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Sample records for autographa californica gp64

  1. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  2. A single amino acid substitution modulates low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of GP64 protein in Autographa californica and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Hayato; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro

    2010-09-01

    We have previously shown that budded viruses of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enter the cell cytoplasm but do not migrate into the nuclei of non-permissive Sf9 cells that support a high titer of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) multiplication. Here we show, using the syncytium formation assay, that low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of BmNPV GP64 protein (Bm-GP64) is significantly lower than that of AcMNPV GP64 protein (Ac-GP64). Mutational analyses of GP64 proteins revealed that a single amino acid substitution between Ac-GP64 H155 and Bm-GP64 Y153 can have significant positive or negative effects on membrane fusion activity. Studies using bacmid-based GP64 recombinant AcMNPV harboring point-mutated ac-gp64 and bm-gp64 genes showed that Ac-GP64 H155Y and Bm-GP64 Y153H substitutions decreased and increased, respectively, the multiplication and cell-to-cell spread of progeny viruses. These results indicate that Ac-GP64 H155 facilitates the low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction between virus envelopes and endosomal membranes.

  3. Proteomics of the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus budded virions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ranran; Deng, Fei; Hou, Dianhai; Zhao, Yong; Guo, Lin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2010-07-01

    Baculoviruses produce two progeny phenotypes during their replication cycles. The occlusion-derived virus (ODV) is responsible for initiating primary infection in the larval midgut, and the budded virus (BV) phenotype is responsible for the secondary infection. The proteomics of several baculovirus ODVs have been revealed, but so far, no extensive analysis of BV-associated proteins has been conducted. In this study, the protein composition of the BV of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the type species of baculoviruses, was analyzed by various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, including liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap (LC-Qtrap), liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-Q-TOF), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF). SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analyses showed that the three most abundant proteins of the AcMNPV BV were GP64, VP39, and P6.9. A total of 34 viral proteins associated with the AcMNPV BV were identified by the indicated methods. Thirteen of these proteins, PP31, AC58/59, AC66, IAP-2, AC73, AC74, AC114, AC124, chitinase, polyhedron envelope protein (PEP), AC132, ODV-E18, and ODV-E56, were identified for the first time to be BV-associated proteins. Western blot analyses showed that ODV-E18 and ODV-E25, which were previously thought to be ODV-specific proteins, were also present in the envelop fraction of BV. In addition, 11 cellular proteins were found to be associated with the AcMNPV BV by both LC-Qtrap and LC-Q-TOF analyses. Interestingly, seven of these proteins were also identified in other enveloped viruses, suggesting that many enveloped viruses may commonly utilize certain conserved cellular pathways.

  4. Genetic diversity among isolates of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our knowledge of genetic variation at the nucleotide sequence level of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV; Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus) derives from complete genome sequences of the C6 clonal isolate of AcMNPV and the R1 and CL3 clonal isolates of AcMNPV variants Rachip...

  5. Improving promiscuous mammalian cell entry by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    PubMed Central

    O’Flynn, Neil M. J.; Patel, Avnish; Kadlec, Jan; Jones, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    The insect baculovirus AcMNPV (Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus) enters many mammalian cell lines, prompting its application as a general eukaryotic gene delivery agent, but the basis of entry is poorly understood. For adherent mammalian cells, we show that entry is favoured by low pH and by increasing the available cell-surface area through a transient release from the substratum. Low pH also stimulated baculovirus entry into mammalian cells grown in suspension which, optimally, could reach 90% of the transduced population. The basic loop, residues 268–281, of the viral surface glycoprotein gp64 was required for entry and a tetra mutant with increasing basicity increased entry into a range of mammalian cells. The same mutant failed to plaque in Sf9 cells, instead showing individual cell entry and minimal cell-to-cell spread, consistent with an altered fusion phenotype. Viruses grown in different insect cells showed different mammalian cell entry efficiencies, suggesting that additional factors also govern entry. PMID:23035899

  6. Mapping the conformational epitope of a neutralizing antibody (AcV1) directed against the AcMNPV GP64 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jian; Blissard, Gary W. . E-mail: gwb1@cornell.edu

    2006-09-01

    The envelope glycoprotein GP64 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is necessary and sufficient for the acid-induced membrane fusion activity that is required for fusion of the budded virus (BV) envelope and the endosome membrane during virus entry. Infectivity of the budded virus (BV) is neutralized by AcV1, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against GP64. Prior studies indicated that AcV1 recognizes a conformational epitope and does not inhibit virus attachment to the cell, but instead inhibits entry at a step following virus attachment. We found that AcV1 recognition of GP64 was lost upon exposure of GP64 to low pH (pH 4.5) and restored by returning GP64 to pH 6.2. In addition, the AcV1 epitope was lost upon denaturation of GP64 in SDS, but the AcV1 epitope was restored by refolding the protein in the absence of SDS. Using truncated GP64 proteins expressed in insect cells, we mapped the AcV1 epitope to a 24 amino acid region in the central variable domain of GP64. When sequences within the mapped AcV1 epitope were substituted with a c-Myc epitope and the resulting construct was used to replace wt GP64 in recombinant AcMNPV viruses, the modified GP64 protein appeared to function normally. However, an anti-c-Myc monoclonal antibody did not neutralize infectivity of those viruses. Because binding of the c-Myc MAb to the same site in the GP64 sequence did not result in neutralization, these studies suggest that AcV1 neutralization may result from a specific structural constraint caused by AcV1 binding and not simply by steric hindrance caused by antibody binding at this position in GP64.

  7. Nuclear Translocation Sequence and Region in Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ME53 That Are Important for Optimal Baculovirus Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; de Jong, Jondavid; Nagy, Éva; Theilmann, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is in the family Baculoviridae, genus Alphabaculovirus. AcMNPV me53 is a highly conserved immediate early gene in all lepidopteran baculoviruses that have been sequenced and is transcribed up to late times postinfection. Although me53 is not essential for viral DNA synthesis, infectious budded virus (BV) production is greatly attenuated when it is deleted. ME53 associates with the nucleocapsid on both budded virus and occlusion-derived virus, but not with the virus envelope. ME53 colocalizes in plasma membrane foci with the envelope glycoprotein GP64 in a GP64-dependent manner. ME53 localizes in the cytoplasm early postinfection, and despite the lack of a reported nuclear localization signal (NLS), ME53 translocates to the nucleus at late times postinfection. To map determinants of ME53 that facilitate its nuclear translocation, recombinant AcMNPV bacmids containing a series of ME53 truncations, internal deletions, and peptides fused with hemagglutinin (HA) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were constructed. Intracellular-localization studies identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus of ME53 that acted as the nuclear translocation sequence (NTS), facilitating its nuclear transport at late times postinfection. The first 100 N-terminal amino acids and the last 50 C-terminal amino acids of ME53 are dispensable for high levels of budded virus production. The region within amino acids 101 to 398, which also contains the NTS, is critical for optimal levels of budded virus production. IMPORTANCE Baculovirus me53 is a conserved immediate early gene found in all sequenced lepidopteran alpha- and betabaculoviruses. We first identified residues within amino acids 109 to 137 at the N terminus that act as the ME53 nuclear translocation sequence (NTS) to facilitate its nuclear translocation and defined an internal region within amino acids 101 to 398, which includes the NTS, as

  8. The pnk/pnl gene (ORF 86) of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a non-essential, immediate early gene.

    PubMed

    Durantel, D; Croizier, L; Ayres, M D; Croizier, G; Possee, R D; López-Ferber, M

    1998-03-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ORF 86, located within the HindIII C fragment, potentially encodes a protein which shares sequence similarity with two T4 bacteriophage gene products, RNA ligase and polynucleotide kinase. This AcMNPV gene has been designated pnk/pnl but has yet to be assigned a function in virus replication. It has been classified as an immediate early virus gene, since the promoter was active in uninfected insect cells and mRNA transcripts were detectable from 4 to 48 h post-infection and in the presence of cycloheximide or aphidicolin in virus-infected cells. The extremities of the transcript have been mapped by primer extension and 3' RACE-PCR to positions -18 from the translational start codon and +15 downstream of the stop codon. The function of pnk/pnl was investigated by producing a recombinant virus (Acdel86lacZ) with the coding region replaced with that of lacZ. This virus replicated normally in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf 21) cells, indicating that pnk/pnl is not essential for propagation in these cells. Virus protein production in Acdel86lacZ-infected Sf 21 cells also appeared to be unaffected, with normal synthesis of the IE-1, GP64, VP39 and polyhedrin proteins. Shut-down of host protein synthesis was not abolished in recombinant infection. When other baculovirus genomes were examined for the presence of pnk/pnl by restriction enzyme digestion and PCR, a deletion was found in AcMNPV 1.2, Galleria mellonella NPV (GmMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV), suggesting that in many isolates this gene has either never been acquired or has been lost during genome evolution. This is one of the first baculovirus immediate early genes that appears to be nonessential for virus survival.

  9. The role of the PI3K-Akt signal transduction pathway in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Wei; Yang Yi; Weng Qingbei; Lin Tiehao; Yuan Meijin; Yang Kai; Pang Yi

    2009-08-15

    Many viruses activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, thereby modulating diverse downstream signaling pathways associated with antiapoptosis, proliferation, cell cycling, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism, in order to augment their replication. To date, the role of the PI3K-Akt pathway in Baculovirus replication has not been defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of Sf9 cells with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) elevated cellular Akt phosphorylation at 1 h post-infection. The maximum Akt phosphorylation occurred at 6 h post-infection and remained unchanged until 18 h post-infection. The PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that AcMNPV-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3K-dependent. The inhibition of PI3K-Akt activation by LY294002 significantly reduced the viral yield, including a reduction in budded viruses and occlusion bodies. The virus production was reduced only when the inhibitor was added within 24 h of infection, implying that activation of PI3K occurred early in infection. Correspondingly, both viral DNA replication and late (VP39) and very late (POLH) viral protein expression were impaired by LY294002 treatment; LY294002 had no effect on immediate-early (IE1) and early-late (GP64) protein expression. These results demonstrate that the PI3K-Akt pathway is required for efficient Baculovirus replication.

  10. A soluble form of P74 can act as a per os infectivity factor to the autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The baculovirus occlusion-derived virion (ODV) is required to spread virus infection among insect hosts via the per os route. The Autographa californica Multicapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) P74 protein is an ODV envelope protein that is essential for ODVs to be infectious. P74 is anchored in ...

  11. BV/ODV-E26: a palmitoylated, multifunctional structural protein of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Burks, Jared K; Summers, Max D; Braunagel, Sharon C

    2007-04-25

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac16 is 1 of 17 genes conserved within Type 1 nucleopolyhedroviruses. This report demonstrates that multiple isoforms of the protein encoded by Ac16, BV/ODV-E26 (E26), are present in the infected cell. One form of E26 associates with viral DNA or DNA-binding proteins, while a second form associates with intracellular membranes and this is likely due to palmitoylation. The different forms of E26 present unique epitopes that can be discriminated by antiserum produced to bacterially or virally produced antigen. A summation of the data now available on E26 suggests that it is a multifunctional protein and the functional states assume unique conformations that can be discriminated by differing antisera.

  12. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  13. Multistage production of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus in insect cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Klöppinger, M; Fertig, G; Fraune, E; Miltenburger, H G

    1990-11-01

    The aim of our study was to establish an efficient system for the in vitro production of the insect pathogenic Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus in a Spodoptera frugiperda cell line. We optimized cultivation conditions for cell proliferation as well as for virus replication in a 1.5 litre stirred tank bioreactor. Cell and virus propagation were found to be optimal at a constant oxygen tension of 40%. In order to provide sufficient nutrients during virus synthesis filtration and perfusion devices were connected to the bioreactor. A virus production procedure in a repeated batch mode by using a two stage bioreactor system is described. Stage I was optimized for cell production and stage II for virus production.

  14. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus odv-e66 is an essential gene required for oral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xingwei; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xiaolong; Yu, Shaofang; Yang, Rui; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2011-06-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) odv-e66 is a core gene and encodes an occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-specific envelope protein, ODV-E66. The N-terminal 23 amino acid of the envelope protein ODV-E66 are sufficient to direct native and fusion proteins to induced membrane microvesicles and the viral envelope during infection with AcMNPV. In this study, an odv-e66-knockout bacmid can not express N-terminal hydrophobic domains was constructed via homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. The odv-e66 deletion had no effect on budded virus (BV) production and viral DNA replication in infected Sf9 cells. Larval bioassays demonstrated that injection of odv-e66 deletion BV into the hemocoel could kill P. xylostella larvae as efficiently as repaired and control viruses; however, odv-e66 deletion mutant resulted in a 50% lethal dose that was 10(3) higher than that of the repaired and control viruses when inoculated per os. These results indicated that ODV-E66 envelope protein most likely played an important role in the oral infectivity of AcMNPV, but is not essential for virus replication.

  15. The structural protein ODV-EC27 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a multifunctional viral cyclin.

    PubMed

    Belyavskyi, M; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-09-15

    Two major characteristics of baculovirus infection are arrest of the host cell at G2/M phase of the cell cycle with continuing viral DNA replication. We show that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes for a multifunctional cyclin that may partially explain the molecular basis of these important characteristics of AcMNPV (baculovirus) infection. Amino acids 80-110 of the viral structural protein ODV-EC27 (-EC27) demonstrate 25-30% similarity with cellular cyclins within the cyclin box. Immunoprecipitation results using antibodies to -EC27 show that -EC27 can associate with either cdc2 or cdk6 resulting in active kinase complexes that can phosphorylate histone H1 and retinoblastoma protein in vitro. The cdk6-EC27 complex also associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we demonstrate that PCNA is a structural protein of both the budded virus and the occlusion-derived virus. These results suggest that -EC27 can function as a multifunctional cyclin: when associated with cdc2, it exhibits cyclin B-like activity; when associated with cdk6, the complex possesses cyclin D-like activity and binds PCNA. The possible roles of such a multifunctional cyclin during the life cycle of baculovirus are discussed, along with potential implications relative to the expression of functionally authentic recombinant proteins by using baculovirus-infected cells.

  16. Chitinase from Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus: rapid purification from Sf-9 medium and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fukamizo, Tamo; Sato, Hirokazu; Mizuhara, Mamiko; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Gotoh, Takeshi; Hiwatashi, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori

    2011-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) chitinase is involved in the final liquefaction of infected host larvae. We purified the chitinase rapidly to homogeneity from Sf-9 cells infected with AcMNPV by a simple procedure using a pepstatin-aminohexyl-Sepharose column. In past studies, a recombinant AcMNPV chitinase was found to exhibit both exo- and endo-chitinase activities by analysis using artificial substrates with a fluorescent probe. In this study, however, we obtained more accurate information on the mode of action of the chitinase by HPLC analysis of the enzymatic products using natural oligosaccharide and polysaccharide substrates. The AcMNPV chitinase hydrolyzed the second β-1,4 glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide substrates [(GlcNAc)(n), n=4, 5, and 6], producing the β-anomer of (GlcNAc)₂. The mode of action was similar to that of Serratia marcescens chitinase A (SmChiA), the amino acid sequence of which is 60.5% homologous to that of the AcMNPV enzyme. The enzyme also hydrolyzed solid β-chitin, producing only (GlcNAc)₂. The AcMNPV chitinase processively hydrolyzes solid β-chitin in a manner similar to SmChiA. The processive mechanism of the enzyme appears to be advantageous in liquefaction of infected host larvae.

  17. Functional characterization of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus gp16 (ac130)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Huang, Cui; Qian, Duo-Duo; Li, Lu-Lin

    2014-09-15

    To investigate the function of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) gp16, multiple gp16-knockout and repair mutants were constructed and characterized. No obvious difference in productivity of budded virus, DNA synthesis, late gene expression and morphogenesis was observed between gp16-knockout and repair viruses, but gp16 deletion resulted in six hours of lengthening in ST{sub 50} to the third instar Spodoptera exigua larvae in bioassays. GP16 was fractionated mainly in the light membrane fraction, by subcellular fractionation. A GP16-EGFP fusion protein was predominantly localized close around the nuclear membrane in infected cells, being coincident with formation of the vesicles associated with the nuclear membrane, which hosted nucleocapsids released from the nucleus. These data suggest that gp16 is not required for viral replication, but may be involved in membrane trafficking associated with the envelopment/de-envelopment of budded viruses when they cross over the nuclear membrane and pass through cytoplasm. - Highlights: • gp16 knockout and repair mutants of AcMNPV were constructed and characterized. • AcMNPV gp16 is not essential to virus replication. • Deletion of gp16 resulted in time lengthening to kill S. exigua larvae. • GP16 was localized close around the nuclear membrane of infected cells. • GP16 was fractionated in the light membrane fraction in subcellular fractionation.

  18. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Li Zhaofei Wu Wenbi; Li Lingling; Yuan Meijin; Pan Lijing; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-12-05

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP}) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP} could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  19. Semipermissive replication of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica in a gypsy moth cell line

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, J.T.; Dougherty, E.M.; Weiner, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Several gypsy moth cell lines have been previously described as nonpermissive for the multiple-embedded nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica (AcMNPV). In this report, the authors demonstrate the semipermissive infection of a gypsy moth cell line, IPLB-LD-652Y, with AcMNPV. IPLB-LD-652Y cells infected with AcMNPV produced classic cytopathic effects but failed to yield infectious progeny virus. Results of experiments employing DNA-DNA dot hybridization suggested that AcMNPV DNA synthesis was initiated from 8 to 12 h postinfection (p.i.), continued at a maximum rate from 12 to 20 h p.i., and declined from 20 to 36 h p.i. The rate of AcMNPV DNA synthesis approximated that observed in the permissive TN-368 cell line. AcMNPV-infected IPLB-LD-652Y cells, pulse-labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine at various time intervals p.i. and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed four virus-induced proteins, one novel to the semipermissive system and three early ..cap alpha.. proteins, synthesized from 1 to 20 h p.i. Thereafter, both host and viral protein synthesis was completely suppressed. These results suggest that AcMNPV adsorbed, penetrated, and initiated limited macromolecular synthesis in the semipermissive gypsy moth cell line. However, the infection cycle was restricted during the early phase of AcMNPV replication.

  20. A microRNA encoded by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus regulates expression of viral gene ODV-E25.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengxiao; Wang, Jinwen; Deng, Riqiang; Xiong, Peiwen; Liang, Hai; Wang, Xunzhang

    2013-12-01

    Baculovirus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) have been described in Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus; however, most of their functions remain unclear. Here we report the identification and characterization of an miRNA encoded by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus. The identified miRNA, AcMNPV-miR-1, perfectly matched a segment in the coding sequence of the viral gene ODV-E25 and downregulated ODV-E25 mRNA expression, which likely resulted in a reduction of infectious budded virions and accelerated the formation of occlusion-derived virions.

  1. Isolation and characterization of the DNA-binding protein (DBP) of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Victor S. Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2008-01-20

    DNA-binding protein (DBP) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was expressed as an N-terminal His{sub 6}-tag fusion using a recombinant baculovirus and purified to near homogeneity. Purified DBP formed oligomers that were crosslinked by redox reagents resulting in predominantly protein dimers and tetramers. In gel retardation assays, DBP showed a high affinity for single-stranded oligonucleotides and was able to compete with another baculovirus SSB protein, LEF-3, for binding sites. DBP binding protected ssDNA against hydrolysis by a baculovirus alkaline nuclease AN/LEF-3 complex. Partial proteolysis by trypsin revealed a domain structure of DBP that is required for interaction with DNA and that can be disrupted by thermal treatment. Binding to ssDNA, but not to dsDNA, changed the pattern of proteolytic fragments of DBP indicating adjustments in protein structure upon interaction with ssDNA. DBP was capable of unwinding short DNA duplexes and also promoted the renaturation of long complementary strands of ssDNA into duplexes. The unwinding and renaturation activities of DBP, as well as the DNA binding activity, were sensitive to sulfhydryl reagents and were inhibited by oxidation of thiol groups with diamide or by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide. A high affinity of DBP for ssDNA and its unwinding and renaturation activities confirmed identification of DBP as a member of the SSB/recombinase family. These activities and a tight association with subnuclear structures suggests that DBP is a component of the virogenic stroma that is involved in the processing of replicative intermediates.

  2. Multiple nucleocapsid packaging of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus accelerates the onset of systemic infection in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Washburn, J O; Lyons, E H; Haas-Stapleton, E J; Volkman, L E

    1999-01-01

    Among the nucleopolyhedroviruses (Baculoviridae), the occlusion-derived virus (ODV), which initiates infection in host insects, may contain only a single nucleocapsid per virion (the SNPVs) or one to many nucleocapsids per virion (the MNPVs), but the significance of this difference is unclear. To gain insight into the biological relevance of these different packaging strategies, we compared pathogenesis induced by ODV fractions enriched for multiple nucleocapsids (ODV-M) or single nucleocapsids (ODV-S) of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) containing a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. In time course experiments wherein newly molted fourth-instar Trichoplusia ni were challenged with doses of ODV-S or ODV-M that yielded the same final mortality ( approximately 70%), we characterized viral foci as either being restricted to the midgut or involving tracheal cells (the secondary target tissue, indicative of systemic infection). We found that while the timing of primary infection by ODV-S and ODV-M was similar, ODV-S established significantly more primary midgut cell foci than ODV-M, but ODV-M infected tracheal cells at twice the rate of ODV-S. The more efficient establishment of tracheal infections by ODV-M decreased the probability that infections were lost by midgut cell sloughing, explaining why higher numbers of primary infections established by ODV-S within larvae were needed to achieve the same final mortality. These results showed that the multiple nucleocapsid packaging strategy of AcMNPV accelerates the onset of irreversible systemic infections and may indicate why MNPVs have wider individual host ranges than SNPVs.

  3. Functional characterization of the ubiquitin variant encoded by the baculovirus Autographa californica.

    PubMed

    Haas, A L; Katzung, D J; Reback, P M; Guarino, L A

    1996-04-30

    The marked evolutionary conservation of ubiquitin is assumed to arise from constraints imposed by folding, stability, and interaction of the polypeptide with various components of the ATP, ubiquitin-dependent degradative pathway. The present studies characterize the most divergent (75% identity) of the species-specific ubiquitin isoforms encoded as a late gene product of the baculovirus Autographa californica [Guarino, L. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 409-413]. Viral ubiquitin supports 40% of the rate of ATP-dependent degradation exhibited by eukaryotic ubiquitin. Inhibition of proteolysis correlated with a lower steady-state concentration of ubiquitin-conjugated degradative intermediates. Rate studies revealed that viral ubiquitin exerts its effect at the step of isopeptide ligase-catalyzed (E3) ubiquitin conjugation since viral and eukaryotic polypeptides are identical in their abilities to support ATP-coupled activation by E1 and transthiolation to E2 carrier proteins. Other studies demonstrated viral ubiquitin severely attenuated the rate of K48-linked multiubiquitin chain formation in E3-independent conjugation catalyzed by recombination yeast CDC34 or rabbit reticulocyte E232K but not chain elongation of alternate linkages formed by yeast RAD6 or human E2EPF. The latter observations suggest nonconserved positions on viral ubiquitin constitute recognition signals for K48-linked chain formation. Sequence comparison of species-specific ubiquitin isoforms indicates that nonconserved positions localized to a defined region on the polypeptide surface distinct from the basic face required for E1 binding. These results suggest this novel ubiquitin isoform may function in baculoviral replication to block destruction of a short-lived protein(s) by the host degradative pathway, targeted through either E2-catalyzed K48-linked multibiquitin chain formation or general E3-mediated conjugation.

  4. A mechanism for negative gene regulation in Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leisy, D.J.; Rasmussen, C.; Owusu, E.O.; Rohrmann, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) ie-1 gene product (IE-1) is thought to play a central role in stimulating early viral transcription. IE-1 has been demonstrated to activate several early viral gene promoters and to negatively regulate the promoters of two other AcMNPV regulatory genes, ie-0 and ie-2. Our results indicate that IE-1 negatively regulates the expression of certain genes by binding directly, or as part of a complex, to promoter regions containing a specific IE-1-binding motif (5'-ACBYGTAA-3') near their mRNA start sites. The IE-1 binding motif was also found within the palindromic sequences of AcMNPV homologous repeat (hr) regions that have been shown to bind IE-1. The role of this IE-1 binding motif in the regulation of the ie-2 and pe-38 promoters was examined by introducing mutations in these promoters in which the central 6 bp were replaced with Bg/II sites. GUS reporter constructs containing ie-2 and pe-38 promoter fragments with and without these specific mutations were cotransfected into Sf9 cells with various amounts of an ie-1-containing plasmid (ple-1). Comparisons of GUS expression produced by the mutant and wild-type constructs demonstrated that the IE-1 binding motif mediated a significant decrease in expression from the ie-2 and pe-38 promoters in response to increasing pIe-1 concentrations. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with pIe-1-transfected cell extracts and supershift assays with IE-1- specific antiserum demonstrated that IE-1 binds to promoter fragments containing the IE-1 binding motif but does not bind to promoter fragments lacking this motif.

  5. Expression and mutational analysis of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus HCF-1: functional requirements for cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joyce A; Forney, Scott D; Ricci, Alessondra M; Allen, Emily G; Hefferon, Kathleen L; Miller, Lois K

    2005-11-01

    The host cell-specific factor 1 gene (hcf-1) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus is required for efficient virus growth in TN368 cells but is dispensable for virus replication in SF21 cells. However, the mechanism of action of hcf-1 is unknown. To begin to understand its function in virus replication we have investigated the expression and localization pattern of HCF-1 in infected cells. Analysis of virus-infected TN368 cells showed that hcf-1 is expressed at an early time in the virus life cycle, between 2 and 12 h postinfection, and localized the protein to punctate nuclear foci. Through coprecipitation experiments we have confirmed that HCF-1 self-associates into dimers or higher-order structures. We also found that overexpression of HCF-1 repressed expression from the hcf-1 promoter in transient reporter assays. Mutagenesis of cysteine residues within a putative RING finger domain in the amino acid sequence of HCF-1 abolished self-association activity and suggests that the RING domain may be involved in this protein-protein interaction. A different but overlapping set of cysteine residues were required for efficient gene repression activity. Functional analysis of HCF-1 mutants showed that the cysteine amino acids required for both self-association and gene repression activities of HCF-1 were also required for efficient late-gene expression and occlusion body formation in TN368 cells. Mutational analysis also identified essential charged and hydrophobic amino acids located between two of the essential cysteine residues. We propose that HCF-1 is a RING finger-containing protein whose activity requires HCF-1 self-association and gene repression activity.

  6. A novel third chromosomal locus controls susceptibility to Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Mon, Hiroaki; Li, Zhiqing; Zhu, Li; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Banno, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kaito; Lee, Jae Man

    2014-04-01

    Baculovirus demonstrates specific infection spectrums and thus one certain host exhibits particular response to single baculovirus isolate. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is considered to be not an innate pathogen to Bombyx mori, but some silkworm strains have been identified to be permissive to AcMNPV, indicating the positive or negative involvement of certain host factors in baculovirus replications in vivo. To provide a fundamental knowledge of this process, we performed large-scale screening to investigate the responses of 448 silkworm strains against recombinant AcMNPV inoculation. By genetic analysis between permissive and resistant strains identified, we further confirmed that a potential corresponding locus on chromosome 3 regulates host responses to AcMNPV in silkworm. Additionally, we found that it is available for AcMNPV-silkworm baculovirus expression vector system to produce proteins of interest.

  7. Genetic variation and virulence of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus and Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the genetic diversity within the baculovirus species Autographa calfornica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV; Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus), a PCR-based method was used to identify and classify baculoviruses found in virus samples from the lepidopteran host species A. californi...

  8. Trichoplusia ni Kinesin-1 Associates with Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Is Required for Production of Budded Virus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Siddhartha; Blissard, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism by which nucleocapsids of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) egress from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of budded virus (BV), is not known. AC141 is a nucleocapsid-associated protein required for BV egress and has previously been shown to be associated with β-tubulin. In addition, AC141 and VP39 were previously shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging to interact directly with the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. These results suggested that microtubule transport systems may be involved in baculovirus nucleocapsid egress and BV formation. In this study, we investigated the role of lepidopteran microtubule transport using coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) analyses. We show that nucleocapsid AC141 associates with the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni KLC and kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Kinesin-1, AC141, and microtubules colocalized predominantly at the plasma membrane. In addition, the nucleocapsid proteins VP39, FP25, and BV/ODV-C42 were also coimmunoprecipitated with T. ni KLC. Direct analysis of the role of T. ni kinesin-1 by downregulation of KLC by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in BV production. Nucleocapsids labeled with VP39 fused with three copies of the mCherry fluorescent protein also colocalized with microtubules. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed no evidence of a direct interaction between kinesin-1 and AC141 or VP39, suggesting that either other nucleocapsid proteins or adaptor proteins may be required. These results further support the conclusion that microtubule transport is required for AcMNPV BV formation. IMPORTANCE In two key processes of the replication cycle of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), nucleocapsids are

  9. A soluble form of P74 can act as a per os infectivity factor to the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Slack, Jeffrey M; Lawrence, Susan D; Krell, Peter J; Arif, Basil M

    2010-04-01

    The baculovirus occlusion-derived virion (ODV) is required to spread virus infection among insect hosts via the per os route. The Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus P74 protein is an ODV envelope protein that is essential for ODVs to be infectious. P74 is anchored in the ODV envelope by a C-terminal transmembrane anchor domain and is N-terminally exposed on the ODV surface. In the present study, a series of N-terminal and C-terminal truncation mutants of P74 were evaluated for their ability to rescue per os infectivity of the P74-null virus, AcLP4. It was discovered that a P74 truncation mutant lacking the C-terminal transmembrane anchor domain of P74 was able to rescue per os infection. This result shows that a soluble form of P74 retains per os infectivity factor function and suggests that P74 may be complexed with other proteins in the ODV envelope.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Dai, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  11. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Da, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  12. A study of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV envelope protein p74 using a GFP tag.

    PubMed

    Slack, J M; Dougherty, E M; Lawrence, S D

    2001-09-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) protein p74 is associated with the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope. p74 is essential for oral infectivity of ODV and has been proposed to play a role in midgut attachment and/or fusion. In this study, p74 protein was expressed in-frame with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to create a p74-GFP chimera. The C-terminal GFP portion of the chimera facilitated visualization of the trafficking of p74 in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells. p74-GFP chimeric proteins localized in the intranuclear ring zone of the nucleus and were found to co-precipitate with the microvesicle fraction of cell lysates. A series of truncations of p74 was expressed as p74-GFP chimeras in recombinant baculoviruses. When C-terminal region S580-F645 was deleted from p74, p74-GFP chimera localization became non-specific and chimeras became soluble. p74 region S580-F645 directed GFP to the intranuclear ring zone in a similar pattern to full-length p74. The hydrophobic C terminus of p74 plays a role in protein localization and possibly in transmembrane anchoring and insertion.

  13. Cloning and Characterization of Sf9 Cell Lamin and the Lamin Conformational Changes during Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenqiang; Wang, Hongju; Li, Xiaoya; Fang, Na; Yang, Shili; Liu, Hongyan; Kang, Xiaonan; Sun, Xiulian; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-05-07

    At present, the details of lamina alterations after baculovirus infection remain elusive. In this study, a lamin gene in the Sf9 cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda was cloned. The open reading frame (orf) of the Sf9 lamin was 1860 bp and encoded a protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. A transfection assay with a red fluorescence protein (rfp)-lamin fusion protein indicated that Sf9 lamin was localized in the nuclear rim. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsids may pass through the nuclear envelope. Immunofluorescence assay indicated that the lamina showed a ruffled staining pattern with the formation of invaginations in the Sf9 cells infected with AcMNPV, while it was evenly distributed at the nuclear periphery of mock-infected cells. Western blotting results indicated that the total amount of lamin in the baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells was significantly decreased compared with the mock-infected cells. These results imply that AcMNPV infection induces structural and biochemical rearrangements of lamina of Sf9 cells.

  14. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus and Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus v-cath genes are expressed as pre-proenzymes.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jeffrey J; Arif, Basil M; Krell, Peter J

    2009-04-01

    Intracellular processing and trafficking of the baculovirus v-cath expressed cathepsin (V-CATH), which lacks canonical targeting signals, are poorly understood. The cathepsins of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) and most other alphabaculovirus group I nucleopolyhedroviruses have well-conserved N-termini containing overlapping chymotrypsin-cleavage (Y(11)) and myristoylation (G(12)) motifs, which are suggestive of proteolytic signal-peptide cleavage to generate proV-CATH and subsequent acylation. To determine proteolytic N-terminal processing of V-CATH, haemagglutinin epitope-coding tags were fused to the 5' and/or 3' ends of AcMNPV and CfMNPV v-cath. Immunoblot analysis suggested that a small N-terminal peptide is cleaved for both viruses, indicating that v-cath is expressed as a pre-proenzyme. The two viral homologues undergo similar proteolytic processing, but have different glycosylation or other post-translational modifications. An AcMNPV V-CATH-DsRED fusion protein co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum with an HDEL motif-containing green fluorescent protein. Based on these findings, pre-proV-CATH processing and trafficking mechanisms are postulated.

  15. A Cholesterol Recognition Amino Acid Consensus Domain in GP64 Fusion Protein Facilitates Anchoring of Baculovirus to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R.; Sampieri, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV. PMID:23986592

  16. A cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus domain in GP64 fusion protein facilitates anchoring of baculovirus to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV.

  17. Effects of Early or Overexpression of the Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus orf94 (ODV-e25) on Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Chun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Jie; Qian, Duo-Duo; Wang, Si-Min; Li, Lu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    odv-e25(e25) is one of the core genes of baculoviruses. To investigate how it functions in the replication cycle of a baculovirus, a number of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus recombinants with e25 under control of the promoter of immediate early gene ie1, or the promoter of the very late hyperexpressed gene p10, were constructed using a bacmid system, and the effects of early expression or overexpression of e25 on replication of the virus were evaluated. Microscopy and titration assays demonstrated that bacmids with e25 under control of ie1 promoter were unable to produce budded viruses; and that the recombinant viruses with e25 under control of p10 promoter generated budded virus normally, but formation of occlusion bodies were dramatically reduced and delayed in the infected cells. Electron microscopy showed that there were no mature virions or intact nucleocapsids present in the cells transfected with a recombinant bacmid with e25 under control of ie1 promoter. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that alteration of the e25 promoter did not affect viral DNA synthesis. The reporter gene expression from the promoter of the major capsid protein gene vp39 was reduced 63% by early expression of e25. Confocal microscopy revealed that E25 was predominantly localized in nuclei by 24 hours post infection with wild-type virus, but it remained in the cytoplasm in the cells transfected with a recombinant bacmid with e25 under control of the ie1 promoter, suggesting that the transport of E25 into nuclei was regulated in a specific and strict time dependent manner.

  18. Viral and host cellular transcription in Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus-infected gypsy moth cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Guzo, D; Rathburn, H; Guthrie, K; Dougherty, E

    1992-01-01

    Infection of two gypsy moth cell lines (IPLB-Ld652Y and IPLB-LdFB) by the Autographa californica multiple-enveloped nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is characterized by extremely attenuated viral protein synthesis followed by a total arrest of all viral and cellular protein production. In this study, AcMNPV- and host cell-specific transcription were examined. Overall levels of viral RNAs in infected gypsy moth cells were, at most measured times, comparable to RNA levels from an infected cell line (TN-368) permissive for AcMNPV replication. Northern blot (RNA) analyses using viral and host gene-specific probes revealed predominantly normal-length virus- and cell-specific transcripts postinfection. Transport of viral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and transcript stability in infected gypsy moth cells also appeared normal compared with similar parameters for AcMNPV-infected TN-368 cells. Host cellular and viral mRNAs extracted from gypsy moth and TN-368 cells at various times postinfection and translated in vitro yielded similar spectra of host and viral proteins. Treatment of infected gypsy moth cells with the DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin eliminated the total protein synthesis shutoff in infected IPLB-LdFB cells but had no effect on protein synthesis inhibition in infected IPLB-Ld652Y cells. The apparent selective block in the translation of viral transcripts early in infection and the absence of normal translation or transcription of host cellular genes at later times is discussed. Images PMID:1560533

  19. Cellular VPS4 Is Required for Efficient Entry and Egress of Budded Virions of Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei

    2012-01-01

    Membrane budding is essential for the egress of many enveloped viruses, and this process shares similarities with the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). In eukaryotic cells, the budding of intraluminal vesicles (IVLs) is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and some viruses require ESCRT machinery components or functions to bud from host cells. Baculoviruses, such as Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), enter host cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur within the nucleus. Some progeny nucleocapsids are subsequently trafficked to, and bud from, the plasma membrane, forming budded virions (BV). To determine whether the host ESCRT machinery is important or necessary for AcMNPV replication, we cloned a cDNA of Spodoptera frugiperda VPS4, a key regulator for disassembly and recycling of ESCRT III. We then examined viral infection and budding in the presence of wild-type (WT) or dominant negative (DN) forms of VPS4. First, we used a viral complementation system, in combination with fluorescent tags, to examine the effects of transiently expressed WT or DN VPS4 on viral entry. We found that dominant negative VPS4 substantially inhibited virus entry. Entering virus was observed within aberrant compartments containing the DN VPS4 protein. We next used recombinant bacmids expressing WT or DN VPS4 proteins to examine virus egress. We found that production of infectious AcMNPV BV was substantially reduced by expression of DN VPS4 but not by WT VPS4. Together, these results indicate that a functional VPS4 is necessary for efficient AcMNPV BV entry into, and egress from, insect cells. PMID:22072775

  20. Identification of a novel regulatory sequence of actin nucleation promoting factor encoded by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Shili; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Mu, Jingfang; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-04-10

    Actin polymerization induced by nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) is one of the most fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. NPFs contain a conserved output domain (VCA domain) near the C terminus, which interacts with and activates the cellular actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) to induce actin polymerization and a diverse regulatory domain near the N terminus. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsid protein P78/83 is a virus-encoded NPF that contains a C-terminal VCA domain and induces actin polymerization in virus-infected cells. However, there is no similarity between the N terminus of P78/83 and that of other identified NPFs, suggesting that P78/83 may possess a unique regulatory mechanism. In this study, we identified a multifunctional regulatory sequence (MRS) located near the N terminus of P78/83 and determined that one of its functions is to serve as a degron to mediate P78/83 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In AcMNPV-infected cells, the MRS also binds to another nucleocapsid protein, BV/ODV-C42, which stabilizes P78/83 and modulates the P78/83-Arp2/3 interaction to orchestrate actin polymerization. In addition, the MRS is also essential for the incorporation of P78/83 into the nucleocapsid, ensuring virion mobility powered by P78/83-induced actin polymerization. The triple functions of the MRS enable P78/83 to serve as an essential viral protein in the AcMNPV replication cycle, and the possible roles of the MRS in orchestrating the virus-induced actin polymerization and viral genome decapsidation are discussed.

  1. The autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 envelope protein is required for oral infectivity and can be functionally substituted by rachiplusia ou multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) odv-e56 gene encodes an occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-specific envelope protein, ODV-E56. In a previous analysis, the odv-e56 gene was found to be under positive selection pressure, suggesting that it may be a determinant of viral ho...

  2. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of neonate Heliothis virescens larvae. Here, we present a more detailed study of ODV-E56 function. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lack...

  3. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleocapsid protein BV/ODV-C42 mediates the nuclear entry of P78/83.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Qian; Liang, Changyong; Song, Jianhua; Li, Ni; Shi, Hui; Chen, Xinwen

    2008-05-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-c42 (orf101; c42), which encodes a 41.5-kDa viral nucleocapsid protein with a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at the C terminus, is a highly conserved gene among members of the Baculoviridae family. C42 is demonstrated to be essential for AcMNPV propagation and can bind to nucleocapsid protein P78/83, a viral activator for the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization, which is essential for viral nucleocapsid morphogenesis during AcMNPV infection. Here, we report the identification of a novel pathway through which c42 functions in nucleocapsid assembly. Cotransfection of Sf9 cells with c42 and p78/83 plasmids demonstrated that C42 was capable of recruiting P78/83 to the nuclei of uninfected cells and that the NLS motif of C42 was essential for this process. To validate this nuclear relocation mode in bacmid-transfected cells, a c42-disrupted bacmid (vAc(c42ko-gfp)) and rescued bacmids with wild-type c42 (vAc(c42res-gfp)) or with NLS coding sequence-mutated c42 (vAc(c42nls-gfp)) were prepared. By immuno-staining, P78/83 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, whereas P78/83 was relocated to the nuclei of vAc(c42res-gfp)-transfected cells. Furthermore, F-actin-specific staining confirmed that there was no actin polymerization activity in the nuclei of either vAc(c42ko-gfp)- or vAc(c42nls-gfp)-transfected cells, which might be attributed to the absence of nuclear P78/83, an activator of the ARP2/3 complex to initiate nuclear actin polymerization. We therefore hypothesize a mode of action where C42 binds to P78/83 in the cytoplasm to form a protein complex and cotransports to the nucleus under the direction of the NLS motif in C42 during AcMNPV infection.

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virion envelopment process gives new clues as to its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Li, Kunpeng; Tang, Peiping; Li, Yinyin; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qinfen

    2015-02-01

    Baculoviruses produce two virion phenotypes, occlusion-derived virion (ODV) and budded virion (BV). ODV envelopment occurs in the nucleus. Morphogenesis of the ODV has been studied extensively; however, the mechanisms underlying microvesicle formation and ODV envelopment in nuclei remain unclear. In this study, we used electron tomography (ET) together with the conventional electron microscopy to study the envelopment of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV. Our results demonstrate that not only the inner but also the outer nuclear membrane can invaginate and vesiculate into microvesicles and that intranuclear microvesicles are the direct source of the ODV membrane. Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized, from which we propose a model to explain this process.

  5. Functional Regulation of an Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus-Encoded MicroRNA, AcMNPV-miR-1, in Baculovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengxiao; Deng, Riqiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus-encoded microRNA (miRNA), AcMNPV-miR-1, downregulates the ac94 gene, reducing the production of infectious budded virions and accelerating the formation of occlusion-derived virions. In the current study, four viruses that constitutively overexpress AcMNPV-miR-1 were constructed to further explore the function of the miRNA. In addition to the ac94 gene, two new viral gene targets (ac18 and ac95) of AcMNPV-miR-1 were identified, and the possible interacting proteins were verified and tested. In the context of AcMNPV-miR-1 overexpression, ac18 was slightly upregulated, and ac95 was downregulated. Several interacting proteins were identified, and a functional pathway for AcMNPV-miR-1 was deduced. AcMNPV-miR-1 overexpression decreased budded virus infectivity, reduced viral DNA replication, accelerated polyhedron formation, and promoted viral infection efficiency in Trichoplusia ni larvae, suggesting that AcMNPV-miR-1 restrains virus infection of cells but facilitates virus infection of larvae. IMPORTANCE Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely reported as moderators or regulators of mammalian cellular processes, especially disease-related pathways in humans. However, the roles played by miRNAs encoded by baculoviruses, which infect numerous beneficial insects and agricultural pests, have rarely been described. To explore the actions of virus-encoded miRNAs, we investigated an miRNA encoded by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV-miR-1). We previously identified this miRNA through the exogenous addition of AcMNPV-miR-1 mimics. In the current study, we constitutively overexpressed AcMNPV-miR-1 and analyzed the resultant effects to more comprehensively assess what is indeed the function of this miRNA during viral infection. In addition, we widely explored the target genes for the miRNA in the viral and host genomes and proposed a possible functional network for AcMNPV-miR-1, which provides a

  6. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 Encodes a Nucleocapsid-Associated Protein Required for Budded-Virus and Multiply Enveloped Occlusion-Derived Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Wang, Shuo; Yue, Xiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 (named ac132) has homologs in all genome-sequenced group I nucleopolyhedroviruses. Its role in the viral replication cycle is unknown. In this study, ac132 was shown to express a protein of around 28 kDa, which was determined to be associated with the nucleocapsids of both occlusion-derived virus and budded virus. Confocal microscopy showed that AC132 protein appeared in central region of the nucleus as early as 12 h postinfection with the virus. It formed a ring zone at the periphery of the nucleus by 24 h postinfection. To investigate its role in virus replication, ac132 was deleted from the viral genome by using a bacmid system. In the Sf9 cell culture transfected by the ac132 knockout bacmid, infection was restricted to single cells, and the titer of infectious budded virus was reduced to an undetectable level. However, viral DNA replication and the expression of late genes vp39 and odv-e25 and a reporter gene under the control of the very late gene p10 promoter were unaffected. Electron microscopy showed that nucleocapsids, virions, and occlusion bodies were synthesized in the cells transfected by an ac132 knockout bacmid, but the formation of the virogenic stroma and occlusion bodies was delayed, the numbers of enveloped nucleocapsids were reduced, and the occlusion bodies contained mainly singly enveloped nucleocapsids. AC132 was found to interact with envelope protein ODV-E18 and the viral DNA-binding protein P6.9. The data from this study suggest that ac132 possibly plays an important role in the assembly and envelopment of nucleocapsids. IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report on a functional analysis of ac132. The data presented here demonstrate that ac132 is required for production of the budded virus and multiply enveloped occlusion-derived virus of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. This article reveals unique phenotypic changes induced by ac132

  7. Three-dimensional visualization of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virion envelopment process gives new clues as to its mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yang; Li, Kunpeng; Tang, Peiping; Li, Yinyin; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qinfen

    2015-02-15

    Baculoviruses produce two virion phenotypes, occlusion-derived virion (ODV) and budded virion (BV). ODV envelopment occurs in the nucleus. Morphogenesis of the ODV has been studied extensively; however, the mechanisms underlying microvesicle formation and ODV envelopment in nuclei remain unclear. In this study, we used electron tomography (ET) together with the conventional electron microscopy to study the envelopment of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV. Our results demonstrate that not only the inner but also the outer nuclear membrane can invaginate and vesiculate into microvesicles and that intranuclear microvesicles are the direct source of the ODV membrane. Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized, from which we propose a model to explain this process. - Highlights: • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could invaginate. • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could vesiculate into microvesicles. • Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized. • A model is proposed to explain this ODV envelopment.

  8. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, Dulce María; Aguilar-Diaz, Hugo; Bobes, Raúl José; Sampieri, Alicia; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Carrero, Julio César

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3) of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile protection against ALA, whereas other 20% showed reduction in the size and extent of abscesses, resulting in some protection in 75% of animals compared to the sham control group. Levels of protection showed a linear correlation with the development and intensity of specific antiamoeba cellular and humoral responses, evaluated in serum and spleen of hamsters, respectively. Evaluation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns expressed in the liver of hamsters showed that sterile protection was associated with the production of high levels of IFNγ and IL-4. These results suggest that the baculovirus system is equally efficient by the intramuscular as well as the oral routes for ALA protection and that the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment is a highly protective antigen against hepatic amoebiasis through the local induction of IFNγ and IL-4. PMID:26090442

  9. A peptide with similarity to baculovirus ODV-E66 binds the gut epithelium of Heliothis virescens and impedes infection with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Wendy O; Rohlfing, Amy; Bonning, Bryony C

    2011-05-01

    Baculoviruses infect their lepidopteran hosts via the midgut epithelium through binding of occlusion-derived virus (ODV) and fusion between the virus envelope and microvillar membranes. To identify genes and sequences that are involved in this process, a random phage display library was screened for peptides that bound to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) derived from the midgut epithelium of Heliothis virescens. Seventeen peptides that bound to BBMV were recovered. Two of these, HV1 and HV2, had sequence similarity to the ODV envelope protein ODV-E66 that is found in five species of alphabaculoviruses. Chemically synthesized versions of HV1 and HV2, and two peptides (AcE66A and AcE66B) derived from similar sequences of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV-E66, bound to unfixed cryosections of whole midgut tissues. AcE66A, but not HV1, bound to H. virescens gut BBMV proteins on a far-Western blot. Competition assays with HV1 and purified AcMNPV ODV resulted in decreased mortality of H. virescens larvae at a dose of 1 LD(50), and a significant increase in survival time at higher virus concentrations. These results suggest a role for ODV-E66 in baculovirus infection of lepidopteran larval midgut epithelium.

  10. Identification and analysis of an Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural protein of the occlusion-derived virus envelope: ODV-E56.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Elton, D M; Ma, H; Summers, M D

    1996-03-01

    An Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene encoding an occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein of 56 kDa was identified and sequenced. Transcription initiates from a conserved baculovirus late motif (ATAAG) with transcripts detected from 16 through 72 hr p.i. The protein is detected in infected cell extracts from 36 hr p.i. Western blot assay of ODV, BV, viral envelope, and nucleocapsid preparations coupled with immunoelectron microscopy reveal that this protein localizes to the ODV envelope. This protein is named ODV-E56 to identify its viral origin, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. ODV-E56 is enriched in viral induced intranuclear microvesicles as determined by immunogold labeling. A mutant was constructed with the C-terminal portion of the protein replaced with beta-galactosidase. The fusion protein, E56-beta-gal, locates to the viral nucleocapsids and not to the ODV envelope or intranuclear microvesicles. This suggests that the signals necessary for transport and/or retention into these structures lies within the C-terminal portion of ODV-E56. Additionally, both ODV-E56 and E56-beta-gal are enriched in electron dense regions that cluster around the inner nuclear membrane and within the nucleoplasm.

  11. Identification of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ac93 as a core gene and its requirement for intranuclear microvesicle formation and nuclear egress of nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Huang, Zhenqiu; Wei, Denghui; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf93 (ac93) is a highly conserved uncharacterized gene that is found in all of the sequenced baculovirus genomes except for Culex nigripalpus NPV. In this report, using bioinformatics analyses, ac93 and odv-e25 (ac94) were identified as baculovirus core genes and thus p33-ac93-odv-e25 represent a cluster of core genes. To investigate the role of ac93 in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac93 knockout AcMNPV bacmid was constructed via homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that the AcMNPV ac93 knockout did not spread by infection, and titration assays confirmed a defect in budded virus (BV) production. However, deletion of ac93 did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that ac93 was required for the egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus and the formation of intranuclear microvesicles, which are precursor structures of occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelopes. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that Ac93 was concentrated toward the cytoplasmic membrane in the cytoplasm and in the nuclear ring zone in the nucleus. Western blot analyses showed that Ac93 was associated with both nucleocapsid and envelope fractions of BV, but only the nucleocapsid fraction of ODV. Our results suggest that ac93, although not previously recognized as a core gene, is one that plays an essential role in the formation of the ODV envelope and the egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus.

  12. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus odv-e25 (Ac94) is required for budded virus infectivity and occlusion-derived virus formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Hu, Xiaolong; Xiang, Xingwei; Yu, Shaofang; Yang, Rui; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2012-04-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) odv-e25 is a core gene found in all lepidopteran baculoviruses, but its function is unknown. In this study, we generated an odv-e25-knockout AcMNPV and investigated the roles of ODV-E25 in the baculovirus life cycle. The odv-e25 knockout was subsequently rescued by reinserting the odv-e25 gene into the same virus genome. Fluorescence microscopy showed that transfection with the odv-e25-null bacmid vAcBac(KO) was insufficient for propagation in cell culture, whereas the 'repair' virus vAcBac(RE) was able to function in a manner similar to that of the control vAcBac. We found that odv-e25 was not essential for the release of budded viruses (BVs) into culture medium, although the absence of odv-e25 resulted in a 100-fold lower viral titer at 24 h post-transfection (p.t.). Analysis of viral DNA replication in the absence of odv-e25 showed that viral DNA replication was unaffected in the first 24 h p.t. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed that polyhedra were found in the nucleus, while mature occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) were not found in the nucleus or polyhedra in odv-e25 null transfected cells, which indicated that ODV-E25 was required for the formation of ODV.

  13. P74 mediates specific binding of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virus to primary cellular targets in the midgut epithelia of Heliothis virescens Larvae.

    PubMed

    Haas-Stapleton, Eric J; Washburn, Jan O; Volkman, Loy E

    2004-07-01

    P74, an envelope protein of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), is critical for oral infection of Trichoplusia ni larvae. The role of P74 during primary infection, however, is unknown. Here we provide evidence that P74 facilitates binding of AcMNPV ODV to a specific receptor within the larval midgut epithelia of another host species, Heliothis virescens. We adapted a fluorescence dequenching assay to compare binding, fusion, and competition of wild-type AcMNPV ODV in vivo with itself and with the ODV of a p74-deficient AcMNPV mutant. We found that relative to wild-type ODV, binding and fusion of ODV deficient in P74 were both qualitatively and quantitatively different. Unlike wild-type ODV, an excess of P74-deficient ODV failed to compete effectively with wild-type ODV binding, and the overall binding level of the mutant ODV was one-third that of the wild type. These results implicated P74 as an ODV attachment protein that binds to a specific receptor on primary target cells within the midgut.

  14. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Ruiz, Dulce María; Aguilar-Diaz, Hugo; Bobes, Raúl José; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Carrero, Julio César

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3) of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile protection against ALA, whereas other 20% showed reduction in the size and extent of abscesses, resulting in some protection in 75% of animals compared to the sham control group. Levels of protection showed a linear correlation with the development and intensity of specific antiamoeba cellular and humoral responses, evaluated in serum and spleen of hamsters, respectively. Evaluation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns expressed in the liver of hamsters showed that sterile protection was associated with the production of high levels of IFNγ and IL-4. These results suggest that the baculovirus system is equally efficient by the intramuscular as well as the oral routes for ALA protection and that the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment is a highly protective antigen against hepatic amoebiasis through the local induction of IFNγ and IL-4.

  15. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac34 Protein Retains Cellular Actin-Related Protein 2/3 Complex in the Nucleus by Subversion of CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jingfang; Zhang, Yongli; Hu, Yangyang; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Jizheng; van Oers, Monique M.; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Actin, nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), and the actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) are key elements of the cellular actin polymerization machinery. With nuclear actin polymerization implicated in ever-expanding biological processes and the discovery of the nuclear import mechanisms of actin and NPFs, determining Arp2/3 nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling mechanism is important for understanding the function of nuclear actin. A unique feature of alphabaculovirus infection of insect cells is the robust nuclear accumulation of Arp2/3, which induces actin polymerization in the nucleus to assist in virus replication. We found that Ac34, a viral late gene product encoded by the alphabaculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), is involved in Arp2/3 nuclear accumulation during virus infection. Further assays revealed that the subcellular distribution of Arp2/3 under steady-state conditions is controlled by chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent nuclear export. Upon AcMNPV infection, Ac34 inhibits CRM1 pathway and leads to Arp2/3 retention in the nucleus. PMID:27802336

  16. Spodoptera frugiperda resistance to oral infection by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus linked to aberrant occlusion-derived virus binding in the midgut.

    PubMed

    Haas-Stapleton, Eric J; Washburn, Jan O; Volkman, Loy E

    2005-05-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda larvae are highly resistant to oral infection by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) (LD(50), approximately 9200 occlusions), but extremely susceptible to budded virus within the haemocoel (LD(50), <1 p.f.u.). The inability of AcMNPV occlusion-derived virus (ODV) to establish primary infections readily within midgut cells accounts for a major proportion of oral resistance. To determine whether inappropriate binding of AcMNPV ODV to S. frugiperda midgut cells contributes to lack of oral infectivity, the binding and fusion properties of AcMNPV ODV were compared with those of the ODV of a new isolate of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) obtained from a field-collected larva (oral LD(50), 12 occlusions). By using a fluorescence-dequenching assay conducted in vivo, it was found that AcMNPV ODV bound to the midgut epithelia of S. frugiperda larvae at approximately 15 % of the level of SfMNPV ODV, but that, once bound, the efficiencies of fusion for the two ODVs were similar: 60 % for AcMNPV and 53 % for SfMNPV. Whilst the difference in binding efficiencies was significant, it could not account entirely for the observed differences in infectivity. Competition experiments, however, revealed that, in S. frugiperda larvae, SfMNPV ODV bound to a midgut cell receptor that was not bound by AcMNPV ODV, indicating that ODV interaction with a specific receptor(s) was necessary for productive infection of midgut columnar epithelial cells. Fusion in the absence of this ligand-receptor interaction did not result in productive infections.

  17. Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; He, H; Ramamurthy, P; Summers, M D

    1996-08-01

    This paper identifies two structural proteins of the occluded derived viral envelope of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV): ODV-E18 and ODV-E35. In addition, we identify a protein, ODV-EC27, that is incorporated into the capsid of occluded virus, which is not detected in budded virus. The genes for these proteins reside within the IE0 intron. The intron was sequenced, and five open reading frames (ORF) were identified. ORF 3 (genomic ORF 143) codes for the ODV envelope protein, ODV-E18. ORF 4 (genomic ORF 144) codes for ODV-EC27, and Western blot analyses locate this protein to both the ODV capsid and envelope. Transcripts for both ODV-E18 and ODV-EC27 initiate from conserved TAAG motifs, and transcripts are detected from 16 through 72 hr p.i. Antiserum to ODV-E18 recognizes a band of 18 kDa on Western blots of extracts from infected cells and bands of 18 and 35 kDa on Western blots of proteins from purified ODV envelope. N-terminal amino acid sequencing reveals that both ODV-E18 and ODV-E35 contain the same N-terminus. Antiserum to ODV-EC27 recognizes a protein of 27 kDa on Western blots of extracts from infected cells and bands of 27 and 35 kDa on Western blots of proteins from purified ODV. Using immunogold labeling techniques, ODV-E18 and/or ODV-E35 are detected in viral induced intranuclear microvesicles and are not detected in the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic membranes, or the nuclear envelope. Immunogold labeling using antisera to ODV-EC27 detects this protein on both the ODV envelope and capsid.

  18. Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus: subcellular localization and protein trafficking of BV/ODV-E26 to intranuclear membranes and viral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Beniya, H; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-01-05

    The Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus da26 gene codes for an envelope protein of both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus (ODV). Western blot and temporal analysis of infected cell extracts detected a protein of 26 kDa by 4 h postinfection (p.i.). The amount of protein increased by 16 h p.i. and remained at high levels throughout infection. By 36 h p.i. several additional immunoreactive proteins were detected which migrated at approximately 18 kDa and remained through 96 h p.i. Western blot analysis of purified virus envelope and nucleocapsid preparations revealed that both the 26- and 18-kDa proteins are structural proteins of the envelope of BV and ODV. Immunoelectron microscopy performed at a time when only the 26-kDa species of the protein was present confirmed that the protein located to ODV envelope. The protein was named BV/ODV-E26 to designate incorporation into viral progeny, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. Studies designed to follow localization of BV/ODV-E26 demonstrated that early in infection, the protein was incorporated into cytoplasmic vesicles and by 16 h p.i., BV/ODV-E26 was detected in the nucleus associated with virus-induced intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelope. Coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays showed that BV/ODV-E26 and FP25K were capable of interacting with each other to form a complex and coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that cellular actin was a third component of this complex. Together, these data suggest that FP25K and cellular actin may participate in the regulation, or movement through the cell, of baculovirus proteins and/or virus nucleocapsids.

  19. The putative pocket protein binding site of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus BV/ODV-C42 is required for virus-induced nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Yun; Bai, Huimin; Wang, Qian; Song, Jianhua; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for nucleocapsid morphogenesis of lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses. Previously, we had demonstrated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-C42 (C42) is involved in nuclear actin polymerization by recruiting P78/83, an AcMNPV orf9-encoded N-WASP homology protein that is capable of activating an actin-related-protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex to initiate actin polymerization, to the nucleus. To further investigate the role of C42 in virus-induced actin polymerization, the recombinant bacmid vAc(p78/83nls-gfp), with a c42 knockout, p78/83 tagged with a nuclear localization signal coding sequence, and egfp as a reporter gene under the control of the Pp10 promoter, was constructed and transfected to Sf9 cells. In the nuclei of vAc(p78/83nls-gfp)-transfected cells, polymerized F-actin filaments were absent, whereas other actin polymerization elements (i.e., P78/83, G-actin, and Arp2/3 complex) were present. This in vivo evidence indicated that C42 actively participates in the nuclear actin polymerization process as a key element, besides its role in recruiting P78/83 to the nucleus. In order to collect in vitro evidence for the participation of C42 in actin polymerization, an anti-C42 antibody was used to neutralize the viral nucleocapsid, which is capable of initiating actin polymerization in vitro. Both the kinetics of pyrene-actin polymerization and F-actin-specific staining by phalloidin indicated that anti-C42 can significantly attenuate the efficiency of F-actin formation compared to that with control antibodies. Furthermore, we have identified the putative pocket protein binding sequence (PPBS) on C42 that is essential for C42 to exert its function in nuclear actin polymerization.

  20. Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus efficiently infects Sf9 cells and transduces mammalian cells via direct fusion with the plasma membrane at low pH.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sicong; Wang, Manli; Qiu, Zhijuan; Deng, Fei; Vlak, Just M; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2010-05-01

    The budded virus (BV) of the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) infects insect cells and transduces mammalian cells mainly through the endocytosis pathway. However, this study revealed that the treatment of the virus bound to Sf9 cells at low pH could efficiently rescue the infectivity of AcMNPV in the presence of endocytosis pathway inhibitors. A colocalization assay of the major capsid protein VP39 with the early endosome marker EEA1 showed that at low pH, AcMNPV entered Sf9 cells via an endosome-independent pathway. Using a fluorescent probe (R18), we showed that at low pH, the viral nucleocapsid entered Sf9 cells via direct fusion at the cell surface. By using the myosin-specific inhibitor 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) and the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole, the low pH-triggered direct fusion was demonstrated to be dependent on myosin-like proteins and independent of microtubules. The reverse transcription-PCR of the IE1 gene as a marker for viral entry showed that the kinetics of AcMNPV in cells triggered by low pH was similar to that of the normal entry via endocytosis. The low pH-mediated infection assay and VP39 and EEA1 colocalization assay also demonstrated that AcMNPV could efficiently transduce mammalian cells via direct membrane fusion at the cell surface. More importantly, we found that a low-pH trigger could significantly improve the transduction efficiency of AcMNPV in mammalian cells, leading to the potential application of this method when using baculovirus as a vector for heterologous gene expression and for gene therapy.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a Dim1-like mitosis gene of Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9) induced by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Hussain, Mazhar; Asgari, Sassan

    2013-06-01

    Dim1 proteins are evolutionarily highly conserved throughout the eukaryotes and are present in numerous species. These proteins are essential for mitosis and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Dim1-like gene from Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9) was obtained. S. frugiperda Dim1 (SfDim1) cDNA is comprised of 975 bp including a 429 bp open reading frame (ORF), 225 bp 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), and 321 bp 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) with a poly A tail. The predicted polypeptide encoded by this gene is 142 aa with a molecular weight of 16.76 kDa and a PI of 5.53. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed high similarities with Dim1 of other species. The evolutionary conserved site of Dim1 proteins ((35)Asp-Pro-Thr-Cys(38)) is also present in SfDim1. Silencing of SfDim1 gene decreased cell proliferation at 72 h post-treatment in comparison to mock and control transfected cells. Using RT-PCR, we found relatively higher SfDim1 transcript levels following Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) infection compared to mock-infected cells from 4h post-infection (hpi) up until 24 hpi. The expression level diminished dramatically at 36 hpi up to 120 hpi with no expression detected at 144 hpi. Silencing of SfDim1 resulted in lower levels of virus DNA production in comparison to mock-infected cells, which suggested that SfDim1 might benefit the virus and facilitate viral replication. Overall, the results showed that SfDim1 protein is involved in cell proliferation as well as cell-virus interaction.

  2. Reduced expression of the immediate-early protein IE0 enables efficient replication of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus in poorly permissive Spodoptera littoralis cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liqun; Du, Quansheng; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2003-01-01

    Infection of Spodoptera littoralis SL2 cells with the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) results in apoptosis and low yields of viral progeny, in contrast to infection with S. littoralis nucleopolyhedrovirus (SlNPV). By cotransfecting SL2 cells with AcMNPV genomic DNA and a cosmid library representing the complete SlNPV genome, we were able to rescue AcMNPV replication and to isolate recombinant virus vAcSL2, which replicated efficiently in SL2 cells. Moreover, vAcSL2 showed enhanced infectivity for S. littoralis larvae compared to AcMNPV. The genome of vAcSL2 carried a 519-bp insert fragment that increased the distance between the TATA element and the transcriptional initiation site (CAGT) of immediate-early gene ie0. This finding correlated with low steady-state levels of IE0 and higher steady-state levels of IE1 (the product of the ie1 gene, a major AcMNPV transactivator, and a multifunctional protein) than of IE0. Mutagenesis of the ie0 promoter locus by insertion of the chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) gene yielded a new recombinant AcMNPV with replication properties identical to those of vAcSL2. Thus, the analysis indicated that increasing the steady-state levels of IE1 relative to IE0 should enable AcMNPV replication in SL2 cells. This suggestion was confirmed by constructing a recombinant AcMNPV bearing an extra copy of the ie1 gene under the control of the Drosophila hsp70 promoter. These results suggest that IE0 plays a role in the regulation of AcMNPV infection and show, for the first time, that significant improvement in the ability of AcMNPV to replicate in a poorly permissive cell line and organism can be achieved by increasing the expression of the main multiple functional protein, IE1.

  3. Abortive infection of the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus in Sf-9 cells after mutation of the putative DNA helicase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, S G; Maeda, S

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination between the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) genome and a 0.6-kbp-long DNA fragment derived from the putative DNA helicase gene of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus generates eh2-AcNPV, an expanded-host-range AcNPV mutant (S. Maeda, S.G. Kamita, and A. Kondo, J. Virol. 67:6234-6238, 1993). After inoculation at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI), eh2-AcNPV replicates efficiently in both the Sf-9 (AcNPV-permissive) and BmN (non-AcNPV-permissive) cell lines. In this study, we found that after the inoculation of Sf-9 cells at a low MOI (i.e., 1 and 0.1 PFU per cell), the release of eh2-AcNPV virions was dramatically reduced (approximately 900- and 10,000-fold, respectively, at 72 h postinoculation) compared with that of wild-type AcNPV. In addition, the titer of eh2-AcNPV determined by plaque assay on Sf-9 cells was approximately 200-fold lower than that determined by plaque assay on BmN cells. Analyses of gene expression and viral DNA replication after low-MOI eh2-AcNPV inoculation of Sf-9 cells indicated that viral early genes were expressed normally. However, DNA replication and late-gene expression were significantly reduced. These findings suggested that abortive infection occurred at the stage of viral DNA replication in nearly all low-MOI eh2-AcNPV-infected Sf-9 cells. In the larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda, the organism from which Sf-9 cells are derived, the infectivity of eh2-AcNPV was lower than that of AcNPV; however, abortive infection was not found. PMID:8709251

  4. Mutations within the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus FP25K gene decrease the accumulation of ODV-E66 and alter its intranuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Burks, J K; Rosas-Acosta, G; Harrison, R L; Ma, H; Summers, M D

    1999-10-01

    Previous reports indicate that mutations within the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrosis virus FP25K gene (open reading frame 61) significantly reduce incorporation of enveloped nucleocapsids into viral occlusions. We report that FP25K is a nucleocapsid protein of both the budded virus (BV) and occluded virus (ODV), and we describe the effects of two FP25K mutations (480-1 [N-terminal truncation] and FP-betagal [C-terminal fusion]) on the expression and cellular localization of ODV-E66 and ODV-E25. Significantly decreased amounts of ODV-E66 are detected in cells infected with 480-1 or FP-betagal viral mutants, even though during FP-betagal infection, steady-state levels of ODV-E66 transcripts remain unchanged. While ODV-E66 is normally detected in intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelopes by 24 h postinfection (p.i.), ODV-E66 remains cytosolic throughout infection in cells infected with 480-1 virus (up to 96 h p.i.), and its intranuclear localization is not detected until 96 h p.i. in cells infected with the FP-betagal mutant virus. The nuclear localization of ODV-E25 is not affected during infection by the FP-betagal mutant; however, its trafficking is significantly delayed during infection by the 480-1 mutant. Temporal Western blot analyses of cell lysates show that both 480-1 and FP-betagal mutant virus infections result in altered accumulation patterns of several structural proteins, including gp67, BV/ODV-E26, and the major capsid protein p39. In addition to BV/ODV-E26, ODV-E66 and gp67 may interact with FP25K, and ODV-E25 and p39 may also be components of a protein complex containing ODV-E66 and FP25K. Together, these data suggest that FP25K and its associated protein complex(es) may play an important role in the targeting and intracellular transport of viral proteins during infection.

  5. The Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ac54 Gene Is Crucial for Localization of the Major Capsid Protein VP39 at the Site of Nucleocapsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhanwen; Zhong, Ling; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Wenbi; Yuan, Meijin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Baculovirus DNAs are synthesized and inserted into preformed capsids to form nucleocapsids at a site in the infected cell nucleus, termed the virogenic stroma. Nucleocapsid assembly of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) requires the major capsid protein VP39 and nine minor capsid proteins, including VP1054. However, how VP1054 participates in nucleocapsid assembly remains elusive. In this study, the VP1054-encoding gene (ac54) was deleted to generate the ac54-knockout AcMNPV (vAc54KO). In vAc54KO-transfected cells, nucleocapsid assembly was disrupted, leading to the formation of abnormally elongated capsid structures. Interestingly, unlike cells transfected with AcMNPV mutants lacking other minor capsid proteins, in which capsid structures were distributed within the virogenic stroma, ac54 ablation resulted in a distinctive location of capsid structures and VP39 at the periphery of the nucleus. The altered distribution pattern of capsid structures was also observed in cells transfected with AcMNPV lacking BV/ODV-C42 or in cytochalasin d-treated AcMNPV-infected cells. BV/ODV-C42, along with PP78/83, has been shown to promote nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) formation, which is another requisite for nucleocapsid assembly. Immunofluorescence using phalloidin indicated that the formation and distribution of nuclear F-actin were not affected by ac54 deletion. However, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that BV/ODV-C42, PP78/83, and 38K failed to integrate into capsid structures in the absence of VP1054, and immunoprecipitation further demonstrated that in transient expression assays, VP1054 interacted with BV/ODV-C42 and VP80 but not VP39. Our findings suggest that VP1054 plays an important role in the transport of capsid proteins to the nucleocapsid assembly site prior to the process of nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses whose replication occurs within the host nucleus. The localization of

  6. The Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus tn79 gene encodes a functional sulfhydryl oxidase enzyme that is able to support the replication of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus lacking the sulfhydryl oxidase ac92 gene

    PubMed Central

    Clem, Stian A.; Wu, Wenbi; Lorena Passarelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac92 is a conserved baculovirus gene with homology to flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Its product, Ac92, is a functional sulfhydryl oxidase. Deletion of ac92 results in almost negligible levels of budded virus (BV) production, defects in occlusion-derived virus (ODV) co-envelopment and their inefficient incorporation into occlusion bodies. To determine the role of sulfhydryl oxidation in the production of BV, envelopment of nucleocapsids, and nucleocapsid incorporation into occlusion bodies, the Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus ortholog, Tn79, was substituted for ac92. Tn79 was found to be an active sulfhydryl oxidase that substituted for Ac92, resulting in the production of infectious BV, albeit about 10-fold less than an ac92-containing virus. Tn79 rescued defects in ODV morphogenesis caused by a lack of ac92. Active Tn79 sulfhydryl oxidase activity is required for efficient BV production, ODV envelopment, and their subsequent incorporation into occlusion bodies in the absence of ac92. PMID:25010286

  7. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Wendy O; Harrison, Robert L; Bonning, Bryony C

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  8. Specific binding of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virus to midgut cells of Heliothis virescens larvae is mediated by products of pif genes Ac119 and Ac022 but not by Ac115.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Taro; Washburn, Jan O; Sitapara, Ronika; Sid, Eric; Volkman, Loy E

    2005-12-01

    Per os infectivity factors PIF1 (Ac119) and PIF2 (Ac022), like P74, are essential for oral infection of lepidopteran larval hosts of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Here we show that Ac115 also is a PIF (PIF3) and that, unlike PIF1 and PIF2, it does not mediate specific binding of AcMNPV occlusion-derived virus (ODV) to midgut target cells. We used an improved in vivo fluorescence dequenching assay to compare binding, fusion, and competition among control AcMNPV ODV and the ODVs of AcMNPV PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3 deletion mutants. Our results showed that binding and fusion of PIF1 and PIF2 mutants, but not the PIF3 mutant, were both qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of control ODV. Unlike control and PIF3-deficient ODV, an excess of PIF1- or PIF2-deficient ODV failed to compete effectively with control ODV's binding to specific receptors on midgut epithelial cells. Moreover, the levels of PIF1- and PIF2-deficient ODV binding were depressed threefold compared to control levels. Binding, fusion, and competition by PIF3-deficient ODV, however, were all indistinguishable from those of control ODV. These results implicated PIF1 and PIF2 as ODV envelope attachment proteins that mediate specific binding to primary target cells within the midgut. In contrast, PIF3 mediates another unidentified, but critical, early event during primary infection.

  9. N-terminal sequences from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus envelope proteins ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 are sufficient to direct reporter proteins to the nuclear envelope, intranuclear microvesicles and the envelope of occlusion derived virus.

    PubMed

    Hong, T; Summers, M D; Braunagel, S C

    1997-04-15

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) derives its envelope from an intranuclear membrane source. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) envelope proteins, ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 (23 and 24 amino acids, respectively) are highly hydrophobic. Recombinant viruses that express the two N-terminal amino acid sequences fused to green fluorescent protein (23GFP or 24GFP) provided visual markers to follow protein transport and localization within the nucleus during infection. Autoflourescence was first detected along the cytoplasmic periphery of the nucleus and subsequently localized as foci to discrete locations within the nucleus. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that these foci predominantly contained intranuclear microvesicles and the reporter fusion proteins were also detected in cytoplasmic membranes near the nucleus, and the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Therefore, these defined hydrophobic domains are sufficient to direct native and fusion proteins to induced membrane microvesicles within a baculovirus-infected cell nucleus and the viral envelope. In addition, these data suggest that movement of these proteins into the nuclear envelope may initiate through cytoplasmic membranes, such as endoplasmic reticulum, and that transport into the nucleus may be mediated through the outer and inner nuclear membrane.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Wendy O.; Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  11. Identification of BV/ODV-C42, an Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus orf101-encoded structural protein detected in infected-cell complexes with ODV-EC27 and p78/83.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Guidry, P A; Rosas-Acosta, G; Engelking, L; Summers, M D

    2001-12-01

    orf101 is a late gene of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). It encodes a protein of 42 kDa which is a component of the nucleocapsid of budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To reflect this viral localization, the product of orf101 was named BV/ODV-C42 (C42). C42 is predominantly detected within the infected-cell nucleus: at 24 h postinfection (p.i.), it is coincident with the virogenic stroma, but by 72 h p.i., the stroma is minimally labeled while C42 is more uniformly located throughout the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid screens indicate that C42 is capable of directly interacting with the viral proteins p78/83 (1629K) and ODV-EC27 (orf144). These interactions were confirmed using blue native gels and Western blot analyses. At 28 h p.i., C42 and p78/83 are detected in two complexes: one at approximately 180 kDa and a high-molecular-mass complex (500 to 600 kDa) which also contains EC27.

  12. Characterization of the interaction between P143 and LEF-3 from two different baculovirus species: Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3 can complement Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3 in supporting DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tricia; Sahri, Daniela; Carstens, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    The baculovirus protein P143 is essential for viral DNA replication in vivo, likely as a DNA helicase. We have demonstrated that another viral protein, LEF-3, first described as a single-stranded DNA binding protein, is required for transporting P143 into the nuclei of insect cells. Both of these proteins, along with several other early viral proteins, are also essential for DNA replication in transient assays. We now describe the identification, nucleotide sequences, and transcription patterns of the Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) homologues of p143 and lef-3 and demonstrate that CfMNPV LEF-3 is also responsible for P143 localization to the nucleus. We predicted that the interaction between P143 and LEF-3 might be critical for cross-species complementation of DNA replication. Support for this hypothesis was generated by substitution of heterologous P143 and LEF-3 between two different baculovirus species, Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus and CfMNPV, in transient DNA replication assays. The results suggest that the P143-LEF-3 complex is an important baculovirus replication factor.

  13. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  14. Replication inhibition by nucleoside analogues of a recombinant Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus harboring the herpes thymidine kinase gene driven by the IE-1(0) promoter: a new way to select recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, F; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the thymidine-thymidylate kinase (HSV1-TK), (ATP: thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.21) of herpes simplex virus type 1 endows the host cell with a conditional lethal phenotype which depends on the presence of nucleoside analogues metabolized by this enzyme into toxic inhibitors of DNA replication. To generate a recombinant baculovirus that could be selected against by nucleoside analogs, the HSV1-tk coding sequence was placed under the control of the Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) immediate early promoterm IE-1(0), and this construction was introduced via homologous recombination into the polyhedrin locus of AcMNPV. Two recombinant baculoviruses harboring this gene construct at the polyhedrin locus were isolated and tested for their ability to replicate in the presence of various concentrations of the nucleoside analog 9-(1,3-Dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (Ganciclovir). Neither Sf9 lepidopteran cell viability nor replication of wild type or beta-Galactosidase-expressing recombinant AcMNPVs were affected by concentrations of Ganciclovir up to 100 microM. In contrast, replication of the recombinant AcMNPV virus harboring the HSV1-tk gene was inhibited by Ganciclovir in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was detectable at 2 microM and complete at 100 microM. This property was exploited in model isolations aimed at purifying new recombinant viruses having lost this counter-selectable gene marker as a result of homologous recombination at the polyhedrin locus after cotransfection of the viral DNA with a replacement vector. After being propagated in the presence of Ganciclovir, the progeny of such co-transfections contained over 85% recombinant viruses, demonstrating that counter-selection of parental HSV1-tk-containing viruses by Ganciclovir constitutes a novel approach for recombinant baculovirus isolation. Images PMID:1335569

  15. Reduction of polyhedrin mRNA and protein expression levels in Sf9 and Hi5 cell lines, but not in Sf21 cells, infected with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus fp25k mutants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin-Hua; Hillman, Christopher C; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2013-01-01

    During cell infection, the fp25k gene of baculoviruses frequently mutates, producing the few polyhedra (FP) per cell phenotype with reduced polyhedrin (polh) expression levels compared with wild-type baculoviruses. Here we report that the fp25k gene of the model baculovirus, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), contains two hypermutable seven-adenine (A7) mononucleotide repeats (MNRs) that were mutated to A8 MNRs and a TTAA site that had host DNA insertions, producing fp25k mutants during Sf21 cell infection. The FP phenotype in Sf9 and Hi5 cells was more pronounced than in Sf21 cells. AcMNPV fp25k mutants produced similar levels of polyhedra or enhanced GFP, which were both under the control of the AcMNPV polh promoter for expression, in Sf21 cells but lower levels in Sf9 and Hi5 cells compared with AcMNPV with an intact fp25k gene. This correlated with the polh mRNA levels detected in each cell line. The majority of Sf21 cells infected with fp25 mutants showed high polh promoter-mediated GFP expression levels. Two cell lines subcloned from Sf21 cells that were infected with fp25k mutants showed different GFP expression levels. Furthermore, a small proportion of Hi5 cells infected with fp25k mutants showed higher production of polyhedra and GFP expression than the rest, and the latter was not correlated with increased m.o.i. Therefore, these data suggest that AcMNPV polh promoter-mediated gene expression activities differ in the three cell lines and are influenced by different cells within the cell line.

  16. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus AC83 is a Per Os Infectivity Factor (PIF) Protein Required for Occlusion-Derived Virus (ODV) and Budded Virus Nucleocapsid Assembly as well as Assembly of the PIF Complex in ODV Envelopes.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Biswas, Siddhartha; Willis, Leslie G; Harris, Stephanie; Pritchard, Caitlin; van Oers, Monique M; Donly, B Cameron; Erlandson, Martin A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Theilmann, David A

    2017-03-01

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) initiates infection of lepidopteran larval hosts by binding to the midgut epithelia, which is mediated by per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes seven PIF proteins, of which PIF1 to PIF4 form a core complex in ODV envelopes to which PIF0 and PIF6 loosely associate. Deletion of any pif gene results in ODV being unable to bind or enter midgut cells. AC83 also associates with the PIF complex, and this study further analyzed its role in oral infectivity to determine if it is a PIF protein. It had been proposed that AC83 possesses a chitin binding domain that enables transit through the peritrophic matrix; however, no chitin binding activity has ever been demonstrated. AC83 has been reported to be found only in the ODV envelopes, but in contrast, the Orgyia pseudotsugata MNPV AC83 homolog is associated with both ODV nucleocapsids and envelopes. In addition, unlike known pif genes, deletion of ac83 eliminates nucleocapsid formation. We propose a new model for AC83 function and show AC83 is associated with both ODV nucleocapsids and envelopes. We also further define the domain required for nucleocapsid assembly. The cysteine-rich region of AC83 is also shown not to be a chitin binding domain but a zinc finger domain required for the recruitment or assembly of the PIF complex to ODV envelopes. As such, AC83 has all the properties of a PIF protein and should be considered PIF8. In addition, pif7 (ac110) is reported as the 38th baculovirus core gene.IMPORTANCE ODV is essential for the per os infectivity of the baculovirus AcMNPV. To initiate infection, ODV binds to microvilli of lepidopteran midgut cells, a process which requires a group of seven virion envelope proteins called PIFs. In this study, we reexamined the function of AC83, a protein that copurifies with the ODV PIFs, to determine its role in the oral infection process. A zinc finger domain was identified and

  17. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 envelope protein is required for oral infectivity and can be substituted functionally by Rachiplusia ou multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert L; Sparks, Wendy O; Bonning, Bryony C

    2010-05-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) odv-e56 gene encodes an occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-specific envelope protein, ODV-E56. In a previous analysis, the odv-e56 gene was found to be under positive selection pressure, suggesting that it may be a determinant of virus host range. To assess the role of ODV-E56 in oral infectivity and host range, we constructed recombinant AcMNPV clones (Ac69GFP-e56lacZ and AcIEGFP-e56lacZ) in which ODV-E56 protein synthesis was eliminated by inserting a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) expression cassette into the odv-e56 open reading frame. We also constructed a recombinant virus, Ac69GFP-Roe56, in which the native AcMNPV odv-e56 coding sequence was replaced with that of Rachiplusia ou multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (RoMNPV), a closely related virus that is significantly more virulent towards some host species than AcMNPV. The odv-e56 recombinant viruses exhibited no alterations in polyhedron production and morphogenesis or in the production of infectious budded virus in cell culture. In bioassays using three lepidopteran host species, the oral infectivities of the odv-e56 mutant viruses Ac69GFP-e56lacZ and AcIEGFP-e56lacZ were profoundly impaired compared with those of wild-type and control recombinant viruses. Oral infectivity was restored fully by marker rescue of the odv-e56 mutant viruses with either the AcMNPV or the RoMNPV odv-e56 gene. In bioassays using two host species that are more susceptible to RoMNPV than to AcMNPV, Ac69GFP-Roe56 killed larvae with LC50 values similar to those of recombinant viruses expressing AcMNPV ODV-E56. This result indicated that replacement of the AcMNPV odv-e56 gene with the RoMNPV orthologue did not increase virulence against these two species.

  18. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  19. A pH-sensitive heparin-binding sequence from Baculovirus gp64 protein is important for binding to mammalian cells but not to Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Binding to heparan sulfate is essential for baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells. Our previous study shows that gp64, the major glycoprotein on the virus surface, binds to heparin in a pH-dependent way, with a stronger binding at pH 6.2 than at 7.4. Using fluorescently labeled peptides, we mapped the pH-dependent heparin-binding sequence of gp64 to a 22-amino-acid region between residues 271 and 292. Binding of this region to the cell surface was also pH dependent, and peptides containing this sequence could efficiently inhibit baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells at pH 6.2. When the heparin-binding peptide was immobilized onto the bead surface to mimic the high local concentration of gp64 on the virus surface, the peptide-coated magnetic beads could efficiently pull down cells expressing heparan sulfate but not cells pretreated with heparinase or cells not expressing heparan sulfate. Interestingly, although this heparin-binding function is essential for baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells, it is dispensable for infection of Sf9 insect cells. Virus infectivity on Sf9 cells was not reduced by the presence of heparin or the identified heparin-binding peptide, even though the peptide could bind to Sf9 cell surface and be efficiently internalized. Thus, our data suggest that, depending on the availability of the target molecules on the cell surface, baculoviruses can use two different methods, electrostatic interaction with heparan sulfate and more specific receptor binding, for cell attachment.

  20. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Changyong; Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  1. Proteotoxic stress induced by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lyupina, Yulia V.; Abaturova, Svetlana B.; Erokhov, Pavel A.; Orlova, Olga V.; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N.; Mikhailov, Victor S.

    2013-02-05

    Baculovirus AcMNPV causes proteotoxicity in Sf9 cells as revealed by accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and aggresomes in the course of infection. Inhibition of proteasomes by lactacystin increased markedly the stock of ubiquitinated proteins indicating a primary role of proteasomes in detoxication. The proteasomes were present in Sf9 cells as 26S and 20S complexes whose protease activity did not change during infection. Proteasome inhibition caused a delay in the initiation of viral DNA replication suggesting an important role of proteasomes at early stages in infection. However, lactacystin did not affect ongoing replication indicating that active proteasomes are not required for genome amplification. At late stages in infection (24-48 hpi), aggresomes containing the ubiquitinated proteins and HSP/HSC70s showed gradual fusion with the vacuole-like structures identified as lysosomes by antibody to cathepsin D. This result suggests that lysosomes may assist in protection against proteotoxicity caused by baculoviruses absorbing the ubiquitinated proteins.

  2. Proteotoxic stress induced by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Erokhov, Pavel A; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2013-02-05

    Baculovirus AcMNPV causes proteotoxicity in Sf9 cells as revealed by accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and aggresomes in the course of infection. Inhibition of proteasomes by lactacystin increased markedly the stock of ubiquitinated proteins indicating a primary role of proteasomes in detoxication. The proteasomes were present in Sf9 cells as 26S and 20S complexes whose protease activity did not change during infection. Proteasome inhibition caused a delay in the initiation of viral DNA replication suggesting an important role of proteasomes at early stages in infection. However, lactacystin did not affect ongoing replication indicating that active proteasomes are not required for genome amplification. At late stages in infection (24-48 hpi), aggresomes containing the ubiquitinated proteins and HSP/HSC70s showed gradual fusion with the vacuole-like structures identified as lysosomes by antibody to cathepsin D. This result suggests that lysosomes may assist in protection against proteotoxicity caused by baculoviruses absorbing the ubiquitinated proteins.

  3. Susceptibility of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus to inhibitors of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Thumbi, David K; Arif, Basil M; Krell, Peter J

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop methods to evaluate the susceptibility of the type baculovirus AcMNPV to various antiviral compounds and to select potential inhibitors for investigating baculovirus DNA replication. In concert with the classical cytopathic effects (CPE) and cytotoxicity inhibition assays, two approaches, which could be amenable for high throughput application for evaluating several classes of known antiviral compounds were developed. (i) An indirect approach based on spectrofluorimetric analysis of EGFP expression in Sf21 cells infected with a recombinant AcMNPV (AcEGFP) and (ii) a direct DNA quantitative assay based on quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Initial CPE results suggested that of 21 compounds tested, aphidicolin, abacavir, camptothecin, (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU), l-mimosine, hydroxyurea and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) were selective inhibitors of AcMNPV replication. Consistent with the CPE results, the EGFP fluorescence and the qPCR of viral DNA accumulation exhibited a dose dependent depression of EGFP expression and DNA accumulation, respectively, in infected cells exposed to them. The inhibitory effects of aphidicolin, abacavir, l-mimosine and hydroxyurea on AcMNPV DNA replication were reversible. Taken together, both spectrofluorimetric and qPCR assays are suitable and rapid quantitative approaches to investigate inhibitors of baculovirus DNA replication in infected cells.

  4. Developmental transcriptome of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Vue, Zer; Voolstra, Christian R; Medina, Mónica; Moroz, Leonid L

    2011-03-15

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages-many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization-a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms.

  5. Developmental Transcriptome of Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    HEYLAND, ANDREAS; VUE, ZER; VOOLSTRA, CHRISTIAN R.; MEDINA, MÓNICA; MOROZ, LEONID L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages—many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization—a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms. PMID:21328528

  6. Egress of budded virions of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus does not require activity of Spodoptera frugiperda HSP/HSC70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Orlova, Olga V; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey N; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2014-11-04

    The induction of heat shock proteins in baculovirus infected cells is well documented. However a role of these chaperones in infection cycle remains unknown. The observation that HSP70s are associated with virions of different baculoviruses reported by several researchers suggests that HSPs might be structural components of viruses or involved in virion assembly. These hypotheses were examined by using a novel inhibitor of the ATPase and chaperoning activity of HSP/HSC70s, VER-155008. When VER-155008 was added early in infection, the synthesis of viral proteins, genome replication and the production of budded virions (BV) were markedly inhibited indicating the dependence of virus reproduction on host chaperones. However, BV production was unaffected when VER-155008 was added in the mid-replication phase which is after accumulation of products required for completion of the viral DNA replication. These results suggest that the final stages in assembly of BV and their egress from cells do not depend on chaperone activity of host HSP/HSC70s.

  7. Effects of deletion of the ac109 gene of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus on interactions with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Victoria; Amalfi, Sabrina; López, María Gabriela; Taboga, Oscar

    2017-03-01

    Baculoviruses are able to enter into mammalian cells, where they can express a transgene that is placed under an appropriate promoter, without producing infectious progeny. ORF109 encodes an essential baculovirus protein that participates in the interaction of the baculovirus with mammalian cells. To date, the mechanisms underlying this interaction are not yet known. We demonstrated that although a Ac109 knock out virus maintained its ability to enter into BHK-21 cells, there was a marked reduction in the expression efficiency of the nuclear transgene. Moreover, the amount of free cytoplasmic viral DNA, which was detected by transcription of a reporter gene, was severely diminished. These results suggest Ac109 could be involved in maintaining the integrity of the viral nucleic acid.

  8. Persistent gene expression in mouse nasal epithelia following feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Burnight, Erin R; Hickey, Melissa A; Blissard, Gary W; McCray, Paul B

    2005-10-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 10(6) transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 10(7) to 10(9) TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (approximately 10(9) TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for approximately 1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity.

  9. Characterization of Sleep in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Vorster, Albrecht P.A.; Krishnan, Harini C.; Cirelli, Chiara; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To characterize sleep in the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica. Design: Animal behavior and activity were assessed using video recordings to measure activity, resting posture, resting place preference, and behavior after rest deprivation. Latencies for behavioral responses were measured for appetitive and aversive stimuli for animals in the wake and rest states. Setting: Circadian research laboratory for Aplysia. Patients or Participants: A. californica from the Pacific Ocean. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Aplysia rest almost exclusively during the night in a semi-contracted body position with preferential resting locations in the upper corners of their tank. Resting animals demonstrate longer latencies in head orientation and biting in response to a seaweed stimulus and less frequent escape response steps following an aversive salt stimulus applied to the tail compared to awake animals at the same time point. Aplysia exhibit rebound rest the day following rest deprivation during the night, but not after similar handling stimulation during the day. Conclusions: Resting behavior in Aplysia fulfills all invertebrate characteristics of sleep including: (1) a specific sleep body posture, (2) preferred resting location, (3) reversible behavioral quiescence, (4) elevated arousal thresholds for sensory stimuli during sleep, and (5) compensatory sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. Citation: Vorster AP, Krishnan HC, Cirelli C, Lyons LC. Characterization of sleep in Aplysia californica. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1453-1463. PMID:25142567

  10. Irreversible thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, D. I.; Shnyrov, V. L.; Villar, E.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase, a disulfide-linked homodimer with 537 amino acids in each subunit, was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It displays a single calorimetric peak that is completely irreversible, the shape and temperature maximum depending on the scan rate. Thus, thermal denaturation of acetylcholinesterase is an irreversible process, under kinetic control, which is described well by the two-state kinetic scheme N-->D, with activation energy 131 +/- 8 kcal/mol. Analysis of the kinetics of denaturation in the thermal transition temperature range, by monitoring loss of enzymic activity, yields activation energy of 121 +/- 20 kcal/mol, similar to the value obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Thermally denatured acetylcholinesterase displays spectroscopic characteristics typical of a molten globule state, similar to those of partially unfolded enzyme obtained by modification with thiol-specific reagents. Evidence is presented that the partially unfolded states produced by the two different treatments are thermodynamically favored relative to the native state. PMID:8563632

  11. Dietary metal toxicity to the marine sea hare, Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Tayler A; Capo, Thomas R; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-01-01

    Metal pollution from anthropogenic inputs is a concern in many marine environments. Metals accumulate in tissue and in excess cause toxicity in marine organisms. This study investigated the accumulation and effects of dietary metals in a macroinvertebrate. The green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and the red seaweed, Agardhiella subulata were each concurrently exposed to two concentrations (100 or 1000 μg/L) of five metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Zn). Additionally, U. lactuca was exposed to 10 μg/L of the metal mixture as well as 10 or 100 μg/L of each metal individually for 48 h. The seaweeds were then used as food for the sea hare, Aplysia californica for two to three weeks depending on the exposure concentration. Body mass of A. californica was measured weekly, and at the end of the exposure duration, metal concentrations were quantified in dissected organs (mouth, esophagus, crop, gizzard, ovotestis, heart, hepatopancreas, gill, and the carcass). Metal distribution and accumulation in the organs of A. californica varied with the metal. A. californica fed the metal-exposed diets had significantly reduced body weight by the end of the exposure periods, as compared to controls; however, differences were observed in the extent of growth reductions, dependent on exposure concentration, duration, and exposure regime (metal mixture versus individual metal-exposed diet). Metal mixture diets decreased A. californica growth more so than comparable individual metal diets, despite more metal accumulating in the individual metal diets. Additionally, Zn- and Cu-contaminated algal diets decreased control-normalized growth of A. californica significantly more than comparable Cd-, Pb-, or Ni-contaminated diets. The seaweed diets in this study contained environmentally relevant tissue metal burdens. Therefore, these results have implications for metals in marine systems.

  12. Abortive replication of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in Sf9 and High Five cells: Defective nuclear transport of the virions

    SciTech Connect

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro . E-mail: michihir@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-04-10

    Despite close genetic relationship, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) and Autographa californica multicapsid NPV (AcMNPV) display a distinct host range property. Here, BmNPV replication was examined in Sf9 and High Five cells that were nonproductive for BmNPV infection but supported high titers of AcMNPV replication. Recombinant BmNPV, vBm/gfp/lac, containing bm-ie1 promoter-driven egfp showed that few Sf9 and High Five cells infected with vBm/gfp/lac expressed EGFP, while large proportion of EGFP-expressing cells was observed when transfected with vBm/gfp/lac DNA. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that BmNPV was not imported into the nucleus of these two cell lines, while recombinant BmNPV, vBm{delta}64/ac-gp64 possessing AcMNPV gp64 was imported into the nucleus, yielding progeny virions in High Five cells, but not Sf9 cells. These results indicate that the defective nuclear import of infected virions due to insufficient BmNPV GP64 function is involved in the restricted BmNPV replication in Sf9 and High Five cells.

  13. Abortive replication of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in Sf9 and High Five cells: defective nuclear transport of the virions.

    PubMed

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro

    2006-04-10

    Despite close genetic relationship, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) and Autographa californica multicapsid NPV (AcMNPV) display a distinct host range property. Here, BmNPV replication was examined in Sf9 and High Five cells that were nonproductive for BmNPV infection but supported high titers of AcMNPV replication. Recombinant BmNPV, vBm/gfp/lac, containing bm-ie1 promoter-driven egfp showed that few Sf9 and High Five cells infected with vBm/gfp/lac expressed EGFP, while large proportion of EGFP-expressing cells was observed when transfected with vBm/gfp/lac DNA. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that BmNPV was not imported into the nucleus of these two cell lines, while recombinant BmNPV, vBmDelta64/ac-gp64 possessing AcMNPV gp64 was imported into the nucleus, yielding progeny virions in High Five cells, but not Sf9 cells. These results indicate that the defective nuclear import of infected virions due to insufficient BmNPV GP64 function is involved in the restricted BmNPV replication in Sf9 and High Five cells.

  14. Effects of Hypergravity on Statocyst Development in Embryonic Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, Hugo A.; Wiederhold, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    Aplysia californica is a marine gastropod mollusc with bilaterally paired statocysts as gravity-reccptor organs. Data from three experiments in which embryonic Aplysia californica were exposed to 2 x g arc discussed. The experimental groups were exposed to excess gravity until hatching (9-12 day), whereas control groups were maintained at normal gravity. Body diameter was measured before exposure to 2 x g. Statocyst, statolith and body diameter were each determined for samples of 20 embryos from each group on successive days. Exposure to excess gravity led to an increase in body size. Statocyst size was not affected by exposure to 2 x g. Statolith size decreased with treatment as indicated by smaller statolith-to-body ratios observed in the 2 x g group in all three experiments. Mean statolith diameter was significantly smaller for the 2 x g group in Experiment 1 but not in Experiments 2 and 3. Defective statocysts, characterized by very small or no statoliths, were found in the 2 x g group in Experiments 1 and 2.

  15. Use of Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia californica) & Drosophila for Investigating Predator-Prey Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Carl R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the cobra lily (Darlingtonia californica) and fruit flies (Drosophila virilis) to investigate predator-prey relationships in a classroom laboratory. Suggestions for classroom extension of this experimental system are provided. (ZWH)

  16. First case of synophthalmia and albinism in the Pacific angel shark Squatina californica.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Sánchez, O; Moreno-Sánchez, X G; Aguilar-Cruz, C A; Abitia-Cárdenas, L A

    2014-08-01

    The first record in Mexican waters of albinism and synophthalmia (partial cyclopia) in the Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica is presented. Albinism is not lethal, but synophthalmia may cause the death of the individual immediately after birth.

  17. Bacteria facilitate prey retention by the pitcher plant Darlingtonia californica.

    PubMed

    Armitage, David W

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria are hypothesized to provide a variety of beneficial functions to plants. Many carnivorous pitcher plants, for example, rely on bacteria for digestion of captured prey. This bacterial community may also be responsible for the low surface tensions commonly observed in pitcher plant digestive fluids, which might facilitate prey capture. I tested this hypothesis by comparing the physical properties of natural pitcher fluid from the pitcher plant Darlingtonia californica and cultured 'artificial' pitcher fluids and tested these fluids' prey retention capabilities. I found that cultures of pitcher leaves' bacterial communities had similar physical properties to raw pitcher fluids. These properties facilitated the retention of insects by both fluids and hint at a previously undescribed class of plant-microbe interaction.

  18. Functional Analysis of the Putative Fusion Domain of the Baculovirus Envelope Fusion Protein F

    PubMed Central

    Westenberg, Marcel; Veenman, Frank; Roode, Els C.; Goldbach, Rob W.; Vlak, Just M.; Zuidema, Douwe

    2004-01-01

    Group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), e.g., Spodoptera exigua MNPV, lack a GP64-like protein that is present in group I NPVs but have an unrelated envelope fusion protein named F. In contrast to GP64, the F protein has to be activated by a posttranslational cleavage mechanism to become fusogenic. In several vertebrate viral fusion proteins, the cleavage activation generates a new N terminus which forms the so-called fusion peptide. This fusion peptide inserts in the cellular membrane, thereby facilitating apposition of the viral and cellular membrane upon sequential conformational changes of the fusion protein. A similar peptide has been identified in NPV F proteins at the N terminus of the large membrane-anchored subunit F1. The role of individual amino acids in this putative fusion peptide on viral infectivity and propagation was studied by mutagenesis. Mutant F proteins with single amino acid changes as well as an F protein with a deleted putative fusion peptide were introduced in gp64-null Autographa californica MNPV budded viruses (BVs). None of the mutations analyzed had an major effect on the processing and incorporation of F proteins in the envelope of BVs. Only two mutants, one with a substitution for a hydrophobic residue (F152R) and one with a deleted putative fusion peptide, were completely unable to rescue the gp64-null mutant. Several nonconservative substitutions for other hydrophobic residues and the conserved lysine residue had only an effect on viral infectivity. In contrast to what was expected from vertebrate virus fusion peptides, alanine substitutions for glycines did not show any effect. PMID:15194771

  19. Regulation of statoconia mineralization in Aplysia californica in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    Statoconia are calcium carbonate inclusions in the lumen of the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of Aplysia californica. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of carbonic anhydrase and urease in statoconia mineralization in vitro. The experiments were performed using a previously described culture system (Pedrozo et al., J. Comp. Physiol. (A) 177:415-425). Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase by acetazolamide decreased statoconia production and volume, while inhibition of urease by acetohydroxamic acid reduced total statoconia number, but had no affect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase initially increased and then decreased the statocyst pH, whereas inhibition of urease decreased statocyst pH at all times examined; simultaneous addition of both inhibitors also decreased pH. These effects were dose and time dependent. The results show that carbonic anhydrase and urease are required for statoconia formation and homeostasis, and for regulation of statocyst pH. This suggests that these two enzymes regulate mineralization at least partially through regulation of statocyst pH.

  20. [First report in Panama on Nerocila californica Schioedte and Meinert 1881 (Isopoda: Cymothoidea) in Sciaenops ocellatus (L) (Pisces: Sciaenidae)].

    PubMed

    Garcés, H A

    1993-01-01

    One juvenile specimen of the isopod Nerocila californica (acuminata form) was found on the skin of a cage-raised red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, in Aguadulce, Cocle Province. This finding is the first report of the occurrence of Nerocila californica as ectoparasitic of fishes on the Pacific side of the Republic of Panama.

  1. Comparative investigation of Umbellularia californica and Laurus nobilis Leaf essential oils and identification of constituents active against Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Umbellularia californica (California Bay Laurel) is a native species from California and its leaves are commonly used as spice and insect repellent. The leaves of U. californica may be mistaken or used as a substitute for Mediterranean bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) on the market. The essential oils fr...

  2. Pleasant natural scent with unpleasant effects: cluster headache-like attacks triggered by Umbellularia californica.

    PubMed

    Benemei, S; Appendino, G; Geppetti, P

    2010-06-01

    Umbellularia californica, a shrub or tree indigenous to southwestern Oregon and northern California, is commonly known as headache tree, probably because it is reported that its scent can cause headache. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old Italian gardener, affected during his young adult age by cluster headache, who, 10 years from his last cluster episode, developed shorter-lasting cluster-like headache attacks after and at any time he was exposed to U. californica scent. The present case indicates that, even though endogenous mechanisms causing the cluster headache were no longer present, susceptibility to exogenous triggers remains active in this patient, and suggests that identification of the constituent(s) of U. californica responsible for triggering cluster headache-like attacks may help in the understanding of the hitherto elusive mechanism of cluster headache.

  3. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  4. Digestive Physiology and Nutritional Responses of Autographa gamma (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on Different Sugar Beet Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Bahram; Golikhajeh, Neshat; Rahimi Namin, Foroogh

    2016-01-01

    Digestive enzymatic activity and nutritional responses of Autographa gamma (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an important insect pest of sugar beet, on nine sugar beet cultivars (Peritra, Karolina, Paolita, Lenzier, Tiller, Ardabili, Persia, Rozier, and Dorothea) were studied. The highest proteolytic activity of fourth and fifth instar of A. gamma was in larvae fed on cultivar Persia. The highest amylolytic activity of fourth and fifth instar was observed in larvae fed on cultivars Rozier and Dorothea, respectively. The lowest proteolytic and amylolytic activities in fourth instar were observed on cultivar Tiller; whereas the lowest activities in fifth instar were detected on cultivars Karolina and Tiller, respectively. Larval weight in both larval instars (fourth and fifth) was the heaviest on cultivar Persia and the lightest on cultivar Karolina. Furthermore, weight gain of larvae was the highest on cultivar Persia and the lowest on cultivar Karolina. The results of this study suggest that cultivar Tiller was the most unsuitable host plant for feeding of A. gamma. PMID:27324581

  5. Hybridization of cultivated Vitis vinifera with wild V. californica and V. girdiana in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The native wild grape species of northern California, Vitis californica Benth. (California wild grape), and V. girdiana Munson (desert wild grape) in southern California are under increasing pressure from loss of habitat and from interbreeding with the domesticated grapevine, V. vinifera L. For its...

  6. Composition of Pteryxia terebinthina var. californica (Coult. and Rose) Mathias essential oils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauchamp, Philip E.; Dev, Vasu; Munevar-Mendoza, Elsa; Moore, Peggy E.

    2000-01-01

    β-Pinene (35.0%, 53.8%) was the major component of both the aerial parts and the root oils of Pteryxia terebinthina var. californica, respectively. β-Phellandrene (12.2%) was the other most abundant component of the oil from aeial parts while δ-3-carene (14.2%) was the second abundant component of the root oil.

  7. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) and its alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eschscholzia californica Cham., a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over the counter (OTC) and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. M...

  8. Modulation of antioxidant defense system after long term arsenic exposure in Zantedeschia aethiopica and Anemopsis californica.

    PubMed

    Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Zurita, Florentina; Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Solis-Sánchez, Brenda; Wence-Chávez, Laura; Rodríguez-Sahagún, Araceli; Castellanos-Hernández, Osvaldo A; Vázquez-Armenta, Gabriela; Siller-López, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Zantedeschia aethiopica (calla lily) and Anemopsis californica (yerba mansa) are plant species capable of accumulating arsenic (As) and therefore proposed as phytoremediation for removal of As from drinking water. The effects of a continuous 6 month As exposure (34±11 μg/L) from local contaminated groundwater on the antioxidant response of Z. aethiopica and A. californica were evaluated in leaves and stems of the plants bimonthly in a subsurface flow constructed wetland. As increased the activities of the antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase where higher levels were observed in Z. aethiopica than A. californica. No significant differences were detected on lipid peroxidation levels or antioxidant capacity evaluated by ORAC and DPPH assays or total phenol contents in any part of the plant, although in general the leaves of both plants showed the best antioxidant defense against the metal. In conclusion, Z. aethiopica and A. californica were able to cope to As through induction of a more sensitive enzymatic antioxidant response mechanism.

  9. Properties of baculovirus particles displaying GFP analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toivola, Jouni; Ojala, Kirsi; Michel, Patrik O; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2002-12-01

    Recombinant baculovirus particles displaying green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the major envelope glycoprotein gp64 of the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) were characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS detected Brownian motion of single, intact recombinant baculovirus display particles with a diffusion coefficient (D) of (2.89 +/- 0.74) x 10(-8) cm2s(-1) and an apparent hydrodynamic radius of 83.35 +/- 21.22 nm. In the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, and octylglucoside, the diffusion time was reduced to the 0.2 ms range (D = 7.57 x 10(-7) cm2s(-1)), showing that the fusion proteins were anchored in the viral envelope. This allowed for a calculation of the number of single gp64 fusion proteins incorporated in the viral membrane. A mean value of 3.2 fluorescent proteins per virus particle was obtained. Our results show that FCS is the method of choice for studying enveloped viruses such as a display virus with one component being GFP.

  10. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy) and Its Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Manda, Vamshi K; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Dale, Olivia R; Kumarihamy, Mallika; Cutler, Stephen J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Muhammad, Ilias; Khan, Shabana I

    2016-04-01

    Eschscholzia californica, a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over-the-counter and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. Most of the clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions occur due to modulation of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), P-glycoprotein, and the pregnane X receptor by concomitantly used herbs. This study aimed to determine the effects of an EtOH extract, aqueous extract (tea), basic CHCl3 fractions, and isolated major alkaloids, namely protopine (1), escholtzine (2), allocryptopine (3), and californidine (4), of E. californica on the activity of cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein and the pregnane X receptor. The EtOH extract and fractions showed strong time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19, and reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6. Among the alkaloids, escholtzine (2) and allocryptopine (3) exhibited time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19 (IC50 shift ratio > 2), while protopine (1) and allocryptopine (3) showed reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6 enzyme. A significant activation of the pregnane X receptor (> 2-fold) was observed with the EtOH extract, basic CHCl3 fraction, and alkaloids (except protopine), which resulted into an increased expression of mRNA and the activity of CYP 3A4 and CYP 1A2. The expression of P-glycoprotein was unaffected. However, aqueous extract (tea) and its main alkaloid californidine (4) did not affect cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein, or the pregnane X receptor. This data suggests that EtOH extract of E. californica and its major alkaloids have a potential of causing interactions with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s, while the tea seems to be safer.

  11. Localization and functional characterization of a novel adipokinetic hormone in the mollusk, Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua I; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Nguyen, Cindy; Tsai, Pei-San

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), corazonin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and red pigment-concentrating hormone all share common ancestry to form a GnRH superfamily. Despite the wide presence of these peptides in protostomes, their biological effects remain poorly characterized in many taxa. This study had three goals. First, we cloned the full-length sequence of a novel AKH, termed Aplysia-AKH, and examined its distribution in an opisthobranch mollusk, Aplysia californica. Second, we investigated in vivo biological effects of Aplysia-AKH. Lastly, we compared the effects of Aplysia-AKH to a related A. californica peptide, Aplysia-GnRH. Results suggest that Aplysia-AKH mRNA and peptide are localized exclusively in central tissues, with abdominal, cerebral, and pleural ganglia being the primary sites of Aplysia-AKH production. However, Aplysia-AKH-positive fibers were found in all central ganglia, suggesting diverse neuromodulatory roles. Injections of A. californica with Aplysia-AKH significantly inhibited feeding, reduced body mass, increased excretion of feces, and reduced gonadal mass and oocyte diameter. The in vivo effects of Aplysia-AKH differed substantially from Aplysia-GnRH. Overall, the distribution and biological effects of Aplysia-AKH suggest it has diverged functionally from Aplysia-GnRH over the course of evolution. Further, that both Aplysia-AKH and Aplysia-GnRH failed to activate reproduction suggest the critical role of GnRH as a reproductive activator may be a phenomenon unique to vertebrates.

  12. A water-borne adhesive modeled after the sandcastle glue of P. californica.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hui; Bachus, Kent N; Stewart, Russell J

    2009-05-13

    Polyacrylate glue protein analogs of the glue secreted by Phragmatopoma californica, a marine polycheate, were synthesized with phosphate, primary amine, and catechol sidechains with molar ratios similar to the natural glue proteins. Aqueous mixtures of the mimetic polyelectrolytes condensed into liquid complex coacervates around neutral pH. Wet cortical bone specimens bonded with the coacervates, oxidatively crosslinked through catechol sidechains, had bond strengths nearly 40% of the strength of a commercial cyanoacrylate. The unique material properties of complex coacervates may be ideal for development of clinically useful adhesives and other biomaterials.

  13. Behavioural effects of the American traditional plant Eschscholzia californica: sedative and anxiolytic properties.

    PubMed

    Rolland, A; Fleurentin, J; Lanhers, M C; Younos, C; Misslin, R; Mortier, F; Pelt, J M

    1991-06-01

    Eschsholzia californica Cham. is a traditional medicinal plant of the Indians used by the rural population of California for its analgesic and sedative properties. Our study on the aqueous extract shows that this plant reduced the behavioural parameters measured in a familiar environment test in mice (novelty preference, locomotion and rearings in two compartments test) at doses above 100 mg/kg and in non-familiar environment tests (staircase test) at doses above 200 mg/kg. This finding validates its traditional sedative properties confirmed by the sleeping induction at doses above 100 mg/kg. Furthermore, when administered at a dose a of 25 mg/kg, E. californica appeared to also have an anxiolytic action since it produced an increase of the number of steps climbed by mice in the staircase test (anticonflict effect) and that of the time spent by animals in the lit box when they were confronted with the light/dark choice situation. Before evaluation of the behavioural effects, it was verified that our aqueous extract did not induce any toxic effect when administered i.p. and p.o.

  14. Selective prey avoidance learning in the predatory sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica.

    PubMed

    Noboa, Vanessa; Gillette, Rhanor

    2013-09-01

    Predator-prey interactions involving aposematic signaling, where predators learn the warning cues of well-defended prey, are clear examples of cost-benefit decisions in foraging animals. However, knowledge of the selectivity of predator learning and the natural conditions where it occurs is lacking for those foragers simpler in brain and body plan. We pursued the question in the sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, a generalist forager of marked simplicity of body form, nervous system and behavior. This predator exploits many different types of prey, some of which are costly to attack. When offered Flabellina iodinea, an aeolid nudibranch with a stinging defense, biting attack was followed by rapid rejection and aversive turns. The predatory sea slug rapidly learned avoidance. Notable exceptions were animals with extremely high or low feeding thresholds that either ignored F. iodinea or completely consumed it, respectively. Experienced slugs showed strong avoidance of F. iodinea for days after exposure. Aposematic odor learning was selective: avoidance was not linked to change in feeding thresholds, and trained animals readily attacked and consumed a related aeolid, Hermissenda crassicornis. For P. californica, aposematic learning is a cognitive adaptation in which sensation, motivation and memory are integrated to direct cost-benefit choice, and thereby lend flexibility to the generalist's foraging strategy.

  15. Antimutagenicity of Methanolic Extracts from Anemopsis californica in Relation to Their Antioxidant Activity.

    PubMed

    Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Bautista-Bautista, Nereyda; Blasco-Cabal, José Luis; Gonzalez-Ávila, Marisela; Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Anemopsis californica has been used empirically to treat infectious diseases. However, there are no antimutagenic evaluation reports on this plant. The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity in relation to the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity properties of leaf (LME) and stem (SME) methanolic extracts of A. californica collected in the central Mexican state of Querétaro. Antioxidant properties and total phenols of extracts were evaluated using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and Folin-Ciocalteu methods, respectively. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the Ames test employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (TA98, TA100, and TA102), with and without an aroclor 1254 (S9 mixture). Antimutagenesis was performed against mutations induced on the Ames test with MNNG, 2AA, or 4NQO. SME presented the highest antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. None of the extracts exhibited mutagenicity in the Ames test. The extracts produced a significant reduction in 2AA-induced mutations in S. typhimurium TA98. In both extracts, mutagenesis induced by 4NQO or methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was reduced only if the exposure of strains was <10 μg/Petri dish. A. californca antioxidant properties and its capacity to reduce point mutations render it suitable to enhance medical cancer treatments. The significant effect against antimutagenic 2AA suggests that their consumption would provide protection against carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic compounds.

  16. Antimutagenicity of Methanolic Extracts from Anemopsis californica in Relation to Their Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Bautista-Bautista, Nereyda; Blasco-Cabal, José Luis; Gonzalez-Ávila, Marisela; Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Anemopsis californica has been used empirically to treat infectious diseases. However, there are no antimutagenic evaluation reports on this plant. The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity in relation to the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity properties of leaf (LME) and stem (SME) methanolic extracts of A. californica collected in the central Mexican state of Querétaro. Antioxidant properties and total phenols of extracts were evaluated using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and Folin-Ciocalteu methods, respectively. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the Ames test employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (TA98, TA100, and TA102), with and without an aroclor 1254 (S9 mixture). Antimutagenesis was performed against mutations induced on the Ames test with MNNG, 2AA, or 4NQO. SME presented the highest antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. None of the extracts exhibited mutagenicity in the Ames test. The extracts produced a significant reduction in 2AA-induced mutations in S. typhimurium TA98. In both extracts, mutagenesis induced by 4NQO or methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was reduced only if the exposure of strains was <10 μg/Petri dish. A. californca antioxidant properties and its capacity to reduce point mutations render it suitable to enhance medical cancer treatments. The significant effect against antimutagenic 2AA suggests that their consumption would provide protection against carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. PMID:25152760

  17. Deviating from the Norm: Peculiarities of Aplysia cf. californica Early Cleavage Compared to Traditional Spiralian Models.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Viteri, Yolanda E; Brown, Federico D; Pérez, Oscar D

    2017-01-01

    Spiralia represents one of the main clades of bilaterally symmetrical metazoans (Bilateria). This group is of particular interest due to the remarkable conservation of its early developmental pattern despite of the high diversity of larval and adult body plans. Variations during embryogenesis are considered powerful tools to determine ancestral and derived characters under a phylogenetic framework. By direct observation of embryos cultured in vitro, we analyzed the early cleavage of the euopisthobranchs Aplysia cf. californica. We used tubulin immunocytochemistry to stain mitotic spindles during early cleavages, and followed each division with the aid of an autofluorescent compound inside yolk platelets, which differed from the characteristic pink-brownish pigment of the vegetal cytoplasm in zygotes and early embryos. We found that this species exhibits an unequal cleavage characterized by ooplasmic segregation, oblique inclination of mitotic spindles, and differences in size and positioning of the asters in relation to the cellular cortex. Furthermore, we detected asynchrony in cleavage timing between the two large macromeres C and D, which increases the number of cleavage rounds required to reach a particular cell stage in comparison to other spiralians. Here, we report the presence of a transient and previously undescribed U-shaped embryo in this species. The present detailed description of A. californica early development deviates considerably from stereotypical patterns described in other spiralians. Our observations demonstrate that early spiralian development can be more plastic than previously thought.

  18. Comparative investigation of Umbellularia californica and Laurus nobilis leaf essential oils and identification of constituents active against Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Avonto, Cristina; Wang, Mei; Parcher, Jon F; Ali, Abbas; Demirci, Betul; Raman, Vijayasankar; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2013-12-18

    Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) and Laurus nobilis (Mediterranean bay laurel) leaves may be mistaken or used as a substitute on the market due to their morphological similarity. In this study, a comparison of anatomical and chemical features and biological activity of both plants is presented. L. nobilis essential oil biting deterrent and larvicidal activity were negligible. On the other hand, U. californica leaf oil showed biting deterrent activity against Aedes aegypti . The identified active repellents was thymol, along with (-)-umbellulone, 1,8-cineole, and (-)-α-terpineol. U. californica essential oil also demonstrated good larvicidal activity against 1-day-old Ae. aegypti larvae with a LD50 value of 52.6 ppm. Thymol (LD50 = 17.6 ppm), p-cymene, (-)-umbellulone, and methyleugenol were the primary larvicidal in this oil. Umbellulone was found as the principal compound (37%) of U. californica essential oil, but was not present in L. nobilis essential oil. Umbellulone mosquito activity is here reported for the first time.

  19. Number of conspecifics and reproduction in the invasive plant Eschscholzia californica (Papaveraceae): is there a pollinator-mediated Allee effect?

    PubMed

    Anic, V; Henríquez, C A; Abades, S R; Bustamante, R O

    2015-05-01

    The component Allee effect has been defined as 'a positive relationship between any measure of individual fitness and the number or density of conspecifics'. Larger plant populations or large patches have shown a higher pollinator visitation rate, which may give rise to an Allee effect in reproduction of the plants. We experimentally tested the effect of number of conspecifics on reproduction and pollinator visitation in Eschscholzia californica Cham., an invasive plant in Chile. We then built patches with two, eight and 16 flowering individuals of E. californica (11 replicates per treatment) in an area characterised by dominance of the study species. We found that E. californica exhibits a component Allee effect, as the number of individuals of this species has a positive effect on individual seed set. However, individual fruit production was not affected by the number of plants examined. Pollinator visitation rate was also independent of the number of plants, so this factor would not explain the Allee effect. This rate was positively correlated with the total number of flowers in the patches. We also found that the number of plants did not affect the seed mass or proportion of germinated seeds in the patches. Higher pollen availability in patches with 16 plants and pollination by wind could explain the Allee effect. The component Allee effect identified could lead to a weak demographic Allee effect that might reduce the rate of spread of E. californica. Knowledge of this would be useful for management of this invasive plant in Chile.

  20. Mercury Concentrations in Pacific Angel Sharks (Squatina californica) and Prey Fishes from Southern Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Sánchez, O; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Moreno-Sánchez, X G; Romo-Piñera, A K; Frías-Espericueta, M G

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of mercury (Hg) were quantified in muscle tissues of the Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica sampled from Southern Gulf of California, Mexico, considering total length, sex, diet and the dietary risk assessment. High Hg levels are typically associated with carnivorous fishes, however S. californica showed low Hg concentrations (<1.0 µg g(-1)) in muscle (0.24 ± 0.27 µg g(-1) wet weight; n = 94). No effect of sex, total length and weight on Hg concentrations were observed in the shark (p > 0.05). Hg concentrations were highest in the darkedge mishipman: Porichthys analis (0.14 ± 0.08 µg g(-1)) and red-eye round herring Etrumeus teres (0.13 ± 0.05 µg g(-1)) relative to other prey species, which could suggest that Hg concentrations in S. californica were influenced by these species. Given the relatively low concentration of Hg across age-classes and sex, consumption of S. californica's muscle tissue poses limited risk to humans.

  1. Comparative transcriptomics among floral organs of the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica as reference for floral evolutionary developmental studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular genetic studies of floral development have concentrated on several core eudicots and grasses (monocots), which have canalized floral forms. Basal eudicots possess a wider range of floral morphologies than the core eudicots and grasses and can serve as an evolutionary link between core eudicots and monocots, and provide a reference for studies of other basal angiosperms. Recent advances in genomics have enabled researchers to profile gene activities during floral development, primarily in the eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocots rice and maize. However, our understanding of floral developmental processes among the basal eudicots remains limited. Results Using a recently generated expressed sequence tag (EST) set, we have designed an oligonucleotide microarray for the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica (California poppy). We performed microarray experiments with an interwoven-loop design in order to characterize the E. californica floral transcriptome and to identify differentially expressed genes in flower buds with pre-meiotic and meiotic cells, four floral organs at pre-anthesis stages (sepals, petals, stamens and carpels), developing fruits, and leaves. Conclusions Our results provide a foundation for comparative gene expression studies between eudicots and basal angiosperms. We identified whorl-specific gene expression patterns in E. californica and examined the floral expression of several gene families. Interestingly, most E. californica homologs of Arabidopsis genes important for flower development, except for genes encoding MADS-box transcription factors, show different expression patterns between the two species. Our comparative transcriptomics study highlights the unique evolutionary position of E. californica compared with basal angiosperms and core eudicots. PMID:20950453

  2. Disassembly of structurally modified viral nanoparticles: characterization by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toivola, Jouni; Gilbert, Leona; Michel, Patrik; White, Daniel; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of the breakdown products of engineered viral particles can give useful information on the particle structure. We used various methods to breakdown both a recombinant enveloped virus and virus-like particles (VLPs) from two non-enveloped viruses and analysed the resulting subunits by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Analysis of the enveloped baculovirus, Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), displaying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to its envelope protein gp64 was performed in the presence and absence of 5 mM SDS and 25 mM DTT. Without treatment, the viral particle showed a diffusion time of 3.3 ms. In the presence of SDS, fluorescent subunits with diffusion times of 0.2 ms were observed. Additional treatment with DTT caused a drop in the diffusion time to 0.1 ms. Changes in the amplitude of the autocorrelation function suggested a 3-fold increase in fluorescent particle number when viral particles were treated with SDS, and a further 1.5-fold increase with additional treatment with DTT. Thus, the data showed that an average of 4.5 molecules of gp64-GFP was incorporated in the membrane of the modified baculovirus. Further, this suggests that each fluorescent gp64 trimer carries on average 1.5 fluorescent units. Similar experiments were carried out with two non-enveloped fluorescent virus-like particles (fVLPs) that displayed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). These, fVLPs of canine and human B19 parvoviruses were treated with 6 M urea and 5 mM SDS, respectively. Correspondingly, the original hydrodynamic radii of 17 and 14 nm were reduced to 9 and 5 nm after treatment. Here, the change in the amplitude of the autocorrelation curve suggested a 10-fold increase in particle number when viral particles of CPV were treated with 6 M urea at 50 degrees C for 10 min. For EGFP-B19, there was a decrease in the amplitude, accompanied by a 9-fold increase in the number of fluorescent units with SDS treatment

  3. Biochemical isolation and physiological identification of the egg- laying hormone in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    It has been determined that the bag cells of Aplysia californica produce two polypeptide species that comigrate on electrophoretic gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate. By this separation procedure both species can be assigned a molecular weight of approximately 6,000. One of these molecules has an Rf of 0.65 on alkaline discontinuous electrophoresis gels, an isoelectric point at pH 4.8, a gel filtration molecular weight of approximately 12,000, and has no known biological function. The other does not enter alkaline disk gels, has an isoelectric point at approximately pH 9.3, shows a gel filtration molecular weight consistent with that determined by SDS gel electrophoresis, and is the egg-laying hormone. PMID:956770

  4. Aging in Sensory and Motor Neurons Results in Learning Failure in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kempsell, Andrew T; Fieber, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and molecular mechanisms of age-related memory loss are complicated by the complexity of vertebrate nervous systems. This study takes advantage of a simple neural model to investigate nervous system aging, focusing on changes in learning and memory in the form of behavioral sensitization in vivo and synaptic facilitation in vitro. The effect of aging on the tail withdrawal reflex (TWR) was studied in Aplysia californica at maturity and late in the annual lifecycle. We found that short-term sensitization in TWR was absent in aged Aplysia. This implied that the neuronal machinery governing nonassociative learning was compromised during aging. Synaptic plasticity in the form of short-term facilitation between tail sensory and motor neurons decreased during aging whether the sensitizing stimulus was tail shock or the heterosynaptic modulator serotonin (5-HT). Together, these results suggest that the cellular mechanisms governing behavioral sensitization are compromised during aging, thereby nearly eliminating sensitization in aged Aplysia.

  5. Isolation of sensory neurons of Aplysia californica for patch clamp recordings of glutamatergic currents.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Lynne A; Carlson, Stephen L; Kempsell, Andrew T; Greer, Justin B; Schmale, Michael C

    2013-07-10

    The marine gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica has a venerable history as a model of nervous system function, with particular significance in studies of learning and memory. The typical preparations for such studies are ones in which the sensory and motoneurons are left intact in a minimally dissected animal, or a technically elaborate neuronal co-culture of individual sensory and motoneurons. Less common is the isolated neuronal preparation in which small clusters of nominally homogeneous neurons are dissociated into single cells in short term culture. Such isolated cells are useful for the biophysical characterization of ion currents using patch clamp techniques, and targeted modulation of these conductances. A protocol for preparing such cultures is described. The protocol takes advantage of the easily identifiable glutamatergic sensory neurons of the pleural and buccal ganglia, and describes their dissociation and minimal maintenance in culture for several days without serum.

  6. Climatic Niche Conservatism and Biogeographical Non-Equilibrium in Eschscholzia californica (Papaveraceae), an Invasive Plant in the Chilean Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Gómez, Francisco T.; Guerrero, Pablo C.; Bizama, Gustavo; Duarte, Milén; Bustamante, Ramiro O.

    2014-01-01

    Species climate requirements are useful for predicting their geographic distribution. It is often assumed that the niche requirements for invasive plants are conserved during invasion, especially when the invaded regions share similar climate conditions. California and central Chile have a remarkable degree of convergence in their vegetation structure, and a similar Mediterranean climate. Such similarities make these geographic areas an interesting natural experiment for testing climatic niche dynamics and the equilibrium of invasive species in a new environment. We tested to see if the climatic niche of Eschscholzia californica is conserved in the invaded range (central Chile), and we assessed whether the invasion process has reached a biogeographical equilibrium, i.e., occupy all the suitable geographic locations that have suitable conditions under native niche requirements. We compared the climatic niche in the native and invaded ranges as well as the projected potential geographic distribution in the invaded range. In order to compare climatic niches, we conducted a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Species Distribution Models (SDMs), to estimate E. californica's potential geographic distribution. We also used SDMs to predict altitudinal distribution limits in central Chile. Our results indicated that the climatic niche occupied by E. californica in the invaded range is firmly conserved, occupying a subset of the native climatic niche but leaving a substantial fraction of it unfilled. Comparisons of projected SDMs for central Chile indicate a similarity, yet the projection from native range predicted a larger geographic distribution in central Chile compared to the prediction of the model constructed for central Chile. The projected niche occupancy profile from California predicted a higher mean elevation than that projected from central Chile. We concluded that the invasion process of E. californica in central Chile is consistent with climatic niche

  7. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Margosan, D; Michailides, T J; Xiao, C L

    2016-01-01

    The Botrytis cinerea species complex comprises two cryptic species, originally referred to Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping. Group I was described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea During a survey of Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Valley of California, six isolates, three from blueberries and three from table grapes, were placed in Group I but had a distinct morphological character with conidiophores significantly longer than those of B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea We compared these with B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea by examining morphological and physiological characters, sensitivity to fenhexamid and phylogenetic analysis inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the three partial gene sequences encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2) supported the proposal of a new Botrytis species, B. californica, which is closely related genetically to B. cinerea, B. pseudocinerea and B. sinoviticola, all known as causal agents of gray mold of grapes. Botrytis californica caused decay on blueberry and table grape fruit inoculated with the fungus. This study suggests that B. californica is a cryptic species sympatric with B. cinerea on blueberries and table grapes in California.

  8. Microbiomes of Muricea californica and M. fruticosa: Comparative Analyses of Two Co-occurring Eastern Pacific Octocorals

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Johanna B.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2016-01-01

    Octocorals are sources of novel but understudied microbial diversity. Conversely, scleractinian or reef-building coral microbiomes have been heavily examined in light of the threats of climate change. Muricea californica and Muricea fruticosa are two co-occurring species of gorgonian octocoral abundantly found in the kelp forests of southern California, and thus provide an excellent basis to determine if octocoral microbiomes are host specific. Using Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing and replicate samples, we evaluated the microbiomes collected from multiple colonies of both species of Muricea to measure both inter- and intra-colony microbiome variabilities. In addition, microbiomes from overlying sea water and nearby zoanthids (another benthic invertebrate) were also included in the analysis to evaluate whether bacterial taxa specifically associate with octocorals. This is also the first report of microbiomes from these species of Muricea. We show that microbiomes isolated from each sample type are distinct, and specifically, that octocoral species type had the greatest effect on predicting the composition of the Muricea microbiome. Bacterial taxa contributing to compositional differences include distinct strains of Mycoplasma associated with either M. californica or M. fruticosa, an abundance of Spirochaetes observed on M. californica, and a greater diversity of γ-Proteobacteria associated with M. fruticosa. Many of the bacterial taxa contributing to these differences are known for their presence in photosymbiont-containing invertebrate microbiomes. PMID:27445997

  9. Comparison of the chemistry and diversity of endophytes isolated from wild-harvested and greenhouse-cultivated yerba mansa (Anemopsis californica)

    PubMed Central

    Bussey, Robert O.; Kaur, Amninder; Todd, Daniel A.; Egan, Joseph M.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Graf, Tyler N.; Raja, Huzefa A.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    With this study, we explored the identity and chemistry of fungal endophytes from the roots of yerba mansa [Anemopsis californica (Nutt.) Hook. & Arn. (Saururaceae)], a botanical traditionally used to treat infection. We compared the diversity of fungal endophytes isolated from a wild-harvested A. californica population, and those from plants cultivated for one year in a greenhouse environment. The wild-harvested population yielded thirteen fungal strains (eleven unique genotypes). Of the extracts prepared from these fungi, four inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus by >25% at 20 µg/mL, and three inhibited growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ≥20% at 200 µg/mL. By comparison, A. californica roots after one year of cultivation in the greenhouse produced only two unique genotypes, neither of which displayed significant antimicrobial activity. The fungus Chaetomium cupreum isolated from wild-harvested A. californica yielded a new antimicrobial spirolactone, chaetocuprum (1). An additional fourteen known compounds were identified using LC-MS dereplication of the various fungal endophytes. This study provides new insights into the identity and chemistry of A. californica fungal endophytes, and demonstrates the importance of considering growing conditions when pursuing natural product drug discovery from endophytic fungi. PMID:25642298

  10. Synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica and from the central nervous system of Mus musculus contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs).

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2017-06-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are presynaptic organelles that load and release small molecule neurotransmitters at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have demonstrated that SVs isolated from the Peripheral Nervous Systems (PNS) of the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, and SVs isolated from the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Mus musculus (mouse) contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs; ≤ 50 nucleotides) (Scientific Reports, 5:1-14(14918) Li et al. (2015) [1]). Our previous publication provided the five most abundant sequences associated with the T. californica SVs, and the ten most abundant sequences associated with the mouse SVs, representing 59% and 39% of the total sRNA reads sequenced, respectively). We provide here a full repository of the SV sRNAs sequenced from T. californica and the mouse deposited in the NCBI as biosamples. Three data studies are included: SVs isolated from the electric organ of T. californica using standard techniques, SVs isolated from the electric organ of T. californica using standard techniques with an additional affinity purification step, and finally, SVs isolated from the CNS of mouse. The three biosamples are available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample/ SRS1523467, SRS1523466, and SRS1523472 respectively.

  11. Behavioral aging is associated with reduced sensory neuron excitability in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Andrew T.; Fieber, Lynne A.

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate models have advantages for understanding the basis of behavioral aging due to their simple nervous systems and short lifespans. The potential usefulness of Aplysia californica in aging research is apparent from its long history of neurobiological research, but it has been underexploited in this model use. Aging of simple reflexes at both single sensory neuron and neural circuit levels was studied to connect behavioral aging to neurophysiological aging. The tail withdrawal reflex (TWR), righting reflex, and biting response were measured throughout sexual maturity in 3 cohorts of hatchery-reared animals of known age. Reflex times increased and reflex amplitudes decreased significantly during aging. Aging in sensory neurons of animals with deficits in measures of the TWR and biting response resulted in significantly reduced excitability in old animals compared to their younger siblings. The threshold for firing increased while the number of action potentials in response to depolarizing current injection decreased during aging in sensory neurons, but not in tail motoneurons. Glutamate receptor-activated responses in sensory neurons also decreased with aging. In old tail motoneurons, the amplitude of evoked EPSPs following tail shock decreased, presumably due to reduced sensory neuron excitability during aging. The results were used to develop stages of aging relevant to both hatchery-reared and wild-caught Aplysia. Aplysia is a viable aging model in which the contributions of differential aging of components of neural circuits may be assessed. PMID:24847260

  12. Development of the Statocyst in Aplysia Californica. Part 1; Observations on Statoconial Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederhold, Michael L.; Sharma, Jyotsna S.; Driscoll, Brian P.; Harrison, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    The gravity receptor organs of gastropod molluscs, such as Aplysia californica, are bilateral paired statocysts, which contain dense statoconia within a fluid-filled cyst. Gravitational forces on the statoconia are sensed through their interaction with ciliated mechanoreceptor cells in the wall of the cyst. Larval Aplysia contain a single statolith within each statocyst; when the animals grow to a critical size, they begin producing multiple statoconia, a process that continues throughout life. The number of statoconia is highly correlated with animal weight but poorly correlated with age, indicating that stone production is related to total metabolism. The single statolith has an amorphous internal structure whereas the multiple statoconia have calcification deposited on concentric layers of membrane or matrix protein. The statolith appears to be produced within the cyst lumen but the multiple statoconia are produced within supporting cells between the receptor cells. Large adult animals have statoconia larger than those in early post-metamorphic animals which have just started producing multiple stones. The maximum statocyst diameter at which the receptor-cell cilia can suspend the statolith in the center of the cyst lumen is 45 micrometers; production of multiple stones begins when the cyst reaches this size. The mechanisms by which statoconia production is initiated and controlled are discussed.

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase is Required for Statoconia Homeostasis in Organ Cultures of Statocysts from Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Nakaya, H.; Harrison, J. L.; Dean, D. D.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    A novel organ culture system has been developed to study the regulation of statoconia production in the gravity sensing organ in Aplysia californica. Statocysts were cultured in Leibovitz (LI5) medium supplemented with salts and Aplysia haemolymph for four days at 17 C. The viability of the system was evaluated by examining four parameters: statocyst morphology, the activity of the mechanosensory cilia in the statocyst, production of new statoconia during culture and change in statoconia volume after culture. There were no morphological differences in statocysts before and after culture when ciliary beating was maintained. There was a 29% increase in the number of statoconia after four days in culture. Mean statocyst, statolith and statoconia volumes were not affected by culture conditions. The presence of carbonic anhydrase in the statocysts was shown using immunohistochemistry. When statocysts were cultured in the presence of 4.0 x 10(exp -4) M acetazolamide to inhibit the enzyme activity, there was a decrease in statoconia production and statoconia volume, indicating a role for this enzyme in statoconia homeostasis, potentially, via pH regulation. These studies are the first to report a novel system for the culture of statocysts and show that carbonic anhydrase is involved in the regulation of statoconia volume and production.

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with an aryl azide derivative of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.; Wang, H.H. )

    1990-02-06

    A photoactivatable analogue of phosphatidylserine, {sup 125}I-labeled 4-azidosalicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS), was used to label both native acetylcholine receptor (AchR)-rich membranes from Torpedo californica and AchR membranes affinity purified from Torpedo reconstituted into asolectin vesicles. The radioiodinated arylazido group attaches directly to the phospholipid head group and thus probes for regions of the AchR structure in contact with the negatively charged head group of phosphatidylserine. All four subunits of the AchR incorporated the label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporated {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. The majority of label incorporated into fragments representing a more complete digestion of the {alpha} subunit was localized to 11.7- and 10.1-kDa V8 cleavage fragments, both beginning at Asn-339 and of sufficient length to contain the hydrophobic region M4. An 18.7-kDa fragment beginning at Ser-173 and of sufficient length to contain the hydrophobic regions M1, M2, and M3 was also significantly labeled. In contrast, V8 cleavage fragments representing roughly a third of the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha} subunit incorporated little or no detectable amount of probe.

  15. Proteomic characterization of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica-a protein resource for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Aplysia californica (AC) is a widely used model for testing learning and memory. Although ESTs have been generated, proteomics studies on AC proteins are limited. Studies at the protein level, however, are mandatory, not only due to the fact that studies at the nucleic acid level are not allowing conclusions about PTMs. A gel-based proteomics method was therefore applied to carry out protein profiling in abdominal ganglia from AC. Abdominal ganglia were extirpated, proteins extracted and run on 2DE with subsequent in-gel digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and partially by subtilisin. Peptides were identified using a nano-LC-ESI-LTQ-FT-mass spectrometer. MS/MS data were analyzed by searching the NCBI nonredundant public AC EST database and the NCBI nonredundant public AC protein database. A total of 477 different proteins represented by 363 protein spots were detected and were assigned to different protein pathways as for instance signaling (receptors, protein kinases, and phosphatases), metabolism, protein synthesis, handling and degradation, cytoskeleton and structural, oxido-redox, heat shock and chaperone, hypothetical, predicted and unnamed proteins. The generation of a protein map of soluble proteins shows the existence of so far hypothetical and predicted proteins and is allowing and challenging further work at the protein level, in particular in the field of neuroscience.

  16. Structure and dynamics of the fibronectin-III domains of Aplysia californica cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine M; Muzard, Julien; Brooks, Bernard R; Lee, Gil U; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2015-04-21

    Due to their homophilic and heterophilic binding properties, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) such as integrin, cadherin and the immunoglobulin superfamily CAMs are of primary importance in cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, signalling pathways and other crucial biological processes. We study the molecular structures and conformational dynamics of the two fibronectin type III (Fn-III) extracellular domains of the Aplysia californica CAM (apCAM) protein, by constructing and probing an atomically-detailed structural model based on apCAM's homology with other CAMs. The stability and dynamic properties of the Fn-III domains, individually and in tandem, are probed and analysed using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and normal mode analysis of their corresponding elastic network models. The refined structural model of the Fn-III tandem of apCAM reveals a specific pattern of amino acid interactions that controls the stability of the β-sheet rich structure and could affect apCAM's response to physical or chemical changes of its environment. It also exposes the important role of several specific charged residues in modulating the structural properties of the linker segment connecting the two Fn-III domains, as well as of the inter-domain interface.

  17. Morphology, innervation, and peripheral sensory cells of the siphon of aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Ian D; Croll, Roger P; Wyeth, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    The siphon of Aplysia californica has several functions, including involvement in respiration, excretion, and defensive inking. It also provides sensory input for defensive withdrawals that have been studied extensively to examine mechanisms that underlie learning. To better understand the neuronal bases of these functions, we used immunohistochemistry to catalogue peripheral cell types and innervation of the siphon in stage 12 juveniles (chosen to allow observation of tissues in whole-mounts). We found that the siphon nerve splits into three major branches, leading ultimately to a two-part FMRFamide-immunoreactive plexus and an apparently separate tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive plexus. Putative sensory neurons included four distinct types of tubulin-immunoreactive bipolar cells (one likely also tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive) that bore ciliated dendrites penetrating the epithelium. A fifth bipolar neuron type (tubulin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive) occurred deeper in the tissue, associated with part of the FMRFamide-immunoreactive plexus. Our observations emphasize the structural complexity of the peripheral nervous system of the siphon, and the importance of direct tests of the various components to better understand the functioning of the entire organ, including its role in defensive withdrawal responses.

  18. Efficient expression of acetylcholine-binding protein from Aplysia californica in Bac-to-Bac system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Meng, Hailing; Bing, Hui; Zhangsun, Dongting; Luo, Sulan

    2014-01-01

    The Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system can efficiently produce recombinant proteins, but the system may have to be optimized to achieve high-level expression for different candidate proteins. We reported here the efficient expression of acetylcholine-binding proteins from sea hares Aplysia californica (Ac-AChBP) and a convenient method to monitor protein expression level in this expression system. Three key factors affecting expression of Ac-AChBP were optimized for maximizing the yield, which included the cell density, volume of the infecting baculovirus inoculums, and the culturing time of postinfection. We have found it to reach a high yield of ∼5 mg/L, which needs 55 h incubation after infection at the cell density of 2 × 10(6) cells/mL with an inoculum volume ratio of 1 : 100. The optimized expression system in this study was also applied for expressing another protein Ls-AChBP from Lymnaea stagnalis successfully. Therefore, this established method is helpful to produce high yields of AChBP proteins for X-ray crystallographic structural and functional studies.

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in protostomes: insights from functional studies on Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Sun, Biao; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Tsai, Pei-San

    2012-05-01

    Several protostomian molecules that structurally resemble chordate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) have been identified through cloning, biochemical purification or data mining. These molecules share considerable sequence and structural similarities with chordate GnRH, leading to the current belief that protostomian and chordate forms of GnRH share a common ancestor. However, the physiological significance of these protostomian GnRH-like molecules remains poorly understood. This knowledge gap hampers our understanding of how GnRH has evolved functionally over time. This review provides a summary of our recent functional characterization of a GnRH-like molecule (ap-GnRH) in a gastropod mollusk, Aplysia californica, and presents preliminary proof for a cognate ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR). Our data reveal that ap-GnRH is a general neural regulator capable of exerting diverse central and motor effects, but plays little or no role in reproductive activation. This notion is supported by the abundance of a putative ap-GnRHR transcript in the central nervous system and the foot. Comparing these results to the available functional data from a cephalopod mollusk, Octopus vulgaris, we surmise that protostomian GnRH-like molecules are likely to assume a wide range of physiological roles, and reproductive activation is not an evolutionarily conserved role of these molecules. Future functional studies using suitable protostomian models are required to identify functional changes in protostomian GnRH-like molecules that accompany major taxa-level transitions.

  20. Molecular recognition of thiaclopride by Aplysia californica AChBP: new insights from a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Alamiddine, Zakaria; Selvam, Balaji; Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Thany, Steeve H; Laurent, Adèle D; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-01

    The binding of thiaclopride (THI), a neonicotinoid insecticide, with Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP), the surrogate of the extracellular domain of insects nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has been studied with a QM/QM' hybrid methodology using the ONIOM approach (M06-2X/6-311G(d):PM6). The contributions of Ac-AChBP key residues for THI binding are accurately quantified from a structural and energetic point of view. The importance of water mediated hydrogen-bond (H-bond) interactions involving two water molecules and Tyr55 and Ser189 residues in the vicinity of the THI nitrile group, is specially highlighted. A larger stabilization energy is obtained with the THI-Ac-AChBP complex compared to imidacloprid (IMI), the forerunner of neonicotinoid insecticides. Pairwise interaction energy calculations rationalize this result with, in particular, a significantly more important contribution of the pivotal aromatic residues Trp147 and Tyr188 with THI through CH···π/CH···O and π-π stacking interactions, respectively. These trends are confirmed through a complementary non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis of selected THI-Ac-AChBP amino acid pairs.

  1. The transcriptome of the early life history stages of the California Sea Hare Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, T J; Hudder, A; McKay, S J; Shivkumar, S; Capo, T R; Schmale, M C; Walsh, P J

    2010-06-01

    Aplysia californica is a marine opisthobranch mollusc used as a model organism in neurobiology for cellular analyses of learning and behavior because it possesses a comparatively small number of neurons of large size. The mollusca comprise the second largest animal phylum, yet detailed genetic and genomic information is only recently beginning to accrue. Thus developmental and comparative evolutionary biology as well as biomedical research would benefit from additional information on DNA sequences of Aplysia. Therefore, we have constructed a series of unidirectional cDNA libraries from different life stages of Aplysia. These include whole organisms from the egg, veliger, metamorphic, and juvenile stages as well as adult neural tissue for reference. Individual clones were randomly picked, and high-throughput, single pass sequence analysis was performed to generate 7971 sequences. Of these, there were 5507 quality-filtered ESTs that clustered into 1988 unigenes, which are annotated and deposited into GenBank. A significant number (497) of ESTs did not match existing Aplysia ESTs and are thus potentially novel sequences for Aplysia. GO and KEGG analyses of these novel sequences indicated that a large number were involved in protein binding and translation, consistent with the predominant biosynthetic role in development and the presence of stage-specific protein isoforms.

  2. Molecular recognition of thiaclopride by Aplysia californica AChBP: new insights from a computational investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamiddine, Zakaria; Selvam, Balaji; Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Thany, Steeve H.; Laurent, Adèle D.; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-01

    The binding of thiaclopride (THI), a neonicotinoid insecticide, with Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein ( Ac-AChBP), the surrogate of the extracellular domain of insects nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has been studied with a QM/QM' hybrid methodology using the ONIOM approach (M06-2X/6-311G(d):PM6). The contributions of Ac-AChBP key residues for THI binding are accurately quantified from a structural and energetic point of view. The importance of water mediated hydrogen-bond (H-bond) interactions involving two water molecules and Tyr55 and Ser189 residues in the vicinity of the THI nitrile group, is specially highlighted. A larger stabilization energy is obtained with the THI- Ac-AChBP complex compared to imidacloprid (IMI), the forerunner of neonicotinoid insecticides. Pairwise interaction energy calculations rationalize this result with, in particular, a significantly more important contribution of the pivotal aromatic residues Trp147 and Tyr188 with THI through CH···π/CH···O and π-π stacking interactions, respectively. These trends are confirmed through a complementary non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis of selected THI- Ac-AChBP amino acid pairs.

  3. Characterization of the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Herdegen, Samantha; Holmes, Geraldine; Cyriac, Ashly; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We used a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR to characterize the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Aplysia were exposed to repeated noxious shocks to one side of the body, a procedure known to induce a longlasting, transcription-dependent increase in reflex responsiveness that is restricted to the side of training. One hour after training, pleural ganglia from the trained and untrained sides of the body were harvested; these ganglia contain the sensory nociceptors which help mediate the expression of longterm sensitization memory. Microarray analysis from 8 biological replicates suggests that long-term sensitization training rapidly regulates at least 81 transcripts. We used qPCR to test a subset of these transcripts and found that 83% were confirmed in the same samples, and 86% of these were again confirmed in an independent sample. Thus, our new microarray design shows strong convergent and predictive validity for analyzing the transcriptional correlates of memory in Aplysia. Fully validated transcripts include some previously identified as regulated in this paradigm (ApC/EBP and ApEgr) but also include novel findings. Specifically, we show that long-term sensitization training rapidly upregulates the expression of transcripts which may encode Aplysia homologs of a C/EBPγ transcription factor, a glycine transporter (GlyT2), and a vacuolar-protein-sorting-associated protein (VPS36). PMID:25117657

  4. Transcriptional Changes following Long-Term Sensitization Training and In Vivo Serotonin Exposure in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Bonnick, Kristine; Bayas, Karla; Belchenko, Dmitry; Cyriac, Ashly; Dove, Michael; Lass, Jamie; McBride, Benora; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    We used Aplysia californica to compare the transcriptional changes evoked by long-term sensitization training and by a treatment meant to mimic this training, in vivo exposure to serotonin. We focused on 5 candidate plasticity genes which are rapidly up-regulated in the Aplysia genus by in vivo serotonin treatment, but which have not yet been tested for regulation during sensitization: CREB1, matrilin, antistasin, eIF3e, and BAT1 homolog. CREB1 was rapidly up-regulated by both treatments, but the regulation following training was transient, falling back to control levels 24 hours after training. This suggests some caution in interpreting the proposed role of CREB1 in consolidating long-term sensitization memory. Both matrilin and eIF3e were up-regulated by in vivo serotonin but not by long-term sensitization training. This suggests that in vivo serotonin may produce generalized transcriptional effects that are not specific to long-term sensitization learning. Finally, neither treatment produced regulation of antistasin or BAT1 homolog, transcripts regulated by in vivo serotonin in the closely related Aplysia kurodai. This suggests either that these transcripts are not regulated by experience, or that transcriptional mechanisms of memory may vary within the Aplysia genus. PMID:23056638

  5. Transcriptional analysis of a whole-body form of long-term habituation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Geraldine; Herdegen, Samantha; Schuon, Jonathan; Cyriac, Ashly; Lass, Jamie; Conte, Catherine; Calin-Jageman, Irina E; Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Habituation is the simplest form of learning, but we know little about the transcriptional mechanisms that encode long-term habituation memory. A key obstacle is that habituation is relatively stimulus-specific and is thus encoded in small sets of neurons, providing poor signal/noise ratios for transcriptional analysis. To overcome this obstacle, we have developed a protocol for producing whole-body long-term habituation of the siphon-withdrawal reflex (SWR) of Aplysia californica. Specifically, we constructed a computer-controlled brushing apparatus to apply low-intensity tactile stimulation over the entire dorsal surface of Aplysia at regular intervals. We found that 3 d of training (10 rounds of stimulation/day; each round = 15 min brushing at a 10-sec ISI; 15-min rest between rounds) produces habituation with several characteristics favorable for mechanistic investigation. First, habituation is widespread, with SWR durations reduced whether the reflex is evoked by tactile stimulation to the head, tail, or the siphon. Second, long-term habituation is sensitive to the pattern of training, occurring only when brushing sessions are spaced out over 3 d rather than massed into a single session. Using a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR, we show that long-term habituation produces long-term up-regulation of an apparent Aplysia homolog of cornichon, a protein important for glutamate receptor trafficking. Our training paradigm provides a promising starting point for characterizing the transcriptional mechanisms of long-term habituation memory.

  6. Characterization of the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, Samantha; Holmes, Geraldine; Cyriac, Ashly; Calin-Jageman, Irina E; Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    We used a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR to characterize the rapid transcriptional response to long-term sensitization training in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Aplysia were exposed to repeated noxious shocks to one side of the body, a procedure known to induce a long-lasting, transcription-dependent increase in reflex responsiveness that is restricted to the side of training. One hour after training, pleural ganglia from the trained and untrained sides of the body were harvested; these ganglia contain the sensory nociceptors which help mediate the expression of long-term sensitization memory. Microarray analysis from 8 biological replicates suggests that long-term sensitization training rapidly regulates at least 81 transcripts. We used qPCR to test a subset of these transcripts and found that 83% were confirmed in the same samples, and 86% of these were again confirmed in an independent sample. Thus, our new microarray design shows strong convergent and predictive validity for analyzing the transcriptional correlates of memory in Aplysia. Fully validated transcripts include some previously identified as regulated in this paradigm (ApC/EBP and ApEgr) but also include novel findings. Specifically, we show that long-term sensitization training rapidly up-regulates the expression of transcripts which may encode Aplysia homologs of a C/EBPγ transcription factor, a glycine transporter (GlyT2), and a vacuolar-protein-sorting-associated protein (VPS36).

  7. Transcriptional changes following long-term sensitization training and in vivo serotonin exposure in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Bonnick, Kristine; Bayas, Karla; Belchenko, Dmitry; Cyriac, Ashly; Dove, Michael; Lass, Jamie; McBride, Benora; Calin-Jageman, Irina E; Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    We used Aplysia californica to compare the transcriptional changes evoked by long-term sensitization training and by a treatment meant to mimic this training, in vivo exposure to serotonin. We focused on 5 candidate plasticity genes which are rapidly up-regulated in the Aplysia genus by in vivo serotonin treatment, but which have not yet been tested for regulation during sensitization: CREB1, matrilin, antistasin, eIF3e, and BAT1 homolog. CREB1 was rapidly up-regulated by both treatments, but the regulation following training was transient, falling back to control levels 24 hours after training. This suggests some caution in interpreting the proposed role of CREB1 in consolidating long-term sensitization memory. Both matrilin and eIF3e were up-regulated by in vivo serotonin but not by long-term sensitization training. This suggests that in vivo serotonin may produce generalized transcriptional effects that are not specific to long-term sensitization learning. Finally, neither treatment produced regulation of antistasin or BAT1 homolog, transcripts regulated by in vivo serotonin in the closely related Aplysia kurodai. This suggests either that these transcripts are not regulated by experience, or that transcriptional mechanisms of memory may vary within the Aplysia genus.

  8. Neurogenesis in Aplysia californica resembles nervous system formation in vertebrates. [Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, M.H.

    1984-05-01

    The pattern of neurogenesis of the central nervous system of Aplysia californica was investigated by (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography. Large numbers of animals at a series of early developmental stages were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine for 24 or 48 hr and were subsequently sampled at specific intervals throughout the life cycle. I found that proliferative zones, consisting of columnar and placodal ectodermal cells, are established in regions of the body wall adjacent to underlying mesodermal cells. Mitosis in the proliferative zones generates a population of cells which leave the surface and migrate inward to join the nearby forming ganglia. Tracing specific (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled cells from the body wall to a particular ganglion and within the ganglion over time suggests that the final genomic replication of the neuronal precursors occurs before the cells join the ganglion while glial cell precursors and differentiating glial cells continue to divide within the ganglion for some time. Ultrastructural examination of the morphological features of the few mitosing cells observed within the Aplysia central nervous system supports this interpretation. The pattern of neurogenesis in the Aplysia central nervous system resembles the proliferation of cells in the neural tube and the migration of neural crest and ectodermal placode cells in the vertebrate nervous system but differs from the pattern described for other invertebrates.

  9. The transcriptome of the early life history stages of the California Sea Hare Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, T. J.; Hudder, A.; McKay, S. J.; Shivkumar, S.; Capo, T. R.; Schmale, M. C.; Walsh, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aplysia californica is a marine opisthobranch mollusc used as a model organism in neurobiology for cellular analyses of learning and behavior because it possesses a comparatively small number of neurons of large size. The mollusca comprise the second largest animal phylum, yet detailed genetic and genomic information is only recently beginning to accrue. Thus developmental and comparative evolutionary biology as well as biomedical research would benefit from additional information on DNA sequences of Aplysia. Therefore, we have constructed a series of unidirectional cDNA libraries from different life stages of Aplysia. These include whole organisms from the egg, veliger, metamorphic, and juvenile stages as well as adult neural tissue for reference. Individual clones were randomly picked, and high-throughput, single pass sequence analysis was performed to generate 7971 sequences. Of these, there were 5507 quality-filtered ESTs that clustered into 1988 unigenes, which are annotated and deposited into GenBank. A significant number (497) of ESTs did not match existing Aplysia ESTs and are thus potentially novel sequences for Aplysia. GO and KEGG analyses of these novel sequences indicated that a large number were involved in protein binding and translation, consistent with the predominant biosynthetic role in development and the presence of stage-specific protein isoforms. PMID:20434970

  10. Transcriptional analysis of a whole-body form of long-term habituation in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Geraldine; Herdegen, Samantha; Schuon, Jonathan; Cyriac, Ashly; Lass, Jamie; Conte, Catherine; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.

    2015-01-01

    Habituation is the simplest form of learning, but we know little about the transcriptional mechanisms that encode long-term habituation memory. A key obstacle is that habituation is relatively stimulus-specific and is thus encoded in small sets of neurons, providing poor signal/noise ratios for transcriptional analysis. To overcome this obstacle, we have developed a protocol for producing whole-body long-term habituation of the siphon-withdrawal reflex (SWR) of Aplysia californica. Specifically, we constructed a computer-controlled brushing apparatus to apply low-intensity tactile stimulation over the entire dorsal surface of Aplysia at regular intervals. We found that 3 d of training (10 rounds of stimulation/day; each round = 15 min brushing at a 10-sec ISI; 15-min rest between rounds) produces habituation with several characteristics favorable for mechanistic investigation. First, habituation is widespread, with SWR durations reduced whether the reflex is evoked by tactile stimulation to the head, tail, or the siphon. Second, long-term habituation is sensitive to the pattern of training, occurring only when brushing sessions are spaced out over 3 d rather than massed into a single session. Using a custom-designed microarray and quantitative PCR, we show that long-term habituation produces long-term up-regulation of an apparent Aplysia homolog of cornichon, a protein important for glutamate receptor trafficking. Our training paradigm provides a promising starting point for characterizing the transcriptional mechanisms of long-term habituation memory. PMID:25512573

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes involved in stylopine biosynthesis in Eschscholzia californica.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Nobuhiro; Iwasa, Kinuko; Sato, Fumihiko

    2007-02-01

    (S)-stylopine is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of benzophenanthridine alkaloids, such as sanguinarine. Stylopine biosynthesis involves the sequential formation of two methylenedioxy bridges. Although the methylenedioxy bridge-forming P450 (CYP719) involved in berberine biosynthesis has been cloned from Coptis japonica[Ikezawa N, Tanaka M, Nagayoshi M, Shinkyo R, Sakaki T, Inouye K & Sato F (2003) J Biol Chem278, 38557-38565], no information is available regarding the genes for methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes in stylopine biosynthesis. Two cytochrome P450 cDNAs involved in stylopine biosynthesis were isolated using degenerate primers designed for C. japonica CYP719 from cultured Eschscholzia californica cells. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that both CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 had stylopine synthase activity to catalyze methylenedioxy bridge-formation from cheilanthifoline to stylopine, but not cheilanthifoline synthase activity to convert scoulerine to cheilanthifoline. Functional differences and expression patterns of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 were examined to investigate their physiological roles in stylopine biosynthesis. Enzymatic analysis showed that CYP719A2 had high substrate affinity only toward (R,S)-cheilanthifoline, whereas CYP719A3 had high affinity toward three similar substrates (R,S)-cheilanthifoline, (S)-scoulerine, and (S)-tetrahydrocolumbamine. An expression analysis in E. californica plant tissues showed that CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 exhibited expression patterns similar to those of three stylopine biosynthetic genes (CYP80B1, berberine bridge enzyme, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine : 3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase), whereas the specific expression of CYP719A3 in root was notable. Treatment of E. californica seedlings with methyl jasmonate resulted in the coordinated induction of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 genes. The physiological roles of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 in stylopine biosynthesis are

  12. Sequence analysis of the complete genome of Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus and the identification of a baculoviral photolyase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Leslie G.; Siepp, Robyn; Stewart, Taryn M.; Erlandson, Martin A.; Theilmann, David A. . E-mail: TheilmannD@agr.gc.ca

    2005-08-01

    The genome of the Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus (TnSNPV), a group II NPV which infects the cabbage looper (T. ni), has been completely sequenced and analyzed. The TnSNPV DNA genome consists of 134,394 bp and has an overall G + C content of 39%. Gene analysis predicted 144 open reading frames (ORFs) of 150 nucleotides or greater that showed minimal overlap. Comparisons with previously sequenced baculoviruses indicate that 119 TnSNPV ORFs were homologues of previously reported viral gene sequences. Ninety-four TnSNPV ORFs returned an Autographa californica multiple NPV (AcMNPV) homologue while 25 ORFs returned poor or no sequence matches with the current databases. A putative photolyase gene was also identified that had highest amino acid identity to the photolyase genes of Chrysodeixis chalcites NPV (ChchNPV) (47%) and Danio rerio (zebrafish) (40%). In addition unlike all other baculoviruses no obvious homologous repeat (hr) sequences were identified. Comparison of the TnSNPV and AcMNPV genomes provides a unique opportunity to examine two baculoviruses that are highly virulent for a common insect host (T. ni) yet belong to diverse baculovirus taxonomic groups and possess distinct biological features. In vitro fusion assays demonstrated that the TnSNPV F protein induces membrane fusion and syncytia formation and were compared to syncytia formed by AcMNPV GP64.

  13. A mechanism of adaptation to hypergravity in the statocyst of Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Luther, M.; Dean, D. D.; Boyan, B. D.; Wiederhold, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    The gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica consists of bilaterally paired statocysts containing statoconia, which are granules composed of calcium carbonate crystals in an organic matrix. In early embryonic development, Aplysia contain a single granule called a statolith, and as the animal matures, statoconia production takes place. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hypergravity on statoconia production and homeostasis and explore a possible physiologic mechanism for regulating this process. Embryonic Aplysia were exposed to normogravity or 3 x g or 5.7 x g and each day samples were analyzed for changes in statocyst, statolith, and body dimensions until they hatched. In addition, early metamorphosed Aplysia (developmental stages 7-10) were exposed to hypergravity (2 x g) for 3 weeks, and statoconia number and statocyst and statoconia volumes were determined. We also determined the effects of hypergravity on statoconia production and homeostasis in statocysts isolated from developmental stage 10 Aplysia. Since prior studies demonstrated that urease was important in the regulation of statocyst pH and statoconia formation, we also evaluated the effect of hypergravity on urease activity. The results show that hypergravity decreased statolith and body diameter in embryonic Aplysia in a magnitude-dependent fashion. In early metamorphosed Aplysia, hypergravity decreased statoconia number and volume. Similarly, there was an inhibition of statoconia production and a decrease in statoconia volume in isolated statocysts exposed to hypergravity in culture. Urease activity in statocysts decreased after exposure to hypergravity and was correlated with the decrease in statoconia production observed. In short, there was a decrease in statoconia production with exposure to hypergravity both in vivo and in vitro and a decrease in urease activity. It is concluded that exposure to hypergravity downregulates urease activity, resulting in a significant

  14. Urotensin II in invertebrates: from structure to function in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Sasaki, Kosei; Alexeeva, Vera; Vilim, Ferdinand S; Jing, Jian; Richmond, Timothy A; Weiss, Klaudiusz R; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are ancient signaling molecules that are involved in many aspects of organism homeostasis and function. Urotensin II (UII), a peptide with a range of hormonal functions, previously has been reported exclusively in vertebrates. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that UII-like peptides are also present in an invertebrate, specifically, the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. The presence of UII in the central nervous system (CNS) of Aplysia implies a more ancient gene lineage than vertebrates. Using representational difference analysis, we identified an mRNA of a protein precursor that encodes a predicted neuropeptide, we named Aplysia urotensin II (apUII), with a sequence and structural similarity to vertebrate UII. With in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we mapped the expression of apUII mRNA and its prohormone in the CNS and localized apUII-like immunoreactivity to buccal sensory neurons and cerebral A-cluster neurons. Mass spectrometry performed on individual isolated neurons, and tandem mass spectrometry on fractionated peptide extracts, allowed us to define the posttranslational processing of the apUII neuropeptide precursor and confirm the highly conserved cyclic nature of the mature neuropeptide apUII. Electrophysiological analysis of the central effects of a synthetic apUII suggests it plays a role in satiety and/or aversive signaling in feeding behaviors. Finding the homologue of vertebrate UII in the numerically small CNS of an invertebrate animal model is important for gaining insights into the molecular mechanisms and pathways mediating the bioactivity of UII in the higher metazoan.

  15. Shading decreases the abundance of the herbivorous California horn snail, Cerithidea californica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorda, Julio; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the intertidal zone in estuaries of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico is covered with vascular vegetation. Shading by these vascular plants influences abiotic and biotic processes that shape benthic community assemblages. We present data on the effects of shading on the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica. This species is important because it is the most common benthic macrofaunal species in these systems and acts as an obligate intermediate host of several species of rematode parasites that infect several other species. Using observational and experimental studies, we found a negative effect of shade on the distribution and abundance of the California horn snail. We hypothesized that shading reduces the abundance of the epipelic diatoms that the snails feeds on, causing snails to leave haded areas. We observed a negative relationship between vascular plant cover, sub-canopy light levels, and snail density in Mugu Lagoon. Then we experimentally manipulated light regimes, by clipping vegetation and adding shade structures, and found higher snail densities at higher light levels. In Goleta Slough, we isolated the effect of shade from vegetation by documenting a negative relationship between the shade created by two bridges and diatom and snail densities. We also found that snails moved the greatest distances over shaded channel banks compared to unshaded channel banks. Further, we documented the effect of water depth and channel bank orientation on shading in this system. An additional effect of shading is the reduction of temperature, providing an alternative explanation for some of our results. These results broaden our knowledge of how variation in the light environment influences the ecology of estuarine ecosystems.

  16. Genetically based latitudinal clines in Artemisia californica drive parallel clines in arthropod communities.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Jessica D; Datu, Andrew; Tran, Thi; Sheng, Daniel C; Mooney, Kailen A

    2017-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in plant traits has been clearly shown to drive the structure of associated arthropod communities at the spatial scale of individual plant populations. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown whether plant trait variation among populations drives landscape-scale variation in arthropod communities, and how the strength of such plant genetic effects compares to, and interacts with, those of environmental variation. We documented the structure of arthropod communities on Artemisia californica for two consecutive years in a common garden of plants sourced from five populations along a 5° latitudinal gradient and grown under precipitation treatments approximating the four-fold difference between the north and south range margins for this species. Previous study of plant traits from this garden documented clinal genetic variation, suggesting local adaptation to this environmental gradient, as well as effects of precipitation manipulation that were consistent among populations (i.e., no genotype-by-environment interaction). Within the common garden, arthropod density, evenness, and diversity increased clinally with population source latitude, and arthropod community composition (i.e., species relative abundance) showed a north-south divide. The 2.6-fold cline of northward increase in arthropod density in the common garden was mirrored by a 6.4-fold increase in arthropod density on wild plants sampled along the species range. In contrast to the strong influence of plant genotype, the precipitation manipulation only influenced arthropod community composition, and plant genetic effects on arthropods operated independently of precipitation regime (no genotype-by-environment interaction). Accordingly, we conclude that the strongest driver of landscape-level variation in arthropod communities in this foundational plant species is not variation in the abiotic environment itself, but rather variation in plant traits underlain by the evolutionary process of

  17. Localization of a molluscan gonadotropin-releasing hormone in Aplysia californica by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jung, Lisa H; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Sun, Biao; Tsai, Pei-San

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays important roles in vertebrate reproduction. Recently, molecules structurally similar to vertebrate GnRH were discovered in mollusks, including a gastropod, Aplysia californica. As an important step toward understanding the function of A. californica GnRH (ap-GnRH), the present study examined the localization of ap-GnRH peptide and transcript in the central and peripheral tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed wide expression of ap-GnRH in all ganglia (abdominal, buccal, cerebral, and pedal ganglia) of the central nervous system (CNS) and in multiple peripheral organs. However, in situ hybridization (ISH) revealed that cells positive for ap-GnRH are detectable only in the CNS, with the pedal ganglia containing the highest number of ap-GnRH-positive neurons, followed by the cerebral and abdominal ganglia. Most neurons positive for the transcript were simultaneously positive for the peptide, although some discrepancies were observed in cerebral and abdominal ganglia. Overall, our data suggest the de novo synthesis of ap-GnRH is restricted to the CNS, with the pedal ganglia being the primary source of ap-GnRH. Our results support the notion that ap-GnRH is a bona-fide neuropeptide that may assume diverse central functions, including those unrelated to reproduction.

  18. Presynaptic target of Ca2+ action on neuropeptide and acetylcholine release in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, K; Whim, M D; Fetter, R D; Kaczmarek, L K; Zucker, R S

    2001-09-15

    1. When buccal neuron B2 of Aplysia californica is co-cultured with sensory neurons (SNs), slow peptidergic synapses are formed. When B2 is co-cultured with neurons B3 or B6, fast cholinergic synapses are formed. 2. Patch pipettes were used to voltage clamp pre- and postsynaptic neurons and to load the caged Ca2+ chelator o-nitrophenyl EGTA (NPE) and the Ca2+ indicator BTC into presynaptic neurons. The relationships between presynaptic [Ca2+]i and postsynaptic responses were compared between peptidergic and cholinergic synapses formed by cell B2. 3. Using variable intensity flashes, Ca2+ stoichiometries of peptide and acetylcholine (ACh) release were approximately 2 and 3, respectively. The difference did not reach statistical significance. 4. ACh quanta summate linearly postsynaptically. We also found a linear dose-response curve for peptide action, indicating a linear relationship between submaximal peptide concentration and response of the SN. 5. The minimum intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) for triggering peptidergic and cholinergic transmission were estimated to be about 5 and 10 microM, respectively. 6. By comparing normal postsynaptic responses to those evoked by photolysis of NPE, we estimate [Ca2+]i at the release trigger site elicited by a single action potential (AP) to be at least 10 microM for peptidergic synapses and probably higher for cholinergic synapses. 7. Cholinergic release is brief (half-width approximately 200 ms), even in response to a prolonged rise in [Ca2+]i, while some peptidergic release appears to persist for as long as [Ca2+]i remains elevated (for up to 10 s). This may reflect differences in sizes of reserve pools, or in replenishment rates of immediately releasable pools of vesicles. 8. Electron microscopy revealed that most synaptic contacts had at least one morphologically docked dense core vesicle that presumably contained peptide; these were often located within conventional active zones. 9. Both cholinergic and

  19. Extracellularly identifying motor neurons for a muscle motor pool in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Chiel, Hillel J

    2013-03-25

    In animals with large identified neurons (e.g. mollusks), analysis of motor pools is done using intracellular techniques. Recently, we developed a technique to extracellularly stimulate and record individual neurons in Aplysia californica. We now describe a protocol for using this technique to uniquely identify and characterize motor neurons within a motor pool. This extracellular technique has advantages. First, extracellular electrodes can stimulate and record neurons through the sheath, so it does not need to be removed. Thus, neurons will be healthier in extracellular experiments than in intracellular ones. Second, if ganglia are rotated by appropriate pinning of the sheath, extracellular electrodes can access neurons on both sides of the ganglion, which makes it easier and more efficient to identify multiple neurons in the same preparation. Third, extracellular electrodes do not need to penetrate cells, and thus can be easily moved back and forth among neurons, causing less damage to them. This is especially useful when one tries to record multiple neurons during repeating motor patterns that may only persist for minutes. Fourth, extracellular electrodes are more flexible than intracellular ones during muscle movements. Intracellular electrodes may pull out and damage neurons during muscle contractions. In contrast, since extracellular electrodes are gently pressed onto the sheath above neurons, they usually stay above the same neuron during muscle contractions, and thus can be used in more intact preparations. To uniquely identify motor neurons for a motor pool (in particular, the I1/I3 muscle in Aplysia) using extracellular electrodes, one can use features that do not require intracellular measurements as criteria: soma size and location, axonal projection, and muscle innervation. For the particular motor pool used to illustrate the technique, we recorded from buccal nerves 2 and 3 to measure axonal projections, and measured the contraction forces of the I1

  20. Organochlorine contaminants and maternal offloading in the lecithotrophic Pacific angel shark (Squatina californica) collected from southern California.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kady; Lowe, Christopher G

    2015-08-15

    Pacific angel sharks (Squatina californica) are a benthic elasmobranch that occupy intermediate trophic level positions in coastal food webs. Angel sharks' life history characteristics make them susceptible to accumulating high amounts of contaminants. Four angel sharks were opportunistically captured in southern California and their liver and uterine contents were analyzed for PCBs, DDTs and other pesticides. High DDT:PCB ratios were found in the sharks indicating direct or indirect foraging near a local EPA Superfund Site. Organic contaminants were measured in ovulated eggs, indicating that females are able to maternally offload contaminants. Despite the potential mismatch between ovarian and uterine fecundity, we estimated females to offload approximately 13±5% of their total body load, which represents the upper limit of this capability. Although low in sample size, the initial findings from this study suggest that habitat use might play an important role in contaminant accumulation in this species.

  1. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-07-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmission electron microscopy. Within the scope of the present study we investigated the myogenesis of premetamorphic, metamorphic, and juvenile developmental stages of the anaspidean opisthobranch Aplysia californica using fluorescence F-actin-labeling in conjunction with modern confocal laser scanning microscopy. We categorized muscles with respect to their differentiation and degeneration and found three true larval muscles that differentiate during the embryonic and veliger phase and degenerate during or slightly after metamorphosis. These are the larval retractor, the accessory larval retractor, and the metapodial retractor muscle. While the pedal retractor muscle, some transversal mantle fibers and major portions of the cephalopedal musculature are continued and elaborated during juvenile and adult life, the buccal musculature and the anterior retractor muscle constitute juvenile/adult muscles which differentiate during or after metamorphosis. The metapodial retractor muscle has never been reported for any other gastropod taxon. Our findings indicate that the late veliger larva of A. californica shares some common traits with veligers of other gastropods, such as a larval retractor muscle. However, the postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the importance of ontogenetic approaches to understand adult conditions and life history patterns.

  2. Studies on the metabolism and toxicological detection of the Eschscholtzia californica alkaloids californine and protopine in urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paul, Liane D; Maurer, Hans H

    2003-06-05

    Eschscholtzia californica preparations are in use as phytopharmaceuticals and as herbal drugs. Studies are described on the metabolism and the toxicological analysis of the Eschscholtzia californica alkaloids californine and protopine in rat urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The identified metabolites indicated that californine is extensively metabolized by N-demethylation and/or single or double demethylenation with consecutive catechol-O-methylation of one of the hydroxy groups. Protopine, however, only undergoes extensive demethylenation of the 2,3-methylenedioxy group followed by catechol-O-methylation. All phenolic hydroxy metabolites were found to be partly conjugated. The authors' systematic toxicological analysis procedure using full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction and microwave-assisted acetylation allowed the detection of the main metabolites of californine and protopine in rat urine after a dose which should correspond to that of drug users. Therefore, use of Eschscholtzia californica preparations should also be detectable in human urine by the authors' systematic toxicological analysis procedure.

  3. Botryosphaeriaceae species associated with dieback and canker disease of bay laurel in northern California with the description of Dothiorella californica sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Daniel P; Peduto Hand, Francesca; Gubler, W Douglas; Trouillas, Florent P

    2017-04-01

    Members of the Botryosphaeriaceae are cosmopolitan fungi that may exist as seemingly innocuous endophytes or as destructive pathogens of numerous woody hosts, including fruit and nut crops, urban ornamental trees and shrubs, and forest trees. Surveys of bay laurel in northern California have revealed symptoms of dieback and branch canker of unknown aetiology. The goals of this study were to identify and clarify the species of Botryosphaeriaceae associated with these symptoms and to confirm their pathogenicity. To understand the role of members of the Botryosphaeriaceae in the dieback and canker disease of bay laurel, 23 isolates were isolated from symptomatic wood. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS, translation elongation factor 1-α, and beta-tubulin revealed three species: Botryosphaeria dothidea, Neofusicoccum nonquaesitum, and the newly described and typified species Dothiorella californica sp. nov. When select isolates were inoculated to 2- to 3-year-old branches of Umbellularia californica in a natural forest, both B. dothidea and N. nonquaesitum were pathogenic with N. nonquaesitum producing the largest lesions at 12- and 18-months post inoculation, respectively, while Do. californica did not cause wood lesions significantly greater than the mock-inoculated controls. This study represents the first attempt to identify and test the pathogenicity of Botryosphaeriaceae species associated with dieback and canker disease of bay laurel in a northern California forest.

  4. A specific acyl-ACP thioesterase implicated in medium-chain fatty acid production in immature cotyledons of Umbellularia californica.

    PubMed

    Pollard, M R; Anderson, L; Fan, C; Hawkins, D J; Davies, H M

    1991-02-01

    Umbellularia californica (California Bay) seeds accumulate 10:0 and 12:0 as principal reserve fatty acyl groups. An in vitro fatty acid synthesis system from the developing cotyledons produces chiefly 10:0 and 12:0, in approximately the same proportions as the intact tissue. The kinetics of acyl thioester and free fatty acid formation in this system suggest that a medium-chain specific acyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) hydrolysis mechanism is responsible for the preponderance of medium-chain products. A crude extract of the developing cotyledons exhibits hydrolytic activity toward acyl-ACPs, with marked preference for 12:0-ACP and 18:1-ACP in the test series 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, 11:0, 12:0, 14:0, 16:0, and 18:1-ACPs. Partial purification of the 12:0-ACP hydrolytic activity has resulted in its separation from the 18:1-ACP hydrolase(s) and the 12:0-coenzyme A hydrolase(s) that are also present, thereby demonstrating its specificity for the 12-carbon acyl chain length and the ACP derivative. During cotyledon development, as the proportion of medium-chain to other fatty acyl groups increases, the extractable yield of this activity also increases substantially. Collectively these results suggest a role for this 12-ACP thioesterase in medium-chain production in vivo.

  5. Developmental induction, purification, and further characterization of 12:0-ACP thioesterase from immature cotyledons of Umbellularia californica.

    PubMed

    Davies, H M; Anderson, L; Fan, C; Hawkins, D J

    1991-10-01

    The fatty acyl content of developing cotyledons of Umbellularia californica (California Bay) changes from a long-chain composition to a predominance of 10:0 and 12:0 in just 4-5 days at the beginning of an approximately 100-day period of medium-chain deposition. This striking change occurs at the earliest appearance of 12:0-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activity. The coincidence of these rapid events is consistent with the hypothesis that the enzyme plays a major role in medium-chain biosynthesis. The 12:0-ACP thioesterase has been substantially purified; enzyme activity consistently comigrates in chromatographic and electrophoretic systems with a protein or pair of proteins having an apparent molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa. A native molecular weight of approximately 42 kDa has been estimated by gel filtration chromatography, suggesting that the enzyme is a monomer. Affinity chromatography on immobilized ACP is a critical step in the purification procedure, and resolves the 12:0-ACP and 18:1-ACP thioesterases sufficiently to confirm that the medium-chain enzyme has negligible action on 18:1-ACP.

  6. Multipart copolyelectrolyte adhesive of the sandcastle worm, Phragmatopoma californica (Fewkes): catechol oxidase catalyzed curing through peptidyl-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching Shuen; Stewart, Russell J

    2013-05-13

    Tube-building sabellariid polychaetes have major impacts on the geology and ecology of shorelines worldwide. Sandcastle worms, Phragmatopoma californica (Fewkes), live along the western coast of North America. Individual sabellariid worms build tubular shells by gluing together mineral particles with a multipart polyelectrolytic adhesive. Distinct sets of oppositely charged components are packaged and stored in concentrated granules in separate cell types. Homogeneous granules contain sulfated macromolecules as counter-polyanion to polycationic Pc2 and Pc5 proteins, which become major components of the fully cured glue. Heterogeneous granules contain polyphosphoproteins, Pc3A/B, paired with divalent cations and polycationic Pc1 and Pc4 proteins. Both types of granules contain catechol oxidase that catalyzes oxidative cross-linking of L-DOPA. Co-secretion of catechol oxidase guarantees rapid and spatially homogeneous curing with limited mixing of the preassembled adhesive packets. Catechol oxidase remains active long after the glue is fully cured, perhaps providing an active cue for conspecific larval settlement.

  7. Differential evolutionary rates of neuronal transcriptome in Aplysia kurodai and Aplysia californica as a tool for gene mining.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Yong-Seok; Rim, Young-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Moroz, Leonid L; Kandel, Eric R; Bhak, Jong; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-07-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia is a fascinating model organism for studying molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. However, evolutionary studies about Aplysia have been limited by the lack of its genomic information. Recently, large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) databases have been acquired by sequencing cDNA libraries from A. californica and A. kurodai. The closeness between the two species allowed us to investigate rapidly evolving genes by comparing their orthologs. Using this method, we found that a subset of signal transduction genes in neurons showed rates of protein evolution higher than those of housekeeping genes. Moreover, we were also able to find several candidate genes that may be involved in learning and memory or synaptic plasticity among genes showing relatively higher K(a)/K(s) ratios. We also investigated the relationship between evolutionary rates and tissue distribution of Aplysia genes. They propose that the estimation of evolutionary rates cannot be a good marker to assess neuronal expression; however, it still can be an efficient way to narrow down the pool of candidate genes involved in neuronal functions for the further studies.

  8. A comparative karyological study of the blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis, Phasianidae) and California quail (Callipepla californica, Odontophoridae).

    PubMed

    Shibusawa, M; Nishida-Umehara, C; Tsudzuki, M; Masabanda, J; Griffin, D K; Matsuda, Y

    2004-01-01

    We conducted comparative chromosome painting and chromosome mapping with chicken DNA probes against the blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis, CCH) and California quail (Callipepla californica, CCA), which are classified into the Old World quail and the New World quail, respectively. Each chicken probe of chromosomes 1-9 and Z painted a pair of chromosomes in the blue-breasted quail. In California quail, chicken chromosome 2 probe painted chromosomes 3 and 6, and chicken chromosome 4 probe painted chromosomes 4 and a pair of microchromosomes. Comparison of the cytogenetic maps of the two quail species with those of chicken and Japanese quail revealed that there are several intrachromosomal rearrangements, pericentric and/or paracentric inversions, in chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 between chicken and the Old World quail. In addition, a pericentric inversion was found in chromosome 8 between chicken and the three quail species. Ordering of the Z-linked DNA clones revealed the presence of multiple rearrangements in the Z chromosomes of the three quail species. Comparing these results with the molecular phylogeny of Galliformes species, it was also cytogenetically supported that the New World quail is classified into a different clade from the lineage containing chicken and the Old World quail.

  9. A conformational change in the peripheral anionic site of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase induced by a bis-imidazolium oxime.

    PubMed

    Legler, Patricia M; Soojhawon, Iswarduth; Millard, Charles B

    2015-09-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to design improved nerve agent antidotes, two X-ray crystal structures of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (TcAChE) bound to the bis-pyridinium oxime, Ortho-7, or its experimental bis-imidazolium analogue, 2BIM-7, were determined. Bis-oximes contain two oxime groups connected by a hydrophobic linker. One oxime group of Ortho-7 binds at the entrance to the active-site gorge near Trp279, and the second binds at the bottom near Trp84 and Phe330. In the Ortho-7-TcAChE complex the oxime at the bottom of the gorge was directed towards the nucleophilic Ser200. In contrast, the oxime group of 2BIM-7 was rotated away from Ser200 and the oxime at the entrance induced a significant conformational change in the peripheral anionic site (PAS) residue Trp279. The conformational change alters the surface of the PAS and positions the imidazolium oxime of 2BIM-7 further from Ser200. The relatively weaker binding and poorer reactivation of VX-inhibited, tabun-inhibited or sarin-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase by 2BIM-7 compared with Ortho-7 may in part be owing to the unproductively bound states caught in crystallo. Overall, the reactivation efficiency of 2BIM-7 was comparable to that of 2-pyridine aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM), but unlike 2-PAM the bis-imidazolium oxime lacks a fixed charge, which may affect its membrane permeability.

  10. Presynaptic modulating effects of GABA on depression, facilitation, and posttetanic potentiation of a cholinergic synapse in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, J P; Plourde, G

    1977-12-01

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been studied on the synaptic depression, frequency facilitation, and posttetanic potentiation (PTP) of a unitary, monosynaptic, and presumably cholinergic excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP). This EPSP, produced by minimal stimulation of the right visceropleural connective, was recorded in cell R 15 of Aplysia californica. Perfusion with GABA (10(-4)-10(-3) M) reduces the size of all EPSPs produced by a train of 100 stimuli at 1/s. It also reduced the synaptic depression and PTP, and increases the frequency facilitation seen during the train. GABA does not significantly effect the membrane resistance (mean 102%) but it slightly depolarizes (mean 6 mV) the postsynaptic cell. GABA does not reduce an acetylcholine iontophoretic potential produced on R15. The effects of GABA are reduction when chloride is replaced by acetate but they remain significant. Picrotoxin and bicuculline fail to antagonize GABA. Addition of sodium azide or dinitrophenol does not reduce the action of GABA and even prolongs it. The effects of GABA are attributed to two sites of action: a postsynaptic one, responsible for the small change in potential and partially responsible for the reduction of EPSP size; and a presynaptic one, responsible for a further reduction of EPSP size and the changes of depression, facilitation, and PTP.

  11. Multiscale Structure of the Underwater Adhesive of Phragmatopoma Californica: a Nanostructured Latex with a Steep Microporosity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Mark J.; Steren, Rebekah E.; Hlady, Vladimir; Stewart, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    Phragmatopoma Californica builds a tubular dwelling by gluing bits of sand and seashell together underwater with a proteinaceous adhesive. In the lab, the animals will build with 0.5 mm glass beads. Two spots of glue with a consistent volume of about 100 pL each are deposited on the glass beads before placement on the end of the tube. The animals wriggled the particles for 20-30 s before letting go, which suggested that the adhesive was sufficiently set within 30 s to support the glass beads. The structure of the adhesive joints was examined at the micro- and nanoscopic length scales using laser scanning confocal and atomic force microscopies. At the microscale, the adhesive was a cellular solid with cell diameters ranging from 0.5 to 6.0 μm, distributed to create a steep porosity gradient that ranged from near zero at the outside edges to about 50% at the center of the adhesive joint. At the nanoscale, the adhesive appeared to be an accretion of trillions of deformable nanospheres, reminiscent of a high-solids-content latex adhesive. The implications of the structure for the functionality of the adhesive is discussed. PMID:17394366

  12. Stereoselective L-(3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate-binding sites in nervous tissue of Aplysia californica: evidence for muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, T.F.; Mpitsos, G.J.; Siebenaller, J.F.; Barker, D.L.

    1985-12-01

    The muscarinic antagonist L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (L-(/sup 3/H)QNB) binds with a high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM) to a single population of specific sites (Bmax = 47 fmol/mg of protein) in nervous tissue of the gastropod mollusc, Aplysia. The specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding is displaced stereoselectively by the enantiomers of benzetimide, dexetimide, and levetimide. The pharmacologically active enantiomer, dexetimide, is more potent than levetimide as an inhibitor of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Moreover, the muscarinic cholinergic ligands, scopolamine, atropine, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine are effective inhibitors of the specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding, whereas nicotinic receptor antagonists, decamethonium and d-tubocurarine, are considerably less effective. These pharmacological characteristics of the L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site provide evidence for classical muscarinic receptors in Aplysia nervous tissue. The physiological relevance of the dexetimide-displaceable L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site was supported by the demonstration of the sensitivity of the specific binding to thermal denaturation. Specific binding of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB was also detected in nervous tissue of another marine gastropod, Pleurobranchaea californica. The characteristics of the Aplysia L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site are in accordance with studies of numerous vertebrate and invertebrate tissues indicating that the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site has been highly conserved through evolution.

  13. Proteomics reveals selective regulation of proteins in response to memory-related serotonin stimulation in Aplysia californica ganglia.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Divisch, Isabella; Pollak, Daniela D; Lubec, Gert

    2012-02-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia californica (Aplysia) is a powerful model for learning and memory due to its minimalistic nervous system. Key proteins, identified to be regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin in Aplysia, have been successfully translated to mammalian models of learning and memory. Based upon a recently published large-scale analysis of Aplysia proteomic data, the current study investigated the regulation of protein levels 24 and 48 h after treatment with serotonin in Aplysia ganglia using a 2-D gel electrophoresis approach. Protein spots were quantified and protein-level changes of selected proteins were verified by Western blotting. Among those were Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RabGDIα), synaptotagmin-1 and deleted in azoospermia-associated protein (DAZAP-1) in cerebral ganglia, calreticulin, RabGDIα, DAZAP-1, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF), RACK-1 and actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) in pleural ganglia and DAZAP-1, hnRNPF and ADF in pedal ganglia. Protein identity of the majority of spots was confirmed by a gel-based mass spectrometrical method (FT-MS). Taken together, protein-level changes induced by the learning-related neurotransmitter serotonin in Aplysia ganglia are described and a role for the abovementioned proteins in synaptic plasticity is proposed.

  14. Unique ionotropic receptors for D-aspartate are a target for serotonin-induced synaptic plasticity in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephen L; Fieber, Lynne A

    2012-01-01

    The non-L-glutamate (L-Glu) receptor component of D-aspartate (D-Asp) currents in Aplysia californica buccal S cluster (BSC) neurons was studied with whole cell voltage clamp to differentiate it from receptors activated by other well-known agonists of the Aplysia nervous system and investigate modulatory mechanisms of D-Asp currents associated with synaptic plasticity. Acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) activated whole cell excitatory currents with similar current voltage relationships to D-Asp. These currents, however, were pharmacologically distinct from D-Asp. ACh currents were blocked by hexamethonium (C6) and tubocurarine (D-TC), while D-Asp currents were unaffected. 5-HT currents were blocked by granisetron and methysergide (MES), while D-Asp currents were unaffected. Conversely, while (2S,3R)-1-(Phenanthren-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid(PPDA) blocked D-Asp currents, it had no effect on ACh or 5-HT currents. Comparison of the charge area described by currents induced by ACh or 5-HT separately from, or with, D-Asp suggests activation of distinct receptors by all 3 agonists. Charge area comparisons with L-Glu, however, suggested some overlap between L-Glu and D-Asp receptors. Ten minute exposure to 5-HT induced facilitation of D-Asp-evoked responses in BSC neurons. This effect was mimicked by phorbol ester, suggesting that protein kinase C (PKC) was involved.

  15. The Vacuolar Proton-Cation Exchanger EcNHX1 Generates pH Signals for the Expression of Secondary Metabolism in Eschscholzia californica1

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Cell cultures of Eschscholzia californica react to a fungal elicitor by the overproduction of antimicrobial benzophenanthridine alkaloids. The signal cascade toward the expression of biosynthetic enzymes includes (1) the activation of phospholipase A2 at the plasma membrane, resulting in a peak of lysophosphatidylcholine, and (2) a subsequent, transient efflux of vacuolar protons, resulting in a peak of cytosolic H+. This study demonstrates that one of the Na+/H+ antiporters acting at the tonoplast of E. californica cells mediates this proton flux. Four antiporter-encoding genes were isolated and cloned from complementary DNA (EcNHX1–EcNHX4). RNA interference-based, simultaneous silencing of EcNHX1, EcNHX3, and EcNHX4 resulted in stable cell lines with largely diminished capacities of (1) sodium-dependent efflux of vacuolar protons and (2) elicitor-triggered overproduction of alkaloids. Each of the four EcNHX genes of E. californica reconstituted the lack of Na+-dependent H+ efflux in a Δnhx null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Only the yeast strain transformed with and expressing the EcNHX1 gene displayed Na+-dependent proton fluxes that were stimulated by lysophosphatidylcholine, thus giving rise to a net efflux of vacuolar H+. This finding was supported by three-dimensional protein homology models that predict a plausible recognition site for lysophosphatidylcholine only in EcNHX1. We conclude that the EcNHX1 antiporter functions in the elicitor-initiated expression of alkaloid biosynthetic genes by recruiting the vacuolar proton pool for the signaling process. PMID:26578709

  16. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  17. Individual synaptic vesicles from the electroplaque of Torpedo californica, a classic cholinergic synapse, also contain transporters for glutamate and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huinan; Harlow, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The type of neurotransmitter secreted by a neuron is a product of the vesicular transporters present on its synaptic vesicle membranes and the available transmitters in the local cytosolic environment where the synaptic vesicles reside. Synaptic vesicles isolated from electroplaques of the marine ray, Torpedo californica, have served as model vesicles for cholinergic neurotransmission. Many lines of evidence support the idea that in addition to acetylcholine, additional neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators are also released from cholinergic synapses. We identified the types of vesicular neurotransmitter transporters present at the electroplaque using immunoblot and immunofluoresence techniques with antibodies against the vesicle acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, and 3), and the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT). We found that VAChT, VNUT, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not 3 were present by immunoblot, and confirmed that the antibodies were specific to proteins of the axons and terminals of the electroplaque. We used a single‐vesicle imaging technique to determine whether these neurotransmitter transporters were present on the same or different populations of synaptic vesicles. We found that greater than 85% of vesicles that labeled for VAChT colabeled with VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, and approximately 70% colabeled with VNUT. Based upon confidence intervals, at least 52% of cholinergic vesicles isolated are likely to contain all four transporters. The presence of multiple types of neurotransmitter transporters – and potentially neurotransmitters – in individual synaptic vesicles raises fundamental questions about the role of cotransmitter release and neurotransmitter synergy at cholinergic synapses. PMID:24744885

  18. Regulatory interaction of the Galpha protein with phospholipase A2 in the plasma membrane of Eschscholzia californica.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Michael; Steighardt, Jörg; Gesell, Andreas; Schwartze, Wieland; Roos, Werner

    2007-12-01

    Plant heterotrimeric G-proteins are involved in a variety of signaling pathways, though only one alpha and a few betagamma isoforms of their subunits exist. In isolated plasma membranes of California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), the plant-specific Galpha subunit was isolated and identified immunologically and by homology of the cloned gene with that of several plants. In the same membrane, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) was activated by yeast elicitor only if GTPgammaS (an activator of Galpha) was present. From the cholate-solubilized membrane proteins, PLA(2) was co-precipitated together with Galpha by a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant Galpha. In this immunoprecipitate and in the plasma membrane (but not in the Galpha-free supernatant) PLA(2) was stimulated by GTPgammaS. Plasma membranes and immunoprecipitates obtained from antisense transformants with a low Galpha content allowed no such stimulation. An antiserum raised against the C-terminus (which in animal Galphas is located near the target coupling site) precipitated Galpha without any PLA(2) activity. Using non-denaturing PAGE, complexes of solubilized plasma membrane proteins were visualized that contained Galpha plus PLA(2) activity and dissociated at pH 9.5. At this pH, PLA(2) was no longer stimulated by GTPgammaS. It is concluded that a distinct fraction of the plasma membrane-bound PLA(2) exists in a detergent-resistant complex with Galpha that can be dissociated at pH 9.5. This complex allows the Galpha-mediated activation of PLA(2).

  19. Clinal adaptation and adaptive plasticity in Artemisia californica: implications for the response of a foundation species to predicted climate change.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Jessica D; Mooney, Kailen A

    2013-08-01

    Local adaptation and plasticity pose significant obstacles to predicting plant responses to future climates. Although local adaptation and plasticity in plant functional traits have been documented for many species, less is known about population-level variation in plasticity and whether such variation is driven by adaptation to environmental variation. We examined clinal variation in traits and performance - and plastic responses to environmental change - for the shrub Artemisia californica along a 700 km gradient characterized (from south to north) by a fourfold increase in precipitation and a 61% decrease in interannual precipitation variation. Plants cloned from five populations along this gradient were grown for 3 years in treatments approximating the precipitation regimes of the north and south range margins. Most traits varying among populations did so clinally; northern populations (vs. southern) had higher water-use efficiencies and lower growth rates, C : N ratios and terpene concentrations. Notably, there was variation in plasticity for plant performance that was strongly correlated with source site interannual precipitation variability. The high-precipitation treatment (vs. low) increased growth and flower production more for plants from southern populations (181% and 279%, respectively) than northern populations (47% and 20%, respectively). Overall, precipitation variability at population source sites predicted 86% and 99% of variation in plasticity in growth and flowering, respectively. These striking, clinal patterns in plant traits and plasticity are indicative of adaptation to both the mean and variability of environmental conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of long-term coastal climate data in turn indicates an increase in interannual precipitation variation consistent with most global change models and, unexpectedly, this increased variation is especially pronounced at historically stable, northern sites. Our findings demonstrate the

  20. Highlighting manganese dynamics in the nervous system of Aplysia californica using MEMRI at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Jelescu, Ileana O; Nargeot, Romuald; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the pathways of manganese (Mn(2+)) transport in the nervous system becomes of interest as many recent studies use Mn(2+) as a neural tract tracer in mammals. In this study, we performed manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) at 17.2 T on the buccal ganglia of Aplysia californica. The main advantage of this model over mammalian systems is that it contains networks of large identified neurons. Using Mn(2+) retrograde transport along selected nerves, we first validated the mapping of motor neurons' axonal projections into peripheral nerves, previously obtained from optical imaging (Morton et al., 1991). This protocol was found not to alter the functional properties of the neuronal network. Second, we compared the Mn(2+) dynamics inside the ganglia in the presence or absence of chemical stimulation. We found that 2h of stimulation with the modulatory transmitter dopamine increased the extent of areas of intermediate signal enhancement caused by manganese accumulation. In the absence of dopamine, an overall decrease of the enhanced areas in favor of non-enhanced areas was found, as a result of natural Mn(2+) washout. This supports the hypothesis that, upon activation, Mn(2+) is released from labeled neurons and captured by other, initially unlabeled, neurons. However, the latter could not be clearly identified due to lack of sensitivity and multiplicity of possible pathways starting from labeled cells. Nonetheless, the Aplysia buccal ganglia remain a well-suited model for attempting to visualize Mn(2+) transport from neuron to neuron upon activation, as well as for studying dopaminergic modulation in a motor network.

  1. Immediate and persistent transcriptional correlates of long-term sensitization training at different CNS loci in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, Samantha; Conte, Catherine; Kamal, Saman; Calin-Jageman, Robert J; Calin-Jageman, Irina E

    2014-01-01

    Repeated noxious stimulation produces long-term sensitization of defensive withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia californica, a form of long-term memory that requires changes in both transcription and translation. Previous work has identified 10 transcripts which are rapidly up-regulated after long-term sensitization training in the pleural ganglia. Here we use quantitative PCR to begin examining how these transcriptional changes are expressed in different CNS loci related to defensive withdrawal reflexes at 1 and 24 hours after long-term sensitization training. Specifically, we sample from a) the sensory wedge of the pleural ganglia, which exclusively contains the VC nociceptor cell bodies that help mediate input to defensive withdrawal circuits, b) the remaining pleural ganglia, which contain withdrawal interneurons, and c) the pedal ganglia, which contain many motor neurons. Results from the VC cluster show different temporal patterns of regulation: 1) rapid but transient up-regulation of Aplysia homologs of C/EBP, C/EBPγ, and CREB1, 2) delayed but sustained up-regulation of BiP, Tolloid/BMP-1, and sensorin, 3) rapid and sustained up-regulation of Egr, GlyT2, VPS36, and an uncharacterized protein (LOC101862095), and 4) an unexpected lack of regulation of Aplysia homologs of calmodulin (CaM) and reductase-related protein (RRP). Changes in the remaining pleural ganglia mirror those found in the VC cluster at 1 hour but with an attenuated level of regulation. Because these samples had almost no expression of the VC-specific transcript sensorin, our data suggests that sensitization training likely induces transcriptional changes in either defensive withdrawal interneurons or neurons unrelated to defensive withdrawal. In the pedal ganglia, we observed only a rapid but transient increase in Egr expression, indicating that long-term sensitization training is likely to induce transcriptional changes in motor neurons but raising the possibility of different transcriptional

  2. Immediate and Persistent Transcriptional Correlates of Long-Term Sensitization Training at Different CNS Loci in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Herdegen, Samantha; Conte, Catherine; Kamal, Saman; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated noxious stimulation produces long-term sensitization of defensive withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia californica, a form of long-term memory that requires changes in both transcription and translation. Previous work has identified 10 transcripts which are rapidly up-regulated after long-term sensitization training in the pleural ganglia. Here we use quantitative PCR to begin examining how these transcriptional changes are expressed in different CNS loci related to defensive withdrawal reflexes at 1 and 24 hours after long-term sensitization training. Specifically, we sample from a) the sensory wedge of the pleural ganglia, which exclusively contains the VC nociceptor cell bodies that help mediate input to defensive withdrawal circuits, b) the remaining pleural ganglia, which contain withdrawal interneurons, and c) the pedal ganglia, which contain many motor neurons. Results from the VC cluster show different temporal patterns of regulation: 1) rapid but transient up-regulation of Aplysia homologs of C/EBP, C/EBPγ, and CREB1, 2) delayed but sustained up-regulation of BiP, Tolloid/BMP-1, and sensorin, 3) rapid and sustained up-regulation of Egr, GlyT2, VPS36, and an uncharacterized protein (LOC101862095), and 4) an unexpected lack of regulation of Aplysia homologs of calmodulin (CaM) and reductase-related protein (RRP). Changes in the remaining pleural ganglia mirror those found in the VC cluster at 1 hour but with an attenuated level of regulation. Because these samples had almost no expression of the VC-specific transcript sensorin, our data suggests that sensitization training likely induces transcriptional changes in either defensive withdrawal interneurons or neurons unrelated to defensive withdrawal. In the pedal ganglia, we observed only a rapid but transient increase in Egr expression, indicating that long-term sensitization training is likely to induce transcriptional changes in motor neurons but raising the possibility of different transcriptional

  3. Heterologous expression of the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene from the plant Umbellularia californica mediates polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rehm, B H; Steinbüchel, A

    2001-03-01

    The acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase cDNA from the plant Umbellularia californica was functionally expressed in various recombinant Escherichia coli strains in order to establish a new metabolic route toward medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA(MCL)) biosynthesis from non-related carbon sources. Coexpression of the PHA synthase genes from Ralstonia eutropha and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or only the PHA synthase gene from P. aeruginosa, respectively, showed PHA(MCL) accumulation when the type II PHA synthase from P. aeruginosa was produced. Both wild-type E. coli and various fad mutants were investigated; and only when the beta-oxidation pathway was impaired PHA(MCL) accumulation from gluconate was observed, contributing to about 6% of cellular dry weight. Thus coexpression of type II PHA synthase gene with cDNA encoding the medium-chain acyl-ACP thioesterase from U. californica established a new PHA(MCL) biosynthesis pathway, connecting fatty acid de novo biosynthesis with fatty acid beta-oxidation, using a non-related carbon source.

  4. Gene identification and evidence for expression of G protein alpha subunits, phospholipase C, and an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in Aplysia californica rhinophore.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; De Vries, Melissa R; Hill, Kristen S; Boehning, Darren; Nagle, Gregg T

    2007-07-01

    In the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, waterborne protein pheromones that are released during egg laying act in concert to stimulate mate attraction. However, molecular information concerning the cellular receptors and signaling mechanisms that may be involved in waterborne peptide and protein pheromonal communication is lacking. As a first step toward examining whether members of the G protein family and phosphoinositide signaling pathway are present in the primary peripheral chemosensory organs (i.e., rhinophores), we isolated five full-length cDNA clones from an A. californica central nervous system cDNA library. These clones encoded (1) the G protein alpha subunits of the Gq, Gi, and Go families, (2) a protein with homology to phospholipase C (PLC) isoforms, and (3) an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). The expression of these genes was examined using laser capture microdissection/reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. All of them are expressed in the rhinophore sensory epithelium, suggesting that Galphaq, Galphai, Galphao, PLC-like protein, and IP3R may be involved in waterborne protein pheromone detection in Aplysia-possibly via a phosphoinositide signaling mechanism.

  5. Using double-stranded RNA to prevent in vitro and in vivo viral infections by recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Victor Julian; Sampieri, Alicia; Sepulveda, Jorge; Vaca, Luis

    2003-05-23

    Introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into a wide variety of cells and organisms results in post-transcriptional depletion of the homologue endogenous mRNA. This well-preserved phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) is present in evolutionarily diverse organisms such as plants, fungi, insects, metazoans, and mammals. Because the identification of the targeted mRNA by the RNAi machinery depends upon Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, RNAi can be exquisitely specific. We took advantage of this powerful and flexible technique to demonstrate that selective silencing of genes essential for viral propagation prevents in vitro and in vivo viral infection. Using the baculovirus Autographa californica, a rapidly replicating and highly cytolytic double-stranded DNA virus that infects many different insect species, we show for the first time that introduction of dsRNA from gp64 and ie1, two genes essential for baculovirus propagation, results in prevention of viral infection in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating the use of RNAi to inhibit a viral infection in animals. This inhibition was specific, because dsRNA from the polyhedrin promoter (used as control) or unrelated dsRNAs did not affect the time course of viral infection. The most relevant consequences from the present study are: 1) RNAi offers a rapid and efficient way to interfere with viral genes to assess the role of specific proteins in viral function and 2) using RNAi to interfere with viral genes essential for cell infection may provide a powerful therapeutic tool for the treatment of viral infections.

  6. The Sea Slug, Pleurobranchaea californica: A Signpost Species in the Evolution of Complex Nervous Systems and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Rhanor; Brown, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    How and why did complex brain and behavior evolve? Clues emerge from comparative studies of animals with simpler morphology, nervous system, and behavioral economics. The brains of vertebrates, arthropods, and some annelids have highly derived executive structures and function that control downstream, central pattern generators (CPGs) for locomotion, behavioral choice, and reproduction. For the vertebrates, these structures—cortex, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus—integrate topographically mapped sensory inputs with motivation and memory to transmit complex motor commands to relay stations controlling CPG outputs. Similar computations occur in the central complex and mushroom bodies of the arthropods, and in mammals these interactions structure subjective thought and socially based valuations. The simplest model systems available for comparison are opisthobranch molluscs, which have avoided selective pressure for complex bodies, brain, and behavior through potent chemical defenses. In particular, in the sea-slug Pleurobranchaea californica the functions of vertebrates’ olfactory bulb and pallium are performed in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the chemotactile oral veil. Functions of hypothalamus and basal ganglia are combined in Pleurobranchaea’s feeding motor network. The actions of basal ganglia on downstream locomotor regions and spinal CPGs are analogous to Pleurobranchaea’s feeding network actions on CPGs for agonist and antagonist behaviors. The nervous systems of opisthobranch and pulmonate gastropods may conserve or reflect relations of the ancestral urbilaterian. Parallels and contrasts in neuronal circuits for action selection in Pleurobranchaea and vertebrates suggest how a basic set of decision circuitry was built upon in evolving segmentation, articulated skeletons, sociality, and highly invested reproductive strategies. They suggest (1) an origin of olfactory bulb and pallium from head-region PNS; (2) modularization of an ancestral

  7. An in vitro preparation for eliciting and recording feeding motor programs with physiological movements in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    McManus, Jeffrey M; Lu, Hui; Chiel, Hillel J

    2012-12-05

    Multifunctionality, the ability of one peripheral structure to generate multiple, distinct behaviors(1), allows animals to rapidly adapt their behaviors to changing environments. The marine mollusk Aplysia californica provides a tractable system for the study of multifunctionality. During feeding, Aplysia generates several distinct types of behaviors using the same feeding apparatus, the buccal mass. The ganglia that control these behaviors contain a number of large, identified neurons that are accessible to electrophysiological study. The activity of these neurons has been described in motor programs that can be divided into two types, ingestive and egestive programs, based on the timing of neural activity that closes the food grasper relative to the neural activity that protracts or retracts the grasper(2). However, in isolated ganglia, the muscle movements that would produce these behaviors are absent, making it harder to be certain whether the motor programs observed are correlates of real behaviors. In vivo, nerve and muscle recordings have been obtained corresponding to feeding programs(2,3,4), but it is very difficult to directly record from individual neurons(5). Additionally, in vivo, ingestive programs can be further divided into bites and swallows(1,2), a distinction that is difficult to make in most previously described in vitro preparations. The suspended buccal mass preparation (Figure 1) bridges the gap between isolated ganglia and intact animals. In this preparation, ingestive behaviors - including both biting and swallowing - and egestive behaviors (rejection) can be elicited, at the same time as individual neurons can be recorded from and stimulated using extracellular electrodes(6). The feeding movements associated with these different behaviors can be recorded, quantified, and related directly to the motor programs. The motor programs in the suspended buccal mass preparation appear to be more similar to those observed in vivo than are motor

  8. Profile of the alpha-bungarotoxin-binding regions on the extracellular part of the alpha-chain of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mulac-Jericevic, B; Atassi, M Z

    1987-01-01

    The continuous alpha-neurotoxin-binding regions on the extracellular part (residues 1-210) of the alpha-chain of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor were localized by reaction of 125I-labelled alpha-bungarotoxin with synthetic overlapping peptides spanning this entire part of the chain. The specificity of the binding was confirmed by inhibition with unlabelled toxin and, for appropriate peptides, with unlabelled anti-(acetylcholine receptor) antibodies. Five toxin-binding regions were localized within residues 1-10, 32-41, 100-115, 122-150 and 182-198. The third, fourth and fifth (and to a lesser extent the first and second) toxin-binding regions overlapped with regions recognized by anti-(acetylcholine receptor) antibodies. The five toxin-binding regions may be distinct sites or, alternatively, different 'faces' in one (or more) sites. PMID:3435488

  9. The nitrogen supply from soils and insects during growth of the pitcher plants Nepenthes mirabilis, Cephalotus follicularis and Darlingtonia californica.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Schulze, E D; Pate, J S; Gillison, A N

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated the nitrogen (N) acquisition from soil and insect capture during the growth of three species of pitcher plants, Nepenthes mirabilis, Cephalotus follicularis and Darlingtonia californica. (15)N/(14)N natural abundance ratios (δ(15)N) of plants and pitchers of different age, non-carnivorous reference plants, and insect prey were used to estimate proportional contributions of insects to the N content of leaves and whole plants. Young Nepenthes leaves (phyllodes) carrying closed pitchers comprised major sinks for N and developed mainly from insect N captured elsewhere on the plant. Their δ(15)N values of up to 7.2‰ were higher than the average δ(15)N value of captured insects (mean δ(15)N value = 5.3‰). In leaves carrying old pitchers that are acting as a N source, the δ(15)N decreased to 3.0‰ indicating either an increasing contribution of soil N to those plant parts which in fact captured the insects or N gain from N2 fixation by microorganisms which may exist in old pitchers. The δ(15)N value of N in water collected from old pitchers was 1.2‰ and contained free amino acids. The fraction of insect N in young and old pitchers and their associated leaves decreased from 1.0 to 0.3 mg g(-1). This fraction decreased further with the size of the investigated tiller. Nepenthes contained on average 61.5 ± 7.6% (mean ± SD, range 50-71%) insect N based on the N content of a whole tiller. In the absence of suitable non-carnivorous reference plants for Cephalotus, δ(15)N values were assessed across a developmental sequence from young plants lacking pitchers to large adults with up to 38 pitchers. The data indicated dependence on soil N until 4 pitchers had opened. Beyond that stage, plant size increased with the number of catching pitchers but the fraction of soil N remained high. Large Cephalotus plants were estimated to derive 26 ± 5.9% (mean ± SD of the three largest plants; range: 19-30%) of the N from insects

  10. Microclimate impacts survival and prevalence of Phytophthora ramorum in Umbellularia californica, a key reservoir host of sudden oak death in Northern California forests.

    PubMed

    DiLeo, Matthew V; Bostock, Richard M; Rizzo, David M

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive pathogen and the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death, has become established in mixed-evergreen and redwood forests in coastal northern California. While oak and tanoak mortality is the most visible indication of P. ramorum's presence, epidemics are largely driven by the presence of bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), a reservoir host that supports both prolific sporulation in the winter wet season and survival during the summer dry season. In order to better understand how over-summer survival of the pathogen contributes to variability in the severity of annual epidemics, we monitored the viability of P. ramorum leaf infections over three years along with coincident microclimate. The proportion of symptomatic bay laurel leaves that contained viable infections decreased during the first summer dry season and remained low for the following two years, likely due to the absence of conducive wet season weather during the study period. Over-summer survival of P. ramorum was positively correlated with high percent canopy cover, less negative bay leaf water potential and few days exceeding 30°C but was not significantly different between mixed-evergreen and redwood forest ecosystems. Decreased summer survival of P. ramorum in exposed locations and during unusually hot summers likely contributes to the observed spatiotemporal heterogeneity of P. ramorum epidemics.

  11. Effects of CO2-induced pH reduction on the exoskeleton structure and biophotonic properties of the shrimp Lysmata californica

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jennifer R. A.; Gilleard, Jasmine M.; Allen, Michael C.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2015-01-01

    The anticipated effects of CO2-induced ocean acidification on marine calcifiers are generally negative, and include dissolution of calcified elements and reduced calcification rates. Such negative effects are not typical of crustaceans for which comparatively little ocean acidification research has been conducted. Crustaceans, however, depend on their calcified exoskeleton for many critical functions. Here, we conducted a short-term study on a common caridean shrimp, Lysmata californica, to determine the effect of CO2-driven reduction in seawater pH on exoskeleton growth, structure, and mineralization and animal cryptic coloration. Shrimp exposed to ambient (7.99 ± 0.04) and reduced pH (7.53 ± 0.06) for 21 days showed no differences in exoskeleton growth (percent increase in carapace length), but the calcium weight percent of their cuticle increased significantly in reduced pH conditions, resulting in a greater Ca:Mg ratio. Cuticle thickness did not change, indicating an increase in the mineral to matrix ratio, which may have mechanical consequences for exoskeleton function. Furthermore, there was a 5-fold decrease in animal transparency, but no change in overall shrimp coloration (red). These results suggest that even short-term exposure to CO2-induced pH reduction can significantly affect exoskeleton mineralization and shrimp biophotonics, with potential impacts on crypsis, physical defense, and predator avoidance. PMID:26030212

  12. Effects of CO2-induced pH reduction on the exoskeleton structure and biophotonic properties of the shrimp Lysmata californica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer R A; Gilleard, Jasmine M; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2015-06-01

    The anticipated effects of CO2-induced ocean acidification on marine calcifiers are generally negative, and include dissolution of calcified elements and reduced calcification rates. Such negative effects are not typical of crustaceans for which comparatively little ocean acidification research has been conducted. Crustaceans, however, depend on their calcified exoskeleton for many critical functions. Here, we conducted a short-term study on a common caridean shrimp, Lysmata californica, to determine the effect of CO2-driven reduction in seawater pH on exoskeleton growth, structure, and mineralization and animal cryptic coloration. Shrimp exposed to ambient (7.99 ± 0.04) and reduced pH (7.53 ± 0.06) for 21 days showed no differences in exoskeleton growth (percent increase in carapace length), but the calcium weight percent of their cuticle increased significantly in reduced pH conditions, resulting in a greater Ca:Mg ratio. Cuticle thickness did not change, indicating an increase in the mineral to matrix ratio, which may have mechanical consequences for exoskeleton function. Furthermore, there was a 5-fold decrease in animal transparency, but no change in overall shrimp coloration (red). These results suggest that even short-term exposure to CO2-induced pH reduction can significantly affect exoskeleton mineralization and shrimp biophotonics, with potential impacts on crypsis, physical defense, and predator avoidance.

  13. Standardization of the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model by immunization of rats with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptors — Recommendations for methods and experimental designs

    PubMed Central

    Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Molenaar, Peter C.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates; Brenner, Talma; Duan, Rui-Sheng; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon; Kusner, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is characterized by a chronic, fatigable weakness of voluntary muscles. The production of autoantibodies involves the dysregulation of T cells which provide the environment for the development of autoreactive B cells. The symptoms are caused by destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and degradation of the AChR by IgG autoantibodies, predominantly of the G1 and G3 subclasses. Active immunization of animals with AChR from mammalian muscles, AChR from Torpedo or Electrophorus electric organs, and recombinant or synthetic AChR fragments generates a chronic model of MG, termed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). This model covers cellular mechanisms involved in the immune response against the AChR, e.g. antigen presentation, T cell-help and regulation, B cell selection and differentiation into plasma cells. Our aim is to define standard operation procedures and recommendations for the rat EAMG model using purified AChR from the Torpedo californica electric organ, in order to facilitate more rapid translation of preclinical proof of concept or efficacy studies into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. PMID:25796590

  14. Microclimate Impacts Survival and Prevalence of Phytophthora ramorum in Umbellularia californica, a Key Reservoir Host of Sudden Oak Death in Northern California Forests

    PubMed Central

    DiLeo, Matthew V.; Bostock, Richard M.; Rizzo, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive pathogen and the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death, has become established in mixed-evergreen and redwood forests in coastal northern California. While oak and tanoak mortality is the most visible indication of P. ramorum’s presence, epidemics are largely driven by the presence of bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), a reservoir host that supports both prolific sporulation in the winter wet season and survival during the summer dry season. In order to better understand how over-summer survival of the pathogen contributes to variability in the severity of annual epidemics, we monitored the viability of P. ramorum leaf infections over three years along with coincident microclimate. The proportion of symptomatic bay laurel leaves that contained viable infections decreased during the first summer dry season and remained low for the following two years, likely due to the absence of conducive wet season weather during the study period. Over-summer survival of P. ramorum was positively correlated with high percent canopy cover, less negative bay leaf water potential and few days exceeding 30°C but was not significantly different between mixed-evergreen and redwood forest ecosystems. Decreased summer survival of P. ramorum in exposed locations and during unusually hot summers likely contributes to the observed spatiotemporal heterogeneity of P. ramorum epidemics. PMID:25098281

  15. Effects of lipid-analog detergent solubilization on the functionality and lipidic cubic phase mobility of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Morales-Pérez, Claudio L; De La Cruz-Rivera, Pamela C; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2011-10-01

    Over the past three decades, the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been one of the most extensively studied membrane protein systems. However, the effects of detergent solubilization on nAChR stability and function are poorly understood. The use of lipid-analog detergents for nAChR solubilization has been shown to preserve receptor stability and functionality. The present study used lipid-analog detergents from phospholipid-analog and cholesterol-analog detergent families for solubilization and affinity purification of the receptor and probed nAChR ion channel function using planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) and stability using analytical size exclusion chromatography (A-SEC) in the detergent-solubilized state. We also examined receptor mobility on the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) by measuring the nAChR mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments using lipid-analog and non-lipid-analog detergents. Our results show that it is possible to isolate stable and functional nAChRs using lipid-analog detergents, with characteristic ion channel currents in PLBs and minimal aggregation as observed in A-SEC. Furthermore, fractional mobility and diffusion coefficient values observed in FRAP experiments were similar to the values observed for these parameters in the recently LCP-crystallized β(2)-adrenergic receptor. The overall results show that phospholipid-analog detergents with 16 carbon acyl-chains support nAChR stability, functionality and LCP mobility.

  16. Investigation of the subcellular architecture of L7 neurons of Aplysia californica using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) at 7.8 microns

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choong H.; Flint, Jeremy J.; Hansen, Brian; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool which is well-suited to directly resolve cellular structures in ex vivo and in vitro tissues without use of exogenous contrast agents. Recent advances in its capability to visualize mammalian cellular structure in intact tissues have reinvigorated analytical interest in aquatic cell models whose previous findings warrant up-to-date validation of subcellular components. Even if the sensitivity of MRM is less than other microscopic technologies, its strength lies in that it relies on the same image contrast mechanisms as clinical MRI which make it a unique tool for improving our ability to interpret human diagnostic imaging through high resolution studies of well-controlled biological model systems. Here, we investigate the subcellular MR signal characteristics of isolated cells of Aplysia californica at an in-plane resolution of 7.8 μm. In addition, direct correlation and positive identification of subcellular architecture in the cells is achieved through well-established histology. We hope this methodology will serve as the groundwork for studying pathophysiological changes through perturbation studies and allow for development of disease-specific cellular modeling tools. Such an approach promises to reveal the MR contrast changes underlying cellular mechanisms in various human diseases, for example in ischemic stroke. PMID:26059695

  17. Investigation of the subcellular architecture of L7 neurons of Aplysia californica using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) at 7.8 microns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong H; Flint, Jeremy J; Hansen, Brian; Blackband, Stephen J

    2015-06-10

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool which is well-suited to directly resolve cellular structures in ex vivo and in vitro tissues without use of exogenous contrast agents. Recent advances in its capability to visualize mammalian cellular structure in intact tissues have reinvigorated analytical interest in aquatic cell models whose previous findings warrant up-to-date validation of subcellular components. Even if the sensitivity of MRM is less than other microscopic technologies, its strength lies in that it relies on the same image contrast mechanisms as clinical MRI which make it a unique tool for improving our ability to interpret human diagnostic imaging through high resolution studies of well-controlled biological model systems. Here, we investigate the subcellular MR signal characteristics of isolated cells of Aplysia californica at an in-plane resolution of 7.8 μm. In addition, direct correlation and positive identification of subcellular architecture in the cells is achieved through well-established histology. We hope this methodology will serve as the groundwork for studying pathophysiological changes through perturbation studies and allow for development of disease-specific cellular modeling tools. Such an approach promises to reveal the MR contrast changes underlying cellular mechanisms in various human diseases, for example in ischemic stroke.

  18. Single-cell lipidomics: characterizing and imaging lipids on the surface of individual Aplysia californica neurons with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, Melissa K; Ewing, Andrew G; Winograd, Nicholas

    2013-02-19

    Neurons isolated from Aplysia californica , an organism with a well-defined neural network, were imaged with secondary ion mass spectrometry, C(60)-SIMS. A major lipid component of the neuronal membrane was identified as 1-hexadecyl-2-octadecenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [PC(16:0e/18:1)] using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The assignment was made directly off the sample surface using a C(60)-QSTAR instrument, a prototype instrument that combines an ion source with a commercial electrospray ionization/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (ESI/MALDI) mass spectrometer. Normal phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (NP-LC-MS) was used to confirm the assignment. Cholesterol and vitamin E were also identified with in situ tandem MS analyses that were compared to reference spectra obtained from purified compounds. In order to improve sensitivity on the single-cell level, the tandem MS spectrum of vitamin E reference material was used to extract and compile all the vitamin E related peaks from the cell image. The mass spectrometry images reveal heterogeneous distributions of intact lipid species, PC(16:0e/18:1), vitamin E, and cholesterol on the surface of a single neuron. The ability to detect these molecules and determine their relative distribution on the single-cell level shows that the C(60)-QSTAR is a potential platform for studying important biochemical processes, such as neuron degeneration.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of carbonic anhydrase and urease in calcium carbonate formation in the gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Harrison, J. L.; Campbell, J. W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms that could modulate the formation of otoconia, calcium carbonate granules in the inner ear of vertebrate species, we examined statoconia formation in the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica using an in vitro organ culture model. We determined the type of calcium carbonate present in the statoconia and investigated the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease in regulating statocyst pH as well as the role of protein synthesis and urease in statoconia production and homeostasis in vitro. The type of mineral present in statoconia was found to be aragonitic calcium carbonate. When the CA inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZ), was added to cultures of statocysts, the pH initially (30 min) increased and then decreased. The urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), decreased statocyst pH. Simultaneous addition of AZ and AHA caused a decrease in pH. Inhibition of urease activity also reduced total statoconia number, but had no effect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of protein synthesis reduced statoconia production and increased statoconia volume. In a previous study, inhibition of CA was shown to decrease statoconia production. Taken together, these data show that urease and CA play a role in regulating statocyst pH and the formation and maintenance of statoconia. CA produces carbonate ion for calcium carbonate formation and urease neutralizes the acid formed due to CA action, by production of ammonia.

  20. Identification of potent bactericidal compounds produced by escapin, an L-amino acid oxidase in the ink of the sea hare Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ko-Chun; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C; Derby, Charles D

    2008-12-01

    The ink of sea hares (Aplysia californica) contains escapin, an L-amino acid oxidase that metabolizes L-lysine, thereby producing a mixture that kills microbes and deters attacking predators. This secretion contains H2O2,ammonia, and an equilibrium mixture of "escapin intermediate product" (EIP-K) that includes alpha-keto-epsilon-aminocaproic acid and several other molecules. Components of the equilibrium mixture react nonenzymatically with H2O2 to form "escapin end product" (EEP-K), which contains delta-aminovaleric acid and delta-valerolactam. The proportions of the molecules in this equilibrium mixture change with pH, and this is biologically important because the secretion is pH 5 when released but becomes pH 8 when fully diluted in seawater. The goal of the current study was to identify which molecules in this equilibrium mixture are bactericidal. We show that a mixture of H2O2 and EIP-K, but not EEP-K, at low mM concentrations is synergistically responsible for most of the bactericidal activity of the secretion against Escherichia coli, Vibrio harveyi, Staphylococcus aureus,and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Low pH enhances the bactericidal effect, and this does not result from stress associated with low pH itself. Sequential exposure to low mM concentrations of EIP-K and H2O2, in either order, does not kill E. coli. Reaction products formed when L-arginine is substituted for L-lysine have almost no bactericidal activity. Our results favor the idea that the bactericidal activity is due to unstable intermediates of the reaction of alpha-keto-epsilon-aminocaproic acid with H2O2.

  1. Cloning, characterization and expression of escapin, a broadly antimicrobial FAD-containing L-amino acid oxidase from ink of the sea hare Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiuchin; Johnson, Paul Micah; Ko, Ko-Chun; Kamio, Michiya; Germann, Markus W; Derby, Charles D; Tai, Phang C

    2005-09-01

    A 60 kDa monomeric protein isolated from the defensive purple ink secretion of the sea hare Aplysia californica was cloned and sequenced, and is the first sea hare antimicrobial protein to be functionally expressed in E. coli. Sequence analysis suggested that this protein is a flavin-containing l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), with one predicted potential glycosylation site, although the glycosylation could not be experimentally confirmed. This protein, which we call ;escapin', has high sequence similarity to several other gastropod proteins. Escapin was verified by NMR, mass spectroscopy and HPLC to have FAD as its flavin cofactor. Escapin's antimicrobial effects, bacteriostasis and bactericidal, were determined using a combination of two assays: (1) incubation of bacteria on solid media followed by assessment of inhibition by direct observation of zones of inhibition or by turbidity measurements; and (2) incubation of bacteria in liquid media followed by counting viable colonies after growing on agar plates. Native escapin inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including marine bacteria (Vibrio harveyii and Staphylococcus aureus) and pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Escapin also inhibited the growth of yeast and fungi, with different efficacies. Escapin's antimicrobial activity was concentration dependent and did not decrease when stored for more than 5 months at room temperature. Escapin was bacteriostatic and not bactericidal in minimal media (e.g. salt media) with glucose, yeast extract, and a mixture of 20 amino acids each at 50 micromol l(-1), but was bactericidal in media enriched with Tryptone Peptone. Escapin was also strongly bactericidal in media with l-lysine at concentrations as low as 3 mmol l(-1) and slightly bactericidal in 50 mmol l(-1) l-arginine, but not in most other amino acids even at 50 mmol l(-1). Escapin had high oxidase activity (producing hydrogen

  2. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the CNS of Aplysia californica: biochemical characterization and link to cGMP pathways.

    PubMed

    Bodnárová, Michaela; Martásek, Pavel; Moroz, Leonid L

    2005-04-01

    We characterized enzymatic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica, a popular experimental model in cellular and system neuroscience, and provided biochemical evidence for NO-cGMP signaling in molluscs. Aplysia NOS (ApNOS) activity, determined as citrulline formation, revealed its calcium-/calmodulin-(Ca/CaM) and NADPH dependence and it was inhibited by 50% with 5mM of W7 hydrochloride (a potent Ca/CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase inhibitor). A representative set of inhibitors for mammalian NOS isoforms also suppressed NOS activity in Aplysia. Specifically, the ApNOS was inhibited by 65-92% with 500 microM of L-NAME (a competitive NOS inhibitor) whereas d-NAME at the same concentration had no effect. S-Ethylisothiourea hydrobromide (5mM), a selective inhibitor of all NOS isoforms, suppressed ApNOS by 85%, l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine dihydrochloride (L-NIL, 5mM), an iNOS inhibitor, by 78% and L-thiocitrulline (5mM) (an inhibitor of nNOS and iNOS) by greater than 95%. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat nNOS hybridized with a putative purified ApNOS (160 kDa protein) from partially purified central nervous system homogenates in Western blot studies. Consistent with other studies, the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase was stimulated as a result of NO interaction with its heme prosthetic group. The basal levels of cGMP were estimated by radioimmunoassay to be 44.47 fmol/microg of protein. Incubation of Aplysia CNS with the NO donors DEA/NONOate (diethylammonium (Z)-1-(N,N-diethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate - 1mM) or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (1mM) and simultaneous phosphodiesterase inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1mM) prior to the assay showed a 26-80 fold increase in basal cGMP levels. Addition of ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one - 1mM), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely abolished this effect. This confirms that NO may indeed function as a

  3. Application of an integrated LC-UV-MS-NMR platform to the identification of secondary metabolites from cell cultures: benzophenanthridine alkaloids from elicited Eschscholzia californica (california poppy) cell cultures().

    PubMed

    Gathungu, Rose M; Oldham, John T; Bird, Susan S; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T; Vouros, Paul; Kautz, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue cultures are a scalable and controllable alternative to whole plants for obtaining natural products of medical relevance. Cultures can be optimized for high yields of desired metabolites using rapid profiling assays such as HPLC. We describe an approach to establishing a rapid assay for profiling cell culture expression systems using a novel microscale LC-UV-MS-NMR platform, designed to acquire both MS and NMR each at their optimal sensitivity, by using nanosplitter MS from 4 mm analytical HPLC columns, and offline microdroplet NMR. The approach is demonstrated in the analysis of elicited Eschscholzia californica cell cultures induced with purified yeast extract to produce benzophenanthridine alkaloids. Preliminary HPLC-UV provides an overview of the changes in the production of alkaloids with time after elicitation. At the time point corresponding to the production of the most alkaloids, the integrated LC-MS-microcoil NMR platform is used for structural identification of extracted alkaloids. Eight benzophenanthridine alkaloids were identified at the sub-microgram level. This paper demonstrates the utility of the nanosplitter LC-MS/microdroplet NMR platform when establishing cell culture expression systems.

  4. The seirena B Class Floral Homeotic Mutant of California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) Reveals a Function of the Enigmatic PI Motif in the Formation of Specific Multimeric MADS Domain Protein Complexes[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Orashakova, Svetlana; Lange, Sabrina; Melzer, Rainer; Theißen, Günter; Smyth, David R.; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The products of B class floral homeotic genes specify petal and stamen identity, and loss of B function results in homeotic conversions of petals into sepals and stamens into carpels. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of seirena-1 (sei-1), a mutant from the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) that shows homeotic changes characteristic of floral homeotic B class mutants. SEI has been previously described as EScaGLO, one of four B class–related MADS box genes in California poppy. The C terminus of SEI, including the highly conserved PI motif, is truncated in sei-1 proteins. Nevertheless, like the wild-type SEI protein, the sei-1 mutant protein is able to bind CArG-boxes and can form homodimers, heterodimers, and several higher order complexes with other MADS domain proteins. However, unlike the wild type, the mutant protein is not able to mediate higher order complexes consisting of specific B, C, and putative E class related proteins likely involved in specifying stamen identity. Within the PI motif, five highly conserved N-terminal amino acids are specifically required for this interaction. Several families lack this short conserved sequence, including the Brassicaceae, and we propose an evolutionary scenario to explain these functional differences. PMID:23444328

  5. Efficacy of Three Vaccines in Protecting Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) from Experimental Infection with West Nile Virus: Implications for Vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis)

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Langevin, Stanley; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D.; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The devastating effect of West Nile virus (WNV) on the avifauna of North America has led zoo managers and conservationists to attempt to protect vulnerable species through vaccination. The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) is one such species, being a corvid with a highly restricted insular range. Herein, we used congeneric Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test the efficacy of three WNV vaccines in protecting jays from an experimental challenge with WNV: (1) the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator® DNA equine vaccine, (2) an experimental DNA plasmid vaccine, pCBWN, and (3) the Merial Recombitek® equine vaccine. Vaccine efficacy after challenge was compared with naïve and nonvaccinated positive controls and a group of naturally immune jays. Overall, vaccination lowered peak viremia compared with nonvaccinated positive controls, but some WNV-related pathology persisted and the viremia was sufficient to possibly infect susceptible vector mosquitoes. The Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA equine vaccine and the pCBWN vaccine provided humoral immune priming and limited side effects. Five of the six birds vaccinated with the Merial Recombitek vaccine, including a vaccinated, non-WNV challenged control, developed extensive necrotic lesions in the pectoral muscle at the vaccine inoculation sites, which were attributed to the Merial vaccine. In light of the well-documented devastating effects of high morbidity and mortality associated with WNV infection in corvids, vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays with either the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA vaccine or the pCBWN vaccine may increase the numbers of birds that would survive an epizootic should WNV become established on Santa Cruz Island. PMID:21438693

  6. Repeat sequences from complex ds DNA viruses can be used as minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A M; Buchanan, F C; Fraser, K M; Robinson, A J; Hill, D F

    1991-01-01

    In a search for new fingerprinting probes for use with sheep, repeat sequences derived from five poxviruses, an iridovirus and a baculovirus were screened against DNA from sheep pedigrees. Probes constructed from portions of the parapox viruses, orf virus and papular stomatitis virus and the baculovirus from the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica, nuclear polyhedrosis virus all gave fingerprint patterns. Probes from three other poxviruses and an iridovirus did not give useful banding patterns.

  7. The occlusion-derived virus envelope protein ODV-E56 is required for optimal oral infectivity but is not essential for virus binding and fusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) odv-e56 gene encodes an occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-specific envelope protein, ODV-E56. To determine the role of ODV-E56 in oral infectivity, we produced recombinant EGFP-expressing AcMNPV clones (Ac69GFP-e56lacZ and AcIEGFP-e56lac...

  8. Mechanisms of action of escapin, a bactericidal agent in the ink secretion of the sea hare Aplysia californica: rapid and long-lasting DNA condensation and involvement of the OxyR-regulated oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ko-Chun; Tai, Phang C; Derby, Charles D

    2012-04-01

    The marine snail Aplysia californica produces escapin, an L-amino acid oxidase, in its defensive ink. Escapin uses L-lysine to produce diverse products called escapin intermediate products of L-lysine (EIP-K), including α-amino-ε-caproic acid, Δ¹-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid, and Δ²-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid. EIP-K and H₂O₂ together, but neither alone, is a powerful bactericide. Here, we report bactericidal mechanisms of escapin products on Escherichia coli. We show that EIP-K and H₂O₂ together cause rapid and long-lasting DNA condensation: 2-min treatment causes significant DNA condensation and killing, and 10-min treatment causes maximal effect, lasting at least 70 h. We isolated two mutants resistant to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, both having a single missense mutation in the oxidation regulatory gene, oxyR. A complementation assay showed that the mutated gene, oxyR(A233V), renders resistance to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, and a gene dosage effect leads to reduction of resistance for strains carrying wild-type oxyR. Temperature stress with EIP-K does not produce the bactericidal effect, suggesting the effect is due to a specific response to oxidative stress. The null mutant for any single DNA-binding protein--Dps, H-NS, Hup, Him, or MukB--was not resistant to EIP-K plus H₂O₂, suggesting that no single DNA-binding protein is necessary to mediate this bactericidal effect, but allowing for the possibility that EIP-K plus H₂O₂ could function through a combination of DNA-binding proteins. The bactericidal effect of EIP-K plus H₂O₂ was eliminated by the ferrous ion chelator 1,10-phenanthroline, and it was reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavenger thiourea, suggesting hydroxyl radicals mediate the effects of EIP-K plus H₂O₂.

  9. The chemistry of escapin: identification and quantification of the components in the complex mixture generated by an L-amino acid oxidase in the defensive secretion of the sea snail Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Michiya; Ko, Ko-Chun; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Binghe; Collins, Stacy L; Gadda, Giovanni; Tai, Phang C; Derby, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Escapin is an L-amino acid oxidase in the ink of a marine snail, the sea hare Aplysia californica, which oxidizes L-lysine (1) to produce a mixture of chemicals which is antipredatory and antimicrobial. The goal of our study was to determine the identity and relative abundance of the constituents of this mixture, using molecules generated enzymatically with escapin and also using products of organic syntheses. We examined this mixture under the natural range of pH values for ink-from approximately 5 at full strength to approximately 8 when fully diluted in sea water. The enzymatic reaction likely forms an equilibrium mixture containing the linear form alpha-keto-epsilon-aminocaproic acid (2), the cyclic imine Delta(1)-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid (3), the cyclic enamine Delta(2)-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid (4), possibly the linear enol 6-amino-2-hydroxy-hex-2-enoic acid (7), the alpha-dihydroxy acid 6-amino-2,2-dihydroxy-hexanoic acid (8), and the cyclic aminol 2-hydroxy-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid (9). Using NMR and mass spectroscopy, we show that 3 is the major component of this enzymatic product at any pH, but at more basic conditions, the equilibrium shifts to produce relatively more 4, and at acidic conditions, the equilibrium shifts to produce relatively more 2, 7, and/or 9. Studies of escapin's enzyme kinetics demonstrate that because of the high concentrations of escapin and L-lysine in the ink secretion, millimolar concentrations of 3, H(2)O(2), and ammonia are produced, and also lower concentrations of 2, 4, 7, and 9 as a result. We also show that reactions of this mixture with H(2)O(2) produce delta-aminovaleric acid (5) and delta-valerolactam (6), with 6 being the dominant component under the naturally acidic conditions of ink. Thus, the product of escapin's action on L-lysine contains an equilibrium mixture that is more complex than previously known for any L-amino acid oxidase.

  10. Baculovirus-mediated interferon alleviates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver cirrhosis symptoms in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Y; Kaneko, H; Suzuki, H; Abe, T; Matsuura, Y; Takaku, H

    2008-07-01

    The wild-type baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) infects a range of mammalian cell types in vitro but does not replicate in these cells. The current study investigated the in vivo effect of AcMNPV in the mouse model of liver cirrhosis induced by the mutagen dimethylnitrosamine. Intraperitoneal injection of AcMNPV induced an immune response. The baculovirus was taken up by the liver and spleen where it suppressed liver injury and fibrosis through the induction of interferons. This study presents the first evidence of the feasibility of using baculovirus to treat liver cirrhosis.

  11. Overexpression of Bm65 correlates with reduced susceptibility to inactivation by UV light.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Yanhua; Wu, Huiling; Qiu, Lipeng; Chen, Keping; Li, Guohui

    2015-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the factors that causes baculovirus inactivation. However, little is known about the response of baculoviruses to UV light. In the present study, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf 65 (Bm65), the homolog of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus orf 79 (Ac79), a predicted endonuclease, was analyzed. Preliminary results indicated that Bm65 mainly accumulated within the nucleus and could improve the survival rate of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and BmNPV BVs after UV radiation, suggesting that Bm65 was involved in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  12. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  13. Expression from baculovirus and serological reactivity of the nucleocapsid protein of dolphin morbillivirus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rebecca J; Kelley, Karen L; Maruniak, James E; Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Barrett, Tom; Manire, Charles A; Romero, Carlos H

    2010-07-14

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was expressed from a baculovirus (Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus) vector and shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis to be about 57 kDa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fully assembled nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) exhibiting the typical helical herringbone morphology. These NLPs were approximately 20-22 nm in diameter and varied in length from 50 to 100 nm. Purified DMV-N protein was used as antigen in an indirect ELISA (iELISA) and shown to react with rabbit and human antisera to measles virus (MV) and dog sera with antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV). The iELISA was used for the demonstration of morbillivirus antibodies in the serum of cetaceans and manatees, showing potential as a serological tool for the mass screening of morbillivirus antibodies in marine mammals.

  14. Aggregation of AcMNPV LEF-10 and Its Impact on Viral Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Xinyu; Nan, Hao; Zhao, Yu; Bai, Yu; Ou, Yanmei; Chen, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) late expression factor gene lef-10 has been identified to be required for viral late gene expression by transient expression assay. Our previous work has shown that the gene product LEF-10 can form very stable high-molecular-weight complexes, but the structure and function of the protein remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that LEF-10 was essential for the replication of AcMNPV, and its truncated fragment containing amino acid residues 1 to 48 were sufficient to support the virus survival. Our data also suggested that the LEF-10 could spontaneously aggregate to form punctate spots in virus infected Sf9 cells at low frequency, and the aggregation of the protein could be induced by LEF-10 over-expression. When the protein aggregated to form punctate spots, soluble LEF-10 proteins were depleted and this could result in the down-regulation of viral late gene expression. PMID:27152613

  15. Host cell processes to accomplish mechanical and non-circulative virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Irons, Sarah L; Martinière, Alexandre; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical vector-less transmission of viruses, as well as vector-mediated non-circulative virus transmission, where the virus attaches only to the exterior of the vector during the passage to a new host, are apparently simple processes: the viruses are carried along with the wind, the food or by the vector to a new host. We discuss here, using the examples of the non-circulatively transmitted Cauliflower mosaic virus that binds to its aphid vector's exterior mouthparts, and that of the mechanically (during feeding activity) transmitted Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus, that transmission of these viruses is not so simple as previously thought. Rather, these viruses prepare their transmission carefully and long before the actual acquisition event. Host-virus interactions play a pivotal and specialised role in the future encounter with the vector or the new host. This ensures optimal propagation and enlarges the tremendous bottleneck transmission presents for viruses and other pathogens.

  16. The method used to culture host cells (Sf9 cells) can affect the qualities of baculovirus budding particles expressing recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Kohei; Mori, Takaaki; Tomita, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Budded virus (BV) particles of baculovirus (Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcNPV) are harvested from the supernatant of liquid culture of Sf9 host cells by ultracentrifugation. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of BV samples fractionated closely by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, we observed that BVs exhibited different qualities depending on whether they had been harvested from the supernatant from a standing (static), shaking (suspension), or standing/shaking (pre-/post-infection) culture of Sf9 cells. The amount of BV protein apparently increased in the order of standing, standing/shaking, and shaking procedure, and the yield of intact particles showed an opposite trend. TEM observation clearly showed that appropriate fractions of the standing and standing/shaking cultures contained more intact BV particles than those from the shaking culture. These results suggest that the qualities of recombinant BV particles may be related to the culture conditions of the host cells.

  17. Functional expression of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Reiländer, H; Haase, W; Maul, G

    1996-02-06

    A DNA fragment encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was isolated via PCR from a jellyfish Aequorea victoria cDNA, cloned and sequenced. Subsequently, a recombinant baculovirus bearing the coding region of the GFP under the transcriptional control of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) polyhedrin gene promoter was constructed and isolated. High-level expression of GFP could be easily monitored in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells after infection with recombinant baculovirus, due to the intrinsic fluorescence (lambda(max) = 508 nm) of the recombinant protein after excitation with blue light (lambda(max) = 400 nm). The functional recombinant GFP displayed an apparent molecular mass of approximately 43 kDa and the fluorescence emission spectrum of the recombinant protein was virtually identical to that of the native green fluorescent protein.

  18. Production of human beta interferon in insect cells infected with a Baculovirus expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.E.; Summers, M.D.; Fraser, M.J.

    1983-12-01

    Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was used as an expression vector for human beta interferon. By using specially constructed plasmids, the protein-coding sequences for interferon were linked to the AcNPV promoter for the gene encoding for polyhedrin, the major occlusion protein. The interferon gene was inserted at various locations relative to the AcNPV polyhedrin transcriptional and translational signals, and the interferon-polyhedrin hybrid genes were transferred to infectious AcNPV expression vectors. Biologically active interferon was produced, and greater than 95% was secreted from infected insect cells. A maximum of ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ U of interferon activity was produced by 10/sup 6/ infected cells. These results demonstrate that AcNPV should be suitable for use as a eucaryotic expression vector for the production of products from cloned genes.

  19. Hyperactivity and tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus AcMNPV in Spodoptera exigua larvae are governed by independent mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houte, Stineke; Ros, Vera I. D.; van Oers, Monique M.

    2014-04-01

    Although many parasites are known to manipulate the behavior of their hosts, the mechanisms underlying such manipulations are largely unknown. Baculoviruses manipulate the behavior of caterpillar hosts by inducing hyperactivity and by inducing climbing behavior leading to death at elevated positions (tree-top disease or Wipfelkrankheit). Whether hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independent manipulative strategies of the virus is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated the involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase ( ptp) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in the induction of hyperactivity in Spodoptera exigua larvae. Here we show that AcMNPV ptp is not required for tree-top disease, indicating that in S. exigua baculovirus-induced hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independently induced behaviors that are governed by distinct mechanisms.

  20. AcMNPV ac143 (odv-e18) is essential for mediating budded virus production and is the 30th baculovirus core gene.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Theilmann, David A

    2008-05-25

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac143 (odv-e18) is a late gene that encodes for a predicted 9.6 kDa structural protein that locates to the occlusion derived viral envelope and viral induced intranuclear microvesicles [Braunagel, S.C., He, H., Ramamurthy, P., and Summers, M.D. (1996). Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27. Virology 222, 100-114.]. In this study we demonstrate that ac143 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To examine the role of ac143 in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac143 knockout (KO) virus (AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO)). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that infection by AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) is limited to a single cell and titration assays confirmed that AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) was unable to produce budded virus (BV). Progression to very late phases of the viral infection was evidenced by the development of occlusion bodies in the nuclei of transfected cells. This correlated with the fact that viral DNA replication was unaffected in AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) transfected cells. The entire ac143 promoter, which includes three late promoter motifs, is contained within the ac142 open reading frame. Different deletion mutants of this region showed that the integrity of the ac142-ac143 core gene cluster was required for the bacmids to display wild-type patterns of viral replication, BV production and RNA transcription.

  1. AcMNPV ac143 (odv-e18) is essential for mediating budded virus production and is the 30th baculovirus core gene

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-05-25

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac143 (odv-e18) is a late gene that encodes for a predicted 9.6 kDa structural protein that locates to the occlusion derived viral envelope and viral induced intranuclear microvesicles [Braunagel, S.C., He, H., Ramamurthy, P., and Summers, M.D. (1996). Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27. Virology 222, 100-114.]. In this study we demonstrate that ac143 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To examine the role of ac143 in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac143 knockout (KO) virus (AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO}). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that infection by AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} is limited to a single cell and titration assays confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} was unable to produce budded virus (BV). Progression to very late phases of the viral infection was evidenced by the development of occlusion bodies in the nuclei of transfected cells. This correlated with the fact that viral DNA replication was unaffected in AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} transfected cells. The entire ac143 promoter, which includes three late promoter motifs, is contained within the ac142 open reading frame. Different deletion mutants of this region showed that the integrity of the ac142-ac143 core gene cluster was required for the bacmids to display wild-type patterns of viral replication, BV production and RNA transcription.

  2. Efficient perturbation analysis of elastic network models - Application to acetylcholinesterase of T. californica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, K.

    2010-09-01

    Elastic network models in their different flavors have become useful models for the dynamics and functions of biomolecular systems such as proteins and their complexes. Perturbation to the interactions occur due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We discuss how a naive approach to compute properties for a large number of perturbed structures and interactions by repeated diagonalization can be replaced with an identity found in linear algebra. We argue about the computational complexity and discuss the advantages of the protocol. We apply the proposed algorithm to the acetylcholinesterase, a well-known enzyme in neurobiology, and show how one can gain insight into the "breathing dynamics" of a structural funnel necessary for the function of the protein. The computational speed-up was a 60-fold increase in this example.

  3. Habituation in the Tail Withdrawal Reflex Circuit is Impaired During Aging in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kempsell, Andrew T; Fieber, Lynne A

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of putative contributors to age-related memory loss are poorly understood. The tail withdrawal circuit of the sea hare, a straightforward neural model, was used to investigate the aging characteristics of rudimentary learning. The simplicity of this neuronal circuit permits attribution of declines in the function of specific neurons to aging declines. Memory was impaired in advanced age animals compared to their performance at the peak of sexual maturity, with habituation training failing to attenuate the tail withdrawal response or to reduce tail motoneuron excitability, as occurred in peak maturity siblings. Baseline motoneuron excitability of aged animals was significantly lower, perhaps contributing to a smaller scope for attenuation. Conduction velocity in afferent fibers to tail sensory neurons (SN) decreased during aging. The findings suggest that age-related changes in tail sensory and motor neurons result in deterioration of a simple form of learning in Aplysia.

  4. Functional magnetic resonance microscopy at single-cell resolution in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Guillaume; Nargeot, Romuald; Jelescu, Ileana Ozana; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we show the feasibility of performing functional MRI studies with single-cell resolution. At ultrahigh magnetic field, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy allows the identification of most motor neurons in the buccal network of Aplysia at low, nontoxic Mn2+ concentrations. We establish that Mn2+ accumulates intracellularly on injection into the living Aplysia and that its concentration increases when the animals are presented with a sensory stimulus. We also show that we can distinguish between neuronal activities elicited by different types of stimuli. This method opens up a new avenue into probing the functional organization and plasticity of neuronal networks involved in goal-directed behaviors with single-cell resolution. PMID:24872449

  5. Connecting Model Species to Nature: Predator-Induced Long-Term Sensitization in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Maria J.; Watkins, Amanda J.; Wakabayashi, Jordann; Buechler, Jennifer; Pepino, Christine; Brown, Michelle; Wright, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on sensitization in "Aplysia" was based entirely on unnatural noxious stimuli, usually electric shock, until our laboratory found that a natural noxious stimulus, a single sublethal lobster attack, causes short-term sensitization. We here extend that finding by demonstrating that multiple lobster attacks induce…

  6. Transcriptional Analysis of a Whole-Body Form of Long-Term Habituation in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Geraldine; Herdegen, Samantha; Schuon, Jonathan; Cyriac, Ashly; Lass, Jamie; Conte, Catherine; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Habituation is the simplest form of learning, but we know little about the transcriptional mechanisms that encode long-term habituation memory. A key obstacle is that habituation is relatively stimulus-specific and is thus encoded in small sets of neurons, providing poor signal/noise ratios for transcriptional analysis. To overcome this obstacle,…

  7. Consequences and mechanisms of spike broadening of R20 cells in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Ma, M; Koester, J

    1995-10-01

    We studied frequency-dependent spike broadening in the two electrically coupled R20 neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia. The peptidergic R20 cells excite the R25/L25 interneurons (which trigger respiratory pumping) and inhibit the RB cells. When fired at 1-10 Hz, the duration of the falling phase of the action potential in R20 neurons increases 2-10 fold during a spike train. Spike broadening recorded from the somata of the R20 cells affected synaptic transmission to nearby follower cells. Chemically mediated synaptic output was reduced by approximately 50% when recorded trains of nonbroadened action potentials were used as command signals for a voltage-clamped R20 cell. Electrotonic EPSPs between the R20 cells, which normally facilitated by two- to fourfold during a high frequency spike train, showed no facilitation when spike broadening was prevented under voltage-clamp control. To examine the mechanism of frequency-dependent spike broadening, we applied two-electrode voltage-clamp and pharmacological techniques to the somata of R20 cells. Several voltage-gated ionic currents were isolated, including INa, a multicomponent ICa, and three K+ currents--a high threshold, fast transient A-type K+ current (IAdepol), a delayed rectifier K+ current (IK-V), and a Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ current (IK-Ca), made up of two components. The influences of different currents on spike broadening were determined by using the recorded train of gradually broadening action potentials as the command for the voltage clamp. We found the following. (1) IAdepol is the major outward current that contributes to repolarization of nonbroadened spikes. It undergoes pronounced cumulative inactivation that is a critical determinant of spike broadening. (2) Activity-dependent changes in IK-V, IK-Ca, and ICa have complex effects on the kinetics and extent of broadening. (3) The time integral of ICa during individual action potentials increases approximately threefold during spike broadening.

  8. Circadian Rhythm of Neuron R15 of Aplysia californica: In Vivo Photoentrainment.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Strumwasser, F

    1975-06-01

    (1) The neuron R15 in the parietovisceral ganglion of Aplysia has a circadian rhythm of spiking activity when recorded in the isolated ganglion. The rhythm is entrained in vivo by light-dark cycles. (2) The phase of the R15 rhythm is a function not only of the entraining light schedule, but also of the time of dissection. Changes in the dissection time during the light portion of the light-dark cycle yield little change in the subsequent R15 peak time. Dissections during the dark portion produce peak times that vary with dissection time with a slope that is approximately one. (3) The circadian rhythm of R15 can be phase-shifted in vivo by changes in the phase of the entraining light-dark cycle in one to two weeks. R15 neurons of blinded Aplysia, however, show little or no phase shift in this time. (4) It is concluded that the eyes are important as receptors for the photoentrainment of the R15 rhythm in vivo, but that neural connections from the eyes to R15 are not required.

  9. Circadian Rhythm of Neuron R15 of Aplysia californica: In Vivo Photoentrainment

    PubMed Central

    Audesirk, Gerald; Strumwasser, Felix

    1975-01-01

    (1) The neuron R15 in the parietovisceral ganglion of Aplysia has a circadian rhythm of spiking activity when recorded in the isolated ganglion. The rhythm is entrained in vivo by light-dark cycles. (2) The phase of the R15 rhythm is a function not only of the entraining light schedule, but also of the time of dissection. Changes in the dissection time during the light portion of the light-dark cycle yield little change in the subsequent R15 peak time. Dissections during the dark portion produce peak times that vary with dissection time with a slope that is approximately one. (3) The circadian rhythm of R15 can be phase-shifted in vivo by changes in the phase of the entraining light-dark cycle in one to two weeks. R15 neurons of blinded Aplysia, however, show little or no phase shift in this time. (4) It is concluded that the eyes are important as receptors for the photoentrainment of the R15 rhythm in vivo, but that neural connections from the eyes to R15 are not required. PMID:16592252

  10. The Influence of Increased Nitrogen Tensions on Properties of Identified Neurons in ’Aplysia Californica’.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Aplysia are unaffected by increases in nitrogen tensions to 10 atmospheres absolute. Since no significantly large or consistent alteration occurred in...are stable and well controlled in these neurons to this degree of pressure. The fact that Aplysia is considered an intertidal animal that has not

  11. Connecting model species to nature: predator-induced long-term sensitization in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Mason, Maria J; Watkins, Amanda J; Wakabayashi, Jordann; Buechler, Jennifer; Pepino, Christine; Brown, Michelle; Wright, William G

    2014-08-01

    Previous research on sensitization in Aplysia was based entirely on unnatural noxious stimuli, usually electric shock, until our laboratory found that a natural noxious stimulus, a single sublethal lobster attack, causes short-term sensitization. We here extend that finding by demonstrating that multiple lobster attacks induce long-term sensitization (≥24 h) as well as similar, although not identical, neuronal correlates as observed after electric shock. Together these findings establish long- and short-term sensitization caused by sublethal predator attack as a natural equivalent to sensitization caused by artificial stimuli.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance microscopy at single-cell resolution in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Radecki, Guillaume; Nargeot, Romuald; Jelescu, Ileana Ozana; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2014-06-10

    In this work, we show the feasibility of performing functional MRI studies with single-cell resolution. At ultrahigh magnetic field, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy allows the identification of most motor neurons in the buccal network of Aplysia at low, nontoxic Mn(2+) concentrations. We establish that Mn(2+) accumulates intracellularly on injection into the living Aplysia and that its concentration increases when the animals are presented with a sensory stimulus. We also show that we can distinguish between neuronal activities elicited by different types of stimuli. This method opens up a new avenue into probing the functional organization and plasticity of neuronal networks involved in goal-directed behaviors with single-cell resolution.

  13. Characterization of glycolipids synthesized in an identified neuron of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Sherbany, A A; Ambron, R T; Schwartz, J H

    1984-07-01

    Because radioactive precursors can be injected directly into the cell body or axon of R2, a giant, identified neuron of the Aplysia abdominal ganglion, it was possible to show that glycolipid is synthesized in the cell body, inserted into membranes along with glycoprotein, and then exported into the axon within organelles that are moved by fast axonal transport. After intrasomatic injection of N-[3H]-acetyl-D-galactosamine, five major 3H-glycolipids were identified using thin layer polysilicic acid glass fiber chromatography. At least two of the lipids are negatively charged. Analysis of 32P-labeled lipid from the abdominal ganglion revealed the presence of 2-aminoethylphosphonate, indicating that these polar substances are sphingophosphonoglycolipids. The major 3H-glycolipids synthesized in R2 are similar to a family of phospholipids isolated from the skin of A. kurodai, previously characterized by Araki et al. (Araki, S., Y. Komai, and M. Satake (1980) Biochem J. 87: 503-510). Since sialic acid is absent in Aplysia as in other invertebrates, these polar glycolipids may function like gangliosides in vertebrates. The polar 3H-glycolipids are synthesized and incorporated into intracytoplasmic membranes solely in the cell body. Direct injection of the labeled sugar into the axon revealed no local synthesis or exchange of glycolipid. Moreover, there was no indication for transfer from glial cells into axoplasm. Although the incorporation of N-[3H]-acetyl-D-galactosamine into glycolipid is not affected by anisomycin, an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis, the export into the axon of membranes containing the newly synthesized lipid is completely blocked by the drug.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Characterization of glycolipids synthesized in an identified neuron of Aplysia californica

    SciTech Connect

    Sherbany, A.A.; Ambron, R.T.; Schwartz, J.H.

    1984-07-01

    Because radioactive precursors can be injected directly into the cell body or axon of R2, a giant, identified neuron of the Aplysia abdominal ganglion, it was possible to show that glycolipid is synthesized in the cell body, inserted into membranes along with glycoprotein, and then exported into the axon within organelles that are moved by fast axonal transport. After intrasomatic injection of N-(/sup 3/H)-acetyl-D-galactosamine, five major /sup 3/H-glycolipids were identified using thin layer polysilicic acid glass fiber chromatography. At least two of the lipids are negatively charged. Analysis of /sup 32/P-labeled lipid from the abdominal ganglion revealed the presence of 2-aminoethylphosphonate, indicating that these polar substances are sphingophosphonoglycolipids. The major /sup 3/H-glycolipids synthesized in R2 are similar to a family of phospholipids isolated from the skin of A. kurodai. Since sialic acid is absent in Aplysia as in other invertebrates, these polar glycolipids may function like gangliosides in vertebrates. The polar /sup 3/H-glycolipids are synthesized and incorporated into intracytoplasmic membranes solely in the cell body. Direct injection of the labeled sugar into the axon revealed no local synthesis or exchange of glycolipid. Moreover, there was no indication for transfer from glial cells into axoplasm. Although the incorporation of N-(/sup 3/H)-acetyl-D-galactosamine into glycolipid is not affected by anisomycin, an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis, the export into the axon of membranes containing the newly synthesized lipid is completely blocked by the drug.

  15. Biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates modeled after the Sandcastle glue of P. californica for craniofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Brent D.; Shao, Hui; Stewart, Russell J.; Tresco, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction would benefit from a degradable adhesive capable of holding bone fragments in three-dimensional alignment and gradually being replaced by new bone without loss of alignment or volume changes. Modeled after a natural adhesive secreted by the sandcastle worm, we studied the biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates in vitro and in vivo with two different rat calvarial models. We found that the adhesive was non-cytotoxic and supported the attachment, spreading, and migration of a commonly used osteoblastic cell line over the course of several days. In animal studies we found that the adhesive was capable of maintaining three-dimensional bone alignment in freely moving rats over a 12 week indwelling period. Histological evidence indicated that the adhesive was gradually resorbed and replaced by new bone that became lamellar across the defect without loss of alignment, changes in volume, or changes in the adjacent uninjured bone. The presence of inflammatory cells was consistent with what has been reported with other craniofacial fixation methods including metal plates, screws, tacks, calcium phosphate cements and cyanoacrylate adhesives. Collectively, the results suggest that the new bioadhesive formulation is degradable, osteoconductive and appears suitable for use in the reconstruction of craniofacial fractures. PMID:20950851

  16. Parallel processing in an identified neural circuit: the Aplysia californica gill-withdrawal response model system.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Janet L; Edstrom, John P

    2004-02-01

    The response of the gill of Aplysia calfornica Cooper to weak to moderate tactile stimulation of the siphon, the gill-withdrawal response or GWR, has been an important model system for work aimed at understanding the relationship between neural plasticity and simple forms of non-associative and associative learning. Interest in the GWR has been based largely on the hypothesis that the response could be explained adequately by parallel monosynaptic reflex arcs between six parietovisceral ganglion (PVG) gill motor neurons (GMNs) and a cluster of sensory neurons termed the LE cluster. This hypothesis, the Kupfermann-Kandel model, made clear, falsifiable predictions that have stimulated experimental work for many years. Here, we review tests of three predictions of the Kupfermann-Kandel model: (1) that the GWR is a simple, reflexive behaviour graded with stimulus intensity; (2) that central nervous system (CNS) pathways are necessary and sufficient for the GWR; and (3) that activity in six identified GMNs is sufficient to account for the GWR. The available data suggest that (1) a variety of action patterns occur in the context of the GWR; (2) the PVG is not necessary and the diffuse peripheral nervous system (PNS) is sufficient to mediate these action patterns; and (3) the role of any individual GMN in the behaviour varies. Both the control of gill-withdrawal responses, and plasticity in these responses, are broadly distributed across both PNS and CNS pathways. The Kupfermann-Kandel model is inconsistent with the available data and therefore stands rejected. There is, no known causal connection or correlation between the observed plasticity at the identified synapses in this system and behavioural changes during non-associative and associative learning paradigms. Critical examination of these well-studied central pathways suggests that they represent a 'wetware' neural network, architecturally similar to the neural network models of the widely used 'Perceptron' and/or 'Back-propagation' type. Such models may offer a more biologically realistic representation of nervous system organisation than has been thought. In this model, the six parallel GMNs of the CNS correspond to a hidden layer within one module of the gill-control system. That is, the gill-control system appears to be organised as a distributed system with several parallel modules, some of which are neural networks in their own right. A new model is presented here which predicts that the six GMNs serve as components of a 'push-pull' gain control system, along with known but largely unidentified inhibitory motor neurons from the PVG. This 'push-pull' gain control system sets the responsiveness of the peripheral gill motor system. Neither causal nor correlational links between specific forms of neural plasticity and behavioural plasticity have been demonstrated in the GWR model system. However, the GWR model system does provide an opportunity to observe and describe directly the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of distributed representation and parallel processing in a largely identifiable 'wetware' neural network.

  17. Characterization of a unique OpMNPV-specific early gene not required for viral infection in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Shippam, C; Wu, X; Stewart, S; Theilmann, D A

    1997-01-20

    opep-2 is an Orgyia pseudotsugata multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV) early gene in the ie1-ie2 gene region for which there is no homolog in either the archetype virus, Autographa californica MNPV, or Bombyx mori NPV. opep-2 is transcribed immediately upon infection as three mRNAs which initiate from a early gene motif (TATA-N27-CAGT). The expression of multiple transcripts at very early times postinfection has only been previously described for the baculovirus early gene ie1, which produces spliced mRNAs. However, distinct from ie1, the multiple mRNAs of opep-2 are due to multiple termination sites and not splicing. Western blot analysis of steady-state levels of OPEP-2 showed that in OpMNPV-infected Ld652Y cells maximum levels are obtained at 8-12 hr postinfection (p.i.) prior to DNA replication. By 48 hr p.i. OPEP-2 is shut off and is undetectable. To aid in elucidating the function of this OpMNPV-specific gene an opep-2 deletion mutant was generated and was compared to wild-type virus to determine if its absence affects viral growth in Ld652Y tissue culture cells.

  18. The conserved baculovirus protein p33 (Ac92) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.M.; Rohrmann, G.F.; Merrill, G.F.

    2009-06-05

    Open reading frame 92 of the Autographa californica baculovirus (Ac92) is one of about 30 core genes present in all sequenced baculovirus genomes. Computer analyses predicted that the Ac92 encoded protein (called p33) and several of its baculovirus orthologs were related to a family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Alignment of these proteins indicated that, although they were highly diverse, a number of amino acids in common with the Erv1p/Alrp family of sulfhydryl oxidases are present. Some of these conserved amino acids are predicted to stack against the isoalloxazine and adenine components of FAD, whereas others are involved in electron transfer. To investigate this relationship, Ac92 was expressed in bacteria as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified, and characterized both spectrophotometrically and for its enzymatic activity. The purified protein was found to have the color (yellow) and absorption spectrum consistent with it being a FAD-containing protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated to have sulfhydryl oxidase activity using dithiothreitol and thioredoxin as substrates.

  19. Complex dynamics of defective interfering baculoviruses during serial passage in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Mark P; Pijlman, Gorben P; Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-03-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses are thought to cause oscillations in virus levels, known as the 'Von Magnus effect'. Interference by DI viruses has been proposed to underlie these dynamics, although experimental tests of this idea have not been forthcoming. For the baculoviruses, insect viruses commonly used for the expression of heterologous proteins in insect cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying DI generation have been investigated. However, the dynamics of baculovirus populations harboring DIs have not been studied in detail. In order to address this issue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to determine the levels of helper and DI viruses during 50 serial passages of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in Sf21 cells. Unexpectedly, the helper and DI viruses changed levels largely in phase, and oscillations were highly irregular, suggesting the presence of chaos. We therefore developed a simple mathematical model of baculovirus-DI dynamics. This theoretical model reproduced patterns qualitatively similar to the experimental data. Although we cannot exclude that experimental variation (noise) plays an important role in generating the observed patterns, the presence of chaos in the model dynamics was confirmed with the computation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, and a Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse route to chaos was identified at decreasing production of DI viruses, using mutation as a control parameter. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of DI baculoviruses, and suggest that changes in virus levels over passages may exhibit chaos.

  20. In vivo analysis of fibroin heavy chain signal peptide of silkworm Bombyx mori using recombinant baculovirus as vector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shengpeng; Guo Tingqing; Guo Xiuyang; Huang Junting; Lu Changde . E-mail: cdlu@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-03-24

    In order to investigate the functional signal peptide of silkworm fibroin heavy chain (FibH) and the effect of N- and C-terminal parts of FibH on the secretion of FibH in vivo, N- and C-terminal segments of fibh gene were fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. The fused gene was then introduced into silkworm larvae and expressed in silk gland using recombinant AcMNPV (Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus) as vector. The fluorescence of EGFP was observed with fluorescence microscope. FibH-EGFP fusion proteins extracted from silk gland were analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that the two alpha helices within N-terminal 163 amino acid residues and the C-terminal 61 amino acid residues were not necessary for cleavage of signal peptide and secretion of the fusion protein into silk gland. Then the C-terminal 61 amino acid residues were substituted with a His-tag in the fusion protein to facilitate the purification. N-terminal sequencing of the purified protein showed that the signal cleavage site is between position 21 and 22 amino acid residues.

  1. Baculovirus VP80 protein and the F-actin cytoskeleton interact and connect the viral replication factory with the nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Marek, Martin; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Galibert, Lionel; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2011-06-01

    Recently, we showed that the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) VP80 protein is essential for the formation of both virion types, budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). Deletion of the vp80 gene did not affect assembly of nucleocapsids. However, these nucleocapsids were not able to migrate from the virogenic stroma to the nuclear periphery. In the current paper, we constructed a baculovirus recombinant with enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged VP80, allowing visualization of the VP80 distribution pattern during infection. In baculovirus-infected cells, the EGFP-VP80 protein is entirely localized in nuclei, adjacent to the virus-triggered F-actin scaffold that forms a highly organized three-dimensional network connecting the virogenic stroma physically with the nuclear envelope. Interaction between VP80 and host actin was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. We further showed that VP80 is associated with the nucleocapsid fraction of both BVs and ODVs, typically at one end of the nucleocapsids. In addition, the presence of sequence motifs with homology to invertebrate paramyosin proteins strongly supports a role for VP80 in the polar transport of nucleocapsids to the periphery of the nucleus on their way to the plasma membrane to form BVs and for assembly in the nuclear periphery to form ODVs for embedding in viral occlusion bodies.

  2. Expression of the Lassa virus nucleocapsid protein in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus: application to diagnostic assays for Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Barber, G N; Clegg, J C; Lloyd, G

    1990-01-01

    The coding region of the gene for the nucleocapsid protein of Lassa virus has been inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) using the transfer vector pAcYM1, so that expression of the foreign DNA is under the control of the promoter of the AcNPV polyhedrin gene. Infection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with recombinant virus resulted in the synthesis of high levels of a protein that was indistinguishable from the authentic Lassa virus protein by SDS gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with a variety of specific immune sera and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The kinetics of appearance of the protein were comparable to those of polyhedrin production in wild-type AcNPV-infected cells. The recombinant material was antigenic when used in ELISA for Lassa virus-specific antibodies, reacting well with MAbs specific for the nucleocapsid protein and with sera from experimentally infected guinea-pigs. The recombinant ELISA was able to clearly distinguish sera from human cases of Lassa fever against a panel of known negative sera of African origin. Recombinant-infected insect cells were an effective substitute for mammalian cells infected with Lassa virus itself in the immunofluorescence assay for Lassa virus-specific antibodies. This system offers attractive alternatives to the use of Lassa virus-infected materials as reagents in diagnostic procedures.

  3. Baculovirus envelope protein ODV-E66 is a novel chondroitinase with distinct substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Nobuo; Setoyama, Yuka; Chiba, Mie; Kimata, Koji; Watanabe, Hideto

    2011-08-19

    Chondroitin sulfate is a linear polysaccharide of alternating D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues with sulfate groups at various positions of the sugars. It interacts with and regulates cytokine and growth factor signal transduction, thus influencing development, organ morphogenesis, inflammation, and infection. We found chondroitinase activity in medium conditioned by baculovirus-infected insect cells and identified a novel chondroitinase. Sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme was a truncated form of occlusion-derived virus envelope protein 66 (ODV-E66) of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus. The enzyme was a novel chondroitin lyase with distinct substrate specificity. The enzyme was active over a wide range of pH (pH 4-9) and temperature (30-60 °C) and was unaffected by divalent metal ions. The ODV-E66 truncated protein digested chondroitin most efficiently followed by chondroitin 6-sulfate. It degraded hyaluronan to a minimal extent but did not degrade dermatan sulfate, heparin, and N-acetylheparosan. Further analysis using chemo-enzymatically synthesized substrates revealed that the enzyme specifically acted on glucuronate residues in non-sulfated and chondroitin 6-sulfate structures but not in chondroitin 4-sulfate structures. These results suggest that this chondroitinase is useful for detailed structural and compositional analysis of chondroitin sulfate, preparation of specific chondroitin oligosaccharides, and study of baculovirus infection mechanism.

  4. Live imaging of baculovirus infection of midgut epithelium cells: a functional assay of per os infectivity factors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jingfang; van Lent, Jan W M; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2014-11-01

    The occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses are responsible for oral infection of insect hosts, whereas budded viruses (BVs) are responsible for systemic infection within the host. The ODV membrane proteins play crucial roles in mediating virus entry into midgut epithelium cells to initiate infection and are important factors in host-range determination. For Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), seven conserved ODV membrane proteins have been shown to be essential for oral infectivity and are called per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Information on the function of the individual PIF proteins in virus entry is limited, partly due to the lack of a good in vitro system for monitoring ODV entry. Here, we constructed a baculovirus with EGFP fused to the nucleocapsid to monitor virus entry into primary midgut epithelium cells ex vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The EGFP-labelled virus showed similar BV virulence and ODV infectivity as WT virus. The ability to bind and enter host cells was then visualized for WT AcMNPV and viruses with mutations in P74 (PIF0), PIF1 or PIF2, showing that P74 is required for ODV binding, whilst PIF1 and PIF2 play important roles in the entry of ODV after binding to midgut cells. This is the first live imaging of ODV entry into midgut cells and complements the genetic and biochemical evidence for the role of PIFs in the oral infection process.

  5. Ultra Deep Sequencing of a Baculovirus Population Reveals Widespread Genomic Variations

    PubMed Central

    Chateigner, Aurélien; Bézier, Annie; Labrousse, Carole; Jiolle, Davy; Barbe, Valérie; Herniou, Elisabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely on widespread genetic variation and large population size for adaptation. Large DNA virus populations are thought to harbor little variation though natural populations may be polymorphic. To measure the genetic variation present in a dsDNA virus population, we deep sequenced a natural strain of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. With 124,221X average genome coverage of our 133,926 bp long consensus, we could detect low frequency mutations (0.025%). K-means clustering was used to classify the mutations in four categories according to their frequency in the population. We found 60 high frequency non-synonymous mutations under balancing selection distributed in all functional classes. These mutants could alter viral adaptation dynamics, either through competitive or synergistic processes. Lastly, we developed a technique for the delimitation of large deletions in next generation sequencing data. We found that large deletions occur along the entire viral genome, with hotspots located in homologous repeat regions (hrs). Present in 25.4% of the genomes, these deletion mutants presumably require functional complementation to complete their infection cycle. They might thus have a large impact on the fitness of the baculovirus population. Altogether, we found a wide breadth of genomic variation in the baculovirus population, suggesting it has high adaptive potential. PMID:26198241

  6. A novel baculovirus-derived promoter with high activity in the baculovirus expression system

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Solís, María; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Escribano, José M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.

    2016-01-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) has been widely used to produce a large number of recombinant proteins, and is becoming one of the most powerful, robust, and cost-effective systems for the production of eukaryotic proteins. Nevertheless, as in any other protein expression system, it is important to improve the production capabilities of this vector. The orf46 viral gene was identified among the most highly abundant sequences in the transcriptome of Spodoptera exigua larvae infected with its native baculovirus, the S. exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). Different sequences upstream of the orf46 gene were cloned, and their promoter activities were tested by the expression of the GFP reporter gene using the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) vector system in different insect cell lines (Sf21, Se301, and Hi5) and in larvae from S. exigua and Trichoplusia ni. The strongest promoter activity was defined by a 120 nt sequence upstream of the ATG start codon for the orf46 gene. On average, GFP expression under this new promoter was more than two fold higher than the expression obtained with the standard polyhedrin (polh) promoter. Additionally, the orf46 promoter was also tested in combination with the polh promoter, revealing an additive effect over the polh promoter activity. In conclusion, this new characterized promoter represents an excellent alternative to the most commonly used baculovirus promoters for the efficient expression of recombinant proteins using the BEVS. PMID:27375973

  7. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yanjie; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc(P48-REP-PH-GFP) was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc(PH-GFP). Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  8. Open reading frame 94 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel conserved occlusion-derived virion protein, ODV-EC43.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minggang; Wang, Hanzhong; Wang, Hualin; Yuan, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; Hu, Zhihong

    2003-11-01

    Open reading frame 94 (Ha94) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) is 1086 bp long and a homologue of Autographa californica multiple NPV ORF109. The gene is conserved among all baculoviruses whose genomes have been completely sequenced so far and is thus considered a baculovirus core gene. Ha94 transcripts were detected from 24 to 96 h post-infection (p.i.) of HzAM1 cells with HaSNPV. Polyclonal antiserum raised to a GST-HA94 fusion protein recognized a 43 kDa protein, HA94, in infected cell lysates from 36 to 96 h p.i., suggesting that Ha94 is a late gene. Western blot analysis of proteins present in budded virus and occlusion-derived virus (ODV) showed that Ha94 encodes a structural component of ODV. When ODVs were fractionated further into nucleocapsid and envelope components, Western blot analysis indicated that the encoded protein was associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope. In summary, data available indicated that Ha94 encodes a novel ODV-specific protein of HaSNPV, designated ODV-EC43.

  9. Molecular biology of the baculovirus occlusion-derived virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, Sharon C; Summers, Max D

    2007-10-01

    Study of the biology of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of the baculovirus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus provides opportunities to reveal new discoveries into the mechanism of several cellular pathways. The synchronous pulse of multiple ODV envelope proteins that integrate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and traffic to the nuclear membranes on their way to the ODV envelope provide a unique tool to study the mechanisms of integral membrane protein trafficking from the ER to the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Studies of the formation of virus-induced, intranuclear membrane microvesicles provide insight on mechanisms that alter fluidity and regulate budding of the inner nuclear membrane. Since ODV is specially adapted for primary infection of the insect gut, studies of the structure and function of ODV envelope proteins reveals insights on the mechanism of viral invasion of the gut and this knowledge is fundamental for the development of new strategies for insect control. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the source of the ODV envelope and the molecular events that sort and traffic integral membrane proteins from the ER to the ODV envelope. The composition of ODV is reviewed, however it is worth noting that the function of many ODV proteins are currently unknown.

  10. In situ cleavage of baculovirus occlusion-derived virus receptor binding protein P74 in the peroral infectivity complex.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; van Lent, Jan W M; Vlak, Just M; Hu, Zhihong; van Oers, Monique M

    2011-10-01

    Proteolytic processing of viral membrane proteins is common among enveloped viruses and facilitates virus entry. The Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) protein P74 is part of a complex of essential peroral infectivity factors (PIFs). Here we report that P74 is efficiently cleaved into two fragments of about equal size by an occlusion body (OB) endogenous alkaline protease during ODV release when AcMNPV OBs are derived from larvae. The cleavage is specific for P74, since the other known peroral infectivity factors in the same complex (PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3) were not cleaved under the same conditions. P74 cleavage was not observed in OBs produced in three different insect cell lines, suggesting a larval host origin of the responsible protease. P74 in OBs produced in larvae of two different host species was cleaved into fragments with the same apparent molecular mass, indicating that the virus incorporates a similar alkaline protease from different hosts. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the two P74 subunit fragments remain associated with the recently discovered PIF complex. We propose that under in vivo ODV infection conditions, P74 undergoes two sequential cleavage events, the first one being performed by an ODV-associated host alkaline protease and the second carried out by trypsin in the host midgut.

  11. Trafficking of ODV-E66 is mediated via a sorting motif and other viral proteins: facilitated trafficking to the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, Sharon C; Williamson, Shawn T; Saksena, Suraj; Zhong, Zhenping; Russell, William K; Russell, David H; Summers, Max D

    2004-06-01

    The N-terminal 33 aa of the envelope protein ODV-E66 are sufficient to traffic fusion proteins to intranuclear membranes and the ODV envelope during infection with Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus. This sequence has two distinct features: (i) an extremely hydrophobic sequence of 18 aa and (ii) positively charged amino acids close to the C-terminal end of the hydrophobic sequence. In the absence of infection, this sequence is sufficient to promote protein accumulation at the inner nuclear membrane. Covalent cross-linking results show that the lysines of the motif are proximal to FP25K and/or BV/ODV-E26 during transit from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope. We propose that the 33 aa comprise a signature for sorting proteins to the inner nuclear membrane (sorting motif) and that, unlike other resident proteins of the inner nuclear membrane, ODV-E66 and sortingmotif fusions do not randomly diffuse from their site of insertion at the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope and viral-induced intranuclear membranes. Rather, during infection, trafficking is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  12. AcMNPV AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) regulates the levels of IE0 and IE1 and binds to both proteins via a domain located within the acidic transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingchao; Fang, Minggang; Theilmann, David A

    2009-03-15

    IE0 and IE1 are the primary viral regulatory proteins of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) involved in the transactivation of early genes, stimulation of late gene expression, and viral DNA replication. The protein interactions required for IE0 or IE1 to achieve these varied roles are not well defined, so to identify proteins that interact with IE0 and IE1, tandem affinity purification (TAP) and LC-MS/MS was used. Analysis of purified proteins identified AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) from TAP tagged IE0 virus infected Sf9 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that AC16 interacts with both IE0 and IE1 and yeast 2-hybrid analysis mapped the domain required for interaction with AC16. Mutation of the AC16 binding domain enhanced BV production by viruses expressing only IE0 but had no effect if only IE1 is expressed. An ac16 deletion virus was constructed and was shown not to affect the temporal expression of IE0 and IE1; however the relative level of IE0 to IE1 was significantly increased.

  13. Recombinant baculovirus as a highly potent vector for gene therapy of human colorectal carcinoma: molecular cloning, expression, and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arghya; Jardin, Barbara A; Kulamarva, Arun; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Elias, Cynthia B; Prakash, Satya

    2010-06-01

    Present therapeutic strategies for most cancers are restricted mainly to the primary tumors and are also not very effective in controlling metastatic states. Alternatively, gene therapy can be a potential option for treating such cancers. Currently mammalian viral-based cancer gene therapy is the most popular approach, but the efficacy has been shown to be quite low in clinical trials. In this study, for the first time, the insect cell-specific baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been evaluated as a vector for gene delivery to colorectal cancer cells. Experiments involving factorial design were employed to study the individual and combined effects of different parameters such as multiplicity of infection (MOI), viral incubation time and epigenetic factors on transduction efficiency. The results demonstrate that baculovirus gene delivery system holds immense potential for development of a new generation of highly effective virotherapy for colorectal, as well as other major carcinomas (breast, pancreas, and brain), and offers significant benefits to traditional animal virus-based vectors with respect to safety concerns.

  14. Virus separation using membranes.

    PubMed

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies).

  15. Baculovirus studies in new, indigenous lepidopteran cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pant, U; Sudeep, A B; Athawale, S S; Vipat, V C

    2002-01-01

    Eight lepidopteran cell lines were established recently and their susceptibility to different insect viruses was studied. Two Spodoptera litura cell lines from the larval and pupal ovaries, were found highly susceptible to S. litura nuclear polyhedrosis virus (SLNPV, 5-6 x 10(6) NPV/ml). The Helicoverpa armigera cell line from the embryonic tissue was highly susceptible to H. armigera NPV (HaNPV, 6.3 x 10(6) NPV/ml). These in vitro grown SLNPV and HaNPV caused 100% mortality to respective 2nd instar larvae. The susceptibility of the cryo-preserved cell lines to respective baculoviruses (SLNPV/HaNPV) was studied and no significant difference in their susceptibility status was observed. The cultures could grow as suspension culture on shakers and may find application for in vitro production of wild type/recombinant baculoviruses as bio-insecticides. S. litura and Bombyx mori cell lines from larval ovaries, were highly susceptible to Autographa californica NPV (5.5 x 10(6) NPV/ml) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV, 6.1 x 10(6) NPV/ml) respectively. These cell lines may find application in baculovirus expression vector studies for the production of recombinant proteins, useful in the development of diagnostic kits or as vaccines.

  16. Prorenin processing enzyme (PPE) produced by Baculovirus-infected Sf-9 insect cells: PPE is the cysteine protease encoded in the acMNPV gene.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Takeshi; Awa, Hirono; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nirasawa, Satoru; Takahashi, Saori

    2010-01-01

    In infection cultures of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) insect cells with a recombinant baculovirus, vhpR, carrying human preprorenin cDNA in the polyhedrin locus of Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV), the expressed inactive recombinant human (rh)-prorenin is reported to be proteolytically processed to yield active rh-renin in the very late phase of culture (Takahashi et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 71, 2610-2613 (2007)). To identify the enzyme that catalyzes the processing of rh-prorenin, referred to as prorenin processing enzyme (PPE), we purified potential PPE from virus-infected Sf-9 culture supernatant by the use of an internally quenched fluorescent (IQF) substrate for PPE. The 32-kDa protein band agreed well with PPE activity on the final Mono Q FPLC. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, the protein was revealed to be a cysteine protease encoded by the AcMNPV gene. Enzyme activity was inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors but not by other protease inhibitors. When the purified rh-prorenin was incubated with the 32-kDa protein, renin activity appeared concomitant with the disappearance of rh-prorenin. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the activated product was identical to that of the rh-renin that had accumulated in the infection cultures. These results indicate that the 32-kDa cysteine protease derived from the AcMNPV gene is the enzyme PPE of virus-infected Sf-9 cells.

  17. Uses of flow cytometry in virology.

    PubMed Central

    McSharry, J J

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews some of the published applications of flow cytometry for in vitro and in vivo detection and enumeration of virus-infected cells. Sample preparation, fixation, and permeabilization techniques for a number of virus-cell systems are evaluated. The use of flow cytometry for multiparameter analysis of virus-cell interactions for simian virus 40, herpes simplex viruses, human cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus and its use for determining the effect of antiviral compounds on these virus-infected cells are reviewed. This is followed by a brief description of the use of flow cytometry for the analysis of several virus-infected cell systems, including blue tongue virus, hepatitis C virus, avian reticuloendotheliosis virus, African swine fever virus, woodchuck hepatitis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, feline leukemia virus, Epstein-Barr virus, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus, and Friend murine leukemia virus. Finally, the use of flow cytometry for the rapid diagnosis of human cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency virus in peripheral blood cells of acutely infected patients and the use of this technology to monitor patients on antiviral therapy are reviewed. Future prospects for the rapid diagnosis of in vivo viral and bacterial infections by flow cytometry are discussed. Images PMID:7530594

  18. Improved insecticidal activity of a recombinant baculovirus expressing spider venom cyto-insectotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ali, M P; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-12-01

    Baculoviruses have a long history of safe use as specific, environmentally friendly insecticides that provide alternatives to chemical pesticides for controlling insect pests. However, their use has been limited by several factors, particularly their slow pathogenicity. In this study, we constructed a recombinant Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) and an Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) that expressed an insect-specific cyto-insectotoxin (Cit1a) from the venom of the central Asian spider Lachesana tarabaevi. Cit1a is a comparatively long linear cytolytic molecule that contains a predicted α-helix structure composed of two short membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs) that are joined together in a "head-to-tail" shape. Cit1a fused to polyhedrin gene (polh) (polh-cit1a) was expressed in the nuclei as polyhedra in silkworm larvae, Bm5 and Sf9 cells. An early death of Bm5 and Sf9 cells by recombinant BmNPV/Polh-Cit1a and AcMNPV/Polh-Cit1a was observed compared with control viruses that lacked the toxin gene. The infected cells showed a loss of cytoplasm, membrane integrity, and structural changes, suggesting that recombinant baculovirus-infected cells were killed by the necrosis caused by Cit1a. In addition, the BmNPV/Polh-Cit1a showed a significant reduction in the median lethal time (LT50) against silkworm larvae compared with those of control BmNPV that lacked the cit1a gene.

  19. Temporal characterization of protein production levels from baculovirus vectors coding for GFP and RFP genes under non-conventional promoter control.

    PubMed

    George, Steve; Jauhar, Altamash M; Mackenzie, Jennifer; Kieβlich, Sascha; Aucoin, Marc G

    2015-09-01

    The ease of use and versatility of the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) has made it one of the most widely used systems for recombinant protein production However, co-expression systems currently in use mainly make use of the very strong very late p10 and polyhedron (polh) promoters to drive expression of foreign genes, which does not provide much scope for tailoring expression ratios within the cell. This work demonstrates the use of different Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) promoters to control the timing and expression of two easily traceable fluorescent proteins, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), and a red fluorescent protein (DsRed2) in a BEVS co-expression system. Our results show that gene expression levels can easily be controlled using this strategy, and also that modulating the expression level of one protein can influence the level of expression of the other protein within the system, thus confirming the concept of genes "competing" for limited cellular resources. Plots of "expression ratios" of the two model genes over time were obtained, and may be used in future work to tightly control timing and levels of foreign gene expression in an insect cell co-expression system.

  20. Genome sequence of Perigonia lusca single nucleopolyhedrovirus: insights into the evolution of a nucleotide metabolism enzyme in the family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Lima, Rayane Nunes; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Huang, Ning; Báo, Sônia Nair; Sosa-Gómez, Daniel R.; Ribeiro, Bergmann M.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a novel group II alphabaculovirus, Perigonia lusca single nucleopolyhedrovirus (PeluSNPV), was sequenced and shown to contain 132,831 bp with 145 putative ORFs (open reading frames) of at least 50 amino acids. An interesting feature of this novel genome was the presence of a putative nucleotide metabolism enzyme-encoding gene (pelu112). The pelu112 gene was predicted to encode a fusion of thymidylate kinase (tmk) and dUTP diphosphatase (dut). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that baculoviruses have independently acquired tmk and dut several times during their evolution. Two homologs of the tmk-dut fusion gene were separately introduced into the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) genome, which lacks tmk and dut. The recombinant baculoviruses produced viral DNA, virus progeny, and some viral proteins earlier during in vitro infection and the yields of viral occlusion bodies were increased 2.5-fold when compared to the parental virus. Interestingly, both enzymes appear to retain their active sites, based on separate modeling using previously solved crystal structures. We suggest that the retention of these tmk-dut fusion genes by certain baculoviruses could be related to accelerating virus replication and to protecting the virus genome from deleterious mutation. PMID:27273152

  1. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  2. Conserved structural motifs at the C-terminus of baculovirus protein IE0 are important for its functions in transactivation and supporting hr5-mediated DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Luria, Neta; Lu, Liqun; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2012-05-01

    IE0 and IE1 are transactivator proteins of the most studied baculovirus, the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). IE0 is a 72.6 kDa protein identical to IE1 with the exception of its 54 N-terminal amino acid residues. To gain some insight about important structural motifs of IE0, we expressed the protein and C‑terminal mutants of it under the control of the Drosophila heat shock promoter and studied the transactivation and replication functions of the transiently expressed proteins. IE0 was able to promote replication of a plasmid bearing the hr5 origin of replication of AcMNPV in transient transfections with a battery of eight plasmids expressing the AcMNPV genes dnapol, helicase, lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, p35, ie-2 and lef-7. IE0 transactivated expression of the baculovirus 39K promoter. Both functions of replication and transactivation were lost after introduction of selected mutations at the basic domain II and helix-loop-helix conserved structural motifs in the C-terminus of the protein. These IE0 mutants were unable to translocate to the cell nucleus. Our results point out the important role of some structural conserved motifs to the proper functioning of IE0.

  3. Baculovirus-mediated expression of human apolipoprotein E in Manduca sexta larvae generates particles that bind to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gretch, D G; Sturley, S L; Friesen, P D; Beckage, N E; Attie, A D

    1991-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and mediates the catabolism of several classes of lipoprotein particles. Binding of apoE to the LDL receptor requires association of apoE with lipid in a vesicle or a lipoprotein particle. Because of this requirement, purified apoE or apoE derived directly from bacterial expression systems does not bind to the LDL receptor. To overcome this problem and to facilitate analysis of apoE structure, recombinant baculoviruses containing the human apoE cDNA fused to the polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus were constructed. The recombinant viruses were used to infect larvae of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta in vivo. High levels of lipoprotein particles containing human apoE were present in the hemolymph of infected larvae. In contrast to apoE produced by recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells in vitro, these particles were excellent ligands for the LDL receptor. Images PMID:1924311

  4. Mucosal delivery of ACNPV baculovirus driving expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment confers protection against amoebic liver abscess in hamster.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Laclette, J P; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, J C

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine.

  5. Mucosal Delivery of ACNPV Baculovirus Driving Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment Confers Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, DM; Laclette, JP; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, JC

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  6. Actin-based motility drives baculovirus transit to the nucleus and cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Taro; Volkman, Loy E.

    2010-01-01

    Most viruses move intracellularly to and from their sites of replication using microtubule-based mechanisms. In this study, we show that nucleocapsids of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus undergo intracellular motility driven by actin polymerization. Motility requires the viral P78/83 capsid protein and the host Arp2/3 complex. Surprisingly, the virus directs two sequential and coordinated phases of actin-based motility. Immediately after cell entry, motility enables exploration of the cytoplasm and collision with the nuclear periphery, speeding nuclear entry and the initiation of viral gene expression. Nuclear entry itself requires transit through nuclear pore complexes. Later, after the onset of early gene expression, motility is required for accumulation of a subpopulation of nucleocapsids in the tips of actin-rich surface spikes. Temporal coordination of actin-based nuclear and surface translocation likely enables rapid transmission to neighboring cells during infection in insects and represents a distinctive evolutionary strategy for overcoming host defenses. PMID:20660627

  7. Characterization of a baculovirus gene encoding a small conotoxinlike polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, R; Li, Y; Miller, L K

    1992-01-01

    We identified a gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) that encodes a small cysteine-rich polypeptide which has size and sequence similarity to omega-conotoxins, a class of calcium ion (Ca2+) channel inhibitors, found in the venom of cone snails. Transcriptional analysis indicated that the 159-bp open reading frame, which we named ctl, and a downstream 984-bp open reading frame are transcribed as a single 1.3-kb bicistronic late RNA. The mature ctl gene product was identified as a small secreted protein by high-pressure liquid chromatography fractionation of extracellular fluid. Viruses with a site-specific deletion in ctl appeared normal with regard to the kinetics and virulence of infection, both in vitro and in vivo. Although we studied the behavior of wild-type and mutant virus-infected insects in some detail, a biological role for ctl in AcMNPV infection remains to be established. Images PMID:1404603

  8. Deletion of the AcMNPV core gene ac109 results in budded virions that are non-infectious

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Minggang; Nie, Yingchao; Theilmann, David A.

    2009-06-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac109 is a core gene and its function in the virus life cycle is unknown. To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac109 deletion virus (vAc{sup 109KO}). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that transfection of vAc{sup 109KO} results in a single-cell infection phenotype. Viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in vAc{sup 109KO}-transfected cells evidenced progression to the very late phases of viral infection. Western blot and confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that AC109 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection. In addition, AC109 is a structural protein as it was detected in both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus in both the envelope and nucleocapsid fractions. Titration assays by qPCR and TCID{sub 50} showed that vAc{sup 109KO} produced BV but the virions are non-infectious. The vAc{sup 109KO} BV were indistinguishable from the BV of repaired and wild type control viruses as determined by negative staining and electron microscopy.

  9. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Meijin; Wu Wenbi; Liu Chao; Wang Yanjie; Hu Zhaoyang; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc{sup P48-REP-PH-GFP} was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc{sup PH-GFP}. Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  10. Identification of AcMNPV EXON0 (ac141) domains required for efficient production of budded virus, dimerization and association with BV/ODV-C42 and FP25.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minggang; Nie, Yingchao; Dai, Xiaojiang; Theilmann, David A

    2008-05-25

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) late gene exon0 (ac141) is required for the efficient production of budded virus (BV). EXON0 interacts with nucleopcapsid protein BV/ODV-C42 and FP25 and enables egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This study examines the functional domains of EXON0 that play a role in BV production. Six putative domains of the 261 amino acid EXON0 were deleted and examined for functionality by determining their ability to rescue an AcMNPV exon0 knockout bacmid. Domain mapping results showed that all the six domains were required but deletion of the N-terminal acidic region and the leucine zipper domains had the greatest impact on BV production. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that EXON0 formed dimers. Point mutation analysis demonstrated that the leucine zipper was required for dimer formation and interaction with BV/ODV-C42 and FP25. The charged domain was also required for BV/ODV-C42 interaction.

  11. AcMNPV-mediated expression of BmK IT promotes the apoptosis of Sf9 cells and replication of AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yue-Jun; Zhao, Jie; Liang, Ai-Hua; Hu, Feng-Yun

    2015-06-25

    Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom is a rich source of neurotoxins which bind to various ion channels with high affinity and specificity and thus widely used as compounds to modulate channel gating or channel currents. To promote the insecticidal effects of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the gene encoding an excitatory insect toxin, BmK IT, was inserted into the genome of AcMNPV to construct a recombinant baculovirus, AcMNPV-BmK IT. Spodopter frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells were infected with AcMNPV and AcMNPV-BmK IT respectively for 24 h. Results from the MTT assay, TUNEL assay, analysis of the expression level of apoptosis-related proteins (c-Myc, cleaved-Caspase3, Bcl-2 and Bax) of Sf9 cells, the transcription level of key genes (38K, C42, P78, F) of AcMNPV, and viral propagation assay demonstrated that AcMNPV-mediated expression of BmK IT promoted the apoptosis of Sf9 cells and replication of AcMNPV. The results laid a foundation for further structural and functional analysis of BmK IT.

  12. Effects of recombinant baculovirus AcMNPV-BmK IT on the formation of early cables and nuclear polymerization of actin in Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuejun; Lin, Taotao; Liang, Aihua; Hu, Fengyun

    2016-05-01

    Autographa californica nuclearpoly hedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is one of the most important baculoviridae. However, the application of AcMNPV as a biocontrol agent has been limited. Previously, we engineered Buthus martensii Karsch insect toxin (BmK IT) gene into the genome of AcMNPV. The bioassay data indicated that the recombinant baculovirus AcMNPV-BmK IT significantly enhanced the anti-insect efficacy of the virus. The actin cytoskeleton is the major component beneath the surface of eukaryotic cells. In this report, the effects of AcMNPV-BmK IT on the formation of early cables of actin and nuclear filamentous-actin (F-actin) were studied. The results indicated that these baculovirus induced rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton of host cells during infection and actin might participate in the transportation of baculovirus from cytoplasm to the nuclei. AcMNPV-BmK IT delayed the formation of early cables of actin and nuclear F-actin and accelerated the clearance of actin in the nuclei.

  13. Virus-free transient protein production in Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Hacker, David L; Baldi, Lucia; Wurm, Florian M

    2014-02-10

    A method for virus-free transient gene expression from suspension-adapted Sf9 insect cells was developed with the gene of interest being expressed from a plasmid carrying the homologous region 5 enhancer (hr5) and the immediate early 1 (ie1) promoter from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Under the optimal conditions described in the study, cells were transfected at a density of 30×10⁶ cells/mL with 0.9 μg DNA and 1.35 μg of linear 25 kD polyethylenimine (PEI) per million cells. Following transfection, the culture was diluted to 4×10⁶ cells/mL for the protein production phase. The volumetric yield of tumor necrosis factor receptor (ectodomain) fused to an Fc domain (TNFR-Fc) was about 100 μg/mL for cultures at volumes up to 300 mL. As expected, the molecular weight of the dimeric TNFR-Fc produced from Sf9 cells was about 6 kDa less than that produced from a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line due to differences in glycosylation between the two hosts. Transient transfection provides an alternative to the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) for the rapid production of recombinant proteins from Sf9 cells.

  14. Functional analysis of Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus late expression factors in Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Marcelo F; López, M Gabriela; Taboga, Oscar; Sciocco-Cap, Alicia; Romanowski, Víctor

    2013-02-01

    We used transient expression assays to assess the function of the baculovirus Spodoptera frugiperda M nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) homologs of Autographa californica MNPV (AcMNPV) factors involved in late gene expression (lefs), in the Sf9 insect cell-line, which is permissive for both viruses. It is well-established that nineteen AcMNPV lefs support optimal levels of activity from a late promoter-reporter gene cassette in this assay. A subgroup of SfMNPV lefs predicted to function in transcription-specific events substituted the corresponding AcMNPV lefs very efficiently. When all SfMNPV lefs were assayed, including replication lefs, activity was low, but addition of two AcMNPV lefs not encoded in SfMNPV genome, resulted in augmented reporter activity. SfMNPV IE-1 was able to activate an early promoter cis-linked to an hr-derived element from SfMNPV but not from AcMNPV. However, the level of early promoter activation with SfMNPV IE-1 was lower compared to AcMNPV IE-1.

  15. Characterization of a Trichoplusia ni hexamerin-derived promoter in the AcMNPV baculovirus vector.

    PubMed

    López-Vidal, Javier; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Sánchez-Ramos, Ismael; Escribano, José M

    2013-06-10

    The promoter sequences of the encoding genes for the three most abundant hexamerins of the Lepidoptera Trichoplusia ni were isolated and cloned into the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV)-derived baculovirus expression vector. From the sequences analyzed, the DNA region driving the expression of the Basic juvenile hormone-suppressible protein 2 (BJHSP-2), denominated pB2, presented the highest promoter strength in the context of the baculovirus vector in Sf21 insect cells. This promoter activity occurred earlier in baculovirus-infected cells than that achieved by a conventional polyhedrin promoter (polh), but surprisingly stopped at 48h post-infection. A mapping of pB2 essential promoter elements determined that a region of about 400bp, denominated pB29, retained and even increased the transcriptional activity with respect to the parental full-length sequence. Finally, several chimeric combinations of the insect-derived pB2 with the virus-derived conventional polh or p10 promoters were constructed and incorporated into an AcMNPV baculovirus vector. The pB2-p10 combination showed increased recombinant protein expression at early times post-infection and similar expression levels at very late times post-infection in Sf21 cells with respect to conventional late promoters. To the best of our knowledge, pB2 is the first promoter isolated from the Lepidoptera T. ni, the natural host of AcMNPV, to be assayed in a baculovirus expression vector.

  16. The gene encoding the capsid protein P82 of the Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus: sequencing, transcription and characterization by immunoblot analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Pang, A; Lauzon, H A; Sohi, S S; Arif, B M

    1997-10-01

    A gene encoding a capsid-associated viral structural protein has been identified and sequenced in the genome of the Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV). The gene has a 1872 nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) encoding 624 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 71.4 kDa. Transcription, which appeared to be initiated from a conserved GTAAG motif of baculovirus late genes, was detected at 12 h, reached a maximum at 48 h and declined at 72 h post-infection (p.i.). Part of the ORF was cloned in frame into a prokaryotic expression vector, pMAL-c2, and the fusion protein was used to generate antibodies in rabbits. It was shown, with the aid of the polyclonal antiserum, that this viral protein was detectable at 24 h p.i. in infected cells. The protein appeared as an 82 kDa band in occlusion-derived virus and as an 82 kDa band and a 72 kDa band in budded virus. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that this ORF had high homology with the ORF p87 (77% similarity) of Orgyia pseudotsugata (Op) MNPV and the ORF p80 (60% similarity) of Autographa californica (Ac) MNPV. Immunoblots confirmed that the CfMNPV protein had antigenic similarities to the P87 protein of OpMNPV, but not to the P80 of AcMNPV.

  17. Identification, localization, transcription, and sequence analysis of the Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1995-06-01

    The location of the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene was determined by hybridization analysis using a probe prepared from the previously identified polymerase gene from the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene consists of 2970 base pairs encoding 990 amino acids (114.2 kDa). Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that overlapping transcripts of 3.2 and 4.6 kb, first detected at 6 hr postinfection, potentially coded for the DNA polymerase gene. The major transcription starts sites, identified at 6 hr postinfection, mapped to baculovirus consensus early start sites CGTGCTCA and CAGT. The relatively low level and late initiation of the DNA polymerase gene coupled with our previous data on the temporal control of DNA replication and late gene synthesis (Liu and Carstens, 1993) suggests that the low virulence of the spruce budworm baculovirus may be related to the regulation of its gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  18. Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus: sequence analysis and 5' characterization of ORF891.

    PubMed

    Bah, A; Lucarotti, C J; Arella, M; Guertin, C

    1999-01-01

    A gene located immediately upstream of the granulin gene of Choristoneura fumiferana (ChfuGV) granulovirus was identified, sequenced and named ORF891. The determined, putative open reading frame (ORF) of 891 bp encodes an estimated 34.6 kDa protein. The 5' end transcript of the gene was mapped and analysed. A putative promoter region organization of ChfuGV ORF891 contains a consensus late baculovirus promoter element, TAAG, and two putative early TATA boxes similar to the promoters of ORF909 of Cryptophlebia leucotreta granulovirus (ClGV). Sequence comparisons of ChfuGV ORF891 with ClGV ORF909 and Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) ORF124R showed respective homologies of 60.9 and 63.9% for nucleotides and 46.3% and 49.3% for amino acids. Homology of ChfuGV ORF891 with ME53 ORF of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was 68.2% for nucleotides but a total lack of homology for amino acid sequences. Two zinc finger motifs are also associated with ChfuGV ORF891.

  19. Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus LEF-3-P143 complex can complement DNA replication and budded virus in an AcMNPV LEF-3-P143 double knockout bacmid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mei; Carstens, Eric B

    2012-02-01

    Transient replication assays using Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) genes suggested that the interactions between P143, the viral helicase and LEF-3, a ssDNA-binding protein, may represent virus species specificity determinants. P143 and LEF-3 are essential for DNA replication in these assays and together with IE-1, the major immediate-early transcription factor, may be part of the viral replisome. In the current report, a lef-3/p143 double-knockout AcMNPV bacmid was constructed that was defective for viral DNA replication and late gene expression. When the homologous lef-3/p143 CfMNPV genes were introduced into this double-knockout bacmid, DNA replication was restored but the level of replication was lower, budded virus production was delayed, and the yields were reduced from those in an AcMNPV-rescue bacmid. These results suggest that to maximize virus replication, baculovirus replisome assembly and function requires protein-protein interactions between P143 and LEF-3, and other viral proteins.

  20. MultiBac turns sweet

    PubMed Central

    Palmberger, Dieter; Klausberger, Miriam; Berger, Imre; Grabherr, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system has proven to be a powerful tool for the expression of eukaryotic proteins. Therapeutics, especially in the field of vaccinology, are often composed of several different protein subunits. Conventional baculoviral expression schemes largely lack efficient strategies for simultaneous multi-gene expression. The MultiBac technology which is based on an engineered genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus in combination with specially designed transfer vectors is an elegant way for flexible generation of multi-subunit proteins in insect cells. Yet, the glycosylation pattern of insect cell-derived products is not favorable for many applications. Therefore, a modified version of MultiBac, SweetBac, was generated allowing for a flexible glycosylation of target proteins in insect cells. Beyond the SweetBac technology MultiBac can further be designed for bridging the gap between cell engineering and transient modulation of host genes for improved and product tailored expression of recombinant proteins. PMID:23018636

  1. A novel recombinant baculovirus overexpressing a Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin enhances insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Baculoviruses have been genetically modified to express foreign genes under powerful promoters in order to accelerate their speed of killing. In this study a truncated form of cry1Ab gene derived from Bacillus thuringinsis (Bt) subsp. aegypti isolate Bt7 was engineered into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclearpolyhedrosis wild type virus, in place of the polyhedrin gene by using homologous recombination in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cells between a transfer vector carrying the Bt gene and the wild type virus linearized DNA. Recombinant wild type virus containing the cry1Ab gene was detected as blue occlusion-negative plaques in monolayers of Sf cells grown in the presence of X-Gal. In Sf cells infected with plaque-purified recombinant virus, the cry1Ab gene was expressed to yield a protein of approximately 82-kDa, as determined by immunoblot analysis. The toxicity of the recombinant virus expressing the insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) was compared to that of the wild-type virus. Infected-cell extract was toxic to cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis second instar larvae and the estimated LC50 was 1.7 μg/ml for the recombinant virus compared with that of wild-type virus which was 10 μg/ml. PMID:24735532

  2. Evaluation of Cre Recombinase Delivery in Mammalian Cells using Baculovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Erbs, Eric; Pradhan, Amynah A.; Matifas, Audrey; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Massotte, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In vivo conditional knock-out of a protein is a method of choice to decipher its biological function. It can be achieved by encoding the cre-recombinase on a recombinant virus to exert spatio-temporal control of its expression and enzymatic activity and, subsequently, of the target gene deletion. Recombinant baculoviruses have been successfully used to express a wide range of proteins in insect cells. More recently, their potential to infect mammalian cells has been addressed but, so far, their ability to yield a conditional knock-out as a result of efficient in vivo cre-recombinase gene delivery has not been examined. Cre-recombinase fused to the green fluorescent protein was cloned under the control of the CAG promoter in a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope G protein for increased mammalian cell infection. Gene delivery was evaluated in vitro in mammalian cells, neuroblastoma and mouse primary neuronal cultures as well as in vivo in the mouse brain. Infection with adeno-associated viruses encoding the cre-recombinase fused to the green fluorescent protein was performed as a positive control. Our results indicate that baculovirus infection leads to functional cre-recombinase expression in non-neuronal and neuroblastoma cell lines but not in mouse primary neuronal cultures or brain. PMID:23732834

  3. A novel expression system based on host-range expansion of baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Qi, Y; Liu, D; Joshua, M N; Wang, Y

    1998-12-01

    A host range expanded recombinant Autographa californica multiple-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrosis virus AcMNPV/r2 was obtained by cotransfection of the bacmid DNA from Escherichia coli DH10Bac along with a plasmid pBmH-M containing HindIII M fragment of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) genomic DNA. A recombinant transposon vector carrying a mutant green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) and a polyhedrin gene was constructed. Transposition was carried out in both E. coli DH10Bac and E. coli DH10BmH, which contains AcMNPV/r2 and a helper plasmid. Recombinant DNAs were transfected into Sf-9 cells to generate recombinant virus AcMNPV/r3 and AcMNPV/r4 respectively. Viral stock of AcMNPV/r4 was then infected into Bombyx mori cells (BmN) and Bombyx mori larvae (silkworm). Analysis shows that GFP was highly expressed in Bombyx mori larvae. This expression system, is practicable therefore for mass production of foreign gene products.

  4. Phytophthora siskiyouensis, a new species from soil, water, myrtlewood (Umbellularia californica) and tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) in southwestern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Reeser, Paul W; Hansen, Everett M; Sutton, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    An unknown Phytophthora species was recovered in southwestern Oregon from rhododendron and tanoak leaf baits used for monitoring streams and soils for the presence of Phytophthora ramorum, from a blighted shoot of myrtlewood and from tanoak bark cankers. Isolates of this species yielded ITS-DNA sequences that differed substantially from other Phytophthora sequences in GenBank. Morphological features also differed from available descriptions of known Phytophthora species. Based on the combination of unique morphology and unique ITS sequences a new species is proposed. The new species, Phytophthora siskiyouensis, is homothallic with globose to subglobose oogonia, which may be terminal, sessile or laterally intercalary. Antheridia are capitate and mostly paragynous but sometimes amphigynous. Oospores are mostly aplerotic. Sporangia are variable but commonly ovoid to reniform, with apical, subapical or lateral semipapillae (occasionally more than one). Sporangia are terminal, subterminal or occasionally intercalary on unbranched sporangiophores, with basal, subbasal or lateral attachment. Sporangia are weakly deciduous, with variable length pedicels. This combination of characters clearly separates Phytophthora siskiyouensis from other known Phytophthora species.

  5. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea consists of two cryptic species, referred to as Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping, and Group I has been described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea. During a survey for Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Va...

  6. DIETARY NITROGEN AVAILABILITY IN MACROALGAE AFFECTS GROWTH OF THE SEA HARE APLYSIA CALIFORNICA (OPISTHOBRANCHIA:ANASPIDEA). (R830414)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Transforming Growth Factor ß Recruits Persistent MAPK Signaling to Regulate Long-Term Memory Consolidation in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Justin; Philips, Gary T.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore the mechanistic relationship between growth factor signaling and kinase activity that supports the protein synthesis-dependent phase of long-term memory (LTM) consolidation for sensitization of "Aplysia." Specifically, we examine LTM for tail shock-induced sensitization of the tail-elicited siphon withdrawal…

  8. Transforming growth factor β recruits persistent MAPK signaling to regulate long-term memory consolidation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Shobe, Justin; Philips, Gary T; Carew, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we explore the mechanistic relationship between growth factor signaling and kinase activity that supports the protein synthesis-dependent phase of long-term memory (LTM) consolidation for sensitization ofAplysia Specifically, we examine LTM for tail shock-induced sensitization of the tail-elicited siphon withdrawal (T-SW) reflex, a form of memory that requires both (i) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2; MAPK) activity within identified sensory neurons (SNs) that mediate the T-SW and (ii) the activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling. We now report that repeated tail shocks that induce intermediate-term (ITM) and LTM for sensitization, also induce a sustained post-training phase of MAPK activity in SNs (lasting at least 1 h). We identified two mechanistically distinct phases of post-training MAPK: (i) an immediate phase that does not require ongoing protein synthesis or TGFβ signaling, and (ii) a sustained phase that requires both protein synthesis and extracellular TGFβ signaling. We find that LTM consolidation requires sustained MAPK, and is disrupted by inhibitors of protein synthesis and TGFβ signaling during the consolidation window. These results provide strong evidence that TGFβ signaling sustains MAPK activity as an essential mechanistic step for LTM consolidation.

  9. Distinct Growth Factor Families Are Recruited in Unique Spatiotemporal Domains during Long-Term Memory Formation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Ashley M; Philips, Gary T; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    Several growth factors (GFs) have been implicated in long-term memory (LTM), but no single GF can support all of the plastic changes that occur during memory formation. Because GFs engage highly convergent signaling cascades that often mediate similar functional outcomes, the relative contribution of any particular GF to LTM is difficult to ascertain. To explore this question, we determined the unique contribution of distinct GF families (signaling via TrkB and TGF-βr-II) to LTM formation in Aplysia. We demonstrate that TrkB and TGF-βr-II signaling are differentially recruited during two-trial training in both time (by trial 1 or 2, respectively) and space (in distinct subcellular compartments). These GFs independently regulate MAPK activation and synergistically regulate gene expression. We also show that trial 1 TrkB and trial 2 TGF-βr-II signaling are required for LTM formation. These data support the view that GFs engaged in LTM formation are interactive components of a complex molecular network.

  10. The Development of Caching and Object Permanence in Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica): Which Emerges First?

    PubMed Central

    Salwiczek, Lucie H.; Schlinger, Barney; Emery, Nathan J.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. Here, the authors focus on Piagetian Stages 3 and 4, because they are hallmarks in the cognitive development of both young children and animals. Our aim is to determine in a food-caching corvid, the Western scrub-jay, whether (1) Piagetian Stage 4 competence and tentative caching (i.e., hiding an item invisibly and retrieving it without delay), emerge concomitantly or consecutively; (2) whether experiencing the reappearance of hidden objects enhances the timing of the appearance of object permanence; and (3) discuss how the development of object permanence is related to behavioral development and sensorimotor intelligence. Our findings suggest that object permanence Stage 4 emerges before tentative caching, and independent of environmental influences, but that once the birds have developed simple object-permanence, then social learning might advance the interval after which tentative caching commences. PMID:19685971

  11. Kinetics of calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium current in voltage-clamped neurones of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Chad, J; Eckert, R; Ewald, D

    1984-01-01

    Ca currents flowing during voltage-clamp depolarizations were examined in axotomized Aplysia neurones under conditions that virtually eliminated other currents. Moderate to large currents exhibited a two-component time course of relaxation that can be approximated reasonably well by the sum of two exponentials. The rapid phase (tau 1 approximately equal to 70 ms at 0 mV) plus the slower phase (tau 2 approximately equal to 300 ms at 0 mV) ride upon a steady, non-inactivating current, I infinity. Conditions that diminish the peak current amplitude, such as reduced stimulus depolarization, inactivation remaining from a prior depolarization, or partial blockade of the Ca conductance by Cd, slowed both phases of inactivation, and all selectively eliminated the tau 1 phase, such that weak currents exhibited only the slower phase of decline. Injection of EGTA slowed both phases of inactivation, decreased the extent of the tau 1 phase, and increased the intensity of I infinity and of the current during the tau 2 phase. For a given voltage, the rate of inactivation increased as the peak current strength was increased, and decreased as the peak current strength was decreased. For a given peak current the rate of inactivation decreased as depolarization was increased. The relation of inactivation to prior Ca2+ entry was essentially linear for small currents, but decreased in slope with time during strong currents. The relation also became shallower with increasing depolarization, suggesting an apparent decrease in the efficacy of Ca in causing inactivation at more positive potentials. The basic kinetics of Ca current inactivation along with experimentally induced changes in those kinetics were simulated with a binding-site model in which inactivation develops during current flow as a function of the entry and accumulation of free Ca2+. This demonstrated that a single Ca-mediated process can account for the two-component time course of inactivation, and that the nearly bi-exponential shape need not arise from two separate processes. The two-component time course emerges as a consequence of a postulated hyperbolic reaction between diminishing probability of channels remaining open and the accumulation of intracellular free Ca2+. The occurrence of a single- or a two-component time course of inactivation thus appears to depend on the levels of internal free Ca2+ traversed during current flow. PMID:6323696

  12. The 91-205 amino acid region of AcMNPV ORF34 (Ac34), which comprises a potential C3H zinc finger, is required for its nuclear localization and optimal virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianxiang; Tang, Zhimin; Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Yang, Kai

    2017-01-15

    During baculovirus infection, most viral proteins must be imported to the nucleus to support virus multiplication. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf34 (ac34) is an alphabaculovirus unique gene that is required for optimal virus production. Ac34 distributes in both the cytoplasm and the nuclei of virus-infected Sf9 cells, but contains no conventional nuclear localization signal (NLS). In this study, we investigated the nuclear targeting domains in Ac34. Transient expression assays showed that Ac34 localized in both the cytoplasm and the nuclei of Sf9 cells, indicating that no viral protein is required for Ac34 nuclear localization. Subcellular localization analysis of Ac34 truncations and internal deletions fused with green fluorescent protein in plasmid-transfected Sf9 cells identified that the 91-205 amino acid (aa) region is required for Ac34 nuclear localization. Mutations in a potential C3H zinc finger (aa 116-131) in Ac34 resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic distribution of GFP:Ac34, suggesting that the zinc finger is required for Ac34 nuclear localization. To assess the functional importance of Ac34 in the nucleus during virus replication, recombinant AcMNPV bacmids containing a series of Ac34 truncations, internal deletions, or site mutations fused with HA tags were constructed. Subcellular localization analysis showed that Ac34 with internal deletions in aa 91-205 or site mutations in the potential zinc finger was predominantly distributed in the cytoplasm. Viral plaque assays and virus growth curves indicated that disruption of Ac34 nuclear localization significantly impaired virus replication. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that the nuclear localization of Ac34 requires the 91-205 aa region and its nuclear localization is essential for optimal virus replication.

  13. Baculoviruses modulate a proapoptotic DNA damage response to promote virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan K; Friesen, Paul D

    2012-12-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) initiates apoptosis in diverse insects through events triggered by virus DNA (vDNA) replication. To define the proapoptotic pathway and its role in antivirus defense, we investigated the link between the host's DNA damage response (DDR) and apoptosis. We report here that AcMNPV elicits a DDR in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Replication of vDNA activated DDR kinases, as evidenced by ATM-driven phosphorylation of the Drosophila histone H2AX homolog (H2Av), a critical regulator of the DDR. Ablation or inhibition of ATM repressed H2Av phosphorylation and blocked virus-induced apoptosis. The DDR kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU55933 also prevented virus-induced apoptosis in cells derived from the permissive AcMNPV host, Spodoptera frugiperda. This block occurred at a step upstream of virus-mediated depletion of the cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, an event that initiates apoptosis in Spodoptera and Drosophila. Thus, the DDR is a conserved, proapoptotic response to baculovirus infection. DDR inhibition also repressed vDNA replication and reduced virus yields 100,000-fold, demonstrating that the DDR contributes to virus production, despite its recognized antivirus role. In contrast to virus-induced phosphorylation of Drosophila H2Av, AcMNPV blocked phosphorylation of the Spodoptera H2AX homolog (SfH2AX). Remarkably, AcMNPV also suppressed SfH2AX phosphorylation following pharmacologically induced DNA damage. These findings indicate that AcMNPV alters canonical DDR signaling in permissive cells. We conclude that AcMNPV triggers a proapoptotic DDR that is subsequently modified, presumably to stimulate vDNA replication. Thus, manipulation of the DDR to facilitate multiplication is an evolutionarily conserved strategy among DNA viruses of insects and mammals.

  14. Display of a Maize cDNA library on baculovirus infected insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Meller Harel, Helene Y; Fontaine, Veronique; Chen, Hongying; Jones, Ian M; Millner, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Background Maize is a good model system for cereal crop genetics and development because of its rich genetic heritage and well-characterized morphology. The sequencing of its genome is well advanced, and new technologies for efficient proteomic analysis are needed. Baculovirus expression systems have been used for the last twenty years to express in insect cells a wide variety of eukaryotic proteins that require complex folding or extensive posttranslational modification. More recently, baculovirus display technologies based on the expression of foreign sequences on the surface of Autographa californica (AcMNPV) have been developed. We investigated the potential of a display methodology for a cDNA library of maize young seedlings. Results We constructed a full-length cDNA library of young maize etiolated seedlings in the transfer vector pAcTMVSVG. The library contained a total of 2.5 × 105 independent clones. Expression of two known maize proteins, calreticulin and auxin binding protein (ABP1), was shown by western blot analysis of protein extracts from insect cells infected with the cDNA library. Display of the two proteins in infected insect cells was shown by selective biopanning using magnetic cell sorting and demonstrated proof of concept that the baculovirus maize cDNA display library could be used to identify and isolate proteins. Conclusion The maize cDNA library constructed in this study relies on the novel technology of baculovirus display and is unique in currently published cDNA libraries. Produced to demonstrate proof of principle, it opens the way for the development of a eukaryotic in vivo display tool which would be ideally suited for rapid screening of the maize proteome for binding partners, such as proteins involved in hormone regulation or defence. PMID:18700036

  15. Functional characterization of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus late gene transcription and genome replication factors in the non-permissive insect cell line SF-21

    SciTech Connect

    Berretta, Marcelo F.; Deshpande, Mandar; Crouch, Erin A.; Passarelli, A. Lorena . E-mail: lpassar@ksu.edu

    2006-04-25

    We compared the abilities of late gene transcription and DNA replication machineries of the baculoviruses Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV) in SF-21 cells, an insect-derived cell line permissive for AcMNPV infection. It has been well established that 19 AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) stimulate substantial levels of late gene promoter activity in SF-21 cells. Thus, we constructed a set of clones containing the BmNPV homologs of the AcMNPV lefs under control of the constitutive Drosophila heat shock 70 protein promoter and tested their ability to activate an AcMNPV late promoter-reporter gene cassette in SF-21 cells. We tested the potential of individual or predicted functional groups of BmNPV lefs to successfully replace the corresponding AcMNPV gene(s) in transient late gene expression assays. We found that most, but not all, BmNPV lefs were able to either fully or partially substitute for the corresponding AcMNPV homolog in the context of the remaining AcMNPV lefs with the exception of BmNPV p143, ie-2, and p35. BmNPV p143 was unable to support late gene expression or be imported into the nucleus of cells in the presence of the AcMNPV or the BmNPV LEF-3, a P143 nuclear shuttling factor. Our results suggest that host-specific factors may affect the function of homologous proteins.

  16. Active Depletion of Host Cell Inhibitor-of-Apoptosis Proteins Triggers Apoptosis upon Baculovirus DNA Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Vandergaast, Rianna; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Friesen, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense by virtue of its impact on virus multiplication and pathogenesis. To define molecular mechanisms by which viruses are detected and the apoptotic response is initiated, we examined the antiviral role of host inhibitor-of-apoptosis (IAP) proteins in insect cells. We report here that the principal IAPs, DIAP1 and SfIAP, of the model insects Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda, respectively, are rapidly depleted and thereby inactivated upon infection with the apoptosis-inducing baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Virus-induced loss of these host IAPs triggered caspase activation and apoptotic death. Elevation of IAP levels by ectopic expression repressed caspase activation. Loss of host IAP in both species was triggered by AcMNPV DNA replication. By using selected inhibitors, we found that virus-induced IAP depletion was mediated in part by the proteasome but not by caspase cleavage. Consistent with this conclusion, mutagenic disruption of the SfIAP RING motif, which acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, stabilized SfIAP during infection. Importantly, SfIAP was also stabilized upon the removal of its 99-residue N-terminal leader, which serves as a critical determinant of IAP turnover. These data indicated that a host pathway initiated by virus DNA replication and acting through instability motifs embedded within IAP triggers IAP depletion and thereby causes apoptosis. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that host modulation of cellular IAP levels is a conserved mechanism by which insects mount an apoptotic antiviral response. Thus, host IAPs may function as critical sentinels of virus invasion in insects. PMID:21653668

  17. The effect of cell line, phylogenetics and medium on baculovirus budded virus yield and quality.

    PubMed

    Matindoost, Leila; Hu, Hao; Chan, Leslie C L; Nielsen, Lars K; Reid, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The performance of bioprocesses involving baculoviruses largely depends on an efficient infection of cells by concentrated budded virus (BV) inoculums. Baculovirus expression vector systems have been established using Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), a group I NPV that displays rapid virus kinetics, whereas bioprocesses using group II baculovirus-based biopesticides such as Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) have the limitation of low levels of BV, as these viruses often display poor BV production kinetics. In this study, the effect of key parameters involved in the quality of progeny virions, including cell line, virus phylogenetics and medium, on viral DNA replication, virus trafficking to the extracellular environment, and the yield of recombinant protein or polyhedra were investigated in synchronous infections of HearNPV and AcMNPV. HearNPV showed higher vDNA replication in its optimum medium, SF900III, when compared to AcMNPV, but both viruses had similar specific extracellular virion content. However, the ratio of AcMNPV extracellular virions to the total number of progeny virions produced was higher, and their quality was tenfold higher than that of HearNPV extracellular virions. The results of infection of two different cell lines, High Five and Sf9, with AcMNPV, along with HearNPV infection of HzAM1 cells in three different media, suggest that the host cells and the nutritional state of the medium as well as the phylogenetics of the virus affect the BV yields produced by different baculovirus/cell line/medium combinations.

  18. Disruption of the baculovirus core gene ac78 results in decreased production of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped occlusion-derived virions and the failure of primary infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai-Nan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Yuan, Mei-Jin; Yang, Kai

    2014-10-13

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac78 gene is one of the baculovirus core genes. Recent studies showed that ac78 is essential for budded virion (BV) production and the embedding of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) into occlusion body during the AcMNPV life cycle. Here, we report that an ac78-knockout AcMNPV (vAc78KO) constructed in this study had different phenotypes than those described in the previous studies. A few infectious BVs were detected using titer assays, immunoblot analyses and plaque assays, indicating that ac78 is not essential for BV formation. Electron microscopy confirmed that the ac78 deletion did not affect nucleocapsid assembly and ODV formation. However, the numbers of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODVs and ODV-embedded occlusion bodies were significantly decreased. Subsequently, the highly conserved amino acid residues 2-25 and 64-88 of Ac78, which are homologous to an oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase, respectively, were demonstrated to play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV. Immunoblot analysis found that Ac78 was an ODV envelope-associated protein. Consistently, amino acid residues 56-93 of Ac78 were identified as an inner nuclear membrane sorting motif, which may direct the localization of Ac78 to the ODV envelope. In vivo infectivity assays showed that the occlusion bodies of vAc78KO were unable to establish primary infection in the midgut of Trichoplusia ni larvae. Taken together, our results suggest that ac78 plays an important role in BV production and proper multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV formation, as well as AcMNPV primary infection in vivo.

  19. Generating a host range-expanded recombinant baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfeng; Deng, Zihao; Long, Zhao; Cai, Yi; Ying, Zhongfu; Yin, Hanqi; Yuan, Meijin; Clem, Rollie J.; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    As baculoviruses usually have a narrow insecticidal spectrum, knowing the mechanisms by which they control the host-range is prerequisite for improvement of their applications as pesticides. In this study, from supernatant of culture cells transfected with DNAs of an Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) mutant lacking the antiapoptotic gene p35 (vAc∆P35) and a cosmid representing a fragment of Spodoptera exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV), a viral strain was plaque-purified and named vAcRev. vAcRev had a broader host range than either vAc∆P35 or SeMNPV parental virus, being able to infect not only the permissive hosts of its parental viruses but also a nonpermissive host (Spodoptera litura). Genome sequencing indicated that vAcRev comprises a mixture of two viruses with different circular dsDNA genomes. One virus contains a genome similar to vAc∆P35, while in the other viral genome, a 24.4 kbp-fragment containing 10 essential genesis replaced with a 4 kbp-fragment containing three SeMNPV genes including a truncated Se-iap3 gene. RNA interference and ectopic expression assays found that Se-iap3 is responsible for the host range expansion of vAcRev, suggesting that Se-iap3 inhibits the progression of apoptosis initiated by viral infection and promotes viral propagation in hosts both permissive and non-permissive for AcMNPV and SeMNPV. PMID:27321273

  20. Characterization of novel components of the baculovirus per os infectivity factor complex.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; van Lent, Jan W M; Boeren, Sjef; Fang, Minggang; Theilmann, David A; Erlandson, Martin A; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2012-05-01

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) infects insect midgut cells under alkaline conditions, a process mediated by highly conserved per os infectivity factors (PIFs), P74 (PIF0), PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 (ODV-E56). Previously, a multimolecular complex composed of PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, and P74 was identified which was proposed to play an essential role during ODV entry. Recently, more proteins have been identified that play important roles in ODV oral infectivity, including PIF4, PIF5, and SF58, which might work in concert with previously known PIFs to facilitate ODV infection. In order to understand the ODV entry mechanism, the identification of all components of the PIF complex is crucial. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify additional components of the PIF complex. Coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) combined with proteomic analysis was used to identify the components of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) PIF complex. PIF4 and P95 (AC83) were identified as components of the PIF complex while PIF5 was not, and this was confirmed with blue native PAGE and a second CoIP. Deletion of the pif4 gene impaired complex formation, but deletion of pif5 did not. Differentially denaturing SDS-PAGE further revealed that PIF4 forms a stable complex with PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3. P95 and P74 are more loosely associated with this complex. Three other proteins, AC5, AC68, and AC108 (homologue of SF58), were also found by the proteomic analysis to be associated with the PIF complex. Finally the functional significance of the PIF protein interactions is discussed.

  1. Protein-Protein Interactions of the Baculovirus Per Os Infectivity Factors in the PIF Complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qin; Shen, Yunwang; Kon, Xiangshuo; Zhang, Jianjia; Feng, Min; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-28

    After ingestion of occlusion bodies, the occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses establish the first round of infection within the larval host midgut cells. Several ODV envelope proteins, called per os infectivity factors (PIFs), have been shown to be essential for oral infection. Eight PIFs have been identified to date, including P74, PIFs1-6, and Ac110. At least six PIFs: P74, PIFs1-4, PIF6, together with three other ODV-specific proteins: Ac5, P95 (Ac83), and Ac108, have been reported to form a complex on the ODV surface. In this study, in order to understand the interactions of these PIFs, the direct protein-protein interactions of the nine components of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) PIF complex were investigated using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) combined with bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. Six direct interactions comprising PIF1-PIF2, PIF1-PIF3, PIF1-PIF4, PIF1-P95, PIF2-PIF3, and PIF3-PIF4, were identified in Y2H analysis, and these results were further verified by BiFC. For P74, PIF6, Ac5 and Ac108, no direct interaction was identified. P95 (Ac83) was identified to interact with PIF1 and further Y2H analysis of the truncations and deletion mutants showed that the predicted P95 chitin-binding domain and PIF1 100-200aa were responsible for P95 interaction with PIF1. Furthermore, a summary of the protein-protein interactions of PIFs reported so far, comprising 10 reciprocal interactions and 2 self-interactions, is presented, which will facilitate our understanding of the characteristic of PIF complex.

  2. Baculovirus FP25K Localization: Role of the Coiled-Coil Domain.

    PubMed

    Garretson, Tyler A; McCoy, Jason C; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Two types of viruses are produced during the baculovirus life cycle: budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). A particular baculovirus protein, FP25K, is involved in the switch from BV to ODV production. Previously, FP25K from the model alphabaculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was shown to traffic ODV envelope proteins. However, FP25K localization and the domains involved are inconclusive. Here we used a quantitative approach to study FP25K subcellular localization during infection using an AcMNPV bacmid virus that produces a functional AcMNPV FP25K-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. During cell infection, FP25K-GFP localized primarily to the cytoplasm, particularly amorphous structures, with a small fraction being localized in the nucleus. To investigate the sequences involved in FP25K localization, an alignment of baculovirus FP25K sequences revealed that the N-terminal putative coiled-coil domain is present in all alphabaculoviruses but absent in betabaculoviruses. Structural prediction indicated a strong relatedness of AcMNPV FP25K to long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1) open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), which contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain responsible for cytoplasmic retention. Point mutations and deletions of this domain lead to a change in AcMNPV FP25K localization from cytoplasmic to nuclear. The coiled-coil and C-terminal deletion viruses increased BV production. Furthermore, a betabaculovirus FP25K protein lacking this N-terminal coiled-coil domain localized predominantly to the nucleus and exhibited increased BV production. These data suggest that the acquisition of this N-terminal coiled-coil domain in FP25K is important for the evolution of alphabaculoviruses. Moreover, with the divergence of preocclusion nuclear membrane breakdown in betabaculoviruses and membrane integrity in alphabaculoviruses, this domain represents an alphabaculovirus adaptation for nuclear trafficking

  3. Chondroitinase from baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus and chondroitin sulfate from silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Nobuo; Ikeda, Motoko; Shioiri, Tatsumasa; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Watanabe, Hideto

    2013-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a linear polysaccharide composed of repeating disaccharide units of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc) with sulfate groups at various positions. Baculovirus is an insect-pathogenic virus that infects Lepidoptera larvae. Recently, we found that the occlusion-derived virus envelope protein 66 (ODV-E66) from Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) exhibits chondroitin (CH)-digesting activity with distinct substrate specificity. Here, we demonstrate that the ODV-E66 protein from Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) exhibits 92% homology to the amino acid sequence and 83% of the CH lyase activity of ODV-E66 from AcMNPV. ODV-E66 cleaves glycosyl bonds at nonreducing sides of disaccharide units consisting of nonsulfated and 6-O-sulfated GalNAc residues. We then investigated CS in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, which is the host of BmNPV. CS was present in insect tissues such as the midgut, peritrophic membrane, silk gland and skin. The polysaccharide consisted of a nonsulfated disaccharide unit, mono-sulfated disaccharide at Position 4 of the GalNAc residue and mono-sulfated disaccharide at Position 6 of the GalNAc residue. With regard to immunohistochemical analysis, the staining patterns of the silkworm tissues were different among anti-CS antibodies. Chondroitn sulfate that is digestible by ODV-E66 exists sufficiently in the peritrophic membrane protecting the midgut epithelium from ingested pathogens. Our results suggest that ODV-E66 facilitates the primary infection of the virus by digestion of CS in the peritrophic membrane.

  4. Baculovirus per os infectivity factors form a complex on the surface of occlusion-derived virus.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; van Oers, Monique M; Hu, Zhihong; van Lent, Jan W M; Vlak, Just M

    2010-09-01

    Five highly conserved per os infectivity factors, PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, PIF4, and P74, have been reported to be essential for oral infectivity of baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) in insect larvae. Three of these proteins, P74, PIF1, and PIF2, were thought to function in virus binding to insect midgut cells. In this paper evidence is provided that PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3 form a stable complex on the surface of ODV particles of the baculovirus Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). The complex could withstand 2% SDS-5% beta-mercaptoethanol with heating at 50 degrees C for 5 min. The complex was not formed when any of the genes for PIF1, PIF2, or PIF3 was deleted, while reinsertion of these genes into AcMNPV restored the complex. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis independently confirmed the interactions of the three PIF proteins and revealed in addition that P74 is also associated with this complex. However, deletion of the p74 gene did not affect formation of the PIF1-PIF2-PIF3 complex. Electron microscopy analysis showed that PIF1 and PIF2 are localized on the surface of the ODV with a scattered distribution. This distribution did not change for PIF1 or PIF2 when the gene for PIF2 or PIF1 protein was deleted. We propose that PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, and P74 form an evolutionarily conserved complex on the ODV surface, which has an essential function in the initial stages of baculovirus oral infection.

  5. Identification of protein-protein interactions of the occlusion-derived virus-associated proteins of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; Wu, Minzhi; Deng, Fei; Song, Jingjiao; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify protein-protein interactions among the components of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II alphabaculovirus in the family Baculoviridae. To achieve this, 39 selected genes of potential ODV structural proteins were cloned and expressed in the Gal4 yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. The direct-cross Y2H assays identified 22 interactions comprising 13 binary interactions [HA9-ODV-EC43, ODV-E56-38K, ODV-E56-PIF3, LEF3-helicase, LEF3-alkaline nuclease (AN), GP41-38K, GP41-HA90, 38K-PIF3, 38K-PIF2, VP80-HA100, ODV-E66-PIF3, ODV-E66-PIF2 and PIF3-PIF2] and nine self-associations (IE1, HA44, LEF3, HA66, GP41, CG30, 38K, PIF3 and P24). Five of these interactions - LEF3-helicase and LEF3-AN, and the self-associations of IE1, LEF3 and 38K - have been reported previously in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. As HA44 and HA100 were two newly identified ODV proteins of group II viruses, their interactions were further confirmed. The self-association of HA44 was verified with a His pull-down assay and the interaction of VP80-HA100 was confirmed by a co-immunoprecipitation assay. A summary of the protein-protein interactions of baculoviruses reported so far, comprising 68 interactions with 45 viral proteins and five host proteins, is presented, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of baculovirus infection.

  6. The Host Specificities of Baculovirus per os Infectivity Factors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingjiao; Wang, Xi; Hou, Dianhai; Huang, Huachao; Liu, Xijia; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin; Arif, Basil M.; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Manli

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviruses are insect-specific pathogens with a generally narrow host ranges. Successful primary infection is initiated by the proper interaction of at least 8 conserved per os infectivity factors (PIFs) with the host’s midgut cells, a process that remains largely a mystery. In this study, we investigated the host specificities of the four core components of the PIF complex, P74, PIF1, PIF2 and PIF3 by using Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) backbone. The four pifs of HearNPV were replaced by their counterparts from a group I Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) or a group II Spodoptera litura nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpltNPV). Transfection and infection assays showed that all the recombinant viruses were able to produce infectious budded viruses (BVs) and were lethal to H. armigera larvae via intrahaemocoelic injection. However, feeding experiments using very high concentration of occlusion bodies demonstrated that all the recombinant viruses completely lost oral infectivity except SpltNPV pif3 substituted pif3-null HearNPV (vHaBacΔpif3-Sppif3-ph). Furthermore, bioassay result showed that the median lethal concentration (LC50) value of vHaBacΔpif3-Sppif3-ph was 23-fold higher than that of the control virus vHaBacΔpif3-Hapif3-ph, indicating that SpltNPV pif3 can only partially substitute the function of HearNPV pif3. These results suggested that most of PIFs tested have strict host specificities, which may account, at least in part, for the limited host ranges of baculoviruses. PMID:27454435

  7. Baculovirus-induced tree-top disease: how extended is the role of egt as a gene for the extended phenotype?

    PubMed

    Ros, Vera I D; van Houte, Stineke; Hemerik, Lia; van Oers, Monique M

    2015-01-01

    Many parasites alter host behaviour to enhance their chance of transmission. Recently, the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyl transferase (egt) gene from the baculovirus Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) was identified to induce tree-top disease in L. dispar larvae. Infected gypsy moth larvae died at elevated positions (hence the term tree-top disease), which is thought to promote dissemination of the virus to lower foliage. It is, however, unknown whether egt has a conserved role among baculoviruses in inducing tree-top disease. Here, we studied tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in two different host insects, Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua, and we investigated the role of the viral egt gene therein. AcMNPV induced tree-top disease in both T. ni and S. exigua larvae, although in S. exigua a moulting-dependent effect was seen. Those S. exigua larvae undergoing a larval moult during the infection process died at elevated positions, while larvae that did not moult after infection died at low positions. For both T. ni and S. exigua, infection with a mutant AcMNPV lacking egt did not change the position where the larvae died. We conclude that egt has no highly conserved role in inducing tree-top disease in lepidopteran larvae. The conclusion that egt is a 'gene for an extended phenotype' is therefore not generally applicable for all baculovirus-host interactions. We hypothesize that in some baculovirus-host systems (including LdMNPV in L. dispar), an effect of egt on tree-top disease can be observed through indirect effects of egt on moulting-related climbing behaviour.

  8. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection.

  9. Verifying the stability of selected genes for normalization in Q PCR experiments of Spodoptera frugiperda cells during AcMNPV infection.

    PubMed

    Salem, Tamer Z; Allam, Walaa R; Thiem, Suzanne M

    2014-01-01

    It is challenging to find genes with stable transcripts for use as reference genes for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) during viral infection. Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is known to globally shut off host gene transcription in Sf21 cells and to modify their cytoskeletons. In this study, seven host genes were selected for validation as references for gene expression experiments using qRT-PCR. Two of them, ecdysoneless (ECD) and myosin showed stable RNA levels in our previous microarray study at 6, 12, and 24 hpi for both genes and 48 hpi for ECD. The others, actin, tubulin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and 28S ribosome (28S), are commonly employed as reference genes for qRT-PCR. Ribosomal protein L35 (L35) gene was selected to test if ribosomal protein genes show stable RNA transcript levels similar to 28S and 18S rRNA and to validate the microarray data. In addition to 28S, previously known to have stable transcript levels, qRT-PCR showed that ECD transcript levels remained constant throughout the time course of AcMNPV infection. Transcripts of cytoskeleton genes such as actin, tubulin, and myosin declined dramatically as the infection progressed. GAPDH and L35 transcripts also declined over time. These results indicate that ECD is a reliable reference gene for qRT-PCR experiments during AcMNPV infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells. Although 28S could be used as a reference gene for these experiments, it is less useful than ECD because of its abundance, which might make it difficult to establish an accurate baseline value for data analysis.

  10. Recombinant protein production by the baculovirus-insect cell system in Basal media without serum supplementation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Norikatsu; Yamaji, Hideki; Fukuda, Hideki

    2003-11-01

    The production of beta-galactosidase by Sf9 cells infected with recombinant Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) was investigated in shake-flask culture using two serum-free basal media: Grace's medium and TNM-FH (Grace's medium supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate and yeast extract). At the time of infection, cells grown in serum-supplemented TNM-FH were transferred into fresh basal media without adaptation. The absence of serum depressed the beta-galactosidase yield considerably in Grace's medium, but to a much lesser extent in TNM-FH, where it reached around 2/3 of the level obtained in TNM-FH supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). While both lactalbumin hydrolysate and yeast extract promoted beta-galactosidase production, their removal by medium replacement on post-infection day 1 gave a beta-galactosidase yield nearly equal to that obtained in their continuous presence. Supplementation of basal media with phosphatidic acid (PA) from egg yolk lecithin, which has been shown to enhance cell growth and recombinant protein production in serum-free culture of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, was also effective in increasing beta-galactosidase yield. Elevating the multiplicity of infection (MOI) from 2 to 10 plaque-forming units per cell (pfu/cell) also resulted in an increase in product yield. These results provide information important to the development of cost-effective serum-free culture technology for use in large-scale production of recombinant proteins by the baculovirus-insect cell system.

  11. Loading of iron into recombinant rat liver ferritin heteropolymers by ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Juan, S H; Guo, J H; Aust, S D

    1997-05-15

    We have reported previously that the heavy chain of ferritin is required for iron incorporation by ceruloplasmin (J.-H. Guo, M. Abedi, and S. D. Aust (1996) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 335(1)). The purpose of this study was to determine how many heavy chains were required for ceruloplasmin to interact with ferritin such that iron loading occurred. The cDNA sequences encoding the heavy and light chains of rat liver ferritin were cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pA-cUW51 under the control of polyhedrin and p10 promoters, respectively, which was then incorporated by homologous recombination into the infections Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome. Both ferritin chains were expressed and assembled into two heteropolymers following the infection of insect cells by recombinant virus, which were separated by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. The percentage of heavy (H) and light (L) chains making up the two heteropolymers, determined by gel scanning following the resolution of chains on SDS-PAGE, were equivalent to 1 H and 23 L chains and 2 H and 22 L chains. The maximal extent of iron loading was observed using 1 mol of rat ceruloplasmin per mole of H chain in the two heteropolymers. The extent of iron incorporation decreased with additional ceruloplasmin. Iron incorporation into rat liver ferritin, found to contain 10 H chains, increased as the molar ratio of ceruloplasmin to ferritin increased to 4:1 and remained the same up to 8:1. Iron loading into horse spleen ferritin, found to have one H chain, appeared similar to that for recombinant ferritin, having only one H chain. Therefore, we propose that the optimal molar ratio of ceruloplasmin to ferritin depends upon the numbers of H chain making up the ferritin molecule for the maximal incorporation of iron into ferritin. These results also suggest that the iron loading channel is contained within a single H chain subunit.

  12. A baculovirus-mediated strategy for full-length plant virus coat protein expression and purification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Garlic production is severely affected by virus infection, causing a decrease in productivity and quality. There are no virus-free cultivars and garlic-infecting viruses are difficult to purify, which make specific antibody production very laborious. Since high quality antisera against plant viruses are important tools for serological detection, we have developed a method to express and purify full-length plant virus coat proteins using baculovirus expression system and insects as bioreactors. Results In this work, we have fused the full-length coat protein (cp) gene from the Garlic Mite-borne Filamentous Virus (GarMbFV) to the 3′-end of the Polyhedrin (polh) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). The recombinant baculovirus was amplified in insect cell culture and the virus was used to infect Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Thus, the recombinant fused protein was easily purified from insect cadavers using sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed by Western Blotting. Interestingly, amorphous crystals were produced in the cytoplasm of cells infected with the recombinant virus containing the chimeric-protein gene but not in cells infected with the wild type and recombinant virus containing the hexa histidine tagged Polh. Moreover, the chimeric protein was used to immunize rats and generate antibodies against the target protein. The antiserum produced was able to detect plants infected with GarMbFV, which had been initially confirmed by RT-PCR. Conclusions The expression of a plant virus full-length coat protein fused to the baculovirus Polyhedrin in recombinant baculovirus-infected insects was shown to produce high amounts of the recombinant protein which was easily purified and efficiently used to generate specific antibodies. Therefore, this strategy can potentially be used for the development of plant virus diagnostic kits for those viruses that are difficult to purify, are present in low titers or are

  13. A New theraphosid Spider Toxin Causes Early Insect Cell Death by Necrosis When Expressed In Vitro during Recombinant Baculovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Morgado, Fabrício Da Silva; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Corzo, Gerardo; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2013-01-01

    Baculoviruses are the most studied insect viruses in the world and are used for biological control of agricultural and forest insect pests. They are also used as versatile vectors for expression of heterologous proteins. One of the major problems of their use as biopesticides is their slow speed to kill insects. Thus, to address this shortcoming, insect-specific neurotoxins from arachnids have been introduced into the baculovirus genome solely aiming to improve its virulence. In this work, an insecticide-like toxin gene was obtained from a cDNA derived from the venom glands of the theraphosid spider Brachypelma albiceps. The mature form of the peptide toxin (called Ba3) has a high content of basic amino acid residues, potential for three possible disulfide bonds, and a predicted three-stranded β-sheetDifferent constructions of the gene were engineered for recombinant baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclepolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) expression. Five different forms of Ba3 were assessed; (1) the full-length sequence, (2) the pro-peptide and mature region, (3) only the mature region, and the mature region fused to an (4) insect or a (5) virus-derived signal peptide were inserted separately into the genome of the baculovirus. All the recombinant viruses induced cell death by necrosis earlier in infection relative to a control virus lacking the toxin gene. However, the recombinant virus containing the mature portion of the toxin gene induced a faster cell death than the other recombinants. We found that the toxin construct with the signal peptide and/or pro-peptide regions delayed the necrosis phenotype. When infected cells were subjected to ultrastructural analysis, the cells showed loss of plasma membrane integrity and structural changes in mitochondria before death. Our results suggest this use of baculovirus is a potential tool to help understand or to identify the effect of insect-specific toxic peptides when produced during infection of insect cells. PMID

  14. Studies of Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene expression in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, W; Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1996-03-15

    To investigate the mechanisms regulating baculovirus virulence and host range we have begun to study Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus (CfMNPV) and its gene expression in permissive and nonpermissive cells. We have identified and mapped three genes on the CfMNPV genome. The polyhedrin gene is located from 0.0 to 2.0 m.u. and two other genes, dnapol and p143, both of which are essential for baculovirus DNA replication, are located from 35.3 to 40.9 m.u. and 55.5 to 63.4 m.u., respectively. To gain insight into the expression of CfMNPV genes in permissive C. fumiferana and nonpermissive Spodoptera frugiperda cells, we constructed three expression plasmids in which the promoter region of the dnapol, the p143, and polyhedrin genes were placed in front of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. All three CfMNPV promoters were active in nonpermissive cells in the presence of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) DNA, but no activity was detected in permissive cells either in the presence of CfMNPV DNA or AcMNPV DNA. This lack of promoter activity was not due to failure of viral or plasmid DNA to enter the cell nucleus. It was possible that the reporter plasmids were inefficient templates for transcriptional transactivation so we developed a CfMNPV transfer vector and generated a recombinant virus in which the polyhedrin promoter driving CAT gene cassette was integrated into the CfMNPV genome. In this case, the CfMNPV polyhedrin promoter was highly active in the permissive cells.

  15. A molt-associated chitinase cDNA from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Zheng, S; Cheng, X; Ladd, T; Lingohr, E J; Krell, P J; Arif, B M; Retnakaran, A; Feng, Q

    2002-12-01

    Chitinase (CfChitinase) cDNA from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, was cloned using reverse transcription PCR and cDNA library screening. The CfChitinase cDNA was determined to be 2856 nucleotides long with the longest open reading frame made up of 1671 nucleotides that encoded a protein that was 557 amino acid long with a predicted molecular mass of 62 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 76-79% identity with other lepidopteran chitinases. Northern blots revealed that transcripts of CfChitinase appeared prior to each molt and peaked on the day of ecdysis from the second instar to the pupal stage but disappeared immediately after the molt. No transcripts could be detected in the early first instar prior to the spinning of the hibernaculum or in the diapausing second instars or during the intermolt periods of the other instars. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein appeared 12 h prior to ecdysis and disappeared 12 h after ecdysis from the sixth instar to pupal stage. The 20-hydroxyecdysone analog, tebufenozide (RH5992), induced expression of CfChitinase in the early stage of the sixth instar and caused a precocious and incomplete molt into an extra larval stage. During the sixth instar to the pupal molt, transcripts could be detected only in the epidermis and fat bodies, but not in the midgut. Western blots showed that the protein was present in the epidermis and midgut, but not in the fat bodies. The recombinant protein expressed in Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) showed high levels of chitinolytic activity with an optimal pH range 6-9. Glycosylation appeared to be necessary for the chitinolytic activity and secretion of the recombinant protein.

  16. Identification and molecular characterization of the Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus genomic region encoding the regulatory genes pkip, p47, lef-12, and gta.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Back, D W; Ding, Q; Carstens, E B

    2000-05-25

    Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) is a baculovirus pathogenic to spruce budworm, the most damaging insect pest in Canadian forestry. CfMNPV is less virulent to its host insect and its replication cycle is slower than the baculovirus type species Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) but the basis of these characteristics is not known. We have now identified, localized, and determined the sequence of the region of CfMNPV carrying potentially important regulatory genes including p47, lef-12, gta, and pkip. DNA database searches revealed that this region of CfMNPV is most closely related to the homologous OpMNPV genes. Transcription analysis demonstrated that CfMNPV P47 is encoded by a 1.6-kb transcript, LEF-12 is encoded by a 2.6-kb transcript, and GTA is encoded by a 2.1-kb transcript. Transcripts for these genes were detectable at 6 h postinfection but all of them showed a burst in expression levels between 12 and 24 h postinfection corresponding to the time of initiation of CfMNPV DNA replication. A polyclonal antibody, raised against CfMNPV P47, detected a nuclear 43-kDa polypeptide from 12 to 72 h postinfection, demonstrating that the CfMNPV p47 gene product is first expressed at a time corresponding to the burst of transcriptional activity between the early and the late phases. Both AcMNPV and CfMNPV P47 translocate to the nucleus of infected cells.

  17. Caspase Inhibitors of the P35 Family Are More Active When Purified from Yeast than Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Ingo L.; Civciristov, Srgjan; Taylor, Nicole L.; Talbo, Gert H.; Pantaki-Eimany, Delara; Levina, Vita; Clem, Rollie J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2012-01-01

    Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a “reactive site loop” within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins) may underestimate their activity. PMID:22720082

  18. Activity-Dependent Inhibitory Gating in Molecular Signaling Cascades Induces a Novel Form of Intermediate-Term Synaptic Facilitation in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbach, Soren; Kopec, Ashley M.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistically distinct forms of long-lasting plasticity and memory can be induced by a variety of different training patterns. Although several studies have identified distinct molecular pathways that are engaged during these different training patterns, relatively little work has explored potential interactions between pathways when they are…

  19. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  20. Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report/Statement. Appendices. Monterey Peninsula Water Management District

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    chamissonis yerba buena Scirpus sp. tule Scrophularia californica coast figwort Sedum spathulifolium ssp. anomalum Pacific stonecrop Senecio vulgaris...spathacea crimson sage Sanicula crassicaulis gamble weed Satureja chamissonis yerba buena I Scrophularia californica coast figwort Silene antirrhina...curly dock Sanicula crassicaulis gambleweed Scrophularia californica coast figwort Silene gallica windmill pink l Silybum marianum milk thistle Sisymbrium

  1. Identification of a High-Efficiency Baculovirus DNA Replication Origin That Functions in Insect and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Carol-P; Huang, Yu-Hui; Huang, Sheng-Ping; Lo, Huei-Ru; Chang, Hao-Shuo; Lin, Pi-Hsiu; Wu, Ming-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The p143 gene from Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been found to increase the expression of luciferase, which is driven by the polyhedrin gene promoter, in a plasmid with virus coinfection. Further study indicated that this is due to the presence of a replication origin (ori) in the coding region of this gene. Transient DNA replication assays showed that a specific fragment of the p143 coding sequence, p143-3, underwent virus-dependent DNA replication in Spodoptera frugiperda IPLB-Sf-21 (Sf-21) cells. Deletion analysis of the p143-3 fragment showed that subfragment p143-3.2a contained the essential sequence of this putative ori. Sequence analysis of this region revealed a unique distribution of imperfect palindromes with high AT contents. No sequence homology or similarity between p143-3.2a and any other known ori was detected, suggesting that it is a novel baculovirus ori. Further study showed that the p143-3.2a ori can replicate more efficiently in infected Sf-21 cells than baculovirus homologous regions (hrs), the major baculovirus ori, or non-hr oris during virus replication. Previously, hr on its own was unable to replicate in mammalian cells, and for mammalian viral oris, viral proteins are generally required for their proper replication in host cells. However, the p143-3.2a ori was, surprisingly, found to function as an efficient ori in mammalian cells without the need for any viral proteins. We conclude that p143 contains a unique sequence that can function as an ori to enhance gene expression in not only insect cells but also mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE Baculovirus DNA replication relies on both hr and non-hr oris; however, so far very little is known about the latter oris. Here we have identified a new non-hr ori, the p143 ori, which resides in the coding region of p143. By developing a novel DNA replication-enhanced reporter system, we have identified and located the core region required for the p143

  2. Serum-Free Culture of the Suspension Cell Line QB-Tn9-4s of the Cabbage Looper, Trichoplusia ni, is Highly Productive for Virus Replication and Recombinant Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gui-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Xu; Li, Chang-You

    2014-01-01

    Serum-free cultures of insect cells play an important role in the fields of protein engineering, medicine, and biology. In this paper, the suspension cell line QB-Tn9-4s of Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was successfully adapted to serum-free Sf-900 III medium and passaged for 52 generations. The adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells grew faster. Their population doubling time shortened from 27.4 hr in serum-containing medium to 24.1 hr, and their maximal density increased by 1.83-fold, reaching 3.50 × 106 cells/mL in serum-free culture in T-flasks. The cells readily adapted to spinner culture, with maximum cell density of 4.40 × 106 cells/mL in a spinner flask. Although the infection rate of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus and production of occlusion bodies (OBs) of the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells were 91.0% and 85.4 OBs/cell, respectively, similar to those of QB-Tn9-4s cells cultured in serum-containing medium and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cells, their budded virus titer was 4.97 × 107 TCID50/mL, significantly higher than those of the latter two. In addition, the expression levels of β-galactosidase at six days post-infection and secreted alkaline phosphatase at seven days postinfection in the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells reached 2.98 ± 0.15×104 IU/mL and 3.34 ± 0.13 IU/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of QB-Tn9-4s and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cultured in serum-containing media. The above findings establish a foundation for industrial production of virus and recombinant proteins in QB-Tn9-4s serum-free culture. PMID:25373171

  3. High-level expression and purification of secreted forms of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gD synthesized by baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sisk, W P; Bradley, J D; Leipold, R J; Stoltzfus, A M; Ponce de Leon, M; Hilf, M; Peng, C; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1994-02-01

    Two forms of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gD were recombined into Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus) and expressed in infected Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. Each protein was truncated at residue 306 of mature gD. One form, gD-1(306t), contains the coding sequence of Patton strain herpes simplex virus type 1 gD; the other, gD-1(QAAt), contains three mutations which eliminate all signals for addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Prior to recombination, each gene was cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pVT-Bac, which permits insertion of the gene minus its natural signal peptide in frame with the signal peptide of honeybee melittin. As in the case with many other baculovirus transfer vectors, pVT-Bac also contains the promoter for the baculovirus polyhedrin gene and flanking sequences to permit recombination into the polyhedrin site of baculovirus. Each gD gene was engineered to contain codons for five additional histidine residues following histidine at residue 306, to facilitate purification of the secreted protein on nickel-containing resins. Both forms of gD-1 were abundantly expressed and secreted from infected Sf9 cells, reaching a maximum at 96 h postinfection for gD-1(306t) and 72 h postinfection for gD-1(QAAt). Secretion of the latter protein was less efficient than gD-1(306t), possibly because of the absence of N-linked oligosaccharides from gD-1(QAAt). Purification of the two proteins by a combination of immunoaffinity chromatography, nickel-agarose chromatography, and gel filtration yielded products that were > 99% pure, with excellent recovery. We are able to obtain 20 mg of purified gD-1(306t) and 1 to 5 mg of purified gD-1(QAAt) per liter of infected insect cells grown in suspension. Both proteins reacted with monoclonal antibodies to discontinuous epitopes, indicating that they retain native structure. Use of this system for gD expression makes crystallization trials feasible.

  4. Rapid and Efficient Filtration-Based Procedure for Separation and Safe Analysis of CBRN Mixed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and

  5. Baculovirus-challenge and poor nutrition inflict within-generation fitness costs without triggering transgenerational immune priming.

    PubMed

    Shikano, Ikkei; Hua, Kevin Ngoc; Cory, Jenny S

    2016-05-01

    Invertebrate hosts that survive pathogen challenge can produce offspring that are more resistant to the same pathogen via immune priming, thereby improving the fitness of their offspring in the same pathogen environment. Most evidence for immune priming comes from exposure to bacteria and there are limited data on other groups of pathogens. Poor parental nutrition has also been shown to result in the transgenerational transfer of pathogen resistance and increased immunocompetence. Here, we combine exposure to an insect DNA virus with a change in the parental diet to examine both parental costs and transgenerational immune priming. We challenged the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, with a low dose of the baculovirus, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and altered dietary protein to carbohydrate ratio (p:c ratio) after virus exposure. Insects fed a low protein diet had lower haemolymph protein concentrations, and exhibited costs of smaller pupae and slower development, while survivors of virus challenge developed more slowly, irrespective of p:c ratio, and those that were virus-challenged and fed on a low protein diet showed a reduction in haemocyte density. In addition, AcMNPV-challenged parents laid fewer eggs earlier in egg laying although egg size was the same as for unchallenged parents. There was no evidence for increased resistance to AcMNPV (immune priming) or changes in haemocyte number (as proxy for constitutive cellular immunity) in the offspring either as a result of parental AcMNPV-challenge or low dietary p:c ratio. Therefore, although pathogen-challenge and nutritional changes can affect host development and reproduction, this does not necessarily translate into transgenerational immune priming. Our findings contrast with an earlier study on another type of baculovirus, a granulovirus, where immune priming was suggested. This indicates that transgenerational immune priming is not universal in invertebrates and is likely to

  6. Superinfection Exclusion in Alphabaculovirus Infections Is Concomitant with Actin Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Irons, Sarah L.; Simón, Oihane; King, Linda A.; Williams, Trevor; Possee, Robert D.; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Superinfection exclusion is the ability of an established virus to interfere with a second virus infection. This effect was studied in vitro during lepidopteran-specific nucleopolyhedrovirus (genus Alphabaculovirus, family Baculoviridae) infection. Homologous interference was detected in Sf9 cells sequentially infected with two genotypes of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), each one expressing a different fluorescent protein. This was a progressive process in which a sharp decrease in the signs of infection caused by the second virus was observed, affecting not only the number of coinfected cells observed, but also the level of protein expression due to the second virus infection. Superinfection exclusion was concurrent with reorganization of cytoplasmic actin to F-actin in the nucleus, followed by budded virus production (16 to 20 h postinfection). Disruption of actin filaments by cell treatment with cytochalasin D resulted in a successful second infection. Protection against heterologous nucleopolyhedrovirus infection was also demonstrated, as productive infection of Sf9 cells by Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) was inhibited by prior infection with AcMNPV, and vice versa. Finally, coinfected cells were observed following inoculation with mixtures of these two phylogenetically distant nucleopolyhedroviruses—AcMNPV and SfMNPV—but at a frequency lower than predicted, suggesting interspecific virus interference during infection or replication. The temporal window of infection is likely necessary to maintain genotypic diversity that favors virus survival but also permits dual infection by heterospecific alphabaculoviruses. IMPORTANCE Infection of a cell by more than one virus particle implies sharing of cell resources. We show that multiple infection, by closely related or distantly related baculoviruses, is possible only during a brief window of time that allows additional virus particles to enter an

  7. Rapid and efficient filtration-based procedure for separation and safe analysis of CBRN mixed samples.

    PubMed

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and

  8. Display of VP1 on the Surface of Baculovirus and Its Immunogenicity against Heterologous Human Enterovirus 71 Strains in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Tanja K.; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and has caused high mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no effective vaccine and antiviral agents available against EV71 infections. VP1 is one of the major immunogenic capsid protein of EV71 and plays a crucial role in viral infection. Antibodies against VP1 are important for virus neutralization. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present study, infectious EV71 viruses were generated from their synthetic complementary DNA using the human RNA polymerase I reverse genetics system. Secondly, the major immunogenic capsid protein (VP1) of EV71-Fuyang (subgenogroup C4) was displayed on the surface of recombinant baculovirus Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 as gp64 fusion protein under a novel White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) immediate early ie1 promoter. Baculovirus expressed VP1 was able to maintain its structural and antigenic conformity as indicated by immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis. Interestingly, our results with confocal microscopy revealed that VP1 was able to localize on the plasma membrane of insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. In addition, we demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy that baculovirus successfully acquired VP1 from the insect cell membrane via the budding process. After two immunizations in mice, Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 elicited neutralization antibody titer of 1∶64 against EV71 (subgenogroup C4) in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, the antisera showed high cross-neutralization activities against all 11 subgenogroup EV71 strains. Conclusion Our results illustrated that Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 retained native epitopes of VP1 and acted as an effective EV71 vaccine candidate which would enable rapid production without any biosafety concerns. PMID:21747954

  9. 50 CFR 17.41 - Special rules-birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules-birds. 17.41 Section 17.41 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED... rules—birds. (a) (b) Coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). (1) Except...

  10. 50 CFR 17.41 - Special rules-birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules-birds. 17.41 Section 17.41 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED... rules—birds. (a) (b) Coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). (1) Except...

  11. 50 CFR 17.41 - Special rules-birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules-birds. 17.41 Section 17.41 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED... rules—birds. (a) (b) Coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). (1) Except...

  12. Women's Health Among the Chumash

    PubMed Central

    Adams, James D.; Garcia, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Plants were, and still are, widely used for a number of conditions affecting women in California. This article discusses traditional remedies of the Chumash for dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, feminine hygiene, heavy menstruation, urinary tract infections, parturition, lactation, infant care, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, fertility, contraception and abortions. Many plants are presented including Artemisia douglasiana, Paeonia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Ephedra viridis, Leymus condensatus, Vitis californica, Eschscholzia californica, Rosa californica, Scirpus acutus, Anemopsis californica and Phoradendron macrophyllum. By providing the specific uses of plants for specific diseases and discussing chemistry, efficacy and safety concerns for each plant, we hope that this article gives direction to women seeking to use plants in their health care. PMID:16550233

  13. Biosafety of Recombinant and Wild Type Nucleopolyhedroviruses as Bioinsecticides

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Mohamed-Bassem; Ragheb, Didair A.; El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A.; Gomaa, El-Adarosy A.; Kamita, Shizuo G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT) as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV) were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 × 1012 PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2) and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field), AcMNPV, and SlNPV) using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 μg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%), AcAaIT-field (1.2%), and SlNPV (4.0%). Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female) that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal injection at

  14. Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the Disposal and Reuse of Mare Island Naval Shipyard Vallejo, California. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    family Salix lasiolepis arroyo willow Salix gooddingii black willow Scrophulariaceae - Figwort family *Bellardia trixago bellardia Castilleja exerta...canadensis blue toadflax Mimulus aurantiacus sticky monkey flower Scrophularia californica coast figwort Tripbysaria pusilla dwarf orthocarpus

  15. Structural and functional analysis of Aplysia attractins, a family of water-borne protein pheromones with interspecific attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Sherry D.; Cummins, Scott F.; Nichols, Amy E.; Akalal, David-B. G.; Schein, Catherine H.; Braun, Werner; Smith, John S.; Susswein, Abraham J.; Levy, Miriam; de Boer, Pamela A. C. M.; ter Maat, Andries; Miller, Mark W.; Scanlan, Cory; Milberg, Richard M.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Nagle, Gregg T.

    2004-01-01

    Mate attraction in Aplysia involves a long-distance water-borne signal (the protein pheromone attractin), which is released during egg laying. Aplysia californica attractin attracts species that produce closely related attractins, such as Aplysia brasiliana, whose geographic distribution does not overlap that of A. californica. This finding suggests that other mollusks release attractin-related pheromones to form and maintain breeding aggregations. We describe four additional members of the attractin family: A. brasiliana, Aplysia fasciata, Aplysia depilans (which aggregates with A. fasciata aggregations), and Aplysia vaccaria (which aggregates with A. californica aggregations). On the basis of their sequence similarity with A. californica attractin, the attractin proteins fall into two groups: A. californica, A. brasiliana, and A. fasciata (91–95% identity), and A. depilans and A. vaccaria (41–43% identity). The sequence similarity within the attractin family, the conserved six cysteines, and the compact fold of the NMR solution structure of A. californica attractin suggest a common fold for this pheromone family containing two antiparallel helices. The second helix contains the IEECKTS sequence conserved in Aplysia attractins. Mutating surface-exposed charged residues within this heptapeptide sequence abolishes attractin activity, suggesting that the second helix is an essential part of the receptor-binding interface. PMID:15118100

  16. The localization of a heterologous displayed antigen in the baculovirus-budded virion determines the type and strength of induced adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Tavarone, Eugenia; Molina, Guido Nicolás; Amalfi, Sabrina; Peralta, Andrea; Molinari, Paula; Taboga, Oscar

    2017-02-17

    In the search of strategies of presentation of heterologous antigens to elicit humoral or cellular immune responses that modulate and properly potentiate each type of response, researchers have been studying baculovirus (BV) as vaccine vectors with promising results. For some years, several research groups explored different antigen presentation approaches using the BV AcNPV by expressing polypeptides on the surface of budded virions or by de novo synthesis of heterologous antigens by transduction of mammalian cells. In the case of expression on the surface of budded virions, for example, researchers have expressed polypeptides in peplomers as GP64 glycoprotein fusions or distributed throughout the entire surface by fusions to portions of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV. Recently, our group developed the strategy of cross-presentation of antigens by fusions of GP64 to the capsid protein VP39 (capsid display) for the generation of cytotoxic responses. While the different strategies showed to be effective in raising immune responses, the individuality of each analysis makes difficult the comparison of the results. Here, by comparing the different strategies, we show that localization of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) strongly determined the quality and intensity of the adaptive response to the heterologous antigen. Furthermore, surface display favored humoral responses, whereas capsid display favored cytotoxic responses. Finally, capsid display showed a much more efficient strategy to activate CD8-mediated responses than transduction. The incorporation of adjuvants in baculovirus formulations dramatically diminished the immunostimulatory properties of baculovirus.

  17. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  18. Measurement of membrane fusion activity from viral membrane fusion proteins based on a fusion-dependent promoter induction system in insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J. M.; Blissard, G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A number of viral membrane fusion proteins can be expressed alone on the surface of host cells, then triggered to induce cell-to-cell fusion or syncytium formation. Although rapid and easily observed, syncytium formation is not easily quantified and differences in fusion activity are not easily distinguished or measured. To address this problem, we developed a rapid and quantitative cell-to-cell fusion system that is useful for comparative analysis and may be suitable for high throughput screening. In this system, expression of a reporter protein, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), is dependent on cell-to-cell fusion. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells expressing a chimeric Lac Repressor-IE1 protein were fused to Sf9 cells containing an EGFP reporter construct under the control of a responsive lac operator containing promoter. Membrane fusion efficiency was measured from the resulting EGFP fluorescence activity. Sf9 cells expressing the Orgyia pseudotsugata Multicapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV) GP64 envelope fusion protein were used as a model to test this fusion assay. Subtle changes in fusion activities of GP64 proteins containing single amino acid substitutions in a putative membrane fusion domain were distinguished, and decreases in EGFP fluorescence corresponded to decreases in the hydrophobicity in the small putative membrane fusion domain. PMID:11562545

  19. Baculovirus surface display of sigmaC and sigmaB proteins of avian reovirus and immunogenicity of the displayed proteins in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yueh H; Lee, Long H; Shih, Wen L; Hu, Yu C; Liu, Hung J

    2008-11-25

    Avian reovirus (ARV), an important pathogen in poultry, causes arthritis, chronic respiratory disease, and malabsorption syndrome that cause considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. In present study, we have succeeded in construction of a universal baculovirus surface display system (UBSDS) that can display different foreign proteins on the envelope of baculovirus. Sequences encoding the signal peptide (SS), transmembrane domain (TM), and cytoplasmic domain (CTD) derived from the gp64 protein of baculovirus and histidine tag, respectively were inserted into the pBacCE vector. Four restriction enzyme sites between the histidine tag and gp64 transmembrane domain were established for expression of different foreign proteins. The transmembrane domain and CTD of gp64 in the platform were designed in order to improve stability and quantity of foreign proteins on the envelope of baculovirus. The sigmaC and sigmaB proteins of ARV are known to elicit neutralizing antibodies against ARV. The UBSDS was therefore used to express sigmaC and sigmaB proteins on the envelope of baculovirus. Two recombinant baculoviruses BacSC-sigmaC and BacSC-sigmaB have been successfully constructed. After infection, both His6-tagged recombinant sigmaC (rsigmaC) and sigmaB (rsigmaB) proteins were displayed on the envelope of recombinant baculoviruses and the recombinant viral proteins were anchored on the plasma membrane of Sf-9 cells, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining (IFS) and confocal microscopy. The antigenicity of rsigmaC and rsigmaB proteins was demonstrated by Western blotting assay. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that both recombinant viruses displayed rsigmaC and rsigmaB proteins on the viral surface. Immunization of BALB/c mice with recombinant viruses, demonstrated that serum from the BacSC-sigmaC and BacSC-sigmaB treated models had significant higher levels of virus neutralization activities than the control groups. This demonstrates that the

  20. BmNHR96 participate BV entry of BmN-SWU1 cells via affecting the cellular cholesterol level.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Long; Liu, Tai-Hang; Wang, Wei; Pan, Cai-Xia; Du, Guo-Yu; Wu, Yun-Fei; Pan, Min-Hui; Lu, Cheng

    2017-01-22

    B.mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which produces BV and ODV two virion phenotypes in its life cycle, caused the amount of economic loss in sericulture. But the mechanism of its infection was still unclear. In this study we characterized B.mori nuclear hormone receptor 96 (BmNHR96) as a NHR96 family member, which was localized in the nucleus. We also found BmNHR96 over-expression could enhance the entry of BV as well as cellular cholesterol level. Furthermore, we validated that BmNHR96 increased membrane fusion mediated by GP64, which could probably promote BV-infection. In summary, our study suggested that BmNHR96 plays an important role in BV infection and this function probably actualized by affecting cellular cholesterol level, and our results provided insights to the mechanisms of BV-infection of B.mori.

  1. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest). Olympia Oyster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    oysters was spread in the dyked beds The maximum reported size of Olympia oysters and left for 3.5 to 5 years until most of the is 75 mm ( Hertlein ...rangec. In elevations. They are found at depths of’ 0 to California, the bat ray Myliobatis californica is 71 m ( Hertlein 1959). Oysters may attach to an

  2. Implantable Microsystems for Anatomical Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry: A New Approach for Brain Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    dopamine or serotonin, provide outputs to large regions of the brain that affect mood, learning, and cognition [4]. Hence, understanding brain function on a...Sutton, B. T. Higashikubo, C. A. Chestek, H. J. Chiel, and H. B. Martin, “Diamond electrodes for neurodynamic studies in Aplysia californica,” Diam

  3. Cercosporoid leaf pathogens from whorled milkweed and spineless safflower in California.

    PubMed

    Koike, Steven T; Baameur, Aziz; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Crous, Pedro W

    2011-06-01

    Two cercosporoid species are respectively described from Mexican whorled milkweed (Asclepias fascicularis), and spineless safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) from California. Passalora californica represents a new pathogen on Asclepias fascicularis, while Ramularia cynarae is confirmed on Carthamus tinctorius and Cynara cardunculus (Asteraceae), and an epitype designated. Pathogenicity is also established for both pathogens based on Koch's postulate.

  4. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  5. FEEDING RATES OF THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the clam Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities of the shrimp and its commensal clam, as well as particle settlement within t...

  6. Sporulation on plant roots by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum has been shown to infect the roots of many of the pathogen’s foliar hosts. Methods of detecting inoculum in runoff and of quantifying root colonization were tested using Viburnum tinus, Camellia oleifera, Quercus prinus, Umbellularia californica, and Epilobium ciliatum. Plants...

  7. Delineating Playas in the Arid Southwest: A Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    subterminalis, Suaeda fruticos, S. torreyana, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Allenrolfea oc- cidentalis, and Nitrophila occidentalis. (3) Alkalai meadow and...successively upward. Pioneer plants such as Kochia californica or Suaeda fruticos may be initial colonizers; as aeolian material develops around them they may...such as Allenrolfea occidentalis, Nitrophi- la occidentalis, Salicornia subterminalis, Suaeda spp., and Sarcobatus vermiculatus as representatives of

  8. Dredge Disposal Study. San Francisco Bay and Estuary. Appendix D. Biological Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    1931 Subclass Anomalodesmata. Order Pholadomyoida Family Lyonsiidae Lyonsa californica Conrad, 1837 Lyonsia sp. PHYLUM ECTOPROCTA (= BRYOZOA ) Unidentified...Alderinidae Callopora armata O’Donoghue, 1926 Callopora sr. Tegella arrLfera (Hincks, 1880) 174 Benthic Animal Master List PHYLUM ECTOPROCTA (= BRYOZOA ...Phylactellidae Lagenipora vunctulata (Gabb and Horn, 1862) i F 175 Benthic Animal Master List PHYLUM ECTOPKOCTA (= BRYOZOA ) (Continued) Family

  9. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  10. Model of statoconia accumulation in gravireceptors of mollusks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondrachuk, A. V.; Wiederhold, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of formation and accumulation of statoconia are different for Aplysia californica and Biomphalaria glabrata. In Aplysia californica, the fast growth of statoconia number occurs after the critical size (approximately 45 micrometers) of statocyst is reached; then the increase of statoconia number is proceeding with the nonmonotonic rate during the life of an animal. In Biomphalaria the growth of statoconia number occurs only in the initial phase. Then long-term evolution of statoconia in the absence of their generation is the result of their growth in the cyst lumen. In the case of Aplysia californica it is not clear whether a temporal change of the statoconia size distribution (SSD) is caused by statoconia growth in the cyst lumen similar to that in Biomphalaria (Model 1) or statoconia growth takes place in supporting cells until their release into the cyst lumen occurs. (Model 2). This problem is of practical importance because the majority of experiments related to the development of molluscan gravireceptors in altered gravity dealt with an initial phase of statoconia evolution in Aplysia californica and Biomphalaria glabrata. The purpose of the present work is the application of mathematical modeling to the analysis of mechanisms of statoconia formation by supporting cells.

  11. American River Watershed Investigation, California. Volume 7. Appendix S. Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Goldfields Lasthenia californica X X Gooseberry Ribes sp. X X Hairgrass Deschamnsia danthonioides X X X Hazelnut Corvlus cornuta var. cal ifornica X Horned... Hazelnut Coyu corniata var. ca~lifonia X Horned pondweed Zanichel.li.aiB p.o1ust~ri.i x x Horsetail EcrisJet.um spp. x X x Horseweed Coz canadnsais X X X

  12. Anatomical comparison of the cephalic musculature of some members of the superfamily Myliobatoidea (chondrichthyes): implications for evolutionary understanding.

    PubMed

    González-Isáis, Mónica

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the dorsal and ventral cephalic musculature of Gymnura marmorata, G. micrura, Aetobatus narinari, Myliobatis californica, M. longirostris, Rhinoptera steindachneri, Mobula munkiana, and M. thurstoni. It was observed that muscles of the dorsal cephalic region showed little variation among species, with the exception of the dorsal longitudinal bundles and the cucullaris muscle. The ventral cephalic musculature showed wider differences, mainly in the depressor hyomandibulae, coracomandibularis, and mandibular adductor muscles. M. munkiana and M. thurstoni revealed a significant muscle reduction, while M. californica, M. longirostris, A. narinari, and R. steindachneri showed a significant development of the ventral cephalic musculature. The species in this comparative study were clearly grouped based on their feeding habits. Data gathered on the muscle arrangements correspond to other taxonomy studies conducted on these groups. However, the results of this study agree only partially with those from previously described phylogenetic models. Therefore, further phylogenetic research is recommended.

  13. Pichia hawaiiensis sp. nov., occurring in decaying bark of Charpentiera trees in the Hawaiian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Phaff, H J; Starmer, W T; Kurtzman, C P

    2000-07-01

    A description is given for Pichia hawaiiensis sp. nov., a nitrate-utilizing member of the genus Pichia E. C. Hansen emend. Kurtzman. Seven strains of the new species were isolated during the years 1972, 1973 and 1978 from rotting bark of the Hawaiian tree genera Charpentiera, Pisonia and Cheirodendron. P. hawaiiensis is heterothallic but appears to occur in nature mainly in the diploid state. Asci are deliquescent and produce up to four hat-shaped spores per ascus. Phylogenetic analysis of the 600 nucleotide D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA showed that P. hawaiiensis is most closely related to Pichia populi and Williopsis californica (syn. Hansenula californica). The type strain of P. hawaiiensis, isolated on the island of Hawaii from the rotting bark of Charpentiera sp. containing insect larvae, is strain UCD-FST 72-181T (= ATCC MYA-137T = CBS 8760T = NRRL Y-27270T).

  14. Synergic effects of tryptamine and octopamine on ophiuroid luminescence (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Vanderlinden, C; Mallefet, J

    2004-10-01

    In ophiuroids, bioluminescence is under nervous control. Previous studies have shown that acetylcholine is the main neurotransmitter triggering light emission in Amphipholis squamata and Amphiura filiformis. By contrast, none of the neurotransmitters tested so far induced luminescence in two other ophiuroid species, Ophiopsila aranea and Ophiopsila californica. The aim of this work was thus to investigate the putative involvement of two biogenic amines, tryptamine and octopamine, in light emission of three ophiuroid species. A. filiformis responds to both tryptamine and octopamine, mainly on its arm segments, while O. californica only responds to tryptamine stimulation. By contrast, tryptamine and octopamine do not seem to be involved in O. aranea luminescence control since none of these substances induced light emission in this species. The synergic effects of several other drugs with tryptamine and octopamine were also tested.

  15. Diversification in North American arid lands: niche conservatism, divergence and expansion of habitat explain speciation in the genus Ephedra.

    PubMed

    Loera, Israel; Sosa, Victoria; Ickert-Bond, Stefanie M

    2012-11-01

    A lineage of 12 arid land shrubby species in the gymnosperm genus Ephedra (Gnetales) from North America is used to evaluate the influence of climate on speciation. With a long evolutionary history, and a well documented fossil record this lineage is an ideal model for understanding the process of speciation under a niche conservatism scenario. Using seven DNA molecular markers, Bayesian inference is carried out to uncover sister species and to estimate time of divergence of the lineages. Ecological niche models are generated for four parapatric and sympatric sister species and two analyses of niche evolution are performed, one based on ecological niche models and another using raw data and multivariate analysis. As previous analyses suggest, the diversification of North America Ephedra species may be the result of a recent secondary radiation. Both parapatric and sympatric species diverged mostly in a scenario of climatic niche conservatism. However, we also found strong evidence for niche divergence for one of the sister species pairs (E. californica-E. trifurca). Moreover, the multivariate analysis found environmental differences for some variables between sister species. The estimated divergence time of three pairs of sister species distributed in southwestern North America (E. cutleri-E. aspera, E. californica-E. trifurca and E. torreyana-E. viridis) is inferred to have occurred in the Late Miocene to Pliocene and for the sister species pair E. antisyphilitica-E. coryi distributed in the southern United States and northeastern Mexico, it was inferred from the Pliocene to Pleistocene. The orogenetic and climatic changes documented for these regions related to expansion of arid lands, may have contributed to the diversification in North American Ephedra, rather than adaptations to new climatic conditions.

  16. Determination by X-Ray Crystallography of the Three-Dimensional Structure of Acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo Electric Organ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    PIPLC purified from Bacillus thuringiensis (Low et al., 1988) or, more recently, by PIPLC produced by Bacillus subtilis transfected with the PIPLC gene...from Bacillus thuringiensis (Henner et al., 1988). PIPLC from Bacillus thuringiensis has been reported to have a much higher specific activity than...number of sulfhydryl reagents inhibit Torpedo californica AChE with pseudo-first-order kinetics , the best of those examined being N-ethylmaleimide and

  17. Floral visitation by the Argentine ant reduces pollinator visitation and seed set in the coast barrel cactus, Ferocactus viridescens.

    PubMed

    LeVan, Katherine E; Hung, Keng-Lou James; McCann, Kyle R; Ludka, John T; Holway, David A

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that trade-offs between plant defense and reproduction arise not only from resource allocation but also from interactions among mutualists. Indirect costs of plant defense by ants, for example, can outweigh benefits if ants deter pollinators. Plants can dissuade ants from occupying flowers, but such arrangements may break down when novel ant partners infiltrate mutualisms. Here, we examine how floral visitation by ants affects pollination services when the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) replaces a native ant species in a food-for-protection mutualism with the coast barrel cactus (Ferocactus viridescens), which, like certain other barrel cacti, produces extrafloral nectar. We compared the effects of floral visitation by the Argentine ant with those of the most prevalent native ant species (Crematogaster californica). Compared to C. californica, the Argentine ant was present in higher numbers in flowers. Cactus bees (Diadasia spp.), the key pollinators in this system, spent less time in flowers when cacti were occupied by the Argentine ant compared to when cacti were occupied by C. californica. Presumably as a consequence of decreased duration of floral visits by Diadasia, cacti occupied by L. humile set fewer seeds per fruit and produced fewer seeds overall compared to cacti occupied by C. californica. These data illustrate the importance of mutualist identity in cases where plants balance multiple mutualisms. Moreover, as habitats become increasingly infiltrated by introduced species, the loss of native mutualists and their replacement by non-native species may alter the shape of trade-offs between plant defense and reproduction.

  18. Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia by lymph node cells in inbred guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia (EAM) was performed with lymph node cells from donor guinea pigs immunized with purified acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from Torpedo californica. Recipient animals revealed the same clinical signs and electromyographic patterns as observed in actively challenged animals. These phenomena are parallel to the clinical manifestations of the human disease myasthenia gravis, in which cellular response to AChR was recently demonstrated. PMID:1165476

  19. Wetland Plants of Specialized Habitats in the Arid West

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    phreatophytes; many other species, such as grasses and shallower- rooted shrubs, rely on groundwater discharge or precipitation (Scott et al. 2000...UPL UPL Brickellia californica (Torr. & Gray) Gray 2 FAC FACU+ UPL FACU- FACU Briza minor L. FAC+ NO NO FAC FACW Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn...UPL UPL UPL UPL UPL Bromus diandrus Roth 2 UPL UPL UPL UPL UPL Bromus mollis L. Bromus hordeaceus L. UPL UPL UPL UPL FACU Bromus rubens L

  20. Non-virulence of a recombinant shrimp nidovirus is associated with its non structural gene sequence and not a large structural gene deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Anantasomboon, Gun; Sang-oum, Wiwat; Sriurairatana, Siriporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Flegel, Timothy W.

    2009-03-01

    RT-PCR using a commercial kit for yellow head virus (YHV) detection in growth-retarded shrimp yielded an unusual 777 bp amplicon instead of expected amplicons of 277 bp for YHV type-1 (YHV-1) or 406 bp for YHV type-2 (YHV-2). Cloning and sequencing (GenBank (EU170438)) revealed approximately 80% identity to non-structural (NS) ORF1b sequences of both YHV-1 (GenBank (AA083987)) and YHV-2 (GenBank (AF227196)), indicating an atypical YHV type (A-YHV) phylogenetically equidistant from both types. An RT-PCR test specifically designed for A-YHV revealed that it was uncommon and that its occurrence in shrimp culture ponds did not correlate with growth retardation or mortality. By immunohistochemistry with YHV-specific monoclonal antibodies, the A-YHV gave positive reactions for envelope protein gp64 and capsid protein p20, but not for envelope protein gp116, even though gp116 and gp64 originate from a polyprotein of ORF3. Lack of gp116 immunoreactivity correlated with a large ORF3 deletion (GenBank (EU123854)) in the region of the protein targeted by an MAb against gp116. Transmission electron microscopy of A-YHV-infected shrimp revealed only unenveloped pre-virions. During manuscript revision, information received revealed that typing of YHV isolates based on sequences of ORF1b and ORF3 had yielded several geographical types, including one virulent type (YHV-1b) with an ORF3 deletion sequence that matched the sequence of A-YHV. Using these sequences and an additional A-YHV sequence ( (EU853170)) from the ORF1b typing region, A-YHV potentially represents a recombinant between type 1b and type 5. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed that type 1b produced a gp116 deletion protein that did not bind with the MAb or polyclonal Ab to normal gp116. Overall, the information suggested that lack of A-YHV virulence was associated with the NS gene sequence linked to ORF1b rather than the deletion in ORF3.

  1. Susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum in a key infectious host: landscape variation in host genotype, host phenotype, and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Brian L; Rank, Nathan E; Hüberli, Daniel; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gordon, Sarah; Harnik, Tami; Whitkus, Richard; Meentemeyer, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death is an emerging forest disease caused by the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Genetic and environmental factors affecting susceptibility to P. ramorum in the key inoculum-producing host tree Umbellularia californica (bay laurel) were examined across a heterogeneous landscape in California, USA. Laboratory susceptibility trials were conducted on detached leaves and assessed field disease levels for 97 host trees from 12 225-m(2) plots. Genotype and phenotype characteristics were assessed for each tree. Effects of plot-level environmental conditions (understory microclimate, amount of solar radiation and topographic moisture potential) on disease expression were also evaluated. Susceptibility varied significantly among U. californica trees, with a fivefold difference in leaf lesion size. Lesion size was positively related to leaf area, but not to other phenotypic traits or to field disease level. Genetic diversity was structured at three spatial scales, but primarily among individuals within plots. Lesion size was significantly related to amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, but local environment explained most variation in field disease level. Thus, substantial genetic variation in susceptibility to P. ramorum occurs in its principal foliar host U. californica, but local environment mediates expression of susceptibility in nature.

  2. Tryptophan and cystein residues of the acetylcholine receptors of Torpedo species. Relationship to binding of cholinergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T; Wilson, D B

    1975-09-23

    Several methods were used to analyze for tryptophan in the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors purified from the electric organs of the electric rays, Torpedo californica and Torpedo marmorata. The best value of tryptophan was 2.4 mol %. When excited at 290 nm, both receptors fluoresced with a maximum at 336, but there was no change in the fluorescence emission spectra upon binding of carbamylcholine, d-tubocurarine, ACh, or decamethonium. The free SH content of the Torpedo receptors varied in different preparations, and was highest in that purified from fresh T. californica using deaerated solutions and dialysis under nitrogen, and lowest in that prepared from the aged lyophilized membranes of T. marmorata. The maximum free SH content was 20 nmol/mg of protein or 0.22 mol %, equal to at most 18% of the total cysteic acid residues. Reaction of either 33% or of all the SH residues with p-chloromercuribenzoate reduced maximum ACh binding to the pure receptor prepared from fresh T. californica by only 23%.

  3. Baculovirus as a PRRSV and PCV2 bivalent vaccine vector: baculovirus virions displaying simultaneously GP5 glycoprotein of PRRSV and capsid protein of PCV2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Sheng; Zhang, Qi; Li, Zhao-Cai; Ding, Li; Li, Wei; Wu, Hung-Yi; Chang, Ching-Dong; Lee, Long-Huw; Tong, De-Wen; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-02-01

    The GP5 glycoprotein of PRRSV is the main target for inducing neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity in the natural host. The capsid (Cap) protein is the major immunogenic protein and associated with the production of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies. In the present study, one genetic recombinant baculovirus BacSC-Dual-GP5-Cap was constructed. This virus displays simultaneously histidine-tagged GP5 and Cap proteins with the baculovirus glycoprotein gp64 TM and CTD on the virion surface as well as the surface of the virus-infected cells. After infection, the GP5 and Cap proteins were expressed and anchored simultaneously on the plasma membrane of Sf-9 cells, as revealed by Western blot and confocal microscopy. This report demonstrated first that both GP5 and Cap proteins were displayed successfully on the viral surface, revealed by immunogold electron microscopy. Vaccination of swine with recombinant baculovirus BacSC-Dual-GP5-Cap elicited significantly higher GP5 and Cap ELISA antibody titers in swine than the control groups. Virus neutralization test also showed that serum from the BacSC-Dual-GP5-Cap treated swine had significant levels of virus neutralization titers. Lymphocyte proliferation responses could be induced in swine immunized with BacSC-Dual-GP5-Cap than the control groups. These findings demonstrate that the BacSC-Dual-GP5-Cap bivalent subunit vaccine can be a potential vaccine against PRRSV and PCV2 infections.

  4. Preparation and application of monoclonal antibodies against oxidized DJ-1. Significant elevation of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes of early-stage Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Hamakubo, Takao; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Ogawa, Yoko; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Imai, Yasuharu; Iwanari, Hiroko; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Nishio, Keiko; Kinumi, Tomoya; Noguchi, Noriko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Niki, Etsuo

    2009-11-06

    DJ-1 was initially identified as a novel oncogene and has recently been found to be a causative gene for a familial form of Parkinson's disease (PD), viz, PARK7. Cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) in DJ-1 was found to be oxidized preferentially under oxidative stress. In the present study, we developed specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 using baculovirus particles displaying the surface glycoprotein gp64-fusion protein as the immunizing agent. Western blot analysis combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that these antibodies specifically recognized oxidized DJ-1. Furthermore, we developed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting oxidized DJ-1 and measured blood levels of oxidized DJ-1 in PD patients (n=15). It was observed that the levels of oxidized DJ-1 in erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients were markedly higher without overlap than those of medicated PD patients and healthy subjects. No significant difference was observed in DJ-1 levels between mediated and unmediated PD patient. These results suggest the oxidative modification of DJ-1 in PD patients and the potential application of the antibody for diagnosis of PD at early-stage.

  5. Lentiviral-mediated phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Ashley L.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Shah, Viral S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Stroik, Mallory R.; Powers, Linda S.; Gansemer, Nick D.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Sinn, Patrick L.; McCray, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), resulting in defective anion transport. Regardless of the disease-causing mutation, gene therapy is a strategy to restore anion transport to airway epithelia. Indeed, viral vector–delivered CFTR can complement the anion channel defect. In this proof-of-principle study, functional in vivo CFTR channel activity was restored in the airways of CF pigs using a feline immunodeficiency virus–based (FIV-based) lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the GP64 envelope. Three newborn CF pigs received aerosolized FIV-CFTR to the nose and lung. Two weeks after viral vector delivery, epithelial tissues were analyzed for functional correction. In freshly excised tracheal and bronchus tissues and cultured ethmoid sinus cells, we observed a significant increase in transepithelial cAMP-stimulated current, evidence of functional CFTR. In addition, we observed increases in tracheal airway surface liquid pH and bacterial killing in CFTR vector–treated animals. Together, these data provide the first evidence to our knowledge that lentiviral delivery of CFTR can partially correct the anion channel defect in a large-animal CF model and validate a translational strategy to treat or prevent CF lung disease. PMID:27656681

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  7. Counter-selection recombineering of the baculovirus genome: a strategy for seamless modification of repeat-containing BACs.

    PubMed

    Westenberg, Marcel; Soedling, Helen M; Mann, Derek A; Nicholson, Linda J; Dolphin, Colin T

    2010-09-01

    Recombineering is employed to modify large DNA clones such as fosmids, BACs and PACs. Subtle and seamless modifications can be achieved using counter-selection strategies in which a donor cassette carrying both positive and negative markers inserted in the target clone is replaced by the desired sequence change. We are applying counter-selection recombineering to modify bacmid bMON14272, a recombinant baculoviral genome, as we wish to engineer the virus into a therapeutically useful gene delivery vector with cell targeting characteristics. Initial attempts to replace gp64 with Fusion (F) genes from other baculoviruses resulted in many rearranged clones in which the counter-selection cassette had been deleted. Bacmid bMON14272 contains nine highly homologous regions (hrs) and deletions were mapped to recombination between hr pairs. Recombineering modifications were attempted to decrease intramolecular recombination and/or increase recombineering efficiency. Of these only the use of longer homology arms on the donor molecule proved effective permitting seamless modification. bMON14272, because of the presence of the hr sequences, can be considered equivalent to a highly repetitive BAC and, as such, the optimized method detailed here should prove useful to others applying counter-selection recombineering to modify BACs or PACs containing similar regions of significant repeating homologies.

  8. Elicitors of tansy volatiles from cotton leafworm larval oral secretion.

    PubMed

    Mack, Lienhard; Gros, Petra; Burkhardt, Jens; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2013-12-01

    The feeding of Spodoptera littoralis and Autographa gamma caterpillars on tansy leaves led to a complete different release of volatile monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and hexenyl alkanoates. Volatiles were collected from S. littoralis and A. gamma larvae damaged, mechanically wounded, and excised tansy leaves by closed loop stripping analysis. The qualitative and quantitative determination of the volatiles were done by GC-MS- and GC-measurements. The oligosaccharides sucrose, raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose have been detected in oral secretion of the caterpillars of the cotton leafworm S. littoralis. When applied to damaged leaves of tansy plants, these oligosaccharides induce the tansy leaves to emit a similar volatile blend as the feeding of S. littoralis larvae.

  9. A Comparison of Photosynthetic Characteristics of Encelia Species Possessing Glabrous and Pubescent Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehleringer, James R.; Björkman, Olle

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the dependence of photosynthesis on light, CO2, and temperature are reported for two species of Encelia (Compositae) which differ in leaf pubescence and in geographical distribution. Encelia californica is glabrous and occurs in relatively mild, but arid habitats and Encelia farinosa is heavily pubescent and occurs in hot, arid habitats. Both species possess the C3 photosynthetic pathway. Under high irradiances and normal atmospheric conditions the two species have high photosynthetic rates, exceeding 3 nanomoles of CO2 per square centimeter per second (48 milligrams of CO2 per square decimeter per hour) and complete light saturation does not occur by full noon sunlight. The high photosynthetic capacity is related to a high efficiency of utilization of intercellular CO2 combined with high stomatal conductance. Leaf estimates of total soluble protein and fraction I protein are higher in these species than in most plants, although the proportion of fraction I protein is not higher. Both E. californica and E. farinosa attain a maximum rate of photosynthesis between 25 and 30 C, despite the fact that the two species grow in very different thermal habitats. Neither E. californica nor E. farinosa shows significant acclimation in the temperature dependence of photosynthesis when grown under different temperature regimes. The presence of leaf hairs which reduce leaf absorptance and consequently leaf temperature plays an important part in the ability of E. farinosa to survive in its native high temperature environment. When the effects of pubescence are taken into account, there are few if any significant differences in the photosynthetic characteristics of the two species. PMID:16660483

  10. Characterization of rbcL group IA introns from two colonial volvocalean species (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Nozaki, H; Ohta, N; Yamada, T; Takano, H

    1998-05-01

    Group I introns were reported for the first time in the large subunit of Rubisco (rbcL) genes, using two colonial green algae, Pleodorina californica and Gonium multicoccum (Volvocales). The rbcL gene of P. californica contained an intron (PIC intron) of 1320 bp harboring an open reading frame (ORF). The G. multicoccum rbcL gene had two ORF-lacking introns of 549 (GM1 intron) and 295 (GM2 intron) base pairs. Based on the conserved nucleotide sequences of the secondary structure, the PIC and GM1 introns were assigned to group IA2 whereas the GM2 intron belonged to group IA1. Southern hybridization analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNAs indicated that such intron-containing rbcL genes are located in the chloroplast genome. Sequencing RNAs from the two algae revealed that these introns are spliced out during mRNA maturation. In addition, the PIC and GM1 introns were inserted in the same position of the rbcL exons, and phylogenetic analysis of group IA introns indicated a close phylogenetic relationship between the PIC and GM1 introns within the lineage of bacteriophage group IA2 introns. However, P. californica and G. multicoccum occupy distinct clades in the phylogenetic trees of the colonial Volvocales, and the majority of other colonial volvocalean species do not have such introns in the rbcL genes. Therefore, these introns might have been recently inserted in the rbcL genes independently by horizontal transmission by viruses or bacteriophage.

  11. A test system to evaluate the susceptibility of Oregon, USA, native stream invertebrataes to triclopyr and carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J L; Jepson, P C; Jenkins, J J

    2001-10-01

    The susceptibility of six indigenous macroinvertebrate species representative of U.S. Pacific Northwest streams (Ameletus sp., Brachycentrus americanus, Calineuria californica, Cinygma sp., Lepidostoma unicolor, Psychoglypha sp. early and late instar) to formulated triclopyr ester (herbicide) and carbaryl (insecticide) was determined using laboratory bioassays. Acute toxicity was expressed as the lethal concentration to 50% (LC50) and 1% (LC1) of the test population based on a 96-h exposure duration. Carbaryl was found to be 1,000 times more toxic than triclopyr for all the organisms tested. The LCI values (7.5, 28.8, 9.0, 3.0, 9.5, 14.8, 33.8 microg/L, respectively, for carbaryl and 1.8, 3.9, 4.0, 4.2, 29.0, 16.1 mg/L, respectively, for triclopyr) were used in the calculation of hazardous concentration to 5% of the stream macroinvertebrate community (HC5) based on the lower 95% confidence limit (HC5/95). The hazardous concentration (HC5/95) for triclopyr was 0.11 mg/L and for carbaryl ranged from 0.43 to 0.66 microg/L, respectively. Triclopyr and carbaryl symptomology were analyzed for two organisms, C. californica and Cinygma sp. Carbaryl symptomology included knockdown and moribund states with severity and time of appearance being a function of dose. In triclopyr poisoning, death occurred suddenly with little or no symptomology. Time to 50% mortality (LT50) values were consistently higher for C. californica than for Cinygma sp. exposed to both chemicals at similar concentrations.

  12. Comparative morphology of stingray lateral line canal and electrosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura K

    2008-11-01

    Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays) possess a variety of sensory systems including the mechanosensory lateral line and electrosensory systems, which are particularly complex with high levels of interspecific variation in batoids (skates and rays). Rays have dorsoventrally compressed, laterally expanded bodies that prevent them from seeing their mouths and more often than not, their prey. This study uses quantitative image analysis techniques to identify, quantify, and compare structural differences that may have functional consequences in the detection capabilities of three Eastern Pacific stingray species. The benthic round stingray, Urobatis halleri, pelagic stingray, Pteroplatytrygon (Dasyatis) violacea, and benthopelagic bat ray, Myliobatis californica, show significant differences in sensory morphology. Ventral lateral line canals correlate with feeding ecology and differ primarily in the proportion of pored and nonpored canals and the degree of branching complexity. Urobatis halleri shows a high proportion of nonpored canals, while P. violacea has an intermediate proportion of pored and nonpored canals with almost no secondary branching of pored canals. In contrast, M. californica has extensive and highly branched pored ventral lateral line canals that extended laterally toward the wing tips on the anterior edge of the pectoral fins. Electrosensory morphology correlates with feeding habitat and prey mobility; benthic feeders U. halleri and M. californica, have greater electrosensory pore numbers and densities than P. violacea. The percentage of the wing surface covered by these sensory systems appears to be inversely related to swimming style. These methods can be applied to a broader range of species to enable further discussion of the relationship of phylogeny, ecology, and morphology, while the results provide testable predictions of detection capabilities.

  13. Improving the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium-chain fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Sherkhanov, Saken; Korman, Tyler P; Bowie, James U

    2014-09-01

    Microbial fatty acids are an attractive source of precursors for a variety of renewable commodity chemicals such as alkanes, alcohols, and biofuels. Rerouting lipid biosynthesis into free fatty acid production can be toxic, however, due to alterations of membrane lipid composition. Here we find that membrane lipid composition can be altered by the direct incorporation of medium-chain fatty acids into lipids via the Aas pathway in cells expressing the medium-chain thioesterase from Umbellularia californica (BTE). We find that deletion of the aas gene and sequestering exported fatty acids reduces medium-chain fatty acid toxicity, partially restores normal lipid composition, and improves medium-chain fatty acid yields.

  14. The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Vriens, Joris; Prenen, Jean; Benemei, Silvia; De Siena, Gaetano; la Marca, Giancarlo; Andrè, Eunice; Preti, Delia; Avonto, Cristina; Sadofsky, Laura; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Dussor, Greg; Porreca, Frank; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Appendino, Giovanni; Nilius, Bernd; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2012-02-01

    The California bay laurel or Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known as the 'headache tree' because the inhalation of its vapours can cause severe headache crises. However, the underlying mechanism of the headache precipitating properties of Umbellularia californica is unknown. The monoterpene ketone umbellulone, the major volatile constituent of the leaves of Umbellularia californica, has irritating properties, and is a reactive molecule that rapidly binds thiols. Thus, we hypothesized that umbellulone stimulates the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel in a subset of peptidergic, nocioceptive neurons, activating the trigeminovascular system via this mechanism. Umbellulone, from µM to sub-mM concentrations, selectively stimulated transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-expressing HEK293 cells and rat trigeminal ganglion neurons, but not untransfected cells or neurons in the presence of the selective transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonist, HC-030031. Umbellulone evoked a calcium-dependent release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from rodent trigeminal nerve terminals in the dura mater. In wild-type mice, umbellulone elicited excitation of trigeminal neurons and released calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals. These two responses were absent in transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Umbellulone caused nocioceptive behaviour after stimulation of trigeminal nerve terminals in wild-type, but not transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 deficient mice. Intranasal application or intravenous injection of umbellulone increased rat meningeal blood flow in a dose-dependent manner; a response selectively inhibited by systemic administration of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 or calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists. These data indicate that umbellulone activates, through a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-dependent mechanism, the trigeminovascular system, thereby causing

  15. Two new desert Eschscholzia (Papaveraceae) from southwestern North America.

    PubMed

    Still, Shannon M

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Eschscholzia are described. Both are found in the deserts of California and one extends outside the state boundary into Arizona. Eschscholzia androuxii Still, sp. nov. is found mainly in and around Joshua Tree National Park in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Eschscholzia papastillii Still, sp. nov. is found from the northern Mojave south through Joshua Tree National Park to central Imperial County. Both are annuals found in coarse, sandy soil and have yellow flowers typical of desert Eschscholzia. Eschscholzia papastillii has an expanded receptacular rim similar to that of Eschscholzia californica. Eschscholzia androuxii has anthocyanin bands around the stamen filaments.

  16. Coexistence of Several Putative Neurotransmitters in Single Identified Neurosn of Aplysia

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, Michael J.; Saavedra, Juan M.; Axelrod, Julius; Zeman, Gary H.; Carpenter, David O.

    1974-01-01

    By sensitive enzymatic micromethods several putative neurotransmitters were measured in four identifiable neurons of Aplysia californica (R-2, R-14, L-11, and C-1). Serotonin was found in all of these neurons, and octopamine in all but C-1. Acetylcholine has been previously reported to be present in R-2 and L-11. The catecholamines, norepinephrine and dopamine, were not detected in the four cells examined. The possible biological consequence of the presence of several putative transmitters in single identifiable neurons is discussed. PMID:4373726

  17. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) inhibits electrically evoked neural responses in the deaf white cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Robinson, Alan; Young, Hunter K.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been used in the past to evoke neural activity from hearing and partially deaf animals. All the responses were excitatory. In Aplysia californica, Duke and coworkers demonstrated that INS also inhibits neural responses [1], which similar observations were made in the vestibular system [2, 3]. In deaf white cats that have cochleae with largely reduced spiral ganglion neuron counts and a significant degeneration of the organ of Corti, no cochlear compound action potentials could be observed during INS alone. However, the combined electrical and optical stimulation demonstrated inhibitory responses during irradiation with infrared light.

  18. BmREEPa Is a Novel Gene that Facilitates BmNPV Entry into Silkworm Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Cai-xia; Wu, Yun-fei; Du, Guo-yu; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-hui

    2015-01-01

    We previously established two silkworm cell lines, BmN-SWU1 and BmN-SWU2, from Bombyx mori ovaries. BmN-SWU1 cells are susceptible while BmN-SWU2 cells are highly resistant to BmNPV infection. Interestingly, we found that the entry of BmNPV into BmN-SWU2 cells was largely inhibited. To explore the mechanism of this inhibition, in this study we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative protein expression profiling and identified 629 differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines. Among them, we identified a new membrane protein termed BmREEPa. The gene encoding BmREEPa transcribes two splice variants; a 573 bp long BmREEPa-L encoding a protein with 190 amino acids and a 501 bp long BmREEPa-S encoding a protein with 166 amino acids. BmREEPa contains a conserved TB2/DP, HVA22 domain and three transmembrane domains. It is localized in the plasma membrane with a cytoplasmic C-terminus and an extracellular N-terminus. We found that limiting the expression of BmREEPa in BmN-SWU1 cells inhibited BmNPV entry, whereas over-expression of BmREEPa in BmN-SWU2 cells promoted BmNPV entry. Our results also indicated that BmREEPa can interact with GP64, which is the key envelope fusion protein for BmNPV entry. Taken together, the findings of our study revealed that BmREEPa is required for BmNPV to gain entry into silkworm cells, and may provide insights for the identification of BmNPV receptors. PMID:26656276

  19. Identification and characterization of Eutypa leptoplaca, a new pathogen of grapevine in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, Florent P; Gubler, Walter D

    2004-10-01

    Although Eutypa lata is the main agent of Eutypa dieback of grapevine, another species of Eutypa has been isolated from diseased grapevines in Northern California. Stromata of this recently discovered Eutypa were also collected from Acer macrophyllum, A. negundo, and Fraxinus latifolia in the vicinity of vineyards, and appeared commonly on Umbellularia californica in some mixed-evergreen forests of Napa and Sonoma counties. This second species of Eutypa was distinguished from E. lata because of the sulcate ostiole of the perithecium and smaller ascospores. A morphological comparison with type specimens revealed identical features between the Californian isolates and E. leptoplaca sensu Rappaz (1987). This identification was confirmed through phylogenetic analyses of Eutypa spp. based on the complete sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA and partial sequence of the beta-tubulin gene. These analyses also separated collections of E. maura, E. sparsa, E. lejoplaca, E. tetragona, E. leptoplaca and E. lata, confirming the previously proposed species concepts. The pathogenicity of E. leptoplaca on grapevine was established using isolates collected from Vitis vinifera, U. californica, and A. macrophyllum. The importance of E. leptoplaca in relation to Eutypa dieback and its role as a necrotrophic pathogen are discussed.

  20. Pit membrane chemistry influences the magnitude of ion-mediated enhancement of xylem hydraulic conductance in four Lauraceae species.

    PubMed

    Gortan, Emmanuelle; Nardini, Andrea; Salleo, Sebastiano; Jansen, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The ion-mediated enhancement of xylem hydraulic conductivity in angiosperms is thought to be controlled by the pectin chemistry of intervessel pit membranes. However, there is little or no direct evidence on the ultrastructure and chemical nature of pit membranes in species that show an 'ionic effect'. The potential link between the magnitude of the ionic effect and pectin composition in intervessel pit membranes of four Lauraceae species (Laurus nobilis, Lindera megaphylla, Litsea sericea and Umbellularia californica) that show rather similar vessel and pit dimensions was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM observations confirmed the presence of a pectic matrix associated with intervessel pit membranes, indicating that the relative abundance of acidic versus methylesterified pectins was closely related to the ionic effect. The two species examined with a high ionic effect ~20%, i.e. Laurus nobilis and Umbellularia californica) showed relatively high levels of acidic pectins, whereas methylesterified pectins were abundant in Lindera megaphylla and Litsea sericea, which showed a low ionic effect (~10%). Variation in the ionic effect is strongly associated with the chemical nature of pit membrane pectins in the species studied. Our findings support the current interpretation of the ionic effect due to dynamic swelling and shrinking behaviour of pit membrane pectins.

  1. Molluscan attractins, a family of water-borne protein pheromones with interspecific attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Schein, Catherine H; Xu, Yuan; Braun, Werner; Nagle, Gregg T

    2005-01-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia releases the water-borne pheromone attractin during egg laying. This small protein stimulates the formation and maintenance of mating and egg-laying aggregations. Attractin has been characterized from five Aplysia species: A. californica, A. brasiliana, A. fasciata, A. vaccaria, and A. depilans. We describe here the isolation of attractin from Bursatella leachii, and show that it belongs to the same protein family. The pattern of residue conservation, especially the six invariant cysteines, suggests that all of these attractins have a common fold. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of A. californica attractin contains two antiparallel alpha-helices, the second of which contains the heptapeptide sequence IEECKTS that has been implicated in attractin function. Synthetic peptides containing this IEECKTS region are attractive, and mutating surface exposed charged residues within this region of attractin abolishes attractin activity. This suggests that the second helix is an essential part of the receptor-binding interface. In contrast to the peptide pheromonal attractants in amphibians, which are species specific, the attractins are, to our knowledge, the first water-borne peptide or protein pheromone family in invertebrates and vertebrates that are not species specific.

  2. Review of Canadian species of the genera Gnathusa Fenyes, Mniusa Mulsant & Rey and Ocyusa Kraatz (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae)

    PubMed Central

    Klimaszewski, Jan; Webster, Reginald P.; Langor, David W.; Bourdon, Caroline; Hammond, H.E. James; Pohl, Greg R.; Godin, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Four species of Gnathusa Fenyes (G. alfacaribou Klimaszewski & Langor, G. caribou Lohse, G. eva Fenyes, and G. tenuicornis Fenyes) occur in the Nearctic and in Canada. Three species of Ocyusa Kraatz (O. asperula Casey, O. californica Bernhauer, O. canadensis Lohse), and three species of Mniusa Mulsant and Ray (M. minutissima (Klimaszewski & Langor), M. yukonensis (Klimaszewski & Godin), and M. odelli Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n.), are known from the Nearctic and all but O. californica occur in Canada. The recently described Gnathusa minutissima Klimaszewski and Langor and Ocyusa yukonensis Klimaszewski and Godin, are transferred here to the genus Mniusa Mulsant & Rey. New provincial and state records are reported for: G. eva (Alberta), G. tenuicornis (Alberta, Oregon, and New Brunswick), O. canadensis (New Brunswick and Newfoundland), M. minutissima (New Brunswick), and M. yukonensis (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, and British Columbia). The female of M. yukonensis was discovered and is illustrated for the first time. The genus Mniusa is reported for the first time from Canada and represents the first confirmed generic record for North America. Keys for identification of all Canadian species, images of body and genital structures, maps showing distribution mainly in Canada, and new bionomics data are provided. PMID:24899860

  3. Revalidation of the spider genus Citharoceps Chamberlin, 1924 (Araneae, Segestriidae)

    PubMed Central

    Giroti, André Marsola; Brescovit, Antonio Domingos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Citharoceps Chamberlin was diagnosed by the presence of a very distinctive stridulatory apparatus composed of two patches of ridges on the sides of the cephalic region, and a stridulatory thorn on the prolateral region of the femur I. Currently, this genus is a junior synonym of Ariadna Audouin, with the assumption that the stridulatory apparatus could constitute an exclusive feature of its unique known species, Citharoceps fidicina Chamberlin, currently senior synonym of Citharoceps californica Chamberlin & Ivie. In the present study, Citharoceps is revalidated and redescribed based on the occurrence of the stridulatory apparatus in Citharoceps fidicina and Segestria cruzana Chamberlin & Ivie, and also on the presence of distinguishable characters, such as the length of the labium-sternum junction, ventral median spine on male metatarsi I, and strong sclerotized interpulmonary fold in females, forming a conspicuous median flap. Segestria cruzana is transfered to Citharoceps, with Citharoceps californica removed from the synonym of Citharoceps fidicina, and proposed as a junior synonym of Citharoceps cruzana, due to the similarity between the additional material examined and the original description. Males of Citharoceps fidicina and Citharoceps cruzana are described for the first time. PMID:25901118

  4. Review of Canadian species of the genera Gnathusa Fenyes, Mniusa Mulsant & Rey and Ocyusa Kraatz (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae).

    PubMed

    Klimaszewski, Jan; Webster, Reginald P; Langor, David W; Bourdon, Caroline; Hammond, H E James; Pohl, Greg R; Godin, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Four species of Gnathusa Fenyes (G. alfacaribou Klimaszewski & Langor, G. caribou Lohse, G. eva Fenyes, and G. tenuicornis Fenyes) occur in the Nearctic and in Canada. Three species of Ocyusa Kraatz (O. asperula Casey, O. californica Bernhauer, O. canadensis Lohse), and three species of Mniusa Mulsant and Ray (M. minutissima (Klimaszewski & Langor), M. yukonensis (Klimaszewski & Godin), and M. odelli Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n.), are known from the Nearctic and all but O. californica occur in Canada. The recently described Gnathusa minutissima Klimaszewski and Langor and Ocyusa yukonensis Klimaszewski and Godin, are transferred here to the genus Mniusa Mulsant & Rey. New provincial and state records are reported for: G. eva (Alberta), G. tenuicornis (Alberta, Oregon, and New Brunswick), O. canadensis (New Brunswick and Newfoundland), M. minutissima (New Brunswick), and M. yukonensis (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, and British Columbia). The female of M. yukonensis was discovered and is illustrated for the first time. The genus Mniusa is reported for the first time from Canada and represents the first confirmed generic record for North America. Keys for identification of all Canadian species, images of body and genital structures, maps showing distribution mainly in Canada, and new bionomics data are provided.

  5. Host Phenology and Leaf Effects on Susceptibility of California Bay Laurel to Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Steven F; Cohen, Michael F; Torok, Tamas; Meentemeyer, Ross K; Rank, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Spread of the plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of the forest disease sudden oak death, is driven by a few competent hosts that support spore production from foliar lesions. The relationship between traits of a principal foliar host, California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), and susceptibility to P. ramorum infection were investigated with multiple P. ramorum isolates and leaves collected from multiple trees in leaf-droplet assays. We examined whether susceptibility varies with season, leaf age, or inoculum position. Bay laurel susceptibility was highest during spring and summer and lowest in winter. Older leaves (>1 year) were more susceptible than younger ones (8 to 11 months). Susceptibility was greater at leaf tips and edges than the middle of the leaf. Leaf surfaces wiped with 70% ethanol were more susceptible to P. ramorum infection than untreated leaf surfaces. Our results indicate that seasonal changes in susceptibility of U. californica significantly influence P. ramorum infection levels. Thus, in addition to environmental variables such as temperature and moisture, variability in host plant susceptibility contributes to disease establishment of P. ramorum.

  6. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense.

  7. Antibacterial activity of fractions from three Chumash medicinal plant extracts and in vitro inhibition of the enzyme enoyl reductase by the flavonoid jaceosidin.

    PubMed

    Allison, Brittany J; Allenby, Mark C; Bryant, Shane S; Min, Jae Eun; Hieromnimon, Mark; Joyner, P Matthew

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the in vitro antibacterial bioactivity of dichloromethane-soluble fractions of Artemisia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Sambucus nigra ssp. cerulea and Quercus agrifolia Née against a ΔtolC mutant strain of Escherichia coli. These plants are traditional medicinal plants of the Chumash American Indians of Southern California. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of three flavonoid compounds from A. californica: jaceosidin (1), jaceidin (2), and chrysoplenol B (3). Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ΔtolC in liquid cultures. The in vitro activity of 1 against the enoyl reductase enzyme (FabI) was measured using a spectrophotometric assay and found to completely inhibit FabI activity at a concentration of 100 μM. However, comparison of minimum inhibitory concentration values for 1-3 against E. coli ΔtolC and an equivalent strain containing a plasmid constitutively expressing fabI did not reveal any selectivity for FabI in vivo.

  8. Functional consequences of structural differences in stingray sensory systems. Part I: mechanosensory lateral line canals.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura K; Kajiura, Stephen M; Gordon, Malcolm S

    2009-10-01

    Short range hydrodynamic and electrosensory signals are important during final stages of prey capture in elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), and may be particularly useful for dorso-ventrally flattened batoids with mouths hidden from their eyes. In stingrays, both the lateral line canal and electrosensory systems are highly modified and complex with significant differences on ventral surfaces that relate to feeding ecology. This study tests functional hypotheses based on quantified differences in sensory system morphology of three stingray species, Urobatis halleri, Myliobatis californica and Pteroplatytrygon violacea. Part I investigates the mechanosensory lateral line canal system whereas part II focuses on the electrosensory system. Stingray lateral line canals include both pored and non-pored sections and differ in branching complexity and distribution. A greater proportion of pored canals and high pore numbers were predicted to correspond to increased response to water flow. Behavioral experiments were performed to compare responses of stingrays to weak water jets mimicking signals produced by potential prey at velocities of 10-20 cm s(-1). Bat rays, M. californica, have the most complex and broadly distributed pored canal network and demonstrated both the highest response rate and greater response intensity to water jet signals. Results suggest that U. halleri and P. violacea may rely on additional sensory input, including tactile and visual cues, respectively, to initiate stronger feeding responses. These results suggest that stingray lateral line canal morphology can indicate detection capabilities through responsiveness to weak water jets.

  9. Lipase production by yeasts from extra virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Ciafardini, G; Zullo, B A; Iride, A

    2006-02-01

    Newly produced olive oil has an opalescent appearance due to the presence of solid particles and micro-drops of vegetation water from the fruits. Some of our recent microbiological research has shown that a rich micro-flora is present in the suspended fraction of the freshly produced olive oil capable of improving the quality of the oil through the hydrolysis of the oleuropein. Present research however has, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of lipase-positive yeasts in some samples of extra virgin olive oil which can lower the quality of the oil through the hydrolysis of the triglycerides. The tests performed with yeasts of our collection, previously isolated from olive oil, demonstrated that two lipase-producing yeast strains named Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1525 and Williopsis californica 1639 were able to hydrolyse different specific synthetic substrates represented by p-nitrophenyl stearate, 4-nitrophenyl palmitate, tripalmitin and triolein as well as olive oil triglycerides. The lipase activity in S. cerevisiae 1525 was confined to the whole cells, whereas in W. californica 1639 it was also detected in the extracellular fraction. The enzyme activity in both yeasts was influenced by the ratio of the aqueous to the organic phase reaching its maximum value in S. cerevisiae 1525 when the water added to the olive oil was present in a ratio of 0.25% (v/v), whereas in W. californica 1639 the optimal ratio was 1% (v/v). Furthermore, the free fatty acids of olive oil proved to be good inducers of lipase activity in both yeasts. The microbiological analysis carried out on commercial extra virgin olive oil, produced in four different geographic areas, demonstrated that the presence of lipase-producing yeast varied from zero to 56% of the total yeasts detected, according to the source of oil samples. The discovery of lipase-positive yeasts in some extra virgin olive oils leads us to believe that yeasts are able to contribute in a positive or negative way towards

  10. Plant and Root Growth Responses to Heterogeneous Supplies of Soil Water in Two Coastal Shrubs of California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S.; Mahall, B. E.

    2007-05-01

    Much effort has been focused on identifying plant and root growth responses to heterogeneous supplies of soil nutrients. However, in many circumstances, soil water may limit plant growth and it too can have a patchy distribution. In our research we asked: 1) What is the ecological significance of soil moisture heterogeneity to plant growth in a California coastal dune habitat? 2) How does growth of whole plants and roots respond to soil moisture heterogeneity? and 3) Can roots of these species sense and grow towards moisture-rich areas (hydrotropism) in a natural medium? To address these questions: we conducted comparative field studies of water relations and growth of Artemisia californica and Eriogonum parvifolium; we performed a growth rate study of roots and plants in experimental pots with either patchy or homogeneous distributions of soil water; and we analyzed individual root growth in sand-filled observation chambers in response to moisture-rich patches and resultant soil water gradients. In the field, correlations between daily photosynthetic rates, active leaf display and predawn xylem pressure potentials (ΨPD) indicated that access to water limited growth in A. californica and E. parvifolium. These species, common in habit and habitat, differed in their ability to access water with E. parvifolium having overall higher ΨPD than A. californica (repeated measures ANOVA, P < 0.01). Our growth rate study revealed that patchy supplies of water did not reduce the relative growth rate or average size of E. parvifolium (two-tailed t-tests, P > 0.25). It appears that modified partitioning of growth both at the whole plant and root system level permitted E. parvifolium to maintain growth in patchy soil water conditions. We found that E. parvifolium increased allocation to roots and proliferated in moisture-rich patches in the patchy soil water treatment. Root length density and the proportion of root mass present in the patch was 20- to >100-fold greater in and

  11. Functional genomics analysis of free fatty acid production under continuous phosphate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Korosh, Travis C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-10-13

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are an attractive platform chemical that serves as a functional intermediate in metabolic pathways for producing oleochemicals. Many groups have established strains of Escherichia coli capable of producing various chain-length mixtures of FFA by heterologous expression of acyl-ACP thioesterases. For example, high levels of dodecanoic acid are produced by an E. coli strain expressing the Umbellularia californica FatB2 thioesterase, BTE. Prior studies achieved high dodecanoic acid yields and productivities under phosphate-limiting media conditions. In an effort to understand the metabolic and physiological changes that led to increased FFA production, the transcriptome of this strain was assessed as a function of nutrient limitation and growth rate. FFA generation under phosphate limitation led to consistent changes in transporter expression, osmoregulation, and central metabolism. Guided by these results, targeted knockouts led to a further ~11 % in yield in FFA.

  12. Complex coacervates as a foundation for synthetic underwater adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Wang, Ching Shuen; Shao, Hui

    2011-09-14

    Complex coacervation was proposed to play a role in the formation of the underwater bioadhesive of the Sandcastle worm (Phragmatopoma californica) based on the polyacidic and polybasic nature of the glue proteins and the balance of opposite charges at physiological pH. Morphological studies of the secretory system suggested that the natural process does not involve complex coacervation as commonly defined. The distinction may not be important because electrostatic interactions likely play an important role in the formation of the sandcastle glue. Complex coacervation has also been invoked in the formation of adhesive underwater silk fibers of caddisfly larvae and the adhesive plaques of mussels. A process similar to complex coacervation, that is, condensation and dehydration of biopolyelectrolytes through electrostatic associations, seems plausible for the caddisfly silk. This much is clear, the sandcastle glue complex coacervation model provided a valuable blueprint for the synthesis of a biomimetic, water-borne, underwater adhesive with demonstrated potential for repair of wet tissue.

  13. Transcriptome analysis and identification of regulators for long-term plasticity in Aplysia kurodai.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Seok; Choi, Sun-Lim; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Jin-A; Kim, Hyong Kyu; Kim, Hyoung; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jennifer J; Lee, Sunghoon; Sin, Gwang Sik; Kim, Chang-Bae; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Kubo, Tai; Moroz, Leonid L; Kandel, Eric R; Bhak, Jong; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2008-11-25

    The marine mollusk Aplysia is a useful model organism for studying the cellular bases of behavior and plasticity. However, molecular studies of Aplysia have been limited by the lack of genomic information. Recently, a large scale characterization of neuronal transcripts was performed in A. californica. Here, we report the analysis of a parallel set of neuronal transcripts from a closely related species A. kurodai found in the northwestern Pacific. We collected 4,859 nonredundant sequences from the nervous system tissue of A. kurodai. By performing microarray and real-time PCR analyses, we found that ApC/EBP, matrilin, antistasin, and eIF3e clones were significantly up-regulated and a BAT1 homologous clone was significantly down-regulated by 5-HT treatment. Among these, we further demonstrated that the Ap-eIF3e plays a key role in 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) as a positive regulator.

  14. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  15. Effects of pelletized anticoagulant rodenticides on California quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Grove, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A moribund, emaciated California quail (Callipepla californica) that was found in an orchard in the state of Washington had an impacted crop and gizzard. Pellets containing the anticoagulant chlorophacinone (Rozol, RO) were in the crop; the gizzard contents consisted of a pink mass of paraffin that was selectively accumulated from the paraffinized pellets. The plasma prothrombin time of 28 sec was near that determined for control quail. The signs of RO intoxication seen in the moribund wild quail were duplicated in captive quail given ad libitum diets of either RO or another paraffinized chlorophacinone pellet (Mr. Rat Guard II, MRG). This left little doubt that paraffin impaction of the gizzard was the primary problem. All captive quail fed RO or MRG pellets showed no increases in prothrombin times compared to control values, died in an emaciated condition, and had gizzards impacted with paraffin.

  16. Trematodes in snails near raccoon latrines suggest a final host role for this mammal in California Salt Marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, K.D.; Dunham, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Of the 18 trematode species that use the horn snail, Cerithidea californica, as a first intermediate host, 6 have the potential to use raccoons as a final host. The presence of raccoon latrines in Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California, allowed us to investigate associations between raccoons and trematodes in snails. Two trematode species, Probolocoryphe uca and Stictodora hancocki, occurred at higher prevalences in snails near raccoon latrines than in snails away from latrines, suggesting that raccoons may serve as final hosts for these species. Fecal remains indicated that raccoons fed on shore crabs, the second intermediate host for P. uca, and fish, the second intermediate host for S. hancocki. The increase in raccoon populations in the suburban areas surrounding west coast salt marshes could increase their importance as final hosts for trematodes in this system. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2005.

  17. Trematodes in snails near raccoon latrines suggest a final host role for this mammal in California salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, K D; Dunham, E J

    2005-04-01

    Of the 18 trematode species that use the horn snail, Cerithidea californica, as a first intermediate host, 6 have the potential to use raccoons as a final host. The presence of raccoon latrines in Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California, allowed us to investigate associations between raccoons and trematodes in snails. Two trematode species, Probolocoryphe uca and Stictodora hancocki, occurred at higher prevalences in snails near raccoon latrines than in snails away from latrines, suggesting that raccoons may serve as final hosts for these species. Fecal remains indicated that raccoons fed on shore crabs, the second intermediate host for P. uca, and fish, the second intermediate host for S. hancocki. The increase in raccoon populations in the suburban areas surrounding west coast salt marshes could increase their importance as final hosts for trematodes in this system.

  18. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  19. Cloning and characterization of an abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) actin gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongming; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Chen, Hong

    2004-10-01

    An actin encoding gene was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3‧ RACE and 5‧ RACE from abalone Haliotis discus hannai. The full length of the gene is 1532 base pairs, which contains a long 3‧ untranslated region of 307 base pairs and 79 base pairs of 5‧ untranslated sequence. The open reading frame encodes 376 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison with those of human and other mollusks showed high conservation among species at amino acid level. The identities was 96%, 97% and 96% respectively compared with Aplysia californica, Biomphalaria glabrata and Homo sapience β-actin. It is also indicated that this actin is more similar to the human cytoplasmic actin (β-actin) than to human muscle actin.

  20. Why does the yellow-eyed Ensatina have yellow eyes? Batesian mimicry of Pacific newts (genus Taricha) by the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii xanthoptica.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, Shawn R; Krakauer, Alan H; Sinervo, Barry

    2008-04-01

    Color patterns commonly vary geographically within species, but it is rare that such variation corresponds with divergent antipredator strategies. The polymorphic salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii, however, may represent such a case. In this species, most subspecies are cryptically colored, whereas E. e. xanthoptica, the Yellow eyed ensatina, is hypothesized to be an aposematic mimic of highly toxic Pacific newts (genus Taricha). To test the mimicry hypothesis, we conducted feeding trials using Western Scrub-Jays, Aphelocoma californica. In every feeding trial, we found that jays, following presentation with the presumed model (T. torosa), were more hesitant to contact the presumed mimic (E. e. xanthoptica) than a control subspecies lacking the postulated aposematic colors (E. e. oregonensis). The median time to contact was 315 sec for the mimic and 52 sec for the control. These results support the mimicry hypothesis, and we suggest that E. e. xanthoptica is likely a Batesian mimic, rather a Müllerian or quasi-Batesian mimic, of Pacific newts.

  1. Uranium-series age of the Eel Point terrace, San Clemente Island, California

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, D.R.; Szabo, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium-series analysis of the coral Allopora californica Verrill from the 2nd, 32-m Eel Point terrace on San Clemente Island, California, has yielded an age of 127,000 +/- 7,000 yr. The Eel Point terrace is thus correlative with numerous terrace localities on the southern California mainland, with coral reefs on Barbados and New Guinea dated about 120,000 yr, and with substage 5e of the marine oxygen-isotope record. A tectonic uplift rate of about 0.20 m/1,000 yr has been calculated assuming a sea level slightly higher than the present one at the time of terrace formation. Extrapolation of this uplift rate allows age estimates to be made for other terraces on the island.

  2. Uranium series ages of corals from the upper Pleistocene Mulege terrace, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.R.; Ku, T.L.; Minch, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    Specimens of Porites californica contained in the sediments of upper Pleistocene, +12-m marine terrace deposits developed on the east coast of the Baja California (Mexico) peninsula at Mulege have yielded /sup 239/Th//sup 234/U dates of 124 +/- 5 and 144 +/- 7 ka (+/- 1 sigma). These dates can be assigned to the well-documented late Pleistocene oxygen-isotope stage 5e high sea stand. Differences between the eustatic and present elevations of this terrace indicate average uplift rates since terrace formation of approximately 4 to 5 cm/1000 yr, indicating a relative stability and lack of major vertical deformation since the late Pleistocene. This terrace in the Mulege area can now be correlated with other marine terraces throughout the Baja California peninsula and southern California.

  3. Development of a high specific activity radioligand, /sup 125/I-LSD, and its application to the study of serotonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kadan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 125/I-Labeled receptor ligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2000 Ci/mmol, making them nearly 70-fold more sensitive in receptor site assays than (mono) tritiated ligands. We have synthesized and characterized /sup 125/I-lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 125/I-LSD), the first radioiodinated ligand for serotonin receptor studies. The introduction of /sup 125/I at the 2 position of LSD increased both the affinity and selectivity of this compound for serotonin 5-HT/sub 2/ receptors in rat cortex. The high specific activity of /sup 125/I-LSD and its high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding make this ligand especially useful for autoradiographic studies of serotonin receptor distribution. We have found that /sup 125/I-LSD binds with high affinity to a class of serotonin receptors in the CNS of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica.

  4. Molecular systematics and global phylogeography of angel sharks (genus Squatina).

    PubMed

    Stelbrink, Björn; von Rintelen, Thomas; Cliff, Geremy; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Angel sharks of the genus Squatina represent a group comprising 22 extant benthic species inhabiting continental shelves and upper slopes. In the present study, a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of 17 Squatina species based on two mitochondrial markers (COI and 16S rRNA) is provided. The phylogenetic reconstructions are used to test biogeographic patterns. In addition, a molecular clock analysis is conducted to estimate divergence times of the emerged clades. All analyses show Squatina to be monophyletic. Four geographic clades are recognized, of which the Europe-North Africa-Asia clade is probably a result of the Tethys Sea closure. A second sister group relationship emerged in the analyses, including S. californica (eastern North Pacific) and S. dumeril (western North Atlantic), probably related to the rise of the Panamanian isthmus. The molecular clock analysis show that both lineage divergences coincide with the estimated time of these two geological events.

  5. Relationship between sequence conservation and three-dimensional structure in a large family of esterases, lipases, and related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cygler, M.; Schrag, J. D.; Sussman, J. L.; Harel, M.; Silman, I.; Gentry, M. K.; Doctor, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the recently determined X-ray structures of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase and Geotrichum candidum lipase and on their three-dimensional superposition, an improved alignment of a collection of 32 related amino acid sequences of other esterases, lipases, and related proteins was obtained. On the basis of this alignment, 24 residues are found to be invariant in 29 sequences of hydrolytic enzymes, and an additional 49 are well conserved. The conservation in the three remaining sequences is somewhat lower. The conserved residues include the active site, disulfide bridges, salt bridges, and residues in the core of the proteins. Most invariant residues are located at the edges of secondary structural elements. A clear structural basis for the preservation of many of these residues can be determined from comparison of the two X-ray structures. PMID:8453375

  6. [Two new species of the genus Squatina (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae) from the Gulf of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castro-Aguirre, José Luis; Espinosa Pérez, Héctor; Huidobro Campos, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    Two undescribed species of the genus Squatina, caught by bottom-trawl during the OGMEX VIII, IX and PROBEMEX II oceanographic cruises were compared with S. dumeril Lesueur, 1818, the only well known species from the northern Gulf of Mexico. The collections were made off Tamaulipas, Veracruz and Tabasco. The descriptions of the new species refer to morphology, coloration pattern and dorsal fin shape and size. An English description of each species is included. Some specimens erroneously assigned to S. dumeril are deposited in Mexican collections. With these two new species, besides S. californica Ayres, 1859 and S. dumeril, the number of documented species of this genus in Mexico ascends to four, and a total of five are known from the western Atlantic. A key is provided for their identification.

  7. The relative toxicities of several pesticides to naiads of three species of stoneflies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, Herman O.; Cope, Oliver B.

    1968-01-01

    Static bioassays were conducted to determine the relative acute toxicities of some insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, a defoliant, and a molluscicide to the naiads of three species of stonef!y, Pteronarcys califomica, Pteronarcella badia, and Claassenia sabulosa. Toxic effects were measured by determination of median lethal concn (Lcoo) for 24-, 48-, and 96-hr exposures, at 15.5C. Endrin and dieldrin were the most and DDT the least toxic of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides tested. Parathion was the most toxic organophosphate insecticide to P. califomica naiads, but dursban was the most toxic to P. badia and C. sabulosa naiads. Trichlorofon ( Dipterex) was the least toxic to all three species. P. badia, the species of smallest size, was the species most susceptible to most pesticides, followed in descending order of sensitivity by C. sabulosa and P. califomica. Smaller specimens of P. californica naiads were consistently more susceptible to some insecticides than larger specimens of the same species.

  8. Statoconia formation in molluscan statocysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederhold, M. L.; Sheridan, C. E.; Smith, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    The gravity sensors of all molluscs phylogenetically below the cephalopods are spherical organs called statocysts. The wall of the sphere contains mechanosensory cells whose sensory cilia project into the lumen of the cyst. The lumen is filled with fluid and dense "stones", the statoconia or statoliths, which sink under the influence of gravity to load, and stimulate, those receptor cells which are at the bottom. The statoconia of Aplysia californica are shown to be calcified about a lamellar arrangement of membranes. Similar lamellar membrane arrangements are seen within the receptor cells, and their possible role in the formation of the statoconia is discussed. SEM of unfixed statoconia reveals plate-like crystallization on their surface. Elemental analysis shows a relatively high Sr content, which is of interest, since others have recently reported that Sr is required in the culture medium of several laboratory reared molluscs in order for the statoconia to develop.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative metabolomic investigation of single neurons by capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Peter; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Aerts, Jordan T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) empowers metabolomic investigations by decreasing analytical dimensions to the size of individual cells and subcellular structures. We describe a protocol for investigating and quantifying metabolites in individual isolated neurons using single-cell capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS. The protocol requires ~2 h for sample preparation, neuron isolation, and metabolite extraction, and 1 h for metabolic measurement. The approach was used to detect more than 300 distinct compounds in the mass range of typical metabolites in various individual neurons (25–500-µm in diameter) isolated from the sea slug (Aplysia californica) central and rat (Rattus norvegicus) peripheral nervous systems. A subset of identified compounds was sufficient to reveal metabolic differences among freshly isolated neurons of different types and changes in the metabolite profiles of cultured neurons. The protocol can be applied to the characterization of the metabolome in a variety of smaller cells and/or subcellular domains. PMID:23538882

  10. Synthesis and discovery of highly functionalized mono- and bis-spiro-pyrrolidines as potent cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kia, Yalda; Osman, Hasnah; Suresh Kumar, Raju; Basiri, Alireza; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2014-04-01

    Novel mono and bis spiropyrrolidine derivatives were synthesized via an efficient ionic liquid mediated, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition methodology and evaluated in vitro for their AChE and BChE inhibitory activities in search for potent cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed remarkable AChE inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 1.68 to 21.85 μM, wherein compounds 8d and 8j were found to be most active inhibitors against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 1.68 and 2.75 μM, respectively. Molecular modeling simulation on Torpedo californica AChE and human BChE receptors, showed good correlation between IC50 values and binding interaction template of the most active inhibitors docked into the active site of their relevant enzymes.

  11. Soils and vegetation of Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, William L.; Fenn, Dennis B.; Allardice, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The multifaceted development of an erosion surface on Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, has led to this study of the relationship between soils and vegetation. A dry Mediterranean climate and past attempts at farming and introductions of alien species have led to vegetative degradation accompanied by both gully and surface erosion. Soil and vegetation analyses show this erosion to be in a location of transition. The soils are Typic Chromoxererts (Vertisol Order) with high clay, salinity, and sodium contents. The vegetation is ecotonal in nature, grading from a principally alien annual grassland with Avena fatua and Atriplex semibaccata to a shrub community dominated by the native Suaeda californica. Management toward revegetation and stabilization of this island ecosystem will be difficult with high clay, saline-sodic soils and disturbed vegetation.

  12. Hybrid Viability and Fertility in Co-occuring Plant Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, E.; Garcia, C.; Yost, J.

    2012-12-01

    Similar species of plants can co-exist due to reproductive barriers that keep them from hybridizing. In the case of Lasthenia gracilis and L. californica, certain reproductive barriers allow them to co-exist at Jasper Ridge without hybridization. The two species are locally adapted to different regions of the same hillside, and have slight differences in flowering time but hybrids can be created at low rate in the green house. We tested the viability and fertility of green house produced hybrids to quantify post-zygotic reproductive isolation at Jasper Ridge. We planted 10 hybrid seeds and 10 control seeds from 11 different families. We measured the percent germination, survival to flowering and pollen fertility of the seeds. We expect lower germination, lower survival to flowering, and lower pollen viability of hybrid seeds as compared to control seeds.

  13. Characterization of alpha-conotoxin interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcom, J D; Stiles, B G

    1997-01-01

    The venoms of predatory marine cone snails, Conus species, contain numerous peptides and proteins with remarkably diverse pharmacological properties. One group of peptides are the alpha-conotoxins, which consist of 13-19 amino acids constrained by two disulphide bonds. A biologically active fluorescein derivative of Conus geographus alpha-conotoxin GI (FGI) was used in novel solution-phase-binding assays with purified Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and monoclonal antibodies developed against the toxin. The binding of FGI to nAchR or antibody had apparent dissociation constants of 10-100 nM. Structure-function studies with alpha-conotoxin GI analogues composed of a single disulphide loop revealed that different conformational restraints are necessary for effective toxin interactions with nAchR or antibodies. PMID:9359860

  14. Geosmithia morbida sp. nov., a new phytopathogenic species living in symbiosis with the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) on Juglans in USA.

    PubMed

    Kolarík, Miroslav; Freeland, Emily; Utley, Curtis; Tisserat, Ned

    2011-01-01

    Widespread morbidity and mortality of Juglans nigra has occurred in the western USA over the past decade. Tree mortality is the result of aggressive feeding by the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) and subsequent canker development around beetle galleries caused by a filamentous ascomycete in genus Geosmithia (Ascomycota: Hypocreales). Thirty-seven Geosmithia strains collected from J. californica, J. hindsii, J. major and J. nigra in seven USA states (AZ, CA, CO, ID, OR, UT, WA) were compared with morphological and molecular methods (ITS rDNA sequences). Strains had common characteristics including yellowish conidia en masse, growth at 37 C and absence of growth on Czapek-Dox agar and belonged to a single species described here as G. morbida. Whereas Geosmithia are common saprobes associated with bark beetles attacking hardwoods and conifers worldwide, G. morbida is the first species documented as a plant pathogen.

  15. Small estuarine fishes feed on large trematode cercariae: Lab and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaplan, A.T.; Rebhal, S.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, dense populations of snails can shed millions of digenean trematode cercariae every day. These short-lived, free-living larvae are rich in energy and present a potential resource for consumers. We investigated whether estuarine fishes eat cercariae shed by trematodes of the estuarine snail Cerithidea californica. In aquaria we presented cercariae from 10 native trematode species to 6 species of native estuarine fishes. Many of these fishes readily engorged on cercariae. To determine if fishes ate cercariae in the field, we collected the most common fish species, Fundulus parvipinnis (California killifish), from shallow water on rising tides when snails shed cercariae. Of 61 killifish, 3 had recognizable cercariae in their gut. Because cercariae are common in this estuary, they could be frequent sources of energy for small fishes. In turn, predation on cercariae by fishes (and other predators) could also reduce the transmission success of trematodes. ?? 2009 American Society of Parasitologists.

  16. A new species of Helobdella (Hirudinida: Glossiphoniidae) from Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Moser, William E; Fend, Steven V; Richardson, Dennis J; Hammond, Charlotte I; Lazo-Wasem, Eric A; Govedich, Fredric R; Gullo, Bettina S

    2013-01-01

    Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is described from specimens collected in fine sediment of open water benthos of Upper Klamath Lake, Klamath County, Oregon. The new species has pale yellow/buff coloration with scattered chromatophore blotches throughout the dorsal surface, lateral extensions or papillae only on the a2 annulus, dorsal medial row of papillae with small papilla on al and larger papillae on a2 and a3, and a small oval scute (rarely triangular). Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is morphologically similar to Helobdella atli and Helobdella simplex. Molecular comparison of CO-I sequence data from H. bowermani n. sp. revealed differences of 10.6/--10.8% with Helobdella californica, differences of 12.2%-13.7% with H. atli, and differences of 12.7%-13.2% with H. simplex.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Smilax sieboldii (Smilacaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yalu; Cheng, Ruijing; Shang, Jing; Zhao, Yunpeng; Li, Pan; Fu, Chengxin

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Smilax sieboldii (Smilacaceae), a member of the S. hispida group with a biogeographic disjunction between eastern Asia and North America, to study the phylogeography and incipient speciation of this species and its close relatives. Methods and Results: Transcriptome sequencing produced 47,628 unigenes. Seventeen loci were developed from 122 randomly selected primer pairs. Polymorphism and genetic variation were evaluated for 68 accessions representing five populations of S. sieboldii. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 18; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.59 to 0.92. Twelve loci were successfully amplified in five related species: S. scobinicaulis, S. californica, S. hispida, S. moranensis, and S. jalapensis. Conclusions: These novel expressed sequence tag–derived microsatellite markers will facilitate further population genetic research of S. sieboldii and its close allies of the S. hispida group. PMID:28337395

  18. A new species of Helobdella (Hirudinida: Glossiphoniidae) from Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moser, William E.; Fend, Steven V.; Richardson, Dennis J.; Hammond, Charlette I.; Lazo-Wasem, Eric A.; Govedich, Fredric R.; Gullo, Bettina S.

    2013-01-01

    Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is described from specimens collected in fine sediment of open water benthos of Upper Klamath Lake, Klamath County, Oregon. The new species has pale yellow/buff coloration with scattered chromatophore blotches throughout the dorsal surface, lateral extensions or papillae only on the a2 annulus, dorsal medial row of papillae with small papilla on a1 and larger papillae on a2 and a3, and a small oval scute (rarely triangular). Helobdella bowermani n. sp. is morphologically similar to Helobdella atli and Helobdella simplex. Molecular comparison of CO-I sequence data from H. bowermani n. sp. revealed differences of 10.6%–10.8% with Helobdella californica, differences of 12.2%–13.7% with H. atli, and differences of 12.7%–13.2% with H. simplex.

  19. The influence of Aster x salignus Willd. Invasion on the diversity of soil yeast communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushakova, A. M.; Kachalkin, A. V.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The annual dynamics of yeast communities were studied in the soddy-podzolic soil under the thickets of Aster x salignus Willd., one of the widespread invasive plant species in central Russia. Yeast groups in the soils under continuous aster thickets were found to differ greatly from the yeast communities in the soils under the adjacent indigenous meadow vegetation. In both biotopes the same species ( Candida vartiovaarae, Candida sake, and Cryptococcus terreus) are dominants. However, in the soils under indigenous grasses, eurybiontic yeasts Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, which almost never occur in the soil under aster, are widespread. In the soil under aster, the shares of other typical epiphytic and pedobiontic yeast fungi (ascomycetic species Wickerhamomyces aniomalus, Barnettozyma californica and basidiomycetic species Cystofilobasidium macerans, Guehomyces pullulans) significantly increase. Thus, the invasion of Aster x salignus has a clear effect on soil yeast complexes reducing their taxonomic and ecological diversity.

  20. Histopathology and Host Range Studies of the Redwood Nematode Rhizonema sequoiae

    PubMed Central

    Cid Del Prado Vera, I.; Lownsbery, B. F.

    1984-01-01

    Second-stage larvae of Rehizonma sequoiae Cid del Prado Vera et al. tunnel through the cortex of the redwood Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. root to the vascular tissue where each developing female induces a single ovoid or occasionally spherical giant cell with a single ovoid to spherical nucleus containing one to four enlarged nucleoli. Nematode tunnels are filled with a gel material and often contain second-stage larvae and males. There is tissue necrosis around females, and cortical tissue is destroyed after infection by many second-stage larvae. R. sequoiae females developed to maturity on S. sempervirens, Acer macrophyllum Pursh, AInus rhombifolia Nutt., Libocedrus decurrens Torr, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, and Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Decne. In the Marin County, California, forest mature females were also found naturally infecting Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook &Arn.) Rehd., Umbellularia californica (Hook &Arn.) Nutt., and Arbutus menziesii Pursh. PMID:19295877

  1. Histopathology and Host Range Studies of the Redwood Nematode Rhizonema sequoiae.

    PubMed

    Cid Del Prado Vera, I; Lownsbery, B F

    1984-01-01

    Second-stage larvae of Rehizonma sequoiae Cid del Prado Vera et al. tunnel through the cortex of the redwood Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. root to the vascular tissue where each developing female induces a single ovoid or occasionally spherical giant cell with a single ovoid to spherical nucleus containing one to four enlarged nucleoli. Nematode tunnels are filled with a gel material and often contain second-stage larvae and males. There is tissue necrosis around females, and cortical tissue is destroyed after infection by many second-stage larvae. R. sequoiae females developed to maturity on S. sempervirens, Acer macrophyllum Pursh, AInus rhombifolia Nutt., Libocedrus decurrens Torr, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, and Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Decne. In the Marin County, California, forest mature females were also found naturally infecting Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook &Arn.) Rehd., Umbellularia californica (Hook &Arn.) Nutt., and Arbutus menziesii Pursh.

  2. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, H.L.; Chapin, F.S. III; Field, C.B.

    1995-06-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients altered interspecific competitive performance of three grassland annuals, all exhibiting the C{sub 3} metabolic pathway. Plantago erecta, an herbaceous dicot dominant in low-fertility serpentine grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at low soil nutrients. Bromus hordeaceus, an introduced grass dominant in higher fertility sandstone grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Plantago was slightly enhanced under elevated CO{sub 2}, but only at high soil nutrients, whereas interspecific competitive ability of Bromus was stimulated under elevated CO{sub 2} at both low and high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Lasthenia californica, another herbaceous dicot common in serpentine grassland, was low in all treatments, and tended to decrease with elevated CO{sub 2} at low soil nutrients. Our results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may shift plant species abundance of serpentine grassland in favor of Bromus hordeaceus.

  3. Single-Cell Metabolomics: Changes in the Metabolome of Freshly Isolated and Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites are involved in a diverse range of intracellular processes, including a cell’s response to a changing extracellular environment. Using single-cell capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we investigated how placing individual identified neurons in culture affects their metabolic profile. First, glycerol-based cell stabilization was evaluated using metacerebral neurons from Aplysia californica; the measurement error was reduced from ∼24% relative standard deviation to ∼6% for glycerol-stabilized cells compared to those isolated without glycerol stabilization. In order to determine the changes induced by culturing, 14 freshly isolated and 11 overnight-cultured neurons of two metabolically distinct cell types from A. californica, the B1 and B2 buccal neurons, were characterized. Of the more than 300 distinctive cell-related signals detected, 35 compounds were selected for their known biological roles and compared among each measured cell. Unsupervised multivariate and statistical analysis revealed robust metabolic differences between these two identified neuron types. We then compared the changes induced by overnight culturing; metabolite concentrations were distinct for 26 compounds in the cultured B1 cells. In contrast, culturing had less influence on the metabolic profile of the B2 neurons, with only five compounds changing significantly. As a result of these culturing-induced changes, the metabolic composition of the B1 neurons became indistinguishable from the cultured B2 cells. This observation suggests that the two cell types differentially regulate their in vivo or in vitro metabolomes in response to a changing environment. PMID:23077722

  4. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD)1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs. PMID:22974368

  5. Mouse VAP33 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Skehel, P. A.; Fabian-Fine, R.; Kandel, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is a synaptic vesicle protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release. Intracellular injection of antisera against the Aplysia californica VAMP/synaptobrevin-binding protein ApVAP33 inhibited evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in cultured cells, suggesting that this association may regulate the function of VAMP/synaptobrevin. We have identified and characterized a mouse homologue of ApVAP33, mVAP33. The overall domain structure of the proteins is conserved, and they have similar biochemical properties. mVAP33 mRNA is detectable in all mouse tissues examined, in contrast to the more restricted expression seen in A. californica. We analyzed the cellular distribution of mVAP33 protein in brain slices and cultured cortical cells by light and electron microscopy. Although present at higher levels in neurons, immunoreactivity was detected throughout both neurons and glia in a reticular pattern similar to that of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins. mVAP33 does not colocalize with VAMP/synaptobrevin at synaptic structures, but expression overlaps with lower levels of VAMP/synaptobrevin in the soma. Ultrastructural analysis revealed mVAP33 associated with microtubules and intracellular vesicles of heterogeneous size. In primary neuronal cultures, large aggregates of mVAP33 are also detected in short filamentous structures, which are occasionally associated with intracellular membranes. There is no evidence for accumulation of mVAP33 on synaptic vesicles or at the plasma membrane. These data suggest that mVAP33 is an endoplasmic-reticulum–resident protein that associates with components of the cytoskeleton. Any functional interaction between mVAP33 and VAMP/synaptobrevin, therefore, most likely involves the delivery of components to synaptic terminals rather than a direct participation in synaptic vesicle exocytosis. PMID:10655491

  6. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew C; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Reed, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  7. Using larval trematodes that parasitize snails to evaluate a saltmarsh restoration project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huspeni, Todd C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study using larval digeneans infecting the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica, to evaluate the success of an ecological restoration project at Carpinteria Salt Marsh in California, USA. Digenean trematodes are parasites with complex life cycles requiring birds and other vertebrates as final hosts. We tested two hypotheses for prevalence and species richness of larval trematodes in C. californica: (1) prior to the restoration, sites to be restored would have lower trematode prevalence and species richness relative to unimpacted control sites, and (2) that these differences would diminish after restoration. The sites to be restored were initially degraded for trematode species. They had a mean trematode prevalence (12%) and species richness (4.5 species) that were lower than control sites (28% trematode prevalence and 7 species). Despite the differences in prevalence, the proportional representation of each trematode species in the total community was similar between sites to be restored and control sites. Over the six years following restoration, trematode prevalence nearly quadrupled at restored sites (43%) while the prevalence at control sites (26%) remained unchanged. In addition, species richness at restored sites doubled (9 species), while species richness at the control sites (7.8 species) did not change. Immediately after restoration, the relative abundance of trematode species using fishes as second intermediate hosts declined while those using molluscs as second intermediate hosts increased. Trematode communities at restored and control sites gradually returned to being similar. We interpret the increase in trematode prevalence and species richness at restored sites to be a direct consequence of changes in bird use of the restored habitat. This study demonstrates a new comparative technique for assessing wetlands, and while it does not supplant biotic surveys, it informs such taxonomic lists. Most

  8. Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula; Lepidoptera, Prodoxidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Pellmyr, Olof; Balcazar-Lara, Manuel; Segraves, Kari A.; Althoff, David M.; Littlefield, Rik J.

    2008-02-01

    ABSTRACT The yucca moths (Tegeticula and Parategeticula; Lepidoptera, Prodoxidae) are well-known for their obligate relationship as exclusive pollinators of yuccas. Revisionary work in recent years has revealed far higher species diversity than historically recognized, increasing the number of described species from four to 21. Based on field surveys in Mexico and examination of collections, we describe five additional species: T. californica Pellmyr sp. nov., T. tehuacana Pellmyr & Balcázar-Lara sp. nov., T. tambasi Pellmyr & Balcázar-Lara sp. nov., T. baja Pellmyr & Balcázar-Lara sp. nov., and P. californica Pellmyr & Balcázar-Lara sp. nov. Tegeticula treculeanella Pellmyr is identified as a junior synonym of T. mexicana Bastida. A diagnostic key to the adults of all species of the T. yuccasella complex is provided. A phylogeny based on a 2104-bp segment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytochrome oxidase I and II region supported monophyly of the two pollinator genera, and strongly supported monophyly of the 17 recognized species of the T. yuccasella complex. Most relationships are well-supported, but some relationships within a recent and rapidly diversified group of 11 taxa are less robust, and in one case conflicts with a whole-genome data set (AFLP). The current mtDNA-based analyses, together with previously published AFLP data, provide a robust phylogenetic foundation for future studies of life history evolution and host interactions in one of the classical models of coevolution and obligate mutualism. ADDITIONAL KEY WORDS: mutualism, pollination, molecular phylogenetics, mitochondrial DNA

  9. Ulva (Chlorophyta, Ulvales) Biodiversity in the North Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean, Italy): Cryptic Species and New Introductions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marion A; Sciuto, Katia; Andreoli, Carlo; Moro, Isabella

    2012-12-01

    Ulva Linnaeus (Ulvophyceae, Ulvales) is a genus of green algae widespread in different aquatic environments. Members of this genus show a very simple morphology and a certain degree of phenotypic plasticity, heavily influenced by environmental conditions, making difficult the delineation of species by morphological features alone. Most studies dealing with Ulva biodiversity in Mediterranean waters have been based only on morphological characters and a modern taxonomic revision of this genus in the Mediterranean is not available. We report here the results of an investigation on the diversity of Ulva in the North Adriatic Sea based on molecular analyses. Collections from three areas, two of which subject to intense shipping traffic, were examined, as well as historical collections of Ulva stored in the Herbarium Patavinum of the University of Padova, Italy. Molecular analyses based on partial sequences of the rbcL and tufA genes revealed the presence of six different species, often with overlapping morphologies: U. californica Wille, U. flexuosa Wulfen, U. rigida C. Agardh, U. compressa Linnaeus, U. pertusa Kjellman, and one probable new taxon. U. californica is a new record for the Mediterranean and U. pertusa is a new record for the Adriatic. Partial sequences obtained from historical collections show that most of the old specimens are referable to U. rigida. No specimens referable to the two alien species were found among the old herbarium specimens. The results indicate that the number of introduced seaweed species and their impact on Mediterranean communities have been underestimated, due to the difficulties in species identification of morphologically simple taxa as Ulva.

  10. Influence of land-cover change on the spread of an invasive forest pathogen.

    PubMed

    Meentemeyer, Ross K; Rank, Nathan E; Anacker, Brian L; Rizzo, David M; Cushman, J Hall

    2008-01-01

    Human-caused changes in land use and land cover have dramatically altered ecosystems worldwide and may facilitate the spread of infectious diseases. To address this issue, we examined the influence of land-cover changes between 1942 and 2000 on the establishment of an invasive pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, which causes the forest disease known as Sudden Oak Death. We assessed effects of land-cover change, forest structure, and understory microclimate on measures of inoculum load and disease prevalence in 102 15 x 15 m plots within a 275-km2 region in northern California. Within a 150 m radius area around each plot, we mapped types of land cover (oak woodland, chaparral, grassland, vineyard, and development) in 1942 and 2000 using detailed aerial photos. During this 58-year period, oak woodlands significantly increased in area by 25%, while grassland and chaparral decreased by 34% and 51%, respectively. Analysis of covariance revealed that vegetation type in 1942 and woodland expansion were significant predictors of pathogen inoculum load in bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), the primary inoculum-producing host for P. ramorum in mixed evergreen forests. Path analysis showed that woodland expansion resulted in larger forests with higher densities of the primary host trees (U. californica, Quercus agrifolia, Q. kelloggii) and cooler understory temperatures. Together, the positive effects of woodland size and negative effects of understory temperature explained significant variation in inoculum load and disease prevalence in bay laurel; host stem density had additional positive effects on inoculum load. We conclude that enlargement of woodlands and closure of canopy gaps, likely due largely to years of fire suppression, facilitated establishment of P. ramorum by increasing the area occupied by inoculum-production foliar hosts and enhancing forest microclimate conditions. Epidemiological studies that incorporate land-use change are rare but may increase

  11. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Binding of nitroxide analogs of a local anesthetic and a photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance was used to contrast the accessibility of tertiary and quaternary amine local anesthetics to their high affinity binding site in the desensitized Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AchR). Preincubation of AchR-rich membranes with agonist resulted in a substantial reduction in the initial association of the quaternary amine local anesthetic C6SLMEI with the receptor. The time-dependent reduction in association follows a biphasic exponential function having rate constants of 0.19 min{sup {minus}1} and 0.03 min{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, agonist preincubation did not produce a comparable decrease in the association of C6SL, a tertiary amine analog, with the AchR. The results are modeled in two ways: (1) A charge gate near the channel mouth in the desensitized receptor limits access of the permanently charged cationic local anesthetic (C6SLMEI), but not for the uncharged form of the tertiary amine anesthetic C6SL. (2) A hydrophobic pathway, possibly through a corridor in the annular lipid surrounding receptor subunits, allows the uncharged form of C6SL to reach the high affinity binding site in the AchR. A photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine {sup 125}I 4-azido salicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS) was use to label both Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and reconstituted AchR membranes. All four subunits of the AchR were found to incorporate label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporate {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. Eighty-one per cent of the incorporated label was localized to 11.7 and 10.1 kdal V8 cleavage fragments.

  12. Flowering responses of insect-pollinated plants to elevated CO{sub 2} levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Koch, G.W.; Chiariello, N.R. ||

    1995-06-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have been predicted or shown to substantially influence plants, communities and ecosystems in a variety of ways. Here, we examined the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} levels on the timing and magnitude of flowering for two insect-pollinated annual plant species in a serpentine grassland. We focused on Lasthenia californica and Linanthus parviflorus and addressed three questions: (1) Do elevated CO{sub 2} levels influence flowering phenologies and is this species specific? (2) Do elevated CO{sub 2} levels affect flower production and is this due to altered numbers of individuals, flowers per plant, or both? and (3) Are effects on flowering due to elevated CO{sub 2} levels per se or changes in environmental conditions associated with methods used to manipulate CO{sub 2} levels? To address these questions, we used the ecosystem experiment at Stanford University`s Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (San Mateo Co., CA). This system consists of 20 open-topped chambers - half receiving ambient CO{sub 2} (360 ppm) and half receiving elevated CO{sub 2} (720 ppm) - and 10 untreated plots serving as chamber controls. Results from the 1994 season demonstrated that there were species-specific responses to elevated CO{sub 2} levels and the field chambers. For Lasthenia californica, elevated CO{sub 2} per se did not affect relative abundance, inflorescence production, or phenology, but chambers did significantly increase inflorescence production and extend the duration of flowering. For Linanthus parviflorus, elevated CO{sub 2} levels significantly increased relative abundance and flower production, and extended the flowering period slightly, while the chambers significantly decreased flower production early in the season and increased it later in the season.

  13. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Jarrett E.K.; Reed, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  14. Characterization of the peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) from the venom ducts of neogastropods, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Hasan, Sabah; Burgess, Daniel M.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Li, Qing; Hu, Hao; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.

    2014-01-01

    Cone snails, genus Conus, are predatory marine snails that use venom to capture their prey. This venom contains a diverse array of peptide toxins, known as conotoxins, which undergo a diverse set of posttranslational modifications. Amidating enzymes modify peptides and proteins containing a C-terminal glycine residue, resulting in loss of the glycine residue and amidation of the preceding residue. A significant fraction of peptides present in the venom of cone snails contain C-terminal amidated residues, which are important for optimizing biological activity. This study describes the characterization of the amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), present in the venom duct of cone snails, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus. PAM is known to carry out two functions, peptidyl α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and peptidylamido-glycolate lyase (PAL). In some animals, such as Drosophila melanogaster, these two functions are present in separate polypeptides, working as individual enzymes. In other animals, such as mammals and in Aplysia californica, PAM activity resides in a single, bifunctional polypeptide. Using specific oligonucleotide primers and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction we have identified and cloned from the venom duct cDNA library, a cDNA with 49% homology to PAM from A. californica. We have determined that both the PHM and PAL activities are encoded in one mRNA polynucleotide in both C. bullatus and C. geographus. We have directly demonstrated enzymatic activity catalyzing the conversion of dansyl-YVG-COOH to dansyl-YV-NH2 in cloned cDNA expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. PMID:23994590

  15. Identification of Essential Genes in the Salmonella Phage SPN3US Reveals Novel Insights into Giant Phage Head Structure and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Benítez Quintana, Andrea Denisse; Bosch, Martine A.; Coll De Peña, Adriana; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Coulibaly, Assitan; Wu, Weimin; Osier, Michael V.; Hudson, André O.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Giant tailed bacterial viruses, or phages, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage ϕKZ, have long genomes packaged into large, atypical virions. Many aspects of ϕKZ and related phage biology are poorly understood, mostly due to the fact that the functions of the majority of their proteins are unknown. We hypothesized that the Salmonella enterica phage SPN3US could be a useful model phage to address this gap in knowledge. The 240-kb SPN3US genome shares a core set of 91 genes with ϕKZ and related phages, ∼61 of which are virion genes, consistent with the expectation that virion complexity is an ancient, conserved feature. Nucleotide sequencing of 18 mutants enabled assignment of 13 genes as essential, information which could not have been determined by sequence-based searches for 11 genes. Proteome analyses of two SPN3US virion protein mutants with knockouts in 64 and 241 provided new insight into the composition and assembly of giant phage heads. The 64 mutant analyses revealed all the genetic determinants required for assembly of the SPN3US head and a likely head-tail joining role for gp64, and its homologs in related phages, due to the tailless-particle phenotype produced. Analyses of the mutation in 241, which encodes an RNA polymerase β subunit, revealed that without this subunit, no other subunits are assembled into the head, and enabled identification of a “missing” β′ subunit domain. These findings support SPN3US as an excellent model for giant phage research, laying the groundwork for future analyses of their highly unusual virions, host interactions, and evolution. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in virology with the realization that extremely large viruses infecting prokaryotes (giant phages) can be found in many environments. A group of phages related to the prototype giant phage ϕKZ are of great interest due to their virions being among the most complex of prokaryotic viruses and their potential for

  16. Genome sequence of a baculovirus pathogenic for Culex nigripalpus.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Tulman, E R; Lu, Z; Balinsky, C A; Moser, B A; Becnel, J J; Rock, D L; Kutish, G F

    2001-11-01

    In this report we describe the complete genome sequence of a nucleopolyhedrovirus that infects larval stages of the mosquito Culex nigripalpus (CuniNPV). The CuniNPV genome is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule of 108,252 bp and is predicted to contain 109 genes. Although 36 of these genes show homology to genes from other baculoviruses, their orientation and order exhibit little conservation relative to the genomes of lepidopteran baculoviruses. CuniNPV genes homologous to those from other baculoviruses include genes involved in early and late gene expression (lef-4, lef-5, lef-8, lef-9, vlf-1, and p47), DNA replication (lef-1, lef-2, helicase-1, and dna-pol), and structural functions (vp39, vp91, odv-ec27, odv-e56, p6.9, gp41, p74, and vp1054). Auxiliary genes include homologues of genes encoding the p35 antiapoptosis protein and a novel insulin binding-related protein. In contrast to these conserved genes, CuniNPV lacks apparent homologues of baculovirus genes essential (ie-1 and lef-3) or stimulatory (ie-2, lef-7, pe38) for DNA replication. Also, baculovirus genes essential or stimulatory for early-late (ie-1, ie-2), early (ie-0 and pe-38), and late (lef-6, lef-11, and pp31) gene transcription are not identifiable. In addition, CuniNPV lacks homologues of genes involved in the formation of virogenic stroma (pp31), nucleocapsid (orf1629, p87, and p24), envelope of occluded virions (odv-e25, odv-e66, odv-e18), and polyhedra (polyhedrin/granulin, p10, pp34, and fp25k). A homologue of gp64, a budded virus envelope fusion protein, was also absent, although a gene related to the other category of baculovirus budded virus envelope proteins, Ld130, was present. The absence of homologues of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) envelope proteins and occlusion body (OB) protein (polyhedrin) suggests that both CuniNPV ODV and OB may be structurally and compositionally different from those found in terrestrial lepidopteran hosts. The striking difference in genome

  17. Cyclic Avian Mass Mortality in the Northeastern United States Is Associated with a Novel Orthomyxovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Jennifer R.; Tesh, Robert B.; Brown, Justin D.; Ruder, Mark G.; Keel, M. Kevin; Munk, Brandon A.; Mickley, Randall M.; Gibbs, Samantha E. J.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Ellis, Julie C.; Ip, Hon S.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Ghedin, Elodie; Holmes, Edward C.; Parrish, Colin R.; Dwyer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 1998, cyclic mortality events in common eiders (Somateria mollissima), numbering in the hundreds to thousands of dead birds, have been documented along the coast of Cape Cod, MA, USA. Although longitudinal disease investigations have uncovered potential contributing factors responsible for these outbreaks, detecting a primary etiological agent has proven enigmatic. Here, we identify a novel orthomyxovirus, tentatively named Wellfleet Bay virus (WFBV), as a potential causative agent of these outbreaks. Genomic analysis of WFBV revealed that it is most closely related to members of the Quaranjavirus genus within the family Orthomyxoviridae. Similar to other members of the genus, WFBV contains an alphabaculovirus gp64-like glycoprotein that was demonstrated to have fusion activity; this also tentatively suggests that ticks (and/or insects) may vector the virus in nature. However, in addition to the six RNA segments encoding the prototypical structural proteins identified in other quaranjaviruses, a previously unknown RNA segment (segment 7) encoding a novel protein designated VP7 was discovered in WFBV. Although WFBV shows low to moderate levels of sequence similarity to Quaranfil virus and Johnston Atoll virus, the original members of the Quaranjavirus genus, additional antigenic and genetic analyses demonstrated that it is closely related to the recently identified Cygnet River virus (CyRV) from South Australia, suggesting that WFBV and CyRV may be geographic variants of the same virus. Although the identification of WFBV in part may resolve the enigma of these mass mortality events, the details of the ecology and epidemiology of the virus remain to be determined. IMPORTANCE The emergence or reemergence of viral pathogens resulting in large-scale outbreaks of disease in humans and/or animals is one of the most important challenges facing biomedicine. For example, understanding how orthomyxoviruses such as novel influenza A virus reassortants and

  18. Female dietary bias towards large migratory moths in the European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis)

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Martin F. V.

    2016-01-01

    In bats, sexual segregation has been described in relation to differential use of roosting and foraging habitats. It is possible that variation may also exist between genders in the use of different prey types. However, until recently this idea was difficult to test owing to poorly resolved taxonomy of dietary studies. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing to describe gender-related variation in diet composition of the European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis), while controlling for effects of age and season. We analysed guano pellets collected from 143 individuals mist-netted from April to October 2012 and 2013, in northeast Portugal. Moths (Lepidoptera; mainly Noctuidae and Geometridae) were by far the most frequently recorded prey, occurring in nearly all samples and accounting for 96 out of 115 prey taxa. There were significant dietary differences between males and females, irrespective of age and season. Compared to males, females tended to consume larger moths and more moths of migratory behaviour (e.g. Autographa gamma). Our study provides the first example of gender-related dietary variation in bats, illustrating the value of novel molecular tools for revealing intraspecific variation in food resource use in bats and other insectivores. PMID:27009885

  19. Seasonal migration to high latitudes results in major reproductive benefits in an insect

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jason W.; Bell, James R.; Burgin, Laura E.; Reynolds, Donald R.; Pettersson, Lars B.; Hill, Jane K.; Bonsall, Michael B.; Thomas, Jeremy A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the population dynamics of long-range insect migrants, and it has been suggested that the annual journeys of billions of nonhardy insects to exploit temperate zones during summer represent a sink from which future generations seldom return (the “Pied Piper” effect). We combine data from entomological radars and ground-based light traps to show that annual migrations are highly adaptive in the noctuid moth Autographa gamma (silver Y), a major agricultural pest. We estimate that 10–240 million immigrants reach the United Kingdom each spring, but that summer breeding results in a fourfold increase in the abundance of the subsequent generation of adults, all of which emigrate southward in the fall. Trajectory simulations show that 80% of emigrants will reach regions suitable for winter breeding in the Mediterranean Basin, for which our population dynamics model predicts a winter carrying capacity only 20% of that of northern Europe during the summer. We conclude not only that poleward insect migrations in spring result in major population increases, but also that the persistence of such species is dependent on summer breeding in high-latitude regions, which requires a fundamental change in our understanding of insect migration. PMID:22927392

  20. Wind selection and drift compensation optimize migratory pathways in a high-flying moth.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jason W; Reynolds, Don R; Mouritsen, Henrik; Hill, Jane K; Riley, Joe R; Sivell, Duncan; Smith, Alan D; Woiwod, Ian P

    2008-04-08

    Numerous insect species undertake regular seasonal migrations in order to exploit temporary breeding habitats [1]. These migrations are often achieved by high-altitude windborne movement at night [2-6], facilitating rapid long-distance transport, but seemingly at the cost of frequent displacement in highly disadvantageous directions (the so-called "pied piper" phenomenon [7]). This has lead to uncertainty about the mechanisms migrant insects use to control their migratory directions [8, 9]. Here we show that, far from being at the mercy of the wind, nocturnal moths have unexpectedly complex behavioral mechanisms that guide their migratory flight paths in seasonally-favorable directions. Using entomological radar, we demonstrate that free-flying individuals of the migratory noctuid moth Autographa gamma actively select fast, high-altitude airstreams moving in a direction that is highly beneficial for their autumn migration. They also exhibit common orientation close to the downwind direction, thus maximizing the rectilinear distance traveled. Most unexpectedly, we find that when winds are not closely aligned with the moth's preferred heading (toward the SSW), they compensate for cross-wind drift, thus increasing the probability of reaching their overwintering range. We conclude that nocturnally migrating moths use a compass and an inherited preferred direction to optimize their migratory track.

  1. Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus classification by electropherotype; validation by serological analyses and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P P; Crook, N E; Rubinstein, R; Pedley, S; Payne, C C

    1989-01-01

    Serological analyses of several different cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs), including two type 1 CPVs from Bombyx mori, type 1 CPV from Dendrolimus spectabilis, type 12 CPV from Autographa gamma, type 2 CPV from Inachis io, type 5 CPV from Orgyia pseudotsugata and type 5 CPV from Heliothis armigera, demonstrated a close correlation between the antigenic properties of the polyhedrin or virus particle structural proteins and the genomic dsRNA electropherotypes. The dsRNAs of these viruses were analysed by electrophoresis in 3% and 10% polyacrylamide gels with a discontinuous Tris-HCl/Tris-glycine buffer system or by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis using a continuous Tris-acetate-EDTA buffer system. Electrophoretic analysis in agarose gels was found to be the most suitable for the classification of CPV isolates into electropherotypes, and the results obtained showed a close correlation with the observed antigenic relationships between different virus isolates. However, electrophoretic analysis in 10% polyacrylamide gels was most sensitive for the detection of intra-type variation and the presence of mixed virus isolates.

  2. Adaptive strategies in nocturnally migrating insects and songbirds: contrasting responses to wind.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jason W; Nilsson, Cecilia; Lim, Ka S; Bäckman, Johan; Reynolds, Don R; Alerstam, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Animals that use flight as their mode of transportation must cope with the fact that their migration and orientation performance is strongly affected by the flow of the medium they are moving in, that is by the winds. Different strategies can be used to mitigate the negative effects and benefit from the positive effects of a moving flow. The strategies an animal can use will be constrained by the relationship between the speed of the flow and the speed of the animal's own propulsion in relation to the surrounding air. Here we analyse entomological and ornithological radar data from north-western Europe to investigate how two different nocturnal migrant taxa, the noctuid moth Autographa gamma and songbirds, deal with wind by analysing variation in resulting flight directions in relation to the wind-dependent angle between the animal's heading and track direction. Our results, from fixed locations along the migratory journey, reveal different global strategies used by moths and songbirds during their migratory journeys. As expected, nocturnally migrating moths experienced a greater degree of wind drift than nocturnally migrating songbirds, but both groups were more affected by wind in autumn than in spring. The songbirds' strategies involve elements of both drift and compensation, providing some benefits from wind in combination with destination and time control. In contrast, moths expose themselves to a significantly higher degree of drift in order to obtain strong wind assistance, surpassing the songbirds in mean ground speed, at the cost of a comparatively lower spatiotemporal migratory precision. Moths and songbirds show contrasting but adaptive responses to migrating through a moving flow, which are fine-tuned to the respective flight capabilities of each group in relation to the wind currents they travel within.

  3. Two Year Field Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Mamestra brassicae Nucleopolyhedrovirus Combined with Proteins Derived from Xestia c-nigrum Granulovirus

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Chie; Mukawa, Shigeyuki; Mitsunaga, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Japan has only three registered baculovirus biopesticides despite its long history of studies on insect viruses. High production cost is one of the main hindrances for practical use of baculoviruses. Enhancement of insecticidal effect is one possible way to overcome this problem, so there have been many attempts to develop additives for baculoviruses. We found that alkaline soluble proteins of capsules (GVPs) of Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus can increase infectivity of some viruses including Mamestra brassicae nucleopolyhedrovirus (MabrNPV), and previously reported that MabrNPV mixed with GVPs was highly infectious to three important noctuid pests of vegetables in the following order, Helicoverpa armigera, M. brassicae, and Autographa nigrisigna. In this study, small-plot experiments were performed to assess concentrations of MabrNPV and GVPs at three cabbage fields and a broccoli field for the control of M. brassicae. In the first experiment, addition of GVPs (10 µg/mL) to MabrNPV at 106 OBs/mL resulted in a significant increase in NPV infection (from 53% to 66%). In the second experiment, the enhancing effect of GVP on NPV infection was confirmed at 10-times lower concentrations of MabrNPV. In the third and fourth experiments, a 50% reduction in GVPs (from 10 µg/mL to 5 µg/mL) did not result in a lowering of infectivity of the formulations containing MabrNPV at 105 OBs/mL. These results indicate that GVPs are promising additives for virus insecticides. PMID:25760139

  4. Multiple Mutations on the Second Acetylcholinesterase Gene Associated With Dimethoate Resistance in the Melon Aphid, Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Lokeshwari, D; Krishna Kumar, N K; Manjunatha, H

    2016-04-01

    The melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important cosmopolitan and extremely polyphagous species capable of causing direct and indirect damage to various crops. Insecticide resistance in melon aphids is of particular concern. To determine the basis of resistance, organophosphate (OP)-resistant strains of A. gossypii were obtained by continuous selection with dimethoate in the laboratory, and resistance mechanisms were investigated along with susceptible strains. Three resistant strains LKR-1, LKR-2, and LKR-3 exhibiting 270-, 243-, and 210-fold resistance obtained after 30 generations of selection with dimethoate, respectively, were utilized in this study. The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a target enzyme for OPs and carbamates (CMs), was investigated. AChE enzyme assay revealed that there was no significant change in the activities of AChE in resistant and susceptible strains. However, AChE inhibitory assay showed that 50% of the enzyme activity in resistant strains was inhibited at significantly higher concentration of dimethoate (131.87, 158.65, and 99.29 µmolL(−1)) as compared with susceptible strains (1.75 and 2.01 µmolL(−1)), indicating AChE insensitivity owing to altered AChE. Molecular diagnostic tool polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism revealed the existence of two consistent non-synonymous point mutations, single-nucleotide polymorphism, viz., A302S (equivalent to A201 in Torpedo californica Ayres) and S431F (equivalent to F331 in T. californica), in the AChE gene Ace2 of resistant strains. Further, cloning and sequencing of a partial fragment of Ace2 (897 bp) gene from susceptible and resistant strains revealed an additional novel mutation G221A in resistant strains, LKR-1 and LKR-2. Susceptible Ace2 genes shared 99.6 and 98.9% identity at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels with resistant ones, respectively. Functional analysis of these point mutations was assessed by in

  5. Speciation in Western Scrub-Jays, Haldane’s rule, and genetic clines in secondary contact

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haldane’s Rule, the tendency for the heterogametic sex to show reduced fertility in hybrid crosses, can obscure the signal of gene flow in mtDNA between species where females are heterogametic. Therefore, it is important when studying speciation and species limits in female-heterogametic species like birds to assess the signature of gene flow in the nuclear genome as well. We studied introgression of microsatellites and mtDNA across a secondary contact zone between coastal and interior lineages of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test for a signature of Haldane’s Rule: a narrower cline of introgression in mtDNA compared to nuclear markers. Results Our initial phylogeographic analysis revealed that there is only one major area of contact between coastal and interior lineages and identified five genetic clusters with strong spatial structuring: Pacific Slope, Interior US, Edwards Plateau (Texas), Northern Mexico, and Southern Mexico. Consistent with predictions from Haldane’s Rule, mtDNA showed a narrower cline than nuclear markers across a transect through the hybrid zone. This result is not being driven by female-biased dispersal because neutral diffusion analysis, which included estimates of sex-specific dispersal rates, also showed less diffusion of mtDNA. Lineage-specific plumage traits were associated with nuclear genetic profiles for individuals in the hybrid zone, indicating that these differences are under genetic control. Conclusions This study adds to a growing list of studies that support predictions of Haldane’s Rule using cline analysis of multiple loci of differing inheritance modes, although alternate hypotheses like selection on different mtDNA types cannot be ruled out. That Haldane’s Rule appears to be operating in this system suggests a measure of reproductive isolation between the Pacific Slope and interior lineages. Based on a variety of evidence from the phenotype, ecology, and genetics, we recommend elevating

  6. Metabolite profiling of the carnivorous pitcher plants Darlingtonia and Sarracenia.

    PubMed

    Hotti, Hannu; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Rischer, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Sarraceniaceae is a New World carnivorous plant family comprising three genera: Darlingtonia, Heliamphora, and Sarracenia. The plants occur in nutrient-poor environments and have developed insectivorous capability in order to supplement their nutrient uptake. Sarracenia flava contains the alkaloid coniine, otherwise only found in Conium maculatum, in which its biosynthesis has been studied, and several Aloe species. Its ecological role and biosynthetic origin in S. flava is speculative. The aim of the current research was to investigate the occurrence of coniine in Sarracenia and Darlingtonia and to identify common constituents of both genera, unique compounds for individual variants and floral scent chemicals. In this comprehensive metabolic profiling study, we looked for compound patterns that are associated with the taxonomy of Sarracenia species. In total, 57 different Sarracenia and D. californica accessions were used for metabolite content screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting high-dimensional data were studied using a data mining approach. The two genera are characterized by a large number of metabolites and huge chemical diversity between different species. By applying feature selection for clustering and by integrating new biochemical data with existing phylogenetic data, we were able to demonstrate that the chemical composition of the species can be explained by their known classification. Although transcriptome analysis did not reveal a candidate gene for coniine biosynthesis, the use of a sensitive selected ion monitoring method enabled the detection of coniine in eight Sarracenia species, showing that it is more widespread in this genus than previously believed.

  7. A regional analysis of weather mediated competition between a parasitoid and a coccinellid predator of oleander scale.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Andrew P; Pizzamiglio, Marina A

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of an asexual population of the oleander scale [Aspidiotus nerii Bouchè (Hemiptera: Diaspididae)] on California bay tree [Umbellularia californica (Hopk. & Arn.) Nut.] by two natural enemies; an idiobiont, ectoparasitoid Aphytis chilensis Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) and a coccinellid predator (Rhysobius lophanthae (Blaisd.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), was examined using a general weather-driven, tri-trophic, physiologically based age-mass structured demographic model. The model is of intermediate complexity and was parameterized using extensive laboratory data and field observations from Albany, CA. Temperature-dependent physiological indices were estimated from the laboratory data and used to scale per capita growth, fecundity and survivorship rates from maximal values in a time varying environment. The tri-trophic model was integrated in a GIS (geographic information system) and the species dynamics examined across years and across the ecological zones of California. Field data and simulation results suggested the coccinellid predator was the most important regulating agent of oleander scale in the mild climate of Albany. However, multiple linear regression analysis of simulation data across all ecological zones of California shows that the parasitoid A. chilensis is the most important agent in suppressing oleander scale densities in warmer climates, while the predator R. lophanthae increases scale density an average of 9.7% across all regions.

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase from coconut endosperm mediates the insertion of laurate at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols in lauric rapeseed oil and can increase total laurate levels

    PubMed

    Knutzon; Hayes; Wyrick; Xiong; Maelor Davies H; Voelker

    1999-07-01

    Expression of a California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) 12:0-acyl-carrier protein thioesterase, bay thioesterase (BTE), in developing seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) led to the production of oils containing up to 50% laurate. In these BTE oils, laurate is found almost exclusively at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions of the triacylglycerols (T.A. Voelker, T.R. Hayes, A.C. Cranmer, H.M. Davies [1996] Plant J 9: 229-241). Coexpression of a coconut (Cocos nucifera) 12:0-coenzyme A-preferring lysophosphatitic acid acyltransferase (D.S. Knutzon, K.D. Lardizabal, J.S. Nelsen, J.L. Bleibaum, H.M. Davies, J.G. Metz [1995] Plant Physiol 109: 999-1006) in BTE oilseed rape seeds facilitates efficient laurate deposition at the sn-2 position, resulting in the acccumulation of trilaurin. The introduction of the coconut protein into BTE oilseed rape lines with laurate above 50 mol % further increases total laurate levels.

  9. Efficient odd straight medium chain free fatty acid production by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; San, Ka-Yiu

    2014-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) can be used as precursors for the production of biofuels or chemicals. Different composition of FFAs will be useful for further modification of the biofuel/biochemical quality. Microbial biosynthesis of even chain FFAs can be achieved by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into E. coli. In this study, odd straight medium chain FFAs production was investigated by using metabolic engineered E. coli carrying acyl-ACP thioesterase (TE, Ricinus communis), propionyl-CoA synthase (Salmonella enterica), and β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (four different sources) with supplement of extracellular propionate. By using these metabolically engineered E. coli, significant quantity of C13 and C15 odd straight-chain FFAs could be produced from glucose and propionate. The highest concentration of total odd straight chain FFAs attained was 1205 mg/L by the strain HWK201 (pXZ18, pBHE2), and 85% of the odd straight chain FFAs was C15. However, the highest percentage of odd straight chain FFAs was achieved by the strain HWK201 (pXZ18, pBHE3) of 83.2% at 48 h. This strategy was also applied successfully in strains carrying different TE, such as the medium length acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from Umbellularia californica. C11 and C13 became the major odd straight-chain FFAs.

  10. Engineering Escherichia coli for odd straight medium chain free fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; San, Ka-Yiu

    2014-10-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of free fatty acids (FFAs) can be achieved by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into Escherichia coli. The engineered E. coli usually produced even chain FFAs. In this study, propionyl-CoA synthetase (prpE) from Salmonella enterica was overexpressed in two efficient even chain FFAs producers, ML103 (pXZM12) carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from Umbellularia californica and ML103 (pXZ18) carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from Ricinus communis combined with supplement of extracellular propionate. With these metabolically engineered E. coli, the odd straight chain FFAs, undecanoic acid (C11:0), tridecanoic acid (C13:0), and pentadecanoic acid (C15:0) were produced from glucose and propionate. The highest total odd straight chain FFAs produced by ML103 (pXZM12, pBAD-prpE) reached 276 mg/l with a ratio of 23.43 % of the total FFAs. In ML103 (pXZ18, pBAD-prpE), the highest total odd straight chain FFAs accumulated to 297 mg/l, and the ratio reached 17.68 % of the total FFAs. Due to the different substrate specificity of the acyl-ACP thioesterases, the major odd straight chain FFA components of ML103 (pXZM12, pBAD-prpE) were undecanoic acid and tridecanoic acid, while the ML103 (pXZ18, pBAD-prpE) preferred pentadecanoic acid.

  11. Modulating Membrane Composition Alters Free Fatty Acid Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M.; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial synthesis of free fatty acids (FFA) is a promising strategy for converting renewable sugars to advanced biofuels and oleochemicals. Unfortunately, FFA production negatively impacts membrane integrity and cell viability in Escherichia coli, the dominant host in which FFA production has been studied. These negative effects provide a selective pressure against FFA production that could lead to genetic instability at industrial scale. In prior work, an engineered E. coli strain harboring an expression plasmid for the Umbellularia californica acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase was shown to have highly elevated levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. The change in membrane content was hypothesized to be one underlying cause of the negative physiological effects associated with FFA production. In this work, a connection between the regulator of unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in E. coli, FabR, thioesterase expression, and unsaturated membrane content was established. A strategy for restoring normal membrane saturation levels and increasing tolerance towards endogenous production of FFAs was implemented by modulating acyl-ACP pools with a second thioesterase (from Geobacillus sp. Y412MC10) that primarily targets medium chain length, unsaturated acyl-ACPs. The strategy succeeded in restoring membrane content and improving viability in FFA producing E. coli while maintaining FFA titers. However, the restored fitness did not increase FFA productivity, indicating the existence of additional metabolic or regulatory barriers. PMID:23349781

  12. TaqMan Chemistry for Phytophthora ramorum Detection and Quantification, with a Comparison of Diagnostic Methods.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Katherine; Ivors, Kelly; Wilkinson, Carla; Garbelotto, Matteo

    2006-08-01

    ABSTRACT The choice of detection method for phytopathogens can be critically important in determining the success or failure of pest regulation systems. We present an assay for Phytophthora ramorum that uses 5' fluorogenic exonuclease (TaqMan) chemistry to detect and quantify the pathogen from diseased tissue, and include a universal primer and probe set for an internal positive control. This method is sensitive, detecting as little as 15 fg of target DNA when used in a nested design or 50 fg when used in a single round of polymerase chain reaction. None of the 17 other Phytophthora spp. tested was amplified by this assay. A comparison of the nested and non-nested TaqMan assays, and of one other nested assay, showed nested methods to be significantly more sensitive than nonnested and showed that host substrate significantly affected sensitivity of all assays. The nested TaqMan protocol was successfully field-tested; P. ramorum was detected in 255 of 874 plants in California woodlands, whereas the single-round TaqMan protocol detected significantly fewer positive samples. Finally, we documented increases in the quantity of pathogen DNA in Umbellularia californica leaves in initial stages of infection.

  13. Detection, Distribution, Sporulation, and Survival of Phytophthora ramorum in a California Redwood-Tanoak Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, E J; Lynch, S C; Rizzo, D M

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT Recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soils throughout sudden oak death-affected regions of California illustrates that soil may serve as an inoculum reservoir, but the role of soil inoculum in the disease cycle is unknown. This study addresses the efficacy of soil baiting, seasonal pathogen distribution under several epidemiologically important host species, summer survival and chlamydospore production in soil, and the impact of soil drying on pathogen survival. The efficacy of rhododendron leaves and pears as baits for detection of soilborne propagules were compared. Natural inoculum associated with bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus), and redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) were determined by monthly baiting. Summer survival and chlamydospore production were assessed in infected rhododendron leaf disks incubated under bay laurel, tanoak, and redwood at either the surface, the litter/soil interface, or in soil. Rhododendron leaf baits were superior to pear baits for sporangia detection, but neither bait detected chlamydospores. Most inoculum was associated with bay laurel and recovery was higher in soil than litter. Soil-incubated inoculum exhibited over 60% survival at the end of summer and also supported elevated chlamydospore production. P. ramorum survives and produces chlamydospores in forest soils over summer, providing a possible inoculum reservoir at the onset of the fall disease cycle.

  14. Apparent competition in canopy trees determined by pathogen transmission rather than susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Richard C; Meentemeyer, Ross K; Rizzo, David M

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological theory predicts that asymmetric transmission, susceptibility, and mortality within a community will drive pathogen and disease dynamics. These epidemiological asymmetries can result in apparent competition, where a highly infectious host reduces the abundance of less infectious or more susceptible members in a community via a shared pathogen. We show that the exotic pathogen Phytophthora ramorum and resulting disease, sudden oak death, cause apparent competition among canopy trees and that transmission differences among canopy trees drives patterns of disease severity in California coast redwood forests. P. ramorum ranges in its ability to infect, sporulate on, and cause mortality of infected hosts. A path analysis showed that the most prolific inoculum producer, California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), had a greater impact on the mortality rate of tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) than did other inoculum-supporting species. In stands experiencing high tanoak mortality, lack of negative impacts by P. ramorum on bay laurel may increase bay laurel density and subsequently result in positive feedback on pathogen populations. This study demonstrates the degree to which invasive, generalist pathogens can cause rapid changes in forest canopy composition and that differences in transmission can be more important than susceptibility in driving patterns of apparent competition.

  15. The key host for an invasive forest pathogen also facilitates the pathogen's survival of wildfire in California forests.

    PubMed

    Beh, Maia M; Metz, Margaret R; Frangioso, Kerri M; Rizzo, David M

    2012-12-01

    The first wildfires in sudden oak death-impacted forests occurred in 2008 in the Big Sur region of California, creating the rare opportunity to study the interaction between an invasive forest pathogen and a historically recurring disturbance. To determine whether and how the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, survived the wildfires, we completed intensive vegetation-based surveys in forest plots that were known to be infested before the wildfires. We then used 24 plot-based variables as predictors of P. ramorum recovery following the wildfires. The likelihood of recovering P. ramorum from burned plots was lower than in unburned plots both 1 and 2 yr following the fires. Post-fire recovery of P. ramorum in burned plots was positively correlated with the number of pre-fire symptomatic California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), the key sporulating host for this pathogen, and negatively correlated with post-fire bay laurel mortality levels. Patchy burn patterns that left green, P. ramorum-infected bay laurel amidst the charred landscape may have allowed these trees to serve as inoculum reservoirs that could lead to the infection of newly sprouting vegetation, further highlighting the importance of bay laurel in the sudden oak death disease cycle.

  16. Kinetic modeling of free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli based on continuous cultivation of a plasmid free strain.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Lennen, Rebecca M; Ranatunga, Don R; Bothfeld, William H; Marner, Wesley D; Pfleger, Brian F

    2012-06-01

    The microbial production of free fatty acids (FFAs) and reduced derivatives is an attractive process for the renewable production of diesel fuels. Toward this goal, a plasmid-free strain of Escherichia coli was engineered to produce FFAs by integrating three copies of a thioesterase gene from Umbellularia californica (BTE) under the control of an inducible promoter onto the chromosome. In batch culture, the resulting strain produced identical titers to a previously reported strain that expressed the thioesterase from a plasmid. The growth rate, glucose consumption rate, and FFA production rate of this strain were studied in continuous cultivation under carbon limitation. The highest yield of FFA on glucose was observed at a dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1) with the highest specific productivity observed at a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1). The observed yields under the lowest dilution rate were 15% higher than that observed in batch cultures. An increase in both productivity and yield (≈ 40%) was observed when the composition of the nutrients was altered to shift the culture toward non-carbon limitation. A deterministic model of the production strain has been proposed and indicates that maintenance requirements for this strain are significantly higher than wild-type E. coli.

  17. Comparison of rumen microbial inhibition resulting from various essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species.

    PubMed

    Oh, H K; Jones, M B; Longhurst, W M

    1968-01-01

    Essential oils were isolated from eight plant species which were relatively unpalatable to sheep and deer. The inhibitory potency of these essential oils upon sheep and deer rumen microorganisms was compared, in terms of total gas and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, by use of an anaerobic manometric technique. Inhibitory effects of oils from the eight plant species may be placed in four groups: (i) essential oils from vinegar weed (Trichostema lanceoletum) and California bay (Umbellularia californica) inhibited rumen microbial activity most; (ii) lesser inhibition was exhibited by rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) oils, followed by (iii) blue-gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) oils; and (iv) oils from Douglas fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii) and Jerusalem oak (chenopodium botrys) resulted in the least inhibition, when 0.3 ml of each oil was used. A highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.98(**)) between total gas and VFA production indicated the validity of either method to measure the activity of rumen microorganisms. Our results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that the selectivity and voluntary consumption of ruminants are related to the characteristic odor and antibacterial action of essential oils isolated from relatively unpalatable plant species.

  18. Woody tissue photosynthesis and its contribution to trunk growth and bud development in young plants.

    PubMed

    Saveyn, An; Steppe, Kathy; Ubierna, Nerea; Dawson, Todd E

    2010-11-01

    Stem photosynthesis can contribute significantly to woody plant carbon balance, particularly in times when leaves are absent or in 'open' crowns with sufficient light penetration. We explored the significance of woody tissue (stem) photosynthesis for the carbon income in three California native plant species via measurements of chlorophyll concentrations, radial stem growth, bud biomass and stable carbon isotope composition of sugars in different plant organs. Young plants of Prunus ilicifolia, Umbellularia californica and Arctostaphylos manzanita were measured and subjected to manipulations at two levels: trunk light exclusion (100 and 50%) and complete defoliation. We found that long-term light exclusion resulted in a reduction in chlorophyll concentration and radial growth, demonstrating that trunk assimilates contributed to trunk carbon income. In addition, bud biomass was lower in covered plants compared to uncovered plants. Excluding 100% of the ambient light from trunks on defoliated plants led to an enrichment in ¹³C of trunk phloem sugars. We attributed this effect to a reduction in photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination against ¹³C that in turn resulted in an enrichment in ¹³C of bud sugars. Taken together our results reveal that stem photosynthesis contributes to the total carbon income of all species including the buds in defoliated plants.

  19. Hemisynthesis of dihydroumbellulols from umbellulone: new cooling compounds.

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Cayeux, Isabelle; Brauchli, Robert; Mayenzet, Fabienne

    2011-01-26

    Although menthol is a common ingredient used in food products, other molecules also evoke coolness through stimulation of the somatosensory system. To discover new molecules having cooling properties, we virtually screened the chemical structures of terpenes and sesquiterpenes to find structures that are similar to (-)-menthol. We realized that dihydroumbellulols could be good candidates. Although their occurrence was reported in Hyptis pectinata Poit, we were unable to obtain these molecules from the plant or to prove their natural occurrence. Therefore, we extracted (-)-(R)-umbellulone from Umbellularia californica Nutt. The (-)-(R)-umbellulone was reduced to prepare (1R,2R/S)-1-isopropyl-4-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hex-3-en-2-ol, (1R,4R/S)-1-isopropyl-4-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2-one, and (1R,2RS,4RS)-1-isopropyl-4-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2-ols, named dihydroumbellulols. Sensory analysis suggested that (1R,2R,4S)-dihydroumbellulol has a pleasant, trigeminal cooling effect, about 2-3 times less cooling than (-)-menthol, with a weak odor slightly reminiscent of eucalyptol. In addition, a previously unreported compound was discovered, (-)-(1R)-1-isopropyl-4-methylenebicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2-one.

  20. Modulating membrane composition alters free fatty acid tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lennen, Rebecca M; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Microbial synthesis of free fatty acids (FFA) is a promising strategy for converting renewable sugars to advanced biofuels and oleochemicals. Unfortunately, FFA production negatively impacts membrane integrity and cell viability in Escherichia coli, the dominant host in which FFA production has been studied. These negative effects provide a selective pressure against FFA production that could lead to genetic instability at industrial scale. In prior work, an engineered E. coli strain harboring an expression plasmid for the Umbellularia californica acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase was shown to have highly elevated levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. The change in membrane content was hypothesized to be one underlying cause of the negative physiological effects associated with FFA production. In this work, a connection between the regulator of unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in E. coli, FabR, thioesterase expression, and unsaturated membrane content was established. A strategy for restoring normal membrane saturation levels and increasing tolerance towards endogenous production of FFAs was implemented by modulating acyl-ACP pools with a second thioesterase (from Geobacillus sp. Y412MC10) that primarily targets medium chain length, unsaturated acyl-ACPs. The strategy succeeded in restoring membrane content and improving viability in FFA producing E. coli while maintaining FFA titers. However, the restored fitness did not increase FFA productivity, indicating the existence of additional metabolic or regulatory barriers.

  1. Photosynthetic Declines in Phytophthora ramorum-Infected Plants Develop Prior to Water Stress and in Response to Exogenous Application of Elicitins.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death, is responsible for widespread oak mortality in California and Oregon, and has the potential to infect 100 or more species. Symptoms range from stem girdling and shoot blight to leaf spotting. In this study, we examined the physiological impacts of P. ramorum infection on Rhododendron macrophyllum. In stem-inoculated plants, photosynthetic capacity (V(cmax)) significantly declined by approximately 21% 3 weeks after inoculation in visibly asymptomatic leaves. By 4 weeks, after the development of significant stem lesions and loss in water transport capacity, water stress led to stomatal closure and additional declines in photosynthetic capacity. We also report the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of two P. ramorum elicitins. Both elicitins were capable of inducing a hypersensitive-like response in one incompatible (Nicotiana tabacum SR1) and three compatible hosts (R. macrophyllum, Lithocarpus densiflorus, and Umbellularia californica). Infiltration of leaves from all three compatible hosts with both P. ramorum elicitins caused significant declines in chlorophyll fluorescence (F(v) /F(m)). For all four species, the loss of photosynthetic capacity was directly proportional to H(+) uptake and ethylene production, two common components of the hypersensitive response. This is the first report of elicitins causing photosynthetic declines in compatible hosts independent of plant water stress.

  2. Exploring natural products for new taste sensations.

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Cayeux, Isabelle; Birkbeck, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery of uncommon taste or trigeminal active compounds and their associated sensory analysis using human tasting panels with the aim of enhancing the overall taste experience whilst reducing where possible the sugar and salt content of foods. The first example outlines the discovery of the sensory quality attributes of (R)-2-(carboxymethylamino)propanoic acid, named (R)-strombine, as assessed by a panel of 47 subjects to confirm its contribution to the typical taste of scallop muscle. The second example discusses the pungency and trigeminal effect of polygodial, which is compared with piperine and capsaicin, as well as the elucidation of a new structure eliciting a trigeminal effect, (+/-)-trans-2,3,3a,7a-tetrahydro-1 H-indene-4-carbaldehyde, discovered in Amomum tsao-ko. Finally, the time intensity trigeminal effect of (-)-menthol is compared with (1R,2RS,4RS)-1-isopropyl-4-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2-ol, named dihydroumbellulol, a new cooling compound obtained by hemi-synthesis from umbellulone extracted from Umbellularia californica Nutt.

  3. Synthesis of medium chain length fatty acid ethyl esters in engineered Escherichia coli using endogenously produced medium chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liping; Liu, Junfeng; Nie, Kaili; Liu, Luo; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Deng, Li

    2013-07-10

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid-derived biofuels from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids (FFAs) can be used as precursors for the production of micro-diesel. The expression of codon optimized two plants (Umbellularia californica and Cinnamomum camphora) medium-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase genes (ucFatB and ccFatB) in Escherichia coli resulted in a very high level of extractable medium-chain-specific hydrolytic activity and caused large accumulation of medium-chain free fatty acids. By heterologous co-expression of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, specific plant thioesterases in E. coli, with supplementation of exogenous ethanol, resulted in drastic changes in fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) composition ranging from 12:0 to 18:1. Through an optimized microbial shake-flask fermentation of two modified E. coli strains, yielded FFAs and FAEEs in the concentration of approximately 500 mg L(-1)/250 mg L(-1) and 2.01 mg g(-1)/1.99 mg g(-1), respectively. The optimal ethanol level for FAEEs yield in the two recombinant strains was reached at the 3% ethanol concentration, which was about 5.4-fold and 1.93-fold higher than that of 1% ethanol concentration.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of lycopodane-type alkaloids from the Icelandic Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Elsa Steinunn; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate structures and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of lycopodane-type alkaloids isolated from an Icelandic collection of Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre. Ten alkaloids were isolated, including annotinine, annotine, lycodoline, lycoposerramine M, anhydrolycodoline, gnidioidine, lycofoline, lannotinidine D, and acrifoline, as well as a previously unknown N-oxide of annotine. 1H and 13C NMR data of several of the alkaloids were provided for the first time. Solvent-dependent equilibrium constants between ketone and hemiketal form of acrifoline were determined. Conformation of acrifoline was characterized using NOESY spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The isolated alkaloids were evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Ligand docking studies based on mutated 3D structure of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase provided rationale for low inhibitory activity of the isolated alkaloids as compared to huperzine A or B, which are potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors belonging to the lycodine class. Based on the modelling studies the lycopodane-type alkaloids seem to fit well into the active site gorge of the enzyme but the position of their functional groups is not compatible with establishing strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the amino acid residues that line the binding site. The docking studies indicate possibilities of additional functionalization of the lycopodane skeleton to render potentially more active analogues.

  5. Two-state transition between molten globule and unfolded states of acetylcholinesterase as monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, D I; Szosenfogel, R; Goldfarb, D; Silman, I; Weiner, L

    1994-01-01

    Cys-231 of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) was selectively labeled with the mercury derivative of a stable nitroxyl radical. In 1.5 M guanidinium chloride, this conjugate exists in a molten globule state (MG), whereas in 5 M denaturant, it is in an unfolded state (U). The transition between the two states is reversible. In the MG, the label is highly immobilized, whereas in the U, it is almost freely rotating. The clearly distinct electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the two states permits the study of this transition. Upon elevating the guanidinium chloride concentration, a decrease in the EPR signal of the MG occurs concomitantly with an increase in the U signal, the total intensity of the EPR spectra remaining constant. This behavior is characteristic of a two-state transition. The thermodynamic characteristics of this transition (delta G0 and m), whether estimated directly from the EPR data or from both CD and fluorescence data analyzed by assuming a two-state scheme, are in good agreement. PMID:7991597

  6. Geographic patterns in the reproductive ecology of Agave lechuguilla (Agavaceae) in the Chihuahuan desert. I. Floral characteristics, visitors, and fecundity.

    PubMed

    Silva-Montellano, Arturo; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2003-03-01

    Floral characteristics such as morphology and flower color have been interpreted as adaptive traits that evolved through selective pressures generated by pollinators. Differences among populations in the expression of floral characters could result from natural selection for their adaptive value to local conditions. We describe the patterns of variation of flower morphology, color, and fecundity of Agave lechuguilla in 11 populations along a latitudinal gradient encompassing the whole range of the species in the Chihuahuan desert. We found a latitudinal pattern in flower shape and color. Flowers tended to be shorter, more open, and colorful toward the northern part of the gradient. We also recorded flower visitation, discriminating between pollinators and floral robbers. The main pollinators seems to be nocturnal hawk moths (Hyles lineata) and diurnal large bees (Bombus pennsylvanicus and Xylocopa californica). In all populations large bees were the most abundant potential pollinators. However, the abundance of the potential pollinators varied along the gradient. We observed no bat visits along the gradient. The number of visits by all potential pollinators decreased significantly with latitude as did fruit set.

  7. Western scrub-jays allocate longer observation time to more valuable information.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arii; Grodzinski, Uri; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-07-01

    When humans mentally reconstruct past events and imagine future scenarios, their subjective experience of mentally time travelling is accompanied by the awareness of doing so. Despite recent popularity of studying episodic memory in animals, such phenomenological consciousness has been extremely difficult to demonstrate without agreed behavioural markers of consciousness in non-linguistic subjects. We presented western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) with a task requiring them to allocate observing time between two peepholes to see food being hidden in either of two compartments, one where observing the hiding location was necessary to later relocate the food, and another where food could easily be found without watching. Jays first separately experienced these consequences of possessing information in each compartment and subsequently, once given a choice, made more looks and spent more time looking into the compartment where information was necessary than into the compartment where it was unnecessary. Thus, the jays can collect information to solve a future problem. Moreover, they can differentiate sources of information according to their potential value and modify behaviour to efficiently collect important, usable information. This is the first evidence of metacognition in a species that passes the behavioural criteria for both retrospective and prospective mental time travel.

  8. Rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit demonstrated by virus overlay protein binding assay.

    PubMed

    Gastka, M; Horvath, J; Lentz, T L

    1996-10-01

    A virus overlay protein binding assay was used to study binding of 125I-labelled rabies virus to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from Torpedo californica electric organ membranes. After gel electrophoresis of electric organ membranes and transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose, 125I-labelled alpha-bungarotoxin, a curaremimetic neurotoxin, bound to a 40 kDa band and 125I-labelled rabies virus bound to 51 kDa and 40 kDa bands. Binding of rabies virus to the 40 kDa band was inhibited by unlabelled alpha-bungarotoxin. In blots of affinity-purified AChR, labelled virus bound to the 40 kDa alpha subunit and was competed by alpha-bungarotoxin. Based on binding of rabies virus to the alpha subunit and the ability of alpha-bungarotoxin to compete for binding, rabies virus appears to bind to the neurotoxin-binding site of the nicotinic AChR alpha subunit.

  9. Parallel evolution of serotonergic neuromodulation underlies independent evolution of rhythmic motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Lillvis, Joshua L; Katz, Paul S

    2013-02-06

    Neuromodulation can dynamically alter neuronal and synaptic properties, thereby changing the behavioral output of a neural circuit. It is therefore conceivable that natural selection might act upon neuromodulation as a mechanism for sculpting the behavioral repertoire of a species. Here we report that the presence of neuromodulation is correlated with the production of a behavior that most likely evolved independently in two species: Tritonia diomedea and Pleurobranchaea californica (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Nudipleura). Individuals of both species exhibit escape swimming behaviors consisting of repeated dorsal-ventral whole-body flexions. The central pattern generator (CPG) circuits underlying these behaviors contain homologous identified neurons: DSI and C2 in Tritonia and As and A1 in Pleurobranchaea. Homologs of these neurons also can be found in Hermissenda crassicornis where they are named CPT and C2, respectively. However, members of this species do not exhibit an analogous swimming behavior. In Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea, but not in Hermissenda, the serotonergic DSI homologs modulated the strength of synapses made by C2 homologs. Furthermore, the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide blocked this neuromodulation and the swimming behavior. Additionally, in Pleurobranchaea, the robustness of swimming correlated with the extent of the synaptic modulation. Finally, injection of serotonin induced the swimming behavior in Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea, but not in Hermissenda. This suggests that the analogous swimming behaviors of Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea share a common dependence on serotonergic neuromodulation. Thus, neuromodulation may provide a mechanism that enables species to acquire analogous behaviors independently using homologous neural circuit components.

  10. Homology and homoplasy of swimming behaviors and neural circuits in the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Sakurai, Akira; Lillvis, Joshua L; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2012-06-26

    How neural circuit evolution relates to behavioral evolution is not well understood. Here the relationship between neural circuits and behavior is explored with respect to the swimming behaviors of the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opithobranchia). Nudipleura is a diverse monophyletic clade of sea slugs among which only a small percentage of species can swim. Swimming falls into a limited number of categories, the most prevalent of which are rhythmic left-right body flexions (LR) and rhythmic dorsal-ventral body flexions (DV). The phylogenetic distribution of these behaviors suggests a high degree of homoplasy. The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying DV swimming has been well characterized in Tritonia diomedea and in Pleurobranchaea californica. The CPG for LR swimming has been elucidated in Melibe leonina and Dendronotus iris, which are more closely related. The CPGs for the categorically distinct DV and LR swimming behaviors consist of nonoverlapping sets of homologous identified neurons, whereas the categorically similar behaviors share some homologous identified neurons, although the exact composition of neurons and synapses in the neural circuits differ. The roles played by homologous identified neurons in categorically distinct behaviors differ. However, homologous identified neurons also play different roles even in the swim CPGs of the two LR swimming species. Individual neurons can be multifunctional within a species. Some of those functions are shared across species, whereas others are not. The pattern of use and reuse of homologous neurons in various forms of swimming and other behaviors further demonstrates that the composition of neural circuits influences the evolution of behaviors.

  11. Zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) erases long-term memories in a cockroach.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhouheng; Lubinski, Alexander J; Page, Terry L

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to identify the molecules that are involved in the maintenance of long-term memories in mammals have focused attention on atypical isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). Inhibition of these kinases by either the general PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, or the more specific inhibitor, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), can abolish both long-term potentiation in the hippocampus and as well as spatial, fear, appetitive, and sensorimotor memories. These inhibitors can also abolish long-term facilitation and long-term sensitization in the mollusk Aplysia californica. We have extended these results to an insect, the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. We show that systemic injections of either chelerythrine or ZIP erase long-term olfactory memories in the cockroach, but have no effect on memory acquisition during conditioning. We also show that inhibition of either protein kinase A (PKA) or protein synthesis can block memory acquisition but neither has an effect on the memory once it is formed. The results suggest that sustaining memories in insects requires the persistent activity of one or more isoforms of PKC and point to a strong evolutionary conservation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the persistence of long-term memories in the central nervous system.

  12. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-10-08

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  13. Three novel species of coccoid green algae within the Watanabea clade (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Song, Huiyin; Hu, Yuxin; Zhu, Huan; Wang, Qinghua; Liu, Guoxiang; Hu, Zhengyu

    2016-12-01

    Coccoid green algae are extremely diverse despite their simple coccoid phenotype, a phenotype that may be the result of convergent evolution. In this study, we used a polyphasic approach combining molecular phylogenetic analyses, morphology and ultrastructure to investigate isolated coccoid strains from China, and our results reveal three new lineages of Trebouxiophyceae: the novel genus and species Mysteriochloris nanningensis gen. et sp. nov., and the two novel species Phyllosiphon coccidium sp. nov. and Desertella yichangensis sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta). We provide a detailed characterization of the novel microalgae which they are autosporic coccoid unicells and have parietal chloroplasts. In phylogenies based on 18S rDNA sequences and the chloroplast ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL), these three algae are nested within the Watanabea clade and are different from any known algae. M. nanningensis FACHB-1787 is not really close to any known algae within the Watanabea clade. Phyllosiphoncoccidium FACHB-2212 is within the Phyllosiphon lineages. D. yichangensis FACHB-1793 is closely related to Desertella californica and described as a representative of a novel species of the genus Desertella.

  14. Upward cascading effects of nutrients: shifts in a benthic microalgal community and a negative herbivore response.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Anna R; Fong, Peggy

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of nutrient addition on interactions between the benthic microalgal community and a dominant herbivorous gastropod, Cerithidea californica (California horn snail), on tidal flats in Mugu Lagoon, southern California, USA. We crossed snail and nutrient (N and P) addition treatments in enclosures on two tidal flats varying from 71 to 92% sand content in a temporally replicated experiment (summer 2000, fall 2000, spring 2001). Diatom biomass increased slightly (approximately 30%) in response to nutrient treatments but was not affected by snails. Blooms of cyanobacteria (up to 200%) and purple sulfur bacteria (up to 400%) occurred in response to nutrient enrichment, particularly in the sandier site, but only cyanobacterial biomass decreased in response to snail grazing. Snail mortality was 2-5 times higher in response to nutrient addition, especially in the sandier site, corresponding to a relative increase in cyanobacterial biomass. Nutrient-related snail mortality occurred only in the spring and summer, when the snails were most actively feeding on the microalgal community. Inactive snails in the fall showed no response to nutrient-induced cyanobacterial growths. This study demonstrated strongly negative upward cascading effects of nutrient enrichment through the food chain. The strength of this upward cascade was closely linked to sediment type and microalgal community composition.

  15. Glia of the cholinergic electromotor nucleus of Torpedo are the source of the cDNA encoding a GAT-1-like GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Swanson, G T; Umbach, J A; Gundersen, C B

    1994-07-01

    A PCR-based strategy was used to clone DNAs encoding Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent cotransport proteins using DNA from the cholinergic electromotor nucleus of Torpedo californica. This cloning strategy resulted in the isolation of a cDNA clone that shows strong nucleotide sequence homology to the GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) types of rat and human brain. When expressed in frog oocytes, this transporter mediates the uptake of GABA. Moreover, physiologically and pharmacologically, the Torpedo protein behaves very similarly to the rat and human GAT-1 proteins. However, in contrast to the predominantly neuronal localization of the mammalian GAT-1 proteins, the mRNA for the fish protein is found almost exclusively in glial elements of the electromotor nucleus. This unexpected discovery of a GABA transporter cDNA in a nucleus that has no previously characterized GABAergic innervation raises questions about the role of GABA and this transporter in the electromotor system. Several speculative models for GABA function are proposed.

  16. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S.; Harlow, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5′ ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission. PMID:26446566

  17. Karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes: an examination of the process of karyotypic evolution by comparison of the molecular cytogenetic findings with the molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shibusawa, M; Nishibori, M; Nishida-Umehara, C; Tsudzuki, M; Masabanda, J; Griffin, D K; Matsuda, Y

    2004-01-01

    To define the process of karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes on a molecular basis, we conducted genome-wide comparative chromosome painting for eight species, i.e. silver pheasant (Lophura nycthemera), Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Chinese bamboo-partridge (Bambusicola thoracica) and common peafowl (Pavo cristatus) of the Phasianidae, and plain chachalaca (Ortalis vetula) of the Cracidae, with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-9 and Z. Including our previous data from five other species, chicken (Gallus gallus), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis) of the Phasianidae, guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) of the Numididae and California quail (Callipepla californica) of the Odontophoridae, we represented the evolutionary changes of karyotypes in the 13 species of the Galliformes. In addition, we compared the cytogenetic data with the molecular phylogeny of the 13 species constructed with the nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, and discussed the process of karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes. Comparative chromosome painting confirmed the previous data on chromosome rearrangements obtained by G-banding analysis, and identified several novel chromosome rearrangements. The process of the evolutionary changes of macrochromosomes in the 13 species was in good accordance with the molecular phylogeny, and the ancestral karyotype of the Galliformes is represented.

  18. Uncovering the lipidic basis for the preparation of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor detergent complexes for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Orestes; González-Freire, Carol; Ferrer, María Carla; Colón-Sáez, José O; Fernández-García, Emily; Mercado, Juan; Dávila, Alejandro; Morales, Reginald; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-09-19

    This study compares the lipid composition, including individual phospholipid molecular species of solubilized nAChR detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) with those of the bulk lipids from their source, Torpedo californica (Tc) electric tissue. This lipidomic analysis revealed seventy-seven (77) phospholipid species in the Tc tissue. Analysis of affinity-purified nAChR-DCs prepared with C-12 to C-16 phospholipid analog detergents alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) demonstrated that nAChR-DCs prepared with FC12, LFC14, and LFC16 contained >60 phospholipids/nAChR, which was more than twice of those prepared with FC14, FC16, and LFC12. Significantly, all the nAChR-DCs lacked ethanolamine and anionic phospholipids, contained only four cholesterol molecules, and a limited number of phospholipid molecular species per nAChR. Upon incorporation into oocytes, FC12 produce significant functionality, whereas LFC14 and LFC16 nAChR-DCs displayed an increased functionality as compared to the crude Tc membrane. All three nAChR-DCs displayed different degrees of alterations in macroscopic activation and desensitization kinetics.

  19. Endangered light-footed clapper rail affects parasite community structure in coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kathleen L; Hechinger, Ryan F; Kuris, Armand M; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2007-09-01

    An extinction necessarily affects community members that have obligate relationships with the extinct species. Indirect or cascading effects can lead to even broader changes at the community or ecosystem level. However, it is not clear whether generalist parasites should be affected by the extinction of one of their hosts. We tested the prediction that loss of a host species could affect the structure of a generalist parasite community by investigating the role of endangered Light-footed Clapper Rails (Rallus longirostris levipes) in structuring trematode communities in four tidal wetlands in southern California, U.S.A. (Carpinteria Salt Marsh, Mugu Lagoon) and Mexico (Estero de Punta Banda, Bahia Falsa-San Quintin). We used larval trematode parasites in first intermediate host snails (Cerithidea californica) as windows into the adult trematodes that parasitize Clapper Rails. Within and among wetlands, we found positive associations between Clapper Rails and four trematode species, particularly in the vegetated marsh habitat where Clapper Rails typically occur. This suggests that further loss of Clapper Rails is likely to affect the abundance of several competitively dominant trematode species in wetlands with California horn snails, with possible indirect effects on the trematode community and changes in the impacts of these parasites on fishes and invertebrates.

  20. Parasites reduce food web robustness because they are sensitive to secondary extinction as illustrated by an invasive estuarine snail.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

    2009-06-27

    A robust food web is one in which few secondary extinctions occur after removing species. We investigated how parasites affected the robustness of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh food web by conducting random species removals and a hypothetical, but plausible, species invasion. Parasites were much more likely than free-living species to suffer secondary extinctions following the removal of a free-living species from the food web. For this reason, the food web was less robust with the inclusion of parasites. Removal of the horn snail, Cerithidea californica, resulted in a disproportionate number of secondary parasite extinctions. The exotic Japanese mud snail, Batillaria attramentaria, is the ecological analogue of the native California horn snail and can completely replace it following invasion. Owing to the similarities between the two snail species, the invasion had no effect on predator-prey interactions. However, because the native snail is host for 17 host-specific parasites, and the invader is host to only one, comparison of a food web that includes parasites showed significant effects of invasion on the native community. The hypothetical invasion also significantly reduced the connectance of the web because the loss of 17 native trematode species eliminated many links.

  1. Occurrence of hemocyanin in ostracod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Julia C; Pick, Christian; Oakley, Todd H; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Hemocyanin is a copper-containing protein that transports O2 in the hemolymph of many arthropod species. Within the crustaceans, hemocyanin appeared to be restricted to Malacostraca but has recently been identified in Remipedia. Here, we report the occurrence of hemocyanin in ostracods, indicating that this respiratory protein is more widespread within crustaceans than previously thought. By analyses of expressed sequence tags and by RT-PCR, we obtained four full length and nine partial hemocyanin sequences from six of ten investigated ostracod species. Hemocyanin was identified in Myodocopida (Actinoseta jonesi, Cypridininae sp., Euphilomedes morini, Skogsbergia lerneri, Vargula tsujii) and Platycopida (Cytherelloidea californica) but not in Podocopida. We found no evidence for the presence of hemoglobin in any of these ostracod species. Like in other arthropods, we identified multiple hemocyanin subunits (up to six) to occur in a single ostracod species. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses showed that ostracod hemocyanin subunit diversity evolved independently from that of other crustaceans. Ostracod hemocyanin subunits were found paraphyletic, with myodocopid and platycopid subunits forming distinct clades within those of the crustaceans. This pattern suggests that ostracod hemocyanins originated from distinct subunits in the pancrustacean stemline.

  2. Lesions of Copper Toxicosis in Captive Marine Invertebrates With Comparisons to Normal Histology.

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, E E B; Wynne, J; Garner, M M; Nyaoke, A; Keel, M K

    2016-05-01

    Despite increasing concern for coral reef ecosystem health within the last decade, there is scant literature concerning the histopathology of diseases affecting the major constituents of coral reef ecosystems, particularly marine invertebrates. This study describes histologic findings in 6 species of marine invertebrates (California sea hare [Aplysia californica], purple sea urchin [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus], sunburst anemone [Anthopleura sola], knobby star [Pisaster giganteus], bat star [Asterina miniata], and brittle star [Ophiopteris papillosa]) with spontaneous copper toxicosis, 4 purple sea urchins with experimentally induced copper toxicosis, and 1 unexposed control of each species listed. The primary lesions in the California sea hare with copper toxicosis were branchial and nephridial necrosis. Affected echinoderms shared several histologic lesions, including epidermal necrosis and ulceration and increased numbers of coelomocytes within the water-vascular system. The sunburst anemone with copper toxicosis had necrosis of both epidermis and gastrodermis, as well as expulsion of zooxanthellae from the gastrodermis. In addition to the lesions attributed to copper toxicosis, our results describe normal microscopic features of these animals that may be useful for histopathologic assessment of marine invertebrates.

  3. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture.

  4. California Rare Endemics and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, M.

    2010-12-01

    California is known for its wide variety of endemic flora, from its annuals such as the Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) to the perennials like the Arctostaphylos pallida (Alameda manzanita), which happens to be a rare species. Each species plays an important role in the biodiversity of California, yet there are species that are threatened, not only by human interaction and urbanization, but by climate change. Species that we seldom see are now on the verge of becoming eradicated; rare endemics similar to Arctostaphylos pallida are now facing a new challenge that may severely impair their survival. The climate has changed significantly over the twentieth century and it has affected the distribution of rare endemics in California, both geographically as well as within their climatic and edaphic niches. Lilaeopsis masonii is just one rare endemic, however it serves as a representative of the other 23 species that were studied. Using Maxent, a climate-modeling program, it was viable to construct two climate envelopes of the masonii species: the early century envelope (1930-1959) and the later century envelope (1990-2009). When these two climate envelopes were compared, it became clear that the later century climate envelope had contracted radically, reshaping the climate niche of all rare endemics in California due to an increase in temperature. It is possible to conclude that the future of rare endemics hangs in the balance, where one degree higher in temperature is enough to topple the scale.

  5. A neuron-in-capillary platform for facile collection and mass spectrometric characterization of a secreted neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Young; Fan, Yi; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Yoon, Sook; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of microfluidic devices—which effici