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Sample records for australian square-kilometre-array pathfinder

  1. Science with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S.; Feain, I. J.; Gupta, N.

    2009-09-01

    The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries that will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. Most of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from a few hundred MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a technology demonstrator aimed in the mid-frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope that will make substantial advances in SKA key science. ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of two sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. In this paper, we outline the ASKAP project and summarise its headline science goals as defined by the community at large.

  2. Science with ASKAP. The Australian square-kilometre-array pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S.; Taylor, R.; Bailes, M.; Bartel, N.; Baugh, C.; Bietenholz, M.; Blake, C.; Braun, R.; Brown, J.; Chatterjee, S.; Darling, J.; Deller, A.; Dodson, R.; Edwards, P.; Ekers, R.; Ellingsen, S.; Feain, I.; Gaensler, B.; Haverkorn, M.; Hobbs, G.; Hopkins, A.; Jackson, C.; James, C.; Joncas, G.; Kaspi, V.; Kilborn, V.; Koribalski, B.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T.; Lenc, E.; Lovell, J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Manchester, R.; Matthews, D.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Norris, R.; Pen, U.-L.; Phillips, C.; Power, C.; Protheroe, R.; Sadler, E.; Schmidt, B.; Stairs, I.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Stil, J.; Tingay, S.; Tzioumis, A.; Walker, M.; Wall, J.; Wolleben, M.

    2008-12-01

    The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries. The SKA will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. A majority of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from 300 MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is aimed squarely in this frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phase-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. This large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope poised to achieve substantial advances in SKA key science. The central core of ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of the sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. Following an introductory description of ASKAP, this document contains 7 chapters describing specific science programmes for ASKAP. In summary, the goals of these programmes are as follows: The detection of a million galaxies in atomic hydrogen emission across 75% of the sky out to a redshift of 0.2 to understand galaxy formation and gas evolution in the nearby Universe.

  3. Source-Finding for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, M.; Humphreys, B.

    2012-08-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) presents a number of challenges in the area of source finding and cataloguing. The data rates and image sizes are very large, and require automated processing in a high-performance computing environment. This requires development of new tools, that are able to operate in such an environment and can reliably handle large datasets. These tools must also be able to accommodate the different types of observations ASKAP will make: continuum imaging, spectral-line imaging, transient imaging. The ASKAP project has developed a source-finder known as selavy, built upon the duchamp source-finder. selavy incorporates a number of new features, which we describe here. Since distributed processing of large images and cubes will be essential, we describe the algorithms used to distribute the data, find an appropriate threshold and search to that threshold and form the final source catalogue. We describe the algorithm used to define a varying threshold that responds to the local, rather than global, noise conditions, and provide examples of its use. And we discuss the approach used to apply two-dimensional fits to detected sources, enabling more accurate parameterisation. These new features are compared for timing performance, where we show that their impact on the pipeline processing will be small, providing room for enhanced algorithms. We also discuss the development process for ASKAP source finding software. By the time of ASKAP operations, the ASKAP science community, through the Survey Science Projects, will have contributed important elements of the source finding pipeline, and the mechanisms in which this will be done are presented.

  4. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D.; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.; Raja, W.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bateman, T. J.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Cheng, W.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Feain, I.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G. A.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lensson, E. S.; MacLeod, A.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Mitchell, D.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R.; Pearce, S.; Qiao, R. Y.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Wark, R. M.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C.; Wilson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Boolardy Engineering Test Array is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarisation beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of Boolardy Engineering Test Array's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties, and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating Boolardy Engineering Test Array that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final Australian Square Kilometre Array Path telescope.

  5. Discovery of H I gas in a young radio galaxy at z = 0.44 using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Hunstead, R. W.; Pracy, M. B.; Curran, S. J.; Croom, S. M.; Glowacki, M.; Morganti, R.; Shabala, S. S.; Zwaan, M. A.; Allen, G.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K. W.; Barker, S.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Braun, R.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A.; Bunton, J. D.; Cantrall, C.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Ekers, R.; Feain, I.; Ferris, R. H.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Grancea, A.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Haskins, C.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kendall, R.; Kesteven, M.; Kiraly, D.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Macleod, A.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Norris, R. P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A.; Serra, P.; Shaw, R.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, T.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of a new 21-cm H I absorption system using commissioning data from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). Using the 711.5-1015.5 MHz band of ASKAP we were able to conduct a blind search for the 21-cm line in a continuous redshift range between z = 0.4 and 1.0, which has, until now, remained largely unexplored. The absorption line is detected at z = 0.44 towards the GHz-peaked spectrum radio source PKS B1740-517 and demonstrates ASKAP's excellent capability for performing a future wide-field survey for H I absorption at these redshifts. Optical spectroscopy and imaging using the Gemini-South telescope indicates that the H I gas is intrinsic to the host galaxy of the radio source. The narrow [O III] emission lines show clear double-peaked structure, indicating either large-scale outflow or rotation of the ionized gas. Archival data from the XMM-Newton satellite exhibit an absorbed X-ray spectrum that is consistent with a high column density obscuring medium around the active galactic nucleus. The H I absorption profile is complex, with four distinct components ranging in width from 5 to 300 km s-1 and fractional depths from 0.2 to 20 per cent. In addition to systemic H I gas, in a circumnuclear disc or ring structure aligned with the radio jet, we find evidence for a possible broad outflow of neutral gas moving at a radial velocity of v ˜ 300 km s-1. We infer that the expanding young radio source (tage ≈ 2500 yr) is cocooned within a dense medium and may be driving circumnuclear neutral gas in an outflow of ˜1 M⊙ yr-1.

  6. Cosmic magnetism with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the five key science projects for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is “The Origin and Evolution of Cosmic Magnetism”, in which radio polarimetry will be used to reveal what cosmic magnets look like and what role they have played in the evolving Universe. Many of the SKA prototypes now being built are also targeting magnetic fields and polarimetry as key science areas. Here I review the prospects for innovative new polarimetry and Faraday rotation experiments with forthcoming facilities such as ASKAP, LOFAR, the ATA, the EVLA, and ultimately the SKA. Sensitive wide-field polarisation surveys with these telescopes will provide a dramatic new view of magnetic fields in the Milky Way, in nearby galaxies and clusters, and in the high-redshift Universe.

  7. Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Afonso, J.; Bacon, D.; Beck, Rainer; Bell, Martin; Beswick, R. J.; Best, Philip; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Budavári, Tamás; Cassano, Rossella; Condon, J. J.; Cress, Catherine; Dabbech, Arwa; Feain, I.; Fender, Rob; Ferrari, Chiara; Gaensler, B. M.; Giovannini, G.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Van der Heyden, Kurt; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kothes, Roland; Van Langevelde, Huib; Lazio, Joseph; Mao, Minnie Y.; Martínez-Sansigre, Alejo; Mary, David; Mcalpine, Kim; Middelberg, E.; Murphy, Eric; Padovani, P.; Paragi, Zsolt; Prandoni, I.; Raccanelli, A.; Rigby, Emma; Roseboom, I. G.; Röttgering, H.; Sabater, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Schilizzi, Richard; Seymour, N.; Smith, Dan J. B.; Umana, Grazia; Zhao, G.-B.; Zinn, Peter-Christian

    2013-03-01

    In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, several next-generation radio telescopes and upgrades are already being built around the world. These include APERTIF (The Netherlands), ASKAP (Australia), e-MERLIN (UK), VLA (USA), e-EVN (based in Europe), LOFAR (The Netherlands), MeerKAT (South Africa), and the Murchison Widefield Array. Each of these new instruments has different strengths, and coordination of surveys between them can help maximise the science from each of them. A radio continuum survey is being planned on each of them with the primary science objective of understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies over cosmic time, and the cosmological parameters and large-scale structures which drive it. In pursuit of this objective, the different teams are developing a variety of new techniques, and refining existing ones. To achieve these exciting scientific goals, many technical challenges must be addressed by the survey instruments. Given the limited resources of the global radio-astronomical community, it is essential that we pool our skills and knowledge. We do not have sufficient resources to enjoy the luxury of re-inventing wheels. We face significant challenges in calibration, imaging, source extraction and measurement, classification and cross-identification, redshift determination, stacking, and data-intensive research. As these instruments extend the observational parameters, we will face further unexpected challenges in calibration, imaging, and interpretation. If we are to realise the full scientific potential of these expensive instruments, it is essential that we devote enough resources and careful study to understanding the instrumental effects and how they will affect the data. We have established an SKA Radio Continuum Survey working group, whose prime role is to maximise science from these instruments by ensuring we share resources and expertise across the projects. Here we describe these projects, their science goals

  8. The Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Minh; Lazio, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the premier instrument to study radiation at centimetre and metre wavelengths from the cosmos, and in particular neutral hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe. The SKA will probe the dawn of galaxy formation as well as allow advances in many other areas of astronomy, such as fundamental physics, astro-biology and cosmology. The SKA will have a collecting area of up to one million square metres spread over at least 3000 km, providing a collecting area more than twenty times greater than the current largest radio telescope. Its field of view on the sky will be several tens of square degrees with potentially several large (100 square degrees) independent beams at the lower frequencies, providing a survey speed many thousands of times greater than current facilities. This paper summarises the key science drivers of the SKA and provides an update on the international project.

  9. The Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzian, Yervant; Lazio, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the future centimeter- and meter-wavelength telescope with a sensitivity about 50 times higher than present instruments. Its Key Science Projects are (a) Astrobiology including planetary formation within protoplanetary disks; (b) Testing theories of gravitation using an array of pulsars to search for gravitational waves and relativistic binaries to probe the strong-field regime; (c) The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism, both within the Galaxy and in intergalactic space, via an all-sky grid of magnetic field measurements; (d) The end of the Dark Ages, involving searches for a neutral hydrogen signature, the first supermassive black holes, and the first metal-rich systems; and (e) A hydrogen census to a redshift z greater than or equal to 1 from which to study the evolution of galaxies, dark matter, and dark energy. The SKA will operate at wavelengths from 1.2 cm to 3 m (0.1-25 GHz), providing milliarcsecond resolution at the shortest wavelengths. Its instantaneous field of view will be about 1° (20 cm wavelength), with many simultaneous beams on the sky. The Reference Design is composed of a large number of small dish antennas, building upon an original US proposal. In order to obtain these capabilities at a reasonable cost, significant engineering investments are being made in antennas, wideband feeds and receivers, and signal processing; aperture arrays (phased feeds) are also being investigated in Europe for the lower frequencies. Candidate sites are in Argentina, Australia, China, and South Africa, with a short list of acceptable sites anticipated late in 2006.

  10. An Overview of the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Lazio, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the premier instrument to study radiation at centimetre and metre wavelengths from the cosmos, and in particular hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe. The SKA will probe the dawn of galaxy formation as well as allow advances in many other areas of astronomy, such as fundamental physics, astrobiology and cosmology. Phase 1, which will be about 10% of the full SKA collecting area, will be built in Australia and South Africa. This paper describes the key science drivers of the SKA, provides an update on recent SKA Organisation activities and summarises the baseline design for Phase 1.

  11. Operations concept for the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gary R.; Bock, Douglas C.; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Taljaard, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is an ambitious project to build the world's largest radio telescope, eventually reaching one square kilometre in collecting area. The first phase of the project, SKA1, will consist of two telescopes: SKA1-LOW, comprising 131,000 dipole antennas at the Murchison Radio Observatory in Western Australia covering the range 50-350 MHz, and SKA1-MID, comprising 200 x 15-m dishes in the Karoo desert in South Africa covering the range 0.35-13.8 GHz. SKA1 is scheduled to commence operations in 2023 and, in order to appropriately influence the design of the system, operational planning has commenced. This paper presents an overview of the operational concept for SKA1.

  12. Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Huynh, Minh

    2010-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the centimeter- and meter-wavelength telescope for the 21st Century. Its Key Science Projects are (a) The end of the Dark Ages, involving searches for an H i signature and the first metalrich systems; (b) Testing theories of gravitation using an array of pulsars to search for gravitational waves and relativistic binaries to probe the strong-field regime; (c) Observations of H i to a redshift z 2 from which to study the evolution of galaxies and dark energy. (d) Astrobiology including planetary formation within protoplanetary disks; and (c) The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism, both within the Galaxy and in intergalactic space. The SKA will operate over the wavelength range of at least 1.2 cm to 4 m (70 MHz to 25 GHz), providing milliarcsecond resolution at the shortest wavelengths.

  13. Square Kilometre Array Science Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Bojan; SDP Consortium, SKA

    2014-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is planned to be, by a large factor, the largest and most sensitive radio telescope ever constructed. The first phase of the telescope (SKA1), now in the design phase, will in itself represent a major leap in capabilities compared to current facilities. These advances are to a large extent being made possible by advances in available computer processing power so that that larger numbers of smaller, simpler and cheaper receptors can be used. As a result of greater reliance and demands on computing, ICT is becoming an ever more integral part of the telescope. The Science Data Processor is the part of the SKA system responsible for imaging, calibration, pulsar timing, confirmation of pulsar candidates, derivation of some further derived data products, archiving and providing the data to the users. It will accept visibilities at data rates at several TB/s and require processing power for imaging in range 100 petaFLOPS -- ~1 ExaFLOPS, putting SKA1 into the regime of exascale radio astronomy. In my talk I will present the overall SKA system requirements and how they drive these high data throughput and processing requirements. Some of the key challenges for the design of SDP are: - Identifying sufficient parallelism to utilise very large numbers of separate compute cores that will be required to provide exascale computing throughput - Managing efficiently the high internal data flow rates - A conceptual architecture and software engineering approach that will allow adaptation of the algorithms as we learn about the telescope and the atmosphere during the commissioning and operational phases - System management that will deal gracefully with (inevitably frequent) failures of individual units of the processing system In my talk I will present possible initial architectures for the SDP system that attempt to address these and other challenges.

  14. From Nearby Low Luminosity AGN to High Redshift Radio Galaxies: Science Interests with Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, P.; Lal, D. V.; Singh, V.; Bagchi, J.; Ishwara Chandra, C. H.; Hota, A.; Konar, C.; Wadadekar, Y.; Shastri, P.; Das, M.; Baliyan, K.; Nath, B. B.; Pandey-Pommier, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present detailed science cases that a large fraction of the Indian AGN community is interested in pursuing with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). These interests range from understanding low luminosity active galactic nuclei in the nearby Universe to powerful radio galaxies at high redshifts. Important unresolved science questions in AGN physics are discussed. Ongoing low-frequency surveys with the SKA pathfinder telescope GMRT, are highlighted.

  15. Extragalactic radio surveys in the pre-Square Kilometre Array era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Chris

    2017-07-01

    The era of the Square Kilometre Array is almost upon us, and pathfinder telescopes are already in operation. This brief review summarizes our current knowledge of extragalactic radio sources, accumulated through six decades of continuum surveys at the low-frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and the extensive complementary observations at other wavelengths necessary to gain this understanding. The relationships between radio survey data and surveys at other wavelengths are discussed. Some of the outstanding questions are identified and prospects over the next few years are outlined.

  16. Extragalactic radio surveys in the pre-Square Kilometre Array era

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The era of the Square Kilometre Array is almost upon us, and pathfinder telescopes are already in operation. This brief review summarizes our current knowledge of extragalactic radio sources, accumulated through six decades of continuum surveys at the low-frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and the extensive complementary observations at other wavelengths necessary to gain this understanding. The relationships between radio survey data and surveys at other wavelengths are discussed. Some of the outstanding questions are identified and prospects over the next few years are outlined. PMID:28791175

  17. Extragalactic radio surveys in the pre-Square Kilometre Array era.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Chris

    2017-07-01

    The era of the Square Kilometre Array is almost upon us, and pathfinder telescopes are already in operation. This brief review summarizes our current knowledge of extragalactic radio sources, accumulated through six decades of continuum surveys at the low-frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and the extensive complementary observations at other wavelengths necessary to gain this understanding. The relationships between radio survey data and surveys at other wavelengths are discussed. Some of the outstanding questions are identified and prospects over the next few years are outlined.

  18. The renaissance of radio astronomy: towards the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I will give a brief overview of the largest radio telescope in the world, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The history of this instrument, its development as a huge international project, as well as its main scientific goals, will be summarised. I will then focus on a particular science case by presenting how the first phase of the SKA (SKA1), whose observations are expected to start in the early 2020's, will change our radio view of the largest gravitationally bound structures of the Universe: galaxy clusters.

  19. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    DOE PAGES

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kohri, Kazunori; ...

    2016-10-17

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration, and the nature of dark matter. The forthcoming radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world's largest, will be able to open a new frontier in cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the coming decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA wouldmore » have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the viewpoint of modern cosmology. Furthermore, the cosmological science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.« less

  20. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-10-17

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration, and the nature of dark matter. The forthcoming radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world's largest, will be able to open a new frontier in cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the coming decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the viewpoint of modern cosmology. Furthermore, the cosmological science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  1. The square kilometre array and the transient universe.

    PubMed

    Stappers, B W

    2013-06-13

    The square kilometre array (SKA) is a next generation radio telescope that will be built in southern Africa and Australasia. It will be built in two phases and will use a range of detectors, from aperture arrays to dishes, to span the frequency range from a few tens of megahertz to a few gigahertz. The combination of great sensitivity, wide field of view and unprecedented computing power mean that the SKA will be an excellent instrument for studying the transient radio universe. Transient radio emission is generated in extremes of: gravitational and magnetic fields, velocity, temperature, pressure and density. While we know about plenty of source classes for this type of short duration radio emission, there is still a large range of transient parameter space that has not yet been sampled owing to the limitations of current generation radio telescopes.

  2. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-12-01

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration, and the nature of dark matter. The forthcoming radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world's largest, will be able to open a new frontier in cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the coming decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the viewpoint of modern cosmology. The cosmological science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  3. Square Kilometre Array: The radio telescope of the XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainge, K.; Alachkar, B.; Amy, Shaun; Barbosa, D.; Bommineni, M.; Boven, P.; Braddock, R.; Davis, J.; Diwakar, P.; Francis, V.; Gabrielczyk, R.; Gamatham, R.; Garrington, S.; Gibbon, T.; Gozzard, D.; Gregory, S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, Y.; Hammond, J.; Hindley, D.; Horn, U.; Hughes-Jones, R.; Hussey, M.; Lloyd, S.; Mammen, S.; Miteff, S.; Mohile, V.; Muller, J.; Natarajan, S.; Nicholls, J.; Oberland, R.; Pearson, M.; Rayner, T.; Schediwy, S.; Schilizzi, R.; Sharma, S.; Stobie, S.; Tearle, M.; Wang, B.; Wallace, B.; Wang, L.; Warange, R.; Whitaker, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Wingfield, N.

    2017-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world's largest and most sensitive radio telescope. It will address fundamental unanswered questions about our Universe including how the first stars and galaxies formed after the Big Bang, how dark energy is accelerating the expansion of theUniverse, the role of magnetism in the cosmos, the nature of gravity, and the search for life beyond Earth. This project envisages the construction of 133 15-m antennas in South Africa and 131072 log-periodic antennas in Australia, together with the associated infrastructure in the two desert sites. In addition, the SKA is an exemplar Big Data project, with data rates of over 10 Tbps being transported from the telescope to HPC/HTC facilities.

  4. Scalable Data Mining and Archiving for the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Hart, A. F.; Lazio, J.; Bennett, T.; Wagstaff, K. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Preston, R.

    2011-12-01

    As the technologies for remote observation improve, the rapid increase in the frequency and fidelity of those observations translates into an avalanche of data that is already beginning to eclipse the resources, both human and technical, of the institutions and facilities charged with managing the information. Common data management tasks like cataloging both data itself and contextual meta-data, creating and maintaining scalable permanent archive, and making data available on-demand for research present significant software engineering challenges when considered at the scales of modern multi-national scientific enterprises such as the upcoming Square Kilometre Array project. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), leveraging internal research and technology development funding, has begun to explore ways to address the data archiving and distribution challenges with a number of parallel activities involving collaborations with the EVLA and ALMA teams at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and members of the Square Kilometre Array South Africa team. To date, we have leveraged the Apache OODT Process Control System framework and its catalog and archive service components that provide file management, workflow management, resource management as core web services. A client crawler framework ingests upstream data (e.g., EVLA raw directory output), identifies its MIME type and automatically extracts relevant metadata including temporal bounds, and job-relevant/processing information. A remote content acquisition (pushpull) service is responsible for staging remote content and handing it off to the crawler framework. A science algorithm wrapper (called CAS-PGE) wraps underlying code including CASApy programs for the EVLA, such as Continuum Imaging and Spectral Line Cube generation, executes the algorithm, and ingests its output (along with relevant extracted metadata). In addition to processing, the Process Control System has been leveraged to provide data

  5. Observation management challenges of the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, Alan; Williams, Stewart J.; Nicol, Mark; Klaassen, Pamela; Thompson, Roger S.; Knapic, Cristina; Jerse, Giovanna; Orlati, Andrea; Messina, Marco; Valame, Snehal

    2016-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world's most advanced radio telescope, designed to explore some of the biggest questions in astronomy today, such as the epoch of re-ionization, the nature of gravity and the origins of cosmic magnetism. SKA1, the first phase of SKA construction, is currently being designed by a large team of experts world-wide. SKA1 comprises two telescopes: a 200-element dish interferometer in South Africa and a 130000-element dipole antenna aperture array in Australia. To enable the ground-breaking science of the SKA an advanced Observation Management system is required to support both the needs of the astronomical community users and the SKA Observatory staff. This system will ensure that the SKA realises its scientiffc aims and achieves optimal scientific throughput. This paper provides an overview of the design of the system that will accept proposals from SKA users, and result in the execution of the scripts that will obtain science data, taking in the stages of detailed preparation, planning and scheduling of the observations and onwards tracking. It describes the unique challenges of the differing requirements of two telescopes, one of which is very much a software telescope, including the need to schedule the data processing as well as the acquisition, and to react to both internally and externally discovered transient events. The scheduling of multiple parallel sub-array use is covered, along with the need to handle commensal observing - using the same data stream to satisfy the science goals of more than one project simultaneously. An international team from academia and industry, drawing on expertise and experience from previous telescope projects, the virtual observatory and comparable problems in industry, has been assembled to design the solution to this challenging but exciting problem.

  6. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Subhashis; Sur, Sharanya; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Mangalam, Arun; Seshadri, T. R.; Chand, Hum

    2016-12-01

    Origin of magnetic fields, its structure and effects on dynamical processes in stars to galaxies are not well understood. Lack of a direct probe has remained a problem for its study. The first phase of Square Kilometre Array (SKA-I), will have almost an order of magnitude higher sensitivity than the best existing radio telescope at GHz frequencies. In this contribution, we discuss specific science cases that are of interest to the Indian community concerned with astrophysical turbulence and magnetic fields. The SKA-I will allow observations of a large number of background sources with detectable polarization and measure their Faraday depths (FDs) through the Milky Way, other galaxies and their circum-galactic mediums. This will probe line-of-sight magnetic fields in these objects well and provide field configurations. Detailed comparison of observational data (e.g., pitch angles in spirals) with models which consider various processes giving rise to field amplification and maintenance (e.g., various types of dynamo models) will then be possible. Such observations will also provide the coherence scale of the fields and its random component through RM structure function. Measuring the random component is important to characterize turbulence in the medium. Observations of FDs with redshift will provide important information on magnetic field evolution as a function of redshift. The background sources could also be used to probe magnetic fields and its coherent scale in galaxy clusters and in bridges formed between interacting galaxies. Other than FDs, sensitive observations of synchrotron emission from galaxies will provide complimentary information on their magnetic field strengths in the sky plane. The core shift measurements of AGNs can provide more precise measurements of magnetic field in the sub parsec region near the black hole and its evolution. The low band of SKA-I will also be useful to study circularly polarized emission from Sun and comparing various

  7. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, A.; Benford, J.; Cheng-Jin, J.; Chennamangalam, J.; Cordes, J. M.; Falcke, H. D. E.; Garrington, S. T.; Garrett, M. A.; Gurvits, L.; Hoare, M.; Korpela, E.; Lazio, J.; Messerschmitt, D.; Morrison, I.; O'Brien, T.; Paragi, Z.; Penny, A.; Spitler, L.; Tarter, J.; Werthimer, D.

    2015-04-01

    The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of signal types than previously searched for. Here we discuss the astrobiological and astrophysical motivations for radio SETI and describe how the technical capabilities of the SKA will explore the radio SETI parameter space. We detail several conceivable SETI experimental programs on all components of SKA1, including commensal, primary-user, targeted and survey programs and project the enhancements to them possible with SKA2. We also discuss target selection criteria for these programs, and in the case of commensal observing, how the varied use cases of other primary observers can be used to full advantage for SETI.

  8. Spectral performance of Square Kilometre Array Antennas - II. Calibration performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Wayth, Randall B.; Fagnoni, Nicolas; Sutinjo, Adrian T.; Wakley, Brett; Punzalan, Chris Ivan B.

    2017-09-01

    We test the bandpass smoothness performance of two prototype Square Kilometre Array (SKA) SKA1-Low log-periodic dipole antennas, SKALA2 and SKALA3 ('SKA Log-periodic Antenna'), and the current dipole from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) precursor telescope. Throughout this paper, we refer to the output complex-valued voltage response of an antenna when connected to a low-noise amplifier, as the dipole bandpass. In Paper I, the bandpass spectral response of the log-periodic antenna being developed for the SKA1-Low was estimated using numerical electromagnetic simulations and analysed using low-order polynomial fittings, and it was compared with the HERA antenna against the delay spectrum metric. In this work, realistic simulations of the SKA1-Low instrument, including frequency-dependent primary beam shapes and array configuration, are used with a weighted least-squares polynomial estimator to assess the ability of a given prototype antenna to perform the SKA Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) statistical experiments. This work complements the ideal estimator tolerances computed for the proposed EoR science experiments in Trott & Wayth, with the realized performance of an optimal and standard estimation (calibration) procedure. With a sufficient sky calibration model at higher frequencies, all antennas have bandpasses that are sufficiently smooth to meet the tolerances described in Trott & Wayth to perform the EoR statistical experiments, and these are primarily limited by an adequate sky calibration model and the thermal noise level in the calibration data. At frequencies of the Cosmic Dawn, which is of principal interest to SKA as one of the first next-generation telescopes capable of accessing higher redshifts, the MWA dipole and SKALA3 antenna have adequate performance, while the SKALA2 design will impede the ability to explore this era.

  9. Neutron Star Physics in the Square Kilometre Array Era: An Indian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan; Bagchi, Manjari; Bandyopadhyay, Debades; Banik, Sarmistha; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Gangadhara, R. T.; Gopakumar, A.; Gupta, Yashwant; Joshi, B. C.; Maan, Yogesh; Maitra, Chandreyee; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Pai, Archana; Paul, Biswajit; Ray, Alak K.; Sutaria, Firoza K.

    2016-12-01

    It is an exceptionally opportune time for astrophysics when a number of next-generation mega-instruments are poised to observe the Universe across the entire electromagnetic spectrum with unprecedented data quality. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is undoubtedly one of the major components of this scenario. In particular, the SKA is expected to discover tens of thousands of new neutron stars giving a major fillip to a wide range of scientific investigations. India has a sizeable community of scientists working on different aspects of neutron star physics with immediate access to both the uGMRT (an SKA pathfinder) and the recently launched X-ray observatory Astrosat. The current interests of the community largely centre around studies of (a) the generation of neutron stars and the SNe connection, (b) the neutron star population and evolutionary pathways, (c) the evolution of neutron stars in binaries and the magnetic fields, (d) the neutron star equation of state, (e) the radio pulsar emission mechanism, and (f) the radio pulsars as probes of gravitational physics. Most of these studies are the main goals of the SKA first phase, which is likely to be operational in the next four years. This article summarizes the science goals of the Indian neutron star community in the SKA era, with significant focus on coordinated efforts among the SKA and other existing/upcoming instruments.

  10. The likelihood ratio as a tool for radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Fleuren, S.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of the likelihood ratio method as a tool for identifying optical and infrared counterparts to proposed radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor and pathfinder telescopes. We present a comparison of the infrared counterparts identified by the likelihood ratio in the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to radio observations with 6, 10 and 15 arcsec resolution. We cross-match a deep radio catalogue consisting of radio sources with peak flux density >60 ?Jy with deep near-infrared data limited to Ks≲ 22.6. Comparing the infrared counterparts from this procedure to those obtained when cross-matching a set of simulated lower resolution radio catalogues indicates that degrading the resolution from 6 arcsec to 10 and 15 arcsec decreases the completeness of the cross-matched catalogue by approximately 3 and 7 per cent respectively. When matching against shallower infrared data, comparable to that achieved by the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, the fraction of radio sources with reliably identified counterparts drops from ˜89 per cent, at Ks≲ 22.6, to 47 per cent with Ks≲ 20.0. Decreasing the resolution at this shallower infrared limit does not result in any further decrease in the completeness produced by the likelihood ratio matching procedure. However, we note that radio continuum surveys with the MeerKAT and eventually the SKA, will require long baselines in order to ensure that the resulting maps are not limited by instrumental confusion noise.

  11. The Australian SKA Pathfinder: project update and initial operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinckel, Antony E. T.; Bock, Douglas C.-J.

    2016-08-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will be the fastest dedicated cm-wave survey telescope, and will consist of 36 12-meter 3-axis antennas, each with a large chequerboard phased array feed (PAF) receiver operating between 0.7 and 1.8 GHz, and digital beamforming prior to correlation. The large raw data rates involved ( 100 Tb/sec), and the need to do pipeline processing, has led to the antenna incorporating a third axis to fix the parallactic angle with respect to the entire optical system (blockages and phased array feed). It also results in innovative technical solutions to the data transport and processing issues. ASKAP is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO), a new observatory developed for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), 315 kilometres north-east of Geraldton, Western Australia. The MRO also hosts the SKA low frequency pathfinder instrument, the Murchison Widefield Array and will host the initial low frequency instrument of the SKA, SKA1-Low. Commissioning of ASKAP using six antennas equipped with first-generation PAFs is now complete and installation of second-generation PAFs and digital systems is underway. In this paper we review technical progress and commissioning to date, and refer the reader to relevant technical and scientific publications.

  12. The Australian SKA Pathfinder: operations management and user engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the science operations model for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope. ASKAP is a radio interferometer currently being commissioned in Western Australia. It will be operated by a dedicated team of observatory staff with the support of telescope monitoring, control and scheduling software. These tools, as well as the proposal tools and data archive will enable the telescope to operate with little direct input from the astronomy user. The paper also discusses how close engagement with the telescope user community has been maintained throughout the ASKAP construction and commissioning phase, leading to positive outcomes including early input into the design of telescope systems and a vibrant early science program.

  13. The Australian SKA Pathfinder: First Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a precursor and technology demonstrator for the Square Kilometre Array.A specialist wide-field survey instrument, ASKAP compises 36 x 12m dish antennas with a maximum separation of 6km. The array operates in the frequency range 700 - 1800 MHz and has an instantaneous bandwidth of 300 MHz. Each dish is mounted with a 'phased array feed', a radio receiver that dramatically enhances the telescope's field-of-view from 1 to 30 square degrees. ASKAP is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, Australia's core site for the SKA.Ten Science Survey Projects have been established by teams of more than 600 astronomers from around the world. Astronomical research topics tackled by these teams include galaxy evolution, cosmic magnetism, the history of gas in galaxies and cosmology. A program of ASKAP Early Science will commence in late 2015. The 6-antenna Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) is currently being used by the commissioning team and at the time of writing has produced its first scientific discovery paper.In this talk, hear the ASKAP Project Scientist report some of the exciting new capabilities demonstrated by ASKAP and learn about the first scientific discoveries made by the commissioning and early science team.

  14. Interstellar Medium and Star Formation Studies with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, P.; Vig, S.; Maheswar, G.; Kamath, U. S.; Tej, A.

    2016-12-01

    Stars and planetary systems are formed out of molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Although the sequence of steps involved in star formation are generally known, a comprehensive theory which describes the details of the processes that drive formation of stars is still missing. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with its unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, will play a major role in filling these gaps in our understanding. In this article, we present a few science cases that the Indian star formation community is interested in pursuing with SKA, which include investigation of AU-sized structures in the neutral ISM, the origin of thermal and non-thermal radio jets from protostars and the accretion history of protostars, and formation of massive stars and their effect on the surrounding medium.

  15. Low Frequency End Performance of a Symmetrical Configuration Antenna for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Medellín, Germán

    2004-06-01

    The frequency specifications of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) call for an optimum operation of the antenna elements from 25 down to 100 MHz. The current 12 m diameter US-SKA design is specified from 500 up to 25 GHz, with an upper goal of 35 GHz. At the low frequency end of the band (i.e., 100 MHz), a 12 m reflector antenna is about four wavelengths in diameter. Then, the question is: how well can you do, at this low frequency end of the specified band of operation for the SKA, with a symmetric reflector configuration using an ultra-wide-band prime focus feed? This paper presents the analysis of the antenna performance, in terms of Aeff/TA, of three symmetric configurations of the 12 m US-SKA antenna design between 100 and 200 MHz.

  16. The Square Kilometre Array Science Data Processor. Preliminary compute platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekema, P. C.; van Nieuwpoort, R. V.; Bal, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array is a next-generation radio-telescope, to be built in South Africa and Western Australia. It is currently in its detailed design phase, with procurement and construction scheduled to start in 2017. The SKA Science Data Processor is the high-performance computing element of the instrument, responsible for producing science-ready data. This is a major IT project, with the Science Data Processor expected to challenge the computing state-of-the art even in 2020. In this paper we introduce the preliminary Science Data Processor design and the principles that guide the design process, as well as the constraints to the design. We introduce a highly scalable and flexible system architecture capable of handling the SDP workload.

  17. Fast Transients with the Square Kilometre Array and its Pathfinders: An Indian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Yashwant; Chandra, Poonam; Bagchi, Manjari; Ramanujam, Niruj M.; Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha

    2016-12-01

    In the rapidly developing field of study of the transient sky, fast radio transients are perhaps the most exciting objects of scrutiny at present. The SKA, with its wide field-of-view and significant improvement in sensitivity over existing facilities, is expected to detect a plethora of fast transients which, in addition to help resolve the mysteries surrounding their nature and origin, will also lead to other interesting applications in astrophysics. We explore some of these possibilities here, and also emphasize the current status and future plans of the Indian community working in this area, in the context of ongoing work and extension of this to the SKA.

  18. From Antikythera to the Square Kilometre Array: Lessons from the Ancients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More than a hundred years ago an extraordinary mechanism was found by sponge divers at the bottom of the sea near the island of Antikythera in Greece. This Antikythera mechanism is an ancient computer from about 100BC, which uses bronze gears to make astronomical calculations based on cycles of the Solar System. Now, more than 2000 years after the device was lost at sea, scientists have used the latest techniques in X-ray computed tomography and reflectance imaging to understand its intricate workings. In June 2012 we plan to hold a workshop linking modern and ancient astronomical technology through the Antikythera theme. We will explore the evolution of astrometry and computing from ancient Greece to the present, we will compare the technologies used to unravel the secrets of the Antikythera mechanism with the imaging tools of modern astronomy, and most importantly, as we pursue our vision of an exciting scientific future with telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array we can reflect on why the Antikythera technology was lost for more than a thousand years and whether this can happen again.

  19. Square Kilometre Array Telescope—Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zhu, X.; Gao, C.; Bai, Y.; Dong, J. W.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements.

  20. Scalable, efficient ASICS for the square kilometre array: From A/D conversion to central correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, M. L.; Jongerius, R.; Dittmann, G.; Anghel, A.; Engbersen, T.; van Lunteren, J.; Buchmann, P.

    2014-05-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a future radio telescope, currently being designed by the worldwide radio-astronomy community. During the first of two construction phases, more than 250,000 antennas will be deployed, clustered in aperture-array stations. The antennas will generate 2.5 Pb/s of data, which needs to be processed in real time. For the processing stages from A/D conversion to central correlation, we propose an ASIC solution using only three chip architectures. The architecture is scalable - additional chips support additional antennas or beams - and versatile - it can relocate its receiver band within a range of a few MHz up to 4GHz. This flexibility makes it applicable to both SKA phases 1 and 2. The proposed chips implement an antenna and station processor for 289 antennas with a power consumption on the order of 600W and a correlator, including corner turn, for 911 stations on the order of 90 kW.

  1. An innovative, highly sensitive receiver system for the Square Kilometre Array Mid Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Gie Han; Lehmensiek, Robert; Billade, Bhushan; Caputa, Krzysztof; Gauffre, Stéphane; Theron, Isak P.; Pantaleev, Miroslav; Ljusic, Zoran; Quertier, Benjamin; Peens-Hough, Adriaan

    2016-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project is a global science and engineering project realizing the next-generation radio telescopes operating in the metre and centimetre wavelengths regions. This paper addresses design concepts of the broadband, exceptionally sensitive receivers and reflector antennas deployed in the SKA1-Mid radio telescope to be located in South Africa. SKA1-Mid (350 MHz - 13.8 GHz with an option for an upper limit of 24 GHz) will consist of 133 reflector antennas using an unblocked aperture, offset Gregorian configuration with an effective diameter of 15 m. Details on the unblocked aperture Gregorian antennas, low noise front ends and advanced direct digitization receivers, are provided from a system design perspective. The unblocked aperture results in increased aperture efficiency and lower side-lobe levels compared to a traditional on-axis configuration. The low side-lobe level reduces the noise contribution due to ground pick-up but also makes the antenna less susceptible to ground-based RFI sources. The addition of extra shielding on the sub-reflector provides a further reduction of ground pick-up. The optical design of the SKA1-Mid reflector antenna has been tweaked using advanced EM simulation tools in combination with sophisticated models for sky, atmospheric and ground noise contributions. This optimal antenna design in combination with very low noise, partially cryogenic, receivers and wide instantaneous bandwidth provide excellent receiving sensitivity in combination with instrumental flexibility to accommodate a wide range of astronomical observation modes.

  2. Square Kilometre Array Telescope--Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Zhu, X; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-09-09

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements.

  3. A user interface framework for the Square Kilometre Array: concepts and responsibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marassi, Alessandro; Brajnik, Giorgio; Nicol, Mark; Alberti, Valentina; Le Roux, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is responsible for developing the SKA Observatory, the world's largest radio telescope, with eventually over a square kilometre of collecting area and including a general headquarters as well as two radio telescopes: SKA1-Mid in South Africa and SKA1-Low in Australia. The SKA project consists of a number of subsystems (elements) among which the Telescope Manager (TM) is the one involved in controlling and monitoring the SKA telescopes. The TM element has three primary responsibilities: management of astronomical observations, management of telescope hardware and software subsystems, management of data to support system operations and all stakeholders (operators, maintainers, engineers and science users) in achieving operational, maintenance and engineering goals. Operators, maintainers, engineers and science users will interact with TM via appropriate user interfaces (UI). The TM UI framework envisaged is a complete set of general technical solutions (components, technologies and design information) for implementing a generic computing system (UI platform). Such a system will enable UI components to be instantiated to allow for human interaction via screens, keyboards, mouse and to implement the necessary logic for acquiring or deriving the information needed for interaction. It will provide libraries and specific Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to implement operator and engineer interactive interfaces. This paper will provide a status update of the TM UI framework, UI platform and UI components design effort, including the technology choices, and discuss key challenges in the TM UI architecture, as well as our approaches to addressing them.

  4. Probing Statistical Isotropy of Cosmological Radio Sources using Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik; Jain, Pankaj; Kashyap, Gopal; Kothari, Rahul; Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2016-12-01

    There currently exist many observations which are not consistent with the cosmological principle. We review these observations with a particular emphasis on those relevant for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). In particular, several different data sets indicate a preferred direction pointing approximately towards the Virgo cluster. We also observe a hemispherical anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) temperature fluctuations. Although these inconsistencies may be attributed to systematic effects, there remains the possibility that they indicate new physics and various theories have been proposed to explain them. One possibility, which we discuss in this review, is the generation of perturbation modes during the early pre-inflationary epoch, when the Universe may not obey the cosmological principle. Better measurements will provide better constraints on these theories. In particular, we propose measurement of the dipole in number counts, sky brightness, polarized flux and polarization orientations of radio sources. We also suggest test of alignment of linear polarizations of sources as a function of their relative separation. Finally we propose measurement of hemispherical anisotropy or equivalently dipole modulation in radio sources.

  5. Neutron Stars in the Light of Square Kilometre Array: Data, Statistics and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Kashikar, Akanksha; Bagchi, Manjari

    2016-12-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), when it becomes functional, is expected to enrich Neutron Star (NS) catalogues by at least an order of magnitude over their current state. This includes the discovery of new NS objects leading to better sampling of under-represented NS categories, precision measurements of intrinsic properties such as spin period and magnetic field, as also data on related phenomena such as microstructure, nulling, glitching, etc. This will present a unique opportunity to seek answers to interesting and fundamental questions about the extreme physics underlying these exotic objects in the Universe. In this paper, we first present a meta-analysis (from a methodological viewpoint) of statistical analyses performed using existing NS data, with a two-fold goal. First, this should bring out how statistical models and methods are shaped and dictated by the science problem being addressed. Second, it is hoped that these analyses will provide useful starting points for deeper analyses involving richer data from SKA whenever it becomes available. We also describe a few other areas of NS science which we believe will benefit from SKA which are of interest to the Indian NS community.

  6. Possible gamma-ray burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample consisting of merging several GRB catalogues observed by current missions as Swift, Fermi, Agile and INTEGRAL and by previous missions as BeppoSAX, CGRO, GRANAT, HETE-2, Ulysses and Wind. The final catalogue counts 7516 distinct sources. We compute the fraction of GRBs that could be observed by the SKA at high and low frequencies, above its observable sky. Considering the planned SKA sensitivity and through an extrapolation based on previous works and observations, we deduce the minimum fluence in the range 15-150 keV. This is the energy interval where a GRB should emit to be detectable in the radio band by the SKA. Results seem consistent with observational capabilities.

  7. Baryonic acoustic oscillations from 21 cm intensity mapping: the Square Kilometre Array case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Alonso, David; Viel, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    We quantitatively investigate the possibility of detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) using single-dish 21 cm intensity mapping observations in the post-reionization era. We show that the telescope beam smears out the isotropic BAO signature and, in the case of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) instrument, makes it undetectable at redshifts z ≳ 1. We however demonstrate that the BAO peak can still be detected in the radial 21 cm power spectrum and describe a method to make this type of measurements. By means of numerical simulations, containing the 21 cm cosmological signal as well as the most relevant Galactic and extra-Galactic foregrounds and basic instrumental effect, we quantify the precision with which the radial BAO scale can be measured in the 21 cm power spectrum. We systematically investigate the signal to noise and the precision of the recovered BAO signal as a function of cosmic variance, instrumental noise, angular resolution and foreground contamination. We find that the expected noise levels of SKA would degrade the final BAO errors by ∼5 per cent with respect to the cosmic-variance limited case at low redshifts, but that the effect grows up to ∼65 per cent at z ∼ 2-3. Furthermore, we find that the radial BAO signature is robust against foreground systematics, and that the main effect is an increase of ∼20 per cent in the final uncertainty on the standard ruler caused by the contribution of foreground residuals as well as the reduction in sky area needed to avoid high-foreground regions. We also find that it should be possible to detect the radial BAO signature with high significance in the full redshift range. We conclude that a 21 cm experiment carried out by the SKA should be able to make direct measurements of the expansion rate H(z) with measure the expansion with competitive per cent level precision on redshifts z ≲ 2.5.

  8. Delensing cosmic microwave background B modes with the Square Kilometre Array Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sherwin, Blake; Nagata, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    We explore the potential use of the Radio Continuum (RC) survey conducted by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) to remove (delens) the lensing-induced B-mode polarization and thus enhance future cosmic microwave background (CMB) searches for inflationary gravitational waves. Measurements of large-scale B-modes of the CMB are considered to be the best method for probing gravitational waves from the cosmic inflation. Future CMB experiments will, however, suffer from contamination by nonprimordial B modes, one source of which is the lensing B modes. Delensing, therefore, will be required for further improvement of the detection sensitivity for gravitational waves. Analyzing the use of the two-dimensional map of galaxy distribution provided by the SKA RC survey as a lensing mass tracer, we find that joint delensing using near-future CMB experiments and the SKA phase 1 will improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio by more than a factor of ˜2 compared to those without the delensing analysis. Compared to the use of CMB data alone, the inclusion of the SKA phase 1 data will increase the significance of the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio by a factor 1.2-1.6. For LiteBIRD combined with a ground-based experiment such as Simons Array and Advanced ACT, the constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio when adding SKA phase 2 data is improved by a factor of 2.3-2.7, whereas delensing with CMB data alone improves the constraints by only a factor 1.3-1.7. We conclude that the use of SKA data is a promising method for delensing upcoming CMB experiments such as LiteBIRD.

  9. Explosive and Radio-Selected Transients: Transient Astronomy with Square Kilometre Array and its Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Anupama, G. C.; Arun, K. G.; Iyyani, Shabnam; Misra, Kuntal; Narasimha, D.; Ray, Alak; Resmi, L.; Roy, Subhashis; Sutaria, Firoza

    2016-12-01

    With the high sensitivity and wide-field coverage of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), large samples of explosive transients are expected to be discovered. Radio wavelengths, especially in commensal survey mode, are particularly well-suited for uncovering the complex transient phenomena. This is because observations at radio wavelengths may suffer less obscuration than in other bands (e.g. optical/IR or X-rays) due to dust absorption. At the same time, multiwaveband information often provides critical source classification rapidly than possible with only radio band data. Therefore, multiwaveband observational efforts with wide fields of view will be the key to progress of transients astronomy from the middle 2020s offering unprecedented deep images and high spatial and spectral resolutions. Radio observations of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with SKA will uncover not only much fainter bursts and verifying claims of sensitivity-limited population versus intrinsically dim GRBs, they will also unravel the enigmatic population of orphan afterglows. The supernova rate problem caused by dust extinction in optical bands is expected to be lifted in the SKA era. In addition, the debate of single degenerate scenario versus double degenerate scenario will be put to rest for the progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae, since highly sensitive measurements will lead to very accurate mass loss estimation in these supernovae. One also expects to detect gravitationally lensed supernovae in far away Universe in the SKA bands. Radio counterparts of the gravitational waves are likely to become a reality once SKA comes online. In addition, SKA is likely to discover various new kinds of transients.

  10. Dynamic scheduling and planning parallel observations on large Radio Telescope Arrays with the Square Kilometre Array in mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    Scheduling, the task of producing a time table for resources and tasks, is well-known to be a difficult problem the more resources are involved (a NP-hard problem). This is about to become an issue in Radio astronomy as observatories consisting of hundreds to thousands of telescopes are planned and operated. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which Australia and New Zealand bid to host, is aiming for scales where current approaches -- in construction, operation but also scheduling -- are insufficent. Although manual scheduling is common today, the problem is becoming complicated by the demand for (1) independent sub-arrays doing simultaneous observations, which requires the scheduler to plan parallel observations and (2) dynamic re-scheduling on changed conditions. Both of these requirements apply to the SKA, especially in the construction phase. We review the scheduling approaches taken in the astronomy literature, as well as investigate techniques from human schedulers and today's observatories. The scheduling problem is specified in general for scientific observations and in particular on radio telescope arrays. Also taken into account is the fact that the observatory may be oversubscribed, requiring the scheduling problem to be integrated with a planning process. We solve this long-term scheduling problem using a time-based encoding that works in the very general case of observation scheduling. This research then compares algorithms from various approaches, including fast heuristics from CPU scheduling, Linear Integer Programming and Genetic algorithms, Branch-and-Bound enumeration schemes. Measures include not only goodness of the solution, but also scalability and re-scheduling capabilities. In conclusion, we have identified a fast and good scheduling approach that allows (re-)scheduling difficult and changing problems by combining heuristics with a Genetic algorithm using block-wise mutation operations. We are able to explain and eradicate two problems in the

  11. Simulated square kilometre array maps from Galactic 3D-emission models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Planning of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) requires simulations of the expected sky emission at arcsec angular resolution to evaluate its scientific potential, to constrain its technical realization in the best possible way, and to guide the observing strategy. Aims: We simulate high-resolution total intensity, polarization, and rotation measure (RM) maps of selected fields based on our recent global 3D-model of Galactic emission. Methods: Simulations of diffuse Galactic emission were conducted using the hammurabi code modified for arcsec angular resolution patches towards various Galactic directions. The random magnetic field components are set to follow a Kolmogorov-like power-law spectrum. We analysed the simulated maps in terms of their probability density functions (PDFs) and structure functions. Results: We present maps for various Galactic longitudes and latitudes at 1.4 GHz, which is the frequency where deep SKA surveys are proposed. The maps are about 1.5 ° in size and have an angular resolution of about 1.6 °. Total intensity emission is smoother in the plane than at high latitudes because of the different contributions from the regular and random magnetic field. The high-latitude fields show more extended polarized emission and RM structures than those in the plane, where patchy emission structures dominate on very small scales. The RM PDFs in the plane are close to Gaussians, but clearly deviate from that at high latitudes. The RM structure functions show smaller amplitudes and steeper slopes towards high latitudes. These results emerge from much more turbulent cells being passed through by the line-of-sights in the plane. Although the simulated random magnetic field components distribute in 3D, the magnetic field spectrum extracted from the structure functions of RMs conforms to 2D in the plane and approaches 3D at high latitudes. This is partly related to the outer scale of the turbulent magnetic field, but mainly to the different lengths

  12. Evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies and future observational tests with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshakian, T. G.; Beck, R.; Krause, Marita; Sokoloff, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: In the context of models of galaxy formation and evolution, we investigate the cosmological evolution of large- and small-scale magnetic fields inside galaxies. Methods: We use the dynamo theory to derive the timescales of amplification and ordering of magnetic fields in disk and puffy galaxies. Turbulence in protogalactic halos generated by thermal virialization can drive an efficient turbulent dynamo. Results from simulations of hierarchical structure formation cosmology provide a tool to develop an evolutionary model of regular magnetic fields coupled with galaxy formation and evolution. Results: The turbulent (small-scale) dynamo was able to amplify a weak seed magnetic field in halos of protogalaxies to a few μG strength within a few 108 yr. This turbulent field served as a seed to the mean-field (large-scale) dynamo. Galaxies similar to the Milky Way formed their disks at z≈10 and regular fields of μG strength and a few kpc coherence length were generated within 2 Gyr (at z≈3), but field-ordering on the coherence scale of the galaxy size required an additional 6 Gyr (at z≈0.5). Giant galaxies formed their disks at z≈10, allowing more efficient dynamo generation of strong regular fields (with kpc coherence length) already at z≈4. However, the age of the Universe is short for fully coherent fields in giant galaxies larger than 15 kpc to have been achieved. Dwarf galaxies should have hosted fully coherent fields at z≈1. After a major merger, the strength of the turbulent field is enhanced by a factor of a few. Conclusions: This evolutionary scenario can be tested by measurements of polarized synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation with the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We predict an anticorrelation between galaxy size and ratio between ordering scale and galaxy size. Weak regular fields (small Faraday rotation) in galaxies at z⪉3 are signatures of major mergers. Undisturbed dwarf galaxies should host fully coherent fields, giving

  13. Clusters of Galaxies and the Cosmic Web with Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Vir Lal, Dharam; Bagchi, Joydeep; Paul, Surajit; Malu, Siddharth; Datta, Abhirup; Parekh, Viral; Sharma, Prateek; Pandey-Pommier, Mamta

    2016-12-01

    The intra-cluster and inter-galactic media that pervade the large scale structure of the Universe are known to be magnetized at sub-micro Gauss to micro Gauss levels and to contain cosmic rays. The acceleration of cosmic rays and their evolution along with that of magnetic fields in these media is still not well understood. Diffuse radio sources of synchrotron origin associated with the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) such as radio halos, relics and mini-halos are direct probes of the underlying mechanisms of cosmic ray acceleration. Observations with radio telescopes such as the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have led to the discoveries of about 80 such sources and allowed detailed studies in the frequency range 0.15-1.4 GHz of a few. These studies have revealed scaling relations between the thermal and non-thermal properties of clusters and favour the role of shocks in the formation of radio relics and of turbulent re-acceleration in the formation of radio halos and mini-halos. The radio halos are known to occur in merging clusters and mini-halos are detected in about half of the cool-core clusters. Due to the limitations of current radio telescopes, low mass galaxy clusters and galaxy groups remain unexplored as they are expected to contain much weaker radio sources. Distinguishing between the primary and the secondary models of cosmic ray acceleration mechanisms requires spectral measurements over a wide range of radio frequencies and with high sensitivity. Simulations have also predicted weak diffuse radio sources associated with filaments connecting galaxy clusters. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a next generation radio telescope that will operate in the frequency range of 0.05-20 GHz with unprecedented sensitivities and resolutions. The expected detection limits of SKA will reveal a few hundred to thousand new radio halos, relics and mini-halos providing the first large and comprehensive

  14. Constraining primordial non-Gaussianity via a multitracer technique with surveys by Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Keitaro; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-10-01

    We forecast future constraints on local-type primordial non-Gaussianity parameter fNL with a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid, a continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and their combination. We derive a general expression for the covariance matrix of the power spectrum estimates of multiple tracers to show how the so-called multitracer technique improves constraints on fNL. In particular we clarify the role of the overlap fraction of multiple tracers and the division method of the tracers. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that stringent constraints of σ(fNL)≲1 can be obtained even with a single survey, assuming five mass bins. When Euclid and SKA phase 1 (2) are combined, constraints on fNL are improved to σ(fNL)=0.61(0.50).

  15. A failure of serendipity: the Square Kilometre Array will struggle to eavesdrop on human-like extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, D. H.; Nichol, R. C.

    2011-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will operate in frequency ranges often used by military radar and other communications technology. It has been shown that if extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) communicate using similar technology, then the SKA should be able to detect such transmissions up to distances of ~100 pc (~300 light years) from Earth. However, Mankind has greatly improved its communications technology over the last century, dramatically reducing signal leakage and making the Earth ‘radio quiet’. If ETIs follow the same pattern as the human race, will we be able to detect their signal leakage before they become radio quiet? We investigate this question using Monte Carlo realization techniques to simulate the growth and evolution of intelligent life in the Galaxy. We show that if civilizations are ‘human’ in nature (i.e. they are only ‘radio loud’ for ~100 years, and can only detect each other with an SKA-like instrument out to 100 pc, within a maximum communication time of 100 years), then the probability for such civilizations accidentally detecting each other is low (~10-7), much lower than if other, dedicated communication techniques are permissible (e.g. optical SETI or neutrino communication).

  16. Scatter broadening of compact radio sources by the ionized intergalactic medium: prospects for detection with Space VLBI and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.-P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting and probing various components of the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) and their turbulent properties at radio frequencies through observations of scatter broadening of compact sources. There is a strong case for conducting targeted observations to resolve scatter broadening (where the angular size scales as ˜ν-2) of compact background sources intersected by foreground galaxy haloes and rich clusters of galaxies to probe the turbulence of the ionized gas in these objects, particularly using Space very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) with baselines of 350 000 km at frequencies below 800 MHz. The sensitivity of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) allows multifrequency surveys of interstellar scintillation (ISS) of ˜ 100 μJy sources to detect or place very strong constraints on IGM scatter broadening down to ˜ 1 μas scales at 5 GHz. Scatter broadening in the warm-hot component of the IGM with typical overdensities of ˜30 cannot be detected, even with Space VLBI or ISS, and even if the outer scales of turbulence have an unlikely low value of ˜1 kpc. None the less, intergalactic scatter broadening can be of the order of ˜ 100 μas at 1 GHz and ˜ 3 μas at 5 GHz for outer scales ˜1 kpc, assuming a sufficiently high-source redshift that most sight-lines intersect within a virial radius of at least one galaxy halo (z ≳ 0.5 and 1.4 for 1010 and 1011 M⊙ systems, following McQuinn 2014). Both Space VLBI and multiwavelength ISS observations with the SKA can easily test such a scenario, or place strong constraints on the outer scale of the turbulence in such regions.

  17. H I observations of galaxies in the southern filament of the Virgo Cluster with the Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgho, A.; Hess, K.; Carignan, C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    We map the H I distribution of galaxies in a ˜1.5 × 2.5° region located at the virial radius south of the Virgo Cluster using the KAT-7 and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope interferometers. Because of the different beam sizes of the two telescopes, a similar column density sensitivity of NH I ˜ 1 × 1018 atoms cm- 2 was reached with the two observations over 16.5 km s-1. We pioneer a new approach to combine the observations and take advantage of their sensitivity to both the large- and small-scale structures. Out to an unprecedented extent, we detect an H I tail of ˜60 kpc being stripped off NGC 4424, a peculiar spiral galaxy. The properties of the galaxy, together with the shape of the tail, suggest that NGC 4424 is a post-merger galaxy undergoing ram pressure stripping as it falls towards the centre of the Virgo Cluster. We detect a total of 14 galaxies and three H I clouds lacking optical counterparts. One of the clouds is a new detection with an H I mass of 7 × 107 M⊙ and a strong H I profile with W50 = 73 km s-1. We find that 10 out of the 14 galaxies present H I deficiencies not higher than those of the cluster's late spirals, suggesting that the environmental effects are not more pronounced in the region than elsewhere in the cluster.

  18. African Astronomy and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We highlight the growth of astronomy across Africa and the effect of hosting the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will have on this growth. From the construction of a new 25m radio telescope in Nigeria, to new university astronomy programmes in Kenya, the HESS in Namibia and the Mauritian Radio Telescope, to the world class projects being developed in South Africa (Southern African Large Telescope and Karoo Array Telescope) astronomy is re-emerging across the continent. The SKA will represent the pinnacle of technological advancement in astronomy when constructed; requiring ultra high speed data transmission lines over 3000 km baselines and the World's fastest computer for correlation purposes. The investment alone to build the SKA on African soil will be of great economic benefit to its people, but the required network connectivity will significantly drive commercial expansion far beyond the initial value of the SKA investment. The most important consequence of hosting the SKA in Africa would be the impact on Human Capital Development (HCD) on the continent. Major HCD projects already underway producing excellent results will be presented. )

  19. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is an artist's conception of the X-37 Demonstrator descending down left. As part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-37 flight experiment demonstrates advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  20. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is an artist's conception of the X-37 Demonstrator ascending left upright. As part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-37 flight experiment demonstrates advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  1. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is NASA's poster art for the X-34 technology Demonstrator. The X-34 was part of NASA's Pathfinder Program which demonstrated advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments and experimental vehicles. These technology demonstrators and flight experiments would support the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space and would define the future of space transportation pushing technology into a new era of space development and exploration at the dawn of the new century. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  2. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This artist's concept depicts the X-34 Demonstrator landing in a dessert. Part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-34 was a reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center to demonstrate technologies that were essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  3. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This artist's concept depicts the X-34 Demonstrator in flight. Part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-34 was a reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center to demonstrate technologies that were essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  4. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is the X-34 Demonstrator parked on the runway. Part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-34 was a reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center to demonstrate technologies that are essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  5. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured in the high bay, is the X-34 Technology Demonstrator in the process of completion. The X-34 wass part of NASA's Pathfinder Program which demonstrated advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments and experimental vehicles. These technology demonstrators and flight experiments supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space and defined the future of space transportation pushing technology into a new era of space development and exploration at the dawn of the new century. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  6. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This artist's concept depicts the X-34 Demonstrator sitting on a runway. Part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-34 was a reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center to demonstrate technologies that were essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  7. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Australian SKA Pathfinder: A High-Dynamic Range Wide-Field of View Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, D. R.; Gough, R. G.; Bunton, J. D.; Cornwell, T. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Johnston, S.; Feain, I. J.; Schinckel, A. E.; Jackson, C. A.; Kesteven, M. J.; Chippendale, A.; Hampson, G. A.; O'Sullivan, J. D.; Hay, S. G.; Jacka, C. E.; Sweetnam, T. W.; Storey, M. C.; Ball, L.; Boyle, B. J.

    2009-08-01

    The Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a new telescope under development as a world-class high-dynamic-range wide-field-of-view survey instrument. It will utilize focal plane phased array feeds on the 36 12-m antennas that will compose the array. The large amounts of data present a huge computing challenge, and ASKAP will store data products in an archive after near real-time pipeline processing. This powerful instrument will be deployed at a new radio-quiet observatory, the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the midwest region of Western Australia, to enable sensitive surveys of the entire sky to address some of the big questions in contemporary physics. As a pathfinder for the SKA, ASKAP will demonstrate field of view enhancement and computing/processing technology as well as the operation of a large-scale radio array in a remote and radio-quiet region of Australia.

  9. Measuring magnetism in the Milky Way with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, M.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Ferrière, K.; Frick, P.; Gaensler, B.; Heald, G.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Jones, D.; Landecker, T.; Mao, S. A.; Noutsos, A.; Oppermann, N.; Reich, W.; Robishaw, T.; Scaife, A.; Schnitzeler, D.; Stepanov, R.; Sun, X.; Taylor, R.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic fields in the Milky Way are present on a wide variety of sizes and strengths, influencing many processes in the Galactic ecosystem such as star formation, gas dynamics, jets, and evolution of supernova remnants or pulsar wind nebulae. Observation methods are complex and indirect; the most used of these are a grid of rotation measures of unresolved polarized extragalactic sources, and broadband polarimetry of diffuse emission. Current studies of magnetic fields in the Milky Way reveal a global spiral magnetic field with a significant turbulent component; the limited sample of magnetic field measurements in discrete objects such as supernova remnants and HII regions shows a wide variety in field configurations; a few detections of magnetic fields in Young Stellar Object jets have been published; and the magnetic field structure in the Galactic Center is still under debate. The SKA will unravel the 3D structure and configurations of magnetic fields in the Milky Way on sub-parsec to galaxy scales, including field structure in the Galactic Center. The global configuration of the Milky Way disk magnetic field, probed through pulsar RMs, will resolve controversy about reversals in the Galactic plane. Characteristics of interstellar turbulence can be determined from the grid of background RMs. We expect to learn to understand magnetic field structures in protostellar jets, supernova remnants, and other discrete sources, due to the vast increase in sample sizes possible with the SKA. This knowledge of magnetic fields in the Milky Way will not only be crucial in understanding of the evolution and interaction of Galactic structures, but will also help to define and remove Galactic foregrounds for a multitude of extragalactic and cosmological studies.

  10. The Square Kilometre Array: a challenge for 2020 to which Spain can contribute in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Dios Santander-Vela, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The SKA, composed of several hundreds of three different types of antennas with separations up to 3.000 km, and up to 200 square degrees field of view, will be the largest, most sensitive radio telescope ever built. It will be able to provide fundamental answers in areas such as the dark era, when gas in galaxies was first turned into stars and the first black holes formed, star formation in nearby galaxies from stellar birth to death, faint extragalactic emission, magnetism in galaxies, extrasolar planets, or confrontation of Einstein predictions with pulsars and black hole observations. The technological challenges involved offer an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate in the development of hardware and software technologies. The energy requirements of the SKA provide an opportunity to accelerate technology development in scalable renewable energy generation, distribution, storage and demand monitoring and reduction. Data transport will reach over a hundred times the current global internet traffic data rates, delivering as much data as the full World Wide Web. Processing this data torrent in real time will require high-performance distributed computing as well as data storage and innovative retrieval technologies in the exascale. This way to do science, based on data-intensive interdisciplinary cooperation, is the base of the concept of e-Science, which necessarily includes outreach as an indissoluble part of the knowledge-based human progress. The scientific and technological challenges and opportunities that SKA can bring to the Spanish community will be described in this talk.

  11. Probing Individual Sources during Reionization and Cosmic Dawn using Square Kilometre Array HI 21-cm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kanan K.; Ghara, Raghunath; Majumdar, Suman; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Himadri; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-12-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signals: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius Rb ≳ 10 Mpc with ˜100 h of observations at redshift z˜8 provided that the mean outside neutral hydrogen fraction x_{ {HI}} ≳ 0.5. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs such as around ULASJ1120+0641 discovered by Mortlock et al. ( Nature 474, 7353 (2011)). We find that a 5 σ detection is possible with 600 h of SKA1-low observations if the QSO age and the outside xHI are at least ˜2×107 Myr and ˜0.2 respectively. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting the very first X-ray and Ly- α sources during the cosmic dawn. We consider mini-QSOs like sources which emits in X-ray frequency band. We find that with a total ˜ 1000 h of observations, SKA1-low should be able to detect those sources individually with a ˜ 9 σ significance at redshift z=15. We summarize how the SNR changes with various parameters related to the source properties.

  12. Measuring Variations in the Fundamental Constants with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S.

    Recent theories of the fundamental interactions naturally predict space-time variations of the fundamental constants. In these theories (e.g. superstring and Mtheory), the constants naturally emerge as functions of the scale-lengths of the extra dimensions (e.g., [1,2]). At present, no mechanism has been found for keeping the compactified scale-lengths fixed and so, if extra dimensions exist and their sizes undergo any cosmological evolution, our 3-D coupling constants may vary in time. Several other modern theories also provide strong motivation for an experimental search for variation in the fine structure constant, α ≡ e 2/ħc. Interestingly, varying constants can provide alternative solutions to the "cosmological problems", e.g. flatness, horizon, etc. The most effective and well understood method of measuring variations in a is by observing absorption lines due to gas clouds along the line-of-sight to distant quasars. Recent detailed studies of the relative positions of heavy element optical transitions and comparison with present day (laboratory) wavelengths, may indeed suggest that the a may have evolved with time [3,4], although this consensus is be no means universal [5]. It is therefore clear that an independent check is required, which can refute or confirm the optical results, thus providing a sound experimental test of possible unified theories. The study of redshifted radio absorption lines offers the best test of cosmological changes in the fundamental constants, although presently, the paucity of systems exhibiting Hi 21-cm and molecular absorption severely limits our ability to carry out statistically sound comparisons.

  13. A review of Australian experience in the evaluation of helium as a pathfinder in exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, C. R. M.; Gole, M. J.; Hart, M. K. W.

    1987-11-01

    Orientation surveys were conducted to test the potential of using 4He as a pathfinder in mineral and hydrocarbon exploration. Groundwaters were sampled from drill holes and stock wells. Overburden gas samples were collected via fixed tubes emplaced at 6 m depth in backfilled drill holes. While He concentrations in groundwaters associated with most U mineralization were far in excess of the atmospheric equilibrium value of 0.044 μL/L, equivalent, or higher, concentrations were found in groundwaters from unmineralized areas around the deposits. These latter concentrations appear to be due to accumulation of He in groundwaters with long residence times and by leakage from deep sources, particularly granitoid basement. Only at the Koongarra U deposit, where groundwaters are annually recharged, did anomalous He concentrations appear to indicate the presence of the deposit. No credible He anomaly was detected in overburden gas over any U deposit. However, a marked overburden gas He anomaly was detected over the Gingin gas field, although normalization to constant 20Ne suggested much of this to be a relative enrichment due to near-surface biological activity related to the leakage of hydrocarbons altering the major gas composition, particularly the CO2/O2 ratio of the soil atmosphere. It is concluded that He, when used in conjunction with other gases, may be useful in near-surface geochemical exploration for hydrocarbons but that it does not appear to be an effective pathfinder for U deposits.

  14. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Macleod, A.; Shaw, R. D.; Brothers, M. L.; Cantrall, C.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency T_{sys}/η of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  15. Pathfinder Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, John R., III

    2000-01-01

    The Pathfinder Program is presented. The topics include: 1) High Visibility Flight Projects; 3) Significant Events/Accomplishments; 4) Pathfinder Flight Experiments; 5) Top level Goals; 6) Flight Testing for a Multistage Reusable System; 7) Key Embedded Technologies; 8) X-34 Vehicle Description; 9) Government Participation; 10) X-37 Vehicle Characteristics; 10) X-37 Vehicle Deployment Process; and 11) X-37 Configuration Modification Options.

  16. LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2008-01-01

    USA Pathfinder is a space mission dedicated to demonstrating technology for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA is a joint ESA/NASA mission to detect low-frequency gravitational waves on the 0.0001 to 0.1 Hz frequency band. LISA is expected to observe 100's of merging massive black hole binaries out z-15, tens of thousands of close compact binary systems in the Milky Way, merging intermediate-mass black hole binaries, tens of stellar-mass black holes falling into supermassive black holes in galactic centers, and possibly other exotic sources. Several critical LISA technologies have not been demonstrated at the requisite level of performance. In spaceflight, and some fight hardware cannot be tested in a 1-g environment. Hence, the LISA Pathfinder mission is being implemented to demonstrate these critical LISA technologies in a relevant flight environment. LISA Pathfinder mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5-million-kilometer armlength down to a few tens of centimeters. The experimental concept is to measure the relative separation between two test masses nominally following their own geodesics, and thereby determine the relative residual acceleration between them near 1 mHz, about a decade above the lowest frequency required by LISA. To implement such a concept, disturbances on the test masses must be kept very small by many design features, but chiefly by "drag-free" flight. A drag-free spacecraft follows a free-falling test mass which it encloses, but has no mechanical connection to. The spacecraft senses it's orientation and separation with respect to the proof mass, and its propulsion system is commanded to keep the spacecraft centered about the test mass. Thus, the spacecraft shields the test mass from most external influences, and minimizes the effect of force gradients arising from the spacecraft, and acting on the test mass. LISA Pathfinder will compare the geodesic of one test mass against that of the other. Only a

  17. Pathfinder Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, John R., III; Rogacki, Row (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The topics in this viewgraph include: 1) High visibility Flight Projects; 2) Pathfinder Flight Experiments; 3) X-37 Configuration Modification Options; 4) Flight Testing for a Multistage Reusable System; 5) X-34 Vehicle Description; 6) X-34 Expanded View; 7) Vehicle Size Comparison; 8) X-34 Experiment Status; 9) Government Participation; 10) Government and Industry Participants; 11) X-34 Project Status; 12) X-34 Captive Carry Fight; 13) Little Joe III; 14) Fastpac; and 15) Islunar Tug.

  18. H I observations of two new dwarf galaxies: Pisces A and B with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Pisces A and Pisces B are the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy out of 22 Hi clouds identified in the GALFAHI survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. Aims: We derive the Hi content and kinematics of Pisces A and B. Methods: Our aperture synthesis Hi observations used the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), which is a pathfinder instrument for MeerKAT, the South African precursor to the mid-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-MID). Results: The low rotation velocities of ~5 km s-1 and ~10 km s-1 in Pisces A and B, respectively, and their Hi content show that they are really dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr). Despite that small rotation component, it is more the random motions ~9-11 km s-1 that provide most of the gravitational support, especially in the outer parts. The study of their kinematics, especially the strong gradients of random motions, suggest that those two dwarf galaxies are not yet in equilibrium. Conclusions: These Hi- rich galaxies may be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability. However, such gas-rich dwarf galaxies will most likely never be within the virial radius of MW-type galaxies and become subhalo candidates. Systems such as Pisces A and B are more likely to be found at a few Mpc s from MW-type galaxies. The final FITS cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/L3

  19. LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.; McNamara, P. W.

    2009-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder, formerly known as SMART-2, is the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology. The mission will pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), by testing the core assumption of gravitational wave detection - and to a larger extent, General Relativity - that free particles follow geodesics. In order to meet the goals of the mission, and to prepare the way for LISA, several new technologies must be demonstrated in a space environment. These include: inertial sensors, high-precision laser metrology, drag-free control and micro-Newton proportional thrusters. LISA Pathfinder will carry two payloads: the LISA Technology Package (LTP), provided by European Member States and ESA, and the Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) provided by NASA. The DRS has passed its pre-ship acceptance review and has been delivered to ESA, while the LTP has passed its Critical Design Review, with flight hardware currently being manufactured and tested. The spacecraft development is also proceeding well; the flight structures of both the science module and propulsion module are undergoing environmental testing, while subsystem flight hardware is being delivered to the spacecraft testbeds. LISA Pathfinder will be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2010. After 15 apogee raising manoeuvres, the sciencecraft will enter its final orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point. First science results are expected approximately three months after launch. Here we will give an overview of the mission including the technologies being demonstrated. We will also report on the status of the flight hardware testing, and on the status of the ground system.

  20. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  1. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 8: Grote Reber and the 'Square Kilometre Array' near Bothwell, Tasmania, in the 1960s and 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Wielebinski, Richard

    2017-08-01

    In the 1960s, Grote Reber (1911‒2002) established and used an antenna array near Bothwell in Tasmania. Working independently, he produced a radio map of the southern sky at a frequency of 2.085 MHz (a wavelength of 144 metres). Encouraged by this success, he modified the array in the 1970s to work at 1.155 MHz, but this second endeavour failed to produce any usable results.

  2. LUNASKA experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos and develop technology for the lunar Cherenkov technique

    SciTech Connect

    James, C. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Phillips, C. J.; Roberts, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Bray, J. D.; McFadden, R. A.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the design, performance, sensitivity and results of our recent experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) for lunar Cherenkov observations with a very wide (600 MHz) bandwidth and nanosecond timing, including a limit on an isotropic neutrino flux. We also make a first estimate of the effects of small-scale surface roughness on the effective experimental aperture, finding that contrary to expectations, such roughness will act to increase the detectability of near-surface events over the neutrino energy-range at which our experiment is most sensitive (though distortions to the time-domain pulse profile may make identification more difficult). The aim of our 'Lunar UHE Neutrino Astrophysics using the Square Kilometre Array' (LUNASKA) project is to develop the lunar Cherenkov technique of using terrestrial radio telescope arrays for ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino detection, and, in particular, to prepare for using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its path-finders such as the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for lunar Cherenkov experiments.

  3. Pathfinder Rear Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's rear rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was later used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Areas of a lander petal and deflated airbag are visible at left. The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine that the rear ramp was the one to use for rover deployment. At upper right is the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' which Sojourner will later study.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  4. Pathfinder aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined as it soars under a clear blue sky during a test flight from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November of 1996. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  5. The LISA Pathfinder mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cañizares, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferrone, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hernández, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H.-B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission, a precursor mission aimed at demonstrating key technologies for future space-based gravitational wave detectors, like LISA. Since much of the flight hardware has already been constructed and tested, we will show that performance measurements and analysis of these flight components lead to an expected performance of the LISA Pathfinder which is a significant improvement over the mission requirements, and which actually reaches the LISA requirements over the entire LISA Pathfinder measurement band.

  6. Pathfinder Ramp Deploy Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-06

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Sojourner can be seen still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal. The imager helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00628

  7. Pathfinder Rear Ramp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-06

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder's rear rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was later used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Areas of a lander petal and deflated airbag are visible at left. The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine that the rear ramp was the one to use for rover deployment. At upper right is the rock dubbed "Barnacle Bill," which Sojourner will later study. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00627

  8. Pathfinder Innovation Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pathfinder program supports high-risk, high-reward research ideas with funding and staff time. The goal is to feed a culture of innovation in the Agency and integrate innovative ideas in EPA research programs.

  9. MESUR Pathfinder Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M.

    1993-01-01

    The MESUR (Mars Environmental Survey) Pathfinder mission is the first Discovery mission planned for launch in 1996. MESUR Pathfinder is designed as an engineering demonstration of the entry, descent and landing approach to be employed by the follow-on MESUR Network mission, which will land of order 10 small stations on the surface of Mars to investigate interior, atmospheric and surface properties. Pathfinder is a small Mars lander, equipped with a microrover to deploy instruments and explore the local landing site. Instruments selected for Pathfinder include a surface imager on a 1 m pop-up mast (stereo with spectral filters), an atmospheric structure instrument/surface meteorology package, and an alpha proton x-ray spectrometer. The microrover will carry the alpha proton x-ray spectrometer to a number of different rocks and surface materials and provide close-up imaging...

  10. LISA and its pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LISA Pathfinder Team

    2015-08-01

    On astronomical scales, gravity is the engine of the Universe. The launch of LISA Pathfinder this year to prepare the technology to detect gravitational waves will help us 'listen' to the whole Universe.

  11. Pathfinder aircraft flight #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-19

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined as it soars under a clear blue sky during a test flight from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November of 1996.

  12. Pathfinder aircraft flight #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-19

    The Pathfinder solar-powered research aircraft is silhouetted against a clear blue sky as it soars aloft during a checkout flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, November, 1996.

  13. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  14. Martian Surface & Pathfinder Airbags

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-05

    This image of the Martian surface was taken in the afternoon of Mars Pathfinder's first day on Mars. Taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP camera), the image shows a diversity of rocks strewn in the foreground. A hill is visible in the distance (the notch within the hill is an image artifact). Airbags are seen at the lower right. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00612

  15. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder is shown flying low over Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base. Its wing is very flexible, while its upper surface is covered with solar cells. While at high altitude, the vehicle was controlled by a remote pilot on the ground, but when the concept is fully developed, a vehicle larger than but similar to Pathfinder may be able to stay aloft for months at a time, without landing and with only sunlight as its 'fuel.'

  16. Pathfinder aircraft flight #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-19

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's solar cell arrays are prominently displayed as it touches down on the bed of Rogers Dry Lake at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following a test flight. The solar arrays covered more than 75 percent of Pathfinder's upper wing surface, and provided electricity to power its six electric motors, flight controls, communications links and a host of scientific sensors.

  17. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave detectors, such as the proposed eLISA mission. LISA Pathfinder, and its scientific payload - the LISA Technology Package - will test, in flight, the critical technologies required for low frequency gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra-precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in mid-2015, with first results on the performance of the system being available 6 months thereafter. The paper introduces the LISA Pathfinder mission, followed by an explanation of the physical principles of measurement concept and associated hardware. We then provide a detailed discussion of the LISA Technology Package, including both the inertial sensor and interferometric readout. As we approach the launch of the LISA Pathfinder, the focus of the development is shifting towards the science operations and data analysis - this is described in the final section of the paper

  18. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul

    2015-04-01

    LISA Pathfinder is the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology (SMART). The goal of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is to demonstrate the technologies required for future laser interferometric spaceborne gravitational wave detectors. The development of the LPF hardware is now over, and final integration and testing of the spacecraft and payload is underway. The delivery of the opto-mechanical heart of the payload is scheduled for Q2 2015, following which the final system tests will be performed. Launch is scheduled for September 2015. First results will be available approximately 3 months after launch. In this presentation I will describe the LISA Pathfinder mission, and provide the current status of the mission and remaining activities to launch and operations.

  19. Pathfinder aircraft flight #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-19

    The Pathfinder solar-powered research aircraft settles in for landing on the bed of Rogers Dry Lake at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after a successful test flight Nov. 19, 1996. The ultra-light craft flew a racetrack pattern at low altitudes over the flight test area for two hours while project engineers checked out various systems and sensors on the uninhabited aircraft. The Pathfinder was controlled by two pilots, one in a mobile control unit which followed the craft, the other in a stationary control station. Pathfinder, developed by AeroVironment, Inc., is one of several designs being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  20. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  1. Pathfinder: A Retrospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars is one of the most interesting planets in the solar system, featuring enormous canyons, giant volcanoes, and indications that, early in its history, it might have had rivers and perhaps even oceans. Five years ago, in July of 1997, the Pathfinder mission landed on Mars, bringing with it the microwave-oven sized Sojourner rover to wander around on the surface and analyse rocks. Among the experiments on the mission was one designed to analyse dust deposition. Pathfinder is only the first of an armada of spacecraft which will examine Mars from the pole to the equator in the next decade, culminating with a mission to bring humans to Mars.

  2. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-07-27

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure was clearly defined as it soared under a clear blue sky during a test flight July 27, 1995, from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The center section and outer wing panels of the aircraft had ribs constructed of thin plastic foam, while the ribs in the inner wing panels are fabricated from lightweight composite material. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., the Pathfinder was one of several unmanned aircraft being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  3. The Pathfinder Microrover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J. R.; Bickler, D. B.; Braun, D. F.; Eisen, H. J.; Matthies, L. H.; Mishkin, A. H.; Stone, H. W.; van Nieuwstadt, L. M.; Wen, L. C.; Wilcox, B. H.; Ferguson, D.; Landis, G. A.; Oberle, L.

    1996-01-01

    An exciting scientific component of the Pathfinder mission is the rover, which will act as a mini-field geologist by providing us with access to samples for chemical analyses and close-up images of the Martian surface, performing active experiments to modify the surface and study the results, and exploring the landing site area.

  4. Pathfinder Spies Dust Devils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This set of images from NASA's 1997 Pathfinder mission highlight the dust devils that gust across the surface of Mars. The right image shows the dusty martian sky as our eye would see it. The left image has been enhanced to expose the dust devils that lurk in the hazy sky.

  5. The LISA Pathfinder mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for future spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, for example the proposed ESA mission, NGO. The technologies required for NGO are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise, led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical NGO technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the NGO constellation by shrinking the 1 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the NGO interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. Here I will present an overview of the mission, focusing on scientific and technical goals, followed by the current status of the project.

  6. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul

    2013-04-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future interferometric spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, for example the proposed eLISA mission. The technologies required for eLISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise, led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical eLISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the eLISA constellation by shrinking the 1 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the eLISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. Here I will present an overview of the mission, focusing on scientific and technical goals, followed by the current status of the project.

  7. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; Namara, P. W. Mc.; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a dedicated technology demonstration space mission for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a NASA/ESA collaboration to operate a space-based observatory for gravitational waves in the milliHertz band. Although the formal partnership between the agencies was dissolved in the Spring of 2011, both agencies are actively pursuing concepts for LISA-like gravitational wave observatories. These concepts take advantage of the significant technology development efforts that have already been made, especially those of the LISA Pathfinder mission. LISA Pathfinder, which is in the late stages of implementation, will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission and associated activities.

  8. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, james; McNamara, P. W.

    2011-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a dedicated technology demonstration space mission for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a NASA/ESA collaboration to operate a space-based observatory for gravitational waves in the milli-Hertz band. Although the formal partnership between the agencies was dissolved in the Spring of 2011, both agencies are actively pursuing concepts for LISA-like gravitational wave observatories. These concepts take advantage of the significant technology development efforts that have already been made, especially those of the LISA Pathfinder mission. LISA Pathfinder, which is in the late stages of implementation, will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, microNewton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission and associated activities.

  9. VR for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmon, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has played an integral role for Mars Pathfinder mission, operations Using an automated machine vision algorithm, the 3d topography of the Martian surface was rapidly recovered fro -a the stereo images captured. by the Tender camera to produce photo-realistic 3d models, An advanced, interface was developed for visualization and interaction with. the virtual environment of the Pathfinder landing site for mission scientists at the Space Flight Operations Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The VR aspect of the display allowed mission scientists to navigate on Mars in Bud while remaining here on Earth, thus improving their spatial awareness of the rock field that surrounds the lenders Measurements of positions, distances and angles could be easily extracted from the topographic models, providing valuable information for science analysis and mission. planning. Moreover, the VR map of Mars has also been used to assist with the archiving and planning of activities for the Sojourner rover.

  10. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder (formerly known as SMART-2) is a European Space Agency mission designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA LISA mission by testing in flight the critical technologies required for space borne gravitational wave detection; it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder (LPF) essentially mimics one arm of space-borne gravitational wave detectors by shrinking the million kilometer scale armlengths down to a few tens of centimeters, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology. The scientific objective of the LPF mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology.

  11. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2009-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (formerly known as SMART-2) is a European Space Agency (ESA) mission designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission by testing in flight the critical technologies required for spaceborne gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is currently in the integration and test phase of the development, and is due to be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2011, with first results on the performance of the system being available approx 6 months later. This poster will describe the mission in detail, give the current status of the spacecraft development, and highlight the future milestones in the integration and test campaign.

  12. Mars Pathfinder [foldout].

    PubMed

    1997-12-05

    The following foldout present images and analysis from the Mars Pathfinder Mission that are discussed in seven subsequent Reports. The center is a four-page panorama of the surface of Mars around the lander (Plate 1). The back of the foldout contains surface images (Plate 7), a different perspective of the landing site (Plate 2), rover targets (Plate 3), locations of rocks and other features (Plate 6) and data analysis (Plates 4, 4, 8, 9, and 10).

  13. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, P.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixton, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dumbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Mateos, I.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (formerly known as SMART-2) is an European Space Agency mission designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission by testing in flight the critical technologies required for space-borne gravitational wave detection; it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control, and an ultra precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder (LPF) essentially mimics one arm of spaceborne gravitational wave detectors by shrinking the million kilometre scale armlengths down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. In this paper I will give a brief overview of the mission, focusing on scientific and technical goals.

  14. Mars Pathfinder Status at Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, A. J.; Freeman, Delma C., Jr.; Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Flight System is in final test, assembly and launch preparations at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch is scheduled for 2 Dec. 1996. The Flight System development, in particular the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system, was a major team effort involving JPL, other NASA centers and industry. This paper provides a summary Mars Pathfinder description and status at launch. In addition, a section by NASA's Langley Research Center, a key EDL contributor, is provided on their support to Mars Pathfinder. This section is included as an example of the work performed by Pathfinder team members outside JPL.

  15. The Detection of an Extremely Bright Fast Radio Burst in a Phased Array Feed Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, K. W.; Shannon, R. M.; Macquart, J.-P.; Flynn, C.; Edwards, P. G.; O'Neill, M.; Osłowski, S.; Bailes, M.; Zackay, B.; Clarke, N.; D'Addario, L. R.; Dodson, R.; Hall, P. J.; Jameson, A.; Jones, D.; Navarro, R.; Trinh, J. T.; Allison, J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bell, M.; Chippendale, A. P.; Collier, J. D.; Heald, G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lee-Waddell, K.; Madrid, J. P.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Popping, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Allen, G. R.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brodrick, D. P.; Cooray, F.; DeBoer, D. R.; Diamond, P. J.; Ekers, R.; Gough, R. G.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S. G.; Hayman, D. B.; Jackson, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Koribalski, B. S.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; Pearce, S. E.; Phillips, C. J.; Roxby, D. N.; Troup, E. R.; Westmeier, T.

    2017-05-01

    We report the detection of an ultra-bright fast radio burst (FRB) from a modest, 3.4-day pilot survey with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder. The survey was conducted in a wide-field fly’s-eye configuration using the phased-array-feed technology deployed on the array to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 deg2, and achieve an exposure totaling 13200 deg2 hr . We constrain the position of FRB 170107 to a region 8\\prime × 8\\prime in size (90% containment) and its fluence to be 58 ± 6 Jy ms. The spectrum of the burst shows a sharp cutoff above 1400 MHz, which could be due to either scintillation or an intrinsic feature of the burst. This confirms the existence of an ultra-bright (> 20 Jy ms) population of FRBs.

  16. Phased array feed testing for astronomy with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, Aaron P.; O'Sullivan, John; Reynolds, John; Gough, Russell; Hayman, Douglas; Hay, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Phased array feeds enable radio telescopes to make faster surveys with fewer antennas. This paper presents testing of a phased array feed prototype to verify design methods for array feeds of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). We have tested a 5 × 4 port × 2 polarisation connected-chequerboard array at the prime focus of a 12 m diameter parabolic reflector. This prototype system currently achieves a system-temperature-on-efficiency ratio Tsys/η of 134 K at 1260 MHz and operates from 700 MHz to 1,800 MHz. The larger 94 port × 2 polarisation phased array feed being developed for ASKAP has a target Tsys/η of 50 K. The time taken by a radio telescope to survey a fixed area of sky to a fixed sensitivity is proportional to (Tsys/η)2.

  17. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  18. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.; LISA Pathfinder Science Team

    2007-12-01

    LISA Pathfinder is an ESA mission designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission by testing in flight the critical technologies required for space-borne gravitational wave detection. It will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. LISA Pathfinder will carry two technology payloads, the European provided LISA Technology Package (LTP), and the NASA provided Disturbance Reduction System (DRS), also known as the ST-7 mission of the New Millennium Program. The LTP comprises two inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra-precise micro-Newton propulsion system. The DRS consists of a drag-free control system and a micro-Newton propulsion system. The DRS will use the LTP inertial sensors, each of which has a proof mass, reference housing with electrodes for capacitive sensing and actuation and discharging systems. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in the first half of 2010, with first results on the performance of the system being available approx 6 months later. This poster summarizes the mission concept and reports the progress in the last year, and the current status as the mission nears final integration. Many spacecraft subsystems have been delivered. Detailed planning for the orbital test sequences and development of the data reduction software has advanced significantly. Ground support equipment and test procedures for the spacecraft and payloads is also well along. Details of the LISA technology to be flight tested will be given.

  19. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1996-09-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission is a Discovery class mission that will place a small lander and rover on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997. The Pathfinder flight system is a single small lander, packaged within an aeroshell and back cover with a back-pack-style cruise stage. The vehicle will be launched, fly independently to Mars, and enter the atmosphere directly on approach behind the aeroshell. The vehicle is slowed by a parachute and 3 small solid rockets before landing on inflated airbags. Petals of a small tetrahedron shaped lander open up, to right the vehicle. The lander is solar powered with batteries and will operate on the surface for up to a year, downlinking data on a high-gain antenna. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, with 3 imagers and an alpha proton X-ray spectrometer, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The rover (includes a series of technology experiments), the instruments (including a stereo multispectral surface imager on a pop up mast and an atmospheric structure instrument-surface meteorology package) and the telemetry system will allow investigations of: the surface morphology and geology at meter scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products and early environments and conditions on Mars.

  20. The Mars Pathfinder mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, Matthew P.

    1997-02-01

    Mars Pathfinder, one of the first Discovery-class missions (quick, low-cost projects with focused science objectives), will land a single spacecraft with a microrover and several instruments on the surface of Mars in 1997. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, carrying a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or ``ground truth'' for orbital remote sensing observations. In addition to the rover, which also performs a number of technology experiments, Pathfinder carries three science instruments: a stereoscopic imager with spectral filters on an extendable mast, an alpha proton X ray spectrometer, and an atmospheric structure instrument/metereology package. The instruments, the rover technology experiments, and the telemetry system will allow investigations of the surface morphology and geology at submeter to a hundred meters scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations, and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis at 19.5°N, 32.8°W, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains, and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the early environments and conditions on Mars.

  1. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  2. Science with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder will offer a unique opportunity to use an extremely sensitive calibrated pair of accelerometers on a drag-free spacecraft platform to perform weak force experiments in an environment not available on Earth. The Science Team has identified a number of interesting tests which could be done after the main technology demonstration mission is completed. Potential tests include a measurement of G in space to a comparable accuracy to existing ground-based measurements, a long-range 1/r2 test and a Sun-Earth saddle point crossing to search for signatures of modified Newtonian dynamics.

  3. Mars Pathfinder B-roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This video uses computer graphic models of the heat shield, lander, and parachute to present an artist's concept of the Mars Pathfinder descent. Viking image mosaics are used to create a rotating globe of Mars. A separate segment presents a simulated flight over the Mars Pathfinder landing site.

  4. Pathfinder - flight preparation on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    AeroVironment, Inc., crew members prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for its first flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its configuration was shanged from 8 electric motors to 6. Bob Curtin of AeroVironment is in the foreground of the photo. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  5. Pathfinder Rover Atop Mermaid Dune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder Lander camera image of Sojourner Rover atop the Mermaid 'dune' on Sol 30. Note the dark material excavated by the rover wheels. These, and other excavations brought materials to the surface for examination and allowed estimates of mechanical properties of the deposits.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  6. Pathfinder Rover Atop Mermaid Dune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder Lander camera image of Sojourner Rover atop the Mermaid 'dune' on Sol 30. Note the dark material excavated by the rover wheels. These, and other excavations brought materials to the surface for examination and allowed estimates of mechanical properties of the deposits.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  7. LISA Pathfinder ground testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2010-01-01

    The space-based gravitational wave observatory LISA is a joint NASA-ESA mission that requires challenging technology to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of test masses and the interferometric measurement of distance variations between them. The LISA Pathfinder mission is an ESA-launched technology demonstrator of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems is currently ongoing. Studies have been carried out on very sensitive torsion pendulums that effectively reproduce a free-fall condition for the test mass within a horizontal plane in the lab, down to frequencies < 0.1 mHz. Thermal gradient induced effects, impact of gas molecules, noisy charging, surface charge patches, and other effects have been investigated and their physical models consolidated. A final upper limit on non-modeled disturbances has also been obtained within one order of magnitude of LISA requirements at 1 mHz. The interferometry system has also been extensively studied to identify noise sources and develop approaches to mitigate them. Engineering models of the optical bench, laser head and laser modulators have been interconnected and tested for functionality and noise level in closed-loop operation, demonstrating the required optical metrology sensitivity to test mass displacement. This poster presents the current status in the development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts.

  8. Pathfinder Innovation Projects: Awardees 2016

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pathfinder program supports high-risk, high-reward research ideas with funding and staff time. The goal is to feed a culture of innovation in the Agency and integrate innovative ideas in EPA research programs.

  9. Launch Abort System Pathfinder Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Orion Launch Abort System, or LAS, pathfinder returned home to NASA Langley on Oct. 18 on its way to NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The hardware was built at Langley and was used in preparation f...

  10. Pathfinder Innovation Projects: Awardees 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pathfinder program supports high-risk, high-reward research ideas with funding and staff time. The goal is to feed a culture of innovation in the Agency and integrate innovative ideas in EPA research programs.

  11. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  12. Pathfinder in flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer

  13. Pathfinder over runway in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer

  14. LISA Pathfinder data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gesa, L.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    As the launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) draws near, more and more effort is being put in to the preparation of the data analysis activities that will be carried out during the mission operations. The operations phase of the mission will be composed of a series of experiments that will be carried out on the satellite. These experiments will be directed and analysed by the data analysis team, which is part of the operations team. The operations phase will last about 90 days, during which time the data analysis team aims to fully characterize the LPF, and in particular, its core instrument the LISA Technology Package. By analysing the various couplings present in the system, the different noise sources that will disturb the system, and through the identification of the key physical parameters of the system, a detailed noise budget of the instrument will be constructed that will allow the performance of the different subsystems to be assessed and projected towards LISA. This paper describes the various aspects of the full data analysis chain that are needed to successfully characterize the LPF and build up the noise budget during mission operations.

  15. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Project is an approved Discovery-class mission that will place a lander and rover on the surface of the Red Planet in July 1997. The Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop was designed to allow the Mars scientific community to provide input as to where to land Pathfinder on Mars. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from around the United States and from Europe. Over 20 landing sites were proposed at the workshop, and the scientific questions and problems concerning each were addressed. The workshop and the discussion that occured during and afterward have significantly improved the ability to select a scientifically exciting but safe landing site on Mars.

  16. The LISA Pathfinder Radiation Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wass, P. J.; Araújo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Hajdas, W.; Lobo, A.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sumner, T.

    2006-11-01

    We present the concept, design and testing of the radiation monitor for LISA Pathfinder. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) will cause charging of the LISA Pathfinder test masses producing unwanted disturbances which could be significant during a large solar eruption. A radiation monitor on board LISA Pathfinder, using silicon PIN diodes as particle detectors, will measure the particle flux responsible for charging. It will also be able to record spectral information to identify solar energetic particle events. The design of the monitor was supported by Monte Carlo simulations which allow detailed predictions of the radiation monitor performance. We present these predictions as well as the results of high-energy proton tests carried out at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The tests show good agreement with our simulations and confirm the capability of the radiation monitor to perform well in the space environment, meeting all science requirements.

  17. The Sonic Pathfinder: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Allan G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An objective evaluation of the Sonic Pathfinder, a new ultrasonic mobility aid, showed that use of the aid changes mobility in many ways. Reduced perception of environmental sounds was not reflected in performance. The majority of users traveled slowly and exhibited less than optimal strategies. (Author/CL)

  18. Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Sea Grant Program.

    This collection of teaching units were selected from materials developed during the Operation Pathfinder Institutes (OPI) which took place in the Pacific region between 1994 and 1999. The institutes were intended to provide upper elementary and middle school science teachers with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the marine…

  19. The Sonic Pathfinder: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Allan G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An objective evaluation of the Sonic Pathfinder, a new ultrasonic mobility aid, showed that use of the aid changes mobility in many ways. Reduced perception of environmental sounds was not reflected in performance. The majority of users traveled slowly and exhibited less than optimal strategies. (Author/CL)

  20. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the

  1. Spacetime Metrology with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    LISA is the proposed ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector in the 0.1 mHz - 0.1 Hz band. LISA Pathfinder is the down-scaled version of a single LISA arm. The arm - named Doppler link - can be treated as a differential accelerometer, measuring the relative acceleration between test masses. LISA Pathfinder - the in-flight test of the LISA instrumentation - is currently in the final implementation and planned to be launched in 2014. It will set stringent constraints on the ability to put test masses in geodesic motion to within the required differential acceleration of 3times10^{-14} m s^{-2} Hz^{-1/2} and track their relative motion to within the required differential displacement measurement noise of 9times10^{-12} m Hz^{-1/2}, around 1 mHz. Given the scientific objectives, it will carry out - for the first time with such high accuracy required for gravitational wave detection - the science of spacetime metrology, in which the Doppler link between two free-falling test masses measures the curvature. This thesis contains a novel approach to the calculation of the Doppler response to gravitational waves. It shows that the parallel transport of 4-vectors records the history of gravitational wave signals. In practice, the Doppler link is implemented with 4 bodies in LISA and 3 bodies in LISA Pathfinder. To compensate for noise sources a control logic is implemented during the measurement. The closed-loop dynamics of LISA Pathfinder can be condensed into operators acting on the motion coordinates, handling the couplings, as well as the cross-talks. The scope of system identification is the optimal calibration of the instrument. This thesis describes some data analysis procedures applied to synthetic experiments and shows the relevance of system identification for the success of LISA Pathfinder in demonstrating the principles of spacetime metrology for all future space-based missions.

  2. Tracing the neutral gas environments of young radio AGN with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B. T.; McConnell, D.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    At present neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) gas in galaxies at redshifts above {z ˜ 0.3} (the extent of 21 cm emission surveys in individual galaxies) and below {z ˜ 1.7} (where the Lyman-\\alpha line is not observable with ground-based telescopes) has remained largely unexplored. The advent of precursor telescopes to the Square Kilometre Array will allow us to conduct the first systematic radio-selected 21 cm absorption surveys for H I over these redshifts. While H I absorption is a tracer of the reservoir of cold neutral gas in galaxies available for star formation, it can also be used to reveal the extreme kinematics associated with jet-driven neutral outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Using the six-antenna Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, we have demonstrated that in a single frequency tuning we can detect H I absorption over a broad range of redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1.0. As part of our early science and commissioning program, we are now carrying out a search for absorption towards a sample of the brightest GPS and CSS sources in the southern sky. These intrinsically compact sources present us with an opportunity to study the circumnuclear region of recently re-started radio galaxies, in some cases showing direct evidence of mechanical feedback through jet-driven outflows. With the sensitivity of the full ASKAP array we will be able to study the kinematics of atomic gas in a few thousand radio galaxies, testing models of radio jet feedback well beyond the nearby Universe.

  3. Filament hunting: integrated H i 21 cm emission from filaments inferred by galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, Robin; Silva, Marta B.; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2017-06-01

    Large-scale filaments, with lengths that can reach tens of Mpc, are the most prominent features in the cosmic web. These filaments have only been observed indirectly through the positions of galaxies in large galaxy surveys or through absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift sources. In this study, we propose to go one step further and directly detect intergalactic medium filaments through their emission in the H i 21 cm line. We make use of high-resolution cosmological simulations to estimate the intensity of this emission in low-redshift filaments and use it to make predictions for the direct detectability of specific filaments previously inferred from galaxy surveys, in particular the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Given the expected signal of these filaments, our study shows that H i emission from large filaments can be observed by current and next-generation radio telescopes. We estimate that gas in filaments of length l ≳ 15 h-1 Mpc with relatively small inclinations to the line of sight (≲ 10°) can be observed in ˜40-100 h with telescopes such as Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope or Expanded Very Large Array, potentially providing large improvements over our knowledge of the astrophysical properties of these filaments. Due to their large field of view and sufficiently long integration times, upcoming H i surveys with the Apertif and Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder instruments will be able to detect large filaments independently of their orientation and curvature. Furthermore, our estimates indicate that a more powerful future radio telescope like Square Kilometre Array can be used to map most of these filaments, which will allow them to be used as a strong cosmological probe.

  4. Using 21 cm absorption surveys to measure the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Zwaan, M. A.; Duchesne, S. W.; Curran, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    We present a statistical method for measuring the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies using the expected detection yields from future wide-field 21 cm absorption surveys. As a demonstrative case study, we consider an all-southern-sky simulated survey of 2-h per pointing with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder for intervening H I absorbers at intermediate cosmological redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1. For example, if such a survey yielded 1000 absorbers, we would infer a harmonic-mean spin temperature of overline{T}_spin ˜ 100 K for the population of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at these redshifts, indicating that more than 50 per cent of the neutral gas in these systems is in a cold neutral medium (CNM). Conversely, a lower yield of only 100 detections would imply overline{T}_spin ˜ 1000 K and a CNM fraction less than 10 per cent. We propose that this method can be used to provide independent verification of the spin temperature evolution reported in recent 21 cm surveys of known DLAs at high redshift and for measuring the spin temperature at intermediate redshifts below z ≈ 1.7, where the Lyman α line is inaccessible using ground-based observatories. Increasingly more sensitive and larger surveys with the Square Kilometre Array should provide stronger statistical constraints on the average spin temperature. However, these will ultimately be limited by the accuracy to which we can determine the H I column density frequency distribution, the covering factor and the redshift distribution of the background radio source population.

  5. LISA Pathfinder Spacecraft Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-03

    This artist's concept shows ESA's LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, which launched on Dec. 3, 2015, from Kourou, French Guiana, will help pave the way for a mission to detect gravitational waves. LISA Pathfinder, led by the European Space Agency (ESA), is designed to test technologies that could one day detect gravitational waves. Gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, are ripples in spacetime produced by any accelerating body. But the waves are so weak that Earth- or space-based observatories would likely only be able to directly detect such signals coming from massive astronomical systems, such as binary black holes or exploding stars. Detecting gravitational waves would be an important piece in the puzzle of how our universe began. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20196

  6. LISA Pathfinder: A Mission Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Martin; LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2016-03-01

    On December 3rd at 04:04 UTC, The European Space Agency launched the LISA Pathfinder satellite on board a VEGA rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. After a series of orbit raising manoeuvres and a 2 month long transfer orbit, LISA Pathfinder arrived at L1. Following a period of commissioning, the science operations commenced at the start of March, beginning the demonstration of technologies and methodologies which pave the way for a future large-scale gravitational wave observatory in space. This talk will present the scientific goals of the mission, discuss the technologies being tested, elucidate the link to a future space-based observatory, such as LISA, and present preliminary results from the in-orbit operations and experiments.

  7. Propulsion PathFinder (PPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmie, John A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion PathFinder (PPF) project will flight test a variety of CubeSat propulsion systems in a relevant space environment, thereby elevating the Technology Readiness Level (TRL), or technology maturity level, of these subsystems to TRL 7. A series of flights are planned in low Earth orbit to characterize the performance of each propulsion system and demonstrate the capability to perform orbital maneuvers.

  8. Multispectral Imaging from Mars PATHFINDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrand, William H.; Bell, James F., III; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bishop, Janice L.; Morris, Richard V.

    2007-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was a mast-mounted instrument on the Mars Pathfinder lander which landed on Mars Ares Vallis floodplain on July 4, 1997. During the 83 sols of Mars Pathfinders landed operations, the IMP collected over 16,600 images. Multispectral images were collected using twelve narrowband filters at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) range. The IMP provided VNIR spectra of the materials surrounding the lander including rocks, bright soils, dark soils, and atmospheric observations. During the primary mission, only a single primary rock spectral class, Gray Rock, was recognized; since then, Black Rock, has been identified. The Black Rock spectra have a stronger absorption at longer wavelengths than do Gray Rock spectra. A number of coated rocks have also been described, the Red and Maroon Rock classes, and perhaps indurated soils in the form of the Pink Rock class. A number of different soil types were also recognized with the primary ones being Bright Red Drift, Dark Soil, Brown Soil, and Disturbed Soil. Examination of spectral parameter plots indicated two trends which were interpreted as representing alteration products formed in at least two different environmental epochs of the Ares Vallis area. Subsequent analysis of the data and comparison with terrestrial analogs have supported the interpretation that the rock coatings provide evidence of earlier martian environments. However, the presence of relatively uncoated examples of the Gray and Black rock classes indicate that relatively unweathered materials can persist on the martian surface.

  9. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days above 50

  10. Pathfinder-Plus on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  11. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flying over the Hawaiian Islands in 1998 with Ni'ihau Island in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100

  12. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flying over the Hawaiian Islands in 1998 with Ni'ihau Island in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100

  13. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days above 50

  14. Pathfinder-Plus on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  15. Pathfinder Rover, Airbags, & Martian Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-05

    This is one of the first pictures taken by the camera on the Mars Pathfinder lander shortly after its touchdown at 10:07 AM Pacific Daylight Time on July 4, 1997. The small rover, named Sojourner, is seen in the foreground in its position on a solar panel of the lander. The white material on either side of the rover is part of the deflated airbag system used to absorb the shock of the landing. Between the rover and the horizon is the rock-strewn martian surface. Two hills are seen in the right distance, profiled against the light brown sky. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00611

  16. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  17. Electrostatic disturbances aboard LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Valerio

    Test mass charging and stray electrostatic fields are a potentially important source of force noise for the LISA Pathfinder mission. During the flight we plan to measure the relevant stray electrostatic fields on the surfaces of both the test mass and the electrode housing and compensate them with DC electrode bias voltages. In addition we monitor the charge and reduce it to near zero by UV illumination. We describe the analysis techniques used during the mission and explain the importance of periodic charging/discharging and of long-term charge measurements to limit the force noise at low frequency, which is particularly relevant for the eLISA mission.

  18. Pathfinder over runway in Hawaii

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-28

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs.

  19. Pathfinder in flight over Hawaii

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-28

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high spectral resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high spatial resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs.

  20. Software Aids Visualization Of Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes Simulator for Imager for Mars Pathfinder (SIMP) computer program. SIMP generates "virtual reality" display of view through video camera on Mars lander spacecraft of Mars Pathfinder mission, along with display of pertinent textual and graphical data, for use by scientific investigators in planning sequences of activities for mission.

  1. Software Aids Visualization Of Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes Simulator for Imager for Mars Pathfinder (SIMP) computer program. SIMP generates "virtual reality" display of view through video camera on Mars lander spacecraft of Mars Pathfinder mission, along with display of pertinent textual and graphical data, for use by scientific investigators in planning sequences of activities for mission.

  2. Research Pathfinders: Offline Access to Online Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Judith K.

    1998-01-01

    A pathfinder diskette contains a customized Web page that links the student immediately to content-rich Web sites, eliminating the false starts and dead ends inherent in preliminary Web searches. Suggestions are provided for creating pathfinders that meet multiple information needs within the school. (AEF)

  3. MARS PATHFINDER CAMERA TEST IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are conducting a systems test of the imager for the Mars Pathfinder. Mounted on the Pathfinder lander, the imager (the white cylindrical element the worker is touching) is a specially designed camera featuring a stereo-imaging system with color capability provided by a set of selectable filters. It is mounted on an extendable mast that will pop up after the lander touches down on the Martian surface. The imager will transmit images of the terrain, allowing engineers back on Earth to survey the landing site before the Pathfinder rover is deployed to explore the area. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2. JPL manages the Pathfinder project for NASA.

  4. Pathfinder aircraft being assembled - wing assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Technicians easily lift a 20-foot-long wing section during assembly of the Pathfinder solar-powered research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. A number of upgrades were made to the unique aircraft prior to its successful checkout flight Nov. 19, 1996, among them the installation of stronger ultra-light wing ribs made of composite materials on two of the five wing panels. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  5. Pathfinder on lakebed preparing for test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Support crew prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for a research flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  6. Pathfinder - flight preparation on lakebed at sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Crew members prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for a research flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  7. Pathfinder - flight preparation on lakebed at sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Crew members prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for its first flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its configuration was changed from 8 motors to 6. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  8. Northeast View From Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This panorama of the region to the northeast of the lander was constructed to support the Sojourner Rover Team's plans to conduct an 'autonomous traverse' to explore the terrain away from the lander after science objectives in the lander vicinity had been met. The large, relatively bright surface in the foreground, about 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft, in this scene is 'Baker's Bench.' The large, elongated rock left of center in the middle distance is 'Zaphod.'

    This view was produced by combining 8 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  9. Mars Pathfinder mission operations concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturms, Francis M., Jr.; Dias, William C.; Nakata, Albert Y.; Tai, Wallace S.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Project plans a December 1996 launch of a single spacecraft. After jettisoning a cruise stage, an entry body containing a lander and microrover will directly enter the Mars atmosphere and parachute to a hard landing near the sub-solar latitude of 15 degrees North in July 1997. Primary surface operations last for 30 days. Cost estimates for Pathfinder ground systems development and operations are not only lower in absolute dollars, but also are a lower percentage of total project costs than in past planetary missions. Operations teams will be smaller and fewer than typical flight projects. Operations scenarios have been developed early in the project and are being used to guide operations implementation and flight system design. Recovery of key engineering data from entry, descent, and landing is a top mission priority. These data will be recorded for playback after landing. Real-time tracking of a modified carrier signal through this phase can provide important insight into the spacecraft performance during entry, descent, and landing in the event recorded data is never recovered. Surface scenarios are dominated by microrover activity and lander imaging during 7 hours of the Mars day from 0700 to 1400 local solar time. Efficient uplink and downlink processes have been designed to command the lander and microrover each Mars day.

  10. Northeast View From Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This panorama of the region to the northeast of the lander was constructed to support the Sojourner Rover Team's plans to conduct an 'autonomous traverse' to explore the terrain away from the lander after science objectives in the lander vicinity had been met. The large, relatively bright surface in the foreground, about 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft, in this scene is 'Baker's Bench.' The large, elongated rock left of center in the middle distance is 'Zaphod.'

    This view was produced by combining 8 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  11. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-22

    This photodepicts a 15 K Fastrac motor ignition test performed at Marshall Test Stand-116. The Fastrac motor is an alternative low-cost engine which is being developed and tested at Marshall. This engine was to eventually be used on an X-34 launchvehicle. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  12. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-01-01

    This is the McDornell Douglas CD-XA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concept. The Delta Clipper-Experimental (DC-X) was originally developed by McDonnell Douglas for the DOD. The DC-XA is a single-stage-to-orbit, vertical takeoff/vertical landing, launch vehicle concept, whose development is geared to significantly reduce launch cost and provided a test bed for NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology as the Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA). The program was discontinued in 2003.

  13. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-05-21

    The Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) is a single-stage-to-orbit, vertical takeoff / vertical landing launch vehicle concept, whose development was geared to significantly reduce launch cost and provided a test bed for NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology. This photograph shows the descending vehicle landing during the first successful test flight at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The program was discontinued in 2003.

  14. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This is an artist's concept of the X-34 reusable technology testbed demonstrator on-orbit. The X-34 was designed to demonstrate technologies that are essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  15. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is an artist's concept of the X-37 Demonstrator re-entry. After being launched from the cargo bay of a Shuttle as a secondary payload, the X-37 remains on-orbit up to 21 days performing a variety of experiments before re-entering the Earth's atmosphere and landing. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  16. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This is an artist's concept of the X-34 reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed to demonstrate technologies that were essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, the X-34 was capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  17. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This is an artist's concept of the X-34 Demonstrator, a reusable technology testbed vehicle that was designed to demonstrate technologies that were essential to lowering the cost of access to space. Powered by a LOX and RP-1 liquid Fastrac engine that was designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, the X-34 would be capable of speeds up to Mach 8 and altitudes of 250,000-feet. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  18. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Pictured is an artist's collage of every phase of an X-34 Demonstrator's flight, from launch to landing. An X-34 was launched from an airplane, then proceeded to obtain an on-orbit altitude where it could remain for up to 21 days performing various experiments. At the conclusion of its mission, the X-34 returned to the Earth's atmosphere for a runway landing. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  19. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This picture is an artist's concept of an orbiting vehicle using the Electrodynamic Tethers Propulsion System. Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to push against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant.

  20. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-01

    This photograph shows two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers, Mark Vaccaro (left) and Ken Welzyn, testing electrodynamic tethers in the MSFC Tether Winding and Spark Testing Facility. For 4 years, MSFC and industry partners have been developing the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment, called ProSEDS. ProSEDS will test electrodynamic tether propulsion technology. Electrodynamic tethers are long, thin wires that collect electrical current when passing through a magnetic field. The tether works as a thruster as a magnetic field exerts a force on a current-carrying wire. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The initial flight of ProSEDS is scheduled to fly aboard an Air Force Delta II rocket in the summer of 2002. In orbit, ProSEDS will deploy from a Delta II second stage. It will be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire tether cornected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long non-conducting tether. This photograph shows Less Johnson, a scientist at MSFC, inspecting the nonconducting part of a tether as it exits a deployer similar to the one to be used in the ProSEDS experiment. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC.

  1. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-01

    NASA's Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment (ProSEDS) will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether, basically a long, thin wire, for propulsion. An electrodynamic tether uses the same principles as electric motors in toys, appliances and computer disk drives, and generators in automobiles and power plants. When electrical current is flowing through the tether, a magnetic field is produced that pushes against the magnetic field of the Earth. For ProSEDS, the current in the tether results by virtue of the voltage generated when the tether moves through the Earth's magnetic field at more than 17,000 mph. This approach can produce drag thrust generating useable power. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The initial flight of ProSEDS is scheduled to fly aboard an Air Force Delta II rocket in the summer of 2002. In orbit, ProSEDS will deploy from a Delta II second stage. It will be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire cornected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long nonconducting tether. This photograph shows Less Johnson, a scientist at MSFC inspecting the nonconducting part of a tether as it exits a deployer similar to the one to be used in the ProSEDS experiment. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC.

  2. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-25

    Pictured is an artist's concept of NASA's Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment (ProSEDS). ProSEDS will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether, basically a long, thin wire, for propulsion. An electrodynamic tether uses the same principles as electric motors in toys, appliances and computer disk drives, and generators in automobiles and power plants. When electrical current is flowing through the tether, a magnetic field is produced that pushes against the magnetic field of the Earth. For ProSEDS, the current in the tether results by virtue of the voltage generated when the tether moves through the Earth's magnetic field at more than 17,000 mph. This approach can produce drag thrust generating useable power. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The initial flight of ProSEDS is scheduled to fly aboard an Air Force Delta II rocket in summer of 2002. In orbit, ProSEDS will deploy from a Delta II second stage. It will be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire tether cornected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long nonconducting tether. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-06-09

    A 40 K Fastrac II duration test performed at Marshall Test Stand 116. The purpose of this test was to gauge the length of time between contact of TEA (Triethylenealuminum) and LOX (liquid oxygen) as an ignitor for the Fastrac engine.

  4. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-06-04

    This shot offers a bird's eye-view of a Fastrac II engine duration test at Marshall's Test Stand 116. The Fastrac II engine was designed as a part of the low cost X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The purpose for these tests was to test the different types of metal alloys in the nozzle. Beside the engine were six additional nozzels which spray a continuous stream of water onto the test stand to reduce damage to the test stand and the engines. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  5. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-06-04

    A close-up view of Bantam duration testing of the 40K Fastrac II Engine for X-34 at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 116. The Bantam test refers to the super lightweight engines of the Fastrac program. The engines were designed as part of the low cost X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The testing of these engines at MSFC allowed the engineers to determine the capabilities of these engines and the metal alloys that were used in their construction. The Fastrac and X-34 programs were cancelled in 2001.

  6. "Library as Laboratory": Online Pathfinders and the Humanities Graduate Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Sara

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how online pathfinders can best meet the information needs of graduate students and foster advanced research. The article reviews the literature on pathfinders, including the historic characteristics of print pathfinders, and the recommendations that have emerged for online pathfinder content. The article explores the…

  7. Dust devils as observed by Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Francesca; Smith, Peter H.; Lemmon, Mark; Rennó, Nilton O.

    2003-12-01

    Dust devils are localized meteorological phenomena frequently observed in terrestrial dry lands and desert landscapes as well as on Mars. They are low-pressure, warm core vortices that form at the bottom of convective plumes and loft dust from the surface. They move with the speed of the ambient wind and are tilted by wind shears. The Mars Pathfinder detected dust devils as dust plumes in the Imager for Mars Pathfinder images and as low-pressure convective vortices in the meteorological Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation/Meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment data. The Pathfinder data have been analyzed in terms of dust devil size, spatial distribution, and frequency of occurrence. The results show that the Pathfinder imaging and MET observations are consistent with each other and with the observations made by the Viking 1 Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor. The dust devil's ability to loft dust into the atmosphere has been investigated and a thermodynamic theory for dust devils has been used to calculate their physical parameters relevant to dust transport. The dust devils observed in an active day provide a pumping rate larger than the dust-settling rate derived from the optical obscuration of the Pathfinder rover solar panels. Therefore dust devils are a major factor in transporting dust from the surface to the atmosphere at the Pathfinder site.

  8. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  9. Navigation Flight Operations for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Kallemeyn, Pieter H., Jr.; Spencer, David A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder became the first spacecraft to land on the surface of Mars in 21 years. Pathfinder was launched on December 4, 1996 and spent seven months en route to the red planet. This report discusses the navigation flight experience for the Mars Pathfinder interplanetary cruise. In particular, orbit determination and maneuver design and execution results are presented. Special emphasis is given to the navigation role in the days and hours leading up to and including the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase.

  10. The Pathfinder Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, Ned P.; Berkopec, Frank D.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Pathfinder is a research and technology initiative by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) intended to strengthen the technology base of the United States civil space program in preparation for future space exploration missions. Pathfinder begins in FY-89. One of the four major thrusts is the Chemical Transfer Propulsion program which will provide the propulsion technology for high performance, liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engines which are expected to be operated and maintained in space. These advanced engines will enhance or enable a variety of future space exploration missions. The goals and objectives, management, technical plan, and technology transfer for the Chemical Transfer Propulsion element of Pathfinder are described.

  11. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  12. Gravitational science with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, C.; Kemble, S.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the potential of conducting interesting gravitational science experiments with LISA Pathfinder, by executing well defined de-orbiting manoeuvres following the nominal mission. Preliminary work suggests that the residual control authority of the micropropulsion system is sufficient to follow trajectories that cross the region surrounding the Sun-Earth saddle point, and also include one or multiple Earth flybys. Crossing the saddle point region may allow tests of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), while the flybys may potentially shed some light on the so-called flyby anomaly. We present some sample trajectories and discuss the limitations of the current model. Finally, we discuss the work required to take these ideas from the proof of principle presented here, to a concrete proposal for an extended mission.

  13. Mars pathfinder lander deployment mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Lander employs numerous mechanisms, as well as autonomous mechanical functions, during its Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Sequence. This is the first US lander of its kind, since it is unguided and airbag-protected for hard landing using airbags, instead of retro rockets, to soft land. The arrival condition, location, and orientation of the Lander will only be known by the computer on the Lander. The Lander will then autonomously perform the appropriate sequence to retract the airbags, right itself, and open, such that the Lander is nearly level with no airbag material covering the solar cells. This function uses two different types of mechanisms - the Airbag Retraction Actuators and the Lander Petal Actuators - which are designed for the high torque, low temperature, dirty environment and for limited life application. The development of these actuators involved investigating low temperature lubrication, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) to cut gears, and gear design for limited life use.

  14. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  15. Disturbance Reduction System Thrusters Stabilize LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-03

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft is on its way to space, having successfully launched from Kourou, French Guiana Dec. 3, 2015. On board is the state-of-the-art Disturbance Reduction System DRS, a thruster technology developed at NASA JPL.

  16. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  17. Power and pyro subsystems for Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Shirbacheh, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Power and Pyro Subsystem (PPS) for Mars Pathfinder was designed to support the spacecraft activities during Launch, Cruise, Entry and Landing and Mars operation phases of the mission. The key design constraints were cost, volume and mass. The PPS consists of solar arrays, batteries and power electronics. This paper describes the Mars Pathfinder mission, key requirements on PPS, and PPS system architecture and description of each element of the PPS system.

  18. Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii June 2002 AeroVironment's Pathfinder-Plus solar-powered flying wing recently flew a three-flight demonstration of its ability to relay third-generation cell phone and video signals as well as provide Internet linkage. The two pods underneath the center section of the wing carried the advanced two-way telecom package, developed by Japanese telecommunications interests.

  19. Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii June 2002 AeroVironment's Pathfinder-Plus solar-powered flying wing recently flew a three-flight demonstration of its ability to relay third-generation cell phone and video signals as well as provide Internet linkage. The two pods underneath the center section of the wing carried the advanced two-way telecom package, developed by Japanese telecommunications interests.

  20. Testing Modified Newtonian Dynamics with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Christian; Kemble, Steve; Bevis, Neil; Magueijo, Joao

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that LISA Pathfinder, a technology demonstrator for the future gravitational wave observatory LISA, could be used to carry out a direct experimental test of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft is currently being built and the launch date is just a few years away. No modifications of the spacecraft are required, nor any interference with its nominal mission. The basic concept is to fly LISA Pathfinder through the region around the Sun-Earth saddle point, in an extended mission phase, once the original mission goals are achieved. We examine various strategies to reach the saddle point, and find that the preferred strategy, yielding relatively short transfer times of just over 1 year, probably involves a lunar fly-by. LISA Pathfinder will be able to probe the intermediate MOND regime, i.e. the transition between deep MOND and Newtonian gravity. We present robust estimates of the anomalous gravity gradients that LISA Pathfinder should be exposed to, based on MONDian effects as derived from the Tensor-Vector-Scalar (TeVeS) theory. The spacecraft speed and spatial scale of the MOND signal combine in a way that the spectral signature of the signal falls precisely into LISA Pathfinder's measurement bandwidth. We find that if the gravity gradiometer on-board the spacecraft achieves its currently predicted sensitivity, these anomalous gradients could not just be detected, but measured in some detail.

  1. MARS PATHFINDER LAUNCH AT LC-17B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder begins the journey to Mars with liftoff atop a Delta II expendable launch vehicle at 1:58 a.m. EST, Dec. 4, 1996, from Launch Complex 17B on Cape Canaveral Air Station. The Mars Pathfinder will travel on a direct trajectory to the Red Planet, arriving there in July 1997. Mars Pathfinder will send a lander and small robotic rover, Sojourner, to the surface of Mars. The primary objective of the mission is to demonstrate a low-cost way of delivering a science package to the surface of the Red Planet using a direct entry, descent and landing with the aid of small rocket engines, a parachute, airbags and other techniques. In addition, landers and rovers of the future will share the heritage of Mars Pathfinder designs and technologies first tested in this mission. Pathfinder also will collect invaluable data about the Martian surface. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace builds the Delta II launch vehicle.

  2. LISA Pathfinder Instrument Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is an ESA-launched demonstration mission of key technologies required for the joint NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in space, LISA. As part of the LPF interferometry investigations, analytic models of noise sources and corresponding noise subtraction techniques have been developed to correct for effects like the coupling of test mass jitter into displacement readout, and fluctuations of the laser frequency or optical pathlength difference. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Optical Metrology subsystem is currently ongoing at the Albert Einstein Institute Hannover. In collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LPF mission data analysis tool LTPDA is being used to analyze the data product of these tests. Furthermore, the noise subtraction techniques and in-flight experiment runs for noise characterization are being defined as part of the mission experiment master plan. We will present the data analysis outcome of preflight hardware ground tests and possible noise subtraction strategies for in-flight instrument operations.

  3. LISA Pathfinder instrument data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is an ESA-launched demonstration mission of key technologies required for the joint NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in space, LISA. As part of the LPF interferometry investigations, analytic models of noise sources and corresponding noise subtrac-tion techniques have been developed to correct for effects like the coupling of test mass jitter into displacement readout, and fluctuations of the laser frequency or optical pathlength difference. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Optical Metrology Subsystem is currently ongoing at the Albert Einstein Institute Hannover. In collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LPF mission data analysis tool LTPDA is being used to analyze the data product of these tests. Furthermore, the noise subtraction techniques and in-flight experiment runs for noise characterization are being defined as part of the mission experiment master plan. We will present the data analysis outcome of pre-flight hardware ground tests and possible noise subtraction strategies for in-flight instrument operations.

  4. Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Entry Navigation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, R. D.; Spencer, D. A.; Kallemeyn, P. H.; Vaughan, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, after traveling close to 500 million km, the Pathfinder spacecraft successfully completed entry, descent, and landing, coming to rest on the surface of Mars just 27 km from its target point. In the present paper, the atmospheric entry and approach navigation activities required in support of this mission are discussed. In particular, the flight software parameter update and landing site prediction analyses performed by the Pathfinder operations navigation team are described. A suite of simulation tools developed during Pathfinder's design cycle, but extendible to Pathfinder operations, are also presented. Data regarding the accuracy of the primary parachute deployment algorithm is extracted from the Pathfinder flight data, demonstrating that this algorithm performed as predicted. The increased probability of mission success through the software parameter update process is discussed. This paper also demonstrates the importance of modeling atmospheric flight uncertainties in the estimation of an accurate landing site. With these atmospheric effects included, the final landed ellipse prediction differs from the post-flight determined landing site by less then 0.5 km in downtrack.

  5. The EUSO-Balloon pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder for JEM-EUSO, the Extreme Universe Space Observatory which is to be hosted on-board the International Space Station. As JEM-EUSO is designed to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR)-induced Extensive Air Showers (EAS) by detecting their ultraviolet light tracks "from above", EUSO-Balloon is a nadir-pointing UV telescope too. With its Fresnel Optics and Photo-Detector Module, the instrument monitors a 50 km2 ground surface area in a wavelength band of 290-430 nm, collecting series of images at a rate of 400,000 frames/sec. The objectives of the balloon demonstrator are threefold: a) perform a full end-to-end test of a JEM-EUSO prototype consisting of all the main subsystems of the space experiment, b) measure the effective terrestrial UV background, with a spatial and temporal resolution relevant for JEM-EUSO. c) detect tracks of ultraviolet light from near space for the first time. The latter is a milestone in the development of UHECR science, paving the way for any future space-based UHECR observatory. On August 25, 2014, EUSO-Balloon was launched from Timmins Stratospheric Balloon Base (Ontario, Canada) by the balloon division of the French Space Agency CNES. From a float altitude of 38 km, the instrument operated during the entire astronomical night, observing UV-light from a variety of ground-covers and from hundreds of simulated EASs, produced by flashers and a laser during a two-hour helicopter under-flight.

  6. Battery study for the Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Stephen F.; Otzinger, B.; Perrone, D.; Distefano, Sal; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the battery study for the Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder are presented. Topics covered include: MESUR pathfinder introduction; power subsystem concept; battery technology selection; mission battery performance; cell/battery baseline design; charge methodology; and proposed testing.

  7. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  8. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  9. Overhead view of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, prepared by Pathfinder scientists at NASA/ Ames Research Center, is a view of the landing site from above. Seen in the lower right is Mermaid dune, with its long axis oriented northwest-southeast and its steeper side, the presumed slipface, toward the southwest. Dunes like Mermaid, the depositional tails and erosional moats associated with rocks in the area, and the fluted and polished surfaces on several boulders at the landing site all indicate an effective wind that blows from the northeast to the southwest.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. Overhead view of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, prepared by Pathfinder scientists at NASA/ Ames Research Center, is a view of the landing site from above. Seen in the lower right is Mermaid dune, with its long axis oriented northwest-southeast and its steeper side, the presumed slipface, toward the southwest. Dunes like Mermaid, the depositional tails and erosional moats associated with rocks in the area, and the fluted and polished surfaces on several boulders at the landing site all indicate an effective wind that blows from the northeast to the southwest.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  11. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  12. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  13. Dynamic Pathfinders: Leveraging Your OPAC to Create Resource Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Library pathfinders are a time-tested method of leading library users to important resources. However, paper-based pathfinders suffer from space limitations, and both paper-based and Web-based pathfinders require frequent updates to keep up with new library acquisitions. This article details a step-by-step method to create an online dynamic…

  14. Dynamic Pathfinders: Leveraging Your OPAC to Create Resource Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Library pathfinders are a time-tested method of leading library users to important resources. However, paper-based pathfinders suffer from space limitations, and both paper-based and Web-based pathfinders require frequent updates to keep up with new library acquisitions. This article details a step-by-step method to create an online dynamic…

  15. Pathfinder Landing Site in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 14 May 2004 This image of the Mars Pathfinder Landing site was acquired July 17, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.4, Longitude 326.8 East (33.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. System modelling for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Grynagier, Adrien; Rais, Boutheina

    LISA Pathfinder is the technology demonstrator for LISA, a space-borne gravitational waves observatory. The goal of the mission is to characterise the dynamics of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to prove that on-board experimental conditions are compatible with the de-tection of gravitational waves. The LTP is a drag-free dynamics experiment which includes a control loop with sensors (interferometric and capacitive), actuators (capacitive actuators and thrusters), controlled disturbances (magnetic coils, heaters) and which is subject to various endogenous or exogenous noise sources such as infrared pressure or solar wind. The LTP experiment features new hardware which was never flown in space. The mission has a tight operation timeline as it is constrained to about 100 days. It is therefore vital to have efficient and precise means of investigation and diagnostics to be used during the on-orbit operations. These will be conducted using the LTP Data Analysis toolbox (LTPDA) which allows for simulation, parameter identification and various analyses (covariance analysis, state estimation) given an experimental model. The LTPDA toolbox therefore contains a series of models which are state-space representations of each component in the LTP. The State-Space Models (SSM) are objects of a state-space class within the LTPDA toolbox especially designed to address all the requirements of this tool. The user has access to a set of linear models which represent every satellite subsystem; the models are available in different forms representing 1D, 2D and 3D systems, each with settable symbolic and numeric parameters. To limit the possible errors, the models can be automatically linked to produce composite systems and closed-loops of the LTP. Finally, for the sake of completeness, accuracy and maintainability of the tool, the models contain all the physical information they mimic (i.e. variable units, description of parameters, description of inputs/outputs, etc). Models

  17. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site and Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder landed on Mars on July 4, 1997, and continued operating until Sept. 27 of that year. The landing site is on an ancient flood plain of the Ares and Tiu outflow channels. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took an image on Dec. 21, 2006, that provides unprecedented detail of the geology of the region and hardware on the surface.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] HiRISE Image This is the entire image. The crater at center bottom was unofficially named 'Big Crater' by the Pathfinder team. Its wall was visible from Pathfinder, located 3 kilometers (2 miles) to the north. The two bright features to the upper left of Big Crater are the 'Twin Peaks,' also observed by Pathfinder. The bright mound to the upper right of the Twin Peaks is 'North Knob,' seen in Pathfinder images as peaking over the horizon.

    At this scale there is no obvious geologic evidence of an ancient flood. Rather, impact craters dominate the scene, attesting to an old surface. The age is probably on the order of 1.8 billion to 3.5 billion years, when the Ares and Tiu floods are estimated to have occurred. Wind-formed linear ripples and dunes are seen throughout and are concentrated within craters. Sets of polygonal ridges of enigmatic origin are seen east of the Pathfinder lander. Rocks are visible over the entire image, with heavy concentrations near fresh-looking craters. Most of them are probably blocks tossed outward by crater-forming impacts.

    The complete image is centered at 19.1 degrees north latitude, 326.8 degrees east longitude. The range to the target site was 284.7 kilometers (177.9 miles). At this distance the image scale is 28.5 centimeters (11 inches) per pixel, so objects about 85 centimeters (33 inches) across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 centimeters (10 inches) per pixel. North is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time

  18. NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, Ned P.; Berkopec, Frank D.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Pathfinder is a research and technology project, with specific deliverables, initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which will strengthen the technology base of the United States civil space program in preparation for future space exploration missions. Pathfinder begins in Fiscal Year 1989, and is to advance a collection of critical technologies for these missions and ensure technology readiness for future national decisions regarding exploration of the solar system. The four major thrusts of Pathfinder are: surface exploration, in-space operations, humans-in-space, and space transfer. The space transfer thrust will provide the critical technologies needed for transportation to, and return from, the Moon, Mars, and other planets in the solar system, as well as for reliable and cost-effective Earth-orbit operations. A key element of this thrust is the Chemical Transfer Propulsion program which will provide the propulsion technology for high performance, liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engines which may be operated and maintained in space. Described here are the program overview including the goals and objectives, management, technical plan, and technology transfer for the Chemical Transfer Propulsion element of Pathfinder.

  19. Strategy for selecting Mars Pathfinder landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kuzmin, Ruslin O.

    1994-01-01

    A strategy for Pathfinder site selection must be developed that is fundamentally different from most previous considerations. At least two approaches can be identified. In one approach, the objective is to select a site representing a key geologic unit on Mars, i.e., a unit that is widespread, easily recognized, and used frequently as a datum in various investigations. The second approach is to select a site that potentially affords access to a wide variety of rock types. Because rover range is limited, rocks from a variety of sources must be assembled in a small area for sampling. Regardless of the approach taken in site selection, the Pathfinder site should include eolian deposits and provisions should be made to obtain measurements on soils. A recommended approach for selecting the Mars Pathfinder landing site is to identify a deltaic deposit, composed of sediments derived from sources of various ages and geologic units that shows evidence of eolian activity. The site should be located as close as possible to the part of the outwash where rapid deposition occurred because the likelihood of 'sorting' by size and composition increases with distance, decreasing the probability of heterogeneity. In addition, it is recommended that field operation tests be conducted to gain experience and insight into conducting science with Pathfinder.

  20. MARS PATHFINDER CAMERA TEST IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are conducting a systems test of the imager for the Mars Pathfinder. The imager (white and metallic cylindrical element close to hand of worker at left) is a specially designed camera featuring a stereo- imaging system with color capability provided by a set of selectable filters. It is mounted atop an extendable mast on the Pathfinder lander. Visible to the far left is the small rover which will be deployed from the lander to explore the Martian surface. Transmitting back to Earth images of the trail left by the rover will be one of the mission objectives for the imager. To the left of the worker standing near the imager is the mast for the low-gain antenna; the round high-gain antenna is to the right. Visible in the background is the cruise stage that will carry the Pathfinder on a direct trajectory to Mars. The Mars Pathfinder is one of two Mars-bound spacecraft slated for launch aboard Delta II expendable launch vehicles this year.

  1. Pathfinders: An Intellectual Guide to Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Claudia Ruediger; And Others

    Intended as an example for other college libraries, this collection of 38 pathfinders and bibliographies was developed by the reference staff of the Calvin Coolidge Library at Castleton State College, Vermont. Designed to present the types of literature available in particular subject fields and those works readily available in the Coolidge…

  2. Mechanical design of the Mars Pathfinder mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisen, Howard Jay; Buck, Carl W.; Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Umland, Jeffrey W.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover is reported on, with emphasis on the various mission steps and the performance of the technologies involved. The mechanical design of mission hardware was critical to the success of the entry sequence and the landing operations. The various mechanisms employed are considered.

  3. Free-Flight Experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Cutler, C. J.; Hewitson, M.; Jennrich, O.; Maghami, P.; Paczkowski, S.; Russano, G.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this 'suspension noise'. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  4. Free-flight experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, LI; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this ‘suspension noise’. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  5. Pathfinders on Black Dance in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Ed.

    This is a compilation of 18 pathfinders (i.e., a bibliographic instruction aid) on black dance in America, prepared by graduate students in the "Information Resources in the Humanities" and the "Information Resources in the Social Sciences" classes in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  6. Pathfinders on Black Dance in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Ed.

    This is a compilation of 18 pathfinders (i.e., a bibliographic instruction aid) on black dance in America, prepared by graduate students in the "Information Resources in the Humanities" and the "Information Resources in the Social Sciences" classes in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  7. Ventifacts at the Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Greeley, R.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kraft, M.; Parker, T.J.; Ward, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    About half of the rocks at the Mars Pathfinder Ares Vallis landing site appear to be ventifacts, rocks abraded by windborne particles. Comparable resolution images taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) camera and the Viking landers show that ventifacts are more abundant at the Pathfinder site. The ventifacts occur in several forms, including rocks with faceted edges, finger-like projections, elongated pits, flutes, grooves, and possible rills. The trends of elongated pits, flutes, grooves, and rills cluster at ???280-330?? clockwise from north and generally dip 10-30?? away from their trend direction. These orientations are indicative of southeast to northwest winds and differ from the trend of wind tails at the landing site, the direction of local wind streaks, and predictions of the Global Circulation Model, all of which indicate northeast to southwest winds. The disparity between these data sets strongly suggests that local circulation patterns have changed since the abrasion of the ventifacted rocks. The greater number of ventifacts at the Pathfinder site compared to either of the Viking sites is most easily explained as being due to a larger supply of abrading particles, composed of either sand-sized grains or indurated dust aggregates, and higher surface roughness, which should increase the momentum of saltating grains. The Pathfinder ventifacts may have formed shortly after the deposition of outflow channel sediments nearly 2 Gry ago, when a large local supply of abrading particles should have been abundant and atmospheric conditions may have been more conducive to rock abrasion from saltating grains. Based on how ventifacts form on Earth, the several ventifact forms seen at the Pathfinder site and their presence on some rocks but not on others are probably due to local airflow conditions, original rock shape, exposure duration, rock movement, and to a lesser extent, rock lithology. The abundance of ventifacts at the Pathfinder site, together with

  8. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site and Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder landed on Mars on July 4, 1997, and continued operating until Sept. 27 of that year. The landing site is on an ancient flood plain of the Ares and Tiu outflow channels. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took an image on Dec. 21, 2006, that provides unprecedented detail of the geology of the region and hardware on the surface.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] HiRISE Image This is the entire image. The crater at center bottom was unofficially named 'Big Crater' by the Pathfinder team. Its wall was visible from Pathfinder, located 3 kilometers (2 miles) to the north. The two bright features to the upper left of Big Crater are the 'Twin Peaks,' also observed by Pathfinder. The bright mound to the upper right of the Twin Peaks is 'North Knob,' seen in Pathfinder images as peaking over the horizon.

    At this scale there is no obvious geologic evidence of an ancient flood. Rather, impact craters dominate the scene, attesting to an old surface. The age is probably on the order of 1.8 billion to 3.5 billion years, when the Ares and Tiu floods are estimated to have occurred. Wind-formed linear ripples and dunes are seen throughout and are concentrated within craters. Sets of polygonal ridges of enigmatic origin are seen east of the Pathfinder lander. Rocks are visible over the entire image, with heavy concentrations near fresh-looking craters. Most of them are probably blocks tossed outward by crater-forming impacts.

    The complete image is centered at 19.1 degrees north latitude, 326.8 degrees east longitude. The range to the target site was 284.7 kilometers (177.9 miles). At this distance the image scale is 28.5 centimeters (11 inches) per pixel, so objects about 85 centimeters (33 inches) across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 centimeters (10 inches) per pixel. North is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time

  9. Assessment of Mars Pathfinder landing site predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Moore, H.J.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Parker, T.J.; Schofield, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Remote sensing data at scales of kilometers and an Earth analog were used to accurately predict the characteristics of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at a scale of meters. The surface surrounding the Mars Pathfinder lander in Ares Vallis appears consistent with orbital interpretations, namely, that it would be a rocky plain composed of materials deposited by catastrophic floods. The surface and observed maximum clast size appears similar to predictions based on an analogous surface of the Ephrata Fan in the Channeled Scabland of Washington state. The elevation of the site measured by relatively small footprint delay-Doppler radar is within 100 m of that determined by two-way ranging and Doppler tracking of the spacecraft. The nearly equal elevations of the Mars Pathfinder and Viking Lander 1 sites allowed a prediction of the atmospheric conditions with altitude (pressure, temperature, and winds) that were well within the entry, descent, and landing design margins. High-resolution (~38 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter 1 images showed a sparsely cratered surface with small knobs with relatively low slopes, consistent with observations of these features from the lander. Measured rock abundance is within 10% of that expected from Viking orbiter thermal observations and models. The fractional area covered by large, potentially hazardous rocks observed is similar to that estimated from model rock distributions based on data from the Viking landing sites, Earth analog sites, and total rock abundance. The bulk and fine-component thermal inertias measured from orbit are similar to those calculated from the observed rock size-frequency distribution. A simple radar echo model based on the reflectivity of the soil (estimated from its bulk density), and the measured fraction of area covered by rocks was used to approximate the quasi-specular and diffuse components of the Earth-based radar echos. Color and albedo orbiter data were used to predict the relatively dust free or unweathered

  10. Data Triage of Astronomical Transients: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbapragada, U.

    This talk presents real-time machine learning systems for triage of big data streams generated by photometric and image-differencing pipelines. Our first system is a transient event detection system in development for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a fully-automated synoptic sky survey that has demonstrated real-time discovery of optical transient events. The system is tasked with discriminating between real astronomical objects and bogus objects, which are usually artifacts of the image differencing pipeline. We performed a machine learning forensics investigation on PTF’s initial system that led to training data improvements that decreased both false positive and negative rates. The second machine learning system is a real-time classification engine of transients and variables in development for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an upcoming wide-field radio survey with unprecedented ability to investigate the radio transient sky. The goal of our system is to classify light curves into known classes with as few observations as possible in order to trigger follow-up on costlier assets. We discuss the violation of standard machine learning assumptions incurred by this task, and propose the use of ensemble and hierarchical machine learning classifiers that make predictions most robustly.

  11. Wide-field broad-band radio imaging with phased array feeds: a pilot multi-epoch continuum survey with ASKAP-BETA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Bannister, K. W.; Marvil, J.; Allison, J. R.; Ball, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chippendale, A. P.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T. J.; De Boer, D.; Edwards, P.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Kimball, A. E.; Koribalski, B. S.; Lenc, E.; Macleod, A.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Murphy, T.; Neuhold, S.; Norris, R. P.; Pearce, S.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sadler, E. M.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shimwell, T. W.; Stevens, J.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The Boolardy Engineering Test Array is a 6 × 12 m dish interferometer and the prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), equipped with the first generation of ASKAP's phased array feed (PAF) receivers. These facilitate rapid wide-area imaging via the deployment of simultaneous multiple beams within an ˜30 deg2 field of view. By cycling the array through 12 interleaved pointing positions and using nine digitally formed beams, we effectively mimic a traditional 1 h × 108 pointing survey, covering ˜150 deg2 over 711-1015 MHz in 12 h of observing time. Three such observations were executed over the course of a week. We verify the full bandwidth continuum imaging performance and stability of the system via self-consistency checks and comparisons to existing radio data. The combined three epoch image has arcminute resolution and a 1σ thermal noise level of 375 μJy beam-1, although the effective noise is a factor of ˜3 higher due to residual sidelobe confusion. From this we derive a catalogue of 3722 discrete radio components, using the 35 per cent fractional bandwidth to measure in-band spectral indices for 1037 of them. A search for transient events reveals one significantly variable source within the survey area. The survey covers approximately two-thirds of the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field. This pilot project demonstrates the viability and potential of using PAFs to rapidly and accurately survey the sky at radio wavelengths.

  12. Determining the H i content of galaxies via intensity mapping cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Blake, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2017-09-01

    We propose an innovative method for measuring the neutral hydrogen (H i) content of an optically selected spectroscopic sample of galaxies through cross-correlation with H i intensity mapping measurements. We show that the H i-galaxy cross-power spectrum contains an additive shot noise term that scales with the average H i brightness temperature of the optically selected galaxies, allowing constraints to be placed on the average H i mass per galaxy. This approach can estimate the H i content of populations too faint to directly observe through their 21-cm emission over a wide range of redshifts. This cross-correlation, as a function of optical luminosity or colour, can be used to derive H i-scaling relations. We demonstrate that this signal will be detectable by cross-correlating upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder observations with existing optically selected samples. We also use semi-analytic simulations to verify that the H i mass can be successfully recovered by our technique in the range M_{H I} > 10^8 M_{⊙}, in a manner independent of the underlying power spectrum shape. We conclude that this method is a powerful tool to study galaxy evolution, which only requires a single intensity mapping data set to infer complementary H i gas information from existing optical and infrared observations.

  13. Measuring Noise Temperatures of Phased-Array Antennas for Astronomy at CSIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Hayman, D. B.; Hay, S. G.

    We describe the development of a noise-temperature testing capability for phased-array antennas operating in receive mode from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz. Sampled voltages from each array port were recorded digitally as the zenith-pointing array under test was presented with three scenes: (1) a large microwave absorber at ambient temperature, (2) the unobstructed radio sky, and (3) broadband noise transmitted from a reference antenna centred over and pointed at the array under test. The recorded voltages were processed in software to calculate the beam equivalent noise temperature for a maximum signal-to-noise ratio beam steered at the zenith. We introduced the reference-antenna measurement to make noise measurements with reproducible, well-defined beams directed at the zenith and thereby at the centre of the absorber target. We applied a detailed model of cosmic and atmospheric contributions to the radio sky emission that we used as a noise-temperature reference. We also present a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainty including random and systematic effects. The key systematic effect was due to uncertainty in the beamformed antenna pattern and how efficiently it illuminates the absorber load. We achieved a combined uncertainty as low as 4 K for a 40 K measurement of beam equivalent noise temperature. The measurement and analysis techniques described in this paper were pursued to support noise-performance verification of prototype phased-array feeds for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope.

  14. Synchrotron Emission from Dark Matter Annihilation: Predictions for Constraints from Non-detections of Galaxy Clusters with New Radio Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Splettstoesser, Megan; Profumo, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The annihilation of dark matter particles is expected to yield a broad radiation spectrum via the production of Standard Model particles in astrophysical environments. In particular, electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation produce synchrotron radiation in the presence of magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most massive collapsed structures in the universe, and are known to host ˜μG-scale magnetic fields. They are therefore ideal targets to search for, or to constrain the synchrotron signal from dark matter annihilation. In this work, we use the expected sensitivities of several planned surveys from the next generation of radio telescopes to predict the constraints on dark matter annihilation models which will be achieved in the case of non-detections of diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters. Specifically, we consider the Tier 1 survey planned for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) at 120 MHz, the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey planned for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) at 1.4 GHz, and planned surveys for Aperture Tile in Focus (APERTIF) at 1.4 GHz. We find that, for massive clusters and dark matter masses ≲ 100 {GeV}, the predicted limits on the annihilation cross section would rule out vanilla thermal relic models for even the shallow LOFAR Tier 1, ASKAP, and APERTIF surveys.

  15. The Completeness and Reliability of Threshold and False-discovery Rate Source Extraction Algorithms for Compact Continuum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, M. T.; Hopkins, A.; Norris, R.; Hancock, P.; Murphy, T.; Jurek, R.; Whiting, M.

    2012-12-01

    The process of determining the number and characteristics of sources in astronomical images is so fundamental to a large range of astronomical problems that it is perhaps surprising that no standard procedure has ever been defined that has well-understood properties with a high degree of statistical rigour on completeness and reliability. The Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), a continuum survey of the Southern Hemisphere up to declination +30°, aims to utilise an automated source identification and measurement approach that is demonstrably optimal, to maximise the reliability, utility and robustness of the resulting radio source catalogues. A key stage in source extraction methods is the background estimation (background level and noise level) and the choice of a threshold high enough to reject false sources, yet not so high that the catalogues are significantly incomplete. In this analysis, we present results from testing the SExtractor, Selavy (Duchamp), and sfind source extraction tools on simulated data. In particular, the effects of background estimation, threshold and false-discovery rate settings are explored. For parameters that give similar completeness, we find the false-discovery rate method employed by sfind results in a more reliable catalogue compared to the peak threshold methods of SExtractor and Selavy.

  16. Basic Testing of the DUCHAMP Source Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmeier, T.; Popping, A.; Serra, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of basic source finding tests in three dimensions (using spectroscopic data cubes) with DUCHAMP, the standard source finder for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder. For this purpose, we generated different sets of unresolved and extended Hi model sources. These models were then fed into DUCHAMP, using a range of different parameters and methods provided by the software. The main aim of the tests was to study the performance of DUCHAMP on sources with different parameters and morphologies and assess the accuracy of DUCHAMP's source parametrisation. Overall, we find DUCHAMP to be a powerful source finder capable of reliably detecting sources down to low signal-to-noise ratios and accurately measuring their position and velocity. In the presence of noise in the data, DUCHAMP's measurements of basic source parameters, such as spectral line width and integrated flux, are affected by systematic errors. These errors are a consequence of the effect of noise on the specific algorithms used by DUCHAMP for measuring source parameters in combination with the fact that the software only takes into account pixels above a given flux threshold and hence misses part of the flux. In scientific applications of DUCHAMP these systematic errors would have to be corrected for. Alternatively, DUCHAMP could be used as a source finder only, and source parametrisation could be done in a second step using more sophisticated parametrisation algorithms.

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: the 1.4 GHz SFR indicator, SFR-M* relation and predictions for ASKAP-GAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Huynh, M. T.; Hopkins, A. M.; Seymour, N.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. G. R.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Bremer, M. N.; Brown, M. J. I.; Brough, S.; Cluver, M.; Grootes, M. W.; Jarvis, M.; Loveday, J.; Moffet, A.; Owers, M.; Phillipps, S.; Sadler, E.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S.; Wright, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present a robust calibration of the 1.4 GHz radio continuum star formation rate (SFR) using a combination of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey. We identify individually detected 1.4 GHz GAMA-FIRST sources and use a late-type, non-active galactic nucleus, volume-limited sample from GAMA to produce stellar mass-selected samples. The latter are then combined to produce FIRST-stacked images. This extends the robust parametrization of the 1.4 GHz-SFR relation to faint luminosities. For both the individually detected galaxies and our stacked samples, we compare 1.4 GHz luminosity to SFRs derived from GAMA to determine a new 1.4 GHz luminosity-to-SFR relation with well-constrained slope and normalization. For the first time, we produce the radio SFR-M* relation over 2 decades in stellar mass, and find that our new calibration is robust, and produces a SFR-M* relation which is consistent with all other GAMA SFR methods. Finally, using our new 1.4 GHz luminosity-to-SFR calibration we make predictions for the number of star-forming GAMA sources which are likely to be detected in the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder surveys, Evolutionary Map of the Universe and Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins.

  18. The ASKAP/EMU Source Finding Data Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Whiting, M. T.; Seymour, N.; Chow, K. E.; Norris, R. P.; Bonavera, L.; Breton, R.; Carbone, D.; Ferrari, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Garsden, H.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hales, C. A.; Hancock, P. J.; Heald, G.; Herranz, D.; Huynh, M.; Jurek, R. J.; López-Caniego, M.; Massardi, M.; Mohan, N.; Molinari, S.; Orrù, E.; Paladino, R.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rudnick, L.; Schisano, E.; Shulevski, A.; Swinbank, J.; Taylor, R.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) is a proposed radio continuum survey of the Southern Hemisphere up to declination + 30°, with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). EMU will use an automated source identification and measurement approach that is demonstrably optimal, to maximise the reliability and robustness of the resulting radio source catalogues. As a step toward this goal we conducted a "Data Challenge" to test a variety of source finders on simulated images. The aim is to quantify the accuracy and limitations of existing automated source finding and measurement approaches. The Challenge initiators also tested the current ASKAPsoft source-finding tool to establish how it could benefit from incorporating successful features of the other tools. As expected, most finders show completeness around 100% at ≈ 10σ dropping to about 10% by ≈ 5σ. Reliability is typically close to 100% at ≈ 10σ, with performance to lower sensitivities varying between finders. All finders show the expected trade-off, where a high completeness at low signal-to-noise gives a corresponding reduction in reliability, and vice versa. We conclude with a series of recommendations for improving the performance of the ASKAPsoft source-finding tool.

  19. Potential landing sites for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Landheim, R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    In addition to a better understanding of the geological evolution of Mars, new techniques for processing available data have emerged, new data have been acquired, and the engineering approaches for placing spacecraft on the surface have evolved. Selection of the Mars Pathfinder landing site must take these issues into account, along with mission constraints. An advantage of Mars Pathfinder is the rover for sampling surface materials over a range of tens of meters. However, engineering constraints and the limited scientific payload of this mission require new approaches for landing site selection. One approach is to select sites exhibiting a wide variety of rocks near the lander. An alternative approach is to select sites in which the regional geology consists of a single rock type representing a key datum for the geological study of Mars, and is uniformly distributed within the landing ellipse.

  20. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, departs from the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with two containers on railcars for transport to the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the RPSF. Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  1. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, departs from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with two containers on railcars for transport to the Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  2. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, arrives at the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with two containers on railcars for storage. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  3. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, conracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, travels along the NASA railroad bridge over the Indian River north of Kennedy Space Center, with two containers on railcars for transport to the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  4. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, travels along the NASA railroad bridge over the Indian River north of Kennedy Space Center, carrying one of two containers on a railcar for transport to the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard near the center. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  5. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, travels along the NASA railroad bridge over the Indian River north of Kennedy Space Center, carrying one of two containers on a railcar for transport to the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  6. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, continues along the NASA railroad bridge over the Indian River north of Kennedy Space Center, carrying one of two containers on a railcar for transport to the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  7. SLS Pathfinder Segments Car Train Departure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    An Iowa Northern locomotive, contracted by Goodloe Transportation of Chicago, approaches the raised span of the NASA railroad bridge to continue over the Indian River north of Kennedy Space Center with two containers on railcars for storage at the NASA Jay Jay railroad yard. The containers held two pathfinders, or test versions, of solid rocket booster segments for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket that were delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Inside the RPSF, the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and Jacobs Engineering, on the Test and Operations Support Contract, will conduct a series of lifts, moves and stacking operations using the booster segments, which are inert, to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, deep-space missions and the journey to Mars. The pathfinder booster segments are from Orbital ATK in Utah.

  8. APECS - The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muders, D.; Hafok, H.; Wyrowski, F.; Polehampton, E.; Belloche, A.; König, C.; Schaaf, R.

    2006-07-01

    APECS is the CORBA based, distributed control system for the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) Telescope located at the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5100m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. The telescope has been operational since August 2005 and APECS is now being used for regular science observations. APECS employs a modern, object-oriented design. Generic interfaces facilitate adding new instruments. The IPython based observer command language allows using macros and creating more complex observing modes.

  9. Overhead View of Area Surrounding Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Overhead view of the area surrounding the Pathfinder lander illustrating the Sojourner traverse. Red rectangles are rover positions at the end of sols 1-30. Locations of soil mechanics experiments, wheel abrasion experiments, and APXS measurements are shown. The A numbers refer to APXS measurements as discussed in the paper by Rieder et al. (p. 1770, Science Magazine, see image note). Coordinates are given in the LL frame.

    The photorealistic, interactive, three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) terrain models were created from IMP images using a software package developed for Pathfinder by C. Stoker et al. as a participating science project. By matching features in the left and right camera, an automated machine vision algorithm produced dense range maps of the nearfield, which were projected into a three-dimensional model as a connected polygonal mesh. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven three-dimensional cursor and a point-and-click interface. The VR model also incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. As the rover moved, graphical models of the rover were added for each position that could be uniquely determined using stereo images of the rover taken by the IMP. Images taken by the rover were projected into the model as two-dimensional 'billboards' to show the proper perspective of these images.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. Overhead View of Area Surrounding Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Overhead view of the area surrounding the Pathfinder lander illustrating the Sojourner traverse. Red rectangles are rover positions at the end of sols 1-30. Locations of soil mechanics experiments, wheel abrasion experiments, and APXS measurements are shown. The A numbers refer to APXS measurements as discussed in the paper by Rieder et al. (p. 1770, Science Magazine, see image note). Coordinates are given in the LL frame.

    The photorealistic, interactive, three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) terrain models were created from IMP images using a software package developed for Pathfinder by C. Stoker et al. as a participating science project. By matching features in the left and right camera, an automated machine vision algorithm produced dense range maps of the nearfield, which were projected into a three-dimensional model as a connected polygonal mesh. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven three-dimensional cursor and a point-and-click interface. The VR model also incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. As the rover moved, graphical models of the rover were added for each position that could be uniquely determined using stereo images of the rover taken by the IMP. Images taken by the rover were projected into the model as two-dimensional 'billboards' to show the proper perspective of these images.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  11. Pathfinder Program X-37 Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's conception of the X-37 Demonstrator ascending left upright. As part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-37 flight experiment demonstrates advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  12. Pathfinder Program X-37 Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's conception of the X-37 Demonstrator descending down left. As part of the Pathfinder Program, the X-37 flight experiment demonstrates advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  13. Pathfinder-Plus aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Pathfinder-Plus solar-powered aircraft is shown taking off from a runway, then flying at low altitude over the ocean. The vehicle, which looks like a flying ruler, operates at low airspeed. Among the missions proposed for a solar-powered aircraft are communications relay, atmospheric studies, pipeline monitoring and gas leak detection, environmental monitoring using thermal and radar images, and disaster relief and monitoring.

  14. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Kevin; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J. Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-François; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena Parra, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B.; Pen, Ue-li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Mike; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-07-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beam forming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37m long by 20m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of ~100 degrees by 1-2 degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every ~30 cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800 MHz, and directly sampled at 800 MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation. The lessons learned from its implementation will be used to inform and improve the final CHIME design.

  15. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars Pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations. These models are central to the navigation and mission design functions, but they are also used in other aspects of the project such as science observation planning and data reduction.

  16. MARS PATHFINDER CAMERA TEST IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) workers conduct a systems test of the Mars Pathfinder imager, installed atop the Pathfinder lander (with JPL insignia). The imager is the white cyclindrical structure close to the worker's gloved hand. At left is the small rover that will be deployed from the lander to explore the Martian surface. The rover is mounted on one of three petals that will be attached to the lander. The two-pronged mast extending upward from the lander is for the low-gain antenna. The imager is mounted on a mast that will be extended after the lander touches down on Mars, affording a better view of the area. The imager is a camera that will transmit images of the Martian surface as well as the trail left by the rover, helping researchers to better understand the composition of the soil. It also is equipped with selectable filters for gathering data about the atmosphere of the Red Planet. JPL manages the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA. The journey to Mars is scheduled to begin with liftoff Dec. 2 aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle.

  17. Pathfinder: Visual Analysis of Paths in Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Partl, C.; Gratzl, S.; Streit, M.; Wassermann, A. M.; Pfister, H.; Schmalstieg, D.; Lex, A.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of paths in graphs is highly relevant in many domains. Typically, path-related tasks are performed in node-link layouts. Unfortunately, graph layouts often do not scale to the size of many real world networks. Also, many networks are multivariate, i.e., contain rich attribute sets associated with the nodes and edges. These attributes are often critical in judging paths, but directly visualizing attributes in a graph layout exacerbates the scalability problem. In this paper, we present visual analysis solutions dedicated to path-related tasks in large and highly multivariate graphs. We show that by focusing on paths, we can address the scalability problem of multivariate graph visualization, equipping analysts with a powerful tool to explore large graphs. We introduce Pathfinder (Figure 1), a technique that provides visual methods to query paths, while considering various constraints. The resulting set of paths is visualized in both a ranked list and as a node-link diagram. For the paths in the list, we display rich attribute data associated with nodes and edges, and the node-link diagram provides topological context. The paths can be ranked based on topological properties, such as path length or average node degree, and scores derived from attribute data. Pathfinder is designed to scale to graphs with tens of thousands of nodes and edges by employing strategies such as incremental query results. We demonstrate Pathfinder's fitness for use in scenarios with data from a coauthor network and biological pathways. PMID:27942090

  18. Materials Adherence Experiment on Mars Pathfinder: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hunter, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Materials Adherence Experiment (MAE) on the Pathfinder Sojourner rover will measure the dust deposition rate. By August, the Sojourner Rover on Mars Pathfinder will have completed its primary mission, and the experiment will have data on dust deposition during the first three weeks of operation on Mars. This paper will present the initial data from the experiment. This will be the first presentation of the results from the Pathfinder MAE experiment.

  19. Mars Pathfinder: Landing Site Computer Animation [and] Rocky IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video uses computer graphic models of the heat shield, lander, and parachute to present an artist's concept of the Mars Pathfinder descent. Viking image mosaics are used to create a rotating globe of Mars. A separate segment presents a simulated flight over the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The second part of the film describes the development of Rocky IV, the latest in a series of planetary rovers developed in preparation for the Mars Pathfinder mission.

  20. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4

  1. Pathfinder-Plus takes off on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  2. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in 1998 over Hawaiian waters. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least

  3. Pathfinder-Plus takes off on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  4. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4

  5. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in 1998 over Hawaiian waters. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least

  6. The Mars Pathfinder ASI/MET Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, J.; Crisp, D.; Labaw, C.; Mahoney, C.; Seiff, A.; Murphy, J.; Mihalov, J.; Wilson, G.; Haberle, R.; Tillman, J.; Barnes, J.

    1996-09-01

    On July 4th 1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft will enter the martian atmosphere, land in the Ares Vallis region, and obtain the first in-situ measurements of the atmosphere and surface since the Viking mission more than 20 years ago. In addition to a Stereo Imager and an Alpha Proton X-Ray spectrometer, the Pathfinder Lander will carry an Atmospheric Structure and Meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment designed to study the atmosphere during the entry, descent, and landed phases of the mission. The ASI/MET package consists of 3 accelerometers, 4 thermocouple temperature sensors, a Tavis pressure sensor, and a 6-sector hot-wire wind sensor. The sensitivity limits of these instruments are respectively 2 micro g, 0.01 K, 0.25 micro bars, and 0.04 K. Measurements of deceleration in 3-orthogonal axes during entry will be used to determine a density, pressure, temperature profile for the upper atmosphere from 15-150 km, and direct measurements of temperature and pressure in the lower atmosphere will be made as the lander descends on its parachute. After landing, surface pressure measurements will continue and a meteorological mast will deploy. From this mast, atmospheric temperature will be measured 0.25, 0.5, & 1.0 m above the surface, and wind speed and direction will be determined at 1.1 m. Landed data will be acquired continuously for 1 year. Pathfinder is expected to make a significant contribution to Mars atmospheric science. It will provide a third in-situ atmospheric profile at a different season and local time to the earlier Viking profiles, and its surface observations will generate a climate record at the landing site with an order of magnitude better resolution than Viking. Because measurements will be made at different altitudes, they will also allow superior characterization of the martian surface boundary layer.

  7. Scientific results of the Mars Pathfinder mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    The author, project scientist of the Mars Pathfinder mision, presents a summary of the most important scientific results from the space probe, which descended to the Martian surface on July 4, 1997. These results include the strong evidence for catastrophic water floods in the history of the planet; close-up studies of the morphology and mineralogy of Martian rocks; the characteristics, chemistry, and origin of the magnetic dust particles deposited on the Martian surface; and meteorological measurements of temperature fluctuations, pressure variations, and wind velocities.

  8. Hillary Clinton visits Pathfinder projects in Brazil.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In October 1995, US First Lady Hillary Clinton visited a maternity hospital in Salvador, Brazil, in which a family planning (FP)/reproductive health program has been administered by Pathfinder International since 1981 with funding from USAID. During her tour of the facility, Clinton learned about the high degree of unmet need for FP in the region which results from a lack of sufficient resources to meet demand. Clinton, in turn, praised the state of Bahia for its emphasis on FP in low-income areas.

  9. Mars pathfinder Rover egress deployable ramp assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian R.; Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Program is a NASA Discovery Mission, led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to launch and place a small planetary Rover for exploration on the Martian surface. To enable safe and successful egress of the Rover vehicle from the spacecraft, a pair of flight-qualified, deployable ramp assemblies have been developed. This paper focuses on the unique, lightweight deployable ramp assemblies. A brief mission overview and key design requirements are discussed. Design and development activities leading to qualification and flight systems are presented.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  11. The LISA Pathfinder DMU and Radiation Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, P.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Diaz–Aguiló, M.; García-Berro, E.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Araújo, H. M.; Wass, P.

    2011-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder DMU (Data Management Unit) flight model was formally accepted by ESA and ASD on 11 February 2010, after all hardware and software tests had been successfully completed. The diagnostics items are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2010. In this paper, we review the requirements and performance of this instrumentation, specially focusing on the Radiation Monitor and the DMU, as well as the status of their programmed use during mission operations, on which work is ongoing at the time of writing.

  12. Results from the Mars Pathfinder camera.

    PubMed

    Smith, P H; Bell, J F; Bridges, N T; Britt, D T; Gaddis, L; Greeley, R; Keller, H U; Herkenhoff, K E; Jaumann, R; Johnson, J R; Kirk, R L; Lemmon, M; Maki, J N; Malin, M C; Murchie, S L; Oberst, J; Parker, T J; Reid, R J; Sablotny, R; Soderblom, L A; Stoker, C; Sullivan, R; Thomas, N; Tomasko, M G; Wegryn, E

    1997-12-05

    Images of the martian surface returned by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) show a complex surface of ridges and troughs covered by rocks that have been transported and modified by fluvial, aeolian, and impact processes. Analysis of the spectral signatures in the scene (at 440- to 1000-nanometer wavelength) reveal three types of rock and four classes of soil. Upward-looking IMP images of the predawn sky show thin, bluish clouds that probably represent water ice forming on local atmospheric haze (opacity approximately 0.5). Haze particles are about 1 micrometer in radius and the water vapor column abundance is about 10 precipitable micrometers.

  13. Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, M. Patrick; Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will describe the planned 3-year Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO) mission, its instrumentation and implementation. It will use LITE and other data, plus analyses, to show the feasibility of such a mission. PICASSO is being proposed for NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program with launch predicted in 2003.

  14. Pathfinders for Finding Information on Native Americans with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    This bibliography offers strategies for locating information on selected topics of concern to those working with Native Americans with disabilities. The strategies are arranged in a format called a pathfinder. Each pathfinder follows a similar format, beginning with a brief overview of the topic, followed with an annotated bibliography, and…

  15. Pathfinder - closeup of flight preparation on lakebed at sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft sits on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, before a research flight. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  16. Pathfinder aircraft prepared for flight at dawn on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder solar-powered research aircraft is silhouetted by the morning sun on the bed of Rogers Dry Lake as technicians prepare it for flight. The unique remotely piloted flying wing flew for two hours under control of a ground-based pilot on Nov. 19, 1996, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, while engineers checked out various aircraft systems. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  17. Detection of Micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Ira; Littenberg, Tyson; Janchez, Diego; Baker, John; The LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2017-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF), a joint ESA/NASA technology demonstration mission currently operating at the Sun-Earth L1 point, contains the most precise accelerometry system ever flown. Analysis suggests that LPF should have sufficient sensitivity to detect impacts of small micrometeoroids and dust through their transfer of momentum to the spacecraft. Moreover, LPF's ability to fully resolve both the linear and angular momentum transfer in three dimensions allows a magnitude, direction, and location to be estimated for each impact. We present preliminary results from a systematic search of the LISA Pathfinder data for such impacts and discuss the prospects for using these and future results to inform models of the formation and evolution of dust populations in the inner solar system. These models have wide applicability to both pure and applied space science, ranging from the physics of planet formation and dynamics of minor Solar System bodies to estimates of the micrometeorite hazard for future spacecraft. 2017 NASA Science Innovation Fund.

  18. Northeast View From Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This panorama of the region to the northeast of the lander was constructed to support the Sojourner Rover Team's plans to conduct an 'autonomous traverse' to explore the terrain away from the lander after science objectives in the lander vicinity had been met. The large, relatively bright surface in the foreground, about 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft, in this scene is 'Baker's Bench.' The large, elongated rock left of center in the middle distance is 'Zaphod.'

    This anaglyph view was produced by combining the left and right eye mosaics (above) by assigning the left eye view to the red color plane and the right eye view to the green and blue color planes (cyan), to produce a stereo anaglyph mosaic. This mosaic can be viewed in 3-D on your computer monitor or in color print form by wearing red-blue 3-D glasses.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. LISA Pathfinder Science Operations Concept and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauste, Jorge; McNamara, Paul; Armano, Michele; Texier, Damien; Freschi, Marco

    LISA Pathfinder is the second of the ESA Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology, is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. LISA Pathfinder carries two payloads, the European provided LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA provided Disturbance Reduction System (DRS). The ground segment for LPF in the operational configuration will consist of one ground track-ing station, Cebreros (Spain), the Mission Operations Centre (MOC) at ESOC (Darmstadt, Germany), the Science Technology Operations Centre (STOC) located at ESOC and ESAC (Madrid, Spain) and LTP and DRS teams. The Science Technology Operations Centre although initially a small entity compatible with the operational requirements for an ESA SMART, has evolved in complexity in the last few years containing most of the systems and interfaces included as part of a normal ESA Science Operations Centre. In order to maintain a reasonable cost approach for its development and operations, a general reuse philosophy from systems already tested in previous ESA missions and/or from industry has been applied for the design and operation concept of the LPF STOC. The present paper describes the current LPF STOC design and it foreseen operational concept, highlighting the general reuse and customization process carried out for each of their individual subsystems.

  20. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuan, J.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Xirgu, X.; Araujo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Grimani, C.; Puigdengoles, C.; Wass, P.; García-Berro, E.; García, S.; Martínez, L. M.; Montero, G.

    2006-11-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least during the commissioning phase, the latter will be used to identify feed-through coefficients between diagnostics sensor readings and associated actual noise contributions. A brief progress report of the current state of development of the diagnostics subsystem will be given as well.

  1. Overhead View of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Planimetric (overhead view) map of the landing site, to a distance of 20 meters from the spacecraft. North is at the top in this and Plates 3-5. To produce this map, images were geometrically projected onto an assumed mean surface representing the ground. Features above the ground plane (primarily rocks) therefore appear displaced radially outward; the amount of distortion increases systematically with distance. The upper surfaces of the lander and rover also appear enlarged and displaced because of their height. Primary grid (white) is based on the Landing Site Cartographic (LSC) coordinate system, defined with X eastward, Y north, and Z up, and origin located at the mean ground surface immediately beneath the deployed position of the IMP camera gimbal center. Secondary ticks (cyan) are based on the Mars local level (LL) frame, which has X north, Y east, Z down, with origin in the center of the lander baseplate. Rover positions (including APXS measurements) are commonly reported in the LL frame. Yellow grid shows polar coordinates based on the LSC system. Cartographic image processing by U.S. Geological Survey.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Mars Pathfinder flight system integration and test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, B. K.

    This paper describes the system integration and test experiences, problems and lessons learned during the assembly, test and launch operations (ATLO) phase of the Mars Pathfinder flight system scheduled to land on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997. The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft consists of three spacecraft systems: cruise stage, entry vehicle and lander. The cruise stage carries the entry and lander vehicles to Mars and is jettisoned prior to entry. The entry vehicle, including aeroshell, parachute and deceleration rockets, protects the lander during the direct entry and reduces its velocity from 7.6 to 0 km/s in stages during the 5 min entry sequence. The lander's touchdown is softened by airbags which are retracted once stopped on the surface. The lander then uprights itself, opens up fully and begins surface operations including deploying its camera and rover. This paper overviews the system design and the results of the system integration and test activities, including the entry, descent and landing subsystem elements. System test experiences including science instruments, the microrover, Sojourner, and software are discussed. The final qualification of the entry, descent and landing subsystems during this period is also discussed.

  3. Pathfinder landing sites at candidate SNC impact ejection sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew P.

    1994-01-01

    If Mars Pathfinder were able to land at a site on Mars from which the SNC meteorites were ejected by impact, the Pathfinder mission would essentially represent a very inexpensive sample return mission. Geologic units that contain four potential impact craters from which SNC meteorites could have been ejected from Mars are accessible to the Mars Pathfinder lander. Determining that SNC meteorites came from a particular spot on Mars raises the intriguing possibility of using Pathfinder as a sample return mission and providing a radiometric age for the considerably uncertain martian crater-age timescale. Pathfinder instruments are capable of determining if the rock type at the landing site is similar to that of one or more of the SNC meteorites, which would strengthen the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites did, in fact, come from Mars. Unfortunately, instrument observations from Pathfinder are probably not capable of determining if the geologic unit sampled by the lander is definitively the unit from which a SNC meteorite came from as opposed to Mars in general or perhaps a particular region on Mars. This abstract evaluates the possibility of landing at potential SNC ejection sites and the ability of Pathfinder to identify the landing site as the place from which an SNC meteorite came.

  4. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.

    The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.

    This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA

  5. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.

    The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.

    This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA

  6. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Risk Reduction Cryo Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noel, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A., Jr.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; hide

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  7. JWST pathfinder telescope risk reduction cryo test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noël, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; Hadaway, James B.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee D.; Voyton, Mark F.; Lander, Juli A.; Marsh, James M.

    2015-08-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  8. Electrostatic Charging of the Pathfinder Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark W.; Kolecki, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission will send a lander and a rover to the martian surface. Because of the extremely dry conditions on Mars, electrostatic charging of the rover is expected to occur as it moves about. Charge accumulation may result in high electrical potentials and discharge through the martian atmosphere. Such discharge could interfere with the operation of electrical elements on the rover. A strategy was sought to mitigate this charge accumulation as a precautionary measure. Ground tests were performed to demonstrate charging in laboratory conditions simulating the surface conditions expected at Mars. Tests showed that a rover wheel, driven at typical rover speeds, will accumulate electrical charge and develop significant electrical potentials (average observed, 110 volts). Measurements were made of wheel electrical potential, and wheel capacitance. From these quantities, the amount of absolute charge was estimated. An engineering solution was developed and recommended to mitigate charge accumulation. That solution has been implemented on the actual rover.

  9. APECS - the Atacama pathfinder experiment control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muders, D.; Hafok, H.; Wyrowski, F.; Polehampton, E.; Belloche, A.; König, C.; Schaaf, R.; Schuller, F.; Hatchell, J.; van der Tak, F.

    2006-08-01

    APECS is the distributed control system of the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope located on the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5107 m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. APECS is based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) software and employs a modern, object-oriented design using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) as the middleware. New generic device interfaces simplify adding instruments to the control system. The Python based observer command scripting language allows using many existing software libraries and facilitates creating more complex observing modes. A new self-descriptive raw data format (Multi-Beam FITS or MBFITS) has been defined to store the multi-beam, multi-frequency data. APECS provides an online pipeline for initial calibration, observer feedback and a quick-look display. APECS is being used for regular science observations in local and remote mode since August 2005.

  10. 360 Degree Panorama Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the first contiguous, uniform 360-degree color panorama taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) over the course of sols 8, 9, and 10 (Martian days). Different regions were imaged at different times over the three Martian days to acquire consistent lighting and shadow conditions for all areas of the panorama. At left is a lander petal and a metallic mast which is a portion of the low-gain antenna. On the horizon the double 'Twin Peaks' are visible, about 1-2 kilometers away. The rock 'Couch' is the dark, curved rock at right of Twin Peaks. Another lander petal is at left-center, showing the fully deployed forward ramp at far left, and rear ramp at right, which rover Sojourner used to descend to the surface of Mars on July 5. Immediately to the left of the rear ramp is the rock Barnacle Bill, which scientists found to be andesitic, possibly indicating that it is a volcanic rock (a true andesite) or a physical mixture of particles. Just beyond Barnacle Bill, rover tracks lead to Sojourner, shown using its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument to study the large rock Yogi. Yogi, low in quartz content, appears to be more primitive than Barnacle Bill, and appeared more like the common basalts found on Earth. The tracks and circular pattern in the soil leading up to Yogi were part of Sojourner's soil mechanics experiments, in which varying amounts of pressure were applied to the wheels in order to determine physical properties of the soil. During its traverse to Yogi the rover stirred the soil and exposed material from several centimeters in depth. During one of the turns to deploy Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer, the wheels dug particularly deeply and exposed white material. Spectra of this white material show it is virtually identical to the rock Scooby Doo, and such white material may underlie much of the site. Deflated airbags are visible at the perimeter of all three lander petals. The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color

  11. Mars Pathfinder Airbag Impact Attenuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waye, Donald; Cole, J. Kenneth; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in December 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia's High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  12. Modal analysis of PATHFINDER unmanned air vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Woehrle, T.G.; Costerus, B.W.; Lee, C.L.

    1994-10-19

    An experimental modal analysis was performed on PATHFINDER, a 450-lb, 100-ft wing span, flying-wing-design aircraft powered by solar/electric motors. The aircraft was softly suspended and then excited using random input from a long-stroke shaker. Modal data was taken from 92 measurement locations on the aircraft using newly designed, lightweight, tri-axial accelerometers. A conventional PC-based data acquisition system provided data handling. Modal parameters were calculated, and animated mode shapes were produced using SMS STARStruct{trademark} Modal Analysis System software. The modal parameters will be used for validation of finite element models, optimum placement of onboard accelerometers during flight testing, and vibration isolation design of sensor platforms.

  13. Mars Pathfinder airbag impact attenuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, D.E.; Cole, J.K.; Rivellini, T.P.

    1995-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in November 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia`s High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  14. Statechart Analysis with Symbolic PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2012-01-01

    We report here on our on-going work that addresses the automated analysis and test case generation for software systems modeled using multiple Statechart formalisms. The work is motivated by large programs such as NASA Exploration, that involve multiple systems that interact via safety-critical protocols and are designed with different Statechart variants. To verify these safety-critical systems, we have developed Polyglot, a framework for modeling and analysis of model-based software written using different Statechart formalisms. Polyglot uses a common intermediate representation with customizable Statechart semantics and leverages the analysis and test generation capabilities of the Symbolic PathFinder tool. Polyglot is used as follows: First, the structure of the Statechart model (expressed in Matlab Stateflow or Rational Rhapsody) is translated into a common intermediate representation (IR). The IR is then translated into Java code that represents the structure of the model. The semantics are provided as "pluggable" modules.

  15. Java PathFinder User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    The JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a translator from a subset of JAVA 1.0 to PROMELA, the programming language of the SPIN model checker. The purpose of JPF is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programming based on model checking. The main goal is to automate program verification such that a programmer can apply it in the daily work without the need for a specialist to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. The system is especially suited for analyzing multi-threaded JAVA applications, where normal testing usually falls short. The system can find deadlocks and violations of boolean assertions stated by the programmer in a special assertion language. This document explains how to Use JPF.

  16. Pathfinder autonomous rendezvous and docking project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen (Editor); Mccandless, Wayne (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Capabilities are being developed and demonstrated to support manned and unmanned vehicle operations in lunar and planetary orbits. In this initial phase, primary emphasis is placed on definition of the system requirements for candidate Pathfinder mission applications and correlation of these system-level requirements with specific requirements. The FY-89 activities detailed are best characterized as foundation building. The majority of the efforts were dedicated to assessing the current state of the art, identifying desired elaborations and expansions to this level of development and charting a course that will realize the desired objectives in the future. Efforts are detailed across all work packages in developing those requirements and tools needed to test, refine, and validate basic autonomous rendezvous and docking elements.

  17. LISA Pathfinder interferometry: space hardware tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco García Marín, Antonio

    The optical metrology system (OMS) onboard LISA Pathfinder must measure picometre test mass displacements in the millihertz frequency range. It comprises the Laser Assembly for light generation and modulation, the Optical Bench where the interferometry properly takes place and the Phasemeter and Data Management Unit for signal processing and control. During the past years the Albert-Einstein-Institute has developed an OMS test-bed where each subsystem can be integrated sequentially. This way we could perform various system level test campaigns in close collaboration with our industrial partners without waiting for the last subsystems to be delivered. The most important milestone has been the recent tests of the complete OMS at engineering model level, including the demonstration of the required sensitivity. Flight model tests of the Laser Assembly are good underway and OMS flight model tests are planned for the second half of this year.

  18. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder Insurance Pan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Weller, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) obtained a full panorama of the Sagan Memorial Station landing site on Sol 2, before the IMP mast was deployed. The images in this panorama were taken in 4 filters (including stereo) and losslessly compressed to provide a high-quality multispectral survey of the landing site even if the IMP mast did not successfully deploy; this data set was therefore called the Insurance Pan. It was completed late in the afternoon of Sol 2, just before the IMP mast was (successfully) deployed. The data were stored in memory and returned to Earth after it became clear that downlink rates were higher than expected. The Insurance Pan horizontal (azimuth) coverage is nearly complete, with gaps caused by pointing errors and data packet losses. Stereo data were acquired in the blue (445 nm) filter, as well as right-eye green (531 nm), orange (600 nm), and near-infrared (752 nm) data.

  19. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder Insurance Pan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Weller, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) obtained a full panorama of the Sagan Memorial Station landing site on Sol 2, before the IMP mast was deployed. The images in this panorama were taken in 4 filters (including stereo) and losslessly compressed to provide a high-quality multispectral survey of the landing site even if the IMP mast did not successfully deploy; this data set was therefore called the Insurance Pan. It was completed late in the afternoon of Sol 2, just before the IMP mast was (successfully) deployed. The data were stored in memory and returned to Earth after it became clear that downlink rates were higher than expected. The Insurance Pan horizontal (azimuth) coverage is nearly complete, with gaps caused by pointing errors and data packet losses. Stereo data were acquired in the blue (445 nm) filter, as well as right-eye green (531 nm), orange (600 nm), and near-infrared (752 nm) data.

  20. International Planned Parenthood head visits Pathfinder.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In January 1995, Dr. Ingar Brueggemann, the new Secretary General of International Planned Parenthood, and her Deputy Director attended a meeting sponsored by Pathfinder International in the US. Brueggemann discussed the impact of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) and noted that, in order to implement the ICPD Programme of Action, family planning (FP) must become an accepted national objective in all countries. An integrated approach to FP services is also needed so that the programs can provide HIV/AIDS services and reach young people. Brueggemann noted that FP and reproductive health care must be viewed in a broad manner that highlights the positive aspects of the services rather than simply the negative ones (unwanted pregnancy, unsafe abortion, etc.).

  1. Model Checking JAVA Programs Using Java Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Pressburger, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a translator called JAVA PATHFINDER from JAVA to PROMELA, the "programming language" of the SPIN model checker. The purpose is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programs based on model checking. This work should be seen in a broader attempt to make formal methods applicable "in the loop" of programming within NASA's areas such as space, aviation, and robotics. Our main goal is to create automated formal methods such that programmers themselves can apply these in their daily work (in the loop) without the need for specialists to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. This work is a continuation of an effort to formally verify, using SPIN, a multi-threaded operating system programmed in Lisp for the Deep-Space 1 spacecraft, and of previous work in applying existing model checkers and theorem provers to real applications.

  2. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Exobiology site priorities for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Desmarais, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The fact that life developed on the Earth within the first billion years of its history makes it quite plausible that life may have also developed on Mars. If life did develop on Mars, it undoubtedly left behind a fossil record. Such a fossil record is likely to be more accessible than either subsurface environments that may harbor life, or scattered 'oases' that may be present at the surface. Consequently, the post-Viking approach of Mars exobiology has shifted focus to search for evidence of an ancient martian biosphere. This has led to the emergence of a new subdiscipline of paleontology, herein termed 'exopaleontology', which deals with the exploration for fossils on other planets and whose core concepts derive from Earth-based Precambrian paleontology, microbial ecology, and sedimentology. Potential targets on Mars for subaqueous spring deposits, sedimentary cements, and evaporites are ancient terminal lake basins where hydrological systems could have endured for some time under arid conditions. Potential targets for the Mars Pathfinder mission include channeled impact craters and areas of deranged drainage associated with outflows in northwest Arabia and Xanthe Terra, where water may have ponded temporarily to form lakes. The major uncertainty of such targets is their comparatively younger age and the potentially short duration of hydrological activity compared to older paleolake basins found in the southern hemisphere. However, it has been suggested that cycles of catastrophic flooding associated with Tharsis volcanism may have sustained a large body of water, Oceanus Borealis, in the northern plains area until quite late in martian history. Although problematic, the shoreline areas of the proposed northern ocean provide potential targets for a Mars Pathfinder mission aimed at exploring for carbonates or other potentially fossiliferous marine deposits. Carbonates and evaporites possess characteristic spectra signatures in the near-infrared and should be

  4. The CO Mapping Array Pathfinder (COMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Bigot-Sazy, Marie-Anne; Chung, Dongwoo; Church, Sarah E.; Dickinson, Clive; Eriksen, Hans; gaier, todd; Goldsmith, Paul; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Harper, Stuart; Harris, Andrew I.; Lamb, James; Li, Tony; Munroe, Ryan; Pearson, Timothy J.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Kathrine Wehus, Ingunn; Woody, David

    2016-01-01

    The CO Mapping Array Pathfinder (COMAP) will open a new window on both the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the Epoch of Galaxy Assembly by using carbon monoxide (CO) lines to trace the distribution of star-forming galaxies in both epochs. Phase I of COMAP comprises a 10-m telescope, located at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), equipped with a 19-pixel spectrometer array that will map a total of 10 square degrees of sky in the frequency range 30-34 GHz, with spectral resolution R~800. This band will be sensitive to CO(1-0) in the redshift slice z=2.4-2.8 and to CO(2-1) in the redshift slice z = 5.8-6.7.Constraining the CO power spectrum from the EoR will ultimately require measurements at multiple frequencies and arrays with hundreds of elements. The aim of this pathfinder experiment is to i) demonstrate the feasibility and future potential of wide-field CO intensity mapping, and ii) provide a test-bed for the technology development and observational strategies. Phase I of COMAP will focus on constraining the CO power spectrum from the Epoch of Galaxy Assembly, at z=2.4-2.8. A wide range of predictions for the strength of this power spectrum have appeared in the literature; much of this range can either be confirmed or ruled out by COMAP.Cross-correlation with galaxy surveys in this redshift range will allow us to disentangle the impact of cosmological parameters, star formation rate (SFR) and the CO-SFR connection. Cross-correlation will also establish confidence that the observed signal is CO and allow inferences to be drawn about the unobserved, but CO-luminous galaxy population. The COMAP fields will therefore be chosen to overlap with galaxy surveys.COMAP Phase I observations are planned to start in late 2017, continuing until late 2019.

  5. Exopaleontology at The Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; DesMarais, David J.; Greeley, Ronald; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Mission is a Discovery Class mission that will place a small lander and rover on the surface of Mars in July of 1997. It is primarily a technology demonstration to test the feasibility of a direct entry-delivery system, but carries a nominal scientific payload that includes rover-lander and instrumentation for limited mineralogical analysis. The nominal landing site was selected by the Pathfinder Team under the leadership of Dr. Matthew Golombek (JPL) based input from 60 participants at a Landing Site Workshop held last Spring at the Lunar Planetary Institute in Houston. The mission constraints for the landing site were 0-30 deg. N latitude, and below the 0.0 elevation datum. Over 20 landing sites were proposed and a nominal site was selected on southern Chryse Planitia near the terminae of the Ares and Tui outflow channels. In part, the decision to land at this location was based on the opportunity to sample a potentially large number lithologies in a small area (the rover will have a range of a few tens of meters from the lander). The purpose here is to review the general geological context of the landing site and the rationale for Exobiology's recommendation of the Ares site given at the workshop last spring. Because Ares and Tui Valles are sourced within terranes that may have originated by thermokarst processes, hydrothermal processes could have operated there for some time. Hydrothermal systems are presently regarded as important sites for a fossil record on Mars. Models for the formation of the outflow channels suggest that thermal spring sinters and associated aqueous mineral deposits, high priority targets for Mars Exopaleontology, could have formed in association with thermokarst processes and subsequently been delivered to the landing site in large quantities during the periodic cataclysmic outflows that created the channels.

  6. JANUS, A Proposed Pathfinder Mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Clark, P. E.; Giles, B.; Eyerman, C.; Marr, G.; Winterhalter, D.; Janus Mercury Pathfinder Mission Team

    1998-09-01

    Despite the Mariner 10 flybys and decades of ground-based observations, the planet Mercury remains the most poorly understood inner planet although it could potentially provide essential information on the evolution and origin of the solar system. JANUS, a mission proposed for the NASA Discovery Program, is an extremely fast, low cost, low risk, multiple flyby, four platform pathfinder to Mercury which would provide this essential data and complete the exploration of both hemispheres. JANUS studies Mercury and its environment as a system by simultaneously exploring its interior, surface, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. After a direct transfer orbit from Earth, the first dayside equatorial encounter with Mercury is 115 days post-launch, and includes the release of three Remote Experiment Packages (REPs) targeted for north and south poles and the magnetotail. This encounter provides the fist direct compositional measurements of Mercury and simultaneous multi-point modeling of its magnetic field. Perihelion engine burn following this encounter places the main spacecraft in a 264 day orbit allowing view of alternate sunlit faces of Mercury at each encounter. By the end of the second encounter (one year post-launch), the first photospectral map of the entire planet and a completed set of previously mission compositional constraints for inner solar system, core, and planetary formation is produced. The third encounter, less than two years post-launch, takes the spacecraft over the south pole in search of polar volatiles. JANUS features an experienced, integrated science team and a robust instrumentation package: imaging, X-ray, UV, and neutron spectrometers, energetic particle and electric field detectors, magnetometer, low energy plasma analyzer, and search coil on the main spacecraft, and duplicates of the last three instruments on each REP. JANUS is a true pathfinder, completing the primary exploration of Mercury and forging the path for future GSFC/JPL partnerships.

  7. Birdseye View of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image is one frame of an animation that was created by using two mosaics: a color image of the Gallery Pan and an image which indicates the distance to the nearest object at each pixel location, referred to as a range image. The range data set is treated as a displacement map with respect to a sphere's surface, and the color image mosaic is draped onto the inside of the sphere. The position of the camera is fixed at the sphere's center, while its viewing direction is in this case looking at the south pole of the sphere. The mosaics were projected onto a continuous cylindrical/perspective coordinate system spanning 360 degrees of azimuth. The distortion visible near the edges of this image is due to the large field of view, as well as the limitation introduced by using cylindrically-projected images on the sphere - the effects of which are less apparent when smaller fields of view are used.

    The image has been rotated so that the main points of interest, which are the 'Rock Garden,' the rover Sojourner and the rock 'Yogi,' are easily seen arching across the upper hemisphere. In fixed Mars Surface coordinates, the top of the image looks out towards a point a few degrees north of West. Color has been enhanced to improve contrast in features, and is derived from IMP spectral filters 5, 9 and 0.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  8. Australian Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Australia in World Affairs 1966-1970, (Melbourne: Cheshire Publishing Pty Ltd , 1974), p. 258. 6Department of Defence, Australian Defence Review...Pvt, Ltd .: 1977), p. 69. 74 17Desmond Ball, "American Bases: Implications for Australian Securi- ty" The Strategic and Defence Studies Centre...million with aircraft, or 3) a " Woolworth " carrier costing $300-400 million with aircraft.33 Defence planners are now faced with determin- ing which

  9. The Mission and Operations of the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.; Shirley, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA OACT flight experiment which is planned to be delivered and integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system for landing on Mars on July 4, 1997.

  10. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Batteries for the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Frank, Harvey; Staniewicz, R. J.; Willson, John

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of the power requirements for the Mars Pathfinder Mission is given. Topics include: battery requirements; cell design; battery design; test descriptions and results. A summary of the results is also included.

  11. Dust on Mars: Materials Adherence Experiment results from Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.

    1997-12-31

    Mars Pathfinder is the first solar-powered probe to operate on the surface of Mars. Pathfinder consists of a lander and a small, autonomous, six-wheel solar-powered rover, Sojourner. The Pathfinder spacecraft reflects NASA`s new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output. The MAE measurements indicate steady dust accumulation at a rate of about 0.28% per day. This value is consistent with the performance of the solar arrays, which have decreased in power at an estimated rate of 0.29% per day.

  12. LISA Pathfinder paves way for gravitational-wave probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2016-07-01

    Researchers working on the LISA Pathfinder space mission have successfully managed to isolate from the environment two 2 kg test masses at a special “Lagrangian point” between the Earth and the Sun.

  13. Operations and Autonomy of the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Morrison, J. C.; Nguyen, T. T.; Stone, H. W.; Cooper, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NSAS OACT (Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology) flight experiment which, integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system, landed on Mars on July 4, 1997.

  14. Pathfinder aircraft taking off from ground - side view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 27-second video clip shows the Pathfinder taking off from Rogers Dry Lakebed near the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base. Shown from the lakebed side, the video shows Edwards and Dryden in the background.

  15. Pathfinder on lakebed rolling out for test flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-12-10

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined in this photo as personnel from AeroVironment rolled it out onto the lakebed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for another test flight.

  16. Pathfinder aircraft taking off - setting new solar powered altitude record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder solar-powered remotely piloted aircraft climbs to a record-setting altitude of 50,567 feet during a flight Sept. 11, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The flight was part of the NASA ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program. The Pathfinder was designed and built by AeroVironment Inc., Monrovia, California. Solar arrays cover nearly all of the upper wing surface and produce electricity to power the aircraft's six motors. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  17. MARS PATHFINDER INSPECTED BY ENGINEER LINDA ROBECK IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the SAEF-2 spacecraft checkout facility, engineer Linda Robeck of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory inspects the Mars Pathfinder lander. The spacecraft arrived at Kennedy Space Center from Pasadena, CA on Aug. 13, 1996. The petals of the lander will be opened for checkout of the spacecraft and the installation of the small rover. Launch of Mars Pathfinder aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket will occur from Pad B at Complex 17 on Dec. 2.

  18. Pathfinder aircraft taking off - setting new solar powered altitude record

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-09-11

    The Pathfinder solar-powered remotely piloted aircraft climbs to a record-setting altitude of 50,567 feet during a flight Sept. 11, 1995, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The flight was part of the NASA ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program. The Pathfinder was designed and built by AeroVironment Inc., Monrovia, California. Solar arrays cover nearly all of the upper wing surface and produce electricity to power the aircraft's six motors.

  19. LISA Pathfinder as a micrometeorite instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James

    2016-03-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. We describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder [LPF] mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as 4 × 10-8 N . s. We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the inner solar system. We find that LPF may detect dozens to hundreds of individual events corresponding to impacts of particles with masses > 10-9 g during LPF's roughly six-month science operations phase.

  20. LISA pathfinder appreciably constrains collapse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; McClelland, David E.; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous collapse models are phenomological theories formulated to address major difficulties in macroscopic quantum mechanics. We place significant bounds on the parameters of the leading collapse models, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, and the Diosi-Penrose (DP) model, by using LISA Pathfinder's measurement, at a record accuracy, of the relative acceleration noise between two free-falling macroscopic test masses. In particular, we bound the CSL collapse rate to be at most (2.96 ±0.12 ) ×10-8 s-1 . This competitive bound explores a new frequency regime, 0.7 to 20 mHz, and overlaps with the lower bound 10-8 ±2 s-1 proposed by Adler in order for the CSL collapse noise to be substantial enough to explain the phenomenology of quantum measurement. Moreover, we bound the regularization cutoff scale used in the DP model to prevent divergences to be at least 40.1 ±0.5 fm , which is larger than the size of any nucleus. Thus, we rule out the DP model if the cutoff is the size of a fundamental particle.

  1. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  2. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  3. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  4. Data Analysis for the LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2009-01-01

    The LTP (LISA Technology Package) is the core part of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder mission. The main goal of the mission is to study the sources of any disturbances that perturb the motion of the freely-falling test masses from their geodesic trajectories as well as 10 test various technologies needed for LISA. The LTP experiment is designed as a sequence of experimental runs in which the performance of the instrument is studied and characterized under different operating conditions. In order to best optimize subsequent experimental runs, each run must be promptly analysed to ensure that the following ones make best use of the available knowledge of the instrument ' In order to do this, all analyses must be designed and tested in advance of the mission and have sufficient built-in flexibility to account for unexpected results or behaviour. To support this activity, a robust and flexible data analysis software package is also required. This poster presents two of the main components that make up the data analysis effort: the data analysis software and the mock-data challenges used to validate analysis procedures and experiment designs.

  5. Bayesian model selection for LISA pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Gibert, Ferran; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Ferraioli, Luigi; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Korsakova, Natalia; McNamara, Paul W.; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to fully characterize the acceleration noise models and to test key technologies for future space-based gravitational-wave observatories similar to the eLISA concept. The data analysis team has developed complex three-dimensional models of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment onboard the LPF. These models are used for simulations, but, more importantly, they will be used for parameter estimation purposes during flight operations. One of the tasks of the data analysis team is to identify the physical effects that contribute significantly to the properties of the instrument noise. A way of approaching this problem is to recover the essential parameters of a LTP model fitting the data. Thus, we want to define the simplest model that efficiently explains the observations. To do so, adopting a Bayesian framework, one has to estimate the so-called Bayes factor between two competing models. In our analysis, we use three main different methods to estimate it: the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method, the Schwarz criterion, and the Laplace approximation. They are applied to simulated LPF experiments in which the most probable LTP model that explains the observations is recovered. The same type of analysis presented in this paper is expected to be followed during flight operations. Moreover, the correlation of the output of the aforementioned methods with the design of the experiment is explored.

  6. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  7. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  8. The life and times of the Parkes-Tidbinbilla Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Kesteven, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The Parkes-Tidbinbilla took advantage of a real-time radio-link connecting the Parkes and Tidbinbilla antennas to form the world's longest real-time interferometer. Built on a minuscule budget, it was an extraordinarily successful instrument, generating some 24 journal papers including 3 Nature papers, as well as facilitating the early development of the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Here we describe its origins, construction, successes, and life cycle, and discuss the future use of single-baseline interferometers in the era of the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  9. Magnetometer for the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Jin, H.; Kim, K. H.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Son, D.; Lee, S.; Lee, J. K.; Shin, J.; Jeong, S.; Kim, E.

    2016-12-01

    KPLO (Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter) is the first lunar exploration mission of the Korean Space program. KMAG (Kplo MAGnetometer) is the one of the scientific instruments on-board KPLO spacecraft. The main scientific targets are lunar crustal magnetic anomalies and the space environment around the moon. Global lunar magnetic field measurements have already been performed by the Lunar Prospector and SELENE missions. However, numerous questions about the nature and origin of lunar magnetism remain, and additional measurements would help answer them. For example, a greater number of measurements would help constrain inversions for characteristics of magnetized source bodies, and very low altitude measurements could observe complex field geometries at high-albedo locations known as "swirls". KMAG consists of three fluxgate magnetometers and control electronics. The sensor is a 3-axis fluxgate magnetometer and its measurement range is ±1000 nT, with a selectable gain function. One sensor is expected to be located inside of the spacecraft bus and the other two sensors will be operated inside of a 1.2-m-long boom. The total mass and average power consumption rate are estimated to be 3.5 kg and 2.8 W, respectively. KMAG will be operated with a 100% duty cycle in nominal phase ( 100±30 km altitude) and possibly during extended phase (<70 km altitude) after 1year mission period. The measurement campaign will finish just before impact. This paper describes the overall KMAG concept, design and operation scenario during the KPLO mission duration. KMAG is expected to provide lunar magnetic field data to supplement previous data sets, make new measurements at low altitudes, and improve our understanding of lunar magnetism.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment - A New Paradigm for Very Low-Cost Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, Donna L.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) will be carried by the Mars Pathfinder mission to the surface of Mars, where it will perform technology, science and Mars mission engineeering experiments in July, 1997.

  11. From laboratory experiments to LISA Pathfinder: achieving LISA geodesic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Giardini, D.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the performance of the upcoming LISA Pathfinder geodesic explorer mission. The findings are based on the results of extensive ground testing and simulation campaigns using flight hardware, flight control and operations algorithms. The results show that, for the central experiment of measuring the stray differential acceleration between the LISA test masses, LISA Pathfinder will be able to verify the overall acceleration noise to within a factor 2 of the LISA requirement at 1 mHz and within a factor 6 at 0.1 mHz. We also discuss the key elements of the physical model of disturbances, coming from LISA Pathfinder and ground measurement that will guarantee the LISA performance.

  12. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  13. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-07-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  14. Mars Pathfinder Microrover - Implementing a Low Cost Planetary Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA OACT flight experiment which is planned to be delivered and integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MFP) lander and spacecraft system for landing on Mars on July 4, 1997. After landing, the MFEX rover is deployed from the lander and begins a 7 sol (1 sol=1 Martian day) mission to conduct technology experiments, deploy an alpha proton x-ray spectrometer (APXS) on rocks and soil, and image the lander as part of the engineering assessment of the mission after landing.

  15. Mars Pathfinder Microrover- Implementing a Low Cost Planetary Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) flight experiment which has been delivered and integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system. The total cost of the MFEX mission, including all subsystem design and development, test, integration with the MPF lander and operations on Mars has been capped at $25 M??is paper discusses the process and the implementation scheme which has resulted in the development of this first Mars rover.

  16. Design Overview of the DM Radio Pathfinder Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Cho, Hsaio-Mei; Dawson, Carl; Graham, Peter; Irwin, Kent; Kuenstner, Stephen; Li, Dale; Mardon, Jeremy; Moseley, Harvey; hide

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the DM Radio, a dual search for axion and hidden photon dark matter using a tunable superconducting lumped-element resonator. We discuss the prototype DM Radio Pathfinder experiment, which will probe hidden photons in the 500 peV (100 kHz)-50 neV (10 MHz) mass range. We detail the design of the various components: the LC resonant detector, the resonant frequency tuning procedure, the differential SQUID readout circuit, the shielding, and the cryogenic mounting structure. We present the current status of the pathfinder experiment and illustrate it's potential science reach in the context of the larger experimental program.

  17. MARS PATHFINDER LANDER REMOVED FROM SHIPPING CONTAINER IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the SAEF-2 spacecraft checkout facility at Kennedy Space Center, engineers and technicians from Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove the Mars Pathfinder lander from its shipping container, still covered in protective wrapping. Pictured from L-R, Linda Robeck, Jerry Gutierrez, Lorraine Garcia, Chuck Foehlinger of JPL. The arrival of the spacecraft at KSC from Pasadena, CA occurred on Aug. 13, 1996. Launch of Mars Pathfinder aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket will occur from Pad B at Complex 17 on Dec. 2.

  18. MARS PATHFINDER LANDER REMOVED FROM SHIPPING CONTAINER IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the SAEF-2 spacecraft checkout facility at Kennedy Space Center, engineers and technicians from Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove the Mars Pathfinder lander from its shipping container, still covered in protective wrapping. Pictured from L-R, Linda Robeck, Jerry Gutierrez, Lorraine Garcia, Chuck Foehlinger of JPL. The arrival of the spacecraft at KSC from Pasadena, CA occurred on Aug. 13, 1996. Launch of Mars Pathfinder aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket will occur from Pad B at Complex 17 on Dec. 2.

  19. MOC's Highest Resolution View of Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (A) Mars Pathfinder site, left: April 1998; right: January 2000.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (B) top: April 1998; bottom: January 2000.

    Can Mars Global Surveyor's 1.5 meter (5 ft) per pixel camera be used to find any evidence as to the fate of the Mars Polar Lander that was lost on December 3, 1999? One way to find out is to look for one of the other Mars landers and determine what, if anything, can be seen. There have been three successful Mars lander missions: Viking 1 (July 1976), Viking 2 (September 1976), and Mars Pathfinder (July 1997). Of these, the location of Mars Pathfinder is known the best because there are several distinct landmarks visible in the lander's images that help in locating the spacecraft. The MGS MOC Operations Team at Malin Space Science Systems has been tasked since mid-December 1999 with looking for the lost Polar Lander. Part of this effort has been to test the capabilities of MOC by taking a picture of the landing site of Mars Pathfinder.

    An attempt to photograph the Pathfinder site was made once before, in April 1998, by turning the entire MGS spacecraft so that the camera could point at the known location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Turning the MGS spacecraft like this is not a normal operation--it takes considerable planning, and disrupts the on-going, normal acquisition of science data. It took 3 attempts to succeed, but on April 22, 1998, MOC acquired the picture seen on the left side of Figure A, above. The three near-by major landmarks that were visible to the Pathfinder's cameras are labeled here (North Peak, Big Crater, Twin Peaks). It was known at the time that this image was not adequate to see the Pathfinder lander because the camera was not in focus and had a resolution of only 3.3 meters (11 ft) per pixel. In this and all other images shown here, north is up. All views of the 1998 MOC image are illuminated from the lower right, all views

  20. MOC's Highest Resolution View of Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (A) Mars Pathfinder site, left: April 1998; right: January 2000.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (B) top: April 1998; bottom: January 2000.

    Can Mars Global Surveyor's 1.5 meter (5 ft) per pixel camera be used to find any evidence as to the fate of the Mars Polar Lander that was lost on December 3, 1999? One way to find out is to look for one of the other Mars landers and determine what, if anything, can be seen. There have been three successful Mars lander missions: Viking 1 (July 1976), Viking 2 (September 1976), and Mars Pathfinder (July 1997). Of these, the location of Mars Pathfinder is known the best because there are several distinct landmarks visible in the lander's images that help in locating the spacecraft. The MGS MOC Operations Team at Malin Space Science Systems has been tasked since mid-December 1999 with looking for the lost Polar Lander. Part of this effort has been to test the capabilities of MOC by taking a picture of the landing site of Mars Pathfinder.

    An attempt to photograph the Pathfinder site was made once before, in April 1998, by turning the entire MGS spacecraft so that the camera could point at the known location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Turning the MGS spacecraft like this is not a normal operation--it takes considerable planning, and disrupts the on-going, normal acquisition of science data. It took 3 attempts to succeed, but on April 22, 1998, MOC acquired the picture seen on the left side of Figure A, above. The three near-by major landmarks that were visible to the Pathfinder's cameras are labeled here (North Peak, Big Crater, Twin Peaks). It was known at the time that this image was not adequate to see the Pathfinder lander because the camera was not in focus and had a resolution of only 3.3 meters (11 ft) per pixel. In this and all other images shown here, north is up. All views of the 1998 MOC image are illuminated from the lower right, all views

  1. Holographic beam mapping of the CHIME pathfinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Philippe; Newburgh, Laura B.; Amiri, Mandana; Bandura, Kevin; Cliche, Jean-François; Connor, Liam; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gilbert, Adam J.; Good, Deborah; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Johnson, Andre M.; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi W.; Mena Parra, Juan; Oppermann, Niels; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Robishaw, Timothy; Shaw, J. Richard; Siegel, Seth; Sigurdson, Kris; Smith, Kendrick; Storer, Emilie; Tretyakov, Ian; Van Gassen, Kwinten; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Donald

    2016-08-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between z 0.8-2.5 CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.

  2. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance < σ? >, horizontal wind speed variance < σu,v >, vertical wind speed variance < σw >, viscous dissipation rate < ǫ >, and turbu- lent kinetic energy < e > have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances < σu,v > and < σw >. On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance < σ > are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity

  3. LISA Pathfinder and eLISA news

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; Mueller, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Two important gatherings of the space-based gravitational-wave detector community were held in Zurich, Switzerland this past March. The first was a meeting of the Science Working Team for LISA Pathfinder (LPF), a dedicated technology demonstrator mission for a future LISA-like gravitational wave observatory. LPF is entering an extremely exciting phase with launch less than 15 months away. All flight components for both the European science payload, known as the LISA Technology Package (LTP), and the NASA science payload, known as the Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS), have been delivered and are undergoing integration. The final flight component for the spacecraft bus, a cold-gas thruster based on the successful GAIA design, will be delivered later this year. Current focus is on completing integration of the science payload (see Figures 1 and 2) and preparation for operations and data analysis. After a launch in Summer 2015, LPF will take approximately 90 days to reach its operational orbit around the Earth-Sun Lagrange point (L1), where it will begin science operations. After 90 days of LTP operations followed by 90 days of DRS operations, LPF will have completed its prime mission of paving the way for a space-based observatory of gravitational waves in the milliHertz band. Immediately following the meeting of the LPF team, the eLISA consortium held its third progress meeting. The consortium (www.elisascience.org) is the organizing body of the European space-based gravitational-wave community, and it was responsible for the "The Gravitational Universe" whitepaper that resulted in the November 2013 election of a gravitational-wave science theme for ESA's Cosmic Visions L3 opportunity. In preparation for an L3 mission concept call, which is expected later this decade, and for launch in the mid 2030s, the eLISA consortium members are coordinating technology development and mission study activities which will build on the LPF results. The final

  4. Sedimentary geomorphology of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, James W., Jr.; Parker, Timothy Jay

    1997-01-01

    The first landing on Mars in over 20 years will take place July 4, 1997, near te mouth of the Ares Vallis outflow channel located in southeastern Chryse Planitia. Mars Pathfinder, unlike Viking 1, is expected to land on a surface that has a distinct and unambiguous fluvial signature.

  5. A Pathfinder for Animal Research and Animal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This pathfinder was originally prepared for "Biomedical Research and Animal Rights," a session sponsored by the Veterinary Medical Libraries and Research Libraries Sections of the Medical Library Association. Current resources are described, from bibliographies to electronic bulletin boards, which relate to the issue of laboratory animal…

  6. LISA Pathfinder: the geodesy explorer testing alternative theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, Michele

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft by ESA is on schedule to fly by autumn 2015. Implementing a high precision free-fall in-flight system near a Lagrangian point, the mission relies on technologies never used before in space environments and crucial to gravitational waves observatories. The core instrument configuration makes LISA Pathfinder a gradiometer of unprecedented sensitivity. The designated orbit places it in position to further cruise through a volume of space where Newtonian pulls compensate and the Newtonian acceleration is close to zero. In the global picture that sees several dark matter/energy models and many theories at work to match observations, the free-fall specialist LISA Pathfinder can directly explore gravity at its alleged depart from the Newtonian regime, realizing a null dynamical test so far missing between astrophysical measurements and planetary tests. We will explicitly consider MOND theories as a test canvas and show that without further modifications the LISA Pathfinder instrument could sample several scales of the Newtonian-MONDian regime. We shall highlight the science case, the current experiment, the measurement design and the related data analysis.

  7. A Pathfinder for Animal Research and Animal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This pathfinder was originally prepared for "Biomedical Research and Animal Rights," a session sponsored by the Veterinary Medical Libraries and Research Libraries Sections of the Medical Library Association. Current resources are described, from bibliographies to electronic bulletin boards, which relate to the issue of laboratory animal…

  8. GRS vs. OMS Calibration in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshksar, Neda; Ferraioli, Luigi; Mance, Davor; ten Pierick, Jan; Zweifel, Peter; Giardini, Domenico; ">LISA Pathfinder colaboration, Pathfinder spacecraft the test mass displacement along the main measurement axis is sensed in two different ways: optically and electrostatically. We have monitored the relative calibration between the two measurements during the mission science phase. The trend sensitivity of the relative calibration has been computed for different physical parameters, such as temperature, magnetic field, test mass bias voltage and current.

  9. Re-examination of Mars Pathfinder parachute drag coefficient estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P.; Schofield, T.; Lisano, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission utilizes the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) parachute design. The MPF parachute drag coefficient is a driver for the MER entry, descent, and landing (EDL) design. As a result, a good estimate of the performance of the MPF parachute at Mars is required.

  10. Teacher Job Satisfaction: Lessons from the TSW Pathfinder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Lance, Ann; Fielding, Antony; Gunter, Helen; Rayner, Steve; Thomas, Hywel

    2005-01-01

    Government policy assumes that modernization and remodelling will be effective as external intervention mechanisms to improve job satisfaction. Based on data collected as part of the evaluation of the "Transforming the School Workforce Pathfinder Project", an argument is presented here which suggests that internal management models may…

  11. Pathfinder wing tip video at 50,000 feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this clip, the Pathfinder's wing camera shows the view from 50,000 feet. Below is the reddish-brown desert, with the curvature of the Earth visible. Above this is a haze, which blends into the blue-black sky. The vehicle is more than 10,000 feet above an airliner's normal altitude.

  12. Relating MBSE to Spacecraft Development: A NASA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othon, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has sponsored a Pathfinder Study to investigate how Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and Model Based Engineering (MBE) techniques can be applied by NASA spacecraft development projects. The objectives of this Pathfinder Study included analyzing both the products of the modeling activity, as well as the process and tool chain through which the spacecraft design activities are executed. Several aspects of MBSE methodology and process were explored. Adoption and consistent use of the MBSE methodology within an existing development environment can be difficult. The Pathfinder Team evaluated the possibility that an "MBSE Template" could be developed as both a teaching tool as well as a baseline from which future NASA projects could leverage. Elements of this template include spacecraft system component libraries, data dictionaries and ontology specifications, as well as software services that do work on the models themselves. The Pathfinder Study also evaluated the tool chain aspects of development. Two chains were considered: 1. The Development tool chain, through which SysML model development was performed and controlled, and 2. The Analysis tool chain, through which both static and dynamic system analysis is performed. Of particular interest was the ability to exchange data between SysML and other engineering tools such as CAD and Dynamic Simulation tools. For this study, the team selected a Mars Lander vehicle as the element to be designed. The paper will discuss what system models were developed, how data was captured and exchanged, and what analyses were conducted.

  13. Modis, SeaWIFS, and Pathfinder funded activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), SeaWIFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field Sensor), Pathfinder, and DSP (Digital Signal Processor) objectives are summarized. An overview of current progress is given for the automatic processing database, client/server status, matchup database, and DSP support.

  14. Teacher Job Satisfaction: Lessons from the TSW Pathfinder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Lance, Ann; Fielding, Antony; Gunter, Helen; Rayner, Steve; Thomas, Hywel

    2005-01-01

    Government policy assumes that modernization and remodelling will be effective as external intervention mechanisms to improve job satisfaction. Based on data collected as part of the evaluation of the "Transforming the School Workforce Pathfinder Project", an argument is presented here which suggests that internal management models may…

  15. Coordinate Map of Rocks at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars-local-level (LL frame) coordinate map of rocks counted at the Mars Pathfinder landing site. Positions, apparent diameters (D), and heights (H) were measured to the nearest centimeter in the Mars map virtual reality environment constructed from the 'Monster Pan'

  16. Coordinate Map of Rocks at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars-local-level (LL frame) coordinate map of rocks counted at the Mars Pathfinder landing site. Positions, apparent diameters (D), and heights (H) were measured to the nearest centimeter in the Mars map virtual reality environment constructed from the 'Monster Pan'

  17. Dust devils as observed by the Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, F.; Smith, P. H.; Lemmon, M.; Rennó, N. O.

    1999-09-01

    Dust devils have been observed on Mars by the Viking Orbiters and Landers [Ryan and Lucich, 1983; Thomas and Gierash, 1985], by the Mars Pathfinder [Schofield et al., 1997; Metzger et al., 1999] and more recently by the Mars Global Surveyor. Dust devils are low-pressure, warm-core vortices that form at the bottom of convective plumes and loft dust from the surface; on Earth they are frequently observed in hot arid regions. They move with the speed of the ambient wind and slope in the wind shear direction. On Mars, they might play an important role in the maintenance of the atmospheric dust. In the Pathfinder data, dust devils have been detected as dust plumes in the IMP images and as convective vortices in the ASI/MET temperature, pressure and wind data. The size and location of the dust devils observed in the IMP images have been estimated based on assumptions about the ambient wind. The obtained results are in good agreement with the Pathfinder ASI/MET data and observations by the Viking 1 orbiter. A simple thermodynamic theory for dust devils [Rennó et al., 1998;1999] has been used to compute the intensity and some physical parameters of the Martian dust devils. Moreover, their capability of lofting dust high into the atmosphere has been investigated on the basis of Pathfinder's observations. It is concluded that Martian dust devils can provide a pumping rate comparable to the dust settling rate derived from the optical obscuration of the solar panels of the Pathfinder rover [Rover team, 1997]. Therefore, they might be responsible for the maintenance of the dust normally observed in the Martian atmosphere.

  18. Results of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder windsock experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, R.; Greeley, R.; Kraft, M.; Wilson, G.; Golombek, M.; Herkenhoff, K.; Murphy, J.; Smith, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) windsock experiment measured wind speeds at three heights within 1.2 m of the Martian surface during Pathfinder landed operations. These wind data allowed direct measurement of near-surface wind profiles on Mars for the first time, including determination of aerodynamic roughness length and wind friction speeds. Winds were light during periods of windsock imaging, but data from the strongest breezes indicate aerodynamic roughness length of 3 cm at the landing site, with wind friction speeds reaching 1 m/s. Maximum wind friction speeds were about half of the threshold-of-motion friction speeds predicted for loose, fine-grained materials on smooth Martian terrain and about one third of the threshold-of-motion friction speeds predicted for the same size particles over terrain with aerodynamic roughness of 3 cm. Consistent with this, and suggesting that low wind speeds prevailed when the windsock array was not imaged and/or no particles were available for aeolian transport, no wind-related changes to the surface during mission operations have been recognized. The aerodynamic roughness length reported here implies that proposed deflation of fine particles around the landing site, or activation of duneforms seen by IMP and Sojourner, would require wind speeds >28 m/s at the Pathfinder top windsock height (or >31 m/s at the equivalent Viking wind sensor height of 1.6 m) and wind speeds >45 m/s above 10 m. These wind speeds would cause rock abrasion if a supply of durable particles were available for saltation. Previous analyses indicate that the Pathfinder landing site probably is rockier and rougher than many other plains units on Mars, so aerodynamic roughness length elsewhere probably is less than the 3-cm value reported for the Pathfinder site. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, G.; Heywood, I.; Bell, M. E.; Kerr, M.; Rowlinson, A.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ward, C.; Banyer, J.; Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Ekers, R.; Ferris, R. H.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Grancea, A.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C. E.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Kendall, R.; Kiraly, D.; Koribalski, B.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; MacLeod, A.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C. J.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Tzioumis, A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an `off' state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 h BETA observation in order to (1) study the emission from the pulsar, (2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and (3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical time-scale between the strong emission states of 3.7 h. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 min. The other strong states lasted less than 4 min. The second state change was confirmed using observations with the Parkes radio telescope. No other transient events were found and we place constraints on the surface density of such events on these time-scales. The high sensitivity Parkes observations enabled us to detect individual bright pulses during the weak state and to study the strong state over a wide observing band. We conclude by showing that future transient surveys with ASKAP will have the potential to probe the intermittent pulsar population.

  20. Multiwavelength detectability of Pop III GRBs from afterglow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D.

    2017-05-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) stars could reveal the formation history and properties of these first generation stars. Through detailed simulation, we predict the prospects of detecting these afterglows with a range of established, existing and upcoming telescopes across the spectrum from radio waves to X-rays. The simulations show that the afterglow light curves of Pop III GRBs at high redshift (≳8) are very similar to those of Pop I/II GRBs at lower redshift (˜2), with the distinction that Lyα absorption at Pop III redshifts removes any optical [and some near-infrared (NIR)] component. We calculate that within a single field of view (FOV) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope there will be on average four detectable Pop III GRB afterglows. This is the product of ASKAP's large FOV and excellent sensitivity at wavelengths where the afterglows are very long-lasting. We show that the exceptional sensitivity of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near-InfraRed Camera will make this the optimal instrument for afterglow follow-up and redshift measurement, while JWST Near-InfraRed Spectrograph will be able to detect the absorption features of Pop III-enriched environments in 70 per cent of directed Pop III GRB afterglows. We also find that the Atacama Large Millimetre Array is very poorly suited to observe these afterglows, and that the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma 4 yr all-sky X-ray survey has a 12 per cent chance of detecting an orphan Pop III GRB afterglow. The optimal strategy for detecting, identifying and studying Pop III GRB afterglows is to have JWST attempt NIR photometry of afterglows with a detected radio component but no detected optical component.

  1. Illuminating the past 8 billion years of cold gas towards two gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Moss, V. A.; Macquart, J.-P.; Curran, S. J.; Duchesne, S. W.; Mahony, E. K.; Sadler, E. M.; Whiting, M. T.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Sault, R. J.

    2017-03-01

    Using the Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP BETA), we have carried out the first z = 0-1 survey for H I and OH absorption towards the gravitationally lensed quasars PKS B1830-211 and MG J0414+0534. Although we detected all previously reported intervening systems towards PKS B1830-211, in the case of MG J0414+0534, three systems were not found, indicating that the original identifications may have been confused with radio frequency interference. Given the sensitivity of our data, we find that our detection yield is consistent with the expected frequency of intervening H I systems estimated from previous surveys for 21-cm emission in nearby galaxies and z ∼ 3 damped Lyman α absorbers. We find spectral variability in the z = 0.886 face-on spiral galaxy towards PKS B1830-211 from observations undertaken with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in 1997/1998 and ASKAP BETA in 2014/2015. The H I equivalent width varies by a few per cent over approximately yearly time-scales. This long-term spectral variability is correlated between the north-east and south-west images of the core, and with the total flux density of the source, implying that it is observationally coupled to intrinsic changes in the quasar. The absence of any detectable variability in the ratio of H I associated with the two core images is in stark contrast to the behaviour previously seen in the molecular lines. We therefore infer that coherent opaque H I structures in this galaxy are larger than the parsec-scale molecular clouds found at mm-wavelengths.

  2. ASKAP H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Koribalski, B.; Kilborn, V.; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kamphuis, P.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Meyer, M.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Troup, E.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C.; Wong, O. I.; Wu, X.

    2015-09-01

    We present H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve H I in 11 galaxies down to a column density of ˜1020 cm-2 inside a ˜6 deg2 field and with a resolution of ˜1 arcmin on the sky and ˜8 km s-1 in velocity. We present H I images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three H I clouds - two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an H I mass of ˜109 M⊙ and accounts for ˜15 per cent of the H I associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data, we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density H I emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intragroup gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the H I found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times 109 M⊙, at least 10 per cent of the H I contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.

  3. PERFORMANCE OF A NOVEL FAST TRANSIENTS DETECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of a new incoherent dedispersion algorithm optimized for FPGA-based architectures intended for deployment on the Australian SKA Pathfinder and other Square Kilometre Array precursors for fast transients surveys. Unlike conventional CPU- and GPU-optimized incoherent dedispersion algorithms, this algorithm has the freedom to maximize the S/N by way of programmable dispersion profiles that enable the inclusion of different numbers of time samples per spectral channel. This allows, for example, more samples to be summed at lower frequencies where intra-channel dispersion smearing is larger, or it could even be used to optimize the dedispersion sum for steep spectrum sources. Our analysis takes into account the intrinsic pulse width, scatter broadening, spectral index and dispersion measure of the signal, and the system's frequency range, spectral and temporal resolution, and number of trial dedispersions. We show that the system achieves better than 80% of the optimal S/N where the temporal resolution and the intra-channel smearing time are smaller than a quarter of the average width of the pulse across the system's frequency band (after including scatter smearing). Coarse temporal resolutions suffer a {Delta}t {sup -1/2} decay in S/N, and coarse spectral resolutions cause a {Delta}{nu}{sup -1/2} decay in S/N, where {Delta}t and {Delta}{nu} are the temporal and spectral resolutions of the system, respectively. We show how the system's S/N compares with that of matched filter and boxcar filter detectors. We further present a new algorithm for selecting trial dispersion measures for a survey that maintains a given minimum S/N performance across a range of dispersion measures.

  4. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: evidence for a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. J.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a 26 yr period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of 2 between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution very long baseline interferometry follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science programme.

  5. Australian Brain Alliance.

    PubMed

    2016-11-02

    A proposal for an Australian Brain Initiative (ABI) is under development by members of the Australian Brain Alliance. Here we discuss the goals of the ABI, its areas of research focus, its context in the Australian research setting, and its necessity for ensuring continued success for Australian brain research.

  6. Analyzing Pathfinder data using virtual reality and superresolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Zbinden, Eric; Blackmon, Theodore T.; Kanefsky, Bob; Hagen, Joel; Neveu, Charles; Rasmussen, Daryl; Schwehr, Kurt; Sims, Michael

    1999-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission used a unique capability to rapidly generate and interactively display three-dimensional (3-D) photorealistic virtual reality (VR) models of the Martian surface. An interactive terrain visualization system creates and renders digital terrain models produced from stereo images taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) camera. The stereo pipeline, an automated machine vision algorithm, correlates features between the left and right images to determine their disparity and computes the corresponding positions using the known camera geometry. These positions are connected to form a polygonal mesh upon which IMP images are overlaid as textures. During the Pathfinder mission, VR models were produced and displayed almost as fast as images were received. The VR models were viewed using MarsMap, an interface that allows the model to be viewed from any perspective driven by a standard three-button computer mouse. MarsMap incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. Graphical models of the rover were placed in the model to indicate the rover position at the end of each day of the mission. Images taken by Sojourner cameras are projected into the model as 2-D ``billboards'' to show their proper perspective. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven 3-D cursor and a point-and-click interface. MarsMap was used to assist with archiving and planning Sojourner activities and to make detailed measurements of surface features such as wind streaks and rock size and orientation that are difficult to perform using 2-D images. Superresolution image processing is a computational method for improving image resolution by a factor of n1/2 by combining n independent images. This technique was used on Pathfinder to obtain better resolved images of Martian surface features. We show results from superresolving IMP camera

  7. Mars Pathfinder First Anniversary Special -- Refined Landing Site Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It has been one year since NASA's Return to the Red Planet began with the spectacular landing of Mars Pathfinder and its microrover, Sojourner. The spacecraft bounced onto a flood-washed landscape on July 4, 1997.

    Mars Pathfinder was soon joined by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor on September 11, 1997 (PDT). Mars Global Surveyor's high resolution camera, MOC, took a picture of the Mars Pathfinder landing site region during its 256th orbit on April 22, 1998. This picture--at about 5 meters (11 feet) per pixel--is the best available for the site. The previous best images were from the Viking 1 Orbiter in 1976, and had resolutions of about 38 meters (125 feet) per pixel.

    The MOC image has allowed scientists to determine the exact location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Unfortunately, the image resolution is not good enough to actually see the lander--nor can any of the familiar boulders (e.g., 'Yogi') be seen at this resolution.

    Using the MOC image, the landing site location has been refined by Dr. Michael Malin, Principal Investigator for the Mars Global Surveyor MOC Team and a Participating Scientist on the Mars Pathfinder mission. The images above illustrate how the landing site was located by using the 'sight lines' published by T. Parker (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA) and topographic map provided by R. Kirk (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ).

    Left image: MOC image 25603 subframe, shown at 15 meters (about 50 feet) per pixel resolution. Small, colored box is a topographic map of the Mars Pathfinder landing site produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (Flagstaff, AZ) from Mars Pathfinder stereographic images . Dark, heavy lines are 'sight lines' to various landmarks seen along the horizon in Mars Pathfinder camera images, measured by T. Parker and matched to features seen in Viking Orbiter images. These lines were published in Science, v. 278, p. 1746, December 5, 1997. The lighter, thinner sightlines are the same lines, adjusted to

  8. Mars Pathfinder First Anniversary Special -- Refined Landing Site Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It has been one year since NASA's Return to the Red Planet began with the spectacular landing of Mars Pathfinder and its microrover, Sojourner. The spacecraft bounced onto a flood-washed landscape on July 4, 1997.

    Mars Pathfinder was soon joined by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor on September 11, 1997 (PDT). Mars Global Surveyor's high resolution camera, MOC, took a picture of the Mars Pathfinder landing site region during its 256th orbit on April 22, 1998. This picture--at about 5 meters (11 feet) per pixel--is the best available for the site. The previous best images were from the Viking 1 Orbiter in 1976, and had resolutions of about 38 meters (125 feet) per pixel.

    The MOC image has allowed scientists to determine the exact location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Unfortunately, the image resolution is not good enough to actually see the lander--nor can any of the familiar boulders (e.g., 'Yogi') be seen at this resolution.

    Using the MOC image, the landing site location has been refined by Dr. Michael Malin, Principal Investigator for the Mars Global Surveyor MOC Team and a Participating Scientist on the Mars Pathfinder mission. The images above illustrate how the landing site was located by using the 'sight lines' published by T. Parker (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA) and topographic map provided by R. Kirk (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ).

    Left image: MOC image 25603 subframe, shown at 15 meters (about 50 feet) per pixel resolution. Small, colored box is a topographic map of the Mars Pathfinder landing site produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (Flagstaff, AZ) from Mars Pathfinder stereographic images . Dark, heavy lines are 'sight lines' to various landmarks seen along the horizon in Mars Pathfinder camera images, measured by T. Parker and matched to features seen in Viking Orbiter images. These lines were published in Science, v. 278, p. 1746, December 5, 1997. The lighter, thinner sightlines are the same lines, adjusted to

  9. Melas Chasma: A Mars Pathfinder view of Valles Marineris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Murchie, Scott

    1994-01-01

    A Mars Pathfinder landing site in Melas Chasma (Valles Marineris) would yield significant science return, but is outside present mission constraints. In Melas Chasma, Mars Pathfinder could investigate minimally altered basaltic material, sedimentary deposits, chemical weathering, tectonic features, the highland crust, equatorial weather, and Valles mists. Critical issues include the following: (1) nature and the origin of the Valles interior layered deposits, important for understanding water as a sedimentary and chemical agent, and for the past existence of of environments favorable for life; (2) compositions of little-altered basaltic sands, important for understanding magma genesis and weathering on Mars, and the martian meteorites; and (3) structure and composition of the highland crust, important for understanding Mars' early history .

  10. First light of the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Arcidiacono, C.; Marafatto, L.; Farinato, J.; Baumeister, H.; Bertram, T.; Berwein, J.; Briegel, F.; Conrad, A.; Kittman, F.; Kopon, D.; Hofferbert, R.; Magrin, D.; Radhakrishnan Santhakumari, K. K.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2014-07-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment is a test-bed to verify a very complex sub-system: the Ground-layer Wavefront Sensor, or GWS. Pathfinder will test the GWS in its final working environment and demonstrate on-sky the performance achievable with a multiple natural guide star, ground-layer adaptive optics system with a very wide FoV. The GWS uses up to 12 natural guide stars within a 2.8'-6' annular field of view and drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror to correct the lower layers of atmospheric turbulence. This paper will trace the path of the instrument on its way to First Light on-sky in November 2013, from its installation on the telescope to the calibrations to its final operation, focusing in particular on opto-mechanical and software aspects and how they lead to the main achieved results.

  11. Interface Generation and Compositional Verification in JavaPathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Pasareanu, Corina

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for interface generation of software components. Given a component, our algorithm uses learning techniques to compute a permissive interface representing legal usage of the component. Unlike our previous work, this algorithm does not require knowledge about the component s environment. Furthermore, in contrast to other related approaches, our algorithm computes permissive interfaces even in the presence of non-determinism in the component. Our algorithm is implemented in the JavaPathfinder model checking framework for UML statechart components. We have also added support for automated assume-guarantee style compositional verification in JavaPathfinder, using component interfaces. We report on the application of the presented approach to the generation of interfaces for flight software components.

  12. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 39 Sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Sunrise, sol 39. This true color, pre-sunrise image (approximately 0530LST) is composed of six images extending 30 o in azimuth and 45 o in elevation and shows the brownish gray predawn sky. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999. Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  13. The LISA Pathfinder Mission. Tracing Einstein's Geodesics in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, Giuseppe D.; McNamara, Paul W.

    2010-03-01

    LISA Pathfinder, formerly known as SMART-2, is the second of the European Space Agency’s Small Missions for Advance Research and Technology, and is designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, by testing the core assumption of gravitational wave detection and general relativity: that free particles follow geodesics. The new technologies to be demonstrated in a space environment include: inertial sensors, high precision laser interferometry to free floating mirrors, and micro-Newton proportional thrusters. LISA Pathfinder will be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2011 into a low Earth orbit. By a transfer trajectory, the sciencecraft will enter its final orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point. First science results are expected approximately 3 months thereafter. Here, we give an overview of the mission including the technologies being demonstrated.

  14. LISA Pathfinder: picometers and femtoNewtons in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Martin; LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2016-03-01

    On December 3rd at 04:04 UTC, The European Space Agency launched the LISA Pathfinder satellite on board a VEGA rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. After a series of orbit raising manoeuvres and a 2 month long transfer orbit, LISA Pathfinder arrived at L1. Following a period of commissioning, the science operations commenced at the start of March, beginning the demonstration of technologies and methodologies which pave the way for a future large-scale gravitational wave observatory in space. This talk will present the scientific goals of the mission, discuss the technologies being tested, elucidate the link to a future space-based observatory, such as LISA, and present preliminary results from the in-orbit operations and experiments.

  15. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  16. Java PathFinder: A Translator From Java to Promela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a prototype translator from JAVA to PROMELA, the modeling language of the SPIN model checker. JPF is a product of a major effort by the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames to make model checking technology part of the software process. Experience has shown that severe bugs can be found in final code using this technique, and that automated translation from a programming language to a modeling language like PROMELA can help reducing the effort required.

  17. Pathfinder. Volume 8, Number 6, November/December 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency,Office of Corporate Communications,4600 Sangamore Road, Mail Stop D-54,Bethesda,MD...Agency Office of Corporate Communications 4600 Sangamore Road, Mail Stop D-54 Bethesda, MD 20816-5003 Telephone: (301) 227-9123 DSN 287-9123 E...mail: pathfinder@nga.mil Director Letitia A. Long Deputy Director Lloyd Rowland Office of Corporate Communications, Director Kimberly Thompson Public

  18. JPL Experience with the Mars Pathfinder, Mission Simulation Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, Dave; Ewell, Richard

    1997-01-01

    A summary of the Mars Pathfinder Battery is given. The battery survived 47 days at 25 deg. C; it survived a 7 month stand at 10 to -5 deg. C; it met and exceeded 40 ampere-hour capacity for EDL; it met the 30 cycle minimum for Mars surface operation; and the project power profile for MArs surface operation does not yield energy balance.

  19. ST7-DRS on LISA Pathfinder: Initial Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Curt; Ziemer, John; Barela, Phil; Demmons, Nathaniel; Dunn, Charles; Hruby, Vlad; Hsu, Oscar; Liepack, Otfrid; Maghami, Peiman; O'Donnell, James; Slutsky, Jacob; Thorpe, James; Romero-Wolfe, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), a European Space Agency Mission to demonstrate technologies for future space-based gravitational wave observatories, was launched from French Guiana on Dec 3, 2015. A payload on LPF is the NASA-provided ST7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS). We will describe the current state of ST7-DRS, including results from the initial on-orbit commissioning and the experimental plan for the ST7-DRS operations in the summer of 2016.

  20. Latest Results from the Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magalhaes, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation (ASI) obtained information on Martian atmospheric structure from three science accelerometers, which measured the deceleration of the probe at all levels in the atmosphere. Entry, descent, and landing occurred within 850 km of the Viking 1 landing site and somewhat later in northern summer. Pathfinder entered at 3 AME Local Mars Time (LMT), which provided the first opportunity to study Mars' nighttime atmospheric structure, and Viking 1 entered at 4:15 PME LMT. Magalhaes et al and Schofield et al have previously reported on the analysis of accelerometer measurements from the entry phase, which ended at about 8.5 km. The derived temperature profile extends from 140 km altitude down to 8.9 km, with a vertical resolution ranging from 250 meters to 50 meters, respectively. Here we report on a refined analysis of the Pathfinder entry phase ASIE data in which the effects of the small angular motions of the entry vehicle have been removed, thus enabling a search for small amplitude and small vertical wavelength structures. In addition, we will report on the atmospheric structure at altitudes below 8 km which is being derived from the accelerometer data acquired during the parachute descent phase. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Latest Results from the Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magalhaes, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation (ASI) obtained information on Martian atmospheric structure from three science accelerometers, which measured the deceleration of the probe at all levels in the atmosphere. Entry, descent, and landing occurred within 850 km of the Viking 1 landing site and somewhat later in northern summer. Pathfinder entered at 3 AME Local Mars Time (LMT), which provided the first opportunity to study Mars' nighttime atmospheric structure, and Viking 1 entered at 4:15 PME LMT. Magalhaes et al and Schofield et al have previously reported on the analysis of accelerometer measurements from the entry phase, which ended at about 8.5 km. The derived temperature profile extends from 140 km altitude down to 8.9 km, with a vertical resolution ranging from 250 meters to 50 meters, respectively. Here we report on a refined analysis of the Pathfinder entry phase ASIE data in which the effects of the small angular motions of the entry vehicle have been removed, thus enabling a search for small amplitude and small vertical wavelength structures. In addition, we will report on the atmospheric structure at altitudes below 8 km which is being derived from the accelerometer data acquired during the parachute descent phase. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Sedimentary geomorphology of the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Timothy Jay; Rice, James W.

    1997-11-01

    The first landing on Mars in over 20 years will take place July 4, 1997, near the mouth of the Ares Vallis outflow channel located in southeastern Chryse Planitia. Mars Pathfinder, unlike Viking 1, is expected to land on a surface that has a distinct and unambiguous fluvial signature. For safety reasons, the landing site was selected within a broad plains region beyond the mouth of Ares Vallis so as to avoid large topographic obstacles that could pose hazards to the landing. However, this plain is not without its interesting, and in some cases rather problematic, landforms. The 100 km by 200 km landing ellipse contains the following features: (1) primary impact craters, (2) clusters of small secondary craters, (3) streamlined islands, (4) longitudinal grooves, (5) ``scabland'' or ``etched'' terrain, (6) pancake-like shields and dike-like structures, (7) knobs or buttes, and (8) a previously undetected, subtle undulating or hummocky texture to the plains surface. The nature of these landforms has important bearing on how we will interpret what we see at the scale of the Pathfinder lander once the first images are transmitted to Earth. With the exception of the craters, all of the remaining features described within the Mars Pathfinder landing ellipse can be interpreted as forming as a result of catastrophic flooding from Ares and Tiu Valles into Chryse Planitia, either during the flood itself, or through secondary modification of thick flood deposits after the event.

  3. LISA and LISA Pathfinder: Gravitational Wave Observation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1 mHz--100 mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to fluctuations in the Earth gravitational field. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and cosmology backgrounds and bursts. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset of 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. A detailed description of the two missions and an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will be discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented.

  4. Characterization of the LISA Pathfinder Drag Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Jacob; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2015-04-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will be launched this year by ESA, and so it is urgent to simulate and characterize key experiments to optimize and validate the Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) performance. Success of this technology directly applies to any future LISA-like mission. Pathfinder is comprised of both European and NASA payloads, the LISA Technology Package (LTP) and Space Technology 7 (ST-7), respectively. ST-7 includes a Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) system, to maneuver the spacecraft with low noise, and a control system for spacecraft and test mass actuation. European partners have developed the LTP Data Analysis (LTPDA) Matlab suite, including state-space simulations of the full mission to create mock data, analysis pipelines constructed to reduce this and eventual actual data. We have adapted this infrastructure to reflect CMNT physics and control design where they differ from LTP. We analyze the residual GRS acceleration noise, paying particular attention to ST-7 specific CMNT noise characterization experiments and the performance differentials between using the inertial and interferometric sensing systems of Pathfinder in and out of loop. I will discuss our current results analyzing simulated ST-7 experimental runs and our future plans.

  5. LISA Pathfinder: First steps to observing gravitational waves from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul; LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves a little over a year ago, the gravitational window to the Universe has been opened. The gravitational wave spectrum spans many orders of magnitude in frequency, with several of the most interesting astronomical sources emitting gravitational waves at frequencies only observable from space The European Space Agency (ESA) has been active in the field of space-borne gravitational wave detection for many years, and in 2013 selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the third large class mission in the Cosmic Vision science programme. In addition, ESA took the step of developing the LISA Pathfinder mission to demonstrate the critical technologies required for a future mission. The goal of the LISA Pathfinder mission is to place a test body in free fall such that any external forces (acceleration) are reduced to levels lower than those expected from the passage of a gravitational wave LISA Pathfinder was launched on the 3rd December 2015 from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. After a series of 6 apogee raising manoeuvres, the satellite left earth orbit, and travelled to its final science orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). Following a relatively short commissioning phase, science operations began on 1st March 2016. In the following 3 months over 100 experiments and over 1500hours of noise measurements have been performed, demonstrating that the observation of gravitational waves from space can be realised.

  6. Pathfinder-Plus on flight near Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight with the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and

  7. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  8. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  9. Pathfinder-Plus on flight near Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight with the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and

  10. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  11. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  12. Communication: Are Australians Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansford, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the question of the distinctive nature of communication in Australia. Discusses nonverbal messages, gender concerns, historical influences on communication, the Australian accent, communication with indigenous persons, communication apprehension, and classroom communication. Argues that Australians' communication is relatively similar to…

  13. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran; Margvelashvili, Vladimer; Bilder, Leon; Kalandadze, Manana; Tsintsadze, Nino; Machtei, Eli E

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45%) and 157 males (39.55%). Of the total participants 196 (49.37%) were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63%) were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26%) of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  14. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 1; Data Processing Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Beckley, Brian D.; Ray, Richard D.; Wang, Yan-Ming; Tsaoussi, Lucia; Brenner, Anita; Williamson, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-sedes data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. This report describes the processing schemes used to produce a consistent data set and two of the products derived f rom these data. Other reports have been produced that: a) describe the validation of these data sets against tide gauge measurements and b) evaluate the statistical properties of the data that are relevant to climate change. The use of satellite altimetry for earth observations was proposed in the early 1960s. The first successful space based radar altimeter experiment was flown on SkyLab in 1974. The first successful satellite radar altimeter was flown aboard the Geos-3 spacecraft between 1975 and 1978. While a useful data set was collected from this mission for geophysical studies, the noise in the radar measured and incomplete global coverage precluded ft from inclusion in the Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder program. This program initiated its analysis with the Seasat mission, which was the first satellite radar altimeter flown for oceanography.

  15. Neural pathfinding on uni- and multidirectional photopolymerized micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Tuft, Bradley W; Xu, Linjing; White, Scott P; Seline, Alison E; Erwood, Andrew M; Hansen, Marlan R; Guymon, C Allan

    2014-07-23

    Overcoming signal resolution barriers of neural prostheses, such as the commercially available cochlear impant (CI) or the developing retinal implant, will likely require spatial control of regenerative neural elements. To rationally design materials that direct nerve growth, it is first necessary to determine pathfinding behavior of de novo neurite growth from prosthesis-relevant cells such as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear. Accordingly, in this work, repeating 90° turns were fabricated as multidirectional micropatterns to determine SGN neurite turning capability and pathfinding. Unidirectional micropatterns and unpatterned substrates are used as comparisons. Spiral ganglion Schwann cell alignment (SGSC) is also examined on each surface type. Micropatterns are fabricated using the spatial reaction control inherent to photopolymerization with photomasks that have either parallel line spacing gratings for unidirectional patterns or repeating 90° angle steps for multidirectional patterns. Feature depth is controlled by modulating UV exposure time by shuttering the light source at given time increments. Substrate topography is characterized by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both pattern types exhibit features that are 25 μm in width and 7.4 ± 0.7 μm in depth. SGN neurites orient randomly on unpatterned photopolymer controls, align and consistently track unidirectional patterns, and are substantially influenced by, but do not consistently track, multidirectional turning cues. Neurite lengths are 20% shorter on multidirectional substrates compared to unidirectional patterns while neurite branching and microfeature crossing events are significantly higher. For both pattern types, the majority of the neurite length is located in depressed surface features. Developing methods to understand neural pathfinding and to guide de novo neurite growth to specific stimulatory elements will enable design of innovative

  16. Laser Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observation: LISA and LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1mHz-100mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to the large ground motions of the Earth. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermasive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and possibly from as yet unimagined sources. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset oF 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such us spacecraft control with micro-newton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. An introduction to laser interferometric gravitational wave detection, ground-based observatories, and a detailed description of the two missions together with an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will bc discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented

  17. The Data Processor of the JEM-EUSO pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, V.; Osteria, G.

    2014-06-01

    JEM-EUSO is a wide-angle refractive UV telescope being proposed for attachment to the Japanese Experiment Module on ISS. The main goal of the mission is to study Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays. Two pathfinder mission are now in progress: EUSO-TA and EUSO-Balloon. The EUSO-TA project foresees the installation of a telescope prototype in the Telescope Array site. The aim of this project is to calibrate the telescope with the TA fluorescence detector. An initial run of one year starting from 2013 is foreseen. EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder mission in which a prototype telescope will be mounted on a stratospheric balloon. The main aim of this mission is to perform a end-to-end test of all the key technologies and instrumentation of JEM-EUSO detectors and to prove the global detection chain. EUSO-Balloon will measure the UV background fundamental for the development of the simulations. EUSO-Balloon has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, paving the way for any future space-based EECR observatory. We will present the Data Processor of the pathfinders. The DP is the component of the Electronics System which performs data management and instrument control. The DP controls front-end electronics, performs 2nd level trigger filtering, tags events with arrival time and payload position through a GPS system, manages mass memory for data storage, measures live and dead time of the telescope, provides signals for time synchronization of the event, performs housekeeping monitor and handles interface to the telemetry system. We will describe the main components of the DP, the state-of-the-art and the results of the tests carried out.

  18. Rock and Soil Types at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Type areas of rocks and soils. (A) Dark rock type and bright soil type: Shown is the dark rock Barnacle Bill. Reflectance spectra typical of fresh basalt and APXS spectra indicating more silica-rich basaltic andesite compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically the small boulders and intermediate-sized cobbles at the Pathfinder site. The bright soil type is very common and in this case comprises Barnacle Bill's wind tail and much of the surround soil area. This soil has a high reflectance and a strongly reddened spectrum indicative of oxidized ferric minerals. (B) Bright rock type: Shown is the bright rock Wedge. Reflectance spectra typical of weathered basalt and APXS spectra indicating basaltic compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically larger than 1 meter in diameter and many display morphologies indicating flood deposition. (C) Pink rock type: Shown is the pink rock Scooby Doo. APXS and reflectance spectra indicate a composition and optical characteristics similar to the drift soil. However, the morphology of the pink rock type indicates a cemented or rocklike structure. This material may be a chemically cemented hardpan that underlies much of the Pathfinder site. (D) Dark soil type: The dark soil type is typically found on the windward sides of rocks or in rock-free areas like Photometry Flats (shown here) where the bright soil has been striped away by aeolian action or in open areas. Other locations include the Mermaid Dune. (E) Disturbed soil type: The darkening of disturbed soil relative to its parent material, bright soil, as a result of changes in soil texture and compaction caused by movement of the rover and retraction of the lander airbag. (F) Lamb-like soil type: This soil type shows reflectance and spectral characteristics intermediate between the bright and dark soils. Its distinguishing feature is a weak spectral absorption near 900 nanometers not seen in either the bright or dark soils.

    NOTE: original

  19. Missile tracking and range safety: Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowgiallo, David J.; Rauen, Stephen; Peters, Wendy M.; Polisensky, Emil J.

    2013-05-01

    The tracking of missiles at close range proximity has been an ongoing challenge for many launch environments. The ability to provide accurate missile trajectory information is imperative for range safety and early termination of flight. In an effort to provide a potential solution to tracking issues that have plagued many traditional techniques, the Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS) was developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. The paper herein describes the design, field test, and results of an interferometer deployed for missile tracking.

  20. Rock and Soil Types at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Type areas of rocks and soils. (A) Dark rock type and bright soil type: Shown is the dark rock Barnacle Bill. Reflectance spectra typical of fresh basalt and APXS spectra indicating more silica-rich basaltic andesite compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically the small boulders and intermediate-sized cobbles at the Pathfinder site. The bright soil type is very common and in this case comprises Barnacle Bill's wind tail and much of the surround soil area. This soil has a high reflectance and a strongly reddened spectrum indicative of oxidized ferric minerals. (B) Bright rock type: Shown is the bright rock Wedge. Reflectance spectra typical of weathered basalt and APXS spectra indicating basaltic compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically larger than 1 meter in diameter and many display morphologies indicating flood deposition. (C) Pink rock type: Shown is the pink rock Scooby Doo. APXS and reflectance spectra indicate a composition and optical characteristics similar to the drift soil. However, the morphology of the pink rock type indicates a cemented or rocklike structure. This material may be a chemically cemented hardpan that underlies much of the Pathfinder site. (D) Dark soil type: The dark soil type is typically found on the windward sides of rocks or in rock-free areas like Photometry Flats (shown here) where the bright soil has been striped away by aeolian action or in open areas. Other locations include the Mermaid Dune. (E) Disturbed soil type: The darkening of disturbed soil relative to its parent material, bright soil, as a result of changes in soil texture and compaction caused by movement of the rover and retraction of the lander airbag. (F) Lamb-like soil type: This soil type shows reflectance and spectral characteristics intermediate between the bright and dark soils. Its distinguishing feature is a weak spectral absorption near 900 nanometers not seen in either the bright or dark soils.

    NOTE: original

  1. LISA Pathfinder: Optical Metrology System monitoring during operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audley, Heather E.; LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission has demonstrated excellent performance. In addition to having surpassed the main mission goals, data has been collected from the various subsystems throughout the duration of the mission. This data is a valuable resource, both for a more complete understanding of the LPF satellite and the differential acceleration measurements, as well as for the design of the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. Initial analysis of the Optical Metrology System (OMS) data was performed as part of daily system monitoring, and more in-depth analyses are ongoing. This contribution presents an overview of these activities along with an introduction to the OMS.

  2. Symbolic PathFinder: Symbolic Execution of Java Bytecode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Rungta, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Symbolic Pathfinder (SPF) combines symbolic execution with model checking and constraint solving for automated test case generation and error detection in Java programs with unspecified inputs. In this tool, programs are executed on symbolic inputs representing multiple concrete inputs. Values of variables are represented as constraints generated from the analysis of Java bytecode. The constraints are solved using off-the shelf solvers to generate test inputs guaranteed to achieve complex coverage criteria. SPF has been used successfully at NASA, in academia, and in industry.

  3. The LISA PathFinder DMU Software, a Global Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesa, L.; Martin, V.; Conchillo, A.; Lobo, A.; Lloro, I.

    2013-01-01

    During the last 6 years, the IEEC software team has developed the Data Management Unit (DMU) software. It is a critical piece of engineering in the Lisa Pathfinder mission, in charge of the primary processing of data generated by the Phasemeter, acting also as an interface between the whole LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the On-Board Computer (OBC). It also manages and controls the diagnostics systems (Heaters, coils, magnetometers, radiation monitor, thermometers). This article briefly summarizes all the work performed, describing the complex environment built around the application generation.

  4. ER-20037 LLNL eternal pathfinder wing spar design study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the results of a design study performed by EDO-FSD on the LLNL Eternal Pathfinder Wing Spar/Fuel Tank. The main focus of the design study was the weight minimization of the composite wall of the mid span spar section of the aircraft. The torque, shear, moment and pressure loading requirements, as well as LLNL`s preliminary drawings, were used to develop a reduced weight mid-span spar design. The design study also encompassed details such as the pressure bulkheads, wing rod connectors, and attachment flanges.

  5. Reduction and Analysis of Meteorology Data from the Mars Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Dr. James Murphy is a member of the Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation Meteorology (ASI/MET) Science Team. The activities of Dr. Murphy, and his collaborators are summarized in this report, which reviews the activities in support of the analysis of the meteorology data from the Mars Pathfinder Lander.

  6. 77 FR 6554 - Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke-American Transmission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke-American Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on January 30... (Commission), 18 CFR 381.302, Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC (Zephyr), Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC...

  7. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  8. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 24 at 4 PM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The brownish gray sky as it would be seen by an observer on Mars in this four-frame, true color mosaic taken on sol 24 (at approximately 1610 LST). The twin peaks can be seen on the horizon. The sky near the sun is a pale blue color. Azimuth extent is 60o and elevation extent is approximately 12odegrees. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999 (see full reference in Image Note). Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  9. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 2; Data Set Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Ray, Richard D.; Beckley, Brian D.; Bremmer, Anita; Tsaoussi, Lucia S.; Wang, Yan-Ming

    1999-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how existing satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-series data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. Details are currently presented in two technical reports: Report# 1: Data Processing Handbook Report #2: Data Set Validation This report describes the validation of the data sets against a global network of high quality tide gauge measurements and provides an estimate of the error budget. The first report describes the processing schemes used to produce the geodetic consistent data set comprised of SEASAT, GEOSAT, ERS-1, TOPEX/ POSEIDON, and ERS-2 satellite observations.

  10. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  11. Sedimentary Geochemistry of Martian Samples from the Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLennan, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the APXS data collected on soils and rocks at the Pathfinder site in terms of sedimentary geochemistry. Below are described the major findings of this research: (1) An influential model to explain the chemical variation among Pathfinder soils and rocks is a two component mixing model where rocks of fairly uniform composition mix with soil of uniform composition; (2) The very strong positive correlation between MgO and SO, points to a control by a MgSO4 mineral however, spectroscopic data continue to suggest that Fe-sulfates, notably schwertmannite and jarosite, may be important components; (3) In an attempt to better understand the causes of complexities in mixing relationships, the possible influence of sedimentary transport has been evaluated; (4) Another aspect of this research has been to examine the possibility of sedimentary silica being a significant phase on Mars; and (5) On Earth, the geochemistry of sedimentary rocks has been used to constrain the chemical composition of the continental crust and an important part of this research was to evaluate this approach for Mars.

  12. Processing TOVS Polar Pathfinder data using the distributed batch controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Salem, Kenneth M.; Schweiger, Axel; Livny, Miron

    1997-09-01

    The distributed batch controller (DBC) supports scientific batch data processing. Batch jobs are distributed by the DBC over a collection of computing resources. Since these resources may be widely scattered the DBC is well suited for collaborative research efforts whose resources may not be centrally located. The DBC provides its users with centralized monitoring and control of distributed batch jobs. Version 1 of the DBC is currently being used by the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project to generate Arctic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. Profile generating jobs are distributed and executed by the DBC on workstation clusters located at several sites across the US. This paper describes the data processing requirements of the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project, and how the DBC is being used to meet them. It also describes Version 2 of the DBC. DBC V2 is implemented in Java, and utilizes a number of advanced Java features such as threads and remote method invocation. It incorporates a number of functional enhancements. These include a flexible mechanism supporting interoperation of the DBC with a wider variety of execution resources and an improved user interface.

  13. CLARREO Pathfinder Mission: Enabling Faster Observation of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielicki, B. A.; Baize, R. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K.; Lukashin, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Kopp, G.

    2015-12-01

    CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory) is a Decadal Survey Tier 1 mission designed to accelerate the observation of global climate change by increasing the accuracy of reflected solar and infrared instruments by a factor of 5 to 10 over current instruments in space. The CLARREO mission has also been requested by the WMO GSICS (Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System) to serve as its reference calibration source. CLARREO will provide an in-orbit high spectral resolution SI transfer standard for up to 40 orbiting sensors across the entire infrared and reflected solar spectrum. These instruments include VIIRS, CrIS, IASI, CERES, Landsat, Sentinel MSI and other land imagers, as well as the constellation of geostationary imagers and sounders. A CLARREO Pathfinder mission on the International Space Station is included in the Presidents FY2016 budget for launch in late 2019 or 2020. The presentation will update the Pathfinder mission status including advances in understanding instrument accuracy requirements and reference intercalibration using the ISS orbit sampling. The presentation will also demonstrate the ability of more accurate observations to shorten the time required to observe anthropogenic climate change, thereby narrowing uncertainties in future climate change and allowing more efficient societal response planning.

  14. Disentangling the magnetic force noise contribution in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetically-induced forces on the inertial masses on-board LISA Pathfinder are expected to be one of the dominant contributions to the mission noise budget, accounting for up to 40%. The origin of this disturbance is the coupling of the residual magnetization and susceptibility of the test masses with the environmental magnetic field. In order to fully understand this important part of the noise model, a set of coils and magnetometers are integrated as a part of the diagnostics subsystem. During operations a sequence of magnetic excitations will be applied to precisely determine the coupling of the magnetic environment to the test mass displacement using the on-board magnetometers. Since no direct measurement of the magnetic field in the test mass position will be available, an extrapolation of the magnetic measurements to the test mass position will be carried out as a part of the data analysis activities. In this paper we show the first results on the magnetic experiments during an end- to-end LISA Pathfinder simulation, and we describe the methods under development to map the magnetic field on-board.

  15. A Fast Radio Burst Every Second?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    far. [Fialkov Loeb 2017]The FRB luminosity functionFRBs may all have the same intrinsic brightness (like Type Ia supernovae, for instance). Alternatively, there may be many more faint and dim FRBs than bright ones (like the distribution of galaxy luminosities). Thisdifference affects the number of FRBs we could detect.The host galaxy populationAre FRBs most commonly hosted by low-mass galaxies like FRB 121102? Or do they occur in high-mass galaxies as well? This affects the number of FRBs we would expect to observe at different redshifts.Future HopeBy exploring a range of models that vary these three factors, Fialkov and Loeb find estimates for the rate of FRBs that would appear inthe 500 MHz3.5 GHz frequency band probed by observatories like Parkes, Arecibo, and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP).Fialkov and Loeb find that, when we account for faint sources, one FRB may occur per second across the sky in this band. The authors show that future low-frequency radio telescopes with higher sensitivity, such as the Square Kilometre Array, should be able to detect many more of these sources, helping us to differentiate between the models and narrow down the properties of the bursts and their hosts. This, in turn, may finally reveal what causes these mysterious signals.CitationAnastasia Fialkov and Abraham Loeb 2017 ApJL 846 L27. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa8905

  16. Pathfinder aircraft liftoff on altitude record setting flight of 71,500 feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Pathfinder aircraft has set a new unofficial world record for high-altitude flight of over 71,500 feet for solar-powered aircraft at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. Pathfinder was designed and manufactured by AeroVironment, Inc, of Simi Valley, California, and was operated by the firm under a jointly sponsored research agreement with NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Pathfinder's record-breaking flight occurred July 7, 1997. The aircraft took off at 11:34 a.m. PDT, passed its previous record altitude of 67,350 feet at about 5:45 p.m. and then reached its new record altitude at 7 p.m. The mission ended with a perfect nighttime landing at 2:05 a.m. PDT July 8. The new record is the highest altitude ever attained by a propellor-driven aircraft. Before Pathfinder, the altitude record for propellor-driven aircraft was 67,028 feet, set by the experimental Boeing Condor remotely piloted aircraft. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard

  17. Pathfinder aircraft liftoff on altitude record setting flight of 71,500 feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Pathfinder aircraft has set a new unofficial world record for high-altitude flight of over 71,500 feet for solar-powered aircraft at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. Pathfinder was designed and manufactured by AeroVironment, Inc, of Simi Valley, California, and was operated by the firm under a jointly sponsored research agreement with NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Pathfinder's record-breaking flight occurred July 7, 1997. The aircraft took off at 11:34 a.m. PDT, passed its previous record altitude of 67,350 feet at about 5:45 p.m. and then reached its new record altitude at 7 p.m. The mission ended with a perfect nighttime landing at 2:05 a.m. PDT July 8. The new record is the highest altitude ever attained by a propellor-driven aircraft. Before Pathfinder, the altitude record for propellor-driven aircraft was 67,028 feet, set by the experimental Boeing Condor remotely piloted aircraft. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard

  18. MARS PATHFINDER SMALL ROVER MATED TO LANDER'S PETALS IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF- 2), Jet Propulsion Laboratory workers are mating the Mars Pathfinder small rover to one of the lander's three petals. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the three petals of the lander -- closed for the six to seven month journey to the Red Planet -- will open like a flower to allow the rover to begin its quest to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is set for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  19. MARS PATHFINDER SMALL ROVER MATED TO LANDER'S PETALS IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF- 2), Jet Propulsion Laboratory workers are mating the Mars Pathfinder small rover to one of the lander's three petals. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the three petals of the lander -- closed for the six to seven month journey to the Red Planet -- will open like a flower to allow the rover to begin its quest to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is set for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  20. Quality Health Information on the Internet: Developing a Diabetes Pathfinder for the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Ana D.; Philbrick, Jodi; Pan, Xuequn (Della); Yu, Xinyu; Chen, Jiangping; O'Neill, Marty; Smith, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A Web-based bilingual diabetes information pathfinder was created to help the Chinese population access quality health information on the Internet as part of a collaborative outreach project in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. A survey was conducted to identify the demographics, Internet usage, health information needs, and preferences for training sessions of the Chinese population. Breast cancer, diabetes, and breast cancer were the top three diseases of interest. The process of developing the pathfinder is described from start to finish, and it can serve as a model for the development of others. Pathfinder training sessions were held. PMID:20526379

  1. Dust devil vortices seen by the Mars Pathfinder camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, S.M.; Carr, J.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T.J.; Lemmon, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Discovery of dust devil vortices in Mars Pathfinder (MPF) images reveals a dust entrainment mechanism at work on Mars. Scattering of visible light by dust in the Martian atmosphere creates a pronounced haze, preventing conventional image processing from displaying dust plumes. Spectral differencing techniques have enhanced five localized dust plumes from the general haze in images acquired near midday, which we determine to be dust devils. Processing of 440 nm images highlights dust devils as distinct occultation features against the horizon. The dust devils are interpreted to be 14-79 m wide, 46-350 m tall, travel at 0.5-4.6 m/s, with dust loading of 7E-5 kg m-3, relative to the general haze of 9E-8 kg m-3, and total particulate transport of 2.2 - 700 kg. The vortices match predictions from terrestrial analog studies. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Exploring MEDLINE Space with Random Indexing and Pathfinder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search. PMID:18999236

  3. Acquiring multiple stars with the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Farinato, Jacopo; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Kopon, Derek; Marafatto, Luca; Norris, Mark; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder1 (LN-PF), a ground-layer adaptive optics (AO) system recently commissioned at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is one of 4 sensors that provide AO corrected images to the full LINC-NIRVANA instrument. With first light having taken place on November 17, 2013,2, 3 the core goals for the LN-PF have been accomplished. In this report, we look forward to one of the LN-PF extended goals. In particular, we review the acquisition mechanism required to place each of several star probes on its corresponding star in the target asterism. For emerging AO systems in general, co-addition of light from multiple stars stands as one of several methods being pursued to boost sky coverage. With 12 probes patrolling a large field of view (an annulus 6-arcminutes in diameter), the LN-PF will provide a valuable testbed to verify this method.

  4. Pathfinder: A parallel search algorithm for concerted atomistic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    2007-02-01

    An algorithm has been designed to search for the escape paths with the lowest activation barriers when starting from a local minimum-energy configuration of a many-atom system. The pathfinder algorithm combines: (1) a steered eigenvector-following method that guides a constrained escape from the convex region and subsequently climbs to a transition state tangentially to the eigenvector corresponding to the lowest negative Hessian eigenvalue; (2) discrete abstraction of the atomic configuration to systematically enumerate concerted events as linear combinations of atomistic events; (3) evolutionary control of the population dynamics of low activation-barrier events; and (4) hybrid task + spatial decompositions to implement massive search for complex events on parallel computers. The program exhibits good scalability on parallel computers and has been used to study concerted bond-breaking events in the fracture of alumina.

  5. Wake Flow About the Mars Pathfinder Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    A computational approach is used to describe the aerothermodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder vehicle entering the Mars atmosphere at the maximum heating and maximum deceleration points in its trajectory. Ablating and nonablating boundary conditions are developed which produce maximum recombination of CO2 on the surface. For the maximum heating trajectory point, an axisymmetric, nonablating calculation predicts a stagnation-point value for the convective heating of 115 W/cm(exp 2). Radiative heating estimates predict an additional 5-12 W/cm(exp 2) at the stagnation point. Peak convective heating on the afterbody occurs on the vehicle's flat stern with a value of 5.9% of the stagnation value. The forebody flow exhibits chemical nonequilibrium behavior, and the flow is frozen in the near wake. Including ablation injection on the forebody lowers the stagnation-point convective heating 18%.

  6. Aeolian features and processes at the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209°. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Aeolin Features and Processes at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209 degrees.

  8. LISA Pathfinder: Understanding DWS noise performance for the LISA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissel, Lennart; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    ESA’s L3 Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission contains a mechanism to compensate for out-of-plane angles between the received and emitted beams of the three satellites. Depending on the configuration of this Point-Ahead Angle Mechanism (PAAM) it is expected to contribute readout noise through Differential Wavefront Sensing (DWS). This was investigated with LISA Pathfinder (LPF) through a dedicated investigation. One of the two free-falling test masses was rotated via the on-board electrostatic actuators while the resulting angular noise in the differential interferometer between the two test masses was measured. For angles between -250 μrad to 250 μrad and corresponding contrast in the range of 59.4 % to 97.9 % an increased spectral density was found. The differential displacement noise remains almost unchanged for these misalignments.

  9. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  10. Soil-like deposits observed by Sojourner, the Pathfinder rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Henry J.; Bickler, Donald B.; Crisp, Joy A.; Eisen, Howard J.; Gensler, Jeffrey A.; Haldemann, Albert F.C.; Matijevic, Jacob R.; Reid, Lisa K.; Pavlics, Ferenc

    1999-01-01

    Most of the soil-like materials at the Pathfinder landing site behave like moderately dense soils on Earth with friction angles near 34°-39° and are called cloddy deposits. Cloddy deposits appear to be poorly sorted with dust-sized to granule-sized mineral or rock grains; they may contain pebbles, small rock fragments, and clods. Thin deposits of porous, compressible drifts with friction angles near 26°-28° are also present. Drifts are fine grained. Cohesions of both types of deposits are small. There may be indurated soil-like deposits and/or coated or crusted rocks. Cloddy deposits may be fluvial sediments of the Ares-Tiu floods, but other origins, such as ejecta from nearby impact craters, should be considered. Drifts are probably dusts that settled from the Martian atmosphere. Remote-sensing signatures of the deposits inferred from rover observations are consistent with those observed from orbit and Earth.

  11. Exploring MEDLINE space with random indexing and pathfinder networks.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-11-06

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search.

  12. Drill/borescope System for the Mars Polar Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Wood, S. E.; Vasavada, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goals of the Mars Polar Pathfinder (MPP) Discovery Mission are to characterize the composition and structure of Mars' north polar ice cap, and to determine whether a climate record may be preserved in layers of ice and dust. The MPP would land as close as possible to the geographic north pole of Mars and use a set of instruments similar to those used by glaciologists to study polar ice caps on Earth: a radar sounder, a drill/borescope system, and a thermal probe. The drill/borescope system will drill approximately 50 cm into the surface and image the sides of the hole at 10 micron resolution for compositional and stratigraphic analysis. Several uncertainties have guided the development of this instrument, and they are discussed.

  13. State Space Modelling and Data Analysis Exercises in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias, M.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionality required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

  14. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Metals Selection for Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Hoffman, Richard; Hill, Maria M.; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of metals was examined for suitability for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment, one of ten microrover experiments of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. The seven candidate metals were: Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Ni, Pt, and W. Thin films of candidate metals from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer thick were deposited on black anodized aluminum coupons by e-beam and resistive evaporation and chemical vapor deposition. Optical, corrosion, abrasion, and adhesion criteria were used to select Al, Ni, and Pt. A description is given of the deposition and testing of thin films, followed by a presentation of experimental data and a brief discussion of follow-on testing and flight qualification.

  15. Aeolin Features and Processes at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209 degrees.

  16. The LISA Pathfinder interferometry—hardware and system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audley, H.; Danzmann, K.; García Marín, A.; Heinzel, G.; Monsky, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Steier, F.; Gerardi, D.; Gerndt, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Johann, U.; Luetzow-Wentzky, P.; Wand, V.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    Preparations for the LISA Pathfinder mission have reached an exciting stage. Tests of the engineering model (EM) of the optical metrology system have recently been completed at the Albert Einstein Institute, Hannover, and flight model tests are now underway. Significantly, they represent the first complete integration and testing of the space-qualified hardware and are the first tests on an optical system level. The results and test procedures of these campaigns will be utilized directly in the ground-based flight hardware tests, and subsequently during in-flight operations. In addition, they allow valuable testing of the data analysis methods using the MATLAB-based LTP data analysis toolbox. This paper presents an overview of the results from the EM test campaign that was successfully completed in December 2009.

  17. LISA Pathfinder: A Summary of results to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; LISA Pathfinder Team; LTP Team; DRS Team

    2017-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission is an ESA-led mission with contributions from several European member states and NASA which has the primary purpose of validating technologies for a future space-based observatory of gravitational waves. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF has been conducting science operations since March 1st, 2016 and is now entering an extended mission phase that is expected to last unitl June 2016. This poster will present an overview of the LPF results, the highlight of which is the exquiste measurement of differential acceleration at the femto-g level and interferometry at the femtometer level. In addition, I will describe auxilliary analyses that have been applied to the LPF data to search for impacts from micrometeorites and interactions with the Solar environment.

  18. LISA Pathfinder: First steps to observing gravitational waves from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the European Space Agency’s technology demonstrator mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, was launched on 3 December 2015, from the European space port of Kourou, French Guiana. After a short duration transfer to the final science orbit, the mission has been gathering science data since. This data has allowed the science community to validate the critical technologies and measurement principle for low frequency gravitational wave detection and thereby confirming the readiness to start the next generation gravitational wave observatories, such as LISA. This paper will briefly describe the mission, followed by a description of the science operations highlighting the performance achieved. Details of the various experiments performed during the nominal science operations phase can be found in accompanying papers in this volume.

  19. Structural analyses of the JPL Mars Pathfinder impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, Kenneth W.

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that finite element analysis can be used in the design process for high performance fabric structures. These structures exhibit extreme geometric nonlinearity; specifically, the contact and interaction of fabric surfaces with the large deformation which necessarily results from membrane structures introduces great complexity to analyses of this type. All of these features are demonstrated here in the analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Mars Pathfinder impact onto Mars. This lander system uses airbags to envelope the lander experiment package, protecting it with large deformation upon contact. Results from the analysis show the stress in the fabric airbags, forces in the internal tendon support system, forces in the latches and hinges which allow the lander to deploy after impact, and deceleration of the lander components. All of these results provide the JPL engineers with design guidance for the success of this novel lander system.

  20. Mars Pathfinder and the exploration of southern Amazonis Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1994-01-01

    The southern region of Amazonis Planitia provides a variety of target terrains for a roving vehicle such as the Mars Pathfinder Mission. A landing site is proposed at 4 deg N latitude 162 deg W longitude. This area has a reference altitude of between 0 and -1 km and consists of relatively smooth Amazonian-aged deposits within the entire 100 x 200 km landing ellipse. The proposed landing site is within the Upper Member Medusae Fossae Formation deposits (Amu) and near the boundary with Middle Member Medusae Fossae Formation deposits (Amm) and Member 1 Arcadia Formation plains (Aa(sub 1)). Slightly further afield are 107-km-diameter Nicholson crater, its ejecta deposits, and knobby terrain of proposed Hesperian age (HNu). Depending on the exact landing site of the spacecraft and the traverse distance of the rover, these materials also may be sampled.

  1. Mars Pathfinder Near-Field Rock Distribution Re-Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    We have completed analysis of a new near-field rock count at the Mars Pathfinder landing site and determined that the previously published rock count suggesting 16% cumulative fractional area (CFA) covered by rocks is incorrect. The earlier value is not so much wrong (our new CFA is 20%), as right for the wrong reason: both the old and the new CFA's are consistent with remote sensing data, however the earlier determination incorrectly calculated rock coverage using apparent width rather than average diameter. Here we present details of the new rock database and the new statistics, as well as the importance of using rock average diameter for rock population statistics. The changes to the near-field data do not affect the far-field rock statistics.

  2. Bayesian statistics for the calibration of the LISA Pathfinder experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to estimate the acceleration noise models of the overall LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment on-board. This will be of crucial importance for the future space-based Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors, like eLISA. Here, we present the Bayesian analysis framework to process the planned system identification experiments designed for that purpose. In particular, we focus on the analysis strategies to predict the accuracy of the parameters that describe the system in all degrees of freedom. The data sets were generated during the latest operational simulations organised by the data analysis team and this work is part of the LTPDA Matlab toolbox.

  3. Structural analyses of the JPL Mars Pathfinder impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that finite element analysis can be used in the design process for high performance fabric structures. These structures exhibit extreme geometric nonlinearity; specifically, the contact and interaction of fabric surfaces with the large deformation which necessarily results from membrane structures introduces great complexity to analyses of this type. All of these features are demonstrated here in the analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Mars Pathfinder impact onto Mars. This lander system uses airbags to envelope the lander experiment package, protecting it with large deformation upon contact. Results from the analysis show the stress in the fabric airbags, forces in the internal tendon support system, forces in the latches and hinges which allow the lander to deploy after impact, and deceleration of the lander components. All of these results provide the JPL engineers with design guidance for the success of this novel lander system.

  4. Techniques for identifying dust devils in mars pathfinder images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, S.M.; Carr, J.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T.J.; Lemmon, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Image processing methods used to identify and enhance dust devil features imaged by IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) are reviewed. Spectral differences, visible red minus visible blue, were used for initial dust devil searches, driven by the observation that Martian dust has high red and low blue reflectance. The Martian sky proved to be more heavily dust-laden than pre-Pathfinder predictions, based on analysis of images from the Hubble Space Telescope. As a result, these initial spectral difference methods failed to contrast dust devils with background dust haze. Imager artifacts (dust motes on the camera lens, flat-field effects caused by imperfections in the CCD, and projection onto a flat sensor plane by a convex lens) further impeded the ability to resolve subtle dust devil features. Consequently, reference images containing sky with a minimal horizon were first subtracted from each spectral filter image to remove camera artifacts and reduce the background dust haze signal. Once the sky-flat preprocessing step was completed, the red-minus-blue spectral difference scheme was attempted again. Dust devils then were successfully identified as bright plumes. False-color ratios using calibrated IMP images were found useful for visualizing dust plumes, verifying initial discoveries as vortex-like features. Enhancement of monochromatic (especially blue filter) images revealed dust devils as silhouettes against brighter background sky. Experiments with principal components transformation identified dust devils in raw, uncalibrated IMP images and further showed relative movement of dust devils across the Martian surface. A variety of methods therefore served qualitative and quantitative goals for dust plume identification and analysis in an environment where such features are obscure.

  5. Winds on Mars at the Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiff, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Murphy, J. R.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1999-09-01

    Near-surface winds on Mars were measured by a hot-wire anemometer sensor atop the meteorology mast on the Pathfinder lander, 1 m above the spacecraft solar panels. The sensor, designed and developed for Pathfinder, had 6 hot wire elements arrayed around the periphery of a 2.5 cm diameter cylinder. This arrangement permitted definition of both wind directions, published earlier, and magnitudes. Data were acquired on all sols, normally in short (15 min) sessions, but on 5 sols, were taken around the clock over 24 Mars hours. The data showed sensitive response to wind magnitude and direction, but were initially difficult to interpret quantitatively because of dependence not only on the winds but also on atmospheric temperature. There was also some variation in sensitivity of individual elements. Detailed calibrations in Aug., 98, have allowed us to make the first quantitative interpretations. Winds in the early part of the mission, sol 25, showed a systematic diurnal variation, increasing in magnitude from 0 to 10 m/s during the daytime hours to a peak at 13:00, then subsiding toward sunset. Daytime winds were also very gusty, with gust magnitudes of a few m/s on a time scale of a few seconds. Some lander interference effects were noted. After the turbulence and wind magnitude quieted suddenly at sundown, they remained quiet, near zero, until 23:00, when a night flow began which peaked at 4 m/s near 2:30 AM. From this peak until dawn, winds were subsiding to near zero at dawn. There also appears to have been a seasonal change in wind patterns, with more vigorous winds appearing in the morning hours near mission's end, when the season was early fall. We will present the status of the wind investigation as of the meeting date, and will also make interpretations of the significance of the data, where possible.

  6. The UFFO (Ultra Fast Flash Observatory) Pathfinder: Science and Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Pisin

    Hundreds of gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical light curves have been measured since the discovery of optical afterglows. However, even after nearly 7 years of operation of the Swift Observatory, only a handful of measurements have been made soon (within a minute) after the gamma ray signal. This lack of early observations fails to address burst physics at short time scales associated with prompt emissions and progenitors. Because of this lack of sub-minute data, the characteristics of the rise phase of optical light curve of short-hard type GRB and rapid-rising GRB, which may account for ~30% of all GRB, remain practically unknown. We have developed methods for reaching sub-minute and sub-second timescales in a small spacecraft observatory. Rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position, we use rapidly moving mirror to redirect our optical beam. As a first step, we employ motorized slewing mirror telescope (SMT), which can point to the event within 1s, in the UFFO Pathfinder GRB Telescope onboard the Lomonosov satellite to be launched in Nov. 2011. UFFO's sub-minute measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will result in a more rigorous test of current internal shock models, probe the extremes of bulk Lorentz factors, provide the first early and detailed measurements of fast-rise GRB optical light curves, and help verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle. We will describe the science and the mission of the current UFFO Pathfinder project, and our plan of a full-scale UFFO-100 as the next step.

  7. The MARS pathfinder end-to-end information system: A pathfinder for the development of future NASA planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Richard A.; Kazz, Greg J.; Tai, Wallace S.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the Mars pathfinder is considered with emphasis on the End-to-End Information System (EEIS) development approach. The primary mission objective is to successfully develop and deliver a single flight system to the Martian surface, demonstrating entry, descent and landing. The EEIS is a set of functions distributed throughout the flight, ground and Mission Operation Systems (MOS) that inter-operate in order to control, collect, transport, process, store and analyze the uplink and downlink information flows of the mission. Coherence between the mission systems is achieved though the EEIS architecture. The key characteristics of the system are: a concurrent engineering approach for the development of flight, ground and mission operation systems; the fundamental EEIS architectural heuristics; a phased incremental EEIS development and test approach, and an EEIS design deploying flight, ground and MOS operability features, including integrated ground and flight based toolsets.

  8. The MARS pathfinder end-to-end information system: A pathfinder for the development of future NASA planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Richard A.; Kazz, Greg J.; Tai, Wallace S.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the Mars pathfinder is considered with emphasis on the End-to-End Information System (EEIS) development approach. The primary mission objective is to successfully develop and deliver a single flight system to the Martian surface, demonstrating entry, descent and landing. The EEIS is a set of functions distributed throughout the flight, ground and Mission Operation Systems (MOS) that inter-operate in order to control, collect, transport, process, store and analyze the uplink and downlink information flows of the mission. Coherence between the mission systems is achieved though the EEIS architecture. The key characteristics of the system are: a concurrent engineering approach for the development of flight, ground and mission operation systems; the fundamental EEIS architectural heuristics; a phased incremental EEIS development and test approach, and an EEIS design deploying flight, ground and MOS operability features, including integrated ground and flight based toolsets.

  9. Gambling on the Protestants: the Pathfinder Fund and birth control in Peru, 1958-1965.

    PubMed

    López, L Necochea

    2014-01-01

    Among the agencies involved in population control activities in the mid-twentieth century, none scored as many early victories in Latin America as did the Pathfinder Fund, founded by Procter & Gamble scion Clarence Gamble. This article analyzes a style in the delivery of family planning assistance in the developing world through the work of the Pathfinder Fund in Peru, the organization's hub in South America, and shows how Pathfinder personnel collaborated with local Protestant institutions. Its Protestant allies helped Pathfinder set up and manage rapid interventions such as the production of pamphlets, the smuggling of contraceptives, and the enrollment of physicians as advocates of the use of intrauterine devices. Although these rapid interventions helped quickly disseminate information and certain technologies among a fortunate few, they also weakened legitimate state agencies, neglected the monitoring of the safety of the drugs supplied, and alienated allies with their high-handed boldness.

  10. Old Desert Varnish-like Coatings and Young Breccias at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Barnouin-Jha, K.; Bishop, J.; Johnson, J.; McSween, H.; Morris, R.

    2004-01-01

    Many rocks at the Mars Pathfinder landing site exhibit evidence for desert varnish-like coatings that formed during an early, moist climate. Later eolian erosion partly stripped the coatings. Rocks excavated subsequently have shapes consistent with breccias or conglomerates.

  11. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) Pathfinder status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Booth, Andrew; Whitman, Tony

    2014-08-01

    A JWST OTE Pathfinder telescope that includes two spare primary mirror segments, a spare secondary mirror, and a large composite structure with a deployed secondary support structure is in the assembly stage and will be fully completed this year. This Pathfinder will check out key steps in the ambient mirror integration process and also be used at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to check out the optical Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and associated procedures that will be used to test the full JWST telescope and instruments at JSC. This paper will summarize the Pathfinder integration and testing flow, the critical Ground Support Equipment it will test and the key tests planned with the Pathfinder.

  12. Processing and Analysis of Mars Pathfinder Science Data at JPL's Science Data Processing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaVoie, S.; Green, W.; Runkle, A.; Alexander, D.; Andres, P.; DeJong, E.; Duxbury, E.; Freda, D.; Gorjian, Z.; Hall, J.; Hartman, F.; Levoe, S.; Lorre, J.; McAuley, J.; Suzuki, S.; Woncik, P.; Wright, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission required new capabilities and adaptation of existing capabilities in order to support science analysis and flight operations requirements imposed by the in-situ nature of the mission.

  13. LISA Pathfinder: An important first step towards a space-based gravitational wave observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James

    2017-08-01

    ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission was launched on Dec 3rd, 2015 and completed earlier this Summer. During this relatively short mission, Pathfinder at its two science payloads, Europe's LISA Technology Package and NASA's Disturbance Reduction System, demonstrated several techniques and technologies that enable development of a future space-based gravitational wave observatory. Most notably, Pathfinder demonstrated that the technique of drag-free flight could be utilized to place a test mass in near-perfect free-fall, with residual accelerations at the femto-g level in the milliHertz band. Additionally, technologies such as precision bonded optical structures for metrology, micropropulsion systems, and non-contact charge control, were successfully tested, retiring risk for LISA. In this talk, I will present an overview of Pathfinder's results to date and some perspective on how this success will be leveraged into realizing LISA.

  14. Processing and Analysis of Mars Pathfinder Science Data at JPL's Science Data Processing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaVoie, S.; Green, W.; Runkle, A.; Alexander, D.; Andres, P.; DeJong, E.; Duxbury, E.; Freda, D.; Gorjian, Z.; Hall, J.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission required new capabilities and adaptation of existing capabilities in order to support science analysis and flight operations requirements imposed by the in-situ nature of the mission.

  15. LISA Pathfinder and the road to space-based detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James

    2016-04-01

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched on Dec 3rd, 2015 and began science operations in March 2016. Led by the European Space Agency with contributions from a number of European national agencies, universities, and NASA, LISA Pathfinder will demonstrate several key technologies and measurement technqiues for future space-based gravitational wave observatories. A successful LISA Pathfinder will retire much of the technical risk for such missions, which are the only proposed instruments capable of observing gravitational waves in the milliHertz band, a source-rich region expected to include singals from merging extragalactic massive black holes, capture of stellar-mass compact objects by massive black holes, and millions of individual close compact binaries in the Milky Way. I will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, it's current status, and the plans for operations and data analysis.

  16. Finally Here - The launch of LISA Pathfinder and the road to detecting Gravitational Waves in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2016-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched in late 2015 and will begin science operations in early 2016. Led by the European Space Agency with contributions from a number of European national agencies, universities, and NASA, LISA Pathfinder will demonstrate several key technologies and measurement technqiues for future space-based gravitational wave observatories. A successful LISA Pathfinder will retire much of the technical risk for such missions, which are the only proposed instruments capable of observing gravitational waves in the milliHertz band, a source-rich region expected to include singals from merging extragalactic massive black holes, capture of stellar-mass compact objects by massive black holes, and millions of individual close compact binaries in the Milky Way. I will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, it's current status, and the plans for operations and data analysis.

  17. Pathfinder aircraft prepared for flight showing solar cell arrays on wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The solar cell arrays, which cover about 75 percent of its upper wing surface, are clearly evident in this view of the Pathfinder solar-electric aircraft. The solar arrays are capable not only of absorbing direct sunlight, but can also absorb light reflected from the ground through the transparent lower surface of the 98-foot-long wing. Engineers and technicians from Pathfinder's developer, AeroVironment, Inc., conducted a successful two-hour check-out flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on Nov. 19, 1996. The craft then underwent preperations at AeroVironment's Simi Valley, California, facility for a new series of flight tests in Hawaii, during summer, 1997. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the

  18. Pathfinder aircraft prepared for flight showing solar cell arrays on wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The solar cell arrays, which cover about 75 percent of its upper wing surface, are clearly evident in this view of the Pathfinder solar-electric aircraft. The solar arrays are capable not only of absorbing direct sunlight, but can also absorb light reflected from the ground through the transparent lower surface of the 98-foot-long wing. Engineers and technicians from Pathfinder's developer, AeroVironment, Inc., conducted a successful two-hour check-out flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on Nov. 19, 1996. The craft then underwent preperations at AeroVironment's Simi Valley, California, facility for a new series of flight tests in Hawaii, during summer, 1997. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the

  19. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  20. Validation of the Version 1 NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Sea Surface Temperature Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution, global satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data set called Pathfinder, from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard the NOAA Polar Orbiters, is available from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC). Suitable for research as well as education, the Pathfinder SST data set is a result of a collaboration between the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and investigators at several universities. NOAA and NASA are the sponsors of the Pathfinder Program, which takes advantage of currently archived Earth science data from satellites. Where necessary, satellite sensors have been intercalibrated, algorithms improved and processing procedures revised, in order to produce long time-series, global measurements of ocean, land and atmospheric properties necessary for climate research. Many Pathfinder data sets are available to researchers now, nearly a decade before the first launch of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The lessons learned from the Pathfinder programs will facilitate the processing and management of terabytes of data from EOS. The Oceans component of Pathfinder has undertaken to reprocess all Global Area Coverage (GAC) data acquired by the 5-channel AVHRRs since 1981. The resultant data products are consistent and stably calibrated [Rao, 1993a, Rao, 1993b, Brown et al., 1993], Earth-gridded SST fields at a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions.

  1. Pathfinder Version 5.3 AVHRR Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Yeboah, S.; Kilpatrick, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term, climate data records of global sea surface temperature (SST) are important for ocean and climate variability studies. The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information process, maintain, and continue development of the long-term, Pathfinder climate data record of global SST. These SST values are generated at approximately a 4 km resolution using a consistent algorithm for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments aboard NOAA polar-orbiting satellites dating back to 1981. A new version of the Pathfinder SST products, version 5.3, has recently been produced for a thirty three year period (1981 - 2014). This latest reprocessing used an Amazon Web Service cloud system and a modernized version of the heritage Pathfinder SST codes integrated into the open source NASA SeaWiFS Data Analysis System (SeaDAS6.4). Coefficients for this SST product were generated using regression analyses with co-located in situ and satellite measurements. Validation results corresponding to Pathfinder Level 3 skin SST minus sub-surface buoy SST show a global mean difference of -0.2 K with a standard deviation of 0.5 K. New quality control procedures for the new version of Pathfinder SST Climate Data Record products will be presented along with other improvements made in comparison to previous versions of Pathfinder SST.

  2. The semantic pathfinder: using an authoring metaphor for generic multimedia indexing.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Cees G M; Worring, Marcel; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark; Koelma, Dennis C; Seinstra, Frank J; Smeulders, Arnold W M

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the semantic pathfinder architecture for generic indexing of multimedia archives. The semantic pathfinder extracts semantic concepts from video by exploring different paths through three consecutive analysis steps, which we derive from the observation that produced video is the result of an authoring-driven process. We exploit this authoring metaphor for machine-driven understanding. The pathfinder starts with the content analysis step. In this analysis step, we follow a data-driven approach of indexing semantics. The style analysis step is the second analysis step. Here, we tackle the indexing problem by viewing a video from the perspective of production. Finally, in the context analysis step, we view semantics in context. The virtue of the semantic pathfinder is its ability to learn the best path of analysis steps on a per-concept basis. To show the generality of this novel indexing approach, we develop detectors for a lexicon of 32 concepts and we evaluate the semantic pathfinder against the 2004 NIST TRECVID video retrieval benchmark, using a news archive of 64 hours. Top ranking performance in the semantic concept detection task indicates the merit of the semantic pathfinder for generic indexing of multimedia archives.

  3. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.

    The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.

    This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    The anaglyph view of Big Crater was

  4. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.

    The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.

    This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    The anaglyph view of Big Crater was

  5. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants…

  6. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants…

  7. Australian Mineral Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides details on the philosophy and operation of the Australian Mineral Foundation, established in 1970 to update professionals in the mining and petroleum industries. Services in continuing education courses and to secondary school teachers and students are described. (CS)

  8. The Earth System Science Pathfinder Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the Earth System Science Pathfinder Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission is shown. The contents include: 1) Why CO2?; 2) What Processes Control CO2 Sinks?; 3) OCO Science Team; 4) Space-Based Measurements of CO2; 5) Driving Requirement: Precise, Bias-Free Global Measurements; 6) Making Precise CO2 Measurements from Space; 7) OCO Spatial Sampling Strategy; 8) OCO Observing Modes; 9) Implementation Approach; 10) The OCO Instrument; 11) The OCO Spacecraft; 12) OCO Will Fly in the A-Train; 13) Validation Program Ensures Accuracy and Minimizes Spatially Coherent Biases; 14) Can OCO Provide the Required Precision?; 15) O2 Column Retrievals with Ground-based FTS; 16) X(sub CO2) Retrieval Simulations; 17) Impact of Albedo and Aerosol Uncertainty on X(sub CO2) Retrievals; 18) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: Seasonal Cycle; 19) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: The North-South Gradient in CO2; 20) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: Effect of Diurnal Biases; 21) Project Status and Schedule; and 22) Summary.

  9. Dock and Pak regulate olfactory axon pathfinding in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ang, Lay-Hong; Kim, Jenny; Stepensky, Vitaly; Hing, Huey

    2003-04-01

    The convergence of olfactory axons expressing particular odorant receptor (Or) genes on spatially invariant glomeruli in the brain is one of the most dramatic examples of precise axon targeting in developmental neurobiology. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which olfactory axons pathfind to their targets are poorly understood. We report here that the SH2/SH3 adapter Dock and the serine/threonine kinase Pak are necessary for the precise guidance of olfactory axons. Using antibody localization, mosaic analyses and cell-type specific rescue, we observed that Dock and Pak are expressed in olfactory axons and function autonomously in olfactory neurons to regulate the precise wiring of the olfactory map. Detailed analyses of the mutant phenotypes in whole mutants and in small multicellular clones indicate that Dock and Pak do not control olfactory neuron (ON) differentiation, but specifically regulate multiple aspects of axon trajectories to guide them to their cognate glomeruli. Structure/function studies show that Dock and Pak form a signaling pathway that mediates the response of olfactory axons to guidance cues in the developing antennal lobe (AL). Our findings therefore identify a central signaling module that is used by ONs to project to their cognate glomeruli.

  10. Characterization of the LISA Pathfinder Drag Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Jacob; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2016-03-01

    The LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission launched in December 2015 with operations beginning March 2016. LPF is a technology demonstration mission built to prove and fully characterize the performance of the use of drag free test masses as Gravitational Reference Sensors (GRS) for future space based gravitational-wave observatories. As a joint ESA-NASA mission, LPF is comprised of both European and NASA payloads, the LISA Technology Package (LTP) and Disturbance Reduction System (DRS), respectively. DRS includes Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) systems, to precisely maneuver the spacecraft without disturbing the GRS, and a control system that directs spacecraft and test mass actuation. In order to fully characterize DRS/CMNT performance, we have developed a series of experiments, to take place during DRS operations beginning later this year. We have built analysis pipelines, validated on simulated data, to rapidly process experimental data and to identify any performance issues as they occur. European partners have developed the LTP Data Analysis (LTPDA) Matlab extension, and we have adapted and expanded this to DRS missions as the basis of our analysis pipelines. I will discuss the anticipated DRS performance and measurement accuracy, illustrated on simulated data.

  11. Slope Morphology of Twin Peaks, Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Steven; Paine, Colin; Clarke, Jon; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2010-05-01

    Development of slope form over time has long been a concern of geomorphologists, although recently this concern has been moved to slope processes rather than form. There are two basic approaches. The first is theoretical, involving modeling of different types and rates of processes, and calculation of results in terms of slope evolution over time. Comparisons with real-life slopes can follow this approach [1], [2]. The second, inductive, approach involves field measurements to test ideas about slope evolution starting from the assumption that observed slopes represent different stages of an essentially similar evolution [3]. Space is substituted for time, and a number of slopes, assumed to be of increasing age, are measured and placed in an evolutionary sequence (e.g. [4], [5], [6]). [5] showed that slope angles are modally distributed, with the modal angles controlled by the materials (regolith) of which the slopes are formed, and by the processes operating on them. Data can be obtained directly from field work or from digital elevation models (DEM) derived from remote sensing investigations [7]. DEMs are particularly useful to study inaccessible planets, such as Mars, where on site observations are restricted to only a few landing sites. Here we present a study of slopes on the Twin Peaks, two small hills located 780 m north and 910 m south of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at the mouth of the Ares and Tiu flood channels. The presence of streamlined hills, jumbled surfaces and conglomerates suggested the region was modified by massive flooding 1.8 - 3.5 billion years ago [8], [9]. The streamlined forms and terraces of the Twin Peaks were taken to indicate catastrophic flood conditions that were believed to be prevalent in the area [8]. It was also suggested that the northernmost peak was topped by floodwater, causing its flatter appearance. Other researchers postulated alternative geomorphological origins for the features observed at the Pathfinder landing site

  12. Polar Geophysics Products Derived from AVHRR: The "AVHRR Polar Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, James; Fowler, Charles; Scambos, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    This NOAA/NASA Pathfinder effort was established to locate, acquire, and process Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery into geo-located and calibrated radiances, cloud masks, surface clear-sky broadband albedo, clear-sky skin temperatures, satellite viewing times, and viewing and solar geometry for the, high-latitude portions of the northern and southern hemispheres (all area north of 48N and south of 53S). AVHRR GAC data for August 1981 - July 1998 were acquired, with some gaps remaining, and processed into twice-daily 5-km grids, with some products also provided at 25-km resolution. AVHRR LAC data for 3.5 years of coverage in the northern hemisphere and 2.75 years of coverage in the southern hemisphere were processed into 1.25-km grids for the same suite of products. The resulting data sets are presently being transferred to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for archiving and distribution. Using these data, researchers now have at their disposal an extensive AVHRR data set for investigations of high-latitude processes. In addition, the data lend themselves to development and testing of algorithms. The products are particularly relevant for climate research and algorithm development as applied to relatively long time periods and large areas.

  13. Radiation pressure calibration and test mass reflectivities for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakova, Natalia; Kaune, Brigitte; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments which were carried out during the main operations of LISA Pathfinder. These experiments were performed by modulating the power of the measurement and reference beams. In one series of experiments the beams were sequentially switched on and off. In the other series of experiments the powers of the beams were modulated within 0.1% and 1% of the constant power. These experiments use recordings of the total power measured on the photodiodes to infer the properties of the Optical Metrology System (OMS), such as reflectivities of the test masses and change of the photodiode efficiencies with time. In the first case the powers are back propagated from the different photodiodes to the same place on the optical bench to express the unknown quantities in the measurement with the complimentary photodiode measurements. They are combined in the way that the only unknown left is the test mass reflectivities. The second experiment compared two estimates of the force applied to the test masses due to the radiation pressure that appears because of the beam modulations. One estimate of the force is inferred from the measurements of the powers on the photodiodes and propagation of this measurement to the test masses. The other estimation of the force is done by calculating it from the change in the main scientific output of the instrument - differential displacement of the two test masses.

  14. Antenna Deployment for a Pathfinder Lunar Radio Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Minetto, F. A.; Lazio, T. W.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Burns, J. O.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    A first step in the development of a large radio observatory on the moon for cosmological or other astrophysical and planetary goals is to deploy a few antennas as a pathfinder mission. In this presentation, we describe a mechanism being developed to deploy such antennas from a small craft, such as a Google Lunar X-prize lander. The antenna concept is to deposit antennas and leads on a polyimide film, such as Kapton, and to unroll the film on the lunar surface. The deployment technique utilized is to launch an anchor which pulls a double line from a reel at the spacecraft. Subsequently, the anchor is set by catching on the surface or collecting sufficient regolith. A motor then pulls in one end of the line, pulling the film off of its roller onto the lunar surface. Detection of a low frequency cutoff of the galactic radio background or of solar radio bursts by such a system would determine the maximum lunar ionospheric density at the time of measurement. The current design and testing, including videos of the deployment, will be presented. These activities are funded in part by the NASA Lunar Science Institute as an activity of the Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research (LUNAR) consortium. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Effect of viewing mode on pathfinding in immersive Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    White, Paul J; Byagowi, Ahmad; Moussavi, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The use of Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) to view Virtual Reality Environments (VREs) has received much attention recently. This paper reports on the difference between actual humans' navigation in a VRE viewed through an HMD compared to that in the same VRE viewed on a laptop PC display. A novel Virtual Reality (VR) Navigation input device (VRNChair), designed by our team, was paired with an Oculus Rift DK2 Head-Mounted Display (HMD). People used the VRNChair to navigate a VRE, and we analyzed their navigational trajectories with and without the HMD to investigate plausible differences in performance due to the display device. It was found that people's navigational trajectories were more accurate while wearing the HMD compared to viewing an LCD monitor; however, the duration to complete a navigation task remained the same. This implies that increased immersion in VR results in an improvement in pathfinding. In addition, motion sickness caused by using an HMD can be reduced if one uses an input device such as our VRNChair. The VRNChair paired with an HMD provides vestibular stimulation as one moves in the VRE, because movements in the VRE are synchronized with movements in the real environment.

  16. Multiple Sun-Earth Saddle Point flybys for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabacher, Emilien; Kemble, Stephen; Trenkel, Christian; Dunbar, Neil

    2013-07-01

    LISA Pathfinder is an ESA mission due to be launched in the next two years. The gravity gradiometer onboard has the sensitivity required to test predictions by gravitational theories proposed as alternatives to Dark Matter such as TeVeS. Within the Solar System measurable effects are predicted only in the vicinity of gravitational saddle points (SP). For this reason it has been proposed to fly LPF by the Earth-Sun SP, at some 259,000 km from Earth. This could be done in an extension to the nominal mission which uses a Lissajous orbit about the Earth-Sun L1 point. The responsibility for LPF mission design lies with ESA/ESOC, who have designed the transfer trajectories, orbits about L1, and station keeping strategies. This article describes an analysis performed by Astrium to support a suggestion for a possible mission extension to a saddle point crossing. With only very limited fuel availability, reaching the saddle point is a significant challenge. In this article, we present recent advances in the work on trajectory design. It is demonstrated that reaching the SP is feasible once the LPF mission is completed. Furthermore, in a significant enhancement, it is demonstrated that trajectories including more than one SP flyby are possible, thus improving the science return for this proposed mission extension.

  17. Model Checking Real Time Java Using Java PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Gary; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Visser, Willem

    2005-01-01

    The Real Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) is an augmentation of Java for real time applications of various degrees of hardness. The central features of RTSJ are real time threads; user defined schedulers; asynchronous events, handlers, and control transfers; a priority inheritance based default scheduler; non-heap memory areas such as immortal and scoped, and non-heap real time threads whose execution is not impeded by garbage collection. The Robust Software Systems group at NASA Ames Research Center has JAVA PATHFINDER (JPF) under development, a Java model checker. JPF at its core is a state exploring JVM which can examine alternative paths in a Java program (e.g., via backtracking) by trying all nondeterministic choices, including thread scheduling order. This paper describes our implementation of an RTSJ profile (subset) in JPF, including requirements, design decisions, and current implementation status. Two examples are analyzed: jobs on a multiprogramming operating system, and a complex resource contention example involving autonomous vehicles crossing an intersection. The utility of JPF in finding logic and timing errors is illustrated, and the remaining challenges in supporting all of RTSJ are assessed.

  18. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet

  19. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet

  20. Pathfinder ground preparations prior to altitude record setting flight of 71,500 feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Technicians make final adjustments on the solar-powered Pathfinder remotely piloted research aircraft prior to the craft's taking off on a flight which established a new unofficial world's altitude record for both propellor-driven and solar-powered aircraft. The new record of more than 71,500 feet was set during a 14 1/2-hour flight July 7, 1997, from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The new altitude record is subject to verification by the National Aeronautics Association. The Pathfinder took off at 8:34 a.m. HDT, passed its previous record altitude of 67,350 feet about 2:45 p.m., and then reached its new mark at about 4 p.m. Controllers on the ground then initiated a slow decent, and Pathfinder landed seven hours later at 11:05 p.m. HDT. The experimental Boeing Condor remotely-piloted aircraft had held the previous record for propellor-driven craft of 67,028 feet. The Pathfinder had exceeded that height on a previous flight on June 9, 1997, but not by a large enough margin to be considered a new record. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the

  1. AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder Products: Evaluation, Enhancement, and Transition to MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Charles; Maslanik, James; Stone, Robert; Stroeve, Julienne; Emery, William

    2001-01-01

    The AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder (APP) products include calibrated AVHRR channel data, surface temperatures, albedo, satellite scan and solar geometries, and a cloud mask composited into twice- per-day images, and daily averaged fields of sea ice motion, for regions poleward of 50 deg. latitude. Our goals under this grant, in general, are four-fold: 1. To quantify the APP accuracy and sources of error by comparing Pathfinder products with field measurements. 2. To determine the consistency of mean fields and trends in comparison with longer time series of available station data and forecast model output. 3. To investigate the consistency of the products between the different AVHRR instruments over the 1982-present period of the NOAA program. 4. To compare an annual cycle of the AVHRR Pathfinder products with MODIS to establish a baseline for extending Pathfinder-type products into the new ESE period. Year One tasks include intercomparisons of the Pathfinder products with field measurements, testing of algorithm assumptions, collection of field data, and further validation and possible improvement of the multi-sensor ice motion fields. Achievements for these tasks are summarized below.

  2. The Lisa Technology Package (LTP) Diagnostics In Lisa Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuan, Josep; Lobo, A.; Cañizares, P.; Conchillo, A.; Conchillo, A.; Gesa, L.; Grimani, C.; Lloro, I.; Mateos, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sopuerta, C.

    2010-01-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies

  3. General geology and geomorphology of the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, A.W.; Gaddis, L.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Soderblom, L.A.; Tanaka, K.L.; Golombek, M.P.; Parker, T.J.; Greeley, Ronald; Kuzmin, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) spacecraft landed on relatively young (late Hesperian-early Amazonian; 3.1-0.7 Ga) plains in Chryse Planitia near the mouth of Ares Vallis. Images returned from the spacecraft reveal a complex landscape of ridges and troughs, large hills and crater rims, rocks and boulders of various sizes and shapes, and surficial deposits, indicating a complex, multistage geologic history of the landing site. After the deposition of one or more bedrock units, depositional and erosional fluvial processes shaped much of the present landscape. Multiple erosional events are inferred on the basis of observations of numerous channels, different orientations of many streamlined tails from their associated knobs and hills, and superposition of lineations and streamlines. Medium- and small-scale features, interpreted to be related to late-stage drainage of floodwaters, are recognized in several areas at the landing site. Streamlined knobs and hills seen in Viking orbiter images support this inference, as they seem to be complex forms, partly erosional and partly depositional, and may also indicate a series of scouring and depositional events that, in some cases, further eroded or partially buried these landforms. Although features such as these are cited as evidence for catastrophic flooding at Ares Vallis, some of these features may also be ascribed to alternative primary or secondary depositional processes, such as glacial or mass-wasting processes. Close inspection of the landing site reveals rocks that are interpreted to be volcanic in origin and others that may be conglomeratic. If such sedimentary rocks are confirmed, fluvial processes have had a greater significance on Mars than previously thought. For the last several hundred million to few billion years, eolian processes have been dominant. Dunes and dune-like features, ventifacts, and deflation and exhumation features around several rocks probably are the most recent landforms. The relatively pristine

  4. Detection and Measurement of Micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Parvini, C.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. In this paper, we describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as 4 x 10(exp -8) N s.We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the inner solar system. We find that LPF may detect dozens to hundreds of individual events corresponding to impacts of particles with masses greater than 10(exp -9) g during LPF's roughly six-month science operations phase in a 5 x 10(exp 5) km by 8 x 10(exp 5) km Lissajous orbit around L1. In addition, we estimate the ability of LPF to characterize individual impacts by measuring quantities such as total momentum transferred, direction of impact, and location of impact on the spacecraft. Information on flux and direction provided by LPF may provide insight as to the nature and origin of the individual impact and help constrain models of the interplanetary dust complex in general. Additionally, this direct in situ measurement of micrometeoroid impacts will be valuable to designers of future spacecraft targeting the environment around L1.

  5. Detection and measurement of micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Parvini, C.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. In this paper, we describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as 4 × 10-8 N s. We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the inner solar system. We find that LPF may detect dozens to hundreds of individual events corresponding to impacts of particles with masses >10-9g during LPF's roughly six-month science operations phase in a 5 × 105 km by 8 × 105 km Lissajous orbit around L1. In addition, we estimate the ability of LPF to characterize individual impacts by measuring quantities such as total momentum transferred, direction of impact, and location of impact on the spacecraft. Information on flux and direction provided by LPF may provide insight as to the nature and origin of the individual impact and help constrain models of the interplanetary dust complex in general. Additionally, this direct in situ measurement of micrometeoroid impacts will be valuable to designers of future spacecraft targeting the environment around L1.

  6. Verification of Mars solar radiation model based on Mars Pathfinder data

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Segalov, T.; Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Baraona, C.R.

    1997-12-31

    The solar radiation model for the Martian surface was developed based on the images taken by the two Viking Landers VL1 and VL2 cameras, and calculation of the solar flux function. This model was used for the design of the Pathfinder`s photovoltaic arrays. The Pathfinder is equipped with various instruments capable of measuring data from which solar radiation quantities may be derived. In the present study the authors use data of the Lander and Rover, and perform correlation calculation to the solar radiation model. This study shows that the solar radiation model predicts with good accuracy the solar radiation on the Martian surface for horizontal photovoltaic arrays and for an optical depth of 0.5 of the Martian atmosphere.

  7. Preliminary Findings of the Photovoltaic Cell Calibration Experiment on Pathfinder Flight 95-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the photovoltaic (PV) cell calibration experiment for Pathfinder was to develop an experiment compatible with an ultralight UAV to predict the performance of PV cells at AM0, the solar spectrum in space, using the Langley plot technique. The Langley plot is a valuable technique for this purpose and requires accurate measurements of air mass (pressure), cell temperature, solar irradiance, and current-voltage(IV) characteristics with the cells directed normal to the direct ray of the sun. Pathfinder's mission objective (95-3) of 65,000 ft. maximum altitude, is ideal for performing the Langley plot measurements. Miniaturization of electronic data acquisition equipment enabled the design and construction of an accurate and light weight measurement system that meets Pathfinder's low payload weight requirements.

  8. MARS PATHFINDER SMALL ROVER UNDERGOES FINAL FUNCTIONAL CHECK IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder small rover undergoes a final functional check in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) before being attached to the Pathfinder lander. The six- wheeled robotic vehicle will become the first autonomous rover to explore the surface of another planet when it begins crawling across the Martian terrain next year. The small rover will be attached to one of the three petals of the Mars Pathfinder lander. After the petals are closed, a protective aeroshell will be installed around the lander and parachutes attached to it. This assembled entry vehicle will then be mated to the cruise stage that will carry the spacecraft on its interplanetary trajectory. The completed spacecraft assembly will be mated with an upper stage booster before going to the launch pad. Liftoff on a Delta II expendable launch vehicle currently is set for Dec. 2 at the beginning of a 24-day launch period.

  9. AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder Products: Evaluation, Enhancement and Transition to MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Charles; Masalanik, James; Stone, Robert; Stroeve, Julienne; Emery, William

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-Based Polar Pathfinder (APP) products include calibrated AVHRR channel data, surface temperatures, albedo, satellite scan and solar geometries, and cloud mask, all composited into twice-per-day images, and daily averaged fields of sea ice motion, for regions poleward of 50 latitude. Our general goals under this grant: (1) Quantify the APP accuracy and sources of error by comparing Pathfinder products with field measurements; (2) Determine the consistency of mean fields and trends in comparison with longer time series of available station data and forecast model output; (3) Investigate the consistency of the products between the different AVHRR instruments over the 1982-present period of the NOAA program; and (4) Compare and annual cycle of the APP products with MODIS to establish a baseline for extending Pathfinder-type products into the new ESE period.

  10. Validation of AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.0 Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, K. S.; Barton, A. D.; Kearns, E. J.; Reynolds, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    An improved, 20-year long sea surface temperature (SST) data set based on NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations and an improved Pathfinder algorithm has been developed by the NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. This data set implements numerous improvements over previously available version 4.x Pathfinder data sets, including a finer spatial resolution, use of ice masks in quality level determinations, and greater inclusion of coastal and inland waters. Validation studies conducted on this AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.0 collection have been undertaken. Both quantitative and qualitative assessments of these SST observations will be presented, with an emphasis on the improved coastal coverage, reduced biases compared to operational AVHRR SSTs, enhanced climatologies, and refined high-latitude observations.

  11. Pathfinder technologies for bold new missions. [U.S. research and development program for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Rosen, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Project Pathfinder is a proposed U.S. Space Research and Technology program intended to enable bold new missions of space exploration. Pathfinder continues the advancement of technological capabilities and extends the foundation established under the Civil Space Technology Initiative, CSTI. By filling critical technological gaps, CSTI enhances access to Earth orbit and supports effective operations and science missions therein. Pathfinder, with a longer-term horizon, looks to a future that builds on Shuttle and Space Station and addresses technologies that support a range of exploration missions including: a return to the Moon to build an outpost; piloted missions to Mars; and continued scientific exploration of Earth and the other planets. The program's objective is to develop, within reasonable time frames, those emerging and innovative technologies that will make possible both new and enhanced missions and system concepts.

  12. Photogrammetric analysis of horizon panoramas: The Pathfinder landing site in Viking orbiter images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberst, J.; Jaumann, R.; Zeitler, W.; Hauber, E.; Kuschel, M.; Parker, T.; Golombek, M.; Malin, M.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Tiepoint measurements, block adjustment techniques, and sunrise/sunset pictures were used to obtain precise pointing data with respect to north for a set of 33 IMP horizon images. Azimuth angles for five prominent topographic features seen at the horizon were measured and correlated with locations of these features in Viking orbiter images. Based on this analysis, the Pathfinder line/sample coordinates in two raw Viking images were determined with approximate errors of 1 pixel, or 40 m. Identification of the Pathfinder location in orbit imagery yields geological context for surface studies of the landing site. Furthermore, the precise determination of coordinates in images together with the known planet-fixed coordinates of the lander make the Pathfinder landing site the most important anchor point in current control point networks of Mars. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Pathfinder technologies for bold new missions. [U.S. research and development program for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Rosen, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Project Pathfinder is a proposed U.S. Space Research and Technology program intended to enable bold new missions of space exploration. Pathfinder continues the advancement of technological capabilities and extends the foundation established under the Civil Space Technology Initiative, CSTI. By filling critical technological gaps, CSTI enhances access to Earth orbit and supports effective operations and science missions therein. Pathfinder, with a longer-term horizon, looks to a future that builds on Shuttle and Space Station and addresses technologies that support a range of exploration missions including: a return to the Moon to build an outpost; piloted missions to Mars; and continued scientific exploration of Earth and the other planets. The program's objective is to develop, within reasonable time frames, those emerging and innovative technologies that will make possible both new and enhanced missions and system concepts.

  14. Australian Courseware in Geographical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidstone, John G.; Gerber, Rod

    Students pursuing Australian studies should be given every possible opportunity to work with materials produced in Australia. There is a substantial and growing list of good curriculum software written within Australia and from an Australian perspective which can add interest and excitement to Australian geography classrooms. Computers can be used…

  15. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMN). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30µM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato, exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. PMID:25668718

  16. Observations by the Mars 1994 orbiter and possible correlations with Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. Uwe

    1994-01-01

    The Mars '94 spacecraft will still be operational when Mars Pathfinder begins its observations. While it will probably not be possible to detect the lander directly, the terrain, including the landing error ellipse, can be covered in high resolution (10 m) in various color bands. The stereo capability of the high resolution camera will provide a three-dimensional terrain map. The landing site of Pathfinder could possibly be chosen so that correlated observations of IMP and the remote sensing instruments onboard Mars '94 may be possible. We will discuss this scenario based on the presently adopted Mars '94 orbit and resulting enhancements stemming from correlations of data obtained by both spacecraft.

  17. The SKA and its pathfinders in the next decade: synergies with the TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine

    2014-07-01

    The next decade will be extremely exciting for centimeter- and meter-wave radio astronomy. Large new facilities such as ASKAP, LOFAR and MeerKAT, as well as major retrofits to existing facilities such as the JVLA and WSRT, are under construction or have begun operations. While revolutionary in and of themselves, these facilities are also important pathfinders to the SKA, whose construction will begin towards the end of this decade. This talk will review the key science that will be delivered by the SKA pathfinders as well as that anticipated with SKA Phase One (2018-2023) and Phase Two (>2023), with a focus on potential synergies with the TMT.

  18. Mineralogic and compositional properties of Martian soil and dust: results from Mars Pathfinder

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F.; McSween, H.Y.; Crisp, J.A.; Morris, R.V.; Murchie, S.L.; Bridges, N.T.; Johnson, J. R.; Britt, D.T.; Golombek, M.P.; Moore, H.J.; Ghosh, A.; Bishop, J.L.; Anderson, R.C.; Brückner, J.; Economou, T.; Greenwood, J.P.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Hargraves, R.M.; Hviid, S.; Knudsen, J.M.; Madsen, M.B.; Reid, R.; Rieder, R.; Soderblom, L.

    2000-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder obtained multispectral, elemental, magnetic, and physical measurements of soil and dust at the Sagan Memorial Station during the course of its 83 sol mission. We describe initial results from these measurements, concentrating on multispectral and elemental data, and use these data, along with previous Viking, SNC meteorite, and telescopic results, to help constrain the origin and evolution of Martian soil and dust. We find that soils and dust can be divided into at least eight distinct spectral units, based on parameterization of Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) 400 to 1000 nm multispectral images. The most distinctive spectral parameters for soils and dust are the reflectivity in the red, the red/blue reflectivity ratio, the near-IR spectral slope, and the strength of the 800 to 1000 nm absorption feature. Most of the Pathfinder spectra are consistent with the presence of poorly crystalline or nanophase ferric oxide(s), sometimes mixed with small but varying degrees of well-crystalline ferric and ferrous phases. Darker soil units appear to be coarser-grained, compacted, and/or mixed with a larger amount of dark ferrous materials relative to bright soils. Nanophase goethite, akaganeite, schwertmannite, and maghemite are leading candidates for the origin of the absorption centered near 900 nm in IMP spectra. The ferrous component in the soil cannot be well-constrained based on IMP data. Alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) measurements of six soil units show little variability within the landing site and show remarkable overall similarity to the average Viking-derived soil elemental composition. Differences exist between Viking and Pathfinder soils, however, including significantly higher S and Cl abundances and lower Si abundances in Viking soils and the lack of a correlation between Ti and Fe in Pathfinder soils. No significant linear correlations were observed between IMP spectral properties and APXS elemental chemistry. Attempts at constraining

  19. Climate Change on Mars Inferred from Erosion Rates at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    The observation that the Mars Pathfinder landing site probably looks very similar to when it was deposited by catastrophic floods some 1.8-3.5 Ga allows quantitative constraints to be placed on the rate of change at the landing site since that time. When combined with interpretations of data recently returned by the Mars Pathfinder and Global Surveyor missions and perspectives drawn from 20 years of analysis and interpretation of Viking data, these observations and inferences suggest an early warmer and wetter environment with vastly different erosion rates and a major climatic change on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Climate Change on Mars Inferred from Erosion Rates at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    The observation that the Mars Pathfinder landing site probably looks very similar to when it was deposited by catastrophic floods some 1.8-3.5 Ga allows quantitative constraints to be placed on the rate of change at the landing site since that time. When combined with interpretations of data recently returned by the Mars Pathfinder and Global Surveyor missions and perspectives drawn from 20 years of analysis and interpretation of Viking data, these observations and inferences suggest an early warmer and wetter environment with vastly different erosion rates and a major climatic change on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.