyaline, and adult elastic cartilage were expanded in culture and their growth rates determined. Cells were seeded onto synthetic scaffolds, which were then maintained in a bioreactor. Matrix deposition was determined by specific staining and quantitative assays for glycosaminoglycans (GAG), type II collagen (CII), and elastin, as well as compared with native tissue. Statistical analysis was by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Students' t test, with significance set at P less than.01. Fetal elastic chondrocytes grew significantly faster than all other cell types. All fetal constructs resembled hyaline cartilage, regardless of the cell source. There were significantly higher levels of GAG and CII in fetal versus adult constructs, but no significant difference between fetal constructs from different sources. Unlike their adult counterparts, fetal constructs had GAG and CII levels similar to native tissues. Fetal chondrocytes can be rapidly expanded in culture. Compared with adult constructs, matrix deposition is enhanced in engineered fetal cartilage, which closely resembles native tissue, regardless of the cell source. Engineered fetal cartilage may be a preferable option during surgical reconstruction of select congenital anomalies. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  1. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-25

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced 'modified' Sensitivity (SE deg.) and 'modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV deg.) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  2. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  3. Recent advances in fetal near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antona, Donato; Aldrich, Clive J.; O'Brien, Patrick; Lawrence, Sally; Delpy, David T.; Wyatt, John S.

    1997-01-01

    Fetal brain injury resulting from hypoxia and ischemia during labor remains an important cause of death and long- term disability. However, little is known about fetal brain oxygenation and hemodynamics. There are currently no satisfactory clinical techniques for fetal monitoring and there remains a need for a new method to assess brain oxygenation. Fetal near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a new technique that allows noninvasive observation of changes in the cerebral concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to be made during labor. A specially designed optical probe is inserted through the dilated cervix and placed against the fetal head. It is then possible to compare changes in NIRS data with other observations of fetal conditions, such as fetal heart rate and acid-base status.

  4. Fetal tumors: prenatal ultrasonographic findings and clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of fetal tumors has been increased due to generalization of prenatal evaluation and improvement of imaging techniques. The early detection of a fetal tumor and understanding of its imaging features are very important for fetal, maternal, and neonatal care. Ultrasonography is usually used for the detection and differential diagnosis of fetal tumors, and magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being used as a complementary study. Many fetal tumors have different clinical and imaging features compared with pediatric tumors. Although several fetal tumors may mimic other common anomalies, some specific imaging features may carry early accurate diagnosis of fetal tumors, which may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitate immediate postnatal treatment. PMID:25116458

  5. Prospective evaluation of the fetal heart using Fetal Intelligent Navigation Echocardiography (FINE).

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Yeo, L; Romero, R; Haggerty, D; Giardina, I; Hassan, S S; Chaiworapongsa, T; Hernandez-Andrade, E

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate prospectively the performance of Fetal Intelligent Navigation Echocardiography (FINE) applied to spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) volume datasets of the normal fetal heart. In all women between 19 and 30 weeks' gestation with a normal fetal heart, an attempt was made to acquire STIC volume datasets of the apical four-chamber view if the following criteria were met: (1) fetal spine located between 5- and 7-o'clock positions; (2) minimal or absent shadowing (including a clearly visible transverse aortic arch); (3) absence of fetal breathing, hiccups, or movement; and (4) adequate image quality. Each STIC volume successfully acquired was evaluated by STICLoop™ to determine its appropriateness before applying the FINE method. Visualization rates of fetal echocardiography views using diagnostic planes and/or Virtual Intelligent Sonographer Assistance (VIS-Assistance®) were calculated. One or more STIC volumes (365 in total) were obtained successfully in 72.5% (150/207) of women undergoing ultrasound examination. Of the 365 volumes evaluated by STICLoop, 351 (96.2%) were considered to be appropriate. From the 351 STIC volumes, only one STIC volume per patient (n = 150) was analyzed using the FINE method, and consequently nine fetal echocardiography views were generated in 76-100% of cases using diagnostic planes only, in 98-100% of cases using VIS-Assistance only, and in 98-100% of cases when using a combination of diagnostic planes and/or VIS-Assistance. In women between 19 and 30 weeks' gestation with a normal fetal heart undergoing prospective sonographic examination, STIC volumes can be obtained successfully in 72.5% of cases. The FINE method can be applied to generate nine standard fetal echocardiography views in 98-100% of these cases using a combination of diagnostic planes and/or VIS-Assistance. This suggests that FINE could be implemented in fetal cardiac screening programs. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in

  6. Videofetoscopically assisted fetal tissue engineering: bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Fishman, S J; Mehegan, K; Atala, A

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of several congenital anomalies is frequently hindered by lack of enough tissue for surgical reconstruction in the neonatal period. Minimally invasive harvest of fetal tissue, which is then processed through tissue engineering techniques in vitro while pregnancy is allowed to continue so that at delivery a newborn with a prenatally diagnosed congenital anomaly can benefit from having autologous, expanded tissue promptly available for surgical reconstruction at birth. This concept was applied to a bladder defect. Bladder exstrophy was surgically created in ten 90- to 95-day gestation fetal lambs, which were divided in two groups. In group I, a small fetal bladder specimen was harvested through a minimally invasive technique (videofetoscopy). Urothelial and smooth muscle cells were then separately cultivated and expanded in vitro for 55 to 60 days, resulting in a total of approximately 200 million cells. Seven to 10 days before delivery, the cells were seeded in two layers in a 16- to 20-cm2, 3-mm thick biodegradable polyglycolic acid polymer matrix. One to 4 days after delivery, autologous engineered tissue was used for surgical augmentation of the exstrophic bladder. In group II, no harvest was performed, and the bladder exstrophy was primarily closed after delivery. In both groups, a catheter was left inside the bladder for 3 weeks, at which time a cystogram was performed and the catheter then removed. In all animals, at 60 days, another cystogram was performed and urodynamic studies of the bladder were performed. The bladder was then removed for histological analysis. Fetal survival rate was 100%. One newborn died immediately after the implantation of the engineered bladder from an anesthetic accident. The other nine (four in group I and five in group II) survived. One of the animals from group I lost its bladder catheter prematurely and had a urinary leak detected only at the time of death. There were no other complications. The engineered bladders

  7. Bisphenol A disposition in the sheep maternal-placental-fetal unit: mechanisms determining fetal internal exposure.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Tanguy; Gayrard, Véronique; Viguié, Catherine; Puel, Sylvie; Lacroix, Marlène Z; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Picard-Hagen, Nicole

    2013-07-01

    The widespread human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a xenoestrogen interfering with developmental processes, raises the question of the mechanisms determining fetal exposure to BPA. A physiological model was developed in ewes to determine whether the pregnancy-associated physiological changes and the metabolic specificities of the fetal-placental unit can influence BPA toxicokinetics (TK) and fetal exposure to BPA. In a first longitudinal study, BPA was infused (2 mg/[kg·day] i.v. for 1 day) into ewes before breeding, at early and late stages of gestation, and after lambing. In a second study, BPA and BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G) were infused intravenously into pregnant ewes or into fetuses at 4 mo of gestation. BPA and its metabolites were assayed in maternal and fetal plasma and amniotic fluid sampled at steady state and after the end of the infusion. The pregnancy status did not modify the TK parameters of BPA and of BPA-G. Five percent of the BPA dose infused into the pregnant ewe was transferred across the placenta to the fetus. The fetal-placental unit was very efficient in metabolizing BPA into conjugated compounds; those metabolites remained trapped in the fetal-placental compartment, leading to a high fetal exposure to BPA conjugates. Taking into account a body weight adjustment, the ovine fetus in late pregnancy is exposed to a BPA dose similar to that of its mother. In contrast to its mother, the fetus exhibits much higher and sustained exposure to BPA metabolites without evidence of their hydrolysis.

  8. Correlation between Fetal Brain Activity Patterns and Behavioral States: An exploratory fetal magnetoencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Naim; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Vairavan, Srinivasan; Siegel, Eric; Temple, Jessica; Preissl, Hubert; Lowery, Curtis L; Eswaran, Hari

    2011-01-01

    The fetal brain remains inaccessible to neurophysiological studies. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is being assessed to fill this gap. We performed 40 fetal MEG (fMEG) recordings with gestational ages (GA) ranging from 30 to 37 weeks. The data from each recording were divided into 15 second epochs which in turn were classified as continuous (CO), discontinuous (DC), or artifact. The fetal behavioral state, quiet or active sleep, was determined using previously defined criteria based on fetal movements and heart rate variability. We studied the correlation between the fetal state, the GA and the percentage of CO and DC epochs. We also analyzed the Spectral Edge Frequency (SEF) and studied its relation with state and GA. We found that the odds of a DC epoch decreased by 6% per week as the GA increased (P=0.0036). This decrease was mainly generated by changes during quiet sleep, which showed 52% DC epochs before 35 weeks GA versus 38% after 35 weeks (P=0.0006). Active sleep did not show a significant change in DC epochs with GA. When both states were compared for MEG patterns within each GA group (before and after 35 weeks), the early group was found to have more DC epochs in quiet sleep (54%) compared to active sleep (42%) (P=0.036). No significant difference in DC epochs between the two states was noted in the late GA group. Analysis of SEF showed a significant difference (P=0.0014) before and after 35 weeks GA, with higher SEF noted at late GA. However, when both quiet and active sleep states were compared within each GA group, the SEF did not show a significant difference. We conclude that fMEG shows reproducible variations in gross features and frequency content, depending on GA and behavioral state. Fetal MEG is a promising tool to investigate fetal brain physiology and maturation. PMID:21237155

  9. Assessment of fetal growth on the basis of signal strength in fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, P; Beuvink, Y; Lange, S; Klein, A; Geue, D; Grönemeyer, D

    2004-11-30

    Fetal magnetocardiography has shown that fetal P wave and QRS complex durations increase with gestational age, reflecting change in cardiac muscle mass. The latter should, in principle, be associated with an increase in signal strength. We examined two approaches for determining QRS signal strength in a healthy fetus on a weekly basis in the second and third trimester. Twenty-two fetal magnetocardiograms of the same fetus were obtained using a 61 channel Magnes 1300 biomagnetometer (20th-42nd week of gestation). In the signal averaged fetal beat produced at each week, signal strength was assessed on the basis of 1) peak-to-peak QRS signal amplitudes and 2) strength of an equivalent current dipole (ECD) computed at R peak. The results were assessed on the basis of correlation to week of gestation and by comparison to changes in QRS interval duration. All values increased with advancing gestation and regression analysis suggested a nonlinear dependency on age. ECD strength reflected gestational age slightly more reliably (r2=0.93) than signal amplitude values (mean, median, maximum: r2=089, 0.88, 0.85, respectively). ECD strength and mean signal amplitude also correlated well (r=0.97, p<0.0005) Values calculated from QRS complexes determined immediately before and after a clear change in fetal position (acquisition week 24) demonstrated a certain instability in both approaches. Nonetheless, the overall correlation of the amplitude to gestational age compared favorably with that of QRS complex duration. This indicates that not only magnetocardiographically determined fetal cardiac time intervals but also signal strength may be used to assess fetal growth.

  10. A Method to Evaluate Fetal Erythropoiesis from Postnatal Survival of Fetal RBCs.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Denison J; Widness, John A; Nalbant, Demet; Schmidt, Robert L; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Fetal RBCs are produced during a period of very rapid growth and stimulated erythropoiesis under hypoxic intrauterine conditions. Fetal RBC life span varies with gestational age (GA) and is shorter than that in healthy adults. Due to the special kinetic properties of life span-based survival of human RBCs, a mathematical model-based kinetic analysis of the survival of fetal RBCs shortly after birth provides a unique opportunity to "look backward in time" to evaluate fetal erythropoiesis. This work introduces a novel method that utilizes postnatal in vivo RBC survival data collected within 2 days after birth to study both nonsteady-state (non-SS) in utero RBC production and changing fetal RBC life span over time. The effect of changes in erythropoiesis rate and RBC life span and the effect of multiple postnatal phlebotomies on the RBC survival curves were investigated using model-based simulations. This mathematical model, which considers both changes in the rate of erythropoiesis and RBC life span and which accurately accounts for the confounding effect of multiple phlebotomies, was applied to survival curves for biotin-labeled RBCs from ten anemic very low birth weight preterm infants. The estimated mean fetal RBC production rate scaled by body weight was 1.07 × 10(7) RBCs/day g, and the mean RBC life span at birth was 52.1 days; these values are consistent with reported values. The in utero RBC life span increased at a rate of 0.51 days per day of gestation. We conclude that the proposed mathematical model and its implementation provide a flexible framework to study in utero non-SS fetal erythropoiesis in newborn infants.

  11. Heart rate variability parameters and fetal movement complement fetal behavioral states detection via magnetography to monitor neurovegetative development

    PubMed Central

    Brändle, Johanna; Preissl, Hubert; Draganova, Rossitza; Ortiz, Erick; Kagan, Karl O.; Abele, Harald; Brucker, Sara Y.; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Fetal behavioral states are defined by fetal movement and heart rate variability (HRV). At 32 weeks of gestational age (GA) the distinction of four fetal behavioral states represented by combinations of quiet or active sleep or awakeness is possible. Prior to 32 weeks, only periods of fetal activity and quiesence can be distinguished. The increasing synchronization of fetal movement and HRV reflects the development of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) control. Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) detects fetal heart activity at high temporal resolution, enabling the calculation of HRV parameters. This study combined the criteria of fetal movement with the HRV analysis to complete the criteria for fetal state detection. HRV parameters were calculated including the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal R–R interval (SDNN), the mean square of successive differences of the R–R intervals (RMSSD, SDNN/RMSSD ratio, and permutation entropy (PE) to gain information about the developing influence of the ANS within each fetal state. In this study, 55 magnetocardiograms from healthy fetuses of 24–41 weeks’ GA were recorded for up to 45 min using a fetal biomagnetometer. Fetal states were classified based on HRV and movement detection. HRV parameters were calculated for each state. Before GA 32 weeks, 58.4% quiescence and 41.6% activity cycles were observed. Later, 24% quiet sleep state (1F), 65.4% active sleep state (2F), and 10.6% active awake state (4F) were observed. SDNN increased over gestation. Changes of HRV parameters between the fetal behavioral states, especially between 1F and 4F, were statistically significant. Increasing fetal activity was confirmed by a decrease in PE complexity measures. The fHRV parameters support the differentiation between states and indicate the development of autonomous nervous control of heart rate function. PMID:25904855

  12. Cell-Free Fetal DNA and Cell-Free Total DNA Levels in Spontaneous Abortion with Fetal Chromosomal Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Min Hyoung; Han, You Jung; Lee, Da Eun; Park, So Yeon; Han, Jung Yeol; Kim, Moon Young; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA) with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Methodology/Principal Findings A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both). The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001) than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002) and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037). The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852–0.945) and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903–0.975), respectively. Conclusions Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA with fetal

  13. Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in spontaneous abortion with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Min Hyoung; Han, You Jung; Lee, Da Eun; Park, So Yeon; Han, Jung Yeol; Kim, Moon Young; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA) with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both). The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001) than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002) and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037). The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852-0.945) and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903-0.975), respectively. Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, regardless of fetal gender.

  14. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  15. Impaired fetal adrenal function in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunfang; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Xiaotian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-associated liver disease of unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the change in maternal and fetal adrenal function in clinical and experimental ICP. Material/Methods The maternal and fetal serum levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were determined in 14 women with ICP and in pregnant rats with estrogen-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. Results In women with ICP, the fetal serum cortisol and DHEAS levels were significantly higher than those in women with normal pregnancy, after correcting the impact of gestational age at delivery. The relationship between fetal cortisol and maternal cholic acid levels was bidirectional; the fetal cortisol tended to increase in mild ICP, while it decreased in severe ICP. In pregnant rats with estrogen-induced cholestasis, the fetal cortisol level was significantly lower in the group with oxytocin injection, compared with the group without oxytocin injection (191.92±18.86 vs. 272.71±31.83 ng/ml, P<0.05). In contrast, the fetal cortisol concentration was increased after oxytocin injection in normal control rats. Conclusions The data indicate that fetal stress-responsive system is stimulated in mild ICP, but it is suppressed in severe ICP, which might contribute to the occurrence of unpredictable sudden fetal death. Further studies are warranted to explore the role of impaired fetal adrenal function in the pathogenesis of ICP and the clinical implications. PMID:21525808

  16. Human fetal growth and organ development: 50 years of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Giorgio; Cetin, Irene

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge about human fetal growth and organ development has greatly developed in the last 50 years. Anatomists and physiologists had already described some crucial aspects, for example, the circulation of blood during intrauterine life through the fetal heart, the liver as well as the placenta. However, only in the last century physiologic studies were performed in animal models. In the human fetus, the introduction of ultrasound and Doppler velocimetry has provided data about the growth and development of the fetus and of the circulation through the different fetal districts. Moreover, in the last 2 decades we have learned about fetal oxygenation and fetal nutrient supply caused by the availability of fetal blood samples obtained under relatively steady state conditions. These studies, together with studies using stable isotope methodologies, have clarified some aspects of the supply of the major nutrients for the fetus such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids. At the same time, the relevance of placental function has been recognized as a major determinant of fetal diseases leading to intrauterine growth restriction. More recently, the availability of new tools such as 3-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, have made possible the evaluation of the growth and development of fetal organs. This knowledge in the healthy fetus will improve the ability of clinicians to recognize abnormal phenotypes of the different fetal organs, thus allowing to stage fetal diseases.

  17. Fetal tissue transplantation: can it be morally insulated from abortion?

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    1991-06-01

    Ethical controversy over transplantation of human fetal tissue has arisen because the source of tissue is induced abortions. Opposition to such transplants has been based on various arguments, including the following: rightful informed consent cannot be obtained for use of fetal tissue from induced abortions, and fetal tissue transplantation might result in an increase in the number of abortions. These arguments were not accepted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel. The majority opinion of the panel stated that abortion and fetal tissue use are entirely separate issues, and that tissue use is ethically acceptable because it can be morally insulated from the issue of abortion. In support of this view, panel members and others have replied to the arguments put forward by opponents of fetal tissue use. However, replies to the two arguments mentioned above have been unsatisfactory, and the shortcomings of those replies are identified herein. Examination of the arguments pro and con suggests that fetal tissue use cannot be completely insulated from the issue of abortion. Thus, in seeking an ethical justification for fetal tissue transplantation we must consider reasons other than those put forward by the NIH panel. In this paper it is argued that whatever wrong is involved in using fetal tissue from induced abortions must be balanced against the benefits for patients, and it is on this basis that fetal tissue transplantation can be ethically justified.

  18. A Literature Update on Maternal-Fetal Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To critically review and synthesize original research published since 2000 designed to measure factors that influence maternal-fetal attachment. Data Sources EBSCOhost Research Databases that included PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS were searched for journal articles published in the past 7 years (2000–2007) that examined variables thought to increase, decrease, or cause no change in level of maternal-fetal attachment. Keyword searches included maternal-fetal attachment, parental attachment, and prenatal attachment. Study Selection Twenty-two studies were selected that met the inclusion criteria of original research, clear delineation of the measurement of maternal-fetal attachment, measurement of maternal-fetal attachment during pregnancy, and inclusion of women or couples, or both. Data Extraction Studies measuring maternal-fetal attachment included a broad range of variables as potential risk or protective factors, or both. Factors associated with higher levels of maternal-fetal attachment included family support, greater psychological well-being, and having an ultrasound performed. Factors such as depression, substance abuse, and higher anxiety levels were associated with lower levels of maternal-fetal attachment. Data Synthesis The large majority of studies reviewed were limited by small, homogenous samples deemed insufficient to detect significant differences, inconsistent measurement of maternal-fetal attachment during gestational periods, and cross-sectional designs. Conclusions Further research is essential to identify factors influencing maternal-fetal attachment. Specifically, research needs to be conducted on larger sample sizes of greater racial and ethnic diversity. PMID:18507602

  19. Fetal growth in different racial groups.

    PubMed Central

    Alvear, J; Brooke, O G

    1978-01-01

    Three racial groups of mothers and their newborn babies-- North European 75, Negro 75, and "Indian" Asian 37--were matched for parity, gestational age, sex, maternal age, maternal smoking habits, and social class. Multiple anthropometric measurements, including skinfold thickness, limb circumferences, and various linear measurements were made on the mothers and their infants to determine the effects of race and smoking on fetal size. Indian-Asian mothers, though shorter and lighter than Europeans and Negroes, had similar skinfold thickness and weight: height2 ratios and gained as much weight during pregnancy. Their infants, however, were lighter than the others, and had smaller head and limb circumferences, although their linear measurements were the same. Negro and European infants were almost identical in size. We found no effect on any of the fetal measurements which could be attributed to smoking. PMID:626515

  20. Thick fetal corpus callosum: an ominous sign?

    PubMed

    Lerman-Sagie, T; Ben-Sira, L; Achiron, R; Schreiber, L; Hermann, G; Lev, D; Kidron, D; Malinger, G

    2009-07-01

    Anomalies of the corpus callosum are frequently diagnosed during pregnancy, but a thick corpus callosum is a rare finding and its significance is not clear. We aimed to assess the significance of thick fetal corpus callosum by reviewing our experience of such cases. The records of all fetuses with anomalies of the corpus callosum referred to the prenatal diagnosis units of two university hospitals from 2000 to 2007 were reviewed. Nine fetuses with a thick corpus callosum were identified. In all cases there were associated abnormalities: macrocephaly, ventriculomegaly, vermian agenesis, abnormal sulcation or encephalocele. Four pregnancies were terminated and in each of these cases the autopsy confirmed dysmorphic features and additional brain abnormalities. Five infants were delivered; two died shortly after birth, one suffers from mental retardation, one had neonatal convulsions and one is developing normally. A thick fetal corpus callosum is usually associated with other brain anomalies and is part of a neurogenetic syndrome in most cases. (c) 2009 ISUOG.

  1. Effects of experience on fetal voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S; Hains, Sylvia M J; Lee, Kang; Xie, Xing; Huang, Hefeng; Ye, Hai Hui; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Zengping

    2003-05-01

    The ability of human fetuses to recognize their own mother's voice was examined. Sixty term fetuses were assigned to one of two conditions during which they were exposed to a tape recording of their mother or a female stranger reading a passage. Voice stimuli were delivered through a loudspeaker held approximately 10 cm above the maternal abdomen and played at an average of 95 dB SPL. Each condition consisted of three 2-min periods: no stimulus, voice (mother or stranger), and no stimulus. Fetal heart rate increased in response to the mother's voice and decreased in response to the stranger's; both responses were sustained for 4 min. The finding of differential behavior in response to a familiar versus a novel voice provides evidence that experience influences fetal voice processing. It supports an epigenetic model of speech perception, presuming an interaction between genetic expression of neural development and species-specific experience.

  2. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Moessinger, A C

    1983-12-01

    Rat fetuses were paralyzed by daily transuterine injections of curare from day 18 of gestation until term (day 21). The following anomalies were noted at the time of delivery: multiple joint contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, micrognathia, fetal growth retardation, short umbilical cords, and polyhydramnios. Neither sham-operated nor untouched littermate control fetuses had any of these anomalies. The group of anomalies (or deformation sequence) obtained with this animal model is presumed to result from the paralytic effect of curare. This phenotype bears a striking resemblance to the syndrome of ankyloses, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia (also known as Pena and Shokeir I), presumably inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It is suggested that this phenotype is not specific but, rather, represents a deformation sequence which results from fetal immobilization or akinesia. Diagnostic evaluation of patients with this group of anomalies should include the identification of the underlying pathologic process (etiology of the akinesia) to allow for proper classification and genetic counseling.

  3. Fetal programming and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Lara J; Norman, Jane E; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastián E

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is defined by new-onset glucose intolerance during pregnancy. About 2-5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes during their pregnancies and the prevalence has increased considerably during the last decade. This metabolic condition is manifested when pancreatic β-cells lose their ability to compensate for increased insulin resistance during pregnancy, however, the pathogenesis of the disease remains largely unknown. Gestational diabetes is strongly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome as well as with long-term adverse effects on the offspring which likely occurs due to epigenetic modifications of the fetal genome. In the current review we address gestational diabetes and the short and long term complications for both mothers and offspring focusing on the importance of fetal programming in conferring risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  5. Placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment: implications for fetal growth and developmental programming.

    PubMed

    Sandovici, Ionel; Hoelle, Katharina; Angiolini, Emily; Constância, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The placenta is a transient organ found in eutherian mammals that evolved primarily to provide nutrients for the developing fetus. The placenta exchanges a wide array of nutrients, endocrine signals, cytokines and growth factors with the mother and the fetus, thereby regulating intrauterine development. Recent studies show that the placenta is not just a passive organ mediating maternal-fetal exchange. It can adapt its capacity to supply nutrients in response to intrinsic and extrinsic variations in the maternal-fetal environment. These dynamic adaptations are thought to occur to maximize fetal growth and viability at birth in the prevailing conditions in utero. However, some of these adaptations may also affect the development of individual fetal tissues, with patho-physiological consequences long after birth. Here, this review summarizes current knowledge on the causes, possible mechanisms and consequences of placental adaptive responses, with a focus on the regulation of transporter-mediated processes for nutrients. This review also highlights the emerging roles that imprinted genes and epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation may play in placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementing noninvasive prenatal fetal sex determination using cell-free fetal DNA in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Hill, Melissa; Lewis, Celine; Jenkins, Lucy; Allen, Stephanie; Elles, Rob G; Chitty, Lyn S

    2012-06-01

    Fetal sex determination has traditionally been performed in pregnancies at risk of sex-linked genetic conditions by analysis of chorionic villi or amniocytes following invasive tests. The development of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has allowed women to have accurate information about fetal sex early in pregnancy without the risk of miscarriage. In the UK, NIPD for fetal sex determination has been offered on a research basis since 2003. Formal approval and regulation through national bodies is essential to ensure standardized laboratory services, appropriate funding and equity of access for service users. Here we describe the process of formal commissioning that has been supported by a multifaceted approach to service evaluation, including appraisal of analytical and clinical validity, clinical utility and economic costs together with an exploration of service users' and providers' attitudes, preferences and information needs. Implementation strategies that reach beyond the assessment of laboratory test parameters to consider psychosocial and economic issues have been crucial in bringing NIPD for fetal sex determination into routine practice. Ongoing audit and monitoring of service delivery will ensure a high standard of care is maintained.

  7. Fetal Glucocorticoid Synthesis Is Required for Development of Fetal Adrenal Medulla and Hypothalamus Feedback Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Che Jeff; Shih, Meng-Chun Monica; Hsu, Nai-Chi; Chien, Yu

    2012-01-01

    During pregnancy, fetal glucocorticoid is derived from both maternal supply and fetal secretion. We have created mice with a disruption of the Cyp11a1 gene resulting in loss of fetal steroid secretion but preserving the maternal supply. Cyp11a1null embryos have appreciable although lower amounts of circulating corticosterone, the major mouse glucocorticoid, suggesting that transplacental corticosterone is a major source of corticosterone in fetal circulation. These embryos thus provide a means to examine the effect of fetal glucocorticoids. The adrenal in Cyp11a1 null embryos was disorganized with abnormal mitochondria and oil accumulation. The adrenal medullary cells did not express phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and synthesized no epinephrine. Cyp11a1 null embryos had decreased diencephalon Hsd11b1, increased diencephalon Crh, and increased pituitary Pomc expression, leading to higher adrenocorticotropin level in the plasma. These data indicate blunted feedback suppression despite reasonable amounts of circulating corticosterone. Thus, the corticosterone synthesized in situ by the fetus is required for negative feedback suppression of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and for catecholamine synthesis in adrenal medulla. PMID:22962254

  8. Feasibility of a fetal measurement electrode system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Findings of the study are summarized and conclude that all monitoring requirements are not currently satisfied. An approach is presented to provide a multiparametric monitoring system through combinations of existing transducers. This monitoring system would be appropriate, not only for intrapartum monitoring, but also for neonatal and adult blood gas evaluations. A literature search was conducted to provide an insight into current state-of-the-art in fetal monitoring.

  9. PHACE Syndrome: Persistent Fetal Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Hrbac, T.; Chmelova, J.; Skoloudik, D.; Prochazka, M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary PHACE(S) syndrome is an acronym for neurocutaneous disease encompassing the expression of (P) posterior cranial fossa malformations, (H) facial haemangiomas, (A) arterial anomalies, (C) aortic coarctaion and other cardiac defects, (E) eye abnormalities and (S) for sternal malformation or stenotic arterial diseases. We report on a case of PHACE syndrome complete expression with persistent fetal vascular anomalies unusually in a 55-year-old women with large bilateral facial and neck haemangioma and posterior fossa circulation insufficiency. PMID:20584448

  10. Heating of fetal bone by diagnostic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doody, Claire

    Most pregnant women in the Western world undergo an ultrasound examination and so it is important to ensure that exposure of the embryo or fetus does not produce unwanted effects. It is known that ultrasound can heat tissue, especially bone, and so this thesis explores the degree to which fetal bone might be heated during a pulsed Doppler examination. This is done both by carrying out measurements and by developing computer models. Thermal measurements on human fetal thoracic vertebrae of gestational age ranging from 14 to 39 weeks are reported. The bone samples were insonated in vitro with an ultrasound beam which had power and intensity values typical of those from a clinical scanner operating in pulsed Doppler mode. Temperature rises ranging from 0.6°C to 1.8°C were observed after five minutes, with approximately 75% of the temperature rise occurring in the first minute. Two approaches to computer modelling are described. These are the heated disc technique, which is commonly used to model the temperature rise generated by an ultrasound beam, and finite element modelling, a more general approach used to obtain solutions to differential equations. The degree to which our limited knowledge of the properties of fetal tissue affect our ability to make accurate predictions of in vivo heating is explored. It is shown that the present uncertainty in the value of the thermal conductivity and attenuation coefficient of fetal bone can lead to significant uncertainty in predictions of heating. The degree to which the simplifications inherent in the heated disc model affect the results will also be discussed. The results from the models are compared with the experimental measurements in order to estimate the attenuation coefficient of the bone.

  11. Maturation of Fetal Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Hains, S. M. J.; Jacquet, A.-Y.; Granier-Deferre, C.; Lecanuet, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Maturation of fetal response to music was characterized over the last trimester of pregnancy using a 5-minute piano recording of Brahms' Lullaby, played at an average of 95, 100, 105 or 110 dB (A). Within 30 seconds of the onset of the music, the youngest fetuses (28-32 weeks GA) showed a heart rate increase limited to the two highest dB levels;…

  12. Umbilical Cord Segmental Hemorrhage and Fetal Distress

    PubMed Central

    Larciprete, Giovanni; Romanini, Maria Elisabetta; Arduini, Domenico; Cirese, Elio; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We describe an unexplained case of umbilical cord segmental hemorrhage linked with meconium-stained amniotic fluid. A severely asphyxiated infant was delivered at term by Caesarean section. There were poor prognostic signs on fetal cardiotocography with rupture of membranes with meconium-stained amniotic fluid. The pathophysiologic mechanism in this case is still unknown, even if we argued a possible role of the umbilical cord shortness. PMID:23674981

  13. Facial Dysmorphism Across the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, Michael; Foroud, Tatiana; Wetherill, Leah; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Khaole, Nathaniel; Robinson, Luther K.; Riley, Edward P.; Jacobson, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Classic facial characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) are shortened palpebral fissures, smooth philtrum, and thin upper vermillion. We aim to help pediatricians detect facial dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum, especially among nonsyndromal heavily exposed (HE) individuals without classic facial characteristics. METHODS: Of 192 Cape Coloured children recruited, 69 were born to women who reported abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy. According to multifaceted criteria, the remainder were allocated clinically to the FAS (n = 22), partial FAS (n = 26) or nonsyndromal HE (n = 75) categories. We used dense surface modeling and signature analyses of 3-dimensional facial photographs to determine agreement between clinical categorization and classifications induced from face shape alone, to visualize facial differences, and to consider predictive links between face shape and neurobehavior. RESULTS: Face classification achieved significant agreement with clinical categories for discrimination of nonexposed from FAS alone (face: 0.97–1.00; profile: 0.92) or with the addition of partial FAS (face: 0.90; profile: 0.92). Visualizations of face signatures delineated dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum and in half of the nonsyndromal HE category face signature graphs detected facial characteristics consistent with prenatal alcohol exposure. This subgroup performed less well on IQ and learning tests than did nonsyndromal subjects without classic facial characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Heat maps and morphing visualizations of face signatures may help clinicians detect facial dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum. Face signature graphs show potential for identifying nonsyndromal heavily exposed children who lack the classic facial phenotype but have cognitive impairment. PMID:23439907

  14. White noise does not induce fetal sleep.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, E Z; Jakobi, P; Talmon, R; Shenhav, R; Weissman, A

    1993-01-01

    White noise has been shown to induce sleep in newborns. We sought to examine whether this type of sound will also induce a quiet state in the fetus. Twenty-two fetuses at 36-41 weeks of gestation were exposed to white noise during an active state. The sound was delivered for 5 min at an intensity of 100 dB. No significant change in fetal activity was noted following the sound.

  15. Normal renal development investigated with fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Witzani, Linde; Brugger, Peter Christian; Hörmann, Marcus; Kasprian, Gregor; Csapone-Balassy, Csilla; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate age-dependent changes in fetal kidney measurements with MRI. Fetal MRI examinations were used to study the kidney length (218 fetuses), signal intensities of renal tissue, renal pelvis, and liver tissue on T2-weighted images (223 fetuses), and the whole-kidney apparent diffusion coefficient (107 fetuses). A 1.5 T superconducting unit with a phased array coil was used in patients from 16 to 39 weeks' gestation. The imaging protocol included T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo, T2-weighted balanced angiography and diffusion-weighted sequences. Slice thickness ranged from 3 to 5mm. Fetal kidney length as a function of gestational age was expressed by the linear regression: kidney length (mm)=0.190 x gestational age (d) -8.034 (R(2) = 0.883, p < 0.001). Paired t-test analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference between the ratio of renal tissue signal intensity to renal pelvis signal intensity and the ratio of liver signal intensity to renal pelvis signal intensity on T2-weighted images (t = -50.963, d.f. = 162, p < 0.001), with renal tissue hyperintense to liver tissue. The apparent diffusion coefficient in relation to gestational age was described by the equation: ADC (microm(2)/s) = 0.0302 x square (gestational age (d)) -14.202 x gestational age (d) +2,728.6 (R(2) = 0.225, p < 0.001). The length, signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and apparent diffusion coefficient of the fetal kidney change significantly with gestational age. The presented data may help in the prenatal diagnosis of renal anomalies.

  16. Fetal MR imaging diagnosis of pulmonary agenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Kaji, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    A woman was referred to our institution with an ultrasound (US) suggestive of right-sided heart in fetus at 34 weeks' gestation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed right-sided heart, small right hemithorax, and completely absent right main bronchus and right pulmonary artery. From our experience with this case, we point out 5 important MR imaging findings needed for prenatal diagnosis of pulmonary agenesis. Fetal MR imaging also provided information about anomalies of other organs.

  17. Induction of fetal demise before abortion.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Justin; Drey, Eleanor

    2010-06-01

    For decades, the induction of fetal demise has been used before both surgical and medical second-trimester abortion. Intracardiac potassium chloride and intrafetal or intra-amniotic digoxin injections are the pharmacologic agents used most often to induce fetal demise. In the last several years, induction of fetal demise has become more common before second-trimester abortion. The only randomized, placebo-controlled trial of induced fetal demise before surgical abortion used a 1 mg injection of intra-amniotic digoxin before surgical abortion at 20-23 weeks' gestation and found no difference in procedure duration, difficulty, estimated blood loss, pain scores or complications between groups. Inducing demise before induction terminations at near viable gestational ages to avoid signs of life at delivery is practiced widely. The role of inducing demise before dilation and evacuation (D&E) remains unclear, except for legal considerations in the United States when an intact delivery is intended. There is a discrepancy between the one published randomized trial that used 1 mg intra-amniotic digoxin that showed no improvement in D&E outcomes and observational studies using different routes, doses and pre-abortion intervals that have made claims for its use. Additional randomized trials might provide clearer evidence upon which to make further recommendations about any role of inducing demise before surgical abortion. At the current time, the Society of Family Planning recommends that pharmacokinetic studies followed by randomized controlled trials be conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of feticidal agents to improve abortion safety.

  18. Fetal ultrasound biometry: 1. Head reference values.

    PubMed

    Kurmanavicius, J; Wright, E M; Royston, P; Wisser, J; Huch, R; Huch, A; Zimmermann, R

    1999-02-01

    To create reliable reference ranges and calculate Z scores for fetal head ultrasound biometry using a large sample size which is evenly distributed from 12 to 42 weeks of pregnancy. A prospective, cross-sectional study. Obstetric clinics (outpatient and delivery units) at the University Hospital of Zurich. The study data were obtained from 6557 pregnant women. Only the first ultrasound examination between 12 and 42 weeks of each fetus with exactly established gestational age was used for analysis. No exclusions were made on the grounds of small-for-date birthweight, prematurity or other events several weeks after the examination. Separate regression models were fitted to estimate the mean and standard deviation at each gestational age for each parameter. A total of 6217 fetal head biparietal diameters and 5510 occipito-frontal diameters were measured. Both head circumference and cephalic index were derived in 5462 cases where both biparietal diameter and occipito-frontal diameter could be measured on the same fetus. The centile charts, tables and regression formulae for biparietal and occipito-frontal diameters, head circumference and cephalic index are presented. An application to calculate Z scores was developed using Excel (Microsoft Corporation, USA) and macros are presented in detail in the Figure 8 footnote. The comparison of our charts with those of the two most recent studies revealed almost no differences in biparietal diameter centiles. In one publication, occipito-frontal diameter charts, and in another, head circumference charts were different from the current study. We have presented centile charts, tables and regression formulae for fetal head ultrasound biometry derived from a large and minimally selected sample size in a carefully designed cross-sectional study. Complete tables and regression formulae to calculate reference ranges and Z scores are presented for use in computer-aided evaluation of fetal ultrasound biometry.

  19. New perspectives in electronic fetal surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Emily F; Warrick, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    Despite its recognized limitations, fetal heart rate monitoring is a mainstay of intrapartum care. Although the basic technology in standard electronic fetal monitors has changed little in recent decades, clinical behavior in response to heart rate monitoring has changed considerably. In addition to clearly defined nomenclature and clinical guidelines, there is an increased awareness that environmental and human factors can impair clinical judgment, resulting in delayed intervention and, consequently, birth-related injury. This review examines three essential steps that affect clinical outcome: (1) signal acquisition, (2) associations with physiological outcome, and (3) clinical intervention. Only the third step is directly responsible for changing clinical outcome. However, timely initiation of interventions is dependent upon the second step, which is dependent upon the fi rst step. Thus, deficiencies at each step tend to accumulate and contribute to the worsening of overall clinical outcome. This review article summarizes advances occurring at each step. The synergy and convergence of innovations in engineering, mathematics, and behavioral science shows considerable promise in intrapartum fetal surveillance.

  20. Reproductive decisions after fetal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Eugene; Pergament, Deborah

    2012-10-01

    A broad range of testing modalities for fetal genetic disease has been established. These include carrier screening for single-gene mutations, first-trimester and second-trimester screening for chromosome abnormalities and open neural-tube defects, prenatal diagnosis by means of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Reproductive decisions before and after fetal genetic counselling represent the culmination of a dynamic interaction between prospective parents, obstetrician and genetic counsellor. The decision to undergo genetic testing before and after genetic counselling is influenced by a host of interrelated factors, including patient-partner and family relationships, patient-physician communication, societal mores, religious beliefs, and the media. Because of the complexity of personal and societal factors involved, it is not surprising that genetic counselling concerning reproductive decision-making must be individualised. A limited number of principles, guidelines and standards apply when counselling about testing for fetal genetic disease. These principles are that genetic counselling should be non-directive and unbiased and that parental decisions should be supported regardless of the reproductive choice. A critical responsibility of the obstetrician and genetic counsellor is to provide accurate and objective information about the implications, advantages, disadvantages and consequences of any genetic testing applied to prospective parents and their fetuses. These principles and responsibilities will be tested as newer technologies, such as array comparative genome hybridisation, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and sequencing of the entire genome are introduced into the field of reproductive genetics and become routine practice.

  1. Role of fetal DNA in preeclampsia (review).

    PubMed

    Konečná, Barbora; Vlková, Barbora; Celec, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Preeclampsia is an autoimmune disorder characterized by hypertension. It begins with abnormal cytotrophoblast apoptosis, which leads to inflammation and an increase in the levels of anti-angiogenic factors followed by the disruption of the angiogenic status. Increased levels of fetal DNA and RNA coming from the placenta, one of the most commonly affected organs in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, have been found in pregnant women with the condition. However, it remains unknown as to whether this is a cause or a consequence of preeclampsia. Few studies have been carried out on preeclampsia in which an animal model of preeclampsia was induced by an injection of different types of DNA that are mimic fetal DNA and provoke inflammation through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP). The specific mechanisms involved in the development of preeclampsia are not yet fully understood. It is hypothesized that the presence of different fragments of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may cause for the development of preeclampsia. The function of DNase during preeclampsia also remains unresolved. Studies have suggested that its activity is decreased or the DNA is protected against its effects. Further research is required to uncover the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and focus more on the condition of patients with the condition.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal pelvic cysts.

    PubMed

    Archontaki, Styliani; Vial, Yvan; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Meuli, Reto; Alamo, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The detection of fetal anomalies has improved in the last years as a result of the generalization of ultrasound pregnancy screening exams. The presence of a cystic imaging in the fetal pelvis is a relatively common finding, which can correspond to a real congenital cystic lesion or result from the anomalous liquid accumulation in a whole pelvic organ, mainly the urinary bladder, the uterus, or the vagina. In selected cases with poor prognosis and/or inconclusive echographic findings, magnetic resonance may bring additional information in terms of the characterization, anatomical location, and real extension of the pathology. This pictorial essay describes the normal pelvic fetal anatomy, as well as the most common pelvic cysts. It also describes the causes of an anomalous distension of the whole pelvic organs detected in utero, with emphasis on prenatal magnetic resonance imaging exams. Moreover, it proposes practical teaching points to reduce the differential diagnosis of these lesions based on the sex of the fetus, the division of the pelvis in anatomical spaces, and the imaging findings of the pathology. Finally, it discusses the real utility of complementary MRI.

  3. Estimating fetal weight for best clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decisions are often based on the results of third trimester sonograms, particularly with small or large babies and so accuracy of estimating fetal weight (EFW) is essential. There are numerous EFW formula available and yet in Australia no one formula has been recommended for use due to the lack of clinical evidence as to their accuracy. Objectives: 1 To assess inter/intra observer error for fetal parameter measurements with multiple observers. 2 To compare six of the most commonly used EFW formulae and analyse inter/intra formulae variations for different weight range. Method: EFW of 121 pregnancies assessed within 7 days of birth by measuring the BPD, OFD, HC, AC, FL and comparing to actual birth weight. Results: Inter‐observer error: 1.3 to 3.1%. Intra‐observer error: 1.1 to 1.9% depending on fetal parameter. Accuracy of each EFW formula changed with different weight ranges. For all formulae the highest random error occurred in the macrosomic group. The lowest random error in all weight groups was the Hadlock B formula incorporating the HC/AC/FL (7.7%). Conclusion: Considering the possible problems of head moulding this study suggests the use of: Hadlock FP et al (1982) – Formula B – incorporating HC/AC/FL. PMID:28191133

  4. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings.

  5. Fetal autopsy and closing the gap.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Yogavijayan; Kilcullen, Meegan; Watson, David

    2016-06-01

    Over the past 30 years, the perinatal mortality rate (PMR) in Australia has been reduced to almost a quarter of that observed in the 1970s. To a large extent, this decline in the PMR has been driven by a reduction in neonatal mortality. Stillbirth rates have, however, remained relatively unchanged, and stillbirth rates for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander mothers have remained approximately twice that for non-Indigenous women over the last 10 years. The causes for this difference remain to be fully established. Fetal autopsy is the single most important investigative tool to determine the cause of fetal demise. While facilitators and barriers to gaining consent for autopsy have been identified in a non-Indigenous context, these are yet to be established for Indigenous families. In order to address the gap in stillbirths between Indigenous and non-Indigenous mothers, it is essential to identify culturally appropriate ways when approaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families for consent after fetal death. Culturally safe and appropriate counselling at this time provides the basis for respectful care to families while offering an opportunity to gain knowledge to reduce the PMR. Identifying the cause of preventable stillbirth is an important step in narrowing the disparity in stillbirth rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous mothers.

  6. Hypertext atlas of fetal and neonatal pathology.

    PubMed

    Jezová, Marta; Múcková, Katarína; Soucek, Ondrej; Feit, Josef; Vlasín, Pavel

    2008-07-15

    Hypertext atlas of fetal and neonatal pathology is a free resource for pregraduate students of medicine, pathologists and other health professionals dealing with prenatal medicine. The atlas can be found at http://www.muni.cz/atlases. The access is restricted to registered users. Concise texts summarize the gross and microscopic pathology, etiology, and clinical signs of both common and rare fetal and neonatal conditions. The texts are illustrated with over 300 images that are accompanied by short comments. The atlas offers histological pictures of high quality. Virtual microscope interface is used to access the high-resolution histological images. Fetal ultrasound video clips are included. Case studies integrate clinical history, prenatal ultrasonographic examination, gross pathology and histological features. The atlas is available in English (and Czech) and equipped with an active index. The atlas is suitable both for medical students and pathologists as a teaching and reference tool. The atlas is going to be further expanded while keeping the high quality of the images.

  7. Effect of Placenta Previa on Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    HARPER, Lorie M.; ODIBO, Anthony O.; MACONES, George A.; CRANE, James P.; CAHILL, Alison G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between placenta previa and abnormal fetal growth. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women undergoing ultrasound between 15–22 weeks. Groups were defined by the presence or absence of complete or partial placenta previa. The primary outcome was intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), defined as a birth weight <10th percentile by the Alexander growth standard. Univariable, stratified and multivariable analyses were used to estimate the effect of placenta previa on fetal growth restriction. Results Of 59,149 women, 724 (1.2%) were diagnosed with a complete or partial previa. After adjusting for significant confounding factors (black race, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and single umbilical artery,), the risk of IUGR remained similar (adjusted odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.9–1.5). The presence of bleeding did not impact the risk of growth restriction. Conclusion Placenta previa is not associated with fetal growth restriction. Serial growth ultrasounds are not indicated in patients with placenta previa. PMID:20599185

  8. Assessment and control of fetal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Swinth, K.L.; Traub, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    The assessment and control of fetal exposure to radiation in the workplace is an issue that is complicated by both biological and political/social ramifications. As a result of the dramatic increase in the number of women employed as radiation workers during the past 10 years, many facilities using radioactive materials have instituted fetal protection programs with special requirements for female radiation workers. It is necessary, however, to ensure that any fetal protection program be developed in such a way as to be nondiscriminatory. A study has been initiated whose purpose is to balance the political/social and the biological ramifications associated with occupational protection of the developing embryo/fetus. Several considerations are involved in properly balancing these factors. These considerations include appropriate methods of declaring the pregnancy, training workers, controlling the dose to the embryo/fetus, measuring and calculating the dose to the embryo/fetus, and recording the pertinent information. Alternative strategies for handling these factors while ensuring maximum protection of the embryo/fetus and the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers are discussed.

  9. Gestational dexamethasone alters fetal neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-06

    This study tested whether the maternal transport of dexamethasone (DEXA) may affect the development of the neuroendocrine system. DEXA (0.2mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injection) was administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In the DEXA-treated group, a decrease in maternal serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels (hypothyroid status) were observed at GDs 15 & 20 with respect to control group. The reverse pattern (hyperthyroid status) was observed in their fetuses at embryonic days (EDs) 15 & 20. Although the maternal body weight was diminished, the weight of the thyroid gland was increased at studied GDs as compared to the control group. The fetal growth retardation, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinism, and cytokines distortions (transforming growth factor-beta; TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-α, and interferon-γ; IFN-γ) were noticed at examined EDs if compared to the control group. Alternatively, the maternofetal thyroid dysfunctions due to the maternal DEXA administration attenuated the levels of fetal cerebral norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and elevated the levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) at considered days. These alterations were age-dependent and might damage the nerve transmission. Finally, maternal DEXA might act as neuroendocrine disruptor causing dyshormonogenesis and fetal cerebral dysfunction.

  10. Fetal MRI of clubfoot associated with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Servaes, Sabah; Hernandez, Andrea; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Victoria, Teresa; Johnson, Mark; Jaramillo, Diego; Christopher Edgar, J; Johnson, Ann

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of evaluating clubfoot deformity by MR in high-risk fetuses is currently unknown. To correlate fetal MRI with US in the assessment of clubfoot and to identify the MRI features most characteristic of clubfoot. With IRB approval and informed consent, the presence of fetal clubfoot was prospectively evaluated in mothers referred for MRI for a fetus with myelomeningocele. Two radiologists blind to the US results independently reviewed the MRI for the presence of clubfoot. MRI results were compared with US results obtained the same day and birth outcomes. Of 20 patients enrolled, there were 13 clubfeet. Interobserver agreement for the presence of clubfoot was 100%. The sensitivity of the MRI exam was 100% and the specificity 85.2%. A dedicated sagittal imaging plane through the ankle region allowed the most confident diagnosis; medial deviation of the foot relative to the leg was seen in all 13 fetuses with clubfoot. The correlation of fetal MRI with US in the evaluation of clubfoot yields a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.2%. The sagittal plane provided the most useful information.

  11. Assessment and control of fetal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Swinth, K.L.; Traub, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    The assessment and control of fetal exposure to radiation in the workplace is an issue that is complicated by both biological and political/social ramifications. As a result of the dramatic increase in the number of women employed as radiation workers during the past 10 years, many facilities using radioactive materials have instituted fetal protection programs with special requirements for female radiation workers. It is necessary, however, to ensure that any fetal protection program be developed in such a way as to be nondiscriminatory. A study has been initiated whose purpose is to balance the political/social and the biological ramifications associated with occupational protection of the developing embryo/fetus. Several considerations are involved in properly balancing these factors. These considerations include appropriate methods of declaring the pregnancy, training workers, controlling the dose to the embryo/fetus, measuring and calculating the dose to the embryo/fetus, and recording the pertinent information. Alternative strategies for handling these factors while ensuring maximum protection of the embryo/fetus and the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers are discussed.

  12. Elevated fetal steroidogenic activity in autism

    PubMed Central

    Baron-Cohen, S; Auyeung, B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Hougaard, D M; Abdallah, M W; Melgaard, L; Cohen, A S; Chakrabarti, B; Ruta, L; Lombardo, M V

    2015-01-01

    Autism affects males more than females, giving rise to the idea that the influence of steroid hormones on early fetal brain development may be one important early biological risk factor. Utilizing the Danish Historic Birth Cohort and Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we identified all amniotic fluid samples of males born between 1993 and 1999 who later received ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) diagnoses of autism, Asperger syndrome or PDD-NOS (pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) (n=128) compared with matched typically developing controls. Concentration levels of Δ4 sex steroids (progesterone, 17α-hydroxy-progesterone, androstenedione and testosterone) and cortisol were measured with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All hormones were positively associated with each other and principal component analysis confirmed that one generalized latent steroidogenic factor was driving much of the variation in the data. The autism group showed elevations across all hormones on this latent generalized steroidogenic factor (Cohen's d=0.37, P=0.0009) and this elevation was uniform across ICD-10 diagnostic label. These results provide the first direct evidence of elevated fetal steroidogenic activity in autism. Such elevations may be important as epigenetic fetal programming mechanisms and may interact with other important pathophysiological factors in autism. PMID:24888361

  13. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2007-05-17

    One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential.First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed.Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

  14. [Fetal pain - neurobiological causes and consequences].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nuno; Rebelo, Sandra; Tavares, Isaura

    2010-01-01

    The existence of putatively painful situations to the fetus demands a careful evaluation of the issue of fetal pain. Several indirect approaches are used to evaluate the existence of fetal pain. Neurobiological studies showed that from the 30th week on, the anatomical and physiological system for pain transmission is already developed, with the connections from the periphery to the cortex being successively established. Stress responses to a painful stimulation are complex but they can be detected from the 16th week on. There is activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic nervous system and hemodynamic changes in response to nociceptive stimulation. In prematures exposed to pain there are significant increases of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol, hemodynamic changes, motor reflexes and facial reactions. The changes induced by strong nociceptive stimulation of newborns have important postnatal consequences since they affect future reactions to noxious stimuli. Central sensitization and immaturity of the pain inhibitory system are the main neurobiological explanations for the increased pain. Detailed studies of the neurobiological mechanisms of the transmission of painful stimuli along with follow-up studies of the consequences of exposure to pain during the development of the fetus are necessary to fully understand fetal pain.

  15. DNA Methylation Landscapes of Human Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Slieker, Roderick C; Roost, Matthias S; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Suchiman, H Eka D; Tobi, Elmar W; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P; Slagboom, P Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2015-10-01

    Remodelling the methylome is a hallmark of mammalian development and cell differentiation. However, current knowledge of DNA methylation dynamics in human tissue specification and organ development largely stems from the extrapolation of studies in vitro and animal models. Here, we report on the DNA methylation landscape using the 450k array of four human tissues (amnion, muscle, adrenal and pancreas) during the first and second trimester of gestation (9,18 and 22 weeks). We show that a tissue-specific signature, constituted by tissue-specific hypomethylated CpG sites, was already present at 9 weeks of gestation (W9). Furthermore, we report large-scale remodelling of DNA methylation from W9 to W22. Gain of DNA methylation preferentially occurred near genes involved in general developmental processes, whereas loss of DNA methylation mapped to genes with tissue-specific functions. Dynamic DNA methylation was associated with enhancers, but not promoters. Comparison of our data with external fetal adrenal, brain and liver revealed striking similarities in the trajectory of DNA methylation during fetal development. The analysis of gene expression data indicated that dynamic DNA methylation was associated with the progressive repression of developmental programs and the activation of genes involved in tissue-specific processes. The DNA methylation landscape of human fetal development provides insight into regulatory elements that guide tissue specification and lead to organ functionality.

  16. Effects of Cremation on Fetal Bones.

    PubMed

    Zana, Michela; Magli, Francesca; Mazzucchi, Alessandra; Castoldi, Elisa; Gibelli, Daniele; Caccia, Giulia; Cornacchia, Francesca; Gaudio, Daniel A; Mattia, Mirko; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    The charring process is a weak point of anthropological analysis as it changes bone morphology and reduces information obtainable, specially in fetuses. This experiment aims at verifying the conservation of fetal bones after cremation. A total of 3138 fetuses of unknown sex and age were used, deriving from legal and therapeutic abortions from different hospitals of Milan. Cremations took place in modern crematoria. Nine cremation events were analyzed, each ranging from 57 to 915 simultaneously cremated fetuses. During the cremations, 4356 skeletal remains were recovered, 3756 of which (86.2%) were morphologically distinguishable. All types of fetal skeletal elements were found, with the exception of some cranial bones. Only 3.4% of individuals could be detected after the cremation process, because of the prevalence of abortions under 12 lunar weeks. All fire alterations were observed and the results were statistically analyzed. This pilot study confirmed the possibility of preservation of fetal skeletal elements after cremation. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Fetal radiation dose in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kelaranta, Anna; Kaasalainen, Touko; Seuri, Raija; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-01

    The connection between recorded volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol) and determined mean fetal dose (Df) was examined from metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dose measurements on an anthropomorphic female phantom in four stages of pregnancy in a 64-slice CT scanner. Automated tube current modulation kept the mean Df fairly constant through all pregnancy stages in trauma (4.4-4.9 mGy) and abdomino-pelvic (2.1-2.4 mGy) protocols. In pulmonary angiography protocol, the mean Df increased exponentially as the distance from the end of the scan range decreased (0.01-0.09 mGy). For trauma protocol, the relative mean Df as a function of gestational age were in the range 0.80-0.97 compared with the mean CTDI vol. For abdomino-pelvic protocol, the relative mean Df was 0.57-0.79 and for pulmonary angiography protocol, 0.01-0.05 compared with the mean CTDI vol, respectively. In conclusion, if the fetus is in the primary beam, the CTDI vol can be used as an upper estimate of the fetal dose. If the fetus is not in the primary beam, the fetal dose can be estimated by considering also the distance of the fetus from the scan range.

  18. Maternal hurricane exposure and fetal distress risk.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Peek, Lori; Weiler, Stephan

    2010-10-01

    Logistic regression and spatial analytic techniques are used to model fetal distress risk as a function of maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew. First, monthly time series compare the proportion of infants born distressed in hurricane affected and unaffected areas. Second, resident births are analyzed in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, before, during, and after Hurricane Andrew. Third, resident births are analyzed in all Florida locales with 100,000 or more persons, comparing exposed and unexposed gravid females. Fourth, resident births are analyzed along Hurricane Andrew's path from southern Florida to northeast Mississippi. Results show that fetal distress risk increases significantly with maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew in second and third trimesters, adjusting for known risk factors. Distress risk also correlates with the destructive path of Hurricane Andrew, with higher incidences of fetal distress found in areas of highest exposure intensity. Hurricane exposed African-American mothers were more likely to birth distressed infants. The policy implications of in utero costs of natural disaster exposure are discussed. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. [Auriculoventricular blocks in the acute phase of myocardial infarction. Course and prognosis. Apropos of 90 cases].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Derbel, F; Ben Ismail, M

    1988-03-01

    The objective is to study the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics as well as the course of myocardial infarction complicated by atrio-ventricular block (AVB), and to propose a management to acute myocardial infarction with A-V block. This study concerns 90 patients (78 men and 12 women), with a mean age of 58 years. The overall frequency of AVB is 7.6 p. cent. The infarction is most of the time found posteriorly (51 p. cent of the cases). Syncopes are essentially seen in complete AVB (81 p. cent) and with deep antero-septal necrosis (73 p. cent). Heart failure is especially the complication of anterior (73 p. cent) and deep septal (78 p. cent) necrosis. The mortality of myocardial infarction complicated by A-V block (41 p. cent) is higher than that of uncomplicated necroses (15 p. cent). The prognosis is usually favorable in posteriorly located infarctions where the A-V block is usually regressive and benign while it is much more severe in other locations where the conduction disorders associated with severe myocardial lesions. Temporary and/or permanent electrosystolic stimulation must be well codified in its indications which should be broadened, especially in case of anterior or deep septal necrosis.

  20. Influence of fetal blood flow redistribution on fetal and childhood growth and fat distribution: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, M N; Gaillard, R; Reiss, Ikm; Hofman, A; Steegers, Eap; Jaddoe, Vwv

    2016-12-01

    A suboptimal intrauterine environment leads to fetal blood flow redistribution and fetal growth restriction. Not much is known about childhood growth consequences. We examined the associations of fetal blood flow redistribution with birth outcomes, and repeatedly measured fetal and childhood growth and fat mass measures. Prospective cohort study. Population-based. One thousand one hundred and ninety-five pregnant women and their children. We measured umbilical and cerebral artery blood flow at a gestational age of 30.3 weeks (95% range, 28.5-32.6 weeks). A higher umbilical/cerebral (U/C) pulsatility index ratio is an indicator of preferential blood flow to the brain cerebral circulation at the expense of the lower body parts. Fetal and childhood growth were repeatedly measured from the third trimester until childhood. We measured the total body fat mass, lean fat mass and android/gynoid fat mass ratio by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and preperitoneal fat by ultrasound at 6 years. A higher fetal U/C ratio was associated with increased risks of preterm birth and small size for gestational age at birth [odds ratios, 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.85) and 1.63 (95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.19), respectively, per SDS increase in U/C ratio]. Longitudinal growth analyses showed that a higher fetal U/C ratio was associated with persistently lower head circumference, length and weight from third trimester fetal life until childhood (all P < 0.05). The fetal U/C ratio was not associated with total body and abdominal fat measures at 6 years. Our results suggest that fetal blood flow redistribution affects fetal development and has persistent consequences for childhood growth. Fetal blood flow redistribution affects fetal development and has persistent consequences for childhood growth. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. The application of fetal magnetocardiography (FMCG) to investigate fetal arrhythmias and congenital heart defects (CHD).

    PubMed

    Kähler, C; Grimm, B; Schleussner, E; Schneider, A; Schneider, U; Nowak, H; Vogt, L; Seewald, H J

    2001-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (FMCG), a new non-invasive diagnostic tool in the analysis of the electrophysiological changes of the heart, was selectively applied in cases of fetal arrhythmias and congenital heart defect (CHD) to demonstrate its value for diagnosis and prenatal management. The FMCG was analysed and compared to the postnatal ECG in four cases of fetal arrhythmia [supraventricular tachycardia (two cases), complex tachy-/bradycardia (one case), ventricular extrasystoles (one case)] and a case of right heart hypoplasia diagnosed by established methods prior to investigation. A Wolf-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome was diagnosed by its characteristic features and the appropriate transplacental therapy chosen. The types of arrhythmia could be characterised in accordance with postnatal ECG findings and irregular conduction was demonstrated in association with a CHD. The use of the FMCG provides additional information to the common diagnostic tools that influence therapeutic decisions and thus contributes to optimal pre- and postnatal management. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  3. Fetal interlens distance: normal values during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kivilevitch, Z; Salomon, L J; Benoit, B; Achiron, R

    2010-08-01

    The aims of this study were to establish normal ranges of values for interlens distance (ILD) during gestation, and to assess the correlation between ILD and growth of the orbits and other fetal biometric parameters. A cross-sectional study of morphologically normal, singleton fetuses was carried out in low-risk pregnant women. We measured the distance between the centers of the fetal lenses from 12 to 37 completed weeks of gestation. An oblique anterior coronal section was used to measure the ILD. The biorbital diameter (BOD) was measured in the same plane. We analyzed the correlation between the ILD and gestational age (GA), BOD, biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), femur length (FL) and abdominal circumference (AC). Fetal gender was assessed to evaluate possible significant differences. Four hundred and fifty normal fetuses were recruited for the study. In 427 fetuses appropriate ILD measurements were obtained, and complete evaluation of all parameters was accomplished in 377 of these. ILD demonstrated a high positive correlation with GA (r(2) = 0.969), BPD (r(2) = 0.959), HC (r(2) = 0.962), AC (r(2) = 0.949) and FL (r(2) = 0.956) as pregnancy advanced. The mean BOD : ILD ratio was 1.50 +/- 0.08, remaining constant throughout pregnancy (linear regression r(2) = 0.006). No statistically significant differences were found between genders for mean ILD and GA of the study population (P = 0.604 and 0.595, respectively). The results of this study confirm previous hypotheses regarding the close relationship between eyeball growth and growth of the surrounding bony structures. Measurement of fetal ILD, which can be used interchangeably with BOD measurement in either the axial or coronal plane, can be taken to reflect the expected development of the fetal orbits whilst simultaneously providing valuable information on eyeball development. It is likely that ILD could be used as a complementary tool in the elaboration of various severe abnormalities, mainly

  4. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  5. Clinical relevance of fetal hemodynamic monitoring: Perinatal implications.

    PubMed

    Pruetz, Jay D; Votava-Smith, Jodie; Miller, David A

    2015-08-01

    Comprehensive assessment of fetal wellbeing involves monitoring of fetal growth, placental function, central venous pressure, and cardiac function. Ultrasound evaluation of the fetus using 2D, color Doppler, and pulse-wave Doppler techniques form the foundation of antenatal diagnosis of structural anomalies, rhythm abnormalities and altered fetal circulation. Accurate and timely prenatal identification of the fetus at risk is critical for appropriate parental counseling, antenatal diagnostic testing, consideration for fetal intervention, perinatal planning, and coordination of postnatal care delivery. Fetal hemodynamic monitoring and serial assessment are vital to ensuring fetal wellbeing, particularly in the setting of complex congenital anomalies. A complete hemodynamic evaluation of the fetus gives important information on the likelihood of a smooth postnatal transition and contributes to ensuring the best possible outcome for the neonate.

  6. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements. PMID:25258662

  7. MRI of normal and pathological fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Kasprian, Gregor; Balassy, Csilla; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal lung development is a complex process influenced by mechanical and many biochemical factors. In addition to ultrasound, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitutes a new method to investigate this process in vivo during the second and third trimester. The techniques of MRI volumetry, assessment of signal intensities, and MRI spectroscopy of the fetal lung have been used to analyze this process and have already been applied clinically to identify abnormal fetal lung growth. Particularly in conditions such as oligohydramnios and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), pulmonary hypoplasia may be the cause of neonatal death. A precise diagnosis and quantification of compromised fetal lung development may improve post- and perinatal management. The main events in fetal lung development are reviewed and MR volumetric data from 106 normal fetuses, as well as different examples of pathological lung growth, are provided.

  8. Fetal cardiac time intervals estimated on fetal magnetocardiograms: single cycle analysis versus average beat inspection.

    PubMed

    Comani, Silvia; Alleva, Giovanna

    2007-01-01

    Fetal cardiac time intervals (fCTI) are dependent on fetal growth and development, and may reveal useful information for fetuses affected by growth retardation, structural cardiac defects or long QT syndrome. Fetal cardiac signals with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of at least 15 dB were retrieved from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) datasets with a system based on independent component analysis (ICA). An automatic method was used to detect the onset and offset of the cardiac waves on single cardiac cycles of each signal, and the fCTI were quantified for each heartbeat; long rhythm strips were used to calculate average fCTI and their variability for single fetal cardiac signals. The aim of this work was to compare the outcomes of this system with the estimates of fCTI obtained with a classical method based on the visual inspection of averaged beats. No fCTI variability can be measured from averaged beats. A total of 25 fMCG datasets (fetal age from 22 to 37 weeks) were evaluated, and 1768 cardiac cycles were used to compute fCTI. The real differences between the values obtained with a single cycle analysis and visual inspection of averaged beats were very small for all fCTI. They were comparable with signal resolution (+/-1 ms) for QRS complex and QT interval, and always <5 ms for the PR interval, ST segment and T wave. The coefficients of determination between the fCTI estimated with the two methods ranged between 0.743 and 0.917. Conversely, inter-observer differences were larger, and the related coefficients of determination ranged between 0.463 and 0.807, assessing the high performance of the automated single cycle analysis, which is also rapid and unaffected by observer-dependent bias.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of umbilical uptake, fetal utilization rate, and fetal turnover rate of glucose.

    PubMed

    Hay, W W; Sparks, J W; Quissell, B J; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    1981-06-01

    Fetal umbilical glucose uptake was compared with simultaneous measurements of glucose turnover and utilization rates in 12 pregnant sheep, at a mean of 137 days gestational age (range, 118-146 days). Umbilical glucose uptake was calculated by application of the Fick principle. Fetal glucose turnover rate was measured by a primed-constant infusion of [14C]- and [3H]glucose (glucose turnover rate = tracer infusion rate divided by fetal glucose sp act). The calculation of fetal glucose utilization rate required substraction of the loss of tracer to the placenta from the tracer infusion rate, thus defining the net tracer entry into the fetus for direct comparison with the net umbilical glucose uptake. In fed, normoglycemic sheep, these measurements demonstrated statistical equivalence of umbilical glucose uptake rate (4.77 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.34 SE) and glucose utilization rate ([14C]glucose, 5.58 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.54 SE; and [3H]glucose, 7.19 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 1.24 SE) when tested by two-way analysis of variance (P greater than 0.1). In three fasted, hypoglycemic sheep, the umbilical glucose uptake rate fell to 1.43 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.56 SE, which was considerably lower than the simultaneous glucose utilization rate ([14C]glucose, 4.78 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.48 SE; and [3H]glucose, 6.81 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 2.19 SE). Thus, in the normoglycemic, late-gestation fetal lamb, there appears to be little glucogenesis, whereas glucogenesis may become significant during fasting-induced fetal hypoglycemia.

  10. Predicting intrapartum fetal compromise using the fetal cerebro-umbilical ratio.

    PubMed

    Sabdia, S; Greer, R M; Prior, T; Kumar, S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between the cerebro-umbilical ratio measured at 35-37 weeks and intrapartum fetal compromise. This retrospective cross sectional study was conducted at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Maternal demographics and fetal Doppler indices at 35-37 weeks gestation for 1381 women were correlated with intrapartum and neonatal outcomes. Babies born by caesarean section or instrumental delivery for fetal compromise had the lowest median cerebro-umbilical ratio 1.60 (IQR 1.22-2.08) compared to all other delivery groups (vaginal delivery, emergency delivery for failure to progress, emergency caesarean section for other reasons or elective caesarean section). The percentage of infants with a cerebro-umbilical ratio <10th centile that required emergency delivery (caesarean section or instrumental delivery) for fetal compromise was 22%, whereas only 7.3% of infants with a cerebro-umbilical ratio between the 10th-90th centile and 9.6% of infants with a cerebro-umbilical ratio > 90th centile required delivery for the same indication (p < 0.001). A lower cerebro-umbilical ratio was associated with an increased risk of emergency delivery for fetal compromise, OR 2.03 (95% CI 1.41-2.92), p < 0.0001. This study suggests that a low fetal cerebro-umbilical ratio measured at 35-37 weeks is associated with a greater risk of intrapartum compromise. This is a relatively simple technique which could be used to risk stratify women in diverse healthcare settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous monitoring of maternal and fetal heart rate variability during labor in relation with fetal gender.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Fernandes, Diana; Pinto, Paula; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2017-08-21

    Male gender is considered a risk factor for several adverse perinatal outcomes. Fetal gender effect on fetal heart rate (FHR) has been subject of several studies with contradictory results. The importance of maternal heart rate (MHR) monitoring during labor has also been investigated, but less is known about the effect of fetal gender on MHR. The aim of this study is to simultaneously assess maternal and FHR variability during labor in relation with fetal gender. Simultaneous MHR and FHR recordings were obtained from 44 singleton term pregnancies during the last 2 hr of labor (H1, H2 ). Heart rate tracings were analyzed using linear (time- and frequency-domain) and nonlinear indices. Both linear and nonlinear components were considered in assessing FHR and MHR interaction, including cross-sample entropy (cross-SampEn). Mothers carrying male fetuses (n = 22) had significantly higher values for linear indices related with MHR average and variability and sympatho-vagal balance, while the opposite occurred in the high-frequency component and most nonlinear indices. Significant differences in FHR were only observed in H1 with higher entropy values in female fetuses. Assessing the differences between FHR and MHR, statistically significant differences were obtained in most nonlinear indices between genders. A significantly higher cross-SampEn was observed in mothers carrying female fetuses (n = 22), denoting lower synchrony or similarity between MHR and FHR. The variability of MHR and the synchrony/similarity between MHR and FHR vary with respect to fetal gender during labor. These findings suggest that fetal gender needs to be taken into account when simultaneously monitoring MHR and FHR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of betamethasone administration to the fetal sheep in late gestation on fetal cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Matthias; Roedel, Marcus; Anwar, M Akhtar; Müller, Thomas; Schubert, Harald; Buchwalder, Lynn F; Walter, Bernd; Nathanielsz, Peter W

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoid administration to women at risk of preterm delivery to accelerate fetal lung maturation has become standard practice. Antenatal glucocorticoids decrease the incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage as well as accelerating fetal lung maturation. Little is known regarding side effects on fetal cerebral function. Cortisol and synthetic glucocorticoids such as betamethasone increase fetal blood pressure and femoral vascular resistance in sheep. We determined the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid administration on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in fetal sheep. Vehicle (n = 8) or betamethasone (n = 8) was infused over 48 h via the jugular vein of chronically instrumented fetal sheep at 128 days gestation (term 146 days). The betamethasone infusion rate was that previously shown to produce fetal plasma betamethasone concentrations similar to human umbilical vein concentrations during antenatal glucocorticoid therapy. Regional CBF was measured in 10 brain regions, using coloured microspheres, before and 24 and 48 h after onset of treatment, and during hypercapnic challenges performed before and 48 h after onset of betamethasone exposure. Betamethasone exposure decreased CBF in all brain regions measured except the hippocampus after 24 h of infusion (P < 0·05). The CBF decrease was most pronounced in the thalamus and hindbrain (45–50 % decrease) and least pronounced in the cortical regions (35–40 % decrease). It was mediated by an increase in cerebral vascular resistance (CVR, P < 0·05) and led to a decrease in oxygen delivery to subcortical and hindbrain structures of 30–40 %, to 8·6 ± 1·1 ml (100 g)−1 min−1, and 40–45 %, to 11·0 ± 1·6 ml 100 g−1 min−1, respectively (P < 0·05). After 48 h of betamethasone treatment, the reduction in CBF was diminished to about 25–30 %, but was still significant in comparison to vehicle-treated fetuses in all brain regions except three of the five measured cortical regions (P < 0·05). CVR and oxygen

  13. Ethanol-associated selective fetal malnutrition: a contributing factor in the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S E; Atkinson, M; Burnap, J K; Jacobson, S; Sehgal, P K; Scott, W; Van Thiel, D H

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the FAS, particularly the characteristic IUGR, may be due in part to ethanol-related placental injury. Ethanol and/ or acetaldehyde may impair placental transfer of nutrients essential for growth, e.g., amino acids. Such restriction could occur regardless of maternal nutritional status: selective fetal malnutrition. Impairment of placental nutrient transport at critical phases of fetal organogenesis could compound any direct fetotoxic effects of ethanol or acetaldehyde. The effect of ethanol upon human placental hormone synthesis and transport of vitamins, minerals, glucose, and nucleic acid precursors awaits further investigation. Similarly, potential interactions between ethanol and other xenobiotics commonly abused by alcoholics require clarification.

  14. Dichorionic twin pregnancy discordant for fetal anencephaly: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taşcı, Yasemin; Karasu, Yetkin; Erten, Ozlem; Karadağ, Burak; Göktolga, Umit

    2012-01-01

    Dichorionic twin pregnancy discordant for fetal anencephaly is a serious condition that threatens the normal co-twin's life by causing polyhydramniosis, preterm labor and sudden death of one or both of the fetuses. We report a case of dichorionic twin pregnancy discordant for fetal anencephaly delivered at the 32(nd) week of gestation because of preterm labor and nonreassuring fetal monitoring. The aim of this case report is to summarize management options in this situation.

  15. [Fetal circulation in normal pregnancy and in placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, B; Malinova, M

    2010-01-01

    The fetal circulation is different from the adult circulation. One of the quite common conditions that are challenging to the developing fetus is placental hypoxia. Regardless of its cause, placental vascular insufficiency is commonly assumed to be an important factor in the development of intrauterine growth retardation. Several mechanisms are involved in the fetal adaptation to the decompensation during hypoxemia. Doppler Ultrasound technologies can help to evaluate of the fetal wellbeing.

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder: diminished responsibility and mitigation of sentence.

    PubMed

    Scott, Russ

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to consider the implications of a recent Western Australia Court of Appeal decision in which an indigenous youth who had been sentenced for the manslaughter of his neonate child was later diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder. The increased use of the 2016 Australian guide to the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder should be encouraged to enable clinicians to not only diagnose and manage Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder, but also counsel families to prevent it.

  17. Fetal dosimetry from pulmonary imaging in pregnancy. Revised estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Ponto, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Fetal dose estimates from Tc-99m MAA and Tc-99m DTPA aerosol were calculated using two methods. These calculations show that the average fetal dose decreases as gestational age (or fetal size) increases. Although the resultant dose estimates exceed those previously reported by severalfold, the risk to mother and fetus from undiagnosed pulmonary embolism far outweighs the risk to the fetus from the radiation exposure.

  18. Skin wound healing and scarring: fetal wounds and regenerative restitution.

    PubMed

    Yates, Cecelia C; Hebda, Patricia; Wells, Alan

    2012-12-01

    The adverse physiological and psychological effects of scars formation after healing of wounds are broad and a major medical problem for patients. In utero, fetal wounds heal in a regenerative manner, though the mechanisms are unknown. Differences in fetal scarless regeneration and adult repair can provide key insight into reduction of scarring therapy. Understanding the cellular and extracellular matrix alterations in excessive adult scarring in comparison to fetal scarless healing may have important implications. Herein, we propose that matrix can be controlled via cellular therapy to resemble a fetal-like matrix that will result in reduced scarring. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically, in..., and other component parts. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  20. Fetal pituitary negative feedback at early gestational age.

    PubMed

    Rakover, Y; Weiner, E; Mosh, N; Shalev, E

    1999-06-01

    We describe an early prenatal diagnosis and the successful treatment of fetal Graves' disease from transplacental transfer of maternal thyroid stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb). The diagnosis of fetal thyrotoxicosis was made by umbilical cord sampling (UBS) at 20 weeks gestation, based on suppressed TSH with elevated FT4 levels. Therapy with propylthiouracil (PTU) improved fetal thyroid function tests as well as the clinical signs of fetal Graves' disease. Three more UBS were conducted before delivery indicating persisting mild fetal hyperthyroidism. Undetectable concentrations of thyrotrophin in fetal serum in the presence of markedly elevated FT4, suggests pituitary negative feedback at as early as 20 weeks gestation. Amniotic fluid thyrotrophin levels were measured at 20,24 and 26 weeks and were shown to correlate better with (elevated) maternal rather than (suppressed) fetal TSH values; therefore, we believe that amniotic fluid thyrotrophin measurement is unreliable for prediction of fetal thyroid status. Our observation is the first documentation of an intact feedback mechanism so early in fetal development and it suggests that pituitary maturation occurs earlier than previously believed.

  1. Fetal assessment for anesthesiologists: are you evaluating the other patient?

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Daria M; Birnbach, David J; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma; Yasin, Salih Y

    2013-06-01

    Suboptimal communication between anesthesiologists and obstetricians can be associated with unintended poor maternal and neonatal outcomes, especially for emergency cesarean deliveries. Obstetricians use the results of antepartum and intrapartum fetal assessments to assess fetal well-being and to make decisions about the timing and method of delivery. Because abnormal results may lead to the need for urgent or emergency cesarean deliveries, these decisions may directly impact anesthetic care. Lack of familiarity with fetal assessments and the significance of the results may thus hinder the communication necessary for optimal patient care. In this review article, we discuss the current antepartum and intrapartum fetal assessment modalities, including the nonstress test, biophysical profile, Doppler velocimetry, electronic fetal heart rate monitoring, fetal electrocardiogram (STAN-ST waveform analysis), and fetal pulse oximetry. The physiologic basis behind these modalities and the available evidence regarding their utility in clinical practice are also reviewed. The 2008 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development workshop report on electronic fetal monitoring categories, which are incorporated into the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines for intrapartum care, is examined. The implications of test interpretation to the practice of obstetric anesthesiology is also discussed. Anesthesia provider understanding of fetal assessment modalities is essential in improving communication with obstetricians and improving the planning of cesarean deliveries for high-risk obstetric patients.

  2. Implantable Ultralow Pulmonary Pressure Monitoring System for Fetal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Heller, J. Alex; Schecter, Samuel C.; Shue, Eveline H.; Miniati, Doug; Roy, Shuvo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary hypoplasia is a devastating condition affecting fetal and newborn pulmonary physiology, resulting in great morbidity and mortality. The fetal lung develops in a fluid-filled environment. In this paper, we describe a novel, implantable pressure sensing and recording device which we use to study the pressures present in the fetal pulmonary tree throughout gestation. The system achieves 0.18 cm H2O resolution and can record for 21 days continuously at 256 Hz. Sample tracings of in vivo fetal lamb recordings are shown. PMID:22801521

  3. Skin Wound Healing and Scarring: Fetal Wounds and Regenerative Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Cecelia C.; Hebda, Patricia; Wells, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The adverse physiological and psychological effects of scars formation after healing of wounds are broad and a major medical problem for patients. In utero, fetal wounds heal in a regenerative manner, though the mechanisms are unknown. Differences in fetal scarless regeneration and adult repair can provide key insight into reduction of scarring therapy. Understanding the cellular and extracellular matrix alterations in excessive adult scarring in comparison to fetal scarless healing may have important implications. Herein, we propose that matrix can be controlled via cellular therapy to resemble a fetal-like matrix that will result in reduced scarring. PMID:24203921

  4. First reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Min Kyong; Jung, Euiseok; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Young-Hwue

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal intervention of severe fetal aortic valve stenosis by ultrasound-guided percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been performed to prevent the progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and achieve biventricular circulation in neonates. Here we report a case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty prenatally diagnosed with aortic stenosis at 24 weeks of gestation and showed worsening features on a follow-up echocardiography. Prenatal aortic valvuloplasty was performed at 29 weeks of gestation, and was a technical success. However, fetal bradycardia sustained, and an emergency cesarean delivery was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty which was performed in Asia. PMID:28217680

  5. Molecular mechanisms underlying the fetal programming of adult disease.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thin; Hardy, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Adverse events in utero can be critical in determining quality of life and overall health. It is estimated that up to 50 % of metabolic syndrome diseases can be linked to an adverse fetal environment. However, the mechanisms linking impaired fetal development to these adult diseases remain elusive. This review uncovers some of the molecular mechanisms underlying how normal physiology may be impaired in fetal and postnatal life due to maternal insults in pregnancy. By understanding the mechanisms, which include epigenetic, transcriptional, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we also highlight how intervention in fetal and neonatal life may be able to prevent these diseases long-term.

  6. Differentiation and functional regulation of human fetal NK cells.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Martin A; Loh, Liyen; Marquardt, Nicole; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Berglin, Lena; Björkström, Niklas K; Westgren, Magnus; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2013-09-01

    The human fetal immune system is naturally exposed to maternal allogeneic cells, maternal antibodies, and pathogens. As such, it is faced with a considerable challenge with respect to the balance between immune reactivity and tolerance. Here, we show that fetal natural killer (NK) cells differentiate early in utero and are highly responsive to cytokines and antibody-mediated stimulation but respond poorly to HLA class I-negative target cells. Strikingly, expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) did not educate fetal NK cells but rendered them hyporesponsive to target cells lacking HLA class I. In addition, fetal NK cells were highly susceptible to TGF-β-mediated suppression, and blocking of TGF-β signaling enhanced fetal NK cell responses to target cells. Our data demonstrate that KIR-mediated hyporesponsiveness and TGF-β-mediated suppression are major factors determining human fetal NK cell hyporesponsiveness to HLA class I-negative target cells and provide a potential mechanism for fetal-maternal tolerance in utero. Finally, our results provide a basis for understanding the role of fetal NK cells in pregnancy complications in which NK cells could be involved, for example, during in utero infections and anti-RhD-induced fetal anemia.

  7. Differentiation and functional regulation of human fetal NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Martin A.; Loh, Liyen; Marquardt, Nicole; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Berglin, Lena; Björkström, Niklas K.; Westgren, Magnus; Nixon, Douglas F.; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The human fetal immune system is naturally exposed to maternal allogeneic cells, maternal antibodies, and pathogens. As such, it is faced with a considerable challenge with respect to the balance between immune reactivity and tolerance. Here, we show that fetal natural killer (NK) cells differentiate early in utero and are highly responsive to cytokines and antibody-mediated stimulation but respond poorly to HLA class I–negative target cells. Strikingly, expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) did not educate fetal NK cells but rendered them hyporesponsive to target cells lacking HLA class I. In addition, fetal NK cells were highly susceptible to TGF-β–mediated suppression, and blocking of TGF-β signaling enhanced fetal NK cell responses to target cells. Our data demonstrate that KIR-mediated hyporesponsiveness and TGF-β–mediated suppression are major factors determining human fetal NK cell hyporesponsiveness to HLA class I–negative target cells and provide a potential mechanism for fetal-maternal tolerance in utero. Finally, our results provide a basis for understanding the role of fetal NK cells in pregnancy complications in which NK cells could be involved, for example, during in utero infections and anti-RhD–induced fetal anemia. PMID:23945237

  8. Fetal MRI: A Technical Update with Educational Aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Estroff, Judith A.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Robertson, Richard L.; Grant, P. Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; Warfield, Simon K.; Afacan, Onur; Connolly, Susan A.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Wolfberg, Adam; Mulkern, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations have become well-established procedures at many institutions and can serve as useful adjuncts to ultrasound (US) exams when diagnostic doubts remain after US. Due to fetal motion, however, fetal MRI exams are challenging and require the MR scanner to be used in a somewhat different mode than that employed for more routine clinical studies. Herein we review the techniques most commonly used, and those that are available, for fetal MRI with an emphasis on the physics of the techniques and how to deploy them to improve success rates for fetal MRI exams. By far the most common technique employed is single-shot T2-weighted imaging due to its excellent tissue contrast and relative immunity to fetal motion. Despite the significant challenges involved, however, many of the other techniques commonly employed in conventional neuro- and body MRI such as T1 and T2*-weighted imaging, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, as well as spectroscopic methods remain of interest for fetal MR applications. An effort to understand the strengths and limitations of these basic methods within the context of fetal MRI is made in order to optimize their use and facilitate implementation of technical improvements for the further development of fetal MR imaging, both in acquisition and post-processing strategies. PMID:26225129

  9. Risk of fetal hydrops and non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death after gestational parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Enders, Martin; Klingel, Karin; Weidner, Andrea; Baisch, Carola; Kandolf, Reinhard; Schalasta, Gunnar; Enders, Gisela

    2010-11-01

    Risk assessment of parvovirus B19 (B19)-associated fetal complications following gestational B19 infection remains controversial. To determine the risk of fetal hydrops or non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death following acute maternal B19 infection at defined gestational weeks. Observational cohort study of pregnant women with serologic evidence of acute B19 infection. If available, fetal or neonatal tissue samples from cases complicated by fetal loss or hydrops were investigated for the presence of B19 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or in situ hybridization (ISH). Of 236 women with known pregnancy outcome, 228 had a live birth and 8 a fetal loss. The observed rate of fetal hydrops for all pregnant women was 4.2% (10/236) (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-7.7) and 10.6% (10/94) (95% CI, 5.2-18.7) for those infected between 9 and 20 weeks gestation. Tissue samples from 8 hydrops cases were investigated by PCR or ISH and all were B19 DNA positive. Fetal death occurring during or after gestational week 22 was only observed in one case which was associated with B19-derived fetal hydrops. Our findings demonstrate that although adverse fetal outcome is a rare complication of gestational B19 infection, a relevant risk of fetal hydrops exists particularly for women infected between 9 and 20 weeks' gestation. Cases of B19-derived non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death were not observed in the present study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Normalized spectral power of fetal heart rate variability is associated with fetal scalp blood pH.

    PubMed

    van Laar, J O E H; Peters, C H L; Houterman, S; Wijn, P F F; Kwee, A; Oei, S G

    2011-04-01

    Spectral power of fetal heart rate variability is related to fetal condition. Previous studies found an increased normalized low frequency power in case of severe fetal acidosis. To analyze whether absolute or normalized low or high frequency power of fetal heart rate variability is associated with fetal scalp blood pH. Prospective cohort study, performed in an obstetric unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Consecutive singleton term fetuses in cephalic presentation that underwent one or more scalp blood samples, monitored during labour using ST-analysis of the fetal electrocardiogram. Ten-minute continuous beat-to-beat fetal heart rate segments, preceding the scalp blood measurement were used. Absolute and normalized spectral power in the low frequency band (0.04-0.15 Hz) and in the high frequency band (0.4-1.5 Hz). In total 39 fetal blood samples from 30 patients were studied. We found that normalized low frequency and normalized high frequency power of fetal heart rate variability is associated with fetal scalp blood pH. The estimated ß of normalized low frequency power was -0.37 (95% confidence interval -0.68 to -0.06) and the relative risk was 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.94). The estimated ß of normalized high frequency power was 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.01-0.65) and the relative risk was 1.39 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.92). Normalized low and normalized high frequency power of fetal heart rate variability is associated with fetal scalp blood pH. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral Lesions at Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neurologic Outcome After Single Fetal Death in Monochorionic Twins.

    PubMed

    Jatzko, Birgit; Rittenschober-Böhm, Judith; Mailath-Pokorny, Mariella; Worda, Christof; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Worda, Katharina

    2015-10-01

    Single fetal death (sFD) in monochorionic twin pregnancies is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in the survivor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of cerebral lesions detected at fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and to correlate the results with the neurologic outcome of the survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD. Between 2005 and 2012, 11 monochorionic twin pregnancies with sFD and subsequent fetal MRI of the survivor were included. All neonates underwent neurologic assessment after birth and 56% of surviving infants underwent long-term neurologic assessment. MRI findings and neurologic outcome of the survivors were evaluated. Gestational age at sFD was 20.9 (±2.9) weeks; 55% (6/11) of survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD showed cerebral lesions at fetal MRI; 72% (8/11) of all survivors had normal neonatal neurologic outcome: all survivors with normal fetal MRI and 50% of survivors with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. Long-term neurologic assessment was normal in all tested patients with normal fetal MRI and in one of three tested patients with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. Survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD show a high rate of cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. The importance of cerebral lesions at fetal MRI in survivors after sFD in monochorionic twin pregnancies is uncertain. All tested survivors with normal fetal MRI showed normal neurologic outcome but only one of three survivors with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI showed normal long-term neurologic outcome.

  12. Fetal response to maternal hunger and satiation - novel finding from a qualitative descriptive study of maternal perception of fetal movements.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Billie; Maude, Robyn

    2014-08-26

    Maternal perception of decreased fetal movements is a specific indicator of fetal compromise, notably in the context of poor fetal growth. There is currently no agreed numerical definition of decreased fetal movements, with the subjective perception of a decrease on the part of the mother being the most significant definition clinically. Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of fetal activity may be important in identifying the compromised fetus.Yet, how pregnant women perceive and describe fetal activity is under-investigated by qualitative means. The aim of this study was to explore normal fetal activity, through first-hand descriptive accounts by pregnant women. Using qualitative descriptive methodology, interviews were conducted with 19 low-risk women experiencing their first pregnancy, at two timepoints in their third trimester. Interview transcripts were later analysed using qualitative content analysis and patterns of fetal activity identified were then considered along-side the characteristics of the women and their birth outcomes. This paper focuses on a novel finding; the description by pregnant women of fetal behaviour indicative of hunger and satiation. Full findings will be presented in later papers. Most participants (74% 14 of 19) indicated mealtimes were a time of increased fetal activity. Eight participants provided detailed descriptions of increased activity around meals, with seven (37% 7 of 19) of these specifying increased fetal activity prior to meals or in the context of their own hunger. These movements were interpreted as a fetal demand for food often prompting the mother to eat. Interestingly, the women who described increased fetal activity in the context of hunger subsequently gave birth to smaller infants (mean difference 364 gm) than those who did not describe a fetal response to hunger. Food seeking behaviour may have a pre-birth origin. Maternal-fetal interaction around mealtimes could constitute an endocrine mediated

  13. Maternal perception of fetal movements in late pregnancy is affected by type and duration of fetal movement.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca; Higgins, Lucy E; Johnstone, Edward D; Wijekoon, Jayawan H; Heazell, Alexander E P

    2016-01-01

    A reduction in fetal movements has been proposed to identify pregnancies at risk of stillbirth. The utility of this approach is limited by variability in maternal perception of fetal movements. We aimed to determine the proportion of fetal movements observed by ultrasound that were maternally perceived and identify factors that affected maternal perception. During 30-min recordings, women (n = 21) depressed a trigger upon perception of a fetal movement, while an ultrasound operator recorded observed movements according to the fetal parts involved. Women perceived between 2.4% and 81.0% (median 44.8%) of movements observed on scan. Synchronous movement of the fetal trunk and limbs was more likely to be recognized than either part in isolation (60.5% versus 37.5% and 30%, respectively). The ultrasound operator judged the fetus to be moving for a significantly greater proportion of the time than mothers (median 1.5% of total recording time versus 0.7%). There was no significant relationship between the ability to perceive fetal activity and placental site, parity, amniotic fluid index or maternal body mass index. Variations in maternal perception of fetal movements may affect detection of a clinically significant reduction in fetal movements for some women.

  14. Genotype and fetal size affect maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal endocrinology in Large White × Landrace and Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Cheryl J; Nwagwu, Margaret O; McArdle, Harry J

    2013-01-01

    This study compared maternal plasma amino acid concentrations, placental protein secretion in vitro and fetal body composition and plasma amino acid and hormone concentrations in feto-placental units from the smallest and a normally-sized fetus carried by Large White × Landrace or Meishan gilts on Day 100 of pregnancy. Compared with Large White × Landrace, Meishan placental tissue secreted more protein and Meishan fetuses contained relatively more fat and protein, but less moisture. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothryonine, thyroxine and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. In both breeds, fetal cortisol concentrations were inversely related to fetal size, whereas concentrations of IGF-I were higher in average-sized fetuses. Concentrations of 10 amino acids were higher in Large White × Landrace than Meishan gilts, while glutamine concentrations were higher in Meishan gilts. Concentrations of alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and threonine were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. Average-sized fetuses had higher concentrations of asparagine, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine and valine than the smallest fetus. This study revealed novel genotype and fetal size differences in porcine maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal hormone and metabolite concentrations.

  15. Equine fetal sex determination using circulating cell-free fetal DNA (ccffDNA).

    PubMed

    de Leon, Priscila Marques Moura; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Deschamps, João Carlos; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Collares, Tiago

    2012-02-01

    In this study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reamplification of the first PCR product (2nd-PCR) and a qPCR assay were used to detect the sex determining region Y (SRY) gene from circulating cell-free fetal DNA (ccffDNA) in blood plasma of pregnant mares to determine fetal sex. The ccffDNA was isolated from plasma of 20 Thoroughbred mares (5-13 y old) in the final 3 mo of pregnancy (fetal sex was verified after foaling). For controls, plasma from two non-pregnant mares and two virgin mares were used, in addition to the non-template control. The 182 bp nucleotide sequence corresponding to the SRY-PCR product was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Based on SRY/PCR, 8 of 11 male and 9 of 9 female fetuses were correctly identified, resulting in a sensitivity of 72.7% (for male fetuses) and an overall accuracy of 85%. Furthermore, using SRY/2nd-PCR and qPCR techniques, sensitivity and accuracy were 90.9 and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, this study is apparently the first report of fetal sex determination in mares using ccffDNA.

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol and Other Drug Effects. A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of General Academic Education.

    This curriculum guide on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is intended to help meet New Jersey secondary-level learning objectives in the area of chemical health education. The guide is organized into six sections, each with a conceptual statement, content outline, specific objectives, and lesson plans. The six sections and corresponding major concepts…

  17. Early pregnancy maternal and fetal angiogenic factors and fetal and childhood growth: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Bergen, N E; Bouwland-Both, M I; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Hofman, A; Russcher, H; Lindemans, J; Jaddoe, V W V; Steegers, E A P

    2015-06-01

    What are the effects of maternal and fetal soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor (PlGF) concentrations on fetal and childhood growth patterns? An angiogenic profile that is characterized by both low early pregnancy maternal sFlt-1 and PlGF concentrations and higher sFlt-1 concentrations, lower PlGF concentrations or a higher sFlt-1:PlGF ratio in umbilical cord blood is associated with a reduced fetal and childhood growth. An imbalance in maternal and fetal sFlt-1 and PlGF concentrations has been suggested to affect pregnancy outcomes. However, their effects on longitudinal fetal and childhood growth remain largely unknown. This study was performed in 5980 mothers and 4108 of their children, participating in the Generation R Study; a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards in Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2001-2005). Blood samples were obtained from mothers in early and mid-pregnancy and from the umbilical vein at delivery. Fetal and childhood growth characteristics (weight and length) were measured repeatedly by ultrasound and physical examinations until the age of 6 years. We assessed the associations of maternal and fetal angiogenic factors with fetal and childhood growth using repeated measurement regression models. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations between angiogenic factors and small for gestational age at birth (SGA). Compared with early pregnancy maternal sFlt-1 concentrations in the lowest quintile, early pregnancy maternal sFlt-1 concentrations in the highest quintile were associated with a higher fetal weight growth resulting in a higher birthweight (difference in birthweight 0.33 standard deviation score (SDS); 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25-0.41), a lower risk of SGA (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.36; 95% CI 0.27-0.48) and a subsequent higher weight growth until the age of 6 years. Early pregnancy maternal PlGF concentrations in the lowest quintile were associated with a

  18. Recognizing and Managing Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects: A Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreight, Brenda

    A family counselor and mother of adopted children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects (FAS/E) offers practical advice and information on dealing with FAS/E's lifelong effects on behavior and learning. The book begins by discussing the historical, medical, and social aspects of FAS/E, and details common behavioral characteristics associated with…

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE): Implications For Rural Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, Rosalie; And Others

    This report reviews literature on the effects of maternal alcohol consumption on the fetus and the resulting impact on the learning abilities and behavior of children born with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Recent reports indicate that an estimated 73 percent of infants are exposed to alcohol before birth, resulting in varying degrees of learning…

  20. Recognizing and Managing Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects: A Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreight, Brenda

    A family counselor and mother of adopted children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects (FAS/E) offers practical advice and information on dealing with FAS/E's lifelong effects on behavior and learning. The book begins by discussing the historical, medical, and social aspects of FAS/E, and details common behavioral characteristics associated with…

  1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol and Other Drug Effects. A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of General Academic Education.

    This curriculum guide on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is intended to help meet New Jersey secondary-level learning objectives in the area of chemical health education. The guide is organized into six sections, each with a conceptual statement, content outline, specific objectives, and lesson plans. The six sections and corresponding major concepts…

  2. Improvements in fetal heart rate analysis by the removal of maternal-fetal heart rate ambiguities.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Paula; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Hernâni; Ayres-De-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2015-11-19

    Misinterpretation of the maternal heart rate (MHR) as fetal may lead to significant errors in fetal heart rate (FHR) interpretation. In this study we hypothesized that the removal of these MHR-FHR ambiguities would improve FHR analysis during the final hour of labor. Sixty-one MHR and FHR recordings were simultaneously acquired in the final hour of labor. Removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities was performed by subtracting MHR signals from their FHR counterparts when the absolute difference between the two was less or equal to 5 beats per minute. Major MHR-FHR ambiguities were defined when they exceeded 1% of the tracing. Maternal, fetal and neonatal characteristics were evaluated in cases where major MHR-FHR ambiguities occurred and computer analysis of FHR recordings was compared, before and after removal of the ambiguities. Seventy-two percent of tracings (44/61) exhibited episodes of major MHR-FHR ambiguities, which were not significantly associated with any maternal, fetal or neonatal characteristics, but were associated with MHR accelerations, FHR signal loss and decelerations. Removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities resulted in a significant decrease in FHR decelerations, and improvement in FHR tracing classification. FHR interpretation during the final hour of labor can be significantly improved by the removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities.

  3. Discrepancy in fetal sex assignment between cell free fetal DNA and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Grady, M; Shah, D

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing utilizing free fetal DNA is commonly used in pregnancy to screen for trisomy 13, 18, 21 and also fetal sex aneuploidy. We report on two cases of discrepancy between phenotypic and genotypic sex and potential medical implications. In our first case, a patient with known male gender via cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) testing had an ultrasound at 18 weeks' gestation, which identified Dandy-Walker malformation and female-appearing ambiguous genitalia. As Dandy-Walker malformation could not be considered isolated in the presence of ambiguous genitalia, this finding allowed for more complete counseling of the parents as well as extensive genetic workup. Our second case involved a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction diagnosed by ultrasound and normal-appearing female genitalia. After birth, adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed and chromosome analysis identified normal male chromosomes. These two cases showed that fetal sex determination by cffDNA can be used as a tool for earlier identification of affected pregnancies, allowing for parental decision-making, genetic testing and earlier intervention.

  4. Fetal brain disruption sequence versus fetal brain arrest: A distinct autosomal recessive developmental brain malformation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; El-Khayat, Hamed A; Eid, Ola M; Saba, Soliman; Farag, Mona K; Saleem, Sahar N; Gaber, Khaled R

    2015-05-01

    The term fetal brain disruption sequence (FBDS) was coined to describe a number of sporadic conditions caused by numerous external disruptive events presenting with variable imaging findings. However, rare familial occurrences have been reported. We describe five patients (two sib pairs and one sporadic) with congenital severe microcephaly, seizures, and profound intellectual disability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed unique and uniform picture of underdeveloped cerebral hemispheres with increased extraxial CSF, abnormal gyral pattern (polymicrogyria-like lesions in two sibs and lissencephaly in the others), loss of white matter, dysplastic ventricles, hypogenesis of corpus callosum, and hypoplasia of the brainstem, but hypoplastic cerebellum in one. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) of two patients showed the same developmental brain malformations in utero. These imaging findings are in accordance with arrested brain development rather than disruption. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as NDE1, MKL2, OCLN, and JAM3. These unique clinical and imaging findings were described before among familial reports with FBDS. However, our patients represent a recognizable phenotype of developmental brain malformations, that is, apparently distinguishable from either familial microhydranencephaly or microlissencephaly that were collectively termed FBDS. Thus, the use of the umbrella term FBDS is no longer helpful. Accordingly, we propose the term fetal brain arrest to distinguish them from other familial patients diagnosed as FBDS. The presence of five affected patients from three unrelated consanguineous families suggests an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. The spectrum of fetal brain disruption sequence is reviewed.

  5. Differing attitudes toward fetal care by pediatric and maternal-fetal medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen D; Donelan, Karen; Martins, Yolanda; Burmeister, Kelly; Buchmiller, Terry L; Sayeed, Sadath A; Mitchell, Christine; Ecker, Jeffrey L

    2012-12-01

    The expansion of pediatric-based fetal care raises questions regarding pediatric specialists' involvement in pregnancies when maternal conditions may affect pediatric outcomes. For several such conditions, we compared pediatric and obstetric specialists' attitudes regarding whether and when pediatrics consultation should be offered and their views about seeking court authorization to override maternal refusal of physician recommendations. We used a mail survey of 434 maternal-fetal medicine specialists (MFMs) and fetal care pediatric specialists (FCPs) (response rate: MFM, 60.9%; FCP, 54.2%). FCPs were more likely than MFMs to indicate that pediatric counseling should occur before decisions regarding continuing or interrupting pregnancies complicated by maternal alcohol abuse (FCP versus MFM: 63% vs 36%), cocaine abuse (FCP versus MFM: 60% vs 32%), use of seizure medications (FCP versus MFM: 62% vs 33%), and diabetes (FCP versus MFM: 56% vs 27%) (all P < .001). For all conditions, MFMs were more than twice as likely as FCPs to think that no pediatric specialist consultation was ever necessary. FCPs were more likely to agree that seeking court interventions was appropriate for maternal refusal to enter a program to discontinue cocaine use (FCP versus MFM: 72% vs 33%), refusal of azidothymidine to prevent perinatal HIV transmission (80% vs 41%), and refusal of percutaneous transfusion for fetal anemia (62% vs 28%) (all P < .001). Pediatric and obstetric specialists differ considerably regarding pediatric specialists' role in prenatal care for maternal conditions, and regarding whether to seek judicial intervention for maternal refusal of recommended treatment.

  6. Bilateral fetal hydrothorax requiring intrauterine fetal thoracoamniotic shunts: anesthetic considerations and management.

    PubMed

    Hache, John J; Emery, Stephen P; Vallejo, Manuel C

    2009-06-12

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  7. Ovine fetal swallowing responses to polyhydramnios

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Robert A.; Anderson, Debra F.; Cheung, Cecilia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Swallowing of amniotic fluid by late gestation fetuses increases when amniotic fluid volume (AFV) is elevated. Our objectives were to quantitatively characterize fetal swallowing when AFV is elevated above normal to polyhydramniotic levels and to explore the mechanisms that mediate these changes. Late gestation fetal sheep were studied under basal conditions and during intra‐amniotic infusion of lactated Ringer's solution. Control AFV averaged 631 ± 214 mL (SE, n = 6), swallowed volume was 299 ± 94 mL/day, and there were 5.7 ± 1.8 bouts/day of rapid swallowing. During intra‐amniotic infusion, AFV (3065 ± 894 mL) and daily swallowed volume (699 ± 148 mL/day) increased (P < 0.05) and the number of bouts reached a maximum of 13.7 ± 2.0 bouts/day when AFV exceeded 1500 mL. Unexpectedly, the volume swallowed per bout (57.3 ± 5.8 mL, n = 102) did not vary with AFV (r = 0.023, P = 0.81). Neither the number of swallows/day nor the volume/swallow changed consistently with elevated AFV. Daily swallowed volume increases and reaches a maximum of twice normal as AFV approaches polyhydramniotic levels. Mechanistically, the increase in swallowing was achieved primarily by an increase in the number of bouts of swallowing per day rather than the expected passive increase in volume per bout. This implies changes in fetal behavior as AFV was elevated. Furthermore, swallowed volume was four times more sensitive to increases in AFV than reported previously. PMID:24760530

  8. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Fetal Atrioventricular Block

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Strasburger, Janette F.; Huhta, James C.; Gotteiner, Nina L.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of our work was to define the complex electrophysiological characteristics seen in second- (2°) and third-degree (3°) atrioventricular block (AVB) and to longitudinally follow the development of atrial and ventricular heart rate and rhythm patterns with a goal of identifying heart rate and rhythm patterns associated with urgent delivery or neonatal pacing. Background The electrophysiological characteristics of congenital AVB before birth have not been extensively studied, yet the mortality from this disease is substantial. Along with advances in fetal therapies and interventions, a comprehensive natural history specific to the etiology of AVB, as well as the electrophysiological factors influencing outcome, are needed to best select treatment options. Methods Twenty-eight fetuses with AVB were evaluated by fetal magnetocardiography; 21 fetuses were evaluated serially. Results Fetuses with 2° AVB and isolated 3° AVB showed: 1) diverse atrial rhythms and mechanisms of atrioventricular conduction during 2° AVB; 2) junctional ectopic tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia during 3° AVB; 3) reactive ventricular and atrial fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings at ventricular rates >56 beats/min; and 4) flat ventricular FHR tracings at ventricular rates <56 beats/min despite reactive atrial FHR tracings. In contrast, fetuses with 3° AVB associated with structural cardiac disease exhibited predominantly nonreactive heart rate tracings and simpler rhythms. Conclusions Second-degree AVB, isolated 3° AVB, and 3° AVB associated with structural cardiac disease manifest distinctly different electrophysiological characteristics and outcome. Fetuses with 2° AVB or isolated 3° AVB commonly exhibited complex, changing heart rate and rhythm patterns; all 19 delivered fetuses are alive and healthy. Fetuses with structural cardiac disease and 3° AVB exhibited largely monotonous heart rate and rhythm patterns and poor prognosis. Junctional ectopic

  9. Hyperreactio Luteinalis: Maternal and Fetal Effects.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Ann Kinga; Sen, Jonathan; Sermer, Mathew

    2015-08-01

    Hyperreactio luteinalis is a rare condition in which there is massive cystic enlargement of the ovaries, mimicking malignancy, during pregnancy. When confronted with this condition, the fear of missing a cancer diagnosis often leads the physician to react with unnecessary surgical intervention, potentially resulting in impaired future fertility. The literature on the subject contains mainly case reports and one small case series. A recent review attempted to summarize what is currently known, but there has not yet been a pervasive change in the approach to the management of this condition. In order to define the natural history of the condition and its maternal and fetal effects, we examined all case reports available in the English literature from 1993 to 2014, in addition to another as yet unpublished case report. Our analysis suggests that, despite its impressive presentation with ovarian enlargement and hyperandrogenism, hyperreactio luteinalis tends to be self-limiting, with spontaneous postpartum resolution and without untoward maternal or fetal sequelae. In particular, fetal virilization is rare, and dependent on the timing of hyperandrogenism. Adverse pregnancy outcomes are likely a consequence of the abnormally high hCG levels observed in many of these gestations, and the subset of women with these abnormal values should be considered for enhanced surveillance. Vaginal delivery is preferred, and strategies to sustain the potential for breastfeeding must be introduced while maternal androgen levels fall, allowing lactation to be established. Considering its benign nature and postpartum resolution, management of HL must be conservative, and continued education of health care professionals who may encounter this entity is vital.

  10. [Fetal lung maturity delayed on diabetic pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Mendoza Martínez, Tomás de Jesús; Morales Morales, Martha Patricia; Jiménez Perea, María de Lourdes; Escobedo Aguirre, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    To determine the fetal lung maturity in a group of pregnant patients complicated by gestational diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, metabolic controlled patients, as well as to identify the modifications of the phospholipids lung profile by effect of antenatal steroids. 231 pregnant patients were included in an observational, longitudinal, clinical and descriptive study from January 1st 2000 to April 30th 2003. All those included presented gestational diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance according to the criteria of Carpenter. The metabolic control was demonstrated by means of glycosylated hemoglobin figures minor to 6.5%, and glucose monitoring (<95 mg/dL before meals and < 120 mg/dL two hours after each meal). The amniocentesis was performed just before the use of antenatal steroids and 48 hours after. The phospholipids lung profile was performed applying the Hallman and Kulovich method. By means of the Student's t-test non significant results were obtained for the general characteristics of both groups, except for the evolution of the phospholipids lung profile in the post-treatment group with antenatal steroids. As for the evolution of the fractions in the profile of the weekly phospholipids, an ANOVA test was applied with a p < 0.001 coefficient of statistical significance for the phosphatidylglycerol fraction. Delay of fetal lung maturity was shown in all the fractions of the phospholipids lung profile. In the group of patients with pregnancies of 36 weeks or more there was shown no correspondence among gestational age and the state of fetal lung maturity (60.75%), in comparison to that reported in existing literature. There were not reported cases of respiratory distress syndrome in the newborns.

  11. [Drugs during preeclampsia. Fetal risks and pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Serreau, R

    2010-04-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal, placental and fetal physiological characteristics constantly evolve and thereby constantly alter drug bioavailability in the mother and feto-placental unit. Gastric emptying time is increased and bowel movements are reduced. Distribution in the maternal body is mainly influenced by body mass variations, water content and fat stores. Metabolic capacity of the liver appears unchanged but renal clearance of drugs is gradually increased. The placental transfer of most drugs mainly consists of passive diffusion between the maternal and fetal circulations, along their respective concentration gradients. Only the free, unbound and non-ionized fraction of the drug readily crosses the membranes. Four anti-hypertensive drugs have been granted a license for the treatment of PE since the year 2000: these are Clonidine (Catapressan), Nicardipine (Loxen+), Labetalol (Trandate), Dihydralazine (Nepressol). Dihydralazine, Labetalol and Nicardipine are not contraindicated in the breast feeding mother. The administration of a long acting Benzodiazepine during pregnancy can lead to new born intoxication of variable severity and duration. These symptoms may precede a withdrawal syndrome (hyper-excitability, tremor, gastro-intestinal upset, such as diarrhea or vomiting). Breast feeding by mothers using benzodiazepines (Nitrazepam and Midazolam) is not recommended. In France, the use of low molecular weight heparins is not recommended during pregnancy whereas in the United States, they are recommended as a prophylactic measure. Their high molecular weight prevents their diffusion across the placental membrane and therefore prevents any fetal or neonatal risk. Bromocriptine is used as an inhibitor of lactation. During the post-partum period, serious accidents have been described: these consist of systemic hypertension, fits, infarcts (cardiac and neurological). It is contraindicated in case of systemic hypertension.

  12. Biotelemeters for Space Flights and Fetal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, Carsten W.; Ricks, Robert D.; Hines, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Pill-shaped biotelemeters originally designed for space flight applications will soon be used for monitoring the health of a fetus during and after in-utero fetal surgery. The authors developed a family of biotelemeters that are not only small enough for rodent studies on board the space shuttle or international space station, but also fit through a 10 mm trocar, a plastic tube that is used in endoscopic fetal surgery to obtain minimally invasive access to the fetus. The first 'pill' measures pressure and temperature, and is currently undergoing long-term leakage and biocompatibility tests. A second pill under development measures pH and temperature. A prototype of the 'pH-pill' has been built and successfully tested and is presently being miniaturized into the same dimensions as the 'pressure pill'. Additional pills measuring heart rate, ECG, other ions such as calcium and potassium, and eventually glucose and blood gases, will follow. All pills are designed for ultra-low power consumption yielding lifetimes of up to 10 months in order to meet the requirements of fetal monitoring, but also to provide the capability of long-term space station experiments. Each pill transmits its pulse-interval-modulated signal on a unique carrier frequency in the frequency range of 174-216MHz. A custom-designed multi-channel receiver demodulates and decodes each pill signal and sends the data to a LabVIEW program that performs real-time data analysis and display. A patent for the pill family and its data analysis system is pending.

  13. Biotelemeters for Space Flights and Fetal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, Carsten W.; Ricks, Robert D.; Hines, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Pill-shaped biotelemeters originally designed for space flight applications will soon be used for monitoring the health of a fetus during and after in-utero fetal surgery. The authors developed a family of biotelemeters that are not only small enough for rodent studies on board the space shuttle or international space station, but also fit through a 10 mm trocar, a plastic tube that is used in endoscopic fetal surgery to obtain minimally invasive access to the fetus. The first 'pill' measures pressure and temperature, and is currently undergoing long-term leakage and biocompatibility tests. A second pill under development measures pH and temperature. A prototype of the 'pH-pill' has been built and successfully tested and is presently being miniaturized into the same dimensions as the 'pressure pill'. Additional pills measuring heart rate, ECG, other ions such as calcium and potassium, and eventually glucose and blood gases, will follow. All pills are designed for ultra-low power consumption yielding lifetimes of up to 10 months in order to meet the requirements of fetal monitoring, but also to provide the capability of long-term space station experiments. Each pill transmits its pulse-interval-modulated signal on a unique carrier frequency in the frequency range of 174-216MHz. A custom-designed multi-channel receiver demodulates and decodes each pill signal and sends the data to a LabVIEW program that performs real-time data analysis and display. A patent for the pill family and its data analysis system is pending.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wei, Jun; Ma, Ying; Shang, Tao

    2005-09-01

    To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by Yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close follow-up was given for normal fetal heart pregnancies and neonatal echocardiography was performed to check the accuracy of prenatal diagnosis. (1) Forty-six cases (4.68%) were found to have fetal heart abnormalities in this study, 69.56% of them were diagnosed by single four-chamber view, another 30.43% fetal CHD were found by combining other views; (2) Forty-one parents of prenatal fetuses with CHD chose to terminate pregnancy, thirty-two of them gave consent to conduct autopsy, 93.75% of which yielded unanimous conclusion between prenatal fetal echocardiography and autopsy; (3) Thirty-two of 46 cases underwent fetal chromosome analysis, 8 cases (25%) were found to have abnormal chromosome; (4) Five cases were found to have right ventricle and atrium a little bigger than those on the left side, with the unequal condition being the same after birth, but there were no clinical manifestations and they are healthy for the time being; (5) Nine hundred and thirty-six cases were not found with abnormality in this study, but one case was diagnosed with ventricular septal defect after birth, one case was diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus, one case had atrial septal defect after birth. (1) The detected CHD rate was 4.68% by screening fetal heart with five transverse planes according to Yagel's description of high risk population basis for CHD. The coinciding rate of prenatal diagnosis and autopsy was 93.75%; (2) The sensitivity of detecting fetal heart abnormality is 92%, the specificity is 99

  15. Studies in Fetal Behavior: Revisited, Renewed, and Reimagined

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Voegtline, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this Monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodermal activity and fetal heart rate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include: within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physiological processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship. We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  16. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    PubMed

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  17. STUDIES IN FETAL BEHAVIOR: REVISITED, RENEWED, AND REIMAGINED.

    PubMed

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Voegtline, Kristin M

    2015-09-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodrmal activity and fetal heartrate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include:within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physio-logical processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship.We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  18. Iron in fetal and neonatal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Both iron deficiency and iron excess during the fetal and neonatal period bode poorly for developing organ systems. Maternal conditions such as iron deficiency, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and smoking, and preterm birth are the common causes of perinatal iron deficiency. Long-term neurodevelopmental impairments and predisposition to future iron deficiency that are prevalent in infants with perinatal iron deficiency require early diagnosis, optimal treatment and adequate follow-up of infants at risk for the condition. However, due to the potential for oxidant-mediated tissue injury, iron overload should be avoided in the perinatal period, especially in preterm infants. PMID:17157088

  19. Fetal MCG with Atomic Magnetometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deland, Zack; Bulatowicz, Michael D.; Sulai, Ibrahim A.; Wahl, Colin P.; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2016-05-01

    We present results on the development of 87Rb atomic magnetometers for the detection of a fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG). Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers' sensitivities are reported at the 1 fT /√{ Hz } level. Environmental common-mode noise, including the field from the maternal heart, can be suppressed by operating the magnetometers in a gradiometric configuration. We report on schemes from implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  20. Maternal abetalipoproteinemia resulting in multiple fetal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Seckeler, Michael D; Linden, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia is a rare genetic condition that results in an inability of the body to absorb dietary fats, including fat-soluble vitamins. Deficiencies of these vitamins are known to cause a wide range of clinical effects ranging from blindness to coagulopathy and neuropathy. We present the case of a child with multisystem anomalies born to a mother with abetalipoproteinemia and provide a brief review of the literature about vitamin A and fetal development. Mothers at high risk for vitamin deficiencies should be screened and counseled on the potential benefits, and risks, of vitamin supplementation.