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Sample records for autoimmune diabetic nod

  1. Trichloroethylene Does Not Accelerate Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Guillaume; Christ, Marielle; Perron-Lepage, Marie-France; Condevaux, Fabienne; Descotes, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Pre-existing or contributing risk factors, including genetic predisposition and environmental influences, are largely thought to play a crucial (though ill-elucidated) role in the development of autoimmunity. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent, which has been suspected of increasing the prevalence of autoimmune diseases, e.g., lupus, following environmental contamination. Although few epidemiological data are available, several studies reported an accelerated and more severe disease in TCE-exposed autoimmunity-prone MRL(+/+) mice. To test whether TCE can exert similar deleterious effects on organ-specific autoimmune diseases, non obese diabetic (NOD) mice were given 5 mg/ml TCE via the drinking water for 12 weeks. TCE administration induced a decrease in CD44(+) splenic T-cells and CD45RB(high), CD54(+) blood and splenic T-cells. Conversely, the number of CD45RB(low) splenocytes was increased. Interestingly, the progressive increase in serum TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels normally seen with age in these mice was inhibited by TCE. There was also a relative lower incidence of histological changes in the pancreas of TCE-exposed NOD mice than in unexposed mice. Contrary to what has been found in systemic models of autoimmunity, TCE did not accelerate the diabetes of NOD mice and may have a protective effect. This finding suggests that comparative studies using different genetically related autoimmune-prone models are needed to investigate the role of xenobiotics in the precipitation of autoimmunity, particularly in sensitive populations.

  2. Activating Fc gamma receptors participate in the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Kaifu, Tomonori; Sugahara-Tobinai, Akiko; Nakamura, Akira; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in humans is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which pancreatic islet beta cells are ruptured by autoreactive T cells. NOD mice, the most commonly used animal model of T1D, show early infiltration of leukocytes in the islets (insulitis), resulting in islet destruction and diabetes later. NOD mice produce various islet beta cell-specific autoantibodies, although it remains a subject of debate regarding whether these autoantibodies contribute to the development of T1D. Fc gammaRs are multipotent molecules that play important roles in Ab-mediated regulatory as well as effector functions in autoimmune diseases. To investigate the possible role of Fc gammaRs in NOD mice, we generated several Fc gammaR-less NOD lines, namely FcR common gamma-chain (Fc Rgamma)-deficient (NOD.gamma(-/-)), Fc gammaRIII-deficient (NOD.III(-/-)), Fc gammaRIIB-deficient (NOD.IIB(-/-)), and both Fc Rgamma and Fc gammaRIIB-deficient NOD (NOD.null) mice. In this study, we show significant protection from diabetes in NOD.gamma(-/-), NOD.III(-/-), and NOD.null, but not in NOD.IIB(-/-) mice even with grossly comparable production of autoantibodies among them. Insulitis in NOD.gamma(-/-) mice was also alleviated. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells or NK cells from NOD mice rendered NOD.gamma(-/-) animals more susceptible to diabetes, suggesting a possible scenario in which activating Fc gammaRs on dendritic cells enhance autoantigen presentation leading to the activation of autoreactive T cells, and Fc gammaRIII on NK cells trigger Ab-dependent effector functions and inflammation. These findings highlight the critical roles of activating Fc gammaRs in the development of T1D, and indicate that Fc gammaRs are novel targets for therapies for T1D.

  3. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James A; Wong, F. Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mice and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D. PMID:26403950

  4. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC−/− mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC−/− mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC−/− mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  5. T cell-mediated inhibition of the transfer of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has recently been introduced as a model for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The role of regulatory T cells in the development of antipancreatic autoimmunity in this model remains unclear. To evaluate the presence of suppressive phenomena, we used disease transfer by spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice into preirradiated adult recipients as a model for accelerated disease. Suppressor phenomena were detected by testing the protection afforded by lymphoid cells from nondiabetic NOD mice against diabetes transfer in irradiated recipients. Transfer of diabetes was delayed by reconstituting recipients with spleen cells from nondiabetic NOD donors. The greatest protection against diabetes transfer was conferred by spleen cells from 8-wk-old nondiabetic female NOD mice. Depletion experiments showed that the protection was dependent on CD4+ cells. Protection was also detected within thymic cells from nondiabetic NOD mice and protection conferred by spleen cells was abrogated by thymectomy of nondiabetic female, but not male, NOD donors at 3 wk of age. These findings indicate that suppressive CD4+ T cells that are dependent on the presence of the thymus may delay the onset of diabetes in female diabetes-prone NOD mice. PMID:2523954

  6. TAK1 inhibition prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Lu, Jingli; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Wei, Shouguo; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1, Map3k7), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family, is essential in innate and adaptive immune responses. We postulated that blockade of TAK1 would affect autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Administration of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol (OZ), a TAK1 inhibitor, decreased the incidence and delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in both spontaneous and accelerated (cyclophosphamide-induced) experimental NOD mice. OZ also reduced insulitis, preserved islet function, increased the expression of α1- antitrypsin (AAT), and severely inhibited NF-κB and JNK/AP-1 signaling pathways in immune organs and pancreatic tissues. Importantly, TAK1 inhibition by OZ elicited a Th1 to Th2 cytokine shift, and increased TGF-β1 production in cultured T lymphocytes supernatants. Systemic TAK1 inhibition induced immature DCs with lower expressions of MHC-II and CD86, attenuated DC-mediated T cell proliferation in allogeneic MLR, and production of cytokine IL-12p70 in DCs suspensions. The results indicate that TAK1 inhibition with OZ was associated with a lower frequency of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. The net effect of TAK1 inhibition in NOD mice therefore appears to be protective rather than disease-enhancing. Strategies targeting TAK1 specifically in NOD mice might prove useful for the treatment of autoimmune diabetes in general.

  7. The effect of interleukin-22 treatment on autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Borg, Danielle J; Wang, Ran; Murray, Lydia; Tong, Hui; Steptoe, Raymond J; McGuckin, Michael A; Hasnain, Sumaira Z

    2017-08-04

    The aim of this study was to determine whether therapy with the cytokine IL-22 could be used to prevent the development of, or treat, autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse. Six-week-old NOD mice were administered bi-weekly either recombinant mouse IL-22 (200 ng/g) or PBS (vehicle control) intraperitoneally until overt diabetes was diagnosed as two consecutive measurements of non-fasting blood glucose ≥ 11 mmol/l. At this time, NOD mice in the control arm were treated with LinBit insulin pellets and randomised to bi-weekly therapeutic injections of either PBS or IL-22 (200 ng/g) and followed until overt diabetes was diagnosed, as defined above. IL-22 therapy did not delay the onset of diabetes in comparison with the vehicle-treated mice. We did not observe an improvement in islet area, glycaemic control, beta cell residual function, endoplasmic reticulum stress, insulitis or macrophage and neutrophil infiltration as determined by non-fasting blood glucose, C-peptide and histological scoring. Therapeutic administration of IL-22 did not reduce circulating lipopolysaccharide, a marker of impaired gut mucosal integrity. Our study suggests that, at this dosing regimen introduced either prior to overt diabetes or at diagnosis of diabetes, recombinant mouse IL-22 therapy cannot prevent autoimmune diabetes, or prolong the honeymoon period in the NOD mouse.

  8. Recovery of the endogenous beta cell function in the NOD model of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zorina, Tatiana D; Subbotin, Vladimir M; Bertera, Suzanne; Alexander, Angela M; Haluszczak, Catherine; Gambrell, Beverley; Bottino, Rita; Styche, Alexis J; Trucco, Massimo

    2003-01-01

    In light of accumulating evidence that the endocrine pancreas has regenerative properties and that hematopoietic chimerism can abrogate destruction of beta cells in autoimmune diabetes, we addressed the question of whether recovery of physiologically adequate endogenous insulin regulation could be achieved in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice rendered allogeneic chimerae. Allogeneic bone marrow (BM) was transplanted into NOD mice at the preclinical and overtly clinical stages of the disease using lethal and nonlethal doses of radiation for recipient conditioning. Islets of Langerhans, syngeneic to the BM donors, were transplanted under kidney capsules of the overtly diabetic animals to sustain euglycemia for the time span required for recovery of the endogenous pancreas. Nephrectomies of the graft-bearing organs were performed 14 weeks later to confirm the restoration of endogenous insulin regulation. Reparative processes in the pancreata were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. The level of chimerism in NOD recipients was evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. We have shown that as low as 1% of initial allogeneic chimerism can reverse the diabetogenic processes in islets of Langerhans in prediabetic NOD mice, and that restoration of endogenous beta cell function to physiologically sufficient levels is achievable even if the allogeneic BM transplantation is performed after the clinical onset of diabetes. If the same pattern of islet regeneration were shown in humans, induction of an autoimmunity-free status by establishment of a low level of chimerism, or other alternative means, might become a new therapy for type 1 diabetes.

  9. An update on the use of NOD mice to study autoimmune (Type 1) diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Rodolfo José; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2011-01-01

    The widely used nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of autoimmune (Type 1) diabetes mellitus shares multiple characteristics with the human disease, and studies employing this model continue to yield clinically relevant and important information. Here, we review some of the recent key findings obtained from NOD mouse investigations that have both advanced our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggested new therapeutic targets and approaches. Areas discussed include antigen discovery, identification of genes and pathways contributing to disease susceptibility, development of strategies to image islet inflammation and the testing of therapeutics. We also review recent technical advances that, combined with an improved understanding of the NOD mouse model’s limitations, should work to ensure its popularity, utility and relevance in the years ahead. PMID:20979558

  10. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K.; Kim, S.; Choi, C.S.; Jun, H.S.

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  11. Curative and beta cell regenerative effects of alpha1-antitrypsin treatment in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Hoffman, Lauren; Fan, Zhigang; Qipo, Andi; Shi, Hang; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Putheti, Prabhakar; Degauque, Nicolas; Libermann, Towia A; Auchincloss, Hugh; Flier, Jeffrey S; Strom, Terry B

    2008-10-21

    Invasive insulitis is a destructive T cell-dependent autoimmune process directed against insulin-producing beta cells that is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in humans and the clinically relevant nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. Few therapies have succeeded in restoring long-term, drug-free euglycemia and immune tolerance to beta cells in overtly diabetic NOD mice, and none have demonstrably enabled enlargement of the functional beta cell mass. Recent studies have emphasized the impact of inflammatory cytokines on the commitment of antigen-activated T cells to various effector or regulatory T cell phenotypes and insulin resistance and defective insulin signaling. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that inflammatory mechanisms trigger insulitis, insulin resistance, faulty insulin signaling, and the loss of immune tolerance to islets. We demonstrate that treatment with alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT), an agent that dampens inflammation, does not directly inhibit T cell activation, ablates invasive insulitis, and restores euglycemia, immune tolerance to beta cells, normal insulin signaling, and insulin responsiveness in NOD mice with recent-onset T1DM through favorable changes in the inflammation milieu. Indeed, the functional mass of beta cells expands in AAT-treated diabetic NOD mice.

  12. Nearby Construction Impedes the Progression to Overt Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hillhouse, Erin E.; Chabot-Roy, Geneviève; Guyon, Marie-Josée; Tessier, Nathalie; Boulay, Maryse; Liscourt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Construction nearby animal houses has sporadically been reported to affect various aspects of animal health. Most of the reports have focussed on the impact on stress hormone levels and the hypersensitivity of animals relative to humans. There has also been an anecdotal report on the impact of construction on autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Here, we describe that nearby construction significantly impedes the progression to overt diabetes in female NOD mice offspring. We demonstrate that this was not due to a genetic drift or to particularities associated with our specific mouse colony. Interestingly, although the glycemia levels remained low in mice born from mothers subject to construction stress during gestation, we detected an active autoimmune reaction towards pancreatic islet cells, as measured by both the degree of insulitis and the presence of insulin autoantibody levels in the serum. These results suggest that the external stress imposed during embryonic development does not prevent but significantly delays the autoimmune process. Together, our findings emphasize the impact of surrounding factors during in vivo studies and are in agreement with the hypothesis that both environmental and genetic cues contribute to autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:23691516

  13. Impact of T-cell-specific Smad4 deficiency on the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Lee, Song Mi; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is known to play a preventive role in type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Smad4, a key molecule for Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling, in T cells of NOD mice in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. We generated T-cell-specific Smad4 knockout (Smad4 tKO) NOD mice and assessed the pathological and immunological changes. Smad4 tKO showed earlier onset and increased incidence of diabetes than wild type (WT) NOD mice. Pathological features such as insulitis, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase auto-antibody levels and serum IFN-γ levels were significantly increased in Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. Proportion and number of activated/memory CD4+ T cell were significantly increased in pancreatic lymph nodes of Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. However, the proportion and function of regulatory T cells was not different. Effector CD4+ T cells from Smad4 tKO were more resistant to suppression by regulatory T cells than effector cells from WT NOD mice. The proliferative potential of effector T cells from Smad4 tKO was significantly elevated compared with WT NOD mice, and activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in T cells of Smad4 tKO NOD mice was correlated with this proliferative activity. We conclude that Smad4 deletion in T cells of NOD mice accelerated the development of autoimmune diabetes and increased the incidence of the disease by dysregulation of T cell activation at least in part via SREBP-1c activation. PMID:27686408

  14. Thymus reticulum of autoimmune mice. 3. Ultrastructural study of NOD (non-obese diabetic) mouse thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Nabarra, B.; Andrianarison, I.

    1991-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse develops spontaneous insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Converging lines of evidence indicate that the disease is of autoimmune origin and is primarily mediated by T cells. It thus appeared interesting to study the morphology of the thymic microenvironment in order to determine whether the architecture and/or the cellular components of the organ are altered. In the NOD mouse, significant aspects of involution were observed as early as the first month of life, forming a heterogeneous pattern with non-involuted areas. With time, these involuted aspects increased in surface and severity. In non-involuted zones vacuolization of epithelial cells was noted, as well as infiltration by plasma cells and the presence of numerous macrophages with high phagocytic activity. Involuted areas, forming a cellular layer as if cells had lost their limiting membranes, were crossed by a great number of cystic cavities bordered by epithelial cells and cells containing granulations. Their lumens contained lymphocytes and a few macrophages. These observations, which are reminiscent of similar reports made in other autoimmune mouse strains, may be related to the functional thymic abnormality thought to participate in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:1843256

  15. Different immunological responses to early-life antibiotic exposure affecting autoimmune diabetes development in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youjia; Jin, Ping; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Environmental factors clearly influence the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease. We have studied gut microbiota as important environmental agents that could affect the initiation or progression of type 1 diabetes especially in the prenatal period. We used neomycin, targeting mainly Gram negative or vancomycin, targeting mainly Gram positive bacteria, to treat pregnant NOD mothers and to study autoimmune diabetes development in their offspring. Neomycin-treated offspring were protected from diabetes, while vancomycin-treated offspring had accelerated diabetes development, and both antibiotics caused distinctly different shifts in gut microbiota composition compared with the offspring from untreated control mice. Our study demonstrated that neomycin treatment of pregnant mothers leads to generation of immune-tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the offspring and these APCs had reduced specific autoantigen-presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the protection from diabetes mediated by tolerogenic APCs was vertically transmissible to the second generation. In contrast, more diabetogenic inflammatory T cells were found in the lymphoid organs of the offspring from the vancomycin-treated pregnant mothers. This change however was not transmitted to the second generation. Our results suggested that prenatal exposure to antibiotic influenced gut bacterial composition at the earliest time point in life and is critical for consequent education of the immune system. As different bacteria can induce different immune responses, understanding these differences and how to generate self-tolerogenic APCs could be important for developing new therapy for type 1 diabetes.

  16. Helminth protection against autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice is independent of a type 2 immune shift and requires TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Marc P; Shi, Yinghui; Torrero, Marina N; Mueller, Ellen; Larson, David; Soloviova, Kateryna; Gondorf, Fabian; Hoerauf, Achim; Killoran, Kristin E.; Stocker, J Thomas; Davies, Stephen J; Tarbell, Kristin V; Mitre, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Leading hypotheses to explain helminth-mediated protection against autoimmunity postulate that type 2 or regulatory immune responses induced by helminth infections in the host limit pathogenic Th1-driven autoimmune responses. We tested these hypotheses by investigating whether infection with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis prevents diabetes onset in IL-4-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and whether depletion or absence of regulatory T cells, IL-10, or TGFβ alters helminth-mediated protection. In contrast to IL-4-competent NOD mice, IL-4-deficient NOD mice failed to develop a type 2 shift in either cytokine or antibody production during L. sigmodontis infection. Despite the absence of a type 2 immune shift, infection of IL-4-deficient NOD mice with L. sigmodontis prevented diabetes onset in all mice studied. Infections in immunocompetent and IL-4-deficient NOD mice were accompanied by increases in CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell frequencies and numbers, respectively, and helminth infection increased proliferation of CD4+FoxP3+ cells. However, depletion of CD25+ cells in NOD mice or FoxP3+ T cells from splenocytes transferred into NOD.scid mice did not decrease helminth-mediated protection against diabetes onset. Continuous depletion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGFβ, but not blockade of IL-10 signaling, prevented the beneficial effect of helminth infection on diabetes. Changes in Th17 responses did not seem to play an important role in helminth-mediated protection against autoimmunity as helminth infection was not associated with a decreased Th17 immune response. This study demonstrates that L. sigmodontis-mediated protection against diabetes in NOD mice is not dependent on the induction of a type 2 immune shift but does require TGFβ. PMID:22174447

  17. Systemic Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Experimental Allergic Asthma and Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pham Van, Linh; Bardel, Emilie; Gomez Alcala, Alejandro; Jeannin, Pascale; Akira, Shizuo; Bach, Jean-François; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Background Infections may be associated with exacerbation of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, epidemiological and experimental data have shown that some microorganisms can also prevent these pathologies. This observation is at the origin of the hygiene hypothesis according to which the decline of infections in western countries is at the origin of the increased incidence of both Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and Th2-mediated allergic diseases over the last decades. We have tested whether Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation can recapitulate the protective effect of infectious agents on allergy and autoimmunity. Methods and Findings Here, we performed a systematic study of the disease-modifying effects of a set of natural or synthetic TLR agonists using two experimental models, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, presenting the same genetic background of the non obese diabetic mouse (NOD) that is highly susceptible to both pathologies. In the same models, we also investigated the effect of probiotics. Additionally, we examined the effect of the genetic invalidation of MyD88 on the development of allergic asthma and spontaneous diabetes. We demonstrate that multiple TLR agonists prevent from both allergy and autoimmunity when administered parenterally. Probiotics which stimulate TLRs also protect from these two diseases. The physiological relevance of these findings is further suggested by the major acceleration of OVA-induced asthma in MyD88 invalidated mice. Our results strongly indicate that the TLR-mediated effects involve immunoregulatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and different subsets of regulatory T cells, notably CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells for TLR4 agonists and NKT cells for TLR3 agonists. Conclusions/Significance These observations demonstrate that systemic administration of TLR ligands can suppress both allergic and autoimmune responses. They provide a

  18. Diacerhein downregulate proinflammatory cytokines expression and decrease the autoimmune diabetes frequency in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Carina; Vilella, Conceição Aparecida; Vieira, Karla Priscila; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Hyslop, Stephen; Zollner, Ricardo de Lima

    2008-06-01

    NOD mice are used as experimental models as they develop type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1) spontaneously, with a strong similarity to the human disease. Diabetes mellitus type 1 is characterized by the destruction of the islet, orchestrated by T lymphocytes that induce cytokine release like IL-1beta, promoting an inflammatory process. Diacerhein has antiinflammatory properties, inhibiting IL-1. However, the mechanisms involved in immune modulation are not completely understood. In the present study, serum and pancreatic islets were isolated to investigate the relationship between IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF-alpha expression and diabetes onset, morphological aspects, and diacerhein dose dependence in animals treated with different doses (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg/day) and the control group (saline solution). The results demonstrated upregulation of mRNA islets and downregulation of the serum concentration of IL-1beta, IL-12 and TNF-alpha in the group treated with 5 and 10 mg/kg/day diacerhein, when compared with the saline group, and increased IFN-gamma serum concentration in the group treated with 50 mg/kg/day. These results suggest that diacerhein in NOD mice, decreases, in a dose-dependent manner, the diabetes frequency downregulating proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-12 at posttranscriptional or posttranslational level. Furthermore, using the HPLC method, diacerhein and rhein (active metabolite) were detected in serum and pancreas of treated mice.

  19. Induction of autoimmune cholangitis in non-obese diabetic (NOD).1101 mice following a chemical xenobiotic immunization.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, K; Yoshida, K; Leung, P S C; Moritoki, Y; Yang, G-X; Tsuneyama, K; Lian, Z-X; Hibi, T; Ansari, A A; Wicker, L S; Ridgway, W M; Coppel, R L; Mackay, I R; Gershwin, M E

    2009-03-01

    Our laboratory has suggested that loss of tolerance to pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2) leads to an anti-mitochondrial antibody response and autoimmune cholangitis, similar to human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have suggested that this loss of tolerance can be induced either via chemical xenobiotic immunization or exposure to select bacteria. Our work has also highlighted the importance of genetic susceptibility. Using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) congenic strain 1101 (hereafter referred to as NOD.1101 mice), which has chromosome 3 regions from B6 introgressed onto a NOD background, we exposed animals to 2-octynoic acid (2OA) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA). 2OA has been demonstrated previously by a quantitative structural activity relationship to react as well as or better than lipoic acid to anti-mitochondrial antibodies. We demonstrate herein that NOD.1101 mice immunized with 2OA-BSA, but not with BSA alone, develop high titre anti-mitochondrial antibodies and histological features, including portal infiltrates enriched in CD8(+) cells and liver granulomas, similar to human PBC. We believe this model will allow the rigorous dissection of early immunogenetic cause of biliary damage.

  20. Induction of autoimmune cholangitis in non-obese diabetic (NOD).1101 mice following a chemical xenobiotic immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, K; Yoshida, K; Leung, P S C; Moritoki, Y; Yang, G-X; Tsuneyama, K; Lian, Z-X; Hibi, T; Ansari, A A; Wicker, L S; Ridgway, W M; Coppel, R L; Mackay, I R; Gershwin, M E

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory has suggested that loss of tolerance to pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2) leads to an anti-mitochondrial antibody response and autoimmune cholangitis, similar to human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have suggested that this loss of tolerance can be induced either via chemical xenobiotic immunization or exposure to select bacteria. Our work has also highlighted the importance of genetic susceptibility. Using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) congenic strain 1101 (hereafter referred to as NOD.1101 mice), which has chromosome 3 regions from B6 introgressed onto a NOD background, we exposed animals to 2-octynoic acid (2OA) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA). 2OA has been demonstrated previously by a quantitative structural activity relationship to react as well as or better than lipoic acid to anti-mitochondrial antibodies. We demonstrate herein that NOD.1101 mice immunized with 2OA-BSA, but not with BSA alone, develop high titre anti-mitochondrial antibodies and histological features, including portal infiltrates enriched in CD8+ cells and liver granulomas, similar to human PBC. We believe this model will allow the rigorous dissection of early immunogenetic cause of biliary damage. PMID:19094117

  1. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B.; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Though murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin binding determinant sialyl Lewisx (sLex), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLex display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating HCELL, the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL+ MSCs showed 3-fold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL−) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays, however, though engraftment was temporary for both HCELL+ and HCELL− MSCs, administration of HCELL+ MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL− MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44−/− mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLex, but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25641589

  2. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here, we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin-binding determinant sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x) ), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLe(x) display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL(+) MSCs showed threefold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL(-) ) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays; however, although engraftment was temporary for both HCELL(+) and HCELL(-) MSCs, administration of HCELL(+) MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL(-) MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44(-/-) mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLe(x) , but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. Stem Cells

  3. Local expression of transgene encoded TNF alpha in islets prevents autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by preventing the development of auto-reactive islet-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Grewal, I S; Grewal, K D; Wong, F S; Picarella, D E; Janeway, C A; Flavell, R A

    1996-11-01

    Lately, TNF alpha has been the focus of studies of autoimmunity; its role in the progression of autoimmune diabetes is, however, still unclear. To analyze the effects of TNF alpha in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), we have generated nonobese diabetic (NOD) transgenic mice expressing TNF alpha under the control of the rat insulin II promoter (RIP). In transgenic mice, TNF alpha expression on the islets resulted in massive insulitis, composed of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells. Despite infiltration of considerable number of lymphoid cells in islets, expression of TNF alpha protected NOD mice from IDDM. To determine the mechanism of TNF alpha action, splenic cells from control NOD and RIP-TNF alpha mice were adoptively transferred to NOD-SCID recipients. In contrast to the induction of diabetes by splenic cells from control NOD mice, splenic cells from RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice did not induce diabetes in NOD-SCID recipients. Diabetes was induced however, in the RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice when CD8+ diabetogenic cloned T cells or splenic cells from diabetic NOD mice were adoptively transferred to these mice. Furthermore, expression of TNF alpha in islets also downregulated splenic cell responses to autoantigens. These data establish a mechanism of TNF alpha action and provide evidence that local expression of TNF alpha protects NOD mice from autoimmune diabetes by preventing the development of autoreactive islet-specific T cells.

  4. Syngeneic transfer of autoimmune diabetes from diabetic NOD mice to healthy neonates. Requirement for both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have developed a model of syngeneic adoptive transfer for type I diabetes mellitus of NOD mice. This model consists in injecting spleen cells from diabetic adult mice into newborn NOD recipients. 50% of recipients inoculated with 20 X 10(6) cells develop diabetes within the first 10 wk of life, at a time when none of the control littermates have yet become diabetic. The earliest successful transfers are observed at 3 wk of age, at a time when controls do not even exhibit histological changes in their pancreas. In addition we have shown that: (a) both males and females can be adoptively transferred, despite the fact that males rarely develop spontaneous diabetes in our colony; (b) diabetes transfer is a dose-dependent phenomenon that provides an in vivo assay for comparing the autoimmune potential of spleen cells from mice at various stages of their natural history; (c) the susceptibility of the recipients to the transfer is limited in time and declines after 3 wk; and (d) both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cell subsets are necessary for the successful transfer. The neonatal syngeneic transfer provides an effective model for studies of the cellular events involved at regulatory and effector stages of autoimmune type I diabetes. PMID:3309126

  5. Human Cord Blood Stem Cell-Modulated Regulatory T Lymphocytes Reverse the Autoimmune-Caused Type 1 Diabetes in Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Lin, Brian; Darflinger, Robert; Zhang, Yongkang; Holterman, Mark J.; Skidgel, Randal A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The deficit of pancreatic islet β cells caused by autoimmune destruction is a crucial issue in type 1 diabetes (T1D). It is essential to fundamentally control the autoimmunity for treatment of T1D. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in maintaining self-tolerance through their inhibitory impact on autoreactive effector T cells. An abnormality of Tregs is associated with initiation of progression of T1D. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report that treatment of established autoimmune-caused diabetes in NOD mice with purified autologous CD4+CD62L+ Tregs co-cultured with human cord blood stem cells (CB-SC) can eliminate hyperglycemia, promote islet β-cell regeneration to increase β-cell mass and insulin production, and reconstitute islet architecture. Correspondingly, treatment with CB-SC-modulated CD4+CD62L+ Tregs (mCD4CD62L Tregs) resulted in a marked reduction of insulitis, restored Th1/Th2 cytokine balance in blood, and induced apoptosis of infiltrated leukocytes in pancreatic islets. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that treatment with mCD4CD62L Tregs can reverse overt diabetes, providing a novel strategy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes as well as other autoimmune diseases. PMID:19156219

  6. Molecular phenotyping of immune cells from young NOD mice reveals abnormal metabolic pathways in the early induction phase of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Desiderio, Dominic M; Marshall, Dana R; Gerling, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse--a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (~90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes.

  7. Linkage on chromosome 3 of autoimmune diabetes and defective Fc receptor for lgG in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, J.B.; Todd, J.A.; Rodrigues, N.R.; Ghosh, S. ); Hogarth, P.M. ); Wicker, L.S.; Podolin, P.L.; Gaffney, E.; Peterson, L.B.; Fischer, P.A.; Sirotina, A. )

    1993-04-30

    A congenic, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain that contains a segment of chromosome 3 from the diabetes-resistant mouse strain B6.PL-Thy-1[sup a] was less susceptible to diabetes than NOD mice. A fully penetrant immunological defect also mapped to this segment, which encodes the high-affinity Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G (lgG), Fc[gamma]Rl. The NOD Fcgr1 allele, which results in a deletion of the cytoplasmic tail, caused a 73 percent reduction in the turnover of cell surface receptor-antibody complexes. The development of congenic strains and the characterization of Mendelian traits that are specific to the disease phenotype demonstrate the feasibility of dissecting the pathophysiology of complex, non-Mendelian diseases.

  8. Killer Treg restore immune homeostasis and suppress autoimmune diabetes in prediabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2011-08-01

    We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Treg) effectively target diabetogenic cells, and reinforcing their killing capacity will attenuate the course of disease. For proof of concept, Fas-ligand (FasL) protein was conjugated to CD25(+) Treg (killer Treg) to simulate the physiological mechanism of activation-induced cell death. Cytotoxic and suppressive activity of killer Treg was superior to naïve Treg in vitro. Administration of 3-4 × 10(6) Treg prevented hyperglycemia in 65% prediabetic NOD females, however only killer Treg postponed disease onset by 14 weeks. CD25(+) Treg homed to the pancreas and regional lymph nodes of prediabetic NOD females, proliferated and ectopic FasL protein induced apoptosis in CD25(-) T cells in situ. This mechanism of pathogenic cell debulking is specific to killer Treg, as FasL-coated splenocytes have no immunomodulatory effect, and only killer Treg prevent the disease in 80% of NOD.SCID recipients of effector:suppressor T cells (10:1 ratio). All immunomodulated mice displayed increased fractional expression of FoxP3 in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes, which was accompanied by CD25 only in recipients of killer Treg. A therapeutic intervention that uses the affinity of Treg to reduce the pathogenic load has long-term consequences: arrest of destructive insulitis in mice with established disease prior to β-cell extinction.

  9. Severe anaphylactic reactions to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) self peptides in NOD mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pedotti, Rosetta; Sanna, Maija; Tsai, Mindy; DeVoss, Jason; Steinman, Lawrence; McDevitt, Hugh; Galli, Stephen J

    2003-01-01

    Background Insulin dependent (i.e., "type 1") diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is considered to be a T cell mediated disease in which TH1 and Tc autoreactive cells attack the pancreatic islets. Among the beta-cell antigens implicated in T1DM, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 appears to play a key role in the development of T1DM in humans as well as in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, the experimental model for this disease. It has been shown that shifting the immune response to this antigen from TH1 towards TH2, via the administration of GAD65 peptides to young NOD mice, can suppress the progression to overt T1DM. Accordingly, various protocols of "peptide immunotherapy" of T1DM are under investigation. However, in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), another autoimmune TH1 mediated disease that mimics human multiple sclerosis, anaphylactic shock can occur when the mice are challenged with certain myelin self peptides that initially were administered with adjuvant to induce the disease. Results Here we show that NOD mice, that spontaneously develop T1DM, can develop fatal anaphylactic reactions upon challenge with preparations of immunodominant GAD65 self peptides after immunization with these peptides to modify the development of T1DM. Conclusions These findings document severe anaphylaxis to self peptide preparations used in an attempt to devise immunotherapy for a spontaneous autoimmune disease. Taken together with the findings in EAE, these results suggest that peptide therapies designed to induce a TH1 to TH2 shift carry a risk for the development of anaphylactic reactivity to the therapeutic peptides. PMID:12597780

  10. Molecular Phenotyping of Immune Cells from Young NOD Mice Reveals Abnormal Metabolic Pathways in the Early Induction Phase of Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N.; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Marshall, Dana R.; Gerling, Ivan C.

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse – a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (∼90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes. PMID:23071669

  11. Nasal administration of CTB-insulin induces active tolerance against autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice

    PubMed Central

    Aspord, C; Thivolet, C

    2002-01-01

    Nasal administration of beta cell-derived auto-antigens has been reported to suppress the development of autoimmune diabetes. We investigated the tolerogenic effects of insulin conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Nasal administration of 1 µg of CTB-insulin significantly delayed the incidence of diabetes in comparison to CTB treated mice. However, administration of 4 or 8 µg of the conjugate had no protective effect. Protection induced by CTB-insulin was transferred to naive recipients by splenic CD4+ T cells. This result favours an active cellular mechanism of regulation, which was lost using higher (4–8 µg) or lower (0·1–0·5 µg) amounts of the conjugate. When co-administered with diabetogenic T cells, splenic T cells from CTB-insulin-treated mice reduced the lymphocytic infiltration of the islets. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of recipients’ pancreatic glands revealed an increase of TGF-β and IL-10 transcripts after donor mice tolerization, while levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 RNAs were unchanged. We observed a significant increase of T cell proliferation after unspecific stimulation in the spleen and pancreatic lymph nodes 24 h after CTB-insulin administration in comparison to control treatment. Higher amounts of IL-4 and IFN-γ were noticed in pancreatic lymph nodes of tolerized mice upon in vitro stimulation. Antigen-specific unresponsiveness after immunization and upon subsequent in vitro exposure to homologous antigen was obtained in nasally treated animals. Our results underlined the importance of nasal mucosa as an inducing site of tolerance and provided evidence for similar mechanisms of action to what has been described for the oral route, which favoured a CTB-insulin specific effect. PMID:12390307

  12. Methylation of insulin DNA in response to proinflammatory cytokines during the progression of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Rui, Jinxiu; Deng, Songyan; Lebastchi, Jasmin; Clark, Pamela L; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Herold, Kevan C

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immunological destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Preclinical and clinical data indicate that there are changes in beta cell function at different stages of the disease, but the fate of beta cells has not been closely studied. We studied how immune factors affect the function and epigenetics of beta cells during disease progression and identified possible triggers of these changes. We studied FACS sorted beta cells and infiltrating lymphocytes from NOD mouse and human islets. Gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and methylation of the insulin genes was investigated by high-throughput and Sanger sequencing. To understand the role of DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt3a was knocked down with small interfering RNA (siRNA). The effects of cytokines on methylation and expression of the insulin gene were studied in humans and mice. During disease progression in NOD mice, there was an inverse relationship between the proportion of infiltrating lymphocytes and the beta cell mass. In beta cells, methylation marks in the Ins1 and Ins2 genes changed over time. Insulin gene expression appears to be most closely regulated by the methylation of Ins1 exon 2 and Ins2 exon 1. Cytokine transcription increased with age in NOD mice, and these cytokines could induce methylation marks in the insulin DNA by inducing methyltransferases. Similar changes were induced by cytokines in human beta cells in vitro. Epigenetic modification of DNA by methylation in response to immunological stressors may be a mechanism that affects insulin gene expression during the progression of type 1 diabetes.

  13. Age-related deregulation of Aire and peripheral tissue antigen genes in the thymic stroma of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is associated with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1).

    PubMed

    Fornari, Thaís A; Donate, Paula B; Macedo, Claudia; Marques, Márcia M C; Magalhães, Danielle A; Passos, Geraldo A S

    2010-09-01

    Gene expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs) in stromal medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is a key process to the negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes. This phenomenon was termed "promiscuous gene expression" (PGE), which is partially controlled by the Aire gene. Nevertheless, reasons for the correlation of Aire and PTAs with the emergence of autoimmune diseases are largely unknown, though it may be a result of a chronological effect. Although the effect of Aire mutations in pathogenic autoimmunity is well know, it could not be a unique cause for autoimmunity. Independently of mutations, temporal deregulation of Aire expression may imbalance Aire-dependent PTAs and/or wide PGE. This deregulation may be an early warning sign for autoimmune diseases as it guarantees autoantigen representation in the thymus. To assess this hypothesis, we studied the expression levels of Aire, Aire-dependent (Ins2) and Aire-independent (Gad67 and Col2a1) PTAs using real-time-PCR of the thymic stromal cells of NOD mice during the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1). Wide PGE was studied by microarrays in which the PTA genes were identified through parallel CD80(+) mTEC 3.10 cell line expression profiling. The results show that Aire gene was down-regulated in young pre-autoimmune (pre-diabetic) NOD mice. PGE and specific PTA genes were down-regulated in adult autoimmune diabetic animals. These findings represent evidence indicating that chronological deregulation of genes important to negative selection may be associated with the development of an autoimmune disease (DM-1) in mice.

  14. Escherichia coli infection induces autoimmune cholangitis and anti-mitochondrial antibodies in non-obese diabetic (NOD).B6 (Idd10/Idd18) mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J J; Yang, G-X; Zhang, W C; Lu, L; Tsuneyama, K; Kronenberg, M; Véla, J L; Lopez-Hoyos, M; He, X-S; Ridgway, W M; Leung, P S C; Gershwin, M E

    2014-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have a higher incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI) and there is significant homology of the immunodominant mitochondrial autoantigen, the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), between mammals and bacteria. Previous work has demonstrated that non-obese diabetic (NOD).B6 Idd10/Idd18 infected with Novosphingobium aromaticivorans developed liver lesions similar to human PBC. It was postulated that the biliary disease was dependent upon the presence of the unique N. aro glycosphingolipids in activating natural killer T (NK T) cells. To address this issue, we infected NOD.B6 Idd10/Idd18 mice with either Escherichia coli, N. aro or use of a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle control and serially followed animals for the appearance of liver pathology and anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA). Of striking importance, the biliary disease of E. coli-infected mice was more severe than N. Aro-infected mice and the titre of AMA was higher in E. coli-infected mice. Furthermore, the immunopathology did not correlate with the ability of bacterial extracts to produce antigen-dependent activation of NK T cells. Our data suggest that the unique glycosphingolipids of N. aro are not required for the development of autoimmune cholangitis. Importantly, the data highlight the clinical significance of E. coli infection in a genetically susceptible host, and we suggest that the appearance of autoimmune cholangitis is dependent upon molecular mimicry. These data highlight that breach of tolerance to PDC-E2 is probably the first event in the natural history of PBC in genetically susceptible hosts. PMID:24128311

  15. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  16. Extracellular lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) mediates autoimmune disease progression in the NOD model of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Herren, Suzanne; Graber, Pierre; Vilbois, Francis; Pasquali, Christian; Berney, Claude; Plitz, Thomas; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H

    2005-05-01

    Treatment (from 5 to 25 weeks of age) with a novel blocking monoclonal antibody, mAb I-10, directed against the plasma membrane (pm) form of LAMP-1, protected against development of autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse. A shorter course of treatment, i.e. from 5 to 12 weeks of age, significantly reduced the occurrence of insulitis as well as disease onset. Interfering with pm-LAMP-1 required continuous treatment as tolerance was not observed when treatment was stopped, and no higher proportion of cells with a T regulatory phenotype (e.g. CD4(+)CD25(+)) were induced. The mechanism appears to involve modulating a proinflammatory cytokine, as the proportion of pancreatic-infiltrating IFN-gamma-positive cells was significantly reduced in the mAb I-10-treated group. These results demonstrate an unexpected role for pm-LAMP-1 in autoimmune disease progression, and suggest that further investigation should be performed to understand how this molecule modulates IFN-gamma-driven responses.

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulation of diabetes onset in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Chirra, A R; DeGruccio, A; Girman, D J

    1989-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a hydroxyl radical scavenger, is known as an immunosuppressive agent and can reduce autoantibody levels in experimental autoimmune diseases. Because classic diabetogens damage the DNA and membrane of the beta-cell by the generation of free radicals, the purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the intake of DMSO or its derivatives methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) could prevent the expression of autoimmune diabetes in the spontaneously diabetic NOD mouse. DMSO (2.5%), MSM (2.5%), and DMS (0.25%) were added to the drinking water of female NOD mice immediately after weaning. Control animals were maintained on regular drinking water. The presence of overt diabetes was monitored from the age of 2 mo by weekly urinary glucose testing until the animals either became overtly glucosuric or were greater than 240 days of age. In contrast to what we expected, DMSO (2.5%) markedly increased the rate at which the animals expressed overt diabetes (P less than .0004, log-rank test). MSM had no effect, whereas DMS reduced the incidence and rate of diabetes onset. When DMSO (2.5%) was administered to male NOD mice and control strains of mice (BALB/c and ICR), the control group did not develop glucosuria or insipidus, whereas DMSO increased the incidence of diabetes in the male NOD mice from 21 to 79%. In contrast, when DMSO was fed to female NOD mice on a purified AIN-76 diet, diabetes onset was reduced to 36%. We conclude that DMSO accelerates the uptake of dietary diabetogens into the beta-cell of genetically susceptible animals (NOD mice). The protective effect of the purified diet in such animals may be due to a lack of putative diabetogens in purified diet, or alternatively, the diet itself contains factor(s) that protect the beta-cell from autoimmune attack and/or destruction.

  18. Insulin as an Autoantigen in NOD/Human Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Nakayama, Maki; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2008-01-01

    Though multiple islet autoantigens are recognized by T lymphocytes and autoantibodies prior to the development of type 1A (immune mediated diabetes) there is increasing evidence that autoimmunity to insulin may be central to disease pathogenesis. Evidence is strongest for the NOD mouse model where blocking immune responses to insulin prevents diabetes and insulin peptides can be utilized to induce diabetes. In man insulin gene polymorphisms are associated with disease risk, and autoantibodies and T cells reacting with multiple insulin/proinsulin epitopes are present. It is not currently clear why insulin autoimmunity is so prominent and frequent and though insulin can be used to immunologically prevent diabetes of NOD mice, insulin based preventive immunoregulation of diabetes in man is not yet possible. PMID:18178393

  19. Glibenclamide Prevents Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Pontes, Helena; Mathieu, Chantal; Meda, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has revealed that Cx36, the sole connexin expressed in the insulin-producing beta cells, enhances the secretion of insulin, and promotes the resistance of beta cells against pro-inflammatory cytokines. In parallel, the anti-diabetic sulphonylurea glibenclamide was shown to promote the assembly and function of Cx36 channels. Here, we assessed whether glibenclamide could protect the insulin-producing cells against conditions mimicking those expected at the onset of type 1 diabetes. We found that the drug 1) protected in vitro the mouse MIN6 cells from the apoptosis and loss of Cx36, which are induced by Th1 cytokines; 2) prevented the development of hyperglycemia as well as the loss of beta cells and Cx36, which rapidly develop with aging in untreated NOD mice; 3) modified the proportion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in pancreatic draining lymph nodes. The data imply that an early glibenclamide treatment may help protecting beta cells against the autoimmune attack, which triggers the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:28006000

  20. Long-term silencing of autoimmune diabetes and improved life expectancy by a soluble pHLA-DR4 chimera in a newly-humanized NOD/DR4/B7 mouse.

    PubMed

    Pow Sang, Luis; Majji, Sai; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor D

    2014-01-01

    Several human MHC class II (HLA) molecules are strongly associated with high incidence of autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes (T1D). The HLA-humanized mice may thus represent valuable tools to test HLA-based vaccines and therapeutics for human autoimmune diseases. Herein, we have tested the therapeutic potential of a soluble HLA-DR4-GAD65 271-280 (hu DEF-GAD65) chimera of human use in a newly-generated NOD/DR4/B7 double transgenic (dTg) mouse that develops spontaneously an accelerated T1D regardless the gender. The NOD/DR4/B7 dTg mice generated by a two-step crossing protocol express the HLA-DR*0401 molecules on 20% of antigen presenting cells, the human B7 molecules in pancreas, and HLA-DR4/GAD65-specific T-cells in the blood. Some 75% of pre-diabetic NOD/DR4/B7 dTg mice treated with hu DEF-GAD65 chimera remained euglycemic and showed a stabilized pancreatic insulitis 6 months after treatment. The 25% non responders developing hyperglycemia survived 3-4 months longer than their untreated littermates. T1D prevention by this reagent occurred by a Th2/TR-1 polarization in the pancreas. This study strongly suggests that the use of soluble pHLA reagents to suppress/stabilize the T1D progression and to extend the life expectancy in the absence of side effects is an efficient and safe therapeutic approach.

  1. Long-term silencing of autoimmune diabetes and improved life expectancy by a soluble pHLA-DR4 chimera in a newly-humanized NOD/DR4/B7 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pow Sang, Luis; Majji, Sai; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor D

    2014-01-01

    Several human MHC class II (HLA) molecules are strongly associated with high incidence of autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes (T1D). The HLA-humanized mice may thus represent valuable tools to test HLA-based vaccines and therapeutics for human autoimmune diseases. Herein, we have tested the therapeutic potential of a soluble HLA-DR4-GAD65271–280 (hu DEF-GAD65) chimera of human use in a newly-generated NOD/DR4/B7 double transgenic (dTg) mouse that develops spontaneously an accelerated T1D regardless the gender. The NOD/DR4/B7 dTg mice generated by a two-step crossing protocol express the HLA-DR*0401 molecules on 20% of antigen presenting cells, the human B7 molecules in pancreas, and HLA-DR4/GAD65-specific T-cells in the blood. Some 75% of pre-diabetic NOD/DR4/B7 dTg mice treated with hu DEF-GAD65 chimera remained euglycemic and showed a stabilized pancreatic insulitis 6 months after treatment. The 25% non responders developing hyperglycemia survived 3–4 months longer than their untreated littermates. T1D prevention by this reagent occurred by a Th2/TR-1 polarization in the pancreas. This study strongly suggests that the use of soluble pHLA reagents to suppress/stabilize the T1D progression and to extend the life expectancy in the absence of side effects is an efficient and safe therapeutic approach. PMID:24335553

  2. A Preclinical Consortium Approach for Assessing the Efficacy of Combined Anti-CD3 Plus IL-1 Blockade in Reversing New-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ronald G; Pagni, Philippe P; Kupfer, Tinalyn; Wasserfall, Clive H; Deng, Songyan; Posgai, Amanda; Manenkova, Yulia; Bel Hani, Amira; Straub, Laura; Bernstein, Philip; Atkinson, Mark A; Herold, Kevan C; von Herrath, Matthias; Staeva, Teodora; Ehlers, Mario R; Nepom, Gerald T

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing need to develop strategic combinations of therapeutic agents to prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D) or to preserve islet β-cell mass in new-onset disease. Although clinical trials using candidate therapeutics are commonly based on preclinical studies, concern is growing regarding the reproducibility as well as the potential clinical translation of reported results using animal models of human disorders. In response, the National Institutes of Health Immune Tolerance Network and JDRF established a multicenter consortium of academic institutions designed to assess the efficacy and intergroup reproducibility of clinically applicable immunotherapies for reversing new-onset disease in the NOD mouse model of T1D. Predicated on prior studies, this consortium conducted coordinated, prospective studies, using joint standard operating procedures, fixed criteria for study entry, and common reagents, to optimize combined anti-CD3 treatment plus interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade to reverse new-onset disease in NOD mice. We did not find that IL-1 blockade with anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody or IL-1trap provided additional benefit for reversing new-onset disease compared with anti-CD3 treatment alone. These results demonstrate the value of larger, multicenter preclinical studies for vetting and prioritizing therapeutics for future clinical use.

  3. NOD B-cells are insufficient to incite T-cell-mediated anti-islet autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Daniel J; Noorchashm, Hooman; Lin, Tina H; Greeley, Siri A; Naji, Ali

    2005-07-01

    Although it is well established that B-cells are required for the development of diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, the nature of their role remains unknown. Herein, we investigate the hypothesis that B-cells in this autoimmune background actively disrupt the tolerant state of those T-cells with which they interact. We demonstrate that NOD B-cells express elevated levels of crucial molecules involved in antigen presentation (including CD21/35, major histocompatibility complex class II, and CD40), alterations that invite the possibility of inappropriate T-cell activation. However, when chimeric animals are generated in which all B-cells are NOD-derived, a tolerant state is maintained. These data demonstrate that although B-cells are required for the development of autoimmunity, they are not sufficient to disrupt established tolerance. Moreover, non-B-cell antigen-presenting cells may be the critical actors in the establishment of the tolerant state; this function may be absent in NOD mice as they are characterized by deficient professional antigen-presenting cell function.

  4. Roles for Catharsis S, L, and B in Insulitis and Diabetes in the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Lianne C.; Kirk, Elizabeth A.; McMillen, Timothy S.; Hsiao, Shuo-Hung; Caldwell, Mark; Houston, Barbara; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; LeBoeuf, Renee C.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a panel of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice deficient in major lysosomal cysteine proteases (cathepsins S, L and B) to identify protease enzymes essential for autoimmune diabetes. Null alleles for cathepsins (Cts) S, L or B were introgressed onto the NOD genetic background with 19 Idd markers at homozygosity. Diabetes onset was determined among females aged up to 6 months. We evaluated insulitis and sialadenitis in tissues using histology and computer assisted morphology. NOD mice deficient in Ctss or Ctsb were partially protected from diabetes with incidence at 33% and 28%, respectively, versus wild-type NOD (69%; p<0.00001). NODs lacking cathepsin L (Ctsl−/−) are completely protected from IDDM, as originally shown by others. Ctsl, Ctss, or Ctsb heterozygous mice were able to develop IDDM, although incidence levels were significantly lower for Ctsb+/− (50%) and Ctsl+/− (55%) as compared to NODs (69%; p<0.03). Ctsl−/− mice contain functional, diabetogenic T-cells and an enriched Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell population, and diabetes resistance was due to the presence of an expanded population of regulatory T-cells. These data provide additional information about the potency of the diabetogenic T-cell population in Ctsl−/− mice which were comparable in potency to wild-type NOD mice. These data illustrate the critical contribution of each of these proteases in determining IDDM in the NOD mouse and provide a useful set of models for further studies. PMID:19664906

  5. Immunosuppressive therapy exacerbates autoimmunity in NOD mice and diminishes the protective activity of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-09-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that immunosuppressive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation are relatively inefficient approaches to treat autoimmune diabetes. In this study we assessed the impact of immunosuppression on inflammatory insulitis in NOD mice, and the effect of radiation on immunomodulation mediated by adoptive transfer of various cell subsets. Sublethal radiation of NOD females at the age of 14 weeks (onset of hyperglycemia) delayed the onset of hyperglycemia, however two thirds of the mice became diabetic. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes into irradiated NON and NOD mice precipitated disease onset despite increased contents of CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells in the pancreas and regional lymphatics. Similar phenotypic changes were observed when CD25(+) T cells were infused after radiation, which also delayed disease onset without affecting its incidence. Importantly, irradiation increased the susceptibility to diabetes in NOD and NON mice (71-84%) as compared to immunomodulation with splenocytes and CD25(+) T cells in naïve recipients (44-50%). Although irradiation had significant and durable influence on pancreatic infiltrates and the fractions of functional CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cells were elevated by adoptive cell transfer, this approach conferred no protection from disease progression. Irradiation was ineffective both in debulking of pathogenic clones and in restoring immune homeostasis, and the consequent homeostatic expansion evolves as an unfavorable factor in attempts to restore self-tolerance and might even provoke uncontrolled proliferation of pathogenic clones. The obstacles imposed by immunosuppression on abrogation of autoimmune insulitis require replacement of non-specific immunosuppressive therapy by selective immunomodulation that does not cause lymphopenia.

  6. Distinct genetic control of autoimmune neuropathy and diabetes in the non-obese diabetic background.

    PubMed

    Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Thompson, Heather L; Giampaolo, Jennifer R; Davini, Dan; Rosenthal, Wendy; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is susceptible to the development of autoimmune diabetes but also multiple other autoimmune diseases. Over twenty susceptibility loci linked to diabetes have been identified in NOD mice and progress has been made in the definition of candidate genes at many of these loci (termed Idd for insulin-dependent diabetes). The susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases in the NOD background is a unique opportunity to examine susceptibility genes that confer a general propensity for autoimmunity versus susceptibility genes that control individual autoimmune diseases. We previously showed that NOD mice deficient for the costimulatory molecule B7-2 (NOD-B7-2KO mice) were protected from diabetes but spontaneously developed an autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Here, we took advantage of multiple NOD mouse strains congenic for Idd loci to test the role of these Idd loci the development of neuropathy and determine if B6 alleles at Idd loci that are protective for diabetes will also be for neuropathy. Thus, we generated NOD-B7-2KO strains congenic at Idd loci and examined the development of neuritis and clinical neuropathy. We found that the NOD-H-2(g7) MHC region is necessary for development of neuropathy in NOD-B7-2KO mice. In contrast, other Idd loci that significantly protect from diabetes did not affect neuropathy when considered individually. However, we found potent genetic interactions of some Idd loci that provided almost complete protection from neuritis and clinical neuropathy. In addition, defective immunoregulation by Tregs could supersede protection by some, but not other, Idd loci in a tissue-specific manner in a model where neuropathy and diabetes occurred concomitantly. Thus, our study helps identify Idd loci that control tissue-specific disease or confer general susceptibility to autoimmunity, and brings insight to the Treg-dependence of autoimmune processes influenced by given Idd region in the NOD background.

  7. Inhibition of Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes by Gastrointestinal Helminth Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Karin A.; Raine, Tim; Cooke, Anne; Lawrence, Catherine E.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infections are prevalent worldwide and are potent inducers of T helper 2 responses with the capacity to modulate the immune response to heterologous antigens. Parasitic helminth infection has even been shown to modulate the immune response associated with autoimmune diseases. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice provide a model for studying human autoimmune diabetes; as in humans, the development of diabetes in NOD mice has been linked to the loss of self-tolerance to beta cell autoantigens. Previous studies with the NOD mouse have shown that helminth and bacterial infection appears to inhibit type 1 diabetes by disrupting the pathways leading to the Th1-mediated destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. The aim of our study was to examine whether infection with the gastrointestinal helminths Trichinella spiralis or Heligmosomoides polygyrus could inhibit the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice and to analyze the mechanisms involved in protection and the role of Th2 responses. Protection from diabetes was afforded by helminth infection, appeared to inhibit autoimmune diabetes by disrupting pathways leading to the destruction of beta cells, and was mediated by seemingly independent mechanisms depending on the parasite but which may be to be related to the capacity of the host to mount a Th2 response. PMID:17043101

  8. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice express the Lyt2{sup a} (Lyt2.1) and Lyt3{sup a} (Lyt3.1) alleles of CD8

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Tardieu, J.M.; Cornelius, J.G.; Ye, X.

    1996-06-01

    Predisposition to Type I insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) has a strong underlying genetic basis involving class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes as well as several non-MHC genetic systems. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a model for human IDD, genes associated with the appearance of immune cell infiltrates in the pancreatic islets (insulitis) and/or overt IDD have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 11, and 17. A recent report has suggested that CD8+ lymphocytes of the NOD mouse might be deficient in the expression of the CD8{Beta} molecule, a protein encoded by a gene on chromosome 6. The CD8{Beta} molecule is a T-cell surface marker, the lack of which could affect selection in the thymus, possibly permitting auto-reactive T-cell clones to populate the peripheral lymphoid tissues. For this reason, we examined the expression of the CD8 molecule by lymphocytes in the NOD mouse. Results indicate that the NOD mouse is not deficient in its transcription of detectable mRNA encoding either the CD8{alpha} or {Beta} subunits. However, the NOD mouse expresses the Lyt2{sup a} and Lyt3{sup a} alleles, suggesting that a portion of chromosome 6 centromeric to the diabetes-susceptibility genetic region is derived from an ancestry common to AKR and, like AKR, the CD8{alpha} and CD8{Beta}3.1 (but not CD8{Beta}3.2) subunits are detected on the cell surface of T lymphocytes of the NOD mouse. Interestingly, though, the CD8{Beta}3.1 molecule may not be expressed in the NOD mouse to the same extent as it is expressed in the AKR/J mouse, suggesting the possibility that the NOD mouse possesses a defect somewhere between transcription and cell surface expression of the CD8{Beta} molecule. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Reza B.; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T.; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L.; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory / regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26765526

  10. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory/regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes.

  11. Critical role of IFN-gamma in CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshiko; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Kato, Takako; Kanagawa, Edith M; Kanagawa, Osami

    2009-11-01

    IFN-gamma signaling-deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop diabetes with similar kinetics to those of wild-type NOD mice. However, the immunization of IFN-gamma signaling-deficient NOD mice with CFA failed to induce long-term protection, whereas wild-type NOD mice receiving CFA remained diabetes-free. CFA also failed to protect IFN-gamma receptor-deficient (IFN-gammaR(-/-)) NOD mice from the autoimmune rejection of transplanted islets, as it does in diabetic NOD mice, and from disease transfer by spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice. These data clearly show that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma is necessary for the CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes. There is no difference in the T(h)1/T(h)17 balance between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. There is also no difference in the total numbers and percentages of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lymph node CD4(+) T-cell populations between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. However, pathogenic T cells lacking IFN-gammaR are resistant to the suppressive effect of Treg cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, it is likely that CFA-mediated protection against diabetes development depends on a change in the balance between Treg cells and pathogenic T cells, and IFN-gamma signaling seems to control the susceptibility of pathogenic T cells to the inhibitory activity of Treg cells.

  12. Low levels of allogeneic but not syngeneic hematopoietic chimerism reverse autoimmune insulitis in prediabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2009-09-01

    The relative efficiencies of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation and the threshold levels of donor chimerism required to control autoimmune insulitis were evaluated in prediabetic NOD mice. Male and female NOD mice were conditioned by radiation and grafted with bone marrow cells from allogeneic and syngeneic sex-mismatched donors. Establishment of full allogeneic chimerism in peripheral blood reversed insulitis and restored glucose tolerance despite persistence of residual host immune cells. By contrast, sublethal total body irradiation (with or without syngeneic transplant) reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes. The latter pattern was also seen in mice that rejected the bone marrow allografts. Low levels of stable allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism (>1%) were sufficient to prevent the evolution of diabetes following allogeneic transplantation. The data indicate that immunomodulation attained at low levels of allogeneic, but not syngeneic, hematopoietic chimerism is effective in resolution of islet inflammation at even relatively late stages in the evolution of the prediabetic state in a preclinical model. However, our data question the efficacy and rationale behind syngeneic (autologous-like) immuno-hematopoietic reconstitution in type 1 diabetes.

  13. Type 1 diabetes in NOD mice unaffected by mast cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Dario A; Fu, Wenxian; Schonefeldt, Susann; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Lampi, Yulia; Liston, Adrian; Mathis, Diane; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2014-11-01

    Mast cells have been invoked as important players in immune responses associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on in vitro studies, or in vivo through the use of Kit mutant mice, mast cells have been suggested to play immunological roles in direct antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, in the regulation of T-cell and dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes, and in Th1 versus Th2 polarization, all of which could significantly impact the immune response against self-antigens in autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Until now, the role of mast cells in the onset and incidence of T1D has only been indirectly tested through the use of low-specificity mast cell inhibitors and activators, and published studies reported contrasting results. Our three laboratories have generated independently two strains of mast cell-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD.Cpa3(Cre/+) (Heidelberg) and NOD.Kit(W-sh/W-sh) (Leuven and Boston), to address the effects of mast cell deficiency on the development of T1D in the NOD strain. Our collective data demonstrate that both incidence and progression of T1D in NOD mice are independent of mast cells. Moreover, analysis of pancreatic lymph node cells indicated that lack of mast cells has no discernible effect on the autoimmune response, which involves both innate and adaptive immune components. Our results demonstrate that mast cells are not involved in T1D in the NOD strain, making their role in this process nonessential and excluding them as potential therapeutic targets. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. Encapsulated piscine (tilapia) islets for diabetes therapy: studies in diabetic NOD and NOD-SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Safley, Susan A; Cui, Hong; Cauffiel, Sean M D; Xu, Bao-You; Wright, James R; Weber, Collin J

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to improve islet transplantation as a therapy for patients with type I diabetes mellitus. Because human donor islets are scarce, we are studying islet xenografts in the diabetic NOD mouse model. We hypothesize that optimal xenoislet survival will be achieved by the combination of donor islet immunoisolation with recipient immunosuppression. We and others have studied adult and neonatal porcine islets as sources of tissue for microencapsulated islet xenografts, but we believe it is also advantageous to consider using islets from fish, which can be raised in large numbers relatively quickly and economically. Therefore, in this study, we have evaluated the function of microencapsulated xenogeneic piscine (tilapia) islets transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) in NOD mice in the presence of CD4(+) T-cell depletion and/or costimulatory blockade. Spontaneously diabetic NOD mice or streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic NOD-SCID mice were transplanted IP with microencapsulated tilapia islets. Recipient immunosuppression included anti-CD4 mAb, CTLA4-Ig, anti-CD80 mAb, anti-CD86 mAb, or anti-CD154 mAb, alone or in combination. Graft function was evaluated by blood glucose (BG) levels, intravenous (IV) and oral glucose tolerance tests (GTTs), histologic and immunohistochemical analyses of grafts, and flow cytometric analysis of peritoneal cells. Encapsulated tilapia islets normalized random BG levels for up to 210 days in NOD-SCID mice. In diabetic NOD mice, encapsulated tilapia islets were rejected on day 11 ± 4 with a peritoneal infiltrate of macrophages, eosinophils, B cells, occasional neutrophils, but few T cells. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of murine IgG on tilapia islets within capsules of rejecting, non-immunosuppressed mice, as well as murine IgG-positive lymphocytes in the layer of host cells surrounding those capsules. These findings suggested that our barium (Ba)-gelled alginate capsules are permeable to IgG and that anti

  15. Upregulating CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes in diabetic NOD mice by adjuvant immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bole; Hao, Jianqiang; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Lei; Yi, Huimin; O'Brien, Timothy D; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Guo, Zhiguang

    2009-01-27

    Immunotherapy with Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) is effective in ameliorating autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. We investigated whether CFA treatment up-regulates CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and increases transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 production in diabetic NOD mice. New-onset diabetic NOD mice were treated with CFA and exendin-4, a potent analog of glucagon-like peptide-1. Reversal of diabetes was determined by monitoring blood glucose level. Ameliorating autoimmunity through immunoregulation was assessed by adoptive transfer. Regulatory T cells in the peripheral blood, spleen, thymus, and pancreatic nodes were measured. TGF-beta1 in plasma and the insulin content in the pancreas were also measured. Immunostainings for insulin and BrdU were performed. New-onset diabetes could be reversed in 38% of NOD mice treated with CFA alone and in 86% of NOD mice treated with both CFA and exendin-4. Diabetes adoptive transfer by splenocytes from CFA-treated NOD mice was delayed. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes of CFA-treated NOD mice was significantly increased at 1, 5, and 15 to 17 weeks after treatment. TGF-beta1 in the plasma of CFA-treated NOD mice was also significantly increased. Combining CFA with exendin-4 treatment significantly increased the insulin content and the numbers of insulin and BrdU double-labeled beta cells in the islets. Our results demonstrated that CFA treatment ameliorates autoimmunity in diabetic NOD mice by up-regulating CD4=CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and increasing TGF-beta1 production. Exendin-4 enhanced the effect of CFA on reversing diabetes in NOD mice by stimulating beta-cell replication.

  16. Double Negative (CD3+4−8−) TCRαβ Splenic Cells from Young NOD Mice Provide Long-Lasting Protection against Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Beverly; Nazarov–Stoica, Cristina; Surls, Jacqueline; Kehl, Margaret; Bona, Constantin; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor-D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Double negative CD3+4−8− TCRαβ splenic cells (DNCD3) can suppress the immune responses to allo and xenografts, infectious agents, tumors, and some autoimmune disorders. However, little is known about their role in autoimmune diabetes, a disease characterized by the reduction of insulin production subsequent to destruction of pancreatic β-cells by a polyclonal population of self-reactive T-cells. Herein, we analyzed the function and phenotype of DNCD3 splenic cells in young NOD mice predisposed to several autoimmune disorders among which, the human-like autoimmune diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings DNCD3 splenic cells from young NOD mice (1) provided long-lasting protection against diabetes transfer in NOD/Scid immunodeficient mice, (2) proliferated and differentiated in the spleen and pancreas of NOD/Scid mice and pre-diabetic NOD mice into IL-10-secreting TR-1 like cells in a Th2-like environment, and (3) their anti-diabetogenic phenotype is CD3+(CD4−CD8−)CD28+CD69+CD25low Foxp3− iCTLA-4−TCRαβ+ with a predominant Vβ13 gene usage. Conclusions/Significance These findings delineate a new T regulatory component in autoimmune diabetes apart from that of NKT and CD4+CD25high Foxp3+T-regulatory cells. DNCD3 splenic cells could be potentially manipulated towards the development of autologous cell therapies in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:20625402

  17. Vκ polymorphisms in NOD mice are spread throughout the entire immunoglobulin kappa locus and are shared by other autoimmune strains

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rachel A.; Kendall, Peggy L.; Woodward, Emily J.; Hulbert, Chrys

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes available to form the lymphocyte repertoire has the capacity to produce a broad array of both protective and harmful specificities. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the presence of antibodies to insulin and other islet antigens predicts disease development in both mice and humans, and demonstrate that immune tolerance is lost early in the disease process. Anti-insulin T cells isolated from T1D-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice use polymorphic TCRα chains, suggesting that the available T cell repertoire is altered in these autoimmune mice. To probe whether insulin-binding B cells also possess polymorphic V genes, Ig light chains were isolated and sequenced from NOD mice that harbor an Ig heavy chain transgene. Three insulin-binding Vκ genes were identified, all of which were polymorphic to the closest germline sequence matches present in the GenBank database. Additional analysis of over 300 light chain sequences from multiple sources, including germline DNA, shows that polymorphisms are spread throughout the entire NOD Igκ locus, as these polymorphic sequences represent 43 distinct Vκ genes which belong to 14 Vκ families. Database searches reveal that a majority of polymorphic Vκ genes identified in NOD are identical to Vκ genes isolated from SLE-prone NZBxNZW F1 or MRL strains of mice, suggesting that a shared Igκ haplotype may be present. Predicted amino acid changes preferentially occur in CDR, and thus could alter antigen recognition by the germline B cell repertoire of autoimmune versus non-autoimmune mouse strains. PMID:20556377

  18. Vkappa polymorphisms in NOD mice are spread throughout the entire immunoglobulin kappa locus and are shared by other autoimmune strains.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Woodward, Emily J; Hulbert, Chrys; Thomas, James W

    2010-08-01

    The diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes available to form the lymphocyte repertoire has the capacity to produce a broad array of both protective and harmful specificities. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the presence of antibodies to insulin and other islet antigens predicts disease development in both mice and humans, and demonstrate that immune tolerance is lost early in the disease process. Anti-insulin T cells isolated from T1D-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice use polymorphic TCRalpha chains, suggesting that the available T cell repertoire is altered in these autoimmune mice. To probe whether insulin-binding B cells also possess polymorphic V genes, Ig light chains were isolated and sequenced from NOD mice that harbor an Ig heavy chain transgene. Three insulin-binding Vkappa genes were identified, all of which were polymorphic to the closest germline sequence matches present in the GenBank database. Additional analysis of over 300 light chain sequences from multiple sources, including germline DNA, shows that polymorphisms are spread throughout the entire NOD Igkappa locus, as these polymorphic sequences represent 43 distinct Vkappa genes which belong to 14 Vkappa families. Database searches reveal that a majority of polymorphic Vkappa genes identified in NOD are identical to Vkappa genes isolated from SLE-prone NZBxNZW F1 or MRL strains of mice, suggesting that a shared Igkappa haplotype may be present. Predicted amino acid changes preferentially occur in CDR, and thus could alter antigen recognition by the germline B cell repertoire of autoimmune versus non-autoimmune mouse strains.

  19. The role of interferon alpha in initiation of type I diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; McDevitt, Hugh O

    2011-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in both humans and the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, in which the insulin-producing-cells of the pancreatic islets are destroyed by a beta islet cell-specific T cell immune response. We recently reported that interferon (IFN)-α is an early trigger of the T1D process in NOD mice. Here, we show that extensive blockade of IFN-α action by a monoclonal antibody specific to IFN-α receptor 1 results in nearly complete prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Whether professional IFN-α producing cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), are responsible for the initiation of T1D has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that depletion of pDCs in NOD mice by a specific mAb given at 15-25 days of age significantly delays the onset and decreases the incidence of T1D. These findings indicate that pDC and pDC-derived IFN-α are the prime initiators of the pathogenesis of T1D in NOD mice.

  20. T helper 2 (Th2) T cells induce acute pancreatitis and diabetes in immune-compromised nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Pakala, S V; Kurrer, M O; Katz, J D

    1997-07-21

    Autoimmune diabetes is caused by the CD4(+), T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated apoptosis of insulin-producing beta cells. We have previously shown that Th2 T cells bearing the same T cell receptor (TCR) as the diabetogenic Th1 T cells invade islets in neonatal nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice but fail to cause disease. Moreover, when mixed in excess and cotransferred with Th1 T cells, Th2 T cells could not protect NOD neonates from Th1-mediated diabetes. We have now found, to our great surprise, the same Th2 T cells that produced a harmless insulitis in neonatal NOD mice produced intense and generalized pancreatitis and insulitis associated with islet cell necrosis, abscess formation, and subsequent diabetes when transferred into immunocompromised NOD.scid mice. These lesions resembled allergic inflamation and contained a large eosinophilic infiltrate. Moreover, the Th2-mediated destruction of islet cells was mediated by local interleukin-10 (IL-10) production but not by IL-4. These findings indicate that under certain conditions Th2 T cells may not produce a benign or protective insulitis but rather acute pathology and disease. Additionally, these results lead us to question the feasibility of Th2-based therapy in type I diabetes, especially in immunosuppressed recipients of islet cell transplants.

  1. Genetic disassociation of autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Todd; Markees, Thomas G; Serreze, David V; Pierce, Melissa A; Marron, Michele P; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B; Shultz, Leonard D; Mordes, John P; Rossini, Aldo A; Greiner, Dale L

    2003-07-01

    Curing type 1 diabetes by islet transplantation requires overcoming both allorejection and recurrent autoimmunity. This has been achieved with systemic immunosuppression, but tolerance induction would be preferable. Most islet allotransplant tolerance induction protocols have been tested in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, and most have failed. Failure has been attributed to the underlying autoimmunity, assuming that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance have a common basis. Out of concern that NOD biology could be misleading in this regard, we tested the hypothesis that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance in NOD mice are distinct phenotypes. Unexpectedly, we observed that (NOD x C57BL/6)F(1) mice, which have no diabetes, nonetheless resist prolongation of skin allografts by costimulation blockade. Further analyses revealed that the F(1) mice shared the dendritic cell maturation defects and abnormal CD4(+) T cell responses of the NOD but had lost its defects in macrophage maturation and NK cell activity. We conclude that resistance to allograft tolerance induction in the NOD mouse is not a direct consequence of overt autoimmunity and that autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance phenotypes in NOD mice can be dissociated genetically. The outcomes of tolerance induction protocols tested in NOD mice may not accurately predict outcomes in human subjects.

  2. Flow cytometric gating for spleen monocyte and DC subsets: differences in autoimmune NOD mice and with acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Matthew B; Rahman, M Jubayer; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-05-01

    The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases is now better understood due to advances in multicolor flow cytometry, gene expression analysis of APC populations, and functional correlation of mouse to human APC populations. A simple but informative nomenclature of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets (cDC1, cDC2, pDC) and monocyte-derived populations incorporates these advances, but accurate subset identification is critical. Ambiguous gating schemes and alterations of cell surface markers in inflammatory condition can make comparing results between studies difficult. Both acute inflammation, such as TLR-ligand stimulation, and chronic inflammation as found in mouse models of autoimmunity can alter DC subset gating. Here, we address these issues using in vivo CpG stimulation as an example of acute inflammation and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of chronic inflammation.We provide a flow cytometric antibody panel and gating scheme that differentiate 2 monocytic and 3DC subsets in the spleen both at steady state and after CpG stimulation. Using this method, we observed differences in the composition of NOD DCs that have been previously reported, and newly identified increases in the number of NOD monocyte-derived DCs. Finally, we established a protocol for DC phosphoflow to measure the phosphorylation state of intracellular proteins, and use it to confirm functional differences in the identified subsets. Therefore, we present optimized methods for distinguishing monocytic and DC populations with and without inflammation and/or autoimmunity associated with NOD mice.

  3. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  4. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  5. Transplantation of bone marrow genetically engineered to express proinsulin II protects against autoimmune insulitis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Clements, Warren; Field, Judith; Nasa, Zeyad; Lock, Peter; Yap, Felicia; Toh, Ban-Hock; Alderuccio, Frank

    2006-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-dependent autoimmune disease resulting from destructive inflammation (insulitis) of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells. Transgenic expression of proinsulin II by a MHC class II promoter or transfer of bone marrow from these transgenic mice protects NOD mice from insulitis and diabetes. We assessed the feasibility of gene therapy in the NOD mouse as an approach to treat T1D by ex vivo genetic manipulation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with proinsulin II followed by transfer to recipient mice. HSCs were isolated from 6-8-week-old NOD female mice and transduced in vitro with retrovirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and either proinsulin II or control autoantigen. Additional control groups included mice transferred with non-manipulated bone marrow and mice which did not receive bone marrow transfer. EGFP-sorted or non-sorted HSCs were transferred into pre-conditioned 3-4-week-old female NOD mice and insulitis was assessed 8 weeks post-transfer. Chimerism was established in all major lymphoid tissues, ranging from 5-15% in non-sorted bone marrow transplants to 20-45% in EGFP-sorted bone marrow transplants. The incidence and degree of insulitis was significantly reduced in mice receiving proinsulin II bone marrow compared to controls. However, the incidence of sialitis in mice receiving proinsulin II bone marrow and control mice was not altered, indicating protection from insulitis was antigen specific. We show for the first time that ex vivo genetic manipulation of HSCs to express proinsulin II followed by transplantation to NOD mice can establish molecular chimerism and protect from destructive insulitis in an antigen-specific manner.

  6. Oral administration of PDX1 confers protection against insulitis in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Li, Wenjuan; Yao, Zhina; Sun, Yu; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Shiwu; Chen, Li

    2015-10-30

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disease. Antigen-specific immune intervention allows the selective targeting of autoreactive T cell, while leaving the remainder of the immune system intact. However, immune intervention for type 1 diabetes has not yielded perfect results clinically. In our paper published previously, we asked whether pancreatic duodenal home box 1 (PDX1) is a target of anti-islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. In this experiment, we assessed the therapeutic effect of oral administration of PDX1 on diabetes development of 4-week-old non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. The results indicate that PDX1 immunization is an effective intervention strategy for delaying the onset of diabetes in NOD mice in association with: 1) reduced insulitis; 2) suppression of destructive autoreactive T cells; 3) augmentation of regulatory T cells; 4) a shift in cytokine production. The present observations suggest that immunization with PDX1 modulates immune cell responses in NOD mice, raising the possibility that it is beneficial in ameliorating autoimmune destruction of beta-cells and delaying type 1 diabetes development clinically. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene therapy with neurogenin3, betacellulin and SOCS1 reverses diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Buras, E; Lee, J; Liu, R; Liu, V; Espiritu, C; Ozer, K; Thompson, B; Nally, L; Yuan, G; Oka, K; Chang, B; Samson, S; Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus carrying neurogenin3 (Ngn3), an islet lineage-defining transcription factor, and betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these 'neo-islets' from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with Ngn3 and Btc. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing 'neo-islets' in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent 'insulitis' with activated T cells, these 'neo-islets' persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  9. Anti-CD3 mAb treatment cures PDL1-/-.NOD mice of diabetes but precipitates fatal myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Mfarrej, Bechara; Keir, Mary; Dada, Shirine; Trikudanathan, Subbulaxmi; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Sharpe, Arlene H; Guleria, Indira

    2011-07-01

    Anti-CD3 mAb is an effective therapy that can reverse diabetes in NOD mice and has therapeutic potential in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We administered anti-CD3 to PDL1-/-.NOD mice in order to determine whether this treatment would reverse the development of diabetes in these mice. Mice injected with anti-CD3 mAb neonatally were protected from T1D. However, all of these anti-CD3 mAb treated PDL1-/-.NOD mice developed a wasting disease between 12 and 20 weeks of age with sudden deterioration and weight loss, leading to death within 3-5 days of development of illness. Histology revealed severe inflammation in the heart and skeletal muscles. These results suggest that deficiency of PDL1 in NOD background has the potential to lead to immune-mediated tissue damage in organs other than the pancreas, but this cannot be appreciated in PDL1-/-.NOD mice as the mice develop T1D at an early age and die from diabetes prior to manifesting other autoimmune diseases.

  10. Mechanisms of PDL1-mediated regulation of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Indira; Gubbels Bupp, Melanie; Dada, Shirine; Fife, Brian; Tang, Qizhi; Ansari, Mohammed Javeed; Trikudanathan, Subbulaxmi; Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Fiorina, Paolo; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Atkinson, Mark; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2007-10-01

    The PD-1-PDL1 pathway plays a critical role in regulating autoimmune diabetes as blockade or deficiency of PD-1 or PDL1 results in accelerated disease in NOD mice. We explored the cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of these autoimmune responses by investigations involving various gene-deficient mice on the NOD background. Administration of blocking anti-PDL1 antibody to CD4+ T cell-deficient, CD8+ T cell-deficient and B cell-deficient mice demonstrated that PDL1-mediated regulation of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is critical for diabetes development. This concept was confirmed by adoptive transfer studies utilizing lymphocytes from BDC2.5 and 4.1 (CD4+) TCR transgenic mice and 8.3 (CD8+) TCR transgenic mice; efforts showing increased proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following PDL1 blockade in vivo. Furthermore, we observed that anti-PDL1-mediated acceleration is dependent upon events occurring in the pancreatic lymph nodes during early disease stages, but becomes independent of the pancreatic lymph nodes during later disease stages. These data provide strong evidence that PDL1 regulates autoimmune diabetes by limiting the expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ autoreactive T cells, and define the timing and locale of PDL1-mediated regulation of type 1 diabetes.

  11. Longitudinal Frequencies of Blood Leukocyte Subpopulations Differ between NOD and NOR Mice but Do Not Predict Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Telieps, Tanja; Köhler, Meike; Treise, Irina; Foertsch, Katharina; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Verschoor, Admar; Adler, Kerstin; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Immune phenotyping provides insight into disease pathogenesis and prognostic markers. Trajectories from age of 4 to 36 weeks were modeled for insulin autoantibodies and for leukocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from female NOD (n = 58) and NOR (n = 22) mice. NOD mice had higher trajectories of insulin autoantibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, IgD+IgM− B lymphocytes, and NK cells and lower trajectories of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, IgM+ B lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes than NOR mice (all p < 0.001). Of these, only the increased IAA trajectory was observed in NOD mice that developed diabetes as compared to NOD mice that remained diabetes-free. Therefore, the profound differences in peripheral blood leukocyte proportions observed between the diabetes-prone NOD mice and the diabetes-resistant mice do not explain the variation in diabetes development within NOD mice and do not provide markers for diabetes prediction in this model. PMID:26966692

  12. Curcumin ameliorates autoimmune diabetes. Evidence in accelerated murine models of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C N; Barcala Tabarrozzi, A E; Winnewisser, J; Gimeno, M L; Antunica Noguerol, M; Liberman, A C; Paz, D A; Dewey, R A; Perone, M J

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that selectively destroys pancreatic β cells. The only possible cure for T1DM is to control autoimmunity against β cell-specific antigens. We explored whether the natural compound curcumin, with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might down-regulate the T cell response that destroys pancreatic β cells to improve disease outcome in autoimmune diabetes. We employed two accelerated autoimmune diabetes models: (i) cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration to non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and (ii) adoptive transfer of diabetogenic splenocytes into NODscid mice. Curcumin treatment led to significant delay of disease onset, and in some instances prevented autoimmune diabetes by inhibiting pancreatic leucocyte infiltration and preserving insulin-expressing cells. To investigate the mechanisms of protection we studied the effect of curcumin on key immune cell populations involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Curcumin modulates the T lymphocyte response impairing proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ production through modulation of T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet), a key transcription factor for proinflammatory T helper type 1 (Th1) lymphocyte differentiation, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Also, curcumin reduces nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated NOD lymphocytes. In addition, curcumin impairs the T cell stimulatory function of dendritic cells with reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) and low surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules, leading to an overall diminished antigen-presenting cell activity. These in-vitro effects correlated with ex-vivo analysis of cells obtained from curcumin-treated mice during the course of autoimmune diabetes. These findings reveal an effective therapeutic effect of curcumin in autoimmune diabetes by its actions on key immune cells responsible for β cell death. PMID

  13. MicroRNA-26a Promotes Regulatory T cells and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Shoutao; Shi, Doufei; Mao, Yanhua; Cui, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    Type-1 diabetes (TID) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune cells attack islet β cells, the cells in the pancreas that produce and release the hormone insulin. Mir-26a has been reported to play functions in cellular differentiation, cell growth, cell apoptosis, and metastasis. However, the role of microRNA-26a (Mir-26a) in autoimmune TID has never been investigated. In our current study, we found that pre-Mir-26a (LV-26a)-treated mice had significantly longer normoglycemic time and lower frequency of autoreactive IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) cells compared with an empty lentiviral vector (LV-Con)-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Mir-26a suppresses autoreactive T cells and expands Tregs in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, in our adoptive transfer study, the groups receiving whole splenocytes and CD25-depleted splenocytes from LV-Con-treated diabetic NOD mice develop diabetes at 3 to 4 weeks of age. In comparison, mice injected with undepleted splenocytes obtained from LV-26a-treated reversal NOD mice develop diabetes after 6-8 weeks. And depletion of CD25(+) cells in the splenocytes of reversed mice abrogates the delay in diabetes onset. In conclusion, Mir-26a suppresses autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice in part through promoted regulatory T cells (Tregs) expression.

  14. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zandong . E-mail: zandong_yang@merck.com; Chen Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Garmey, James C.; Kimble, Sarah D.; Nadler, Jerry L. . E-mail: jln2n@virginia.edu

    2006-06-09

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic {beta}-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that {beta}-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of {beta}-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for {beta}-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance {beta}-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved {beta}-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing {beta}-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans.

  15. NOD2 promotes renal injury by exacerbating inflammation and podocyte insulin resistance in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Du, Pengchao; Fan, Baoxia; Han, Huirong; Zhen, Junhui; Shang, Jin; Wang, Xiaojie; Li, Xiang; Shi, Weichen; Tang, Wei; Bao, Chanchan; Wang, Ziying; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Wei, Xinbing; Yi, Fan

    2013-08-01

    An increasing number of clinical and animal model studies indicate that activation of the innate immune system and inflammatory mechanisms are important in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2), a member of the NOD-like receptor family, plays an important role in innate immune response. Here we explore the contribution of NOD2 to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and found that it was upregulated in kidney biopsies from diabetic patients and high-fat diet/streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Further, NOD2 deficiency ameliorated renal injury in diabetic mice. In vitro, NOD2 induced proinflammatory response and impaired insulin signaling and insulin-induced glucose uptake in podocytes. Moreover, podocytes treated with high glucose, advanced glycation end-products, tumor necrosis factor-α, or transforming growth factor-β (common detrimental factors in diabetic nephropathy) significantly increased NOD2 expression. NOD2 knockout diabetic mice were protected from the hyperglycemia-induced reduction in nephrin expression. Further, knockdown of NOD2 expression attenuated high glucose-induced nephrin downregulation in vitro, supporting an essential role of NOD2 in mediating hyperglycemia-induced podocyte dysfunction. Thus, NOD2 is one of the critical components of a signal transduction pathway that links renal injury to inflammation and podocyte insulin resistance in diabetic nephropathy.

  16. AAV-mediated pancreatic overexpression of Igf1 counteracts progression to autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Cristina; Casana, Estefania; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Haurigot, Virginia; Jambrina, Claudia; Sacristan, Victor; Morró, Meritxell; Agudo, Judith; Vilà, Laia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β-cells leading to severe insulin deficiency. Although many improvements have been made in recent years, exogenous insulin therapy is still imperfect; new therapeutic approaches, focusing on preserving/expanding β-cell mass and/or blocking the autoimmune process that destroys islets, should be developed. The main objective of this work was to test in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, the effects of local expression of Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a potent mitogenic and pro-survival factor for β-cells with immunomodulatory properties. Transgenic NOD mice overexpressing IGF1 specifically in β-cells (NOD-IGF1) were generated and phenotyped. In addition, miRT-containing, IGF1-encoding adeno-associated viruses (AAV) of serotype 8 (AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT) were produced and administered to 4- or 11-week-old non-transgenic NOD females through intraductal delivery. Several histological, immunological, and metabolic parameters were measured to monitor disease over a period of 28-30 weeks. In transgenic mice, local IGF1 expression led to long-term suppression of diabetes onset and robust protection of β-cell mass from the autoimmune insult. AAV-mediated pancreatic-specific overexpression of IGF1 in adult animals also dramatically reduced diabetes incidence, both when vectors were delivered before pathology onset or once insulitis was established. Transgenic NOD-IGF1 and AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT-treated NOD animals had much less islet infiltration than controls, preserved β-cell mass, and normal insulinemia. Transgenic and AAV-treated islets showed less expression of antigen-presenting molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines important for tissue-specific homing of effector T cells, suggesting IGF1 modulated islet autoimmunity in NOD mice. Local expression of Igf1 by AAV-mediated gene transfer counteracts progression to diabetes in NOD mice. This study suggests a

  17. Studies on the thymus of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice: effect of transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, L A; Healey, D; Simpson, E; Chandler, P; Lund, T; Ritter, M A; Cooke, A

    1994-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a good model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Autoreactive T cells may play a fundamental role in disease initiation in this model, while disregulation of such cells may result from an abnormal thymic microenvironment. Diabetes is prevented in NOD mice by direct introduction of an E alpha d transgene (NOD-E) or a modified I-A beta chain of NOD origin (NOD-PRO or NOD-ASP). To investigate if disease pathology in NOD mice, protection from disease in transgenic NOD-E and NOD-PRO and partial protection from disease in NOD-ASP can be attributed to alterations in the thymic microenvironment, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis of the thymi of these mouse strains was studied. Thymi from NOD and NOD-E mice showed a progressive increase in thymic B-cell percentage from 12 weeks of age. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss in thymic epithelial cells with the appearance of large epithelial-free areas mainly at the corticomedullary junction, which increased in size and number with age and contained the B-cell clusters. Such thymic B cells did not express CD5 and were absent in CBA, NOD-ASP and NOD-PRO mice as were the epithelial cell-free spaces, even at 5 months of age. Therefore the mechanisms of disease protection in the transgenic NOD-E and NOD-ASP/NOD-PRO mice may differ if these thymic abnormalities are related to disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7523287

  18. Astragalus polysaccharides: an effective treatment for diabetes prevention in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Li, Y -M; Yu, M -H

    2008-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is related to the disequilibrium state of Th1 and Th2 subgroups of helper T lymphocyte (Th) and their cytokines. Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) are bioactive components extracted from one of the traditional Chinese herbs, used to enhance the function of human immune system. To investigate the effects of APS on preventing type 1 DM and Th1/Th2-subtype cytokines, we compared the results of administration of APS and normal saline (NS) on non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. APS or NS was administered to 4-week-old mice at a dose of 2.0 g/kg per day for 10 weeks. At 40 weeks, blood glucose, serum C-peptide (C-P) and GAD antibody were measured; pancreas was examined histologically; the intra-islet lymphocyte infiltration and T lymphocyte subsets in the spleen were analysed; the gene expression of IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha, INF-gamma, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-beta, Bcl-2, SOD, Fas and iNOS were measured by RT-PCR. The results showed that APS-administered NOD mice had a lower incidence rate of type 1 DM, lower serum C-P level, better histologic findings of pancreatic islets, and a lower D4+/CD8+ ratio of T lymphocytes from the spleen and the infiltrated islets. RT-PCR analysis showed gene expression levels are lower in IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha, INF-gamma, Fas, iNOS, and higher in IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-beta, Bcl-2, SOD in the pancreatic tissue from APS-administered NOD mice as compared to the NS group. These results demonstrated the effects of Astragalus polysaccharides on the prevention of type 1 DM in NOD mice by correcting the imbalance between the Th1/Th2 cytokines.

  19. Bioluminescence Imaging Reveals Dynamics of Beta Cell Loss in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Poffenberger, Greg; Dula, Adrienne N.; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2013-01-01

    We generated a mouse model (MIP-Luc-VU-NOD) that enables non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of beta cell loss during the progression of autoimmune diabetes and determined the relationship between BLI and disease progression. MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice displayed insulitis and a decline in bioluminescence with age which correlated with beta cell mass, plasma insulin, and pancreatic insulin content. Bioluminescence declined gradually in female MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice, reaching less than 50% of the initial BLI at 10 weeks of age, whereas hyperglycemia did not ensue until mice were at least 16 weeks old. Mice that did not become diabetic maintained insulin secretion and had less of a decline in bioluminescence than mice that became diabetic. Bioluminescence measurements predicted a decline in beta cell mass prior to the onset of hyperglycemia and tracked beta cell loss. This model should be useful for investigating the fundamental processes underlying autoimmune diabetes and developing new therapies targeting beta cell protection and regeneration. PMID:23483929

  20. G(-) anaerobes-reactive CD4+ T-cells trigger RANKL-mediated enhanced alveolar bone loss in diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Deeqa A; Marleau, Annette; Alnaeeli, Mawadda; Singh, Bhagirath; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Penninger, Joseph M; Teng, Yen-Tung A

    2005-05-01

    Diabetic patients experience a higher risk for severe periodontitis; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the contribution of antibacterial T-cell-mediated immunity to enhanced alveolar bone loss during periodontal infection in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by oral inoculation with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a G(-) anaerobe responsible for juvenile and severe periodontitis. The results show that 1) inoculation with A. actinomycetemcomitans in pre-diabetic NOD mice does not alter the onset, incidence, and severity of diabetes; 2) after A. actinomycetemcomitans inoculation, diabetic NOD mice (blood glucose >200 mg/dl and with severe insulitis) exhibit significantly higher alveolar bone loss compared with pre-diabetic and nondiabetic NOD mice; and 3) A. actinomycetemcomitans-reactive CD4+ T-cells in diabetic mice exhibit significantly higher proliferation and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression. When diabetic mice are treated with the RANKL antagonist osteoprotegerin (OPG), there is a significant reversal of alveolar bone loss, as well as reduced RANKL expression in A. actinomycetemcomitans-reactive CD4+ T-cells. This study clearly describes the impact of autoimmunity to anaerobic infection in an experimental periodontitis model of type 1 diabetes. Thus, microorganism-reactive CD4+ T-cells and the RANKL-OPG axis provide the molecular basis of the advanced periodontal breakdown in diabetes and, therefore, OPG may hold therapeutic potential for treating bone loss in diabetic subjects at high risk.

  1. Pancreatic β-Cells Limit Autoimmune Diabetes via an Immunoregulatory Antimicrobial Peptide Expressed under the Influence of the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Furio, Laetitia; Mecheri, Ramine; van der Does, Anne M; Lundeberg, Erik; Saveanu, Loredana; Chen, Yongquan; van Endert, Peter; Agerberth, Birgitta; Diana, Julien

    2015-08-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed by epithelial and immune cells are largely described for the defense against invading microorganisms. Recently, their immunomodulatory functions have been highlighted in various contexts. However how AMPs expressed by non-immune cells might influence autoimmune responses in peripheral tissues, such as the pancreas, is unknown. Here, we found that insulin-secreting β-cells produced the cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) and that this production was defective in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. CRAMP administrated to prediabetic NOD mice induced regulatory immune cells in the pancreatic islets, dampening the incidence of autoimmune diabetes. Additional investigation revealed that the production of CRAMP by β-cells was controlled by short-chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota. Accordingly, gut microbiota manipulations in NOD mice modulated CRAMP production and inflammation in the pancreatic islets, revealing that the gut microbiota directly shape the pancreatic immune environment and autoimmune diabetes development.

  2. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of human type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kachapati, Kritika; Adams, David; Bednar, Kyle; Ridgway, William M

    2012-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has thus served as a model for understanding the genetic and immunological basis, and treatment, of T1D. Since its initial description in 1980, however, the field has matured and recognized that prevention of diabetes in NOD mice (i.e., preventing the disease from occurring by an intervention prior to frank diabetes) is relatively easy to achieve and does not correlate well with curing the disease (after the onset of frank hyperglycemia). Hundreds of papers have described the prevention of diabetes in NOD mice but only a handful have described its actual reversal. The paradoxical conclusion is that preventing the disease in NOD mice does not necessarily tell us what caused the disease nor how to reverse it. The NOD mouse model is therefore best used now, with respect to human disease, as a way to understand the genetic and immunologic causes of and as a model for trying to reverse disease once hyperglycemia occurs. We describe how genetic approaches to identifying causative gene variants can be adapted to identify novel therapeutic agents for reversing new-onset T1D.

  3. Failure of a protective major histocompatibility complex class II molecule to delete autoreactive T cells in autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Slattery, R M; Miller, J F; Heath, W R; Charlton, B

    1993-11-15

    The association of major histocompatibility complex genes with autoimmune diseases is firmly established, but the mechanisms by which these genes confer resistance or susceptibility remain controversial. The controversy extends to the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse that develops disease similar to human insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The transgenic incorporation of certain class II major histocompatibility complex genes protects NOD mice from diabetes, and clonal deletion or functional silencing of autoreactive T cells has been proposed as the mechanism by which these molecules provide protection. We show that neither thymic deletion nor anergy of autoreactive T cells occurs in NOD mice transgenic for I-Ak. Autoreactive T cells are present, functional, and can transfer diabetes to appropriate NOD-recipient mice.

  4. Cure of overt diabetes in NOD mice by transient treatment with anti-lymphocyte serum and exendin-4.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Norihiko; List, James F; Habener, Joel F; Maki, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    Treatment of overtly diabetic NOD mice with anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS), a polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody, abrogates autoimmunity and achieves partial clinical remission. Here we investigated whether the addition of exendin-4, a hormone that stimulates insulin secretion and beta-cell replication and differentiation, improves induction of remission by ALS. Transient treatment of overtly diabetic NOD mice with ALS and exendin-4 achieved complete remission in 23 of 26 mice (88%) within 75 days, accompanied by progressive normalization of glucose tolerance, improved islet histology, increased insulin content in the pancreas, and insulin release in response to a glucose challenge. Syngeneic islets transplanted into mice cured by treatment with ALS plus exendin-4 remained intact, and cotransfer of lymphocytes from cured mice delayed diabetes induction by adoptive transfer, suggesting the long-lasting presence of autoimmune regulatory cells. Although ALS alone also achieved reversal of diabetes, the frequency of remission was low (40%). No treatment or exendin-4 alone failed to produce remission. These results show that exendin-4 synergistically augments the remission-inducing effect of ALS. The addition of beta-cell growth factors, such as exendin-4, to immunotherapy protocols with anti-T-cell antibodies presents a potential novel approach to the cure of patients with new-onset type 1 diabetes.

  5. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice. © 2011 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  6. In vivo BLyS/BAFF neutralization ameliorates islet-directed autoimmunity in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Ghazal; Rostami, Susan Y; Badkerhanian, Armen; Parsons, Ronald F; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Yu, Ming; Ward, Christopher D; Migone, Thi-Sau; Yu, Liping; Eisenbarth, George S; Cancro, Michael P; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2008-12-01

    B lymphocytes are required for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Previous studies established that a lymphopenic transitional (TR) B cell compartment reduces the competitive constraint on the entry of newly emerging TR B cells into the splenic follicle (FO), thereby disrupting a peripheral negative selection checkpoint in NOD mice. Thus, development of clinically feasible immunotherapeutic approaches for restoration of appropriate negative selection is essential for the prevention of anti-islet autoimmunity. In this study we hypothesized that in vivo neutralization of the B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS/BAFF) may enhance the stringency of TR-->FO selection by increasing TR B cell competition for follicular entry in NOD mice. This study demonstrated that in vivo BLyS neutralization therapy leads to the depletion of follicular and marginal zone B lymphocytes. Long-term in vivo BLyS neutralization caused an increased TR:FO B cell ratio in the periphery indicating a relative resistance to follicular entry. Moreover, in vivo BLyS neutralization: 1) restored negative selection at the TR-->FO checkpoint, 2) abrogated serum insulin autoantibodies, 3) reduced the severity of islet inflammation, 4) significantly reduced the incidence of spontaneous diabetes, 5) arrested the terminal stages of islet cell destruction, and 6) disrupted CD4 T cell activation in NOD mice. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of B lymphocyte-directed therapy via in vivo BLyS neutralization for the prevention of autoimmune diabetes.

  7. Congenic mice reveal genetic epistasis and overlapping disease loci for autoimmune diabetes and listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nancy; Elso, Colleen M; Mackin, Leanne; Mannering, Stuart I; Strugnell, Richard A; Wijburg, Odilia L; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2014-08-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain serves as a genomic standard for assessing how allelic variation for insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) loci affects the development of autoimmune diabetes. We previously demonstrated that C57BL/6 (B6) mice harbor a more diabetogenic allele than NOD mice for the Idd14 locus when introduced onto the NOD genetic background. New congenic NOD mouse strains, harboring smaller B6-derived intervals on chromosome 13, now localize Idd14 to an ~18-Mb interval and reveal a new locus, Idd31. Notably, the B6 allele for Idd31 confers protection against diabetes, but only in the absence of the diabetogenic B6 allele for Idd14, indicating genetic epistasis between these two loci. Moreover, congenic mice that are more susceptible to diabetes are more resistant to Listeria monocytogenes infection. This result co-localizes Idd14 and Listr2, a resistance locus for listeriosis, to the same genomic interval and indicates that congenic NOD mice may also be useful for localizing resistance loci for infectious disease.

  8. IL-4-dependent effector phase in autoimmune exocrinopathy as defined by the NOD.IL-4-gene knockout mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brayer, J B; Cha, S; Nagashima, H; Yasunari, U; Lindberg, A; Diggs, S; Martinez, J; Goa, J; Humphreys-Beher, M G; Peck, A B

    2001-01-01

    NOD mice manifest many features of autoimmune exocrinopathy (Sjögren's syndrome), a disease generally characterized by a chronic, progressive immunological attack against the exocrine tissues of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Previous studies using the NOD congenic partner strain, NOD.Igmu(null), defined an important role for B lymphocytes in the development of xerostomia, implicating autoantibodies reactive with the acetylcholine muscarinic receptor (M3R) as the possible effector mechanism. In the present study, we have examined the impact of the cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, on autoimmune exocrinopathy by using the IL-4 gene knockout (KO) NOD mouse strain, NOD.IL-4-/-. Despite manifesting the physiological aberrations and marked leukocytic infiltration of the salivary glands characteristic of autoimmune xerostomia in NOD mice, the NOD.IL-4-/- mice do not develop xerostomia. However, NOD.IL-4-/- mice that received adoptively transferred T lymphocytes derived from NOD.Igmu-/- mice progress to xerostomia, thereby reversing the defect. While progression or lack of progression to xerostomia correlated with the ability of the NOD.IL-4-/- mice to express detectable anti-M3R autoantibodies, the precise mechanism of how IL-4 influences the development of autoimmune xerostomia remains speculative.

  9. NOD1 receptor is up-regulated in diabetic human and murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Patricia; Vallejo-Cremades, María Teresa; Benito, Gemma; González-Peramato, Pilar; Francés, Daniel; Agra, Noelia; Terrón, Verónica; Gónzalez-Ramos, Silvia; Delgado, Carmen; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Pacheco, Ivette; Velasco-Martín, Juan P; Regadera, Javier; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Boscá, Lisardo; Fernández-Velasco, María

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes has a complex pathology that involves a chronic inflammatory state. Emerging evidence suggests a link between the innate immune system receptor NOD1 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain 1) and the pathogenesis of diabetes, in monocytes and hepatic and adipose tissues. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of NOD1 in the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We have measured NOD1 protein in cardiac tissue from Type 2 diabetic (db) mice. Heart and isolated cardiomyocytes from db mice revealed a significant increase in NOD1, together with an up-regulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and increased apoptosis. Heart tissue also exhibited an enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Selective NOD1 activation with C12-γ-D-glutamyl-m-diaminopimelic acid (iEDAP) resulted in an increased NF-κB activation and apoptosis, demonstrating the involvement of NOD1 both in wild-type and db mice. Moreover, HL-1 cardiomyocytes exposed to elevated concentrations of glucose plus palmitate displayed an enhanced NF-κB activity and apoptotic profile, which was prevented by silencing of NOD1 expression. To address this issue in human pathology, NOD1 expression was evaluated in myocardium obtained from patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2DMH) and from normoglycaemic individuals without cardiovascular histories (NH). We have found that NOD1 was expressed in both NH and T2DMH; however, NOD1 expression was significantly pronounced in T2DMH. Furthermore, both the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and the apoptosis mediator caspase-3 were up-regulated in T2DMH samples. Taken together, our results define an active role for NOD1 in the heightened inflammatory environment associated with both experimental and human diabetic cardiac disease.

  10. The natural killer T lymphocyte: a player in the complex regulation of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cardell, S L

    2006-01-01

    Manipulation of the immune response to specifically prevent autoaggression requires an understanding of the complex interactions that occur during the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Much attention has been paid to conventional T lymphocytes recognizing peptide antigens presented by classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules, as key players in the destructive autoreactive process. A pivotal role for different types of regulatory T lymphocytes in modulating the development of disease is also well established. Lately, CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) lymphocytes have been the subject of intense investigation because of their ability to regulate a diversity of immune responses. The non-classical antigen presenting molecule CD1d presents lipids and glycolipids to this highly specialized subset of T lymphocytes found in both humans and mice. From experimental models of autoimmunity, evidence is accumulating that NKT cells can protect from disease. One of the best studied is the murine type 1 diabetes model, the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While the NKT cell population was first recognized to be deficient in NOD mice, augmenting NKT cell activity has been shown to suppress the development of autoimmune disease in this strain. The mechanism by which CD1d-restricted T cells exert this function is still described incompletely, but investigations in NOD mice are starting to unravel specific effects of NKT cell regulation. This review focuses on the role of CD1d-restricted NKT cells in the control of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:16412042

  11. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0121 TITLE: Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald T Nepom, M.D., Ph.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0121 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...therapies. This research study entails using humanized mice manifesting type 1 diabetes (T1 D)-associated human HLA molecules to address the fate and

  12. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide 1-21 suppresses type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brod, Staley A; Hood, Zachary

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model of the human autoimmune disease T1D. Soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS) is a nonspecific protein suppressor of immune response produced by immunomodulatory T cells stimulated by type I interferon (IFN). SIRS inhibits antibody responses in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. Previous investigators have isolated the N-terminal sequence of SIRS protein consisting of 21 amino acids. Mice ingesting 1 microg SIRS peptide 1-21 showed significant delayed onset of T1D and a decreased frequency of T1D compared with mock-fed and 10-microg-fed mice and a significant decrease in islet inflammation. There were significant decreases in islet lymphocyte chemokine production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 gamma (MIP-1 gamma), regulated upon activation, normal T cell-expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the SIRS-fed mice, factors important in migration of inflammatory cell into the islets. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide inhibits clinical T1D by decreasing target organ cellular migration of islet destructive populations by suppression of islet lymphocyte chemokine secretion.

  13. Anti-FcεR1 antibody injections activate basophils and mast cells and delay Type I diabetes onset in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Larson, David; Torrero, Marina N.; Mueller, Ellen; Shi, Yinghui; Killoran, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that helminth infections protect against autoimmune diseases. As helminths cause chronic IgE-mediated activation of basophils and mast cells we hypothesized that continuous activation of these cells could prevents diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice in the absence of infection. Anti-FcεR1 activated basophils and mast cells and resulted in the release of IL-4 and histamine into the bloodstream. Anti-FcεR1-treated NOD mice showed a type 2 shift in insulin-specific antibody production and exhibited significant delays in diabetes onset. IL-4 responses played a partial role as the protective effect of anti-FcεR1 therapy was diminished in IL-4-deficient NOD mice. In contrast, histamine signaling was not required as anti-FcεR1-mediated protection was not reduced in mice treated with histamine receptor blockers. These results demonstrate that anti-FcεR1 therapy delays diabetes onset in NOD mice and suggest that chronic basophil and mast cell activation may represent a new avenue of therapy for Th1-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:21920822

  14. Resveratrol improves salivary dysfunction in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroko; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Ushikoshi-Nakayama, Ryoko; Hasaka, Ayaka; Takahashi, Ayako; Ryo, Koufuchi; Muramatsu, Takashi; Ide, Fumio; Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol produced by plants in response to environmental stress. This compound has been shown to have pharmacological effects against a wide range of diseases including neurological, hepatic, cardiovascular and autoimmune conditions. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, in which loss of lacrimal and salivary gland function occurs, has been studied as an animal model for Sjögren’s syndrome. In this study, we confirmed that administration of resveratrol results in increased secretion of saliva in NOD mice. Although resveratrol enhanced Sirt1 activity, inflammatory cell infiltration was not affected. Moreover, expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in salivary glands was enhanced in the resveratrol-administered group. Thus, we confirmed a novel therapeutic effect for resveratrol on salivary dysfunction in Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:27698537

  15. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  16. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome. PMID:26274050

  17. Age-dependent divergent effects of OX40L treatment on the development of diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Christine S.; Bhattacharya, Palash; Alharshawi, Khaled; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kumar, Prabhakaran; El-Sayed, Osama; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Epstein, Alan L.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that GM-CSF derived bone marrow dendritic cells (G-BMDCs) can expand Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) through a TCR-independent, but IL-2 dependent mechanism that required OX40L/OX40 interaction. While some reports have shown suppression of autoimmunity upon treatment with an OX40 agonist, others have shown exacerbation of autoimmune disease instead. To better understand the basis for these differing outcomes, we compared the effects of OX40L treatment in 6-week-old pre-diabetic and 12-week-old near diabetic NOD mice. Upon treatment with OX40L, 6-week-old NOD mice remained normoglycemic and showed a significant increase in Tregs in their spleen and lymph nodes, while 12-week-old NOD mice very rapidly developed hyperglycemia and failed to show Treg increase in spleen or LN. Interestingly, OX40L treatment increased Tregs in the thymus of both age groups. However, it induced Foxp3+CD103+CD38− stable-phenotype Tregs in the thymus and reduced the frequency of autoreactive Teff cells in 6-week-old mice; while it induced Foxp3+CD103−CD38+ labile-phenotype Tregs in the thymus and increased autoreactive CD4+ T cells in the periphery of 12-week-old mice. This increase in autoreactive CD4+ T cells was likely due to either a poor suppressive function or conversion of labile Tregs into Teff cells. Using ex vivo cultures, we found that the reduction in Treg numbers in 12-week-old mice was likely due to IL-2 deficit, and their numbers could be increased upon addition of exogenous IL-2. The observed divergent effects of OX40L treatment were likely due to differences in the ability of 6- and 12-week-old NOD mice to produce IL-2. PMID:27245356

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Is Critical for Coxsackievirus B4-Induced Type 1 Diabetes in Female NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Jean R.; Courreges, Maria C.; Benencia, Fabian; James, Calvin B.L.; Malgor, Ramiro; Kantake, Noriko; Mudd, William; Denlinger, Nathan; Nolan, Bret; Wen, Li; Schwartz, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are involved in triggering some cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), a receptor that recognizes viral double-stranded RNA, is hypothesized to play a role in virus-induced T1DM, although this hypothesis is yet to be substantiated. The objective of this study was to directly investigate the role of TLR3 in CVB-triggered T1DM in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a mouse model of human T1DM that is widely used to study both spontaneous autoimmune and viral-induced T1DM. As such, we infected female wild-type (TLR3+/+) and TLR3 knockout (TLR3−/−) NOD mice with CVB4 and compared the incidence of diabetes in CVB4-infected mice with that of uninfected counterparts. We also evaluated the islets of uninfected and CVB4-infected wild-type and TLR3 knockout NOD mice by immunohistochemistry and insulitis scoring. TLR3 knockout mice were markedly protected from CVB4-induced diabetes compared with CVB4-infected wild-type mice. CVB4-induced T-lymphocyte-mediated insulitis was also significantly less severe in TLR3 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. No differences in insulitis were observed between uninfected animals, either wild-type or TLR3 knockout mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that TLR3 is 1) critical for CVB4-induced T1DM, and 2) modulates CVB4-induced insulitis in genetically prone NOD mice. PMID:25422874

  19. Prevalent CD8+ T cell response against one peptide/MHC complex in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brad; Park, Bjung-Ju; Verdaguer, Joan; Amrani, Abdelaziz; Santamaria, Pere

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice is the result of a CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-dependent autoimmune process directed against the pancreatic beta cells. CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the initiation and progression of diabetes, but the specificity and diversity of their antigenic repertoire remain unknown. Here, we define the structure of a peptide mimotope that elicits the proliferation, cytokine secretion, differentiation, and cytotoxicity of a diabetogenic H-2Kd-restricted CD8+ T cell specificity (NY8.3) that uses a T cell receptor α (TCRα) rearrangement frequently expressed by CD8+ T cells propagated from the earliest insulitic lesions of NOD mice (Vα17-Jα42 elements, often joined by the N-region sequence M-R-D/E). Stimulation of splenic CD8+ T cells from single-chain 8.3-TCRβ-transgenic NOD mice with this mimotope leads to preferential expansion of T cells bearing an endogenously derived TCRα chain identical to the one used by their islet-associated CD8+ T cells, which is also identical to the 8.3-TCRα sequence. Cytotoxicity assays using islet-derived CD8+ T cell clones from nontransgenic NOD mice as effectors and peptide-pulsed H-2Kd-transfected RMA-S cells as targets indicate that nearly half of the CD8+ T cells recruited to islets in NOD mice specifically recognize the same peptide/H-2Kd complex. This work demonstrates that beta cell-reactive CD8+ T cells mount a prevalent response against a single peptide/MHC complex and provides one peptide ligand for CD8+ T cells in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:10430939

  20. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1) accelerates type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan-Ying; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Zheng-Wang

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 is over-expressed in the blood of NOD mice suffering from insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 increases blood glucose levels and triggers type 1 diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 accelerates insulitis, while its antibody prevents insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 enhances the levels of nitric oxide in the pancreases of NOD mice. -- Abstract: A large body of experimental evidence suggests that cytokines trigger pancreatic {beta}-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1), a specific marker for activated macrophages, is accumulated in the pancreatic islets of pre-diabetic BB rats. In the present study, we demonstrate that daintain/AIF-1 is released into blood and the levels of daintain/AIF-1 in the blood of type 1 diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice suffering from insulitis are significantly higher than that in healthy NOD mice. When injected intravenously into NOD mice, daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation, increases the concentrations of blood glucose, impairs insulin expression, up-regulates nitric oxide (NO) production in pancreases and accelerates diabetes in NOD mice, while the antibody against daintain/AIF-1 delays or prevents insulitis in NOD mice. These results imply daintain/AIF-1 triggers type 1 diabetes probably via arousing immune cells activation and induction of NO production in pancreas of NOD mice.

  1. Regulation of autoimmune diabetes by complete Freund's adjuvant is mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Fang; Qin, Huilian; Trudeau, Jacqueline; Dutz, Jan; Tan, Rusung

    2004-01-15

    Autoimmune (type 1) diabetes results from a loss of beta cells that is mediated by self-reactive T cells. Previous studies have shown that a single injection of CFA prevents diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, but the mechanism(s) of protection remain unknown. We show here that NOD mice immunized with CFA have a markedly reduced incidence of diabetes and that this reduced incidence is associated with a decrease in the number of beta cell-specific, autoreactive CTL. In addition, the adoptive transfer of diabetes into syngeneic NOD/SCID recipients was prevented by CFA immunization, and the protective effects of CFA were lost when cells expressing the NK cell marker, asialo GM1, were removed from both donor cells and recipient mice. Returning a population of CD3-DX5+ cells to the adoptive transfer restored the protective effects of CFA. Therefore, NK cells mediate the protective effects of CFA possibly through the down-regulation of autoreactive CTL and stimulation of NK cells represents a novel approach to the prevention of autoimmune diabetes.

  2. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  3. Myocardial Infarction Triggers Chronic Cardiac Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gottumukkala, Raju V.; Lv, HuiJuan; Cornivelli, Lizbeth; Wagers, Amy J.; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Bronson, Roderick; Stewart, Garrick C.; Schulze, P. Christian; Chutkow, William; Wolpert, Howard A.; Lee, Richard T.; Lipes, Myra A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) suffer excessive morbidity and mortality following myocardial infarction (MI) that is not fully explained by the metabolic effects of diabetes. Acute MI is known to trigger a profound innate inflammatory response with influx of mononuclear cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial for cardiac repair. We hypothesized that these same pathways might exert ‘adjuvant effects’ and induce pathological responses in autoimmune-prone T1D hosts. Here we show that experimental MI in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice - but not in control C57BL/6 mice - results in a severe post-infarction autoimmune (PIA) syndrome characterized by destructive lymphocytic infiltrates in the myocardium, infarct expansion, sustained cardiac IgG autoantibody production and Th1 effector cell responses against cardiac (α-)myosin. PIA was prevented by inducing tolerance to α-myosin, demonstrating that immune responses to cardiac myosin are required for this disease process. Extending these findings to humans, we developed a panel of immunoassays for cardiac autoantibody detection and found autoantibody positivity in 83% post-MI T1D patients. We further identified shared cardiac myosin autoantibody signatures between post-MI T1D patients and non-diabetic patients with myocarditis – that were absent in post-MI type 2 diabetic patients - and confirmed the presence of myocarditis in T1D by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques. These data provide experimental and clinical evidence for a distinct post-MI autoimmune syndrome in T1D. Our findings suggest that PIA may contribute to worsened post-MI outcomes in T1D, and highlight a role for antigen-specific immunointervention to selectively block this pathway. PMID:22700956

  4. B-Lymphocytes Expressing an Ig Specificity Recognizing the Pancreatic β-Cell Autoantigen Peripherin Are Potent Contributors to Type 1 Diabetes Development in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leeth, Caroline M.; Racine, Jeremy; Chapman, Harold D.; Arpa, Berta; Carrillo, Jorge; Carrascal, Jorge; Wang, Qiming; Ratiu, Jeremy; Egia-Mendikute, Leire; Rosell-Mases, Estela; Stratmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells underlying type 1 diabetes (T1D) development is ultimately mediated by T cells in NOD mice and also likely in humans, B cells play an additional key pathogenic role. It appears that the expression of plasma membrane–bound Ig molecules that efficiently capture β-cell antigens allows autoreactive B cells that bypass normal tolerance induction processes to be the subset of antigen-presenting cells most efficiently activating diabetogenic T cells. NOD mice transgenically expressing Ig molecules recognizing antigens that are (insulin) or are not (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]) expressed by β-cells have proven useful in dissecting the developmental basis of diabetogenic B cells. However, these transgenic Ig specificities were originally selected for their ability to recognize insulin or HEL as foreign, rather than autoantigens. Thus, we generated and characterized NOD mice transgenically expressing an Ig molecule representative of a large proportion of naturally occurring islet-infiltrating B cells in NOD mice recognizing the neuronal antigen peripherin. Transgenic peripherin-autoreactive B cells infiltrate NOD pancreatic islets, acquire an activated proliferative phenotype, and potently support accelerated T1D development. These results support the concept of neuronal autoimmunity as a pathogenic feature of T1D, and targeting such responses could ultimately provide an effective disease intervention approach. PMID:26961115

  5. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in autoimmune diabetes - potential tools for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Tatjana; Welzen-Coppens, Jojanneke M C; Leenen, Pieter J M; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Versnel, Marjan A

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a T-cell-mediated attack destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreatic islets. Despite insulin supplementation severe complications ask for novel treatments that aim at cure or delay of the onset of the disease. In spontaneous animal models for diabetes like the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, distinct steps in the pathogenesis of the disease can be distinguished. In the past 10 years it became evident that DC and macrophages play an important role in all three phases of the pathogenesis of T1D. In phase 1, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages accumulate at the islet edges. In phase 2, DC and macrophages are involved in the activation of autoreactive T cells that accumulate in the pancreas. In the third phase the islets are invaded by macrophages, DC and NK cells followed by the destruction of the beta-cells. Recent data suggest a role for a new member of the DC family: the plasmacytoid DC (pDC). pDC have been found to induce tolerance in experimental models of asthma. Several studies in humans and the NOD mouse support a similar role for pDC in diabetes. Mechanisms found to be involved in tolerance induction by pDC are inhibition of effector T cells, induction of regulatory T cells, production of cytokines and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The exact mechanism of tolerance induction by pDC in diabetes remains to be established but the intrinsic tolerogenic properties of pDC provide a promising, yet underestimated target for therapeutic intervention.

  6. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. [Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Márcia S

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (AIT), celiac disease (CD), Addison's disease (AD), and other autoimmune diseases. These diseases can occur simultaneously in defined syndromes with distinct pathophysiology and characteristics: autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APSs) and the immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX). APSs were initially defined as a multiple endocrine gland insufficiency associated to an autoimmune disease in a patient. APS-1 is characterized by the evidence of chronic candidiasis, chronic hypoparathyroidism, AD and T1D could be present as part of this syndrome. The combination of autoimmune adrenal insufficiency with AIT and/or type 1 autoimmune diabetes mellitus defines APS-2. AIT associated to other autoimmune diseases (excluding AD and/or hypoparathyroidism) are the main characteristics of APS-3. Different clinical combinations of autoimmune diseases which were not included in the previous groups are the characteristics of APS-4. IPEX is a recessive disorder characterized by the neonatal onset of T1D, infections, enteropathy, thrombocytopenia and anemia, as well as endocrinopathy, eczema and cachexia. These disorders are not common, but their consequences can be life threatening when the diagnosis is overlooked, and the treatment is the same prescribed for isolated disease presentation.

  8. PI3Kγ Deficient NOD-Mice Are Protected from Diabetes by Restoring the Balance of Regulatory to Effector-T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Jamil; Thueson, Lindsay; Moore, Robert; Abdoli, Rozita; Reijonen, Helena; Abdi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    With a steady increase in its incidence and lack of curative treatment, type 1 diabetes (T1D) has emerged as a major health problem worldwide. To design novel effective therapies, there is a pressing need to identify regulatory targets controlling the balance of autoreactive to regulatory-T-cells (Tregs). We previously showed that the inhibition of the γ-subunit of the Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), significantly suppress autoimmune-diabetes. To further delineate the mechanisms and the selectivity of specific immune modulation by PI3Kγ-inhibition, we developed a new NOD mouse model of T1D lacking the γ-subunit of PI3K. Strikingly, the loss of PI3Kγ protected 92% of the NOD-mice from developing spontaneous diabetes. The NOD.PI3Kγ-/- mice are protected from insulitis secondary to a defect in CD4 and CD8 autoreactive-T-cells activation and survival. In addition, PI3Kγ-deficiency promoted Treg generation in-vitro and in-vivo. Furthermore, PI3Kγ-inhibitor (AS605240) inhibited proliferation and cytokine production of a human CD4+ T-cell clone specific for GAD555-567 peptide that was isolated from a patient with T1D. These studies demonstrate the key role of the PI3Kγ pathway in regulating autoimmune-diabetes and provide rationales for future devise of anti- PI3Kγ therapy in T1D. PMID:28081180

  9. PD-L1-driven tolerance protects neurogenin3-induced islet neogenesis to reverse established type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongying; Lee, Jeongkyung; Kim, Mi-sun; Liu, Victoria; Moulik, Mousumi; Li, Haiyan; Yi, Qing; Xie, Aini; Chen, Wenhao; Yang, Lina; Li, Yimin; Tsai, Tsung Huang; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Yechoor, Vijay

    2015-02-01

    A breakdown in self-tolerance underlies autoimmune destruction of β-cells and type 1 diabetes. A cure by restoring β-cell mass is limited by the availability of transplantable β-cells and the need for chronic immunosuppression. Evidence indicates that inhibiting costimulation through the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is central to immune tolerance. We therefore tested whether induction of islet neogenesis in the liver, protected by PD-L1-driven tolerance, reverses diabetes in NOD mice. We demonstrated a robust induction of neo-islets in the liver of diabetic NOD mice by gene transfer of Neurogenin3, the islet-defining factor, along with betacellulin, an islet growth factor. These neo-islets expressed all the major pancreatic hormones and transcription factors. However, an enduring restoration of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and euglycemia occurs only when tolerance is also induced by the targeted overexpression of PD-L1 in the neo-islets, which results in inhibition of proliferation and increased apoptosis of infiltrating CD4(+) T cells. Further analysis revealed an inhibition of cytokine production from lymphocytes isolated from the liver but not from the spleen of treated mice, indicating that treatment did not result in generalized immunosuppression. This treatment strategy leads to persistence of functional neo-islets that resist autoimmune destruction and consequently an enduring reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  10. Weak Proinsulin Peptide–Major Histocompatibility Complexes Are Targeted in Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Levisetti, Matteo G.; Lewis, Danna M.; Suri, Anish; Unanue, Emil R.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Weak major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding of self-peptides has been proposed as a mechanism that may contribute to autoimmunity by allowing for escape of autoreactive T-cells from the thymus. We examined the relationship between the MHC-binding characteristics of a β-cell antigen epitope and T-cell autoreactivity in a model of autoimmune diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The binding of a proinsulin epitope, proinsulin-1(47–64) (PI-1[47–64]), to the MHC class II molecules I-Ag7 and I-Ak was measured using purified class II molecules. T-cell reactivity to the proinsulin epitope was examined in I-Ag7+ and I-Ak+ mice. RESULTS—C-peptide epitopes bound very weakly to I-Ag7 molecules. However, C-peptide–reactive T-cells were induced after immunization in I-Ag7–bearing mice (NOD and B6.g7) but not in I-Ak–bearing mice (B10.BR and NOD.h4). T-cells reactive with the PI-1(47–64) peptide were found spontaneously in the peripancreatic lymph nodes of pre-diabetic NOD mice. These T-cells were activated by freshly isolated β-cells in the presence of antigen-presenting cells and caused diabetes when transferred into NOD.scid mice. CONCLUSIONS—These data demonstrate an inverse relationship between self-peptide–MHC binding and T-cell autoreactivity for the PI-1(47–64) epitope in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:18398138

  11. The Role of Type I Interferon Subtypes and Interferon-Gamma in Type I Interferon Diabetes Inhibitory Activity in the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Douglas; Ahvazi, Behrouz; Pontzer, Carol

    2016-04-01

    As in bacterial infections and endotoxin shock, type I interferons (IFNs) also have complex and often opposing effects in various models of autoimmune disease. We have shown that type I IFN paradoxically inhibits autoimmune diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse (NOD) and biobreeding (BB) rat. We hypothesize that type I IFN activity differs by IFN subtype and interaction with IFN-gamma. We examined the structure-function relationship of the type I IFN molecule and the mechanism of its diabetes-sparing activity in the NOD mouse. While both recombinant human IFN-alpha A/D (bgl 11) (rHuIFN-alphaA/D) and ovine IFN-tauImod (ovIFN-tau) potently inhibited the development of diabetes (P < 0.01), neither recombinant human IFN-alpha B/D (rHuIFN-alphaB/D) nor recombinant human IFN-alpha consensus (CIFN) were efficacious. The activity of IFN subtypes correlate with their NH3-terminal amino acid sequences. All type I IFN save CIFN, which has no diabetes-sparing activity, inhibited the accessory cell function. IFN-tau administration decreased the expression of Fas and ICAM on total cells, class II MHC expression on B cells, and CD40L expression on T cells by 39%, 45%, 45%, and 60%, respectively. In addition, IFN-tau inhibited the development of diabetes in the NOD.IL4(null) but not the NOD.IFN-gamma(null) mice, suggesting a coordinated interaction between type I and type II IFNs to suppress diabetes development. Thus, the amino terminal portion of the type I IFN molecule influences its ability to inhibit the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. These data also support the contention that IFN-gamma may have a role in mediating the diabetes-sparing effect of high-dose type I IFNs by the inhibition of the IFN-gamma-inducible immune modulators, class II MHC, Fas, ICAM, and CD40L.

  12. Systemic alterations in the metabolome of diabetic NOD mice delineate increased oxidative stress accompanied by reduced inflammation and hypertriglyceremia.

    PubMed

    Fahrmann, Johannes; Grapov, Dmitry; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Bell, Graeme I; Hara, Manami

    2015-06-01

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are a commonly used model of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, not all animals will develop overt diabetes despite undergoing similar autoimmune insult. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomic approach, consisting of gas chromatography time-of-flight (GC-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass quadruple time-of-flight (UHPLC-qTOF) MS and targeted UHPLC-tandem mass spectrometry-based methodologies, was used to capture metabolic alterations in the metabolome and lipidome of plasma from NOD mice progressing or not progressing to T1D. Using this multi-platform approach, we identified >1,000 circulating lipids and metabolites in male and female progressor and nonprogressor animals (n = 71). Statistical and multivariate analyses were used to identify age- and sex-independent metabolic markers, which best differentiated metabolic profiles of progressors and nonprogressors. Key T1D-associated perturbations were related with 1) increases in oxidation products glucono-δ-lactone and galactonic acid and reductions in cysteine, methionine and threonic acid, suggesting increased oxidative stress; 2) reductions in circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid signaling mediators, most notably arachidonic acid (AA) and AA-derived eicosanoids, implying impaired states of systemic inflammation; 3) elevations in circulating triacylglyercides reflective of hypertriglyceridemia; and 4) reductions in major structural lipids, most notably lysophosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylcholines. Taken together, our results highlight the systemic perturbations that accompany a loss of glycemic control and development of overt T1D.

  13. Despite Increased Type 1 IFN, Autoimmune Nonobese Diabetic Mice Display Impaired Dendritic Cell Response to CpG and Decreased Nuclear Localization of IFN-Activated STAT1

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Jubayer; Rahir, Gwendoline; Dong, Matthew B.; Zhao, Yongge; Rodrigues, Kameron B.; Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Chen, Ye; Guerrero, Alan; Tarbell, Kristin V.

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune signals help break self-tolerance to initiate autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, but innate contributions to subsequent regulation of disease progression are less clear. Most studies have measured in vitro innate responses of GM-CSF dendritic cells (DCs) that are functionally distinct from conventional DCs (cDCs) and do not reflect in vivo DC subsets. To determine whether autoimmune NOD mice have alterations in type 1 IFN innate responsiveness, we compared cDCs from prediabetic NOD and control C57BL/6 (B6) mice stimulated in vivo with the TLR9 ligand CpG, a strong type 1 IFN inducer. In response to CpG, NOD mice produce more type 1 IFN and express higher levels of CD40, and NOD monocyte DCs make more TNF. However, the overall CpG-induced transcriptional response is muted in NOD cDCs. Of relevance the costimulatory proteins CD80/CD86, signals needed for regulatory T cell homeostasis, are upregulated less on NOD cDCs. Interestingly, NOD Rag1−/− mice also display a defect in CpG-induced CD86 upregulation compared with B6 Rag1−/−, indicating this particular innate alteration precedes adaptive autoimmunity. The impaired response in NOD DCs is likely downstream of the IFN-α/β receptor because DCs from NOD and B6 mice show similar CpG-induced CD86 levels when anti–IFN-α/β receptor Ab is added. IFN-α–induced nuclear localization of activated STAT1 is markedly reduced in NOD CD11c+ cells, consistent with lower type 1 IFN responsiveness. In conclusion, NOD DCs display altered innate responses characterized by enhanced type 1 IFN and activation of monocyte-derived DCs but diminished cDC type 1 IFN response. PMID:26826238

  14. Immunological aspects of nutritional diabetes prevention in NOD mice: a pilot study for the cow's milk-based IDDM prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Karges, W; Hammond-McKibben, D; Cheung, R K; Visconti, M; Shibuya, N; Kemp, D; Dosch, H M

    1997-04-01

    Human epidemiological studies delineated early exposure to intact dietary protein (e.g., most infant formulas) as an environmental risk factor for the development of IDDM. The Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR), an international IDDM prevention trial, has been designed to determine if avoidance of intact dairy protein in high-risk infants < or =6 months of age can reduce the subsequent diabetes incidence. We here studied the casein hydrolysate-based trial diet (Nutramigen) in NOD mice. When given either continuously or for 10 weeks after weaning, the test diet was highly effective in preventing autoimmune diabetes (32-week incidence: 4.6 vs. 58.8%) and in preserving pancreatic insulin levels, with little effect on islet inflammation. Spleen cells from protected NOD mice failed to adoptively transfer diabetes into irradiated syngeneic recipients. When co-transferred with splenocytes from diabetic donors, cells from diet-protected mice inhibited adoptive diabetes transfer (incidence 50 vs. 94%, P < 0.001). T-cell reactivity to the islet cell autoantigens ICA69 (islet cell antigen 69) and GAD65 developed only in diabetic recipients of spleen cell grafts, indicating that diabetes protection extends to more than one autoantigen. In protected mice, ICA69 T-cell reactivity was not detectable spontaneously nor after priming with this autoantigen; however, priming with the cross-reactive non-self-antigen bovine serum albumin recruited T-cells responsive to ICA69. Thus, diabetes prevention with the clinical trial diet is effective in NOD mice, where it affects some T-cell repertoires and allows development of regulatory cells that interfere with destructive autoimmunity.

  15. Use of Autoantigen-Loaded Phosphatidylserine-Liposomes to Arrest Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Serracant-Prat, Arnau; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Silvia; Sanchez, Alex; Izquierdo, Cristina; Stratmann, Thomas; Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Maspoch, Daniel; Verdaguer, Joan; Vives-Pi, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes. Objective To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes. Methods A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides. Results We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion. Conclusions We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes

  16. A dual role for interferon-gamma in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome-like autoimmune exocrinopathy in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Cha, S; Brayer, J; Gao, J; Brown, V; Killedar, S; Yasunari, U; Peck, A B

    2004-12-01

    Sjogren's syndrome-like autoimmune exocrinopathy (AEC) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse progresses from a preimmune phase to an immune phase, resulting in dry mouth and/or dry eyes. In the present study, the impact of the prototypical T-helper type 1 cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), on the onset of AEC was investigated using both the IFN-gamma and the IFN-gamma receptor gene knockout mice, NOD.IFN-gamma(-/-) and NOD.IFN-gammaR(-/-), respectively. Neither the NOD.IFN-gamma(-/-) nor the NOD.IFN-gammaR(-/-) mice exhibited increased acinar cell apoptosis and abnormal salivary protein expression, typically observed in parental NOD mice prior to disease. Without these preimmune phase abnormalities, NOD.IFN-gamma(-/-) and NOD.IFN-gammaR(-/-) mice showed no subsequent autoimmune responses against the salivary glands at 20 weeks. Interestingly, real-time polymerase chain reaction and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays suggested that IFN-gamma and STAT1, as well as the transcriptional activity of STAT1 in NOD glands, were increased at birth. Unlike the neonatal submandibular glands of NOD or NOD-scid mice that show abnormal glandular morphogenesis at birth, the submandibular glands of the newly constructed congenic strain, NOD-scid.IFN-gamma(-/-), were found to be normal. Taken together, IFN-gamma appears to play a critical role not only during the later immune phase of AEC, but also the early preimmune phase, independent of effector functions of immune cells. How exactly IFN-gamma functions during this period remains speculative.

  17. A combination dual-sized microparticle system modulates dendritic cells and prevents type 1 diabetes in prediabetic NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jamal S.; Dolgova, Natalia V.; Zhang, Ying; Xia, Chang Qing; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Atkinson, Mark A.; Clare-Salzler, Michael J.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based, microparticle (MP) system providing concurrent delivery of multiple encapsulated immuno-suppressive factors and antigen, for in vivo conditioning of dendritic cells (DCs) toward a tolerance promoting pathway. Subcutaneous administration prevents onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice. Two MP sizes were made: phagocytosable MPs were fabricated encapsulating vitamin D3 or insulin B(9-23) peptide, while unphagocytosable MPs were fabricated encapsulating TGF-β1 or GM-CSF. The combination of Vit D3/ TGF-β1 MPs confers an immature and LPS activation-resistant phenotype to DCs, and MP-delivered antigen is efficiently and functionally presented. Notably, two subcutaneous injections into 4 week old NOD mice using the combination of MPs encapsulating Vit D3, Ins B, TGF-β1 and GM-CSF protected 40% of mice from T1D development, significant in comparison to the control. This work represents one of the first applications of a biomaterial-based, MP vaccine system to successfully prevent autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25842187

  18. Deletion of the G6pc2 Gene Encoding the Islet-Specific Glucose-6-Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit–Related Protein Does Not Affect the Progression or Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in NOD/ShiLtJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oeser, James K.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wang, Yingda; Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Sarkar, Suparna A.; Wong, Randall; Lee, Catherine E.; Pound, Lynley D.; Hutton, John C.; Van Kaer, Luc; O’Brien, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit–related protein (IGRP), now known as G6PC2, is a major target of autoreactive T cells implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in both mice and humans. This study aimed to determine whether suppression of G6p2 gene expression might therefore prevent or delay disease progression. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS G6pc2−/− mice were generated on the NOD/ShiLtJ genetic background, and glycemia was monitored weekly up to 35 weeks of age to determine the onset and incidence of diabetes. The antigen specificity of CD8+ T cells infiltrating islets from NOD/ShiLtJ G6pc2+/+ and G6pc2−/− mice at 12 weeks was determined in parallel. RESULTS The absence of G6pc2 did not affect the time of onset, incidence, or sex bias of type 1 diabetes in NOD/ShiLtJ mice. Insulitis was prominent in both groups, but whereas NOD/ShiLtJ G6pc2+/+ islets contained CD8+ T cells reactive to the G6pc2 NRP peptide, G6pc2 NRP-reactive T cells were absent in NOD/ShiLtJ G6pc2−/− islets. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that G6pc2 is an important driver for the selection and expansion of islet-reactive CD8+ T cells infiltrating NOD/ShiLtJ islets. However, autoreactivity to G6pc2 is not essential for the emergence of autoimmune diabetes. The results remain consistent with previous studies indicating that insulin may be the primary autoimmune target, at least in NOD/ShiLtJ mice. PMID:21896930

  19. Protection of non-obese diabetic mice from autoimmune diabetes by Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Thomas O; Williams, Neil A

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is associated with development of inflammation around the islets at around 4–5 weeks of age, which may be prolonged until frank diabetes begins to occur around 12 weeks of age. Although many interventions can halt disease progression if administration coincides with the beginning of the anti-β cell response, very few are able to prevent diabetes development once insulitis is established. Here we describe a strategy which blocks cellular infiltration of islets and prevents diabetes. Intranasal treatment with the B-subunit of Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin (EtxB), a protein that binds GM1 ganglioside (as well as GD1b, asialo-GM1 and lactosylceramide with lower affinities), protected NOD mice from developing diabetes in a receptor-binding dependent manner. Protection was associated with a significant reduction in the number of macrophages, CD4+ T cells, B cells, major histocompatibility complex class II+ cells infiltrating the islets. Despite this, treated mice showed increased number of interleukin-10+ cells in the pancreas, and a decrease in both T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine production in the pancreatic lymph node. Disease protection was also transferred with CD4+ splenocytes from treated mice. Taken together, these results demonstrated that EtxB is a potent immune modulator capable of blocking diabetes. PMID:16423062

  20. Enhanced anti-serpin antibody activity inhibits autoimmune inflammation in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk, Jan; Henegariu, Octavian; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Baldzizhar, Raman; Fedorchuk, Christine; Esplugues, Enric; Bottomly, Kim; Gorus, Frans K; Herold, Kevan; Flavell, Richard A

    2012-06-15

    Intracellular (clade B) OVA-serpin protease inhibitors play an important role in tissue homeostasis by protecting cells from death in response to hypo-osmotic stress, heat shock, and other stimuli. It is not known whether these serpins influence immunological tolerance and the risk for autoimmune diseases. We found that a fraction of young autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice had elevated levels of autoantibodies against a member of clade B family known as serpinB13. High levels of anti-serpinB13 Abs were accompanied by low levels of anti-insulin autoantibodies, reduced numbers of islet-associated T cells, and delayed onset of diabetes. Exposure to anti-serpinB13 mAb alone also decreased islet inflammation, and coadministration of this reagent and a suboptimal dose of anti-CD3 mAb accelerated recovery from diabetes. In a fashion similar to that discovered in the NOD model, a deficiency in humoral activity against serpinB13 was associated with early onset of human type 1 diabetes. These findings suggest that, in addition to limiting exposure to proteases within the cell, clade B serpins help to maintain homeostasis by inducing protective humoral immunity.

  1. Antigen presenting cell-targeted proinsulin expression converts insulin-specific CD8(+) T-cell priming to tolerance in autoimmune-prone NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Peta L S; Rudraraju, Rajeev; Wong, F Susan; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E; Steptoe, Raymond J

    2017-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Therapies need to incorporate strategies to overcome the genetic defects that impair induction or maintenance of peripheral T-cell tolerance and contribute to disease development. We tested whether the enforced expression of an islet autoantigen in antigen-presenting cells (APC) counteracted peripheral T-cell tolerance defects in autoimmune-prone NOD mice. We observed that insulin-specific CD8(+) T cells transferred to mice in which proinsulin was transgenically expressed in APCs underwent several rounds of division and the majority were deleted. Residual insulin-specific CD8(+) T cells were rendered unresponsive and this was associated with TCR downregulation, loss of tetramer binding and expression of a range of co-inhibitory molecules. Notably, accumulation and effector differentiation of insulin-specific CD8(+) T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes was prominent in non-transgenic recipients but blocked by transgenic proinsulin expression. This shift from T-cell priming to T-cell tolerance exemplifies the tolerogenic capacity of autoantigen expression by APC and the capacity to overcome genetic tolerance defects. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A; Mohan, James F; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M; Unanue, Emil R

    2014-10-16

    Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however, the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen-presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103(+) dendritic cell (DC) population. By 4 weeks of age, CD4(+) T cells entered islets coincident with an increase in CD103(+) DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103(+) DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103(+) DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103(+) DCs are essential for autoimmune diabetes development.

  3. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  4. Double Negative (CD3+4-8-) TCRalphaBeta Splenic Cells from Young NOD Mice Provide Long-Lasting Protection against Type 1 Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-02

    Nazarov –Stoica2, Jacqueline Surls2, Margaret Kehl2, Constantin Bona3, Sofia Casares2,4, Teodor-D. Brumeanu2* 1 National Cancer Institute, National...could be potentially manipulated towards the development of autologous cell therapies in autoimmune diabetes. Citation: Duncan B, Nazarov –Stoica C...Sprent J (2001) A defect in central tolerance in NOD mice. Nat Immunol 2: 1025–1031. 34. Nazarov -Stoica C, Surls J, Kehl M, Bona C, Casares S, et al

  5. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  6. Autoimmunity and the highway to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Price, P

    1997-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an immunopathological condition involving loss of beta cell function, but views of how this arises are confusing and contradictory. For example, studies with non-obese diabetic mice implicate abnormal cytokine production in disease pathogenesis, but give little insight into how this arises. Many genetic and environmental risk factors have been described, but no single factor predicts the development of disease. Moreover, the prevalence of auto-antibodies suggests an autoimmune aetiology, but no antigen is recognized by all individuals. As an aid to understanding how IDDM develops, this review considers the risk factors as distinct starting points on a journey, and reviews current literature in search of the point where the roads from each origin merge into a highway to diabetes.

  7. Cow's milk-free diet does not prevent diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Paxson, J A; Weber, J G; Kulczycki, A

    1997-11-01

    Early dietary exposure to cow's milk proteins has been proposed as an important environmental factor in the development of IDDM both in humans and in diabetes-prone rodents. To examine the significance of cow's milk protein in IDDM, 120 NOD mice were maintained, starting from conception until sacrifice, on one of four diets: standard PMI Picolab Rodent Diet 20, a milk-free modification of the standard Picolab diet, a milk-free diet incorporating 0.036% bovine serum albumin (BSA), and a milk-free diet including 0.036% bovine IgG (BGG). The cumulative IDDM incidence at 7 months for these mice in a specific pathogen-free environment on the respective diets was 78, 93, 93, and 67% for females, and 17, 54, 17, and 0% for males. The ages of diabetes onset and insulitis scores were similar for mice on each diet. The unexpectedly lower incidence of IDDM in mice on the milk-free diet that included BGG raises the possibility this cow's milk protein might possibly have some protective effect against the development of IDDM in NOD mice. Our main finding was that the standard, milk-free, and BSA-containing diets resulted in comparable incidences of IDDM in NOD mice, demonstrating that neither cow's milk whey proteins in general nor BSA in particular are significantly important as etiologic dietary agents in IDDM in NOD mice.

  8. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Posgai, Amanda L.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A.; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3+ and LAP+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28205558

  9. IFN-{gamma} gene expression in pancreatic islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells correlates with autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, A.; Suarez-Pinzon, W.L.; Sorensen, O.

    1995-05-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice results from selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta}-cells following islet filtration by mononuclear leukocytes. Cytokines produced by islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells may be involved in {beta}-cell destruction. Therefore, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression, by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay, in mononuclear leukocytes isolated from pancreatic islets of four groups of mice: diabetes-prone female NOD mice; female NOD mice protected from diabetes by injection of CFA at an early age; male NOD mice with a low diabetes incidence; and female BALB/c mice that do not develop diabetes. We found that mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-{gamma} in mononuclear cells from islets of diabetes-prone female NOD mice increased progressively as these cells infiltrated the islets from age 5 wk to diabetes onset (>13 wk). However, only IFN-{gamma} mRNA levels were significantly higher in islet mononuclear cells from 12-wk-old diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from less diabetes-prone NOD mice (CFA-treated females, and males) and normal mice (BALB/c). In contrast, IL-4 mRNA levels were lower in islet mononuclear cells from diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from NOD mice with low diabetes incidence (CFA-treated females and males). Splenic cell mRNA levels of IFN-{gamma} and IL-4 were not different in the four groups of mice. These results suggest that islet {beta}-cell destruction and diabetes in female NOD mice are dependent upon intra-islet IFN-{gamma} production by mononuclear cells, and that CFA-treated female NOD mice and male NOD mice may be protected from diabetes development by down-regulation of IFN-{gamma} production in the islets. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Synergistic reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice with anti-CD3 and interleukin-1 blockade: evidence of improved immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Ablamunits, Vitaly; Henegariu, Octavian; Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Santamaria, Pere; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Herold, Kevan C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are involved in autoimmune diabetes: among the most prominent is interleukin (IL)-1β. We postulated that blockade of IL-1β would modulate the effects of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in treating diabetes in NOD mice. To test this, we treated hyperglycemic NOD mice with F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-CD3 mAb with or without IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), or anti-IL-1β mAb. We studied the reversal of diabetes and effects of treatment on the immune system. Mice that received a combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA showed a more rapid rate of remission of diabetes than mice treated with anti-CD3 mAb or IL-1RA alone. Combination-treated mice had increased IL-5, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ levels in circulation. There were reduced pathogenic NOD-relevant V7 peptide-V7(+) T cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Their splenocytes secreted more IL-10, had increased arginase expression in macrophages and dendritic cells, and had delayed adoptive transfer of diabetes. After 1 month, there were increased concentrations of IgG1 isotype antibodies and reduced intrapancreatic expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17 despite normal splenocyte cytokine secretion. These studies indicate that the combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA is synergistic in reversal of diabetes through a combination of mechanisms. The combination causes persistent remission from islet inflammation.

  11. ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorate type 1 diabetes and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xinyun; Li, Fanghong; Liu, Shanshan; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Tao; Dai, Yifan; Li, Xiaoxi; Zhao, Allan Zijian

    2017-01-01

    Despite the benefit of insulin, blockade of autoimmune attack and regeneration of pancreatic islets are ultimate goals for the complete cure of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Long-term consumption of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is known to suppress inflammatory processes, making these fatty acids candidates for the prevention and amelioration of autoimmune diseases. Here, we explored the preventative and therapeutic effects of ω-3 PUFAs on T1D. In NOD mice, dietary intervention with ω-3 PUFAs sharply reduced the incidence of T1D, modulated the differentiation of Th cells and Tregs, and decreased the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-6, and TNF-α. ω-3 PUFAs exerted similar effects on the differentiation of CD4+ T cells isolated from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation was mediated at least in part through ω-3 PUFA eicosanoid derivatives and by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition. Importantly, therapeutic intervention in NOD mice through nutritional supplementation or lentivirus-mediated expression of an ω-3 fatty acid desaturase, mfat-1, normalized blood glucose and insulin levels for at least 182 days, blocked the development of autoimmunity, prevented lymphocyte infiltration into regenerated islets, and sharply elevated the expression of the β cell markers pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) and paired box 4 (Pax4). The findings suggest that ω-3 PUFAs could potentially serve as a therapeutic modality for T1D. PMID:28375156

  12. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  13. An intravital microscopy model to study early pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian; Fisher, Nicholas B.; Tugwell, Barna; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy (IVM) of the pancreas has been proven to be an invaluable tool in pancreatitis, transplantation and ischemia/reperfusion research. Also in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pancreatic IVM offers unique advantages for the elucidation of the disease process. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop T1D spontaneously by 40 weeks of age. Our goal was to establish an IVM-based method to study early pancreatic inflammation in NOD mice, which can be used to screen novel medications to prevent or delay T1D in future studies. This included evaluation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions as well as disturbances of capillary perfusion in the pancreatic microcirculation. PMID:28243521

  14. Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non-Human Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    0417 TITLE: Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non -Human Primates PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...11 January 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non -Human Primates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11...the genetically diabetes -prone non -obese diabetic mouse strain, whose etio-pathogenesis is widely-held to parallel the one that occurs in humans

  15. Tissue-Specific Stem Cells Obtained by Reprogramming of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse-Derived Pancreatic Cells Confer Insulin Production in Response to Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Issei; Sato, Masahiro; Soda, Miki; Inada, Emi; Iwase, Yoko; Murakami, Tomoya; Ohshima, Hayato; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes occurs due to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells in islets. Transplantation of islets is a promising option for the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes that experience hypoglycemic unawareness despite maximal care, but the present shortage of donor islets hampers such transplantation. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells derived from the patients themselves would be one of the most promising approaches to cure type 1 diabetes. Previously, we demonstrated that insulin-producing cells could be produced by transfecting murine pancreatic cells with Yamanaka’s reprogramming factors. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice are naturally occurring mutant mice defective in insulin production due to autoimmune ablation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we showed that glucose-sensitive insulin-producing cells are successfully generated by transfecting primary pancreatic cells from NOD mice (aged 6 months old) with a plasmid harboring the cDNAs for Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Transfection was repeated 4 times in a 2 day-interval. Sixty-five days after final transfection, cobblestone-like colonies appeared. They proliferated in vitro and expressed pluripotency-related genes as well as Pdx1, a transcription factor specific to tissue-specific stem cells for the β-cell lineage. Transplantation of these cells into nude mice failed to produce teratoma unlike induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Induction of these cells to the pancreatic β-cell lineage demonstrated their capability to produce insulin in response to glucose. These findings suggest that functional pancreatic β-cells can be produced from patients with type 1 diabetes. We call these resultant cells as “induced tissue-specific stem cells from the pancreas” (iTS-P) that could be valuable sources of safe and effective materials for cell-based therapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:27662374

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation prevents diabetes in NOD mice but does not contribute to significant islet cell regeneration once disease is established.

    PubMed

    Kang, Elizabeth M; Zickler, Philipp P; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia M; Brenner, Sebastian; Phang, Oswald A; Patterson, Noelle; Harlan, David; Tisdale, John F

    2005-06-01

    The treatment of type I diabetes by islet cell transplantation, while promising, remains restricted due to the incomplete efficacy and toxicity associated with current immunosuppression, and by limited organ availability. Given reports suggesting bone marrow derived stem cell plasticity, we sought to determine whether such cells could give rise to pancreatic islet cells in vivo. In the context of autoimmune diabetes, we transplanted unfractionated bone marrow from beta-gal trangenic donor mice into NOD mice prior to, at, and two weeks beyond the onset of disease. Successful bone marrow engraftment before diabetes onset prevented disease in all mice and for 1 year after transplant. However, despite obtaining full hematopoietic engraftment in over 50 transplanted mice, only one mouse became insulin independent, and no beta-Gal positive islets were detected in any of the mice. To test whether tolerance to islets was achieved, we injected islets obtained from the same allogeneic donor strain as the hematopoietic cells into 4 transplant recipients, and 2 had a reversion of their diabetes. Thus allogeneic bone marrow transplantation prevents autoimmune diabetes and tolerizes the recipient to donor islet grants, even in diabetic animals, yet the capacity of bone marrow derived cells to differentiate into functional islet cells, at least without additional manipulation, is limited in our model.

  17. Association of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mghari, Ghizlane El; Ansari, Nawal El

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune pancreatitis is a new nosological entity in which a lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine pancreas is involved. The concomitant onset of autoimmune pancreatitis and type 1 diabetes has been recently described suggesting a unique immune disturbance that compromises the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions. We report a case of type1 diabetes onset associated with an autoimmune pancreatitis in a young patient who seemed to present a type 2 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. This rare association offers the opportunity to better understand pancreatic autoimmune disorders in type 1 diabetes. Learning points: The case makes it possible to understand the possibility of a simultaneous disturbance of the endocrine and exocrine function of the same organ by one autoimmune process. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes should make practitioner seek other autoimmune diseases. It is recommended to screen for autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac diseases. We draw attention to consider the autoimmune origin of a pancreatitis associated to type1 diabetes. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a novel rare entity that should be known as it is part of the IgG4-related disease spectrum. PMID:27855231

  18. Inducible adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-2 gene therapy prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goudy, Kevin S; Johnson, Mark C; Garland, Alaina; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R Jude; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2011-03-15

    IL-2 and TGF-β1 play key roles in the immunobiology of Foxp3-expressing CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells (Foxp3(+)Treg). Administration of these cytokines offers an appealing approach to manipulate the Foxp3(+)Treg pool and treat T cell-mediated autoimmunity such as type 1 diabetes. However, efficacy of cytokine treatment is dependent on the mode of application, and the potent pleiotropic effects of cytokines like IL-2 may lead to severe side effects. In the current study, we used a gene therapy-based approach to assess the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors expressing inducible IL-2 or TGF-β1 transgenes to suppress ongoing β cell autoimmunity in NOD mice. Intramuscular vaccination of recombinant adeno-associated virus to 10-wk-old NOD female mice and a subsequent 3 wk induction of IL-2 was sufficient to prevent diabetes and block the progression of insulitis. Protection correlated with an increased frequency of Foxp3(+)Treg in the periphery as well as in the draining pancreatic lymph nodes and islets. IL-2 induced a shift in the ratio favoring Foxp3(+)Treg versus IFN-γ-expressing T cells infiltrating the islets. Induction of IL-2 had no systemic effect on the frequency or activational status of T cells and NK cells. Induction of TGF-β1 had no effect on the Foxp3(+)Treg pool or the progression of β cell autoimmunity despite induced systemic levels of activated TGF-β1 that were comparable to IL-2. These results demonstrate that inducible IL-2 gene therapy is an effective and safe approach to manipulate Foxp3(+)Treg and suppress T cell-mediated autoimmunity and that under the conditions employed, IL-2 is more potent than TGF-β1.

  19. Pancreatic islet expression of chemokine CCL2 suppresses autoimmune diabetes via tolerogenic CD11c+ CD11b+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Martin A; Rathinam, Chozhavendan; Flavell, Richard A

    2012-02-28

    Development of type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is preceded by an immune cell infiltrate in the pancreatic islets. The exact role of the attracted cells is still poorly understood. Chemokine CCL2/MCP-1 is known to attract CCR2(+) monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). We have previously shown that transgenic expression of CCL2 in pancreatic islets via the rat insulin promoter induces nondestructive insulitis on a nonautoimmune background. We report here an unexpected reduction of diabetes development on the NOD background despite an increased islet cell infiltrate with markedly increased numbers of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) DCs. These DCs exhibited a hypoactive phenotype with low CD40, MHC II, CD80/CD86 expression, and reduced TNF-α but elevated IL-10 secretions. They failed to induce proliferation of diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Pancreatic lymph node CD4(+) T cells were down-regulated ex vivo and expressed the anergy marker Grail. By using an in vivo transfer system, we show that CD11c(+) CD11b(+) DCs from rat insulin promoter-CCL2 transgenic NOD mice were the most potent cells suppressing diabetes development. These findings support an unexpected beneficial role for CCL2 in type 1 diabetes with implications for current strategies interfering with the CCL2/CCR2 axis in humans, and for dendritic cell biology in autoimmunity.

  20. Novel leptin receptor mutation in NOD/LtJ mice suppresses type 1 diabetes progression: II. Immunologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Ho; Chen, Yi-Guang; Chen, Jing; Reifsnyder, Peter C; Serreze, David V; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Rodriguez, Michelle; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A; Leiter, Edward H

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we identified in normally type 1 diabetes-prone NOD/LtJ mice a spontaneous new leptin receptor (LEPR) mutation (designated Lepr(db-5J)) producing juvenile obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia. This early type 2 diabetes syndrome suppressed intra-islet insulitis and permitted spontaneous diabetes remission. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone, splenic CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell percentages, or functions of CD3(+) T-cells in vitro distinguished NOD wild-type from mutant mice. Yet splenocytes from hyperglycemic mutant donors failed to transfer type 1 diabetes into NOD.Rag1(-/-) recipients over a 13-week period, whereas wild-type donor cells did so. This correlated with significantly reduced (P < 0.01) frequencies of insulin and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein-reactive CD8(+) T-effector clonotypes in mutant mice. Intra-islet insulitis was also significantly suppressed in lethally irradiated NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt recipients reconstituted with wild-type bone marrow (P < 0.001). In contrast, type 1 diabetes eventually developed when mutant marrow was transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients. Mitogen-induced T-cell blastogenesis was significantly suppressed when splenic T-cells from both NOD/Lt and NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt donors were incubated with irradiated mutant peritoneal exudate cells (P < 0.005). In conclusion, metabolic disturbances elicited by a type 2 diabetes syndrome (insulin and/or leptin resistance, but not hypercorticism) appear to suppress type 1 diabetes development in NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt by inhibiting activation of T-effector cells.

  1. Short-term subcutaneous insulin treatment delays but does not prevent diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Despite encouraging results in the NOD mouse, type 1 diabetes prevention trials using subcutaneous insulin have been unsuccessful. To explain these discrepancies, 3-week-old NOD mice were treated for 7 weeks with subcutaneous insulin at two different doses: a high dose (0.5 U/mouse) used in previous mouse studies; and a low dose (0.005 U/mouse) equivalent to that used in human trials. Effects on insulitis and diabetes were monitored along with immune and metabolic modifications. Low-dose insulin did not have any effect on disease incidence. High-dose treatment delayed but did not prevent diabetes, with reduced insulitis reappearing once insulin discontinued. This effect was not associated with significant immune changes in islet infiltrates, either in terms of cell composition or frequency and IFN-γ secretion of islet-reactive CD8(+) T cells recognizing the immunodominant epitopes insulin B(15-23) and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214). Delayed diabetes and insulitis were associated with lower blood glucose and endogenous C-peptide levels, which rapidly returned to normal upon treatment discontinuation. In conclusion, high- but not low-dose prophylactic insulin treatment delays diabetes onset and is associated with metabolic changes suggestive of β-cell "rest" which do not persist beyond treatment. These findings have important implications for designing insulin-based prevention trials.

  2. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  3. Mast cells contribute to autoimmune diabetes by releasing interleukin-6 and failing to acquire a tolerogenic IL-10(+) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Betto, Elena; Usuelli, Vera; Mandelli, Alessandra; Badami, Ester; Sorini, Chiara; Capolla, Sara; Danelli, Luca; Frossi, Barbara; Guarnotta, Carla; Ingrao, Sabrina; Tripodo, Claudio; Pucillo, Carlo; Gri, Giorgia; Falcone, Marika

    2017-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are innate immune cells that exert positive and negative immune modulatory functions capable to enhance or limit the intensity and/or duration of adaptive immune responses. Although MCs are crucial to regulate T cell immunity, their action in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is still debated. Here we demonstrate that MCs play a crucial role in T1D pathogenesis so that their selective depletion in conditional MC knockout NOD mice protects them from the disease. MCs of diabetic NOD mice are overly inflammatory and secrete large amounts of IL-6 that favors differentiation of IL-17-secreting T cells at the site of autoimmunity. Moreover, while MCs of control mice acquire an IL-10+ phenotype upon interaction with FoxP3+ Treg cells, MCs of NOD mice do not undergo this tolerogenic differentiation. Our data indicate that overly inflammatory MCs unable to acquire a tolerogenic IL-10+ phenotype contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune T1D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recessively Inherited LRBA Mutations Cause Autoimmunity Presenting as Neonatal Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Al Senani, Aisha; Elbarbary, Nancy; Siklar, Zeynep; Berberoglu, Merih; Imane, Zineb; Haghighi, Alireza; Razavi, Zahra; Ullah, Irfan; Alyaarubi, Saif; Gardner, Daphne; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2017-08-01

    Young-onset autoimmune diabetes associated with additional autoimmunity usually reflects a polygenic predisposition, but rare cases result from monogenic autoimmunity. Diagnosing monogenic autoimmunity is crucial for patients' prognosis and clinical management. We sought to identify novel genetic causes of autoimmunity presenting with neonatal diabetes (NDM) (diagnosis <6 months). We performed exome sequencing in a patient with NDM and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and his unrelated, unaffected parents and identified compound heterozygous null mutations in LRBA Biallelic LRBA mutations cause common variable immunodeficiency-8; however, NDM has not been confirmed in this disorder. We sequenced LRBA in 169 additional patients with diabetes diagnosed <1 year without mutations in the 24 known NDM genes. We identified recessive null mutations in 8 additional probands, of which, 3 had NDM (<6 months). Diabetes was the presenting feature in 6 of 9 probands. Six of 17 (35%) patients born to consanguineous parents and with additional early-onset autoimmunity had recessive LRBA mutations. LRBA testing should be considered in patients with diabetes diagnosed <12 months, particularly if they have additional autoimmunity or are born to consanguineous parents. A genetic diagnosis is important as it can enable personalized therapy with abatacept, a CTLA-4 mimetic, and inform genetic counseling. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 ameliorates thyroid damage in autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H‑2h⁴ mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Mao, Jinyuan; Han, Cheng; Peng, Shiqiao; Li, Chenyan; Jin, Ting; Fan, Chenling; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), are upregulated in mice with autoimmune thyroid diseases. However, whether this interaction is involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in an iodine‑induced autoimmune thyroiditis model were investigated. NOD.H‑2h4 mice were randomly separated into a control, AIT and AIT+AMD3100 groups. The mice were fed with 0.05% sodium iodide water for 8 weeks to induce AIT. The AMD3100‑treated mice were administered with the CXCR4 antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times a week during the experimental period. The percentages of CD19+interleukin (IL)10+ B cells and CD4+IL10+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IL10 in the splenocytes were reduced in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, they increased following AMD3100 treatment, compared with the untreated AIT group. The percentages of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD8+ interferon (IFN)γ+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IFNγ increased in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, these were reduced in the AMD3100 group, compared with the AIT group. The AMD3100‑treated mice also had lower serum thyroglobulin antibody titers and reduced lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid, compared with the untreated AIT mice. These results suggested that inhibition of this chemokine axis may offer potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AIT.

  6. Neonatal activation of CD28 signaling overcomes T cell anergy and prevents autoimmune diabetes by an IL-4-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Arreaza, G A; Cameron, M J; Jaramillo, A; Gill, B M; Hardy, D; Laupland, K B; Rapoport, M J; Zucker, P; Chakrabarti, S; Chensue, S W; Qin, H Y; Singh, B; Delovitch, T L

    1997-01-01

    Optimal T cell responsiveness requires signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 costimulatory receptors. Previously, we showed that T cells from autoimmune nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice display proliferative hyporesponsiveness to TCR stimulation, which may be causal to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Here, we demonstrate that anti-CD28 mAb stimulation restores complete NOD T cell proliferative responsiveness by augmentation of IL-4 production. Whereas neonatal treatment of NOD mice with anti-CD28 beginning at 2 wk of age inhibits destructive insulitis and protects against IDDM by enhancement of IL-4 production by islet-infiltrating T cells, administration of anti-CD28 beginning at 5-6 wk of age does not prevent IDDM. Simultaneous anti-IL-4 treatment abrogates the preventative effect of anti-CD28 treatment. Thus, neonatal CD28 costimulation during 2-4 wk of age is required to prevent IDDM, and is mediated by the generation of a Th2 cell-enriched nondestructive environment in the pancreatic islets of treated NOD mice. Our data support the hypothesis that a CD28 signal is requisite for activation of IL-4-producing cells and protection from IDDM. PMID:9410902

  7. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells.

  8. Gluten-Free Diet Only during Pregnancy Efficiently Prevents Diabetes in NOD Mouse Offspring.

    PubMed

    Antvorskov, Julie C; Josefsen, Knud; Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin; Fundova, Petra; Funda, David P; Buschard, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Studies have documented that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes is influenced by the intake of gluten. Aims. To investigate the importance of gluten exposure during pregnancy and the subsequent development of autoimmune diabetes in offspring. Methods. Nonobese diabetic mice were divided into 7 groups to receive combinations of gluten-free and standard diet before, during, or after pregnancy. Diabetes incidence in offspring was followed in each group (n = 16-27) for 310 days. Insulitis score and intestinal expression of T-cell transcription factors (RT-QPCR) were evaluated in animals from the different diet groups. Results. If mothers were fed a gluten-free diet only during pregnancy, the development of autoimmune diabetes in offspring was almost completely prevented with an incidence reduction from 62.5% in gluten-consuming mice to 8.3% (p < 0.0001) in the gluten-free group. The islets of Langerhans were less infiltrated (p < 0.001) and the intestinal expression of RORγt (Th17) (p < 0.0001) reduced in mice whose mothers were Gluten-free during pregnancy. Conclusion. A gluten-free diet exclusively during pregnancy efficiently prevents autoimmune diabetes development in offspring and reduces insulitis and intestinal expression of RORγt (Th17).

  9. Genes and environment as predisposing factors in autoimmunity: acceleration of spontaneous thyroiditis by dietary iodide in NOD.H2(h4) mice.

    PubMed

    Kolypetri, Panayota; King, Justin; Larijani, Mani; Carayanniotis, George

    2015-01-01

    In the field of autoimmune thyroiditis, NOD.H2(h4) mice have attracted significant and increasing attention since they not only develop spontaneous disease but they present thyroiditis with accelerated incidence and severity if they ingest iodide through their drinking water. This animal model highlights the interplay between genetic and dietary factors in the triggering of autoimmune disease and offers new opportunities to study immunoregulatory parameters influenced by both genes and environment. Here, we review experimental findings with this mouse model of thyroiditis.

  10. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dolpady, Jayashree; Sorini, Chiara; Di Pietro, Caterina; Cosorich, Ilaria; Ferrarese, Roberto; Saita, Diego; Clementi, Massimo; Falcone, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA), protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103+ DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D. PMID:26779542

  11. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment.

    PubMed

    Dolpady, Jayashree; Sorini, Chiara; Di Pietro, Caterina; Cosorich, Ilaria; Ferrarese, Roberto; Saita, Diego; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Falcone, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA), protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103(+) DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D.

  12. [Masked autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome caused by sequelae of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B; Seissler, J; Braunstein, S; Tschöpe, D

    2000-11-15

    In most cases Type I diabetes is immunologically mediated. Complications after long duration of the disease are commonly observed. Further autoimmune mediated diseases are rare, but more often diagnosed in diabetics than in the general population. The combination of 2 autoimmune endocrinopathies is subsumed under the term autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS). Depending on the endocrine gland involved disorders are classified as APS Type I, II or III. We report on a 64-year-old diabetic patient presenting with repeated nightly hypoglycemia. Diabetes was first diagnosed 12 years before. Clinical examination revealed a café-au-lait like color of the skin and severe peripheral polyneuropathy. Surprisingly, laboratory testing revealed a hemoglobin concentration of 6.8 g/dl. Further examinations led to the diagnosis of pernicious anemia and funicular myelosis. Screening for potentially associated autoimmune diseases showed also features of autoimmune thyroid disease. Despite of late manifestation of disease Type I diabetes should be considered if the clinical features correspond to an autoimmune induced disorder. Associated autoimmunopathies have always to be considered. Early diagnosis of commonly with diabetes associated autoimmunopathies can prevent as severe manifestations of disease as reported in this case.

  13. NOD Dendritic Cells Stimulated with Lactobacilli Preferentially Produce IL-10 versus IL-12 and Decrease Diabetes Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Manirarora, Jean N.; Parnell, Sarah A.; Hu, Yoon-Hyeon; Kosiewicz, Michele M.; Alard, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) from NOD mice produced high levels of IL-12 that induce IFNγ-producing T cells involved in diabetes development. We propose to utilize the microorganism ability to induce tolerogenic DCs to abrogate the proinflammatory process and prevent diabetes development. NOD DCs were stimulated with Lactobacilli (nonpathogenic bacteria targeting TLR2) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus (TLR2 agonist). LTA-treated DCs produced much more IL-12 than IL-10 and accelerated diabetes development when transferred into NOD mice. In contrast, stimulation of NOD DCs with L. casei favored the production of IL-10 over IL-12, and their transfer decreased disease incidence which anti-IL-10R antibodies restored. These data indicated that L. casei can induce NOD DCs to develop a more tolerogenic phenotype via production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Evaluation of the relative production of IL-10 and IL-12 by DCs may be a very useful means of identifying agents that have therapeutic potential. PMID:21716731

  14. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, is it an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Janahi, Noor M; Santos, Derek; Blyth, Christine; Bakhiet, Moiz; Ellis, Mairghread

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmunity has been identified in a significant number of neuropathies, such as, proximal neuropathies, and autonomic neuropathies associated with diabetes mellitus. However, possible correlations between diabetic peripheral neuropathy and autoimmunity have not yet been fully investigated. This study was conducted to investigate whether autoimmunity is associated with the pathogenesis of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A case-control analysis included three groups: 30 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, 30 diabetic control patients without neuropathy, and 30 healthy controls. Blood analysis was conducted to compare the percentages of positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) between the three groups. Secondary analysis investigated the correlations between the presence of autoimmune antibodies and sample demographics and neurological manifestations. This research was considered as a pilot study encouraging further investigations to take place in the near future. Antinuclear antibodies were significantly present in the blood serum of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in comparison to the control groups (p<0.001). The odds of positive values of ANA in the neuropathy group were 50 times higher when compared to control groups. Secondary analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of ANA and the neurological manifestation of neuropathy (Neuropathy symptom score, Neuropathy disability score and Vibration Perception Threshold). The study demonstrated for the first time that human peripheral diabetic neuropathy may have an autoimmune aetiology. The new pathogenic factors may lead to the consideration of new management plans involving new therapeutic approaches and disease markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. α/β–T Cell Receptor (TCR)+CD4−CD8− (NKT) Thymocytes Prevent Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus in Nonobese Diabetic (NOD)/Lt Mice by the Influence of Interleukin (IL)-4 and/or IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kirsten J.L.; Poulton, Lynn D.; Palmisano, Linda J.; Silveira, Pablo A.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Baxter, Alan G.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are selectively deficient in α/β-T cell receptor (TCR)+CD4−CD8− NKT cells, a defect that may contribute to their susceptibility to the spontaneous development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The role of NKT cells in protection from IDDM in NOD mice was studied by the infusion of thymocyte subsets into young female NOD mice. A single intravenous injection of 106 CD4−/lowCD8− or CD4−CD8− thymocytes from female (BALB/c × NOD)F1 donors protected intact NOD mice from the spontaneous onset of clinical IDDM. Insulitis was still present in some recipient mice, although the cell infiltrates were principally periductal and periislet, rather than the intraislet pattern characteristic of insulitis in unmanipulated NOD mice. Protection was not associated with the induction of “allogenic tolerance” or systemic autoimmunity. Accelerated IDDM occurs after injection of splenocytes from NOD donors into irradiated adult NOD recipients. When α/β-TCR+ and α/β-TCR− subsets of CD4−CD8− thymocytes were transferred with diabetogenic splenocytes and compared for their ability to prevent the development of IDDM in irradiated adult recipients, only the α/β-TCR+ population was protective, confirming that NKT cells were responsible for this activity. The protective effect in the induced model of IDDM was neutralized by anti–IL-4 and anti–IL-10 monoclonal antibodies in vivo, indicating a role for at least one of these cytokines in NKT cell-mediated protection. These results have significant implications for the pathogenesis and potential prevention of IDDM in humans. PMID:9529321

  16. Apoptosis of Purified CD4+ T Cell Subsets Is Dominated by Cytokine Deprivation and Absence of Other Cells in New Onset Diabetic NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Askenasy, Enosh M.; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a significant role in immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Excessive sensitivity of isolated Treg to apoptosis has been demonstrated in NOD mice and humans suffering of type 1 diabetes, suggesting a possible role in the immune dysfunction that underlies autoimmune insulitis. In this study the sensitivity to apoptosis was measured in T cells from new onset diabetic NOD females, comparing purified subsets to mixed cultures. Principal Findings Apoptotic cells are short lived in vivo and death occurs primarily during isolation, manipulation and culture. Excessive susceptibility of CD25+ T cells to spontaneous apoptosis is characteristic of isolated subsets, however disappears when death is measured in mixed splenocyte cultures. In variance, CD25− T cells display balanced sensitivity to apoptosis under both conditions. The isolation procedure removes soluble factors, IL-2 playing a significant role in sustaining Treg viability. In addition, pro- and anti-apoptotic signals are transduced by cell-to-cell interactions: CD3 and CD28 protect CD25+ T cells from apoptosis, and in parallel sensitize naïve effector cells to apoptosis. Treg viability is modulated both by other T cells and other subsets within mixed splenocyte cultures. Variations in sensitivity to apoptosis are often hindered by fast proliferation of viable cells, therefore cycling rates are mandatory to adequate interpretation of cell death assays. Conclusions The sensitivity of purified Treg to apoptosis is dominated by cytokine deprivation and absence of cell-to-cell interactions, and deviate significantly from measurements in mixed populations. Balanced sensitivity of naïve/effector and regulatory T cells to apoptosis in NOD mice argues against the concept that differential susceptibility affects disease evolution and progression. PMID:21209873

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  18. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25866536

  19. Interaction of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes for the therapeutic effect of Dangguiliuhuang decoction to autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Cao, Hui; Ji, Yachun; Pei, Yufeng; Yu, Zhihong; Quan, Yihong; Xiang, Ming

    2015-09-11

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Dangguiliuhuang decoction (DGLHD) is an effective treatment of autoimmune diabetes. Here, we studied potential anti-diabetic mechanisms of DGLHD in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. In vitro, DGLHD and individual active ingredients enhanced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells, inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation, and suppressed dendritic cells (DCs) function. In vivo, DGLHD significantly inhibited insulitis, delayed the onset and development of diabetes, promoted insulin secretion and sensitivity, and balanced partially normalized Th1 and Th2 cytokines in NOD mice. In addition, DGLHD increased α1-antitrypsin (AAT-1), Bcl-2, and CyclinD1, and decreased Bax levels in pancreas, spleen, thymus, DCs, and a NIT-1 cell line, all consistent with protecting and repairing islet β cell. More detailed studies indicated that DGLHD regulated the maturation and function of DCs, decreased the percentage of merocytic dendritic cells (mcDCs) subset, and increased programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression in DCs. DGLHD also impeded T lymphocyte proliferation and promoted regulatory T cells (T(regs)) differentiation in vivo. A JAK2-STAT3-dependent pathway was involved in the suppression by DGLHD of interactions between DCs and T lymphocyte. The experiments implicated five active ingredients in specific anti-diabetic actions of DGLHD. The results demonstrated the reasonable composition of the formula.

  20. Interaction of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes for the therapeutic effect of Dangguiliuhuang decoction to autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Cao, Hui; Ji, Yachun; Pei, Yufeng; Yu, Zhihong; Quan, Yihong; Xiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Dangguiliuhuang decoction (DGLHD) is an effective treatment of autoimmune diabetes. Here, we studied potential anti-diabetic mechanisms of DGLHD in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. In vitro, DGLHD and individual active ingredients enhanced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells, inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation, and suppressed dendritic cells (DCs) function. In vivo, DGLHD significantly inhibited insulitis, delayed the onset and development of diabetes, promoted insulin secretion and sensitivity, and balanced partially normalized Th1 and Th2 cytokines in NOD mice. In addition, DGLHD increased α1-antitrypsin (AAT-1), Bcl-2, and CyclinD1, and decreased Bax levels in pancreas, spleen, thymus, DCs, and a NIT-1 cell line, all consistent with protecting and repairing islet β cell. More detailed studies indicated that DGLHD regulated the maturation and function of DCs, decreased the percentage of merocytic dendritic cells (mcDCs) subset, and increased programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression in DCs. DGLHD also impeded T lymphocyte proliferation and promoted regulatory T cells (Tregs) differentiation in vivo. A JAK2-STAT3-dependent pathway was involved in the suppression by DGLHD of interactions between DCs and T lymphocyte. The experiments implicated five active ingredients in specific anti-diabetic actions of DGLHD. The results demonstrated the reasonable composition of the formula. PMID:26358493

  1. Combination treatment with anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 prevents and reverses autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changyun; Ding, Heyuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2013-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, although B cells also play an important role in T1D development. Both T cell- and B cell-directed immunotherapies have shown efficacy in the prevention and reversal of T1D. However, whether the combined strategy of targeting both T and B cells could further improve therapeutic efficacy remains to be explored. We show that combined treatment with intravenous antihuman CD20 (hCD20) and oral anti-CD3 significantly delays diabetes development in prediabetic hCD20 transgenic NOD mice. More importantly, the combined treatment reverses diabetes in >60% of mice newly diagnosed with diabetes. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the addition of oral anti-CD3 to the B-cell depletion therapy synergistically enhances the suppressive function of regulatory T cells. Of note, the oral anti-CD3 treatment induced a fraction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing CD4 T cells in the small intestine through IL-10- and IL-27-producing dendritic cells. Thus, the findings demonstrate that combining anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 is superior to anti-CD20 monotherapy for restoring normoglycemia in diabetic NOD mice, providing important preclinical evidence for the optimization of B cell-directed therapy for T1D.

  2. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  3. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  4. Oxidative stress and susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition precedes the onset of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, C; La Guardia, P G; Leite, A C R; Oliveira, D N; de Lima Zollner, R L; Catharino, R R; Vercesi, A E; Oliveira, H C F

    2014-12-01

    Beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes (TID) is associated with cellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are present in T1D model (non-obese diabetic mouse, NOD) and if they are related to the stages of disease development. NOD mice were studied at three stages: non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, and diabetic and compared with age-matched Balb/c mice. Mitochondria respiration rates measured at phosphorylating and resting states in liver and soleus biopsies and in isolated liver mitochondria were similar in NOD and Balb/c mice at the three disease stages. However, NOD liver mitochondria were more susceptible to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition as determined by cyclosporine-A-sensitive swelling and by decreased calcium retention capacity in all three stages of diabetes development. Mitochondria H2O2 production rate was higher in non-diabetic, but unaltered in pre-diabetic and diabetic NOD mice. The global cell reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not specific mitochondria ROS production, was significantly increased in NOD lymphomononuclear and stem cells in all disease stages. In addition, marked elevated rates of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF) oxidation were observed in pancreatic islets from non-diabetic NOD mice. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) and lipidomic approach, we identified oxidized lipid markers in NOD liver mitochondria for each disease stage, most of them being derivatives of diacylglycerols and phospholipids. These results suggest that the cellular oxidative stress precedes the establishment of diabetes and may be the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction that is involved in beta cell death.

  5. CD103 is dispensable for anti-viral immunity and autoimmunity in a mouse model of virally-induced autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fousteri, Georgia; Dave, Amy; Juntti, Therese; von Herrath, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a beneficial role for blocking CD103 signaling in preventing islet allograft rejection and thus Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic mice (NOD). However, antibody blockade approaches generally raise anti-microbial safety issues, necessitating additional studies to address the possible adverse effects of antibody therapy. Here we report that CD103 had no significant impact on the development of primary and memory CD8+ or CD4+ responses after acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. In addition, CD103 was found to be dispensable for T1D progression in a rapid, CD8-mediated virally-induced T1D model (the rat insulin promoter– [RIP]-LCMV), suggesting that its previous efficacy in the NOD mouse model may not be related to its effect on the generation, memory conversion and/or effector function of CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. While the data does not preclude a role for CD103 in T1D in its entirety, the current study does provide much evidence to suggest that CD103 blockade may prove to be a safe intervention for autoimmunity and allo-transplantation. While in cases of rapid microbial (CD8)-driven T1D CD103 antibody blockade may not limit disease progression or severity, in mucosally-driven cases of T1D anti-CD103 antibody treatment may provide a new and safe therapeutic avenue. PMID:19162441

  6. Implication of Cytotoxic Helicobacter pylori Infection in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Delitala, Alessandro P.; Pes, Giovanni M.; Malaty, Hoda M.; Pisanu, Gavino; Delitala, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been linked to Helicobacter pylori infection, although results are conflicting. No previous study addressed a possible link between H. pylori infection and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). In this study, a correlation among H. pylori infection and the risk of autoimmune diabetes in comparison with T2D was investigated. Methods. Sera from 234 LADA patients, 105 patients with late-onset T1D, and 156 patients with T2D were analyzed for anti-H. pylori and the cytotoxin-associated antigen (CagA) IgG antibodies. Results. H. pylori seroprevalence was comparable in LADA (52%), late-onset T1D (45%), and T2D (49%) with no gender differences. The seroprevalence of CagA IgG was significantly higher in autoimmune diabetes (late-onset T1D: 45%, LADA: 40%) compared to T2D (25%; p < 0.028). Conclusions. Although H. pylori seroprevalence was similar in LADA, T1D, and T2D, anti-CagA positivity was significantly increased among patients with autoimmune diabetes, suggesting that more virulent H. pylori strains might be a trigger for immune mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis. PMID:26824048

  7. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal.

  8. TRAIL and DR5 promote thyroid follicular cell apoptosis in iodine excess-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiujie; Li, Lanying; Li, Qingxin; Zang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Zebing

    2011-11-01

    Death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been implicated in target organ destruction in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Several apoptosis signaling pathways, such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), have been shown to be active in thyroid cells and may be involved in destructive thyroiditis. Thyroid toxicity of iodide excess has been demonstrated in animals fed with an iodide-rich diet, but its pathogenic role remains unclear. The effects of excessive iodine on TRAIL and its death receptor expression in thyroid were investigated. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was induced by excessive iodine and thyroglobulin (Tg) in non-obese diabetic mice. The expression of TRAIL and its death receptor DR5 was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Following administration of excessive iodine alone, Tg, and excessive iodine combined with Tg, TRAIL-positive cells appear not only in follicular cells but also in lymphocytes infiltrated in the thyroid, whereas DR5-positive cells appear only in follicular cells. Large numbers of CD3-positive cells and a few CD22-positive cells were detected in thyroid. A great amount of follicular cells were labeled specifically by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxynucleotide triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, our results suggest that excessive iodine could induce TRAIL and DR5 abnormal expression in thyroid. TRAIL band with DR5 to promote follicular cells apoptosis thus mediate thyroid destruction in EAT.

  9. IL-15 promotes regulatory T cell function and protects against diabetes development in NK-depleted NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jinxing; Liu, Wentao; Hu, Biliang; Tian, Zhigang; Yang, Yongguang

    2010-02-01

    IL-15, an anti-apoptotic cytokine, has been reported to promote the survival and function of NK cells and T cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we examined the effect of repeated injections of IL-15 on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. Injection of recombinant murine IL-15, once a day for 2 weeks, neither inhibited nor accelerated diabetes development in untreated NOD mice. However, treatment with IL-15 significantly reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes in NOD mice that were depleted of NK cells, while NK cell depletion alone had no protection against the disease development. The protective effect in IL-15-treated, NK cell-depleted NOD mice was associated with an increase in immunosuppressive activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. IL-15 also enhanced Foxp3 expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in an in vitro culture system, and such an effect of IL-15 was abrogated by IL-15-activated NK cells. Inhibition of IL-15-induced Foxp3 expression by IL-15-activated NK cells likely resulted from their IFN-gamma production, as recombinant IFN-gamma, or the culture supernatant of IL-15-activated wild-type mouse NK cells but not of IL-15-activated IFN-gamma-deficient NK cells, mediated a similar inhibition. IFN-gamma also diminished the stimulatory effect of IL-15 on Treg function in vitro. These results indicate that IL-15 has the potential to promote Treg function and protect against diabetes development in NOD mice, but such an activity can be eliminated by simultaneous activation of NK cells in IL-15-treated mice.

  10. Toward defining the autoimmune microbiome for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Giongo, Adriana; Gano, Kelsey A; Crabb, David B; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Novelo, Luis L; Casella, George; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Hyöty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Tuula; Simell, Olli; Neu, Josef; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A; Triplett, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have shown that gut bacteria have a role in diabetes in murine models. Specific bacteria have been correlated with the onset of diabetes in a rat model. However, it is unknown whether human intestinal microbes have a role in the development of autoimmunity that often leads to type 1 diabetes (T1D), an autoimmune disorder in which insulin-secreting pancreatic islet cells are destroyed. High-throughput, culture-independent approaches identified bacteria that correlate with the development of T1D-associated autoimmunity in young children who are at high genetic risk for this disorder. The level of bacterial diversity diminishes overtime in these autoimmune subjects relative to that of age-matched, genotype-matched, nonautoimmune individuals. A single species, Bacteroides ovatus, comprised nearly 24% of the total increase in the phylum Bacteroidetes in cases compared with controls. Conversely, another species in controls, represented by the human firmicute strain CO19, represented nearly 20% of the increase in Firmicutes compared with cases overtime. Three lines of evidence are presented that support the notion that, as healthy infants approach the toddler stage, their microbiomes become healthier and more stable, whereas, children who are destined for autoimmunity develop a microbiome that is less diverse and stable. Hence, the autoimmune microbiome for T1D may be distinctly different from that found in healthy children. These data also suggest bacterial markers for the early diagnosis of T1D. In addition, bacteria that negatively correlated with the autoimmune state may prove to be useful in the prevention of autoimmunity development in high-risk children. PMID:20613793

  11. HLA-A2–Matched Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Type 1 Diabetic Patients, but Not Nondiabetic Donors, Transfer Insulitis to NOD-scid/γcnull/HLA-A2 Transgenic Mice Concurrent With the Expansion of Islet-Specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield-Larry, Fatima; Young, Ellen F.; Talmage, Garrick; Fudge, Elizabeth; Azam, Anita; Patel, Shipra; Largay, Joseph; Byrd, Warren; Buse, John; Calikoglu, Ali S.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. NOD mice provide a useful tool for understanding disease pathogenesis and progression. Although much has been learned from studies with NOD mice, increased understanding of human type 1 diabetes can be gained by evaluating the pathogenic potential of human diabetogenic effector cells in vivo. Therefore, our objective in this study was to develop a small-animal model using human effector cells to study type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We adoptively transferred HLA-A2–matched peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from type 1 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects into transgenic NOD-scid/γcnull/HLA-A*0201 (NOD-scid/γcnull/A2) mice. At various times after adoptive transfer, we determined the ability of these mice to support the survival and proliferation of the human lymphoid cells. Human lymphocytes were isolated and assessed from the blood, spleen, pancreatic lymph node and islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice after transfer. RESULTS Human T and B cells proliferate and survive for at least 6 weeks and were recovered from the blood, spleen, draining pancreatic lymph node, and most importantly, islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice. Lymphocytes from type 1 diabetic patients preferentially infiltrate the islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice. In contrast, PBMCs from nondiabetic HLA-A2–matched donors showed significantly less islet infiltration. Moreover, in mice that received PBMCs from type 1 diabetic patients, we identified epitope-specific CD8+ T cells among the islet infiltrates. CONCLUSIONS We show that insulitis is transferred to NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice that received HLA-A2–matched PBMCs from type 1 diabetic patients. In addition, many of the infiltrating CD8+ T cells are epitope-specific and produce interferon-γ after in vitro peptide stimulation. This indicates that NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice transferred with HLA-A2

  12. Chromosome 18q deletion syndrome with autoimmune diabetes mellitus: putative genomic loci for autoimmunity and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Anna; Lipska-Zietkiewicz, Beata S; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Borowiec, Maciej; Koczkowska, Magdalena; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Drozdz, Izabela; Wyka, Krystyna; Limon, Janusz; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    A girl with 18q deletion syndrome was diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes mellitus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis at the age of 3 yr. In addition, the girl suffered from recurrent infections due to immunoglobulin A and IgG4 deficiency. She was also found to have CD3+CD4+FoxP3+, CD3+CD4+FoxP3+CD25+, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127 regulatory T cells deficiency. The exceptional coincidence of the two autoimmune disorders occurring at an early age, and associated with immune deficiency, implies that genes located on deleted 19.4 Mbp region at 18q21.32-q23 (chr18:58,660,699-78,012,870) might play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity leading to β cell destruction and diabetes.

  13. Consumption of acidic water alters the gut microbiome and decreases the risk of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle J; Daft, Joseph G; Tanner, Scott M; Hartmann, Riley; Khafipour, Ehsan; Lorenz, Robin G

    2014-04-01

    Infant formula and breastfeeding are environmental factors that influence the incidence of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) as well as the acidity of newborn diets. To determine if altering the intestinal microbiome is one mechanism through which an acidic liquid plays a role in T1D, we placed non-obese diabetic (NOD)/ShiLtJt mice on neutral (N) or acidified H2O and monitored the impact on microbial composition and diabetes incidence. NOD-N mice showed an increased development of diabetes, while exhibiting a decrease in Firmicutes and an increase in Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria from as early as 2 weeks of age. NOD-N mice had a decrease in the levels of Foxp3 expression in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells, as well as decreased CD4(+)IL17(+) cells, and a lower ratio of IL17/IFNγ CD4+ T-cells. Our data clearly indicates that a change in the acidity of liquids consumed dramatically alters the intestinal microbiome, the presence of protective Th17 and Treg cells, and the incidence of diabetes. This data suggests that early dietary manipulation of intestinal microbiota may be a novel mechanism to delay T1D onset in genetically pre-disposed individuals.

  14. IL-2 Immunotherapy Reveals Potential for Innate Beta Cell Regeneration in the Non-Obese Diabetic Mouse Model of Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Deborah; Filippi, Christophe; Londei, Marco; McNamara, Peter; Nasoff, Marc; DiDonato, Michael; Glynne, Richard; Herman, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta cells, resulting in dependence on exogenous insulin. To date, significant efforts have been invested to develop immune-modulatory therapies for T1D treatment. Previously, IL-2 immunotherapy was demonstrated to prevent and reverse T1D at onset in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, revealing potential as a therapy in early disease stage in humans. In the NOD model, IL-2 deficiency contributes to a loss of regulatory T cell function. This deficiency can be augmented with IL-2 or antibody bound to IL-2 (Ab/IL-2) therapy, resulting in regulatory T cell expansion and potentiation. However, an understanding of the mechanism by which reconstituted regulatory T cell function allows for reversal of diabetes after onset is not clearly understood. Here, we describe that Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy treatment, given at the time of diabetes onset in NOD mice, not only correlated with reversal of diabetes and expansion of Treg cells, but also demonstrated the ability to significantly increase beta cell proliferation. Proliferation appeared specific to Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy, as anti-CD3 therapy did not have a similar effect. Furthermore, to assess the effect of Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy well after the development of diabetes, we tested the effect of delaying treatment for 4 weeks after diabetes onset, when beta cells were virtually absent. At this late stage after diabetes onset, Ab/IL-2 treatment was not sufficient to reverse hyperglycemia. However, it did promote survival in the absence of exogenous insulin. Proliferation of beta cells could not account for this improvement as few beta cells remained. Rather, abnormal insulin and glucagon dual-expressing cells were the only insulin-expressing cells observed in islets from mice with established disease. Thus, these data suggest that in diabetic NOD mice, beta cells have an innate capacity for regeneration both early and late in disease, which is revealed

  15. Autoimmune endocrinopathy associated with diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, G. L.; O'Brien, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    A case is described in which diabetes insipidus was associated with hypopituitarism, insulin-independent diabetes mellitus, pernicious anaemia and circulating antibodies to the thyroid gland, adrenal gland and the pancreatic islet cells. PMID:7100039

  16. Protection against Autoimmune Diabetes by Silkworm-Produced GFP-Tagged CTB-Insulin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiaohong; Wang, Wenfeng; Shi, Xiaowen; Jin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2011-01-01

    In animals, oral administration of the cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit conjugated to the autoantigen insulin enhances the specific immune-unresponsive state. This is called oral tolerance and is capable of suppressing autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the process by which the CTB-insulin (CTB-INS) protein works as a therapy for T1D in vivo remains unclear. Here, we successfully expressed a green fluorescent protein- (GFP-) tagged CTB-Ins (CTB-Ins-GFP) fusion protein in silkworms in a pentameric form that retained the native ability to activate the mechanism. Oral administration of the CTB-Ins-GFP protein induced special tolerance, delayed the development of diabetic symptoms, and suppressed T1D onset in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Moreover, it increased the numbers of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells in peripheral lymph tissues and affected the biological activity of spleen cells. This study demonstrated that the CTB-Ins-GFP protein produced in silkworms acted as an oral protein vaccine, inducing immunological tolerance involving CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in treating T1D. PMID:21765853

  17. Reversal of autoimmune diabetes by restoration of antigen-specific tolerance using genetically modified Lactococcus lactis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Van Belle, Tom L.; Robert, Sofie; Grieco, Fabio A.; Caluwaerts, Silvia; Galleri, Letizia; Spagnuolo, Isabella; Steidler, Lothar; Van Huynegem, Karolien; Demetter, Pieter; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A.; Dotta, Francesco; Rottiers, Pieter; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Current interventions for arresting autoimmune diabetes have yet to strike the balance between sufficient efficacy, minimal side effects, and lack of generalized immunosuppression. Introduction of antigen via the gut represents an appealing method for induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we developed a strategy for tolerance restoration using mucosal delivery in mice of biologically contained Lactococcus lactis genetically modified to secrete the whole proinsulin autoantigen along with the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. We show that combination therapy with low-dose systemic anti-CD3 stably reverted diabetes in NOD mice and increased frequencies of local Tregs, which not only accumulated in the pancreatic islets, but also suppressed immune response in an autoantigen-specific way. Cured mice remained responsive to disease-unrelated antigens, which argues against excessive immunosuppression. Application of this therapeutic tool achieved gut mucosal delivery of a diabetes-relevant autoantigen and a biologically active immunomodulatory cytokine, IL-10, and, when combined with a low dose of systemic anti-CD3, was well tolerated and induced autoantigen-specific long-term tolerance, allowing reversal of established autoimmune diabetes. Therefore, we believe this method could be an effective treatment strategy for type 1 diabetes in humans. PMID:22484814

  18. Reversal of autoimmune diabetes by restoration of antigen-specific tolerance using genetically modified Lactococcus lactis in mice.

    PubMed

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Van Belle, Tom L; Robert, Sofie; Grieco, Fabio A; Caluwaerts, Silvia; Galleri, Letizia; Spagnuolo, Isabella; Steidler, Lothar; Van Huynegem, Karolien; Demetter, Pieter; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A; Dotta, Francesco; Rottiers, Pieter; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2012-05-01

    Current interventions for arresting autoimmune diabetes have yet to strike the balance between sufficient efficacy, minimal side effects, and lack of generalized immunosuppression. Introduction of antigen via the gut represents an appealing method for induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we developed a strategy for tolerance restoration using mucosal delivery in mice of biologically contained Lactococcus lactis genetically modified to secrete the whole proinsulin autoantigen along with the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. We show that combination therapy with low-dose systemic anti-CD3 stably reverted diabetes in NOD mice and increased frequencies of local Tregs, which not only accumulated in the pancreatic islets, but also suppressed immune response in an autoantigen-specific way. Cured mice remained responsive to disease-unrelated antigens, which argues against excessive immunosuppression. Application of this therapeutic tool achieved gut mucosal delivery of a diabetes-relevant autoantigen and a biologically active immunomodulatory cytokine, IL-10, and, when combined with a low dose of systemic anti-CD3, was well tolerated and induced autoantigen-specific long-term tolerance, allowing reversal of established autoimmune diabetes. Therefore, we believe this method could be an effective treatment strategy for type 1 diabetes in humans.

  19. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Krych, Ł; Nielsen, D S; Hansen, A K; Hansen, C H F

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulated imbalances in the host's immune profile seem to be an important factor in the etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D), and identifying bacterial markers for T1D may therefore be useful in diagnosis and prevention of T1D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the link between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations measured in diabetic and non-diabetic mice at 30 weeks of age. The early gut microbiota composition was found to be different between NOD mice that later in life were classified as diabetic or non-diabetic. Those differences were further associated with changes in FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IFN-γ production. The model proposed in this work suggests that operational taxonomic units classified to S24-7, Prevotella, and an unknown Bacteriodales (all Bacteroidetes) act in favor of diabetes protection whereas members of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcus, and Oscillospira (all Firmicutes) promote pathogenesis.

  20. Type 1A diabetes mellitus-associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Edwin; Eisenbarth, George S

    2002-06-01

    Type 1A diabetes mellitus has become one of the most intensively studied autoimmune disorders, with characterized animal models and extensive prospective studies of the development of anti-islet autoimmunity. It is now possible to predict the development of type 1A diabetes mellitus, beginning with HLA-encoded genetic susceptibility, followed by the development of a series of anti-islet autoantibodies. Prediction primarily is based on the detection of multiple anti-islet autoantibodies reacting with cloned islet antigens. Multiple international workshops fostered the development of specific and sensitive radioassays for autoantibodies reacting with GAD65 (glutamic acid decarboxylase), ICA512 (also termed IA-2, a tyrosine phosphatase-like protein), and insulin. Similar high throughput radioassays have been applied using autoantigens for additional autoimmune disorders including celiac disease and Addison's disease. Relatives of patients with type 1A diabetes mellitus inherit susceptibility to express multiple autoantibodies, and a subset of autoantibody-positive individuals inherit susceptibility to progress to overt disease. This article reviews autoimmune disorders associated with type 1A diabetes mellitus.

  1. Enhanced responsiveness to T-cell help causes loss of B-lymphocyte tolerance to a β-cell neo-self-antigen in type 1 diabetes prone NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Selwyn Lewis; Stolp, Jessica; Hallahan, Nicole L; Counotte, Jacqueline; Zhang, Wenyu; Serreze, David V; Basten, Antony; Silveira, Pablo A

    2010-12-01

    Self-reactive B lymphocytes contribute to type 1 diabetes pathogenesis as APC and auto-Ab producers in NOD mice and humans. To shed light on the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown in B-lymphocyte self-tolerance to β-cell Ag, we utilised a model whereby hen-egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific Ig Tg (IgHEL-Tg)-Tg B lymphocytes were allowed to develop in or were transferred into mice expressing the HEL Tg under an insulin promoter (insHEL-Tg). IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes enhanced type 1 diabetes susceptibility of insHEL-Tg NOD mice. A comparison of the tolerogenic activity of IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes with NOD and non-autoimmune-prone C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds showed that both were rendered anergic in the presence of insHEL when competing with polyclonal B lymphocytes. Nevertheless, NOD IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes transferred into insHEL-Tg mice were more readily susceptible to rescue from anergy than their C57BL/6 counterparts, following provision of in vivo T-cell help. The different tolerogenic outcomes were an intrinsic property of B lymphocytes rather than being related to the quality of T-cell help, with the defective response being at least partially controlled by genes mapping to insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) susceptibility loci on Chromosome 1 (Idd5) and 4 (Idd9/11). Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Targeting ABL-IRE1α Signaling Spares ER-Stressed Pancreatic β Cells to Reverse Autoimmune Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shuhei; Villalta, S Armando; Feldman, Hannah C; Register, Ames C; Rosenthal, Wendy; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg T; Mehdizadeh, Morvarid; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Wang, Likun; Colon-Negron, Kevin; Meza-Acevedo, Rosa; Backes, Bradley J; Maly, Dustin J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Papa, Feroz R

    2017-04-04

    In cells experiencing unrelieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the ER transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease (RNase)-IRE1α-endonucleolytically degrades ER-localized mRNAs to promote apoptosis. Here we find that the ABL family of tyrosine kinases rheostatically enhances IRE1α's enzymatic activities, thereby potentiating ER stress-induced apoptosis. During ER stress, cytosolic ABL kinases localize to the ER membrane, where they bind, scaffold, and hyperactivate IRE1α's RNase. Imatinib-an anti-cancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor-antagonizes the ABL-IRE1α interaction, blunts IRE1α RNase hyperactivity, reduces pancreatic β cell apoptosis, and reverses type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. A mono-selective kinase inhibitor that allosterically attenuates IRE1α's RNase-KIRA8-also efficaciously reverses established diabetes in NOD mice by sparing β cells and preserving their physiological function. Our data support a model wherein ER-stressed β cells contribute to their own demise during T1D pathogenesis and implicate the ABL-IRE1α axis as a drug target for the treatment of an autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oligofructose as an adjunct in treatment of diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clement; Hyslop, Colin M.; Shrivastava, Vipul; Ochoa, Andrea; Reimer, Raylene A.; Huang, Carol

    2016-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, restoration of normoglycemia can be achieved if the autoimmune attack on beta cells ceases and insulin requirement is met by the residual beta cells. We hypothesize that an adjunctive therapy that reduces insulin demand by increasing insulin sensitivity will improve the efficacy of an immunotherapy in reversing diabetes. We tested the gut microbiota-modulating prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), as the adjunctive therapy. We treated non-obese diabetic mice with an immunotherapy, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (aCD3), with or without concurrent dietary supplement of OFS. After 8 weeks of OFS supplement, the group that received both aCD3 and OFS (aCD3 + OFS) had a higher diabetes remission rate than the group that received aCD3 alone. The aCD3 + OFS group had higher insulin sensitivity accompanied by reduced lymphocytic infiltrate into the pancreatic islets, higher beta-cell proliferation rate, higher pancreatic insulin content, and secreted more insulin in response to glucose. The addition of OFS also caused a change in gut microbiota, with a higher level of Bifidobacterium and lower Clostridium leptum. Hence, our results suggest that OFS can potentially be an effective therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of type 1 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, leading to improved glycemic control. PMID:27874076

  4. Oligofructose as an adjunct in treatment of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Clement; Hyslop, Colin M; Shrivastava, Vipul; Ochoa, Andrea; Reimer, Raylene A; Huang, Carol

    2016-11-22

    In type 1 diabetes, restoration of normoglycemia can be achieved if the autoimmune attack on beta cells ceases and insulin requirement is met by the residual beta cells. We hypothesize that an adjunctive therapy that reduces insulin demand by increasing insulin sensitivity will improve the efficacy of an immunotherapy in reversing diabetes. We tested the gut microbiota-modulating prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), as the adjunctive therapy. We treated non-obese diabetic mice with an immunotherapy, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (aCD3), with or without concurrent dietary supplement of OFS. After 8 weeks of OFS supplement, the group that received both aCD3 and OFS (aCD3 + OFS) had a higher diabetes remission rate than the group that received aCD3 alone. The aCD3 + OFS group had higher insulin sensitivity accompanied by reduced lymphocytic infiltrate into the pancreatic islets, higher beta-cell proliferation rate, higher pancreatic insulin content, and secreted more insulin in response to glucose. The addition of OFS also caused a change in gut microbiota, with a higher level of Bifidobacterium and lower Clostridium leptum. Hence, our results suggest that OFS can potentially be an effective therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of type 1 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, leading to improved glycemic control.

  5. Reversible lacrimal gland-protective regulatory T-cell dysfunction underlies male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the non-obese diabetic mouse model of Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Scott M; Kreiger, Portia A; Koretzky, Gary A

    2015-06-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are required to maintain immunological tolerance; however, defects in specific organ-protective Treg cell functions have not been demonstrated in organ-specific autoimmunity. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice spontaneously develop lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity and are a well-characterized model of Sjögren syndrome. Lacrimal gland disease in NOD mice is male-specific, but the role of Treg cells in this sex-specificity is not known. This study aimed to determine if male-specific autoimmune dacryoadenitis in the NOD mouse model of Sjögren syndrome is the result of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cell dysfunction. An adoptive transfer model of Sjögren syndrome was developed by transferring cells from the lacrimal gland-draining cervical lymph nodes of NOD mice to lymphocyte-deficient NOD-SCID mice. Transfer of bulk cervical lymph node cells modelled the male-specific dacryoadenitis that spontaneously develops in NOD mice. Female to female transfers resulted in dacryoadenitis if the CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg-enriched population was depleted before transfer; however, male to male transfers resulted in comparable dacryoadenitis regardless of the presence or absence of Treg cells within the donor cell population. Hormone manipulation studies suggested that this Treg cell dysfunction was mediated at least in part by androgens. Surprisingly, male Treg cells were capable of preventing the transfer of dacryoadenitis to female recipients. These data suggest that male-specific factors promote reversible dysfunction of lacrimal gland-protective Treg cells and, to our knowledge, form the first evidence for reversible organ-protective Treg cell dysfunction in organ-specific autoimmunity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    exhibit pancreatic infiltrates indicative of a diabetic process (data not shown), we crossed DR4/164β mice onto our diabetes- prone RIP-B7/DR4 mice and...cell islet infiltrate that correlated with a loss of islet insulin and pancreatic function (3) and IL-10 has an immune regulatory role (4), this...and pancreatic function measured by a glucose tolerance test (3). We observed that the absence of an infiltrate in 164/Rag2+/+ mice was also

  7. Autoimmune diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis (latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult): definition, characterization, and potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, P; Di Mario, U

    2001-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune-mediated destruction of islet insulin-secreting beta-cells. This chronic destructive process is associated with both cellular and humoral immune changes in the peripheral blood that can be detected months or even years before the onset of clinical diabetes. Throughout this prediabetic period, metabolic changes, including altered glucose tolerance and reduced insulin secretion, deteriorate at variable rates and eventually result in clinical diabetes. A fraction of individuals with humoral immunological changes have clinical diabetes that initially is not insulin-requiring. The onset of diabetes in these patients is usually in adult life, and because their diabetes is at least initially not insulin-requiring, they appear clinically to be affected by type 2 diabetes. Such patients probably have the same disease process as patients with type 1 diabetes in that they have similar HLA genetic susceptibility as well as autoantibodies to islet antigens, low insulin secretion, and a higher rate of progression to insulin dependency. These patients are defined as being affected by an autoimmune type of diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis, which is also named latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). Special attention should be paid to diagnose such patients because therapy may influence the speed of progression toward insulin dependency, and in this respect, efforts should be made to protect residual C-peptide secretion. LADA can serve as a model for designing new strategies for prevention of type 1 diabetes but also as a target group for prevention in its own right.

  8. Comprehensive Survey of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveals That Ccr7 and Cd247 (CD3 zeta) are Posttranscriptionally Controlled in Pancreas Infiltrating T Lymphocytes of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Claudia; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T.; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Passos, Geraldo A.

    2015-01-01

    In autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), auto-reactive clones of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the periphery evolve into pancreas-infiltrating T lymphocytes (PILs), which destroy insulin-producing beta-cells through inflammatory insulitis. Previously, we demonstrated that, during the development of T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a set of immune/inflammatory reactivity genes were differentially expressed in T lymphocytes. However, the posttranscriptional control involving miRNA interactions that occur during the evolution of thymocytes into PILs remains unknown. In this study, we postulated that miRNAs are differentially expressed during this period and that these miRNAs can interact with mRNAs involved in auto-reactivity during the progression of insulitis. To test this hypothesis, we used NOD mice to perform, for the first time, a comprehensive survey of miRNA and mRNA expression as thymocytes mature into peripheral CD3+ T lymphocytes and, subsequently, into PILs. Reconstruction of miRNA-mRNA interaction networks for target prediction revealed the participation of a large set of miRNAs that regulate mRNA targets related to apoptosis, cell adhesion, cellular regulation, cellular component organization, cellular processes, development and the immune system, among others. The interactions between miR-202-3p and the Ccr7 chemokine receptor mRNA or Cd247 (Cd3 zeta chain) mRNA found in PILs are highlighted because these interactions can contribute to a better understanding of how the lack of immune homeostasis and the emergence of autoimmunity (e.g., T1D) can be associated with the decreased activity of Ccr7 or Cd247, as previously observed in NOD mice. We demonstrate that these mRNAs are controlled at the posttranscriptional level in PILs. PMID:26606254

  9. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  10. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune polyglandular syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, A; Eenkhoorn, V; Van Gaal, L; De Block, C

    2009-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells and is characterised by the presence of insulitis and &and beta-cell autoantibodies. Up to one third of patients develop an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Fifteen to 30% of T1DM subjects have autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's or Graves' disease), 5 to 10% are diagnosed with autoimmune gastritis and/or pernicious anaemia (AIG /PA), 4 to 9% present with coeliac disease (CD), 0.5% have Addison's disease (AD), and 2 to 10% show vitiligo. These diseases are characterised by the presence of autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (for Hashimoto's thyroiditis), TSH receptor (for Graves' disease), parietal cell or intrinsic factor (for AIG /PA), tissue transglutaminase (for CD), and 21-hydroxylase (for AD). Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Hashimoto's hypothyroidism may cause weight gain, hyperlipidaemia, goitre, and may affect diabetes control, menses, and pregnancy outcome. In contrast, Graves' hyperthyroidism may induce weight loss, atrial fibrillation, heat intolerance, and ophthalmopathy. Autoimmune gastritis may manifest via iron deficiency or vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia with fatigue and painful neuropathy. Clinical features of coeliac disease include abdominal discomfort, growth abnormalities, infertility, low bone mineralisation, and iron deficiency anaemia. Adrenal insufficiency may cause vomiting, anorexia, hypoglycaemia, malaise, fatigue, muscular weakness, hyperkalaemia, hypotension, and generalised hyperpigmentation. Here we will review prevalence, pathogenetic factors, clinical features, and suggestions for screening, follow-up and treatment of patients with T1DM and/or autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

  11. Intradermal alpha1-antitrypsin therapy avoids fatal anaphylaxis, prevents type 1 diabetes and reverses hyperglycaemia in the NOD mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Lu, Y; Li, H; Campbell-Thompson, M; Parker, M; Wasserfall, C; Haller, M; Brantly, M; Schatz, D; Atkinson, M; Song, S

    2010-10-01

    Human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene therapy prevents type 1 diabetes in a NOD mouse model of diabetes. However, repeated i.p. injections of hAAT into NOD mice leads to fatal anaphylaxis. The aim of the study was to determine if an alternative route of administration avoids anaphylaxis and allows evaluation of hAAT's potential for diabetes prevention and reversal. We also sought to determine if the addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), augments hAAT's capacity to prevent or reverse disease in the NOD mice. To evaluate hAAT pharmacokinetics, serum hAAT levels were monitored in NOD mice receiving a single dose (2 mg) of hAAT by i.p., s.c. or i.d. injection. For studies of type 1 diabetes prevention and reversal, mice received i.d. hAAT (2 mg/mouse/3 days) for 8 or 10 weeks or hAAT and G-CSF (i.p., 6 microg/day) for 6 weeks. Blood glucose determinations, glucose tolerance testing and insulin tolerance tests were performed. Both i.p. and s.c. injections resulted in fatal anaphylaxis. The i.d. injection avoided anaphylaxis and i.d. injection of hAAT into 11-week-old NOD mice prevented disease (p = 0.005, AAT vs PBS at 40 weeks of age). Treatment of diabetic NOD mice with hAAT or hAAT plus G-CSF provided long-term (at least 100 days) reversal of diabetes in 50% of treated animals. G-CSF did not enhance the reversal rates of hAAT. Glucose tolerance and insulin levels were normalised in mice with hAAT prevention and reversal. Intradermal hAAT prevents and reverses disease in a NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes without inducing anaphylaxis.

  12. Antibiotics in Early Life Alter the Gut Microbiome and Increase Disease Incidence in a Spontaneous Mouse Model of Autoimmune Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Cindy; Valette, Fabrice; Foray, Anne-Perrine; Pelletier, Benjamin; Milani, Cristian; Ventura, Marco; Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes is a prototypic autoimmune disease whose incidence steadily increased over the past decades in industrialized countries. Recent evidence suggests the importance of the gut microbiota to explain this trend. Here, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune type 1 diabetes were treated with different antibiotics to explore the influence of a targeted intestinal dysbiosis in the progression of the disease. A mixture of wide spectrum antibiotics (i.e. streptomycin, colistin and ampicillin) or vancomycin alone were administered orally from the moment of conception, treating breeding pairs, and during the postnatal and adult life until the end of follow-up at 40 weeks. Diabetes incidence significantly and similarly increased in male mice following treatment with these two antibiotic regimens. In NOD females a slight yet not significant trend towards an increase in disease incidence was observed. Changes in gut microbiota composition were assessed by sequencing the V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Administration of the antibiotic mixture resulted in near complete ablation of the gut microbiota. Vancomycin treatment led to increased Escherichia, Lactobacillus and Sutterella genera and decreased members of the Clostridiales order and Lachnospiraceae, Prevotellaceae and Rikenellaceae families, as compared to control mice. Massive elimination of IL-17-producing cells, both CD4+TCRαβ+ and TCRγδ+ T cells was observed in the lamina propria of the ileum and the colon of vancomycin-treated mice. These results show that a directed even partial ablation of the gut microbiota, as induced by vancomycin, significantly increases type 1 diabetes incidence in male NOD mice thus prompting for caution in the use of antibiotics in pregnant women and newborns. PMID:25970503

  13. Antibiotics in early life alter the gut microbiome and increase disease incidence in a spontaneous mouse model of autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Candon, Sophie; Perez-Arroyo, Alicia; Marquet, Cindy; Valette, Fabrice; Foray, Anne-Perrine; Pelletier, Benjamin; Milani, Christian; Milani, Cristian; Ventura, Marco; Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes is a prototypic autoimmune disease whose incidence steadily increased over the past decades in industrialized countries. Recent evidence suggests the importance of the gut microbiota to explain this trend. Here, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune type 1 diabetes were treated with different antibiotics to explore the influence of a targeted intestinal dysbiosis in the progression of the disease. A mixture of wide spectrum antibiotics (i.e. streptomycin, colistin and ampicillin) or vancomycin alone were administered orally from the moment of conception, treating breeding pairs, and during the postnatal and adult life until the end of follow-up at 40 weeks. Diabetes incidence significantly and similarly increased in male mice following treatment with these two antibiotic regimens. In NOD females a slight yet not significant trend towards an increase in disease incidence was observed. Changes in gut microbiota composition were assessed by sequencing the V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Administration of the antibiotic mixture resulted in near complete ablation of the gut microbiota. Vancomycin treatment led to increased Escherichia, Lactobacillus and Sutterella genera and decreased members of the Clostridiales order and Lachnospiraceae, Prevotellaceae and Rikenellaceae families, as compared to control mice. Massive elimination of IL-17-producing cells, both CD4+TCRαβ+ and TCRγδ+ T cells was observed in the lamina propria of the ileum and the colon of vancomycin-treated mice. These results show that a directed even partial ablation of the gut microbiota, as induced by vancomycin, significantly increases type 1 diabetes incidence in male NOD mice thus prompting for caution in the use of antibiotics in pregnant women and newborns.

  14. MCS-18, a novel natural plant product prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Seifarth, Christian; Littmann, Leonie; Resheq, Yazid; Rössner, Susanne; Goldwich, Andreas; Pangratz, Nadine; Kerek, Franz; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2011-09-30

    There is still a vital need for new therapies in order to prevent or treat type I diabetes. In this respect, we report that MCS-18 a novel natural product isolated from the plant Helleborus purpurascens (i.e. Christmas rose) is able to increase diabetes free survival using the NOD-mouse model, which is accompanied with a diminished IFN-γ secretion of splenocytes. In the animal group which has been treated with MCS-18 during week 8 and week 12 of age 70% of the animals showed a diabetes free survival at week 30, whereas in contrast in the untreated animals less than 10% were free of diabetes. MCS-18 treatment significantly reduced islet T-cell infiltrates as well as the rate of T-cell proliferation. Periinsular infiltrates in the MCS-18 treated animals showed a significantly enhanced number of Foxp3(+) CD25(+) T cells, indicating the increased presence of regulatory T cells. These studies show that MCS-18 exerts an efficient immunosuppressive activity with remarkable potential for the therapy of diseases characterized by pathological over-activation of the immune system.

  15. Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Molly M; Frederiksen, Brittni; Seifert, Jennifer A; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2015-09-01

    Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes. Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity. In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25-2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk. Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

  16. Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Molly M.; Frederiksen, Brittni; Seifert, Jennifer A.; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes. Methods Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity. Results In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07–2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25–2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk. Conclusions/interpretation Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes. PMID:26048237

  17. Strategies for the prevention of autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Todd, J A; Knip, M; Mathieu, C

    2011-10-01

    European experts on autoimmune Type 1 diabetes met for 2 days in October 2010 in Cambridge, to review the state-of-the-art and to discuss strategies for prevention of Type 1 diabetes (http://www-gene.cimr.cam.ac.uk/todd/sub_pages/T1D_prevention_Cambridge_workshop_20_21Oct2010.pdf). Meeting sessions examined the epidemiology of Type 1 diabetes; possible underlying causes of the continuing and rapid increase in Type 1 diabetes incidence at younger ages; and lessons learned from previous prevention trials. Consensus recommendations from the meeting were: 1. Resources such as national diabetes registries and natural history studies play an essential role in developing and refining assays to be used in screening for risk factors for Type 1 diabetes. 2. It is crucial to dissect out the earliest physiological events after birth, which are controlled by the susceptibility genes now identified in Type 1 diabetes, and the environmental factors that might affect these phenotypes, in order to bring forward a mechanistic approach to designing future prevention trials. 3. Current interventions at later stages of disease, such as in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, have relied mainly on non-antigen-specific mechanisms. For primary prevention-preventing the onset of autoimmunity-interventions must be based on knowledge of the actual disease process such that: participants in a trial would be stratified according the disease-associated molecular phenotypes; the autoantigen(s) and immune responses to them; and the manipulation of the environment, as early as possible in life. Combinations of interventions should be considered as they may allow targeting different components of disease, thus lowering side effects while increasing efficacy.

  18. Alcohol facilitates CD1d loading, subsequent activation of NKT cells, and reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Jensen, Karen; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; de Ruiter, Lilian F; Krohn, Thomas C; Hufeldt, Majbritt R; Vogensen, Finn K; Aasted, Bent; Osterbye, Thomas; Roep, Bart O; de Haar, Colin; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E

    2011-04-01

    Ethanol ('alcohol') is a partly hydrophobic detergent that may affect the accessibility of glycolipids thereby influencing immunological effects of these molecules. The study included cellular in vitro tests using α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), and in vivo NOD mice experiments detecting diabetes incidence and performing behavioural and bacterial analyses. Alcohol in concentrations from 0.6% to 2.5% increased IL-2 production from NKT cells stimulated with αGalCer by 60% (p<0.05). CD1d expressed on HeLa cells contained significantly increasing amounts of αGalCer with increasing concentrations of alcohol, suggesting that alcohol facilitated the passive loading of αGalCer to CD1d. NOD mice were found to tolerate 5% ethanol in their drinking water without signs of impairment in liver function. Giving this treatment, the diabetes incidence declined significantly. Higher numbers of CD3+CD49b+ NKT cells were found in spleen and liver of the alcohol treated compared to the control mice (p<0.05), whereas the amount of CD4+Foxp3+ regulator T cells did not differ. Increased concentrations of IFN-γ were detected in 24-hour blood samples of alcohol treated mice. Behavioural studies showed no change in attitude of the ethanol-consuming mice, and bacterial composition of caecum samples was not affected by alcohol, disqualifying these as protective mechanisms. Alcohol facilitates the uptake of glycolipids and the stimulation of NKT cells, which are known to counteract Type 1 diabetes development. We propose that this is the acting mechanism by which treatment with alcohol reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice. This is corroborated by epidemiology showing beneficial effect of alcohol to reduce the severity of atherosclerosis and related diseases.

  19. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-07

    complexes in the thymus. As T cell CD4 avidity interaction with the 2 domain of the MHC class II has been shown to contribute positively to thymic T...mice (DR4) were generated as previously de- scribed [ 2 ]. These C57BL/6 I-Abo/o mice express a human- mouse chimeric class II molecule in which the TcR...transgenic for the type 1 diabetes- associated human MHC class II allele, DRB1*0401. J Clin Invest 1996;98:2597e603. [9] Kim J, Richter W, Aanstoot HJ

  20. Thymic development of autoreactive T cells in NOD mice is regulated in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuming; Morillon, Y Maurice; Spidale, Nicholas A; Kroger, Charles J; Liu, Bo; Sartor, R Balfour; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2013-12-15

    Inefficient thymic negative selection of self-specific T cells is associated with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. The factors that influence the efficacy of thymic negative selection, as well as the kinetics of thymic output of autoreactive T cells remain ill-defined. We investigated thymic production of β cell-specific T cells using a thymus-transplantation model. Thymi from different aged NOD mice, representing distinct stages of type 1 diabetes, were implanted into NOD.scid recipients, and the diabetogenicity of the resulting T cell pool was examined. Strikingly, the development of diabetes-inducing β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was regulated in an age-dependent manner. NOD.scid recipients of newborn NOD thymi developed diabetes. However, recipients of thymi from 7- and 10-d-old NOD donor mice remained diabetes-free and exhibited a progressive decline in islet infiltration and β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. A similar temporal decrease in autoimmune infiltration was detected in some, but not all, tissues of recipient mice implanted with thymi from NOD mice lacking expression of the autoimmune regulator transcription factor, which develop multiorgan T cell-mediated autoimmunity. In contrast, recipients of 10 d or older thymi lacked diabetogenic T cells but developed severe colitis marked by increased effector T cells reactive to intestinal microbiota. These results demonstrate that thymic development of autoreactive T cells is limited to a narrow time window and occurs in a reciprocal manner compared with colonic microbiota-responsive T cells in NOD mice.

  1. [Type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmune diseases: screening, diagnostic principles and management].

    PubMed

    Witek, Przemysław R; Witek, Joanna; Pańkowska, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is often associated with autoimmune diseases such as: autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), celiac disease (CD), autoimmune gastritis (AIG), pernicious anemia (PA) and vitiligo. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent endocrinopathy among diabetic patients. Hypothyroidism, celiac disease or Addison's disease in patients with type 1 diabetes may deteriorate glycemic control and can lead to an increased rate of hypoglycemia. Autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia and celiac disease can cause malabsorption and anemia which additionally impair the quality of life in patients with T1DM. The presence of organ-specific autoantibodies can be used to screen patients who are at higher risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Such procedure can help to identify patients, who need to undergo treatment in order to decrease the rate of possible complications in the future. In this clinical review we present current opinions in terms of diagnosis, management and screening in the most common type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmune diseases.

  2. Autoimmune diabetes recurrence should be routinely monitored after pancreas transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Martins, La Salete

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes recurrence in pancreas grafts was first described 30 years ago, but it is not yet completely understood. In fact, the number of transplants affected and possibly lost due to this disease may be falsely low. There may be insufficient awareness to this entity by clinicians, leading to underdiagnosis. Some authors estimate that half of the immunological losses in pancreas transplantation are due to autoimmunity. Pancreas biopsy is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis. However, as an invasive procedure, it is not the ideal approach to screen the disease. Pancreatic autoantibodies which may be detected early before graft dysfunction, when searched for, are probably the best initial tool to establish the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to revisit the autoimmune aspects of type 1 diabetes and to analyse data about the identified autoantibodies, as serological markers of the disease. Therapeutic strategies used to control the disease, though with unsatisfactory results, are also addressed. In addition, the author’s own experience with the prospective monitoring of pancreatic autoantibodies after transplantation and its correlation with graft outcome will be discussed. PMID:25346891

  3. Is autoimmune thyroid dysfunction a risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Pascual Corrales, Eider; Andrada, Patricia; Aubá, María; Ruiz Zambrana, Alvaro; Guillén Grima, Francisco; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Galofré, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Some recent studies have related autoimmune thyroid dysfunction and gestational diabetes (GD). The common factor for both conditions could be the existence of pro-inflammatory homeostasis. The study objective was therefore to assess whether the presence of antithyroid antibodies is related to the occurrence of GD. Fifty-six pregnant women with serum TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL during the first trimester were retrospectively studied. Antithyroid antibodies were measured, and an O'Sullivan test was performed. GD was diagnosed based on the criteria of the Spanish Group on Diabetes and Pregnancy. Positive antithyroid antibodies were found in 21 (37.50%) women. GD was diagnosed in 15 patients, 6 of whom (10.71%) had positive antibodies, while 9 (16.07%) had negative antibodies. Data were analyzed using exact logistic regression by LogXact-8 Cytel; no statistically significant differences were found between GD patients with positive and negative autoimmunity (OR = 1.15 [95%CI = 0.28-4.51]; P=1.00). The presence of thyroid autoimmunity in women with TSH above the recommended values at the beginning of pregnancy is not associated to development of GD. However, GD prevalence was higher in these patients as compared to the Spanish general population, suggesting the need for closer monitoring in pregnant women with TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel CD93 polymorphism in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and NZB/W F1 mice is linked to a CD4+ iNKT cell deficient state.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Ghazal; Mozaffari, Raha; Arias, Vanessa J; Rostami, Susan Y; Badkerhanian, Armen; Tenner, Andrea J; Nichols, Kim E; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, we characterize a polymorphism in the CD93 molecule, originally identified as the receptor for the C1q complement component (i.e., C1qRp, or AA4.1) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. This allele carries a coding polymorphism in the first epidermal growth factor-like domain of CD93, which results in an amino acid substitution from Asn-->His at position 264. This polymorphism does not appear to influence protein translation or ecto-domain cleavage, as CD93 is detectable in bone-marrow-derived macrophage and B-cell precursor lysates and in soluble form in the serum. The NOD CD93 isoform causes a phenotypic aberrancy in the early B-cell developmental stages (i.e., pro-, pre-, immature, and transitional), likely related to a conformational variation. Interestingly, the NZB/W F1 strain, which serves as a murine model of Lupus, also expresses an identical CD93 sequence polymorphism. Cd93 is located within the NOD Idd13 locus and is also tightly linked to the NZB/W F1 Wbw1 and Nkt2 disease susceptibility loci, which are thought to regulate natural killer T (NKT) cell homeostasis. Consistent with this genetic linkage, we found B6 CD93(-/-) and B6.NOD(Idd13) mice to be susceptible to a profound CD4(+) NKT cell deficient state. These data suggest that Cd93 may be an autoimmune susceptibility gene residing within the Idd13 locus, which plays a role in regulating absolute numbers of CD4(+) NKT cells.

  5. Beyond HLA-A*0201: New HLA-transgenic NOD Mouse Models of Type 1 Diabetes Identify the Insulin C-peptide As a Rich Source of CD8+ T Cell Epitopes1

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Zoltan; Baker, Jason C.; Smith, Carla; Jarchum, Irene; Babad, Jeffrey; Mukherjee, Gayatri; Yang, Yang; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Santamaria, Pere; DiLorenzo, Teresa P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell responses to beta cell antigens, including insulin. Investigations employing the NOD mouse model of the disease have revealed an essential role for beta cell-specific CD8+ T cells in the pathogenic process. As CD8+ T cells specific for beta cell antigens are also present in patients, these reactivities have the potential to serve as therapeutic targets or markers for autoimmune activity. NOD mice transgenic for human class I MHC molecules have previously been employed to identify T cell epitopes having important relevance to the human disease. However, most studies have focused exclusively on HLA-A*0201. To broaden the reach of epitope-based monitoring and therapeutic strategies, we have looked beyond this allele and developed NOD mice expressing human β2-microglobulin and HLA-A*1101 or HLA-B*0702, which are representative members of the A3 and B7 HLA supertypes, respectively. We have used islet-infiltrating T cells spontaneously arising in these strains to identify beta cell peptides recognized in the context of the transgenic HLA molecules. This work has identified the insulin C-peptide as an abundant source of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Responses to these epitopes should be of considerable utility for immune monitoring, as they cannot reflect an immune reaction to exogenously administered insulin, which lacks the C-peptide. Because the peptides bound by one supertype member were found to bind certain other members also, the epitopes identified here have the potential to result in therapeutic and monitoring tools applicable to large numbers of patients and at-risk individuals. PMID:22539795

  6. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haurogné, Karine; Pavlovic, Marija; Rogniaux, Hélène; Bach, Jean-Marie; Lieubeau, Blandine

    2015-01-01

    In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:26230114

  7. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  8. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elso et al.

  9. Evaluation of impaired beta-cell function in nonobese-diabetic (NOD) mouse model using bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Sever, Dror; Eldor, Roy; Sadoun, Gadi; Amior, Livnat; Dubois, Daniele; Boitard, Christian; Aflalo, Claude; Melloul, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β cells are functionally impaired or destroyed in diabetes mellitus. The onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) represents the culmination of a prolonged prediabetic phase of immune-mediated β-cell destruction. To assess the in vivo metabolic status of these cells, we used the ATP-sensitive firefly luciferase bioluminescence imaging approach, as a noninvasive probe to monitor pathological alterations in β-cell function in the nonobese-diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D. Hence, we generated the ToIβ-NOD transgenic mice in which doxycycline-inducible luciferase gene is selectively expressed in β cells. A sharp reduction in bioluminescence emitted in vivo from β cells at the early stages, preceded by several weeks of a limited reduction in β-cell mass. Since this decline could be due to the ongoing inflammatory process occurring in vivo, we exposed control islets to inflammatory cytokines and observed a dramatic decrease in luciferase luminescence, which appears to be due in part to a decrease in protein levels and a drop in intracellular ATP levels. This is the first evidence that selective expression of the luciferase gene represents a sensitive method for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of early β-cell dysfunction, subtle metabolic changes, such as endogenous ATP levels, indicative of a pathological condition in a tissue at the cellular level.

  10. Growth hormone prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ricardo; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Juarranz, Yasmina; Gomariz, Rosa P; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mellado, Mario

    2013-11-26

    Evidence supports a relationship between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems. Data from mice that overexpress or are deficient in growth hormone (GH) indicate that GH stimulates T and B-cell proliferation and Ig synthesis, and enhances maturation of myeloid progenitor cells. The effect of GH on autoimmune pathologies has nonetheless been little studied. Using a murine model of type 1 diabetes, a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of pancreatic islets and destruction of insulin-producing β-cells, we observed that sustained GH expression reduced prodromal disease symptoms and eliminated progression to overt diabetes. The effect involves several GH-mediated mechanisms; GH altered the cytokine environment, triggered anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) polarization, maintained activity of the suppressor T-cell population, and limited Th17 cell plasticity. In addition, GH reduced apoptosis and/or increased the proliferative rate of β-cells. These results support a role for GH in immune response regulation and identify a unique target for therapeutic intervention in type 1 diabetes.

  11. Growth hormone prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ricardo; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Juarranz, Yasmina; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mellado, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports a relationship between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems. Data from mice that overexpress or are deficient in growth hormone (GH) indicate that GH stimulates T and B-cell proliferation and Ig synthesis, and enhances maturation of myeloid progenitor cells. The effect of GH on autoimmune pathologies has nonetheless been little studied. Using a murine model of type 1 diabetes, a T-cell–mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of pancreatic islets and destruction of insulin-producing β-cells, we observed that sustained GH expression reduced prodromal disease symptoms and eliminated progression to overt diabetes. The effect involves several GH-mediated mechanisms; GH altered the cytokine environment, triggered anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) polarization, maintained activity of the suppressor T-cell population, and limited Th17 cell plasticity. In addition, GH reduced apoptosis and/or increased the proliferative rate of β-cells. These results support a role for GH in immune response regulation and identify a unique target for therapeutic intervention in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24218587

  12. Structure modeling and antidiabetic activity of a seed protein of Momordica charantia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Gagan; Dixit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a well known medicinal plant used in the traditional medicinal system for the treatment of various diseases including diabetes mellitus. Recently, a novel protein termed as ADMc1 from the seed extract of M. charantia has been identified and isolated showing significant antihyperglycemic activity in type 1 diabetic rats in which diabetes was induced. However, the structure of this protein has not yet been analyzed. Homology modeling approach was used to generate a high quality protein 3D structure for the amino acid sequence of the ADMc1 protein in this study. The comparative assessment of secondary structures revealed ADMc1 as an all-alpha helix protein with random coils. Tertiary structure predicted on the template structure of Napin of B. Napus (PDB ID: 1SM7) with which the ADMc1 showed significant sequence similarity, was validated using protein structure validation tools like PROCHECK, WHAT_CHECK, VERIFY3D and ProSA. Arrangement of disulfide bridges formed by cysteine residues were predicted by the Dianna 1.1 server. The presence of multiple disulfide bond confers the stable nature of the ADMc1 protein. Further, the biological activity of the ADMc1 was assessed in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice which are spontaneous model of type 1 diabetes. Significant reduction in the blood glucose levels of NOD mice was observed up to 8 h post administration of the rADMc1 protein. Overall, the structural characterizations with antihyperglycemic activity of this seed protein of Momordica charantia demonstrate its potential as an antidiabetic agent.

  13. B Lymphocyte “Original Sin” in the Bone Marrow Enhances Islet Autoreactivity in Type 1 Diabetes-Prone NOD mice1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Bonami, Rachel A.; Williams, Jonathan M.; Rachakonda, Amita B.; Karamali, Mariam; Kendall, Peggy L.; Thomas, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Effective central tolerance is required to control the large extent of autoreactivity normally present in the developing B cell repertoire. Insulin-reactive B cells are required for T1D in the NOD mouse, as engineered mice lacking this population are protected from disease. The VH125Tg model is used to define this population, which is found with increased frequency in the periphery of NOD vs. non-autoimmune C57BL/6 VH125Tg mice, but the ontogeny of this disparity is unknown. To better understand the origins of these pernicious B cells, anti-insulin B cells were tracked during development in the polyclonal repertoire of VH125Tg mice. An increased proportion of insulin-binding B cells is apparent in NOD mice at the earliest point of antigen commitment in the bone marrow. Two predominant light chains were identified in B cells that bind heterologous insulin. Interestingly, Vκ4-57-1 polymorphisms that confer a CDR3 Pro-Pro motif enhance self-reactivity in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Despite binding circulating autoantigen in vivo, anti-insulin B cells transition from the parenchyma to the sinusoids in the bone marrow of NOD mice and enter the periphery unimpeded. Anti-insulin B cells expand at the site of autoimmune attack in the pancreas and correlate with increased numbers of IFN-γ producing cells in the repertoire. These data identify failure to cull autoreactive B cells in the bone marrow as the primary source of anti-insulin B cells in NOD mice, and suggest that dysregulation of central tolerance permits escape into the periphery to promote disease. PMID:23677466

  14. Bridging Mice to Men: Using HLA Transgenic Mice to Enhance the Future Prediction and Prevention of Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Serreze, David V; Niens, Marijke; Kulik, John; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the vast majority of cases in humans, the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the NOD mouse model is due to T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β cells. Particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (designated HLA in humans; and H2 in mice) provide the primary genetic risk factor for T1D development. It has long been appreciated that within the MHC, particular unusual class II genes contribute to the development of T1D in both humans and NOD mice by allowing for the development and functional activation of β cell autoreactive CD4 T cells. However, studies in NOD mice have revealed that through interactions with other background susceptibility genes, the quite common class I variants (K(d), D(b)) characterizing this strain's H2 (g7) MHC haplotype aberrantly acquire an ability to support the development of β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell responses also essential to T1D development. Similarly, recent studies indicate that in the proper genetic context some quite common HLA class I variants also aberrantly contribute to T1D development in humans. This review focuses on how "humanized" HLA transgenic NOD mice can be created and used to identify class I dependent β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell populations of clinical relevance to T1D development. There is also discussion on how HLA transgenic NOD mice can be used to develop protocols that may ultimately be useful for the prevention of T1D in humans by attenuating autoreactive CD8 T cell responses against pancreatic β cells.

  15. A maternal gluten-free diet reduces inflammation and diabetes incidence in the offspring of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Krych, Lukasz; Buschard, Karsten; Metzdorff, Stine B; Nellemann, Christine; Hansen, Lars H; Nielsen, Dennis S; Frøkiær, Hanne; Skov, Søren; Hansen, Axel K

    2014-08-01

    Early-life interventions in the intestinal environment have previously been shown to influence diabetes incidence. We therefore hypothesized that a gluten-free (GF) diet, known to decrease the incidence of type 1 diabetes, would protect against the development of diabetes when fed only during the pregnancy and lactation period. Pregnant nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were fed a GF or standard diet until all pups were weaned to a standard diet. The early-life GF environment dramatically decreased the incidence of diabetes and insulitis. Gut microbiota analysis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a pronounced difference between both mothers and their offspring on different diets, characterized by increased numbers of Akkermansia, Proteobacteria, and TM7 in the GF diet group. In addition, pancreatic forkhead box P3 regulatory T cells were increased in GF-fed offspring, as were M2 macrophage gene markers and tight junction-related genes in the gut, while intestinal gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines was reduced. An increased proportion of T cells in the pancreas expressing the mucosal integrin α4β7 suggests that the mechanism involves increased trafficking of gut-primed immune cells to the pancreas. In conclusion, a GF diet during fetal and early postnatal life reduces the incidence of diabetes. The mechanism may involve changes in gut microbiota and shifts to a less proinflammatory immunological milieu in the gut and pancreas.

  16. Celiac disease associated antibodies in persons with latent autoimmune diabetes of adult and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J C; Cruz, Julio Cesar Sánchez; Cabrera-Rode, E; Rode, Eduardo Cabrera; Sorell, L; Gómez, Luis Sorell; Galvan, J A; Cabrera, José A Galvan; Hernandez, A; Ortega, Ania Hernandez; Molina, G; Mato, Gisela Molina; Perich, P A; Amador, Pedro A Perich; Licea, M E; Puig, Manuel E Licea; Domínguez, E; Alonso, Emma Domínguez; Díaz-Horta, O; Díaz-Horta, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is present in 1-16.4% of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The most important serological markers of CD are anti-endomysial (EMA), anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) and antigliadin antibodies (AGA). The objective of this work is to determine the frequency of tTGA and/or AGA in latent autoimmune diabetes of adult (LADA) and subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), as well as to evaluate their relation with several clinical and biochemical characteristics. Forty three subjects with LADA and 99 with T2DM were studied. The presence of AGA, tTGA was determined in the sera of these patients. The variables: sex, age, duration of diabetes, treatment, body mass index (BMI) and fasting blood glucose concentration were also recorded. No differences were found in the frequency of celiac disease associated antibodies between LADA and T2DM subjects. The presence of celiac disease related antibodies was more frequent in patients with a normal or low BMI. Celiac disease does not seem to be related with pancreatic autoimmunity in type 2 diabetes. Celiac disease causes a decrease of body mass index in type 2 diabetes while pancreatic islet autoimmunity in this entity masks this effect.

  17. [Genetic and molecular background in autoimmune diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kantárová, D; Prídavková, D; Ságová, I; Vrlík, M; Mikler, J; Buc, M

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1 DM) is caused by autoimmune-mediated and idiopathic beta-cell destruction of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans resulting in absolute insulin deficiency. Susceptibility to T1 DM is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. It is generally believed that in genetically susceptible individuals, the disease is triggered by environmental agents, such as viral infections, dietary factors in early infancy, or climatic influences. Many candidate genes for diabetes have been reported; those within the Major Histocompatibility Complex being among the most important. The most common autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insuloma-associated antigen 2, and zinc transporter ZnT8. The destruction of beta-cells is mediated mainly by cellular mechanisms; antibodies only seem to reflect the ongoing autoimmune processes and are not directly involved in the tissue damage. They, however, appear prior to the onset of insulin deficiency which makes them suitable for use in the prevention of the disease.

  18. Prevention of spontaneous and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with oral 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), a component of caramel colouring III.

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, T E; Koulmanda, M; Mackay, I R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of THI, a compound present in ammonia caramel food colouring, was studied in spontaneous and induced murine diabetes mellitus. Continuous administration of THI at 400 ppm in drinking water reduced the prevalence of spontaneous diabetes in female NOD/Lt mice from 63% in untreated controls to 8% in treated animals. Since cyclophosphamide (CP) accelerates and intensifies diabetes in NOD mice, we also studied the effect of THI in this model. Diabetes incidence was reduced from 100% in mice given only CP to 13-14% in mice given THI either concurrently or from 14 days previously. Histologically, THI greatly reduced the severity of insulitis. As measured by flow cytometry, all THI-treated mice had a 60-80% reduction in splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. THI-treated mice showed no untoward effects and specifically no weight loss, or pathological changes in their livers, kidneys or lungs. However, there was moderate atrophy of the thymus cortex. THI is a small imidazole-containing compound with structural similarity to histamine and urocanic acid, both known to have immunosuppressive properties. It is a widely used food additive with no known long-term toxic effects at low dosage. Thus, THI could be a useful immunosuppressive agent. PMID:1606724

  19. Evaluation of antidiabetic activity of polysaccharide isolated from Phellinus linteus in non-obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Jee Youn; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Hyung Sook; Lee, Young June; Yun, Jieun; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PLP) isolated from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by enhancing immune functions of macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells. Here, we report that PLP can inhibit the development of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although 80% of the NOD mice had developed diabetes by 24 weeks of age, none of the PLP-treated NOD mice developed diabetes. The mean blood glucose levels were 110mg/dl in PLP-treated mice and 499mg/dl in control NOD mice. Histological examination of the pancreatic islets revealed that most of the islets isolated from PLP-treated mice were less infiltrated with lymphocytes compared with those of control mice. Spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice could adaptively transfer diabetes into NOD/SCID mice, but those from PLP-treated NOD mice showed delayed transfer of diabetes. PLP inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha by Th1 cells and macrophages, but up-regulated IL-4 expression by Th2 cells in NOD mice. PLP did not prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetic development in ICR mice. Taken together, these results suggest that PLP inhibits the development of autoimmune diabetes by regulating cytokine expression.

  20. Strial microvascular pathology and age-associated endocochlear potential decline in NOD congenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Rice, Mary E. Rybak; Gagnon, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    NOD/ShiLtJ (previously NOD/LtJ) inbred mice show polygenic autoimmune disease and are commonly used to model autoimmune-related Type I diabetes, as well as Sjogren’s syndrome. They also show rapidly progressing hearing loss, partly due to the combined effects of Cdh23ahl and Ahl2. Congenic NOD.NON-H2nb1/LtJ mice, which carry corrective alleles within the H2 histocompatibility gene complex, are free from diabetes and other overt signs of autoimmune disease, but still exhibit rapidly progressive hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear pathology in these congenics broadly includes hair cell and neuronal loss, plus endocochlear potential (EP) decline from initially normal values after 2 months of age. The EP reduction follows often dramatic degeneration of capillaries in stria vascularis, with resulting strial degeneration. The cochlear modiolus in the congenic mice also features perivascular inclusions that resemble those in some mouse autoimmune models. We posit that cochlear hair cell/neural and strial pathology in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice arise independently. While sensory cell loss may be closely tied to Cdh23ahl and Ahl2, the strial microvascular pathology and modiolar anomalies we observe may arise from alleles on the NOD background related to immune function. Age-associated EP decline in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice may model forms of strial age-related hearing loss caused principally by microvascular disease. The remarkable strial capillary loss in these mice may also be useful for studying the relation between strial vascular insufficiency and strial function. PMID:18727954

  1. Preimplantation factor (PIF) analog prevents type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) development by preserving pancreatic function in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lola; Bernstein, Steve; Jones, Richard; Amunugama, Ravi; Krizman, David; Jebailey, Lellean; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Hazan, Osnat; Yekhtin, Zhanna; Yachtin, Janna; Shiner, Reut; Reibstein, Israel; Triche, Elizabeth; Slavin, Shimon; Or, Reuven; Barnea, Eytan R

    2011-08-01

    Preimplantation factor (PIF) is a novel embryo-secreted immunomodulatory peptide. Its synthetic analog (sPIF) modulates maternal immunity without suppression. There is an urgent need to develop agents that could prevent the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM). Herein, we examine sPIF's preventive effect on TIDM development by using acute adoptive-transfer (ATDM) and spontaneously developing (SDM) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) murine models. Diabetes was evaluated by urinary and plasma glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), pancreatic islets insulin staining by immunohistochemistry and by pancreatic proteome evaluation using mass spectrometry, followed by signal pathway analysis. Continuous administration of sPIF for 4-weeks prevents diabetes development in ATDM model in >90% of recipients demonstrated by normal IPGTT, preserved islets architecture, number, and insulin staining. (P < 0.01). sPIF effect was specific; its protective effects are not replicated by scrambled PIF (χ(2) = 0.009) control. sPIF led also to increased circulating Th2 and Th1 cytokines. In SDM model, 4-week continuous sPIF administration prevented onset of diabetes for 21 weeks post-therapy (P < 0.01). Low-dose sPIF administration for 16 weeks prevented diabetes development up to 14 weeks post-therapy, evidenced by preserved islets architecture and insulin staining. In SDM model, pancreatic proteome pathway analysis demonstrated that sPIF regulates protein traffic, prevents protein misfolding and aggregation, and reduces oxidative stress and islets apoptosis, leading to preserved insulin staining. sPIF further increased insulin receptor expression and reduced actin and tubulin proteins, thereby blocking neutrophil invasion and inflammation. Exocrine pancreatic function was also preserved. sPIF administration results in marked prevention of spontaneous and induced adoptive-transfer diabetes suggesting its potential effectiveness in treating early-stage TIDM.

  2. Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes: current knowledge and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Raffaella; Zampetti, Simona; Maddaloni, Ernesto

    2017-09-08

    Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a reduced genetic load, a less intensive autoimmune process and a mild metabolic decompensation at onset compared with young-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The majority of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes do not require insulin treatment for at least 6 months after diagnosis. Such patients are defined as having latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), which is distinct from classic adult-onset T1DM. The extensive heterogeneity of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is apparent beyond the distinction between classic adult-onset T1DM and LADA. LADA is characterized by genetic, phenotypic and humoral heterogeneity, encompassing different degrees of insulin resistance and autoimmunity; this heterogeneity is probably a result of different pathological mechanisms, which have implications for treatment. The existence of heterogeneous phenotypes in LADA makes it difficult to establish an a priori treatment algorithm, and therefore, a personalized medicine approach is required. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding and gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology and clinical features of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and highlight the similarities and differences with classic T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Patients with chronic pancreatitis have islet progenitor cells in their ducts, but reversal of overt diabetes in NOD mice by anti-CD3 shows no evidence for islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jenny M; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Bland, Chris; Foulis, Alan K; Cooke, Anne

    2007-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to T-cell coreceptors have been shown to tolerise autoreactive T-cells and prevent or even reverse autoimmune pathology. In type 1 diabetes, there is a loss of insulin-secreting beta-cells, and a cure for type 1 diabetes would require not only tolerance induction but also recovery of the functional beta-cell mass. Although we have previously shown that diabetic mice have increased numbers of ductal progenitors in the pancreas, there is no evidence of any increase of insulin-secreting cells in the ducts. In contrast, in the adult human pancreas of patients with chronic pancreatitis, we can demonstrate, in the ducts, increased numbers of insulin-containing cells, as well as cells containing other endocrine and exocrine markers. There are also significantly increased numbers of cells expressing the homeodomain protein, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1. Anti-CD3 has been shown to reverse overt diabetes in NOD mice; thus, we have used this model to ask whether monoclonal antibody-mediated inhibition of ongoing beta-cell destruction enables islet regeneration to occur. We find no evidence that such monoclonal antibody therapy results in either regeneration of insulin-secreting beta-cells or of increased proliferation of islet beta-cells.

  4. Immunological biomarkers: Catalysts for translational advances in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S T; Akirav, E; Bradshaw, E; Buckner, J; McKinney, E; Quintana, F J; Waldron-Lynch, F; Nepom, J

    2013-01-01

    In a recent workshop organized by the JDRF focused on the ‘Identification and Utilization of Robust Biomarkers in Type1 Diabetes’, leaders in the field of type 1 diabetes (T1D)/autoimmunity and assay technology came together from academia, government and industry to assess the current state of the field, evaluate available resources/technologies and identify gaps that need to be filled for moving the field of T1D research forward. The highlights of this workshop are discussed in this paper, as well as the proposal for a larger, planned consortium effort, incorporating a JDRF Biomarker Core, to foster collaboration and accelerate progress in this critically needed area of T1D research. PMID:23574315

  5. Reversal of type 1 diabetes by a new MHC II-peptide chimera: "Single-epitope-mediated suppression" to stabilize a polyclonal autoimmune T-cell process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Marvin; Stoica-Nazarov, Cristina; Surls, Jacqueline; Kehl, Margaret; Bona, Constantin; Olsen, Cara; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Casares, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    Polyclonality of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells is the hallmark of several autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. We have previously reported that a soluble dimeric MHC II-peptide chimera prevents and reverses type 1 diabetes induced by a monoclonal diabetogenic T-cell population in double Tg mice [Casares, S. et al., Nat. Immunol. 2002. 3: 383-391]. Since most of the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)-specific CD4(+) T cells in the NOD mouse are tolerogenic but unable to function in an autoimmune environment, we have activated a silent, monoclonal T-regulatory cell population (GAD65(217-230)-specific CD4(+) T cells) using a soluble I-A(αβ) (g7)/GAD65(217-230)/Fcγ2a dimer, and measured the effect on the ongoing polyclonal diabetogenic T-cell process. Activated GAD65(217-230)-specific T cells and a fraction of the diabetogenic (B(9-23)-specific) T cells were polarized toward the IL-10-secreting T-regulatory type 1-like function in the pancreas of diabetic NOD mice. More importantly, this led to the reversal of hyperglycemia for more than 2 months post-therapy in 80% of mice in the context of stabilization of pancreatic insulitis and improved insulin secretion by the β cells. These findings argue for the stabilization of a polyclonal self-reactive T-cell process by a single epitope-mediated bystander suppression. Dimeric MHC class II-peptide chimeras-like approach may provide rational grounds for the development of more efficient antigen-specific therapies in type 1 diabetes.

  6. A Microsphere-Based Vaccine Prevents and Reverses New-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Brett; Nylander, Karen; Harnaha, Jo; Machen, Jennifer; Lakomy, Robert; Styche, Alexis; Gillis, Kimberly; Brown, Larry; Gallo, Michael; Knox, Janet; Hogeland, Kenneth; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was aimed at ascertaining the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-formulated microspheres to prevent type 1 diabetes and to reverse new-onset disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Microspheres carrying antisense oligonucleotides to CD40, CD80, and CD86 were delivered into NOD mice. Glycemia was monitored to determine disease prevention and reversal. In recipients that remained and/or became diabetes free, spleen and lymph node T-cells were enriched to determine the prevalence of Foxp3+ putative regulatory T-cells (Treg cells). Splenocytes from diabetes-free microsphere-treated recipients were adoptively cotransferred with splenocytes from diabetic NOD mice into NOD-scid recipients. Live animal in vivo imaging measured the microsphere accumulation pattern. To rule out nonspecific systemic immunosuppression, splenocytes from successfully treated recipients were pulsed with β-cell antigen or ovalbumin or cocultured with allogeneic splenocytes. RESULTS The microspheres prevented type 1 diabetes and, most importantly, exhibited a capacity to reverse clinical hyperglycemia, suggesting reversal of new-onset disease. The microspheres augmented Foxp3+ Treg cells and induced hyporesponsiveness to NOD-derived pancreatic β-cell antigen, without compromising global immune responses to alloantigens and nominal antigens. T-cells from successfully treated mice suppressed adoptive transfer of disease by diabetogenic splenocytes into secondary immunodeficient recipients. Finally, microspheres accumulated within the pancreas and the spleen after either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injection. Dendritic cells from spleen of the microsphere-treated mice exhibit decreased cell surface CD40, CD80, and CD86. CONCLUSIONS This novel microsphere formulation represents the first diabetes-suppressive and reversing nucleic acid vaccine that confers an immunoregulatory phenotype to endogenous dendritic cells. PMID:18316361

  7. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages in pregnant NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Hernández, Ana; Leirós, Claudia Pérez

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity is a feature of celiac disease (CD) with tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as a major autoantigen. A correlation between gynecological-obstetric disorders in CD patients and the presence of circulating antibodies anti-tTG that inhibited tTG activity was reported. Serum anti-tTG antibodies were detected in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and Sjögren's syndrome, two comorbid states with CD. Since pregnancy complications have been described in NOD mice, we evaluated the ability of anti-tTG antibodies to affect the functions of tTG relevant to the normal course of an early pregnancy like extracellular matrix assembling and apoptotic cell phagocytosis by macrophages. Circulating IgG antibodies against tTG were detected in NOD mice with titers that decreased at early pregnancy; interestingly, the in vitro transamidating activity of tTG was reduced by NOD serum samples. Particularly, anti-tTG antibody inhibited apoptotic cell phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages from pregnant NOD mice that express the enzyme on surface. Evidence provided support for a role for anti-tTG antibodies through reduced transamidating activity and reduced apoptotic cell clearance by the macrophages of pregnant NOD mice.

  8. Imaging the emergence and natural progression of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, James F; Kohler, Rainer H; Hill, Jonathan A; Weissleder, Ralph; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2017-09-12

    Type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse stems from an infiltration of the pancreatic islets by a mixed population of immunocytes, which results in the impairment and eventual destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. Little is known about the dynamics of lymphocyte movement in the pancreas during disease progression. Using advanced intravital imaging approaches and newly created reporter mice (Flt3-BFP2, Mertk-GFP-DTR, Cd4-tdTomato, Cd8a-tdTomato), we show that the autoimmune process initiates first with a T cell infiltration into the islets, where they have restricted mobility but reside and are activated in apposition to CX3CR1(+) macrophages. The main expansion then occurs in the connective tissue outside the islet, which remains more or less intact. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, Tregs, and dendritic cells (DCs) are highly mobile, going along microvascular tracks, while static macrophages (MF) form a more rigid structure, often encasing the islet cell mass. Transient cell-cell interactions are formed between T cells and both MFs and DCs, but also surprisingly between MFs and DCs themselves, possibly denoting antigen transfer. In later stages, extensive islet destruction coincides with preferential antigen presentation to, and activation of, CD8(+) T cells. Throughout the process, Tregs patrol the active compartments, consistent with the notion that they control the activation of many cell types.

  9. Onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes during pregnancy: Prevalence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Hélène; Lepercq, Jacques; Timsit, José

    2010-08-01

    Although this has been recently challenged, gestational diabetes mellitus (gestational diabetes) is still defined as an "impairment of glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy". According to this definition, all pathophysiological conditions leading to beta cell deficiency may reveal as gestational diabetes, due to the physiological insulin resistance associated with pregnancy. In rare patients, gestational diabetes is associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies and with a high risk of progression to overt type 1 diabetes after delivery. This condition has often been compared to the Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults. The frequency of islet autoantibodies in gestational diabetes has been assessed in many studies, but data about the clinical presentation of this subtype and about its prognosis are few. We review these studies and discuss the links of autoimmune gestational diabetes with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) Mice Lack a Protective B-Cell Response against the “Nonlethal” Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL Malaria Protozoan

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Mirian; Qiu, Qi; Casares, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL is a nonlethal malaria strain in mice of different genetic backgrounds including the C57BL/6 mice (I-Ab/I-Enull) used in this study as a control strain. We have compared the trends of blood stage infection with the nonlethal murine strain of P. yoelii 17XNL malaria protozoan in immunocompetent Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) mice prone to type 1 diabetes (T1D) and C57BL/6 mice (control mice) that are not prone to T1D and self-cure the P. yoelii 17XNL infection. Prediabetic NOD mice could not mount a protective antibody response to the P. yoelii 17XNL-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), and they all succumbed shortly after infection. Our data suggest that the lack of anti-P. yoelii 17XNL-iRBCs protective antibodies in NOD mice is a result of parasite-induced, Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells able to suppress the parasite-specific antibody secretion. Conclusions. The NOD mouse model may help in identifying new mechanisms of B-cell evasion by malaria parasites. It may also serve as a more accurate tool for testing antimalaria therapeutics due to the lack of interference with a preexistent self-curing mechanism present in other mouse strains. PMID:28074170

  11. Erythropoietin and its Carbamylated Derivative Prevent the Development of Experimental Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in STZ-Induced Diabetic NOD-SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Green, Karen G.; Feng, Dongyan; Dorsey, Denise A.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Xiao, Qinlgi; Brines, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a significant diabetic complication resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Studies of autopsied diabetic patients and several rodent models demonstrate that the neuropathologic hallmark of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy in prevertebral ganglia is the occurrence of synaptic pathology resulting in distinctive dystrophic neurites (“neuritic dystrophy”). Our prior studies show that neuritic dystrophy is reversed by exogenous IGF-I administration without altering the metabolic severity of diabetes, i.e. functioning as a neurotrophic substance. The description of erythropoietin (EPO) synergy with IGF-I function and the recent discovery of EPO’s multifaceted neuroprotective role suggested it might substitute for IGF-I in treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Our current studies demonstrate EPO receptor (EPO-R) mRNA in a cDNA set prepared from NGF-maintained rat sympathetic neuron cultures which decreased with NGF deprivation, a result which demonstrates clearly that sympathetic neurons express EPO-R, a result confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Treatment of STZ-diabetic NOD-SCID mice have demonstrated a dramatic preventative effect of EPO and carbamylated EPO (CEPO, which is neuroprotective but not hematopoietic) on the development of neuritic dystrophy. Neither EPO nor CEPO had a demonstrable effect on the metabolic severity of diabetes. Our results coupled with reported salutary effects of EPO on postural hypotension in a few clinical studies of EPO-treated anemic diabetic and non-diabetic patients may reflect a primary neurotrophic effect of EPO on the sympathetic autonomic nervous system, rather than a primary hematopoietic effect. These findings may represent a major clinical advance since EPO has been widely and safely used in anemic patients due to a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:17967455

  12. Obesity, islet cell autoimmunity, and cardiovascular risk factors in youth at onset of type 1 autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cedillo, Maribel; Libman, Ingrid M; Arena, Vincent C; Zhou, Lei; Trucco, Massimo; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Becker, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    The current increase in childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and obesity has led to two conflicting hypotheses and conflicting reports regarding the effects of overweight on initiation and spreading of islet cell autoimmunity vs earlier clinical manifestation of preexisting autoimmune β-cell damage driven by excess weight. The objective of the study was to address the question of whether the degree of β-cell autoimmunity and age are related to overweight at diabetes onset in a large cohort of T1D youth. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of youth with autoimmune T1D consecutively recruited at diabetes onset. The study was conducted at a regional academic pediatric diabetes center. Two hundred sixty-three consecutive children younger than 19 years at onset of T1D participated in the study. Relationships between body mass index and central obesity (waist circumference and waist to height ratio) and antigen spreading (islet cell autoantibody number), age, and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors examined at onset and/or 3 months after the diagnosis were measured. There were no significant associations between number of autoantibodies with measures of adiposity. Age relationships revealed that a greater proportion of those with central obesity (21%) were in the youngest age group (0-4 y) compared with those without central obesity (6%) (P = .001). PATIENTS with central obesity had increased CVD risk factors and higher onset C-peptide levels (P < .05). No evidence was found to support the concept that obesity accelerates progression of autoantibody spreading once autoimmunity, marked by standard islet cell autoantibody assays, is present. Central obesity was present in almost one-third of the subjects and was associated with early CVD risk markers already at onset.

  13. Clustering of autoimmune disease in parents of siblings from the Type 1 diabetes Warren repository.

    PubMed

    Tait, K F; Marshall, T; Berman, J; Carr-Smith, J; Rowe, B; Todd, J A; Bain, S C; Barnett, A H; Gough, S C L

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune disorders co-exist in the same individuals and in families, implying a shared aetiology. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of the common autoimmune diseases in the parents of siblings from the Type 1 diabetes Warren repository with the general population. Between 1989 and 1996, 505 British families with at least two siblings affected by Type 1 diabetes were recruited. Clinical information was collected regarding the presence of autoimmune disease in the parents and the prevalence of disease in the parents was compared with that expected in the general population. The prevalence of autoimmune disease in the parents was significantly higher in the repository compared with that expected in the general population [P-value = 1.98 x 10(-5) (female), P-value = 1.1 x 10(-8) (male)]. Type 1 diabetes was recorded in 63/1010 (6.2%) parents with a marked paternal preponderance (9.5 vs. 3%P = 0.002). Other autoimmune diseases affected 27% of parents with diabetes and 13.2% of parents without diabetes (P < 0.01). These data confirm the importance of family history as a significant risk factor for the development of Type 1 diabetes and support the hypothesis that the common autoimmune diseases share at least some aetiological mechanisms.

  14. The gene expression profile of CD11c+ CD8α- dendritic cells in the pre-diabetic pancreas of the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Wouter; Welzen-Coppens, Jojanneke M C; van Helden-Meeuwsen, Cornelia G; Gibney, Sinead M; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Versnel, Marjan A

    2014-01-01

    Two major dendritic cell (DC) subsets have been described in the pancreas of mice: The CD11c+ CD8α- DCs (strong CD4+ T cell proliferation inducers) and the CD8α+ CD103+ DCs (T cell apoptosis inducers). Here we analyzed the larger subset of CD11c+ CD8α- DCs isolated from the pancreas of pre-diabetic NOD mice for genome-wide gene expression (validated by Q-PCR) to elucidate abnormalities in underlying gene expression networks. CD11c+ CD8α- DCs were isolated from 5 week old NOD and control C57BL/6 pancreas. The steady state pancreatic NOD CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a reduced expression of several gene networks important for the prime functions of these cells, i.e. for cell renewal, immune tolerance induction, migration and for the provision of growth factors including those for beta cell regeneration. A functional in vivo BrdU incorporation test showed the reduced proliferation of steady state pancreatic DC. The reduced expression of tolerance induction genes (CD200R, CCR5 and CD24) was supported on the protein level by flow cytometry. Also previously published functional tests on maturation, immune stimulation and migration confirm the molecular deficits of NOD steady state DC. Despite these deficiencies NOD pancreas CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a hyperreactivity to LPS, which resulted in an enhanced pro-inflammatory state characterized by a gene profile of an enhanced expression of a number of classical inflammatory cytokines. The enhanced up-regulation of inflammatory genes was supported by the in vitro cytokine production profile of the DCs. In conclusion, our data show that NOD pancreatic CD11c+ CD8α- DCs show various deficiencies in steady state, while hyperreactive when encountering a danger signal such as LPS.

  15. The preferential ability of B lymphocytes to act as diabetogenic APC in NOD mice depends on expression of self-antigen-specific immunoglobulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Pablo A; Johnson, Ellis; Chapman, Harold D; Bui, Thi; Tisch, Roland M; Serreze, David V

    2002-12-01

    B lymphocytes partially contribute to autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) as a subset of APC with a preferential ability to trigger pathogenic CD4 T cells. We hypothesized that this resulted from the unique ability of B lymphocytes to take up pancreatic beta cell proteins through Ig mediated capture. T1D was significantly delayed, but not prevented, in a NOD stock in which the B lymphocyte Ig repertoire was strongly restricted because of the allelic exclusion induced by transgenic Ig molecules specific for the disease irrelevant hen egg lysozyme (HEL) protein (NOD.IgHEL mice). However, introducing the Ig(mu)null mutation to eliminate the small residual numbers of non-transgenic B lymphocytes in the NOD.IgHEL stock strongly suppressed T1D to the same low levels that characterize B lymphocyte deficient NOD.Ig(mu)null mice. In contrast to standard NOD mice, both the NOD.IgHEL.Ig(mu)null and NOD.Ig(mu)null stocks were unable to generate T cell responses against the candidate diabetes autoantigen, glutamic acid decarboxylase. These results indicate that Ig-mediated capture of beta cell autoantigens accounts for why B lymphocytes have a greater capacity than other APC subtypes to trigger diabetogenic T cells. Hence, defects in B lymphocyte, as well as T lymphocyte, tolerance induction mechanisms may contribute to T1D in NOD mice.

  16. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  17. Type I diabetes mellitus: a predictable autoimmune disease with interindividual variation in the rate of beta cell destruction.

    PubMed

    Dotta, F; Eisenbarth, G S

    1989-01-01

    A large body of data generated during the past two decades has led to the ability to predict the development of Type I diabetes in the majority of relatives of diabetics. In particular we have recently proposed a dual parameter linear model to aid in predicting the onset of diabetes [years to diabetes = 1.5 + .03(IVGTT insulin secretion) - 0.008 (concn of insulin autoantibodies)]. The concentration of insulin autoantibodies in prediabetics appears to remarkably correlate with the age at which diabetes develops and the rate at which islet cell antibody-positive individuals progress to diabetes. Children developing diabetes before Age 5 often express more than 1000 nU/ml of such antibodies with the upper limit of normal of 39 nU/ml. Each prediabetic appears to be set at a characteristic level of insulin autoantibodies which does not consistently vary prior to the development of diabetes. During the prodromal phase preceding diabetes first phase insulin secretion is progressively lost, and the combination of insulin release which appears to reflect beta cell damage and the level of insulin antibodies accounts for more than 75% of the variation in time to diabetes over a 6-year interval. A subset of NOD mice also expresses insulin autoantibodies, and in addition essentially all NOD mice, but not F1 crosses of NOD by BALB/c, have antibodies to a target antigen of a RIN islet line protein (termed "polar antibodies"). In addition patients but not NOD mice have cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies which appear to react with a glycolipid islet target antigen. In the NOD mice the inheritance of disease is multigenic with a gene on chromosome 9, linked to the T cell marker theta, determining the bulk of islet cell destruction. In crosses of NOD mice with a series of normal strains, inheritance overt diabetes is correlated with inheritance of the NOD's unique I-A beta gene, though the bulk of islet destruction and insulitis can occur independent of MHC inheritance. Until the

  18. Germline TRAV5D-4 T-cell receptor sequence targets a primary insulin peptide of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Maki; Castoe, Todd; Sosinowski, Tomasz; He, XiangLing; Johnson, Kelly; Haskins, Kathryn; Vignali, Dario A A; Gapin, Laurent; Pollock, David; Eisenbarth, George S

    2012-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that autoimmunity to insulin B chain peptide, amino acids 9-23 (insulin B:9-23), is central to development of autoimmune diabetes of the NOD mouse model. We hypothesized that enhanced susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes is the result of targeting of insulin by a T-cell receptor (TCR) sequence commonly encoded in the germline. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that a particular Vα gene TRAV5D-4 with multiple junction sequences is sufficient to induce anti-islet autoimmunity by studying retrogenic mouse lines expressing α-chains with different Vα TRAV genes. Retrogenic NOD strains expressing Vα TRAV5D-4 α-chains with many different complementarity determining region (CDR) 3 sequences, even those derived from TCRs recognizing islet-irrelevant molecules, developed anti-insulin autoimmunity. Induction of insulin autoantibodies by TRAV5D-4 α-chains was abrogated by the mutation of insulin peptide B:9-23 or that of two amino acid residues in CDR1 and 2 of the TRAV5D-4. TRAV13-1, the human ortholog of murine TRAV5D-4, was also capable of inducing in vivo anti-insulin autoimmunity when combined with different murine CDR3 sequences. Targeting primary autoantigenic peptides by simple germline-encoded TCR motifs may underlie enhanced susceptibility to the development of autoimmune diabetes.

  19. Th1-Like ICOS+ Foxp3+ Treg Cells Preferentially Express CXCR3 and Home to β-Islets during Pre-Diabetes in BDC2.5 NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Kornete, Mara; Mason, Edward S; Girouard, Julien; Lafferty, Erin I; Qureshi, Salman; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs through a breakdown of self-tolerance resulting in the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing β-islets of the pancreas. A numerical and functional waning of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, prompted by a pancreatic IL-2 deficiency, accompanies Th1 autoimmunity and T1D progression in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recently, we identified a dominant subset of intra-islet Treg cells that expresses the ICOS costimulatory receptor and promotes self-tolerance delaying the onset of T1D. ICOS co-stimulation potently enhances IL-2 induced survival and proliferation, and suppressive activity of Treg cells in situ. Here, we propose an ICOS-dependent mechanism of Treg cell homing to the β-islets during pre-diabetes in the NOD model via upregulation of the CXCR3 chemokine receptor. The islet-specific ICOS+ Treg cell subset preferentially expresses CXCR3 in the pancreatic lymph nodes (pLN) in response to Teff cell-mediated pancreatic inflammation, an expression correlating with the onset and magnitude of IFN-γ production by Teff cells in pancreatic sites. We also reveal that intra-pancreatic APC populations and insulin-producing β, but not α nor δ, islet cells secrete the CXCR3 chemokines, CXCL9, 10 and 11, and selectively promote ICOS+ CXCR3+ Treg cell chemotaxis in vitro. Strikingly, islet-derived Treg cells also produce these chemokines suggesting an auto-regulation of homing by this subset. Unlike ICOS- cells, ICOS+ Treg cells adopt a Th1-like Treg phenotype while maintaining their suppressive capacity, characterized by expression of T-bet and CXCR3 and production of IFN-γ in the draining pLNs. Finally, in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ blocked Treg cell CXCR3 upregulation evincing its role in regulating expression of this chemokine receptor by Treg cells. Thus, CXCR3-mediated trafficking of Treg cells could represent a mechanism of homeostatic immunoregulation during diabetogeneesis.

  20. Allelic variation of Ets1 does not contribute to NK and NKT cell deficiencies in type 1 diabetes susceptible NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Margaret A; Poulton, Lynn D; Fletcher, Julie M; Baxter, Alan G

    2009-01-01

    The NOD mouse is a well characterized model of type 1 diabetes that shares several of the characteristics of Ets1-deficient targeted mutant mice, viz: defects in TCR allelic exclusion, susceptibility to a lupus like disease characterized by IgM and IgG autoantibodies and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, and deficiencies of NK and NKT cells. Here, we sought evidence for allelic variation of Ets1 in mice contributing to the NK and NKT cell phenotypes of the NOD strain. ETS1 expression in NK and NKT cells was reduced in NOD mice, compared to C57BL/6 mice. Although NKT cells numbers were significantly correlated with ETS1 expression in both strains, NKT cell numbers were not linked to the Ets1 gene in a first backcross from NOD to C57BL/6 mice. These results indicate that allelic variation of Ets1 did not contribute to variation in NKT cell numbers in these mice. It remains possible that a third factor not linked to the Ets1 locus controls both ETS1 expression and subsequently NK and NKT cell phenotypes.

  1. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad; Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4{sup +} T cells and especially CD8{sup +} T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha} and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells.

  2. β-Cell-targeted blockage of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways prevents development of autoimmune diabetes and acute allogeneic islets rejection.

    PubMed

    El Khatib, M M; Sakuma, T; Tonne, J M; Mohamed, M S; Holditch, S J; Lu, B; Kudva, Y C; Ikeda, Y

    2015-05-01

    Protection of β cells from autoimmune destruction potentially cures type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). During antigen presentation, interactions between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and B7 molecules, or programmed death 1 (PD1) and its ligand PDL1, negatively regulate immune responses in a non-redundant manner. Here we employed β-cell-targeted adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-based vectors to overexpress an artificial PDL1-CTLA4Ig polyprotein or interleukin 10 (IL10). β-Cell-targeted expression of PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 preserved β-cell mass and protected NOD mice from T1D development. When NOD mice were treated with vectors at early onset of hyperglycemia, PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 alone failed to normalize the early onset of hyperglycemia. When drug-induced diabetic mice received major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allo-islets, with or without pretreatment of the PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing vector, PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing islets were protected from rejection for at least 120 days. Similarly, transplantation of PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing MHC-matched islets into mice with established T1D resulted in protection of allo-islets from acute rejection, although islet grafts were eventually rejected. Thus the present study demonstrates the potent immuno-suppressive effects of β-cell-targeted PDL1-CTLA4Ig overexpression against T1D development and allo-islet rejection. The gene-based simultaneous inhibition of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways provides a unique strategy for immunosuppression-free tissue/organ transplantation, especially in the setting of no established autoimmunity.

  3. Pancreatic insulin-producing cells differentiated from human embryonic stem cells correct hyperglycemia in SCID/NOD mice, an animal model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiu-feng; Wang, Yan-wei; Tang, Yu-xiao; Yu, Sheng-qiang; Jin, Shao-hua; Meng, Xiao-mei; Li, Hua-feng; Liu, Fu-jun; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Hai-yan; Li, Jian-yuan

    2014-01-01

    Human pancreatic islet transplantation is a prospective curative treatment for diabetes. However, the lack of donor pancreases greatly limits this approach. One approach to overcome the limited supply of donor pancreases is to generate functional islets from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), a cell line with unlimited proliferative capacity, through rapid directed differentiation. This study investigated whether pancreatic insulin-producing cells (IPCs) differentiated from hESCs could correct hyperglycemia in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, an animal model of diabetes. We generated pancreatic IPCs from two hESC lines, YT1 and YT2, using an optimized four-stage differentiation protocol in a chemically defined culture system. Then, about 5-7 × 10(6) differentiated cells were transplanted into the epididymal fat pad of SCID/NOD mice (n = 20). The control group were transplanted with undifferentiated hESCs (n = 6). Graft survival and function were assessed using immunohistochemistry, and measuring serum human C-peptide and blood glucose levels. The pancreatic IPCs were generated by the four-stage differentiation protocol using hESCs. About 17.1% of differentiated cells expressed insulin, as determined by flow cytometry. These cells secreted insulin/C-peptide following glucose stimulation, similarly to adult human islets. Most of these IPCs co-expressed mature β cell-specific markers, including human C-peptide, GLUT2, PDX1, insulin, and glucagon. After implantation into the epididymal fat pad of SCID/NOD mice, the hESC-derived pancreatic IPCs corrected hyperglycemia for ≥ 8 weeks. None of the animals transplanted with pancreatic IPCs developed tumors during the time. The mean survival of recipients was increased by implanted IPCs as compared to implanted undifferentiated hESCs (P<0.0001). The results of this study confirmed that human terminally differentiated pancreatic IPCs derived from hESCs can correct hyperglycemia in

  4. A case of autoimmune urticaria accompanying autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kasznicki, Jacek; Drzewoski, Józef

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APS III) associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria. This rare genetic disorder occurs with unknown frequency in the Polish population. It is characterised by endocrine tissue destruction resulting in the malfunction of multiple organs.Several cases of APS III associated with organ-specific autoimmune diseases such as coeliac disease, hypogonadism and myasthenia gravis, as well as organ-nonspecific or systemic autoimmune diseases such as sarcoidosis, Sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis have been described. To the best of our knowledge, we here describe the first case of APS III associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria in an adult patient.

  5. Anterior hypopituitarism is rare and autoimmune disease is common in adults with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hannon, M J; Orr, C; Moran, C; Behan, L A; Agha, A; Ball, S G; Thompson, C J

    2012-05-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, although many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data have suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood-onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone magnetic resonance imaging scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. Thirty-three percent had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not, therefore, be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Di Caro, Valentina; Phillips, Brett; Engman, Carl; Harnaha, Jo; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  7. Interventions for latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) in adults.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Mannan, Sopna; Brunt, Huw; Williams, Rhys

    2011-09-07

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly developing type 1 diabetes. To compare interventions used for LADA. Studies were obtained from searches of electronic databases, supplemented by handsearches, conference proceedings and consultation with experts. Date of last search was December 2010. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) evaluating interventions for LADA or type 2 diabetes with antibodies were included. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were summarised using meta-analysis or descriptive methods. Searches identified 13,306 citations. Fifteen publications (ten studies) were included, involving 1019 participants who were followed between three months to 10 years (1060 randomised). All studies had a high risk of bias. Sulphonylurea (SU) with insulin did not improve metabolic control significantly more than insulin alone at three months (one study, n = 15) and at 12 months (one study, n = 14) of treatment and follow-up. SU (with or without metformin) gave poorer metabolic control compared to insulin alone (mean difference in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline to end of study, for insulin compared to oral therapy: -1.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.4 to -0.1; P = 0.03, 160 participants, four studies, follow-up/duration of therapy: 12, 30, 36 and 60 months; however, heterogeneity was considerable). In addition, there was evidence that SU caused earlier insulin dependence (proportion requiring insulin at two years was 30% in the SU group compared to 5% in conventional care group (P < 0.001); patients classified as insulin dependent was 64% (SU group) and 12.5% (insulin group, P = 0.007). No intervention influenced fasting C-peptide, but insulin maintained stimulated C-peptide better than SU (one study, mean difference 7.7 ng/ml (95% CI 2.9 to 12.5)). In a five year follow-up of GAD65 (glutamic acid decarboxylase formulated with aluminium hydroxide

  8. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  9. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  10. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-11-23

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies.

  11. Do we really need to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells for attenuation of the autoimmune responses in type 1 diabetes: immunoprophylactic effects of precursors to insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Rani, Rajni

    2017-07-12

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial autoimmune disorder where pancreatic beta cells are lost before the clinical manifestations of the disease. Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or MSCs differentiated into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) have yielded limited success when used therapeutically. We have evaluated the immunoprophylactic potentials of precursors to insulin-producing cells (pIPCs) and IPCs in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice to ask a basic question: do we need to differentiate MSCs into IPCs or will pIPCs suffice to attenuate autoimmune responses in T1D? Bone marrow-derived MSCs from Balb/c mice were characterized following the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) guidelines. MSCs cultured in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages were characterized for the expression of pancreatic lineage genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of the PDX1 gene in pIPCs was assessed using Western blot and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Triple-positive MSCs were differentiated into IPCs using a three-step protocol after sorting them for cell surface markers, i.e. CD29, CD44, and SCA-1. Nonobese diabetic mice were administered pIPCs, IPCs, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the tail vein at weeks 9 or 10 and followed-up for 29-30 weeks for fasting blood glucose levels. Two consecutive blood sugar levels of more than 250 mg/dl were considered diabetic. MSCs grown in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages expressed genes of the pancreatic lineage such as PDX1, beta2, neurogenin, PAX4, Insulin, and glucagon. Furthermore, Western blot and FACS analysis for PDX-1, a transcription factor necessary for beta cell maturation, confirmed that these cells were precursors of insulin-producing cells (pIPCs). NOD mice administered with pIPCs were better protected from developing diabetes with a protective efficacy of 78.4% (p < 0.009); however, administration of IPCs gave protective efficacy of 55% at the end of

  12. Autoimmune aspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Itariu, Bianca K; Stulnig, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity is a well-known pathogenic component in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The assumption that the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) also encompasses autoimmune aspects is recognized increasingly, based on the presence of circulating autoantibodies against β cells, self-reactive T cells, but also on the glucose-lowering efficacy of some immunomodulatory therapies in T2DM. The identification of these autoantibodies in elderly patients with slowly progressive manifestation of diabetes led to the introduction of a distinct clinical entity termed latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), which combines features of both T1DM and T2DM. The autoantibody cluster differs in patients with LADA from patients with T1DM, but their presence indicates steady progression towards β-cell death and subsequent need for initiation of insulin treatment in a shorter period of time compared to autoantibody-negative T2DM patients. Autoimmune aspects in T2DM are not solely restricted to autoantibodies and thus LADA. They include the self-reactive T cells or defects in regulatory T cells (Tregs), which have been detected in autoantibody-negative T2DM patients as well. One contributor to the autoimmune activation in T2DM seems to be the chronic inflammatory state, characteristic of this disease. Upon inflammation-induced tissue destruction, cryptic 'self' antigens can trigger an autoimmune response, which in turn accelerates β-cell death. Both innate and adaptive immune system components, specifically macrophages and self-reactive T cells, contribute to an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines involved in inflammatory and autoimmune processes. However, the extent to which inflammation overlaps with autoimmunity is not known. Our review focuses on autoimmune involvement in T2DM, with an emphasis on LADA and the humoral immune response, on the involvement of chronic inflammation in autoimmunity, and specifically the role of B and T cells as links between inflammatory and

  13. Erythrocyte membrane docosapentaenoic acid levels are associated with islet autoimmunity: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jill M.; Kroehl, Miranda; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Frederiksen, Brittni N.; Seifert, Jennifer; Wong, Randall; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Rewers, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypotheses We previously reported that lower n-3 fatty acid intake and levels in erythrocyte membranes were associated with increased risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) but not progression to type 1 diabetes in children at increased risk for diabetes. We hypothesise that specific n-3 fatty acids and genetic markers contribute synergistically to this increased risk of IA in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY). Methods DAISY is following 2547 children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA, defined as being positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65, IA-2 or insulin autoantibodies on two consecutive visits. Using a case-cohort design, erythrocyte membrane fatty acids and dietary intake were measured prospectively in 58 IA-positive children and 299 IA-negative children. Results Lower membrane levels of the n-3 fatty acid, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), were predictive of IA (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.09,0.55), while alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were not, adjusting for HLA and diabetes family history. We examined whether the effect of dietary intake of the n-3 fatty acid ALA on IA risk was modified by fatty acid elongation and desaturation genes. Adjusting for HLA, diabetes family history, ethnicity, energy intake and questionnaire type, ALA intake was significantly more protective for IA in the presence of an increasing number of minor alleles at FADS1 rs174556 (pinteraction=0.017), at FADS2 rs174570 (pinteraction=0.016) and at FADS2 rs174583 (pinteraction=0.045). Conclusions/interpretation The putative protective effect of n-3 fatty acids on IA may result from a complex interaction between intake and genetically-controlled fatty acid desaturation. PMID:24240437

  14. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet beta-cell line in diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Black, Sasha P; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J; Safley, Susan A

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic beta-cell line (betaTC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of betaTC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic beta-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  15. Down syndrome presenting with multiple sclerosis, thyroid dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus. Multiple autoimmune disorders in a genetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Sayed M; Hamzehloo, Ali; Sabet, Zari

    2011-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common survivable chromosomal disorders, and is well known to be associated with multiple autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. An association of DS and other autoimmune disease has been previously reported, and we report one case of DS in coexistence with MS, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid diseases. We suggest that MS, such as other autoimmune diseases, is prevalent in DS patients.

  16. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful. Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1–13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes. PMID:28291161

  17. Targeted regulation of self-peptide presentation prevents type I diabetes in mice without disrupting general immunocompetence.

    PubMed

    Yi, Woelsung; Seth, Nilufer P; Martillotti, Tom; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2010-04-01

    Peptide loading of MHC class II (MHCII) molecules is directly catalyzed by the MHCII-like molecule HLA-DM (DM). Another MHCII-like molecule, HLA-DO (DO), associates with DM, thereby modulating DM function. The biological role of DO-mediated regulation of DM activity in vivo remains unknown; however, it has been postulated that DO expression dampens presentation of self antigens, thereby preventing inappropriate T cell activation that ultimately leads to autoimmunity. To test the idea that DO modulation of the MHCII self-peptide repertoire mediates self tolerance, we generated NOD mice that constitutively overexpressed DO in DCs (referred to herein as NOD.DO mice). NOD mice are a mouse model for type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease mediated by the destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells. Our studies showed that diabetes development was completely blocked in NOD.DO mice. Similar to NOD mice, NOD.DO animals selected a diabetogenic T cell repertoire, and the numbers and function of Tregs were normal. Indeed, immune system function in NOD.DO mice was equivalent to that in NOD mice. NOD.DO DCs, however, presented an altered MHCII-bound self-peptide repertoire, thereby preventing the activation of diabetogenic T cells and subsequent diabetes development. These studies show that DO expression can shape the overall MHCII self-peptide repertoire to promote T cell tolerance.

  18. Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndromes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Skowronek, Iwona; Michalczyk, Aneta; Piekarski, Robert; Wysocka-Łukasik, Beata; Banecka, Bożena

    2013-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome (PAS III) is composed of autoimmune thyroid diseases associated with endocrinopathy other than adrenal insufficiency. This syndrome is associated with organ-specific and organ-nonspecific or systemic autoimmune diseases. The frequency of PAS syndromes in diabetic children is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of PAS III in children with diabetes mellitus type 1. The study consisted of 461 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1(T1DM), who were 1-19 years of age. TSH, free thyroxin, TPO autoantibodies, and thyroglobulin autoantibodies were determined annually. Autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in children with positive tests for TPO Ab and Tg Ab and thyroid parenchymal hypogenicity in the ultrasound investigation. Elevated TSI antibodies were used to diagnose Graves' disease. Additionally, Anti-Endomysial Antibodies IgA class were determined every year as screening for celiac disease. During clinical control, other autoimmune diseases were diagnosed. Adrenal function was examined by the diurnal rhythm of cortisol. PAS III was diagnosed in 14.5% children: PAS IIIA (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis) was recognized in 11.1 % and PAS III C (T1DM and other autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, and JIA, psoriasis and vitiligo) in 3.5% children. PAS IIIA was more prevalent in girls than in boys - 78.4% versus 21.6% (p<0.05). PAS III was observed between 1-5 years of life in 66.6% children; the frequency decreased in consecutive years and successively increased in the adolescence period to 22.7%. PAS III occurs in 14.5% of children with DM type1 and the incidence is positively correlated with patients' age and female gender. Children with PAS III should be carefully monitored as a group at risk for the development of other autoimmune diseases.

  19. Estrogen Therapy Delays Autoimmune Diabetes and Promotes the Protective Efficiency of Natural Killer T-Cell Activation in Female Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Gourdy, Pierre; Bourgeois, Elvire A; Levescot, Anaïs; Pham, Linh; Riant, Elodie; Ahui, Marie-Louise; Damotte, Diane; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Bayard, Francis; Ohlsson, Claes; Arnal, Jean-François; Herbelin, André

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies focused on restoring immune tolerance remain the main avenue to prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). Because estrogens potentiate FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, two regulatory lymphocyte populations that are functionally deficient in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, we investigated whether estradiol (E2) therapy influences the course of T1D in this model. To this end, female NOD mice were sc implanted with E2- or placebo-delivering pellets to explore the course of spontaneous and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes. Treg-depleted and iNKT-cell-deficient (Jα18(-/-)) NOD mice were used to assess the respective involvement of these lymphocyte populations in E2 effects. Early E2 administration (from 4 wk of age) was found to preserve NOD mice from both spontaneous and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes, and a complete protection was also observed throughout treatment when E2 treatment was initiated after the onset of insulitis (from 12 wk of age). This delayed E2 treatment remained fully effective in Treg-depleted mice but failed to entirely protect Jα18(-/-) mice. Accordingly, E2 administration was shown to restore the cytokine production of iNKT cells in response to in vivo challenge with the cognate ligand α-galactosylceramide. Finally, transient E2 administration potentiated the previously described protective action of α-galactosylceramide treatment in NOD females. This study provides original evidence that E2 therapy strongly protects NOD mice from T1D and reveals the estrogen/iNKT cell axis as a new effective target to counteract diabetes onset at the stage of insulitis. Estrogen-based therapy should thus be considered for T1D prevention.

  20. Beyond the hormone: insulin as an autoimmune target in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Carel, Jean-Claude; Boitard, Christian; Mallone, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Insulin is not only the hormone produced by pancreatic β-cells but also a key target antigen of the autoimmune islet destruction leading to type 1 diabetes. Despite cultural biases between the fields of endocrinology and immunology, these two facets should not be regarded separately, but rather harmonized in a unifying picture of diabetes pathogenesis. There is increasing evidence suggesting that metabolic factors (β-cell dysfunction, insulin resistance) and immunological components (inflammation and β-cell-directed adaptive immune responses) may synergize toward islet destruction, with insulin standing at the crossroad of these pathways. This concept further calls for a revision of the classical dichotomy between type 1 and type 2 diabetes because metabolic and immune mechanisms may both contribute to different extents to the development of different forms of diabetes. After providing a background on the mechanisms of β-cell autoimmunity, we will explain the role of insulin and its precursors as target antigens expressed not only by β-cells but also in the thymus. Available knowledge on the autoimmune antibody and T-cell responses against insulin will be summarized. A unifying scheme will be proposed to show how different aspects of insulin biology may lead to β-cell destruction and may be therapeutically exploited. We will argue about possible reasons why insulin remains the mainstay of metabolic control in type 1 diabetes but has so far failed to prevent or halt β-cell autoimmunity as an immune modulatory reagent.

  1. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: definition, prevalence, beta-cell function, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Gunnar; Gottsäter, Anders; Bakhtadze, Ekaterine; Berger, Bo; Sundkvist, Göran

    2005-12-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder in which, despite the presence of islet antibodies at diagnosis of diabetes, the progression of autoimmune beta-cell failure is slow. LADA patients are therefore not insulin requiring, at least during the first 6 months after diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients with phenotypic type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age. Prospective studies of beta-cell function show that LADA patients with multiple islet antibodies develop beta-cell failure within 5 years, whereas those with only GAD antibodies (GADAs) or only islet cell antibodies (ICAs) mostly develop beta-cell failure after 5 years. Even though it may take up to 12 years until beta-cell failure occurs in some patients, impairments in the beta-cell response to intravenous glucose and glucagon can be detected at diagnosis of diabetes. Consequently, LADA is not a latent disease; therefore, autoimmune diabetes in adults with slowly progressive beta-cell failure might be a more adequate concept. In agreement with proved impaired beta-cell function at diagnosis of diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice.

  2. Production of a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit-insulin B chain peptide hybrid protein by Brevibacillus choshinensis expression system as a nasal vaccine against autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Hara-Yakoyama, Chisato; Guadiz, Abigail A E; Udaka, Shigezo; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Chatterjee, Subhendra

    2005-12-30

    Mucosally induced tolerance is an attractive strategy for preventing or reducing autoimmune diseases. Here, we produced a recombinant CTB fusion protein linked with autoantigen T cell epitope of insulin B chain peptide 9-23 (C19S) at levels up to 200 mg/L culture media in Brevibacillus choshinensis secretion-expression system. Receptor-competitive assay showed that the CTB-insulin peptide binds to GM1 receptor almost equivalent degree as the native form of CTB. Non-obese diabetes (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop an insulin-dependent diabetes were nasally immunized with CTB-insulin peptide (5 microg) for three times. The nasal treatment significantly reduced the development of insulin-dependent diabetes and peptide specific DTH responses after systemic immunization with the insulin peptide B 9-23(C19S) in CFA. Nasal administration of as high as 50 microg of the peptide alone demonstrated a similar level of the disease inhibition. In contrast, all mice given 5 microg of the insulin peptide alone or 5 microg of insulin peptide with 25 microg of the free form of CTB did not lead to the suppression of diabetes development and DTH responses. Because molecular weight of the insulin peptide is about one tenth of that of the CTB-insulin peptide, the results demonstrate that the recombinant hybrid of autoantigen and CTB increased its tolerogenic potential for nasal administration by up 100-fold on molar base of autoantigen peptide. Taken together, nasally-induced tolerance by administration of the recombinant B. choshinensis-derived hybrid protein of CTB and autoantigen T cell-epitope peptide could be useful mucosal immunetherapy for the control of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  3. Primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes – The Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes (GPPAD) perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, A.G.; Danne, T.; Dunger, D.B.; Berner, R.; Puff, R.; Kiess, W.; Agiostratidou, G.; Todd, J.A.; Bonifacio, E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Type 1 diabetes can be identified by the presence of beta-cell autoantibodies that often arise in the first few years of life. The purpose of this perspective is to present the case for primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and to provide a study design for its implementation in Europe. Methods We examined and summarized recruitment strategies, enrollment rates, and outcomes in published TRIGR, FINDIA and BABYDIET primary prevention trials, and the TEDDY intensive observational study. A proposal for a recruitment and implementation strategy to perform a phase II/III primary prevention randomized controlled trial in infants with genetic risk for developing beta-cell autoimmunity is outlined. Results Infants with a family history of type 1 diabetes (TRIGR, BABYDIET, TEDDY) and infants younger than age 3 months from the general population (FINDIA, TEDDY) were enrolled into these studies. All studies used HLA genotyping as part of their eligibility criteria. Predicted beta-cell autoimmunity risk in the eligible infants ranged from 3% (FINDIA, TEDDY general population) up to 12% (TRIGR, BABYDIET). Amongst eligible infants, participation was between 38% (TEDDY general population) and 97% (FINDIA). Outcomes, defined as multiple beta-cell autoantibodies, were consistent with predicted risks. We subsequently modeled recruitment into a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that could assess the efficacy of oral insulin treatment as adapted from the Pre-POINT pilot trial. The RCT would recruit infants with and without a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and be based on general population genetic risk testing. HLA genotyping and, for the general population, genotyping at additional type 1 diabetes susceptibility SNPs would be used to identify children with around 10% risk of beta-cell autoimmunity. The proposed RCT would have 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in multiple beta-cell autoantibodies by age 4 years at a two-tailed alpha of 0.05, and

  4. Primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes - The Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes (GPPAD) perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A G; Danne, T; Dunger, D B; Berner, R; Puff, R; Kiess, W; Agiostratidou, G; Todd, J A; Bonifacio, E

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes can be identified by the presence of beta-cell autoantibodies that often arise in the first few years of life. The purpose of this perspective is to present the case for primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and to provide a study design for its implementation in Europe. We examined and summarized recruitment strategies, enrollment rates, and outcomes in published TRIGR, FINDIA and BABYDIET primary prevention trials, and the TEDDY intensive observational study. A proposal for a recruitment and implementation strategy to perform a phase II/III primary prevention randomized controlled trial in infants with genetic risk for developing beta-cell autoimmunity is outlined. Infants with a family history of type 1 diabetes (TRIGR, BABYDIET, TEDDY) and infants younger than age 3 months from the general population (FINDIA, TEDDY) were enrolled into these studies. All studies used HLA genotyping as part of their eligibility criteria. Predicted beta-cell autoimmunity risk in the eligible infants ranged from 3% (FINDIA, TEDDY general population) up to 12% (TRIGR, BABYDIET). Amongst eligible infants, participation was between 38% (TEDDY general population) and 97% (FINDIA). Outcomes, defined as multiple beta-cell autoantibodies, were consistent with predicted risks. We subsequently modeled recruitment into a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that could assess the efficacy of oral insulin treatment as adapted from the Pre-POINT pilot trial. The RCT would recruit infants with and without a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and be based on general population genetic risk testing. HLA genotyping and, for the general population, genotyping at additional type 1 diabetes susceptibility SNPs would be used to identify children with around 10% risk of beta-cell autoimmunity. The proposed RCT would have 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in multiple beta-cell autoantibodies by age 4 years at a two-tailed alpha of 0.05, and would randomize around 1160

  5. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  6. Contrasting the Genetic Background of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Romanos, Jihane; Bakker, Sjoerd F.; Kumar, Vinod; de Haas, Esther C.; Trynka, Gosia; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Steck, Andrea; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Simsek, Suat; Rewers, Marian; Mulder, Chris J.; Liu, Ed; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CeD) cluster in families and can occur in the same individual. Genetic loci have been associated with susceptibility to both diseases. Our aim was to explore the genetic differences between individuals developing both these diseases (double autoimmunity) versus those with only one. We hypothesized that double autoimmunity individuals carry more of the genetic risk markers that are shared between the two diseases independently. SNPs were genotyped in loci associated with T1D (n = 42) and CeD (n = 28) in 543 subjects who developed double autoimmunity, 2,472 subjects with T1D only, and 2,223 CeD-only subjects. For identification of loci that were specifically associated with individuals developing double autoimmunity, two association analyses were conducted: double autoimmunity versus T1D and double autoimmunity versus CeD. HLA risk haplotypes were compared between the two groups. The CTLA4 and IL2RA loci were more strongly associated with double autoimmunity than with either T1D or CeD alone. HLA analyses indicated that the T1D high-risk genotype, DQ2.5/DQ8, provided the highest risk for developing double autoimmunity (odds ratio 5.22, P = 2.25 × 10−29). We identified a strong HLA risk genotype (DQ2.5/DQ8) predisposing to double autoimmunity, suggesting a dominant role for HLA. Non-HLA loci, CTLA4 and IL2RA, may also confer risk to double autoimmunity. Thus, CeD patients who carry the DQ2.5/DQ8 genotype may benefit from periodic screening of autoantibodies related to T1D. PMID:26405070

  7. Circadian rhythm-related genes: implication in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lebailly, B; Boitard, C; Rogner, U C

    2015-09-01

    Recent gene association and functional studies have proven the implication of several circadian rhythm-related genes in diabetes. Diabetes has been related to variation in central circadian regulation and peripheral oscillation. Different transcriptional regulators have been identified. Circadian genes are clearly implicated in metabolic pathways, pancreatic function and in type 2 diabetes. Much less evidence has been shown for the link between circadian regulation and type 1 diabetes. The hypothesis that circadian genes are involved in type 1 diabetes is reinforced by findings that the immune system undergoes circadian variation and that several autoimmune diseases are associated with circadian genes. Recent findings in the non-obese diabetic mouse model pinpoint to specific mechanisms controlling type 1 diabetes by the clock-related gene Arntl2 in the immune system.

  8. Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 and diabetes insipidus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Samborek, Malgorzata

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rarely diagnosed conditions characterized by the association of at least 2 organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Very few cases of these syndromes have been described during pregnancy. The authors report a case of a patient diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and a history of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet) syndrome in a prior pregnancy. After increasing the levothyroxine dose, she developed Addisonian crisis. Normalization of adrenal cortex function resulted in the appearance of diabetes insipidus. This report shows that pregnancy may influence the course of preexisting endocrine disorders and lead to their unmasking. Although the risk of the development of autoimmune polyglandular syndromes during pregnancy is small, they may pose a serious health problem. The possible presence of these clinical entities should be considered in every woman with 1 or more endocrine disturbances.

  9. A viral epitope that mimics a self antigen can accelerate but not initiate autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Urs; Edelmann, Kurt H.; McGavern, Dorian B.; Wolfe, Tom; Coon, Bryan; Teague, Meghann K.; Miller, Stephen D.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2004-01-01

    We document here that infection of prediabetic mice with a virus expressing an H-2Kb–restricted mimic ligand to a self epitope present on β cells accelerates the development of autoimmune diabetes. Immunization with the mimic ligand expanded autoreactive T cell populations, which was followed by their trafficking to the islets, as visualized in situ by tetramer staining. In contrast, the mimic ligand did not generate sufficient autoreactive T cells in naive mice to initiate disease. Diabetes acceleration did not occur in H-2Kb–deficient mice or in mice tolerized to the mimic ligand. Thus, arenavirus-expressed mimics of self antigens accelerate a previously established autoimmune process. Sequential heterologous viral infections might therefore act in concert to precipitate clinical autoimmune disease, even if single exposure to a viral mimic does not always cause sufficient tissue destruction. PMID:15520861

  10. Beta cell function and BMI in ethnically diverse children with newly diagnosed autoimmune type 1 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of our study was to examine the relationship between BMI and beta-cell function at diagnosis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a large group of ethnically diverse children. Cross-sectional analysis of 524 children (60.8% White, 19.5% Hispanic, 14.5% African-American, 5.2% other n...

  11. Use of Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA).

    PubMed

    Rasouli, B; Andersson, T; Carlsson, P-O; Grill, V; Groop, L; Martinell, M; Midthjell, K; Storm, P; Tuomi, T; Carlsson, S

    2017-04-01

    It has been suggested that moist snuff (snus), a smokeless tobacco product that is high in nicotine and widespread in Scandinavia, increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies are however few, contradictory and, with regard to autoimmune diabetes, lacking. Our aim was to study the association between snus use and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). Analyses were based on incident cases (Type 2 diabetes, n = 724; LADA, n = 200) and population-based controls (n = 699) from a Swedish case-control study. Additional analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the Norwegian HUNT study (n = 21 473) with 829 prevalent cases of Type 2 diabetes. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated adjusted for age, BMI family history of diabetes and smoking. Only men were included. No association between snus use and Type 2 diabetes or LADA was seen in the Swedish data. For Type 2 diabetes, the OR for > 10 box-years was 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47 to 2.11] and for LADA 1.01 (95% CI, 0.45 to 2.29). Similarly, in HUNT, the OR for Type 2 diabetes in ever-users was estimated at 0.91 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.10) and in heavy users at 0.92 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.83). The risk of Type 2 diabetes and LADA is unrelated to the use of snus, despite its high nicotine content. This opens the possibility of the increased risk of Type 2 diabetes seen in smokers may not be attributed to nicotine, but to other substances in tobacco smoke. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  12. Possible type 1 diabetes risk prediction: Using ultrasound imaging to assess pancreas inflammation in the inducible autoimmune diabetes BBDR model.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Frederick R; Hupple, Clinton; Norowski, Elaine; Walsh, Nicole C; Przewozniak, Natalia; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Van Dessel, Filia M; Jurczyk, Agata; Harlan, David M; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita; Yang, Chaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Studies of human cadaveric pancreas specimens indicate that pancreas inflammation plays an important role in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. Due to the inaccessibility of pancreas in living patients, imaging technology to visualize pancreas inflammation is much in need. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of utilizing ultrasound imaging to assess pancreas inflammation longitudinally in living rats during the progression leading to type 1 diabetes onset. The virus-inducible BBDR type 1 diabetes rat model was used to systematically investigate pancreas changes that occur prior to and during development of autoimmunity. The nearly 100% diabetes incidence upon virus induction and the highly consistent time course of this rat model make longitudinal imaging examination possible. A combination of histology, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and ultrasound imaging technology was used to identify stage-specific pancreas changes. Our histology data indicated that exocrine pancreas tissue of the diabetes-induced rats underwent dramatic changes, including blood vessel dilation and increased CD8+ cell infiltration, at a very early stage of disease initiation. Ultrasound imaging data revealed significant acute and persistent pancreas inflammation in the diabetes-induced rats. The pancreas micro-vasculature was significantly dilated one day after diabetes induction, and large blood vessel (superior mesenteric artery in this study) dilation and inflammation occurred several days later, but still prior to any observable autoimmune cell infiltration of the pancreatic islets. Our data demonstrate that ultrasound imaging technology can detect pancreas inflammation in living rats during the development of type 1 diabetes. Due to ultrasound's established use as a non-invasive diagnostic tool, it may prove useful in a clinical setting for type 1 diabetes risk prediction prior to autoimmunity and to assess the effectiveness of potential therapeutics.

  13. [Thyroid autoimmunity in type I (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Pavía Sesma, C; Valls Tolosa, C; Eighian Baho, B; Gallart Marsillas, M; Albarrán Deogracias, J M

    1989-12-01

    225 diabetic children aged 4-18 years, were screened for antithyroid antibodies. 120 of them were determined at onset of diabetes mellitus. In the remaining patients, duration of diabetes ranged from 6 months to 8 years. The overall prevalence of thyroid antibodies was 14.19% (21/148), while positive titres were found in 10.39% (8/77), at onset. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis was diagnosed in 16 patients. No growth retardation was observed. Thyroxine therapy was started in all hypothyroid cases. We conclude that antithyroid antibodies screening in well indicated in diabetic children in view of their high prevalence and strong association with chronic thyroiditis.

  14. Loss of peripheral protection in pancreatic islets by proteolysis-driven impairment of VTCN1 (B7-H4) presentation is associated with the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Radichev, Ilian A.; Maneva-Radicheva, Lilia V.; Amatya, Christina; Salehi, Maryam; Parker, Camille; Ellefson, Jacob; Burn, Paul; Savinov, Alexei Y.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific activation of T cells is an essential process in the control of effector immune responses. Defects in T cell activation, particularly in the co-stimulation step, have been associated with many autoimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Recently, we demonstrated that the phenotype of impaired negative co-stimulation, due to reduced levels of V-set domain-containing T cell activation inhibitor-1 (VTCN1) protein on antigen-presenting cells, is shared between diabetes-susceptible NOD mice and human T1D patients. Here, we show that a similar process takes place in the target organ, as both α and β cells within pancreatic islets gradually lose their VTCN1 protein during autoimmune diabetes development despite the up-regulation of the VTCN1 gene. Diminishment of functional islet cells' VTCN1 is caused by the active proteolysis by metalloproteinase NRD1 and leads to the significant induction of proliferation and cytokine production by diabetogenic T cells. Inhibition of NRD1 activity, on the other hand, stabilizes VTCN1 and dulls the anti-islet T cell responses. Therefore, we suggest a general endogenous mechanism of defective VTCN1 negative co-stimulation, which affects both lymphoid and peripheral target tissues during T1D progression and results in aggressive anti-islet T cell responses. This mechanism is tied to up-regulation of NRD1 expression and likely acts in two synergistic proteolytic modes: cell-intrinsic intracellular and cell-extrinsic systemic. Our results highlight an importance of VTCN1 stabilization on cell surfaces for the restoration of altered balance of immune control during T1D. PMID:26773144

  15. Is autoimmunity or insulin resistance the primary driver of type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Terence J

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is usually classified as autoimmune or metabolic but, as difficulties have arisen with the taxonomy of diabetes, it may help to forego the conventional classification for a more inclusive model. Thus, all diabetes can be ascribed to beta cell insufficiency-hyperglycemia occurs only when the insulin supply fails to meet demand. Humans enter the world with a reserve of beta cells, which is eroded variably by apoptosis over the course of a lifetime. For most, the loss is slow and inconsequential but, for others fast enough to be critical within a lifetime. The challenge now is to define the factors that vary the tempo of beta cell loss, because tempo, not type, seems likely to determine whether diabetes occurs at all, in adulthood or in childhood. Insulin resistance is generally believed to underpin T2D, but has been a feature of insulin-dependent diabetes as well for nearly 80 years, though largely ignored until immunotherapy trials to test the autoimmunity hypothesis persistently failed to bring patient benefit. It seems possible that insulin resistance accelerates beta cell loss generally, its impact modulated by an immune response (autoimmunity) to the beta-cell stress whose intensity varies with immunogenotype. If so, the target for prevention of T1D might more logically lie with insulin sensitivity than with immunoregulation.

  16. Childhood malignancy and maternal diabetes or other auto-immune disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Westbom, L; Aberg, A; Källén, B

    2002-04-08

    Among 4380 children born in 1987-1997 of women with a diagnosis of diabetes and alive at the age of one, 10 were registered in the Swedish Cancer Registry before the end of 1998. The odds ratio for having a childhood cancer after maternal diabetes, stratified for year of birth, maternal age, parity, multiple birth, and 500 g birth weight class was 2.25 (95%CI 1.22-4.15). Among 5842 children born during the period 1973-1997 whose mothers had other auto-immune diseases (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn, ulcerous colitis, multiple sclerosis or thyroiditis), the number of observed childhood cancers (9) was close to that expected (8.5). Maternal diabetes but not other auto-immune diseases may be a risk factor for childhood cancer.

  17. Coffee consumption and the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults--results from a Swedish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Löfvenborg, J E; Andersson, T; Carlsson, P-O; Dorkhan, M; Groop, L; Martinell, M; Rasouli, B; Storm, P; Tuomi, T; Carlsson, S

    2014-07-01

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate if coffee intake may also reduce the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, an autoimmune form of diabetes with features of Type 2 diabetes. We used data from a population-based case-control study with incident cases of adult onset (≥ 35 years) diabetes, including 245 cases of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive), 759 cases of Type 2 diabetes (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody negative), together with 990 control subjects without diabetes, randomly selected from the population. Using questionnaire information on coffee consumption, we estimated the odds ratio of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and Type 2 diabetes adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking, physical activity, alcohol, education and family history of diabetes. Coffee intake was inversely associated with Type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.98 per cup/day). With regard to latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, the general trend was weak (odds ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.96-1.13), but stratification by degree of autoimmunity (median glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody levels) suggested that coffee intake may be associated with an increased risk of high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.23 per cup/day). Furthermore, for every additional cup of coffee consumed per day, there was a 15.2% (P = 0.0268) increase in glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody levels. Our findings confirm that coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the findings suggest that coffee may be associated with development of autoimmunity and possibly an increased risk of more Type 1-like latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  18. Prevention of Cyclophosphamide-induced Accelerated Diabetes in the NOD Mouse by Nicotinamide or a Soy Protein-based Infant Formula

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, M.; Robinson, E.

    2000-01-01

    Spontaneous diabetes in the NOD mouse can be prevented by nicotinamide or by an infant formula diet in which the protein source is replaced with casein hydrolysate (Pregestimil) or soy protein (Prosobee). NOD mice maintained on the standard diet (chow and water) and given cyclophosphamide (Cy) at day 95 develop accelerated and synchronised diabetes within 14 days. Here, we compared the ability of oral nicotinamide or Prosobee, either given alone or concurrently, from weaning, in preventing diabetes in the Cy model. The resulting insulitis and the expression of intra-islet inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were examined at days 0, 4, 7, 11 and 14 following Cy administration. Intra-islet CD4 and CD8 cells and macrophages were also enumerated at day 11. In mice given the standard diet and injected with Cy at day 95 (group 5), diabetes developed in 7/11 mice, 14 days later. Mice exposed to oral nicotinamide (group 2), Prosobee (group 3) or both (group 4), did not develop the disease during this period and until a further 30 days (p = 0.03). In mice exposed to the standard diet and without Cy treatment (group 1) the insulitis scores increased slowly until day 11 and then declined slightly at day 14 whereas mice exposed to the same diet but given Cy at day 95, showed a sharp decline at day 4 followed by a rapid increase between day 7–14. However, in mice given either nicotinamide, Prosobee or both, the insulitis scores at most time-points were generally lower than in Cy-teated animals on the standard diet. In the latter group, CD4 and CD8 cells and macrophages were also higher at day 11 than all other 4 groups (CD4: p < 0.05; CD8: p < 0.05; macrophages: p < 0.0001). The number of iNOS labelled cells increased progressively in mice on the standard diet and given Cy and were significantly higher at days 4, 7 and 11 than in the 3 dietary groups. Thus, oral nicotinamide or Prosobee, either alone or together, prevents Cy induced diabetes in the NOD mouse. The

  19. High-Throughput Sequencing of Islet-Infiltrating Memory CD4+ T Cells Reveals a Similar Pattern of TCR Vβ Usage in Prediabetic and Diabetic NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Idania; Hamm, David E.; Davies, Joanna D.

    2013-01-01

    Autoreactive memory CD4+ T cells play a critical role in the development of type 1 diabetes, but it is not yet known how the clonotypic composition and TCRβ repertoire of the memory CD4+ T cell compartment changes during the transition from prediabetes to diabetes. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze the TCRβ repertoire of sorted islet-infiltrating memory CD4+CD44high T cells in 10-week-old prediabetic and recently diabetic NOD mice. We show that most clonotypes of islet-infiltrating CD4+CD44high T cells were rare, but high-frequency clonotypes were significantly more common in diabetic than in prediabetic mice. Moreover, although the CD4+CD44high TCRβ repertoires were highly diverse at both stages of disease development, dominant use of TRBV1 (Vβ2), TRBV13-3 (Vβ8.1), and TRBV19 (Vβ6) was evident in both prediabetic and diabetic mice. Our findings strongly suggest that therapeutic targeting of cells specifically expressing the dominant TCRβ might reduce pancreatic infiltration in prediabetic mice and attenuate the progression to diabetes. PMID:24146886

  20. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-11-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition.

  1. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition. PMID:27321428

  2. Fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes through nasal immunization in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shiping; Li, Guoliang; Liu, Kunfeng; Yang, Xue; Cao, Rongyue; Zong, Li; Long, Jun; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Human heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is an endogenous β-cells autoantigen, it could postpone the onset of insulitis and sooner type 1 diabetes mellitus. P277 is one of Hsp65 determinants at position 437-469 of amino acids cascaded. Meanwhile, it's already well-known that there were several better anti-diabetic B epitopes, such as insulinoma antigen-2 (IA-2). Currently, fusion protein IA2P2 has constructed in order to enhance its pharmacological efficacy. In addition, added homologous bacterial-derived Hsp65 and His tag were beneficial to protein immunogenicity and purification separately. So, finally we examined a fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could regulate Th2 immune response and reduce natural diabetic incidence in NOD mice. We constructed two express vector pET28a-His-Hsp65-6P277 and pET28a-His-Hsp65-6IA2P2. After purification, we observed that triple intranasal administration of these two fusion protein in 4-week-old NOD mice maintained normal blood glucose and weight, with a lower diabetic or insulitis incidence. Consistent with induced splenic T cells proliferation and tolerance, His-Hsp65-6IA2P2-treated mice performed reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-10 level. In conclusion, we suggested that fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could be reconstructed and purified successively. Furthermore, nasal administration of this fusion protein could rebalance T cells population and prevent T1DM.

  3. Idd13 is involved in determining immunoregulatory DN T-cell number in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Dugas, V; Liston, A; Hillhouse, E E; Collin, R; Chabot-Roy, G; Pelletier, A-N; Beauchamp, C; Hardy, K; Lesage, S

    2014-03-01

    Immunoregulatory T cells have been identified as key modulators of peripheral tolerance and participate in preventing autoimmune diseases. CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative, DN) T cells compose one of these immunoregulatory T-cell subsets, where the injection of DN T cells confers protection from autoimmune diabetes progression. Interestingly, genetic loci defining the function and number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) coincide with at least some autoimmune disease susceptibility loci. Herein, we investigate the impact of major insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) loci in defining the number of DN T cells. We demonstrate that although Idd3, Idd5 and Idd9 loci do not regulate DN T-cell number, NOD mice congenic for diabetes resistance alleles at the Idd13 locus show a partial restoration in DN T-cell number. Moreover, competitive and non-competitive bone marrow chimera experiments reveal that DN T-cell number is defined by a bone marrow-intrinsic, but DN T-cell-extrinsic, factor. This suggests that non-autonomous candidate genes define DN T-cell number in secondary lymphoid organs. Together, our results show that the regulation of DN T-cell number in NOD mice is at least partially conferred by alleles at the Idd13 locus.

  4. Overlap of genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Guy, Vanessa C; Schwartz, Stanley; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notion that there is a degree of commonality to the biological etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the lack of overlap in the genetic factors underpinning each of them suggests very distinct mechanisms. A disorder considered to be at the "intersection" of these two diseases is "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults" (LADA). Interestingly, genetic signals from both T1D and T2D are also seen in LADA, including the key HLA and transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) loci, but the magnitudes of these effects are more complex than just pointing to LADA as being a simple admixture of T1D and T2D. We review the current status of the understanding of the genetics of LADA and place it in the context of what is known about the genetics of its better-studied "cousins," T1D and T2D, especially with respect to the myriad of discoveries made over the last decade through genome-wide association studies.

  5. Transgenic expression of TGF-beta on thyrocytes inhibits development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis and increases regulatory T cells in thyroids of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiguang; Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic NOD.H-2h4 mice expressing TGF-beta under control of the thyroglobulin promoter were generated to assess the role of TGF-beta in the development of thyrocyte hyperplasia. In contrast to nontransgenic littermates, which develop lymphocytic spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (L-SAT), all TGF-beta transgenic (Tg) mice given NaI water for 2-7 mo developed thyroid lesions characterized by severe thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia and proliferation, with fibrosis and less lymphocyte infiltration than in nontransgenic mice. Most Tg mice produced less anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody than did wild type (WT) mice. T cells from Tg and WT mice were equivalent in their ability to induce L-SAT after transfer to SCID or TCRalpha(-/-) mice. WT lymphocytes could transfer experimental autoimmune thyroiditis or L-SAT to Tg mice, indicating that the transgenic environment did not prevent migration of lymphocytes to the thyroid. Thyroids of Tg mice had higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with nontransgenic WT mice. Transient depletion of Tregs by anti-CD25 resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into thyroids of transgenic mice. Treg depletion also resulted in increased anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses and increased expression of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines in thyroids of Tg mice. The results suggest that spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis is inhibited in mice expressing transgenic TGF-beta on thyrocytes, at least in part, because there is an increased frequency of Tregs in their thyroids.

  6. Identification and Antioxidant Activity of the Extracts of Eugenia uniflora Leaves. Characterization of the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Aqueous Extract on Diabetes Expression in an Experimental Model of Spontaneous Type 1 Diabetes (NOD Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Simon Gonzalez Schumacher, Nayara; Colomeu, Talita Cristina; de Figueiredo, Daniella; Carvalho, Virginia de Campos; Baú Betim Cazarin, Cinthia; Prado, Marcelo Alexandre; Molina Meletti, Laura Maria; de Lima Zollner, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Medical and folklore reports suggest that Eugenia uniflora (E. uniflora) is a functional food that contains numerous compounds in its composition, with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-diabetic effects. In the present study, we investigated the best solvents (water, ethanol and methanol/acetone) for extracting bioactive compounds of E. uniflora leaves, assessing total phenols and the antioxidant activity of the extracts by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP), 2,2′-Azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assays, identifying hydrolysable tannins and three phenolic compounds (ellagic acid, gallic acid and rutin) present in the leaves. In addition, we evaluated the incidence of diabetes, degree of insulitis, serum insulin, hepatic glutathione and tolerance test glucose in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Our results suggest that the aqueous extract presents antioxidant activity and high total phenols, which were used as a type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1) treatment in NOD mice. We verified that the chronic consumption of aqueous extract reduces the inflammatory infiltrate index in pancreatic islets, maintaining serum insulin levels and hepatic glutathione, and reducing serum lipid peroxidation as well as the risk for diabetes. PMID:26783951

  7. Identification and Antioxidant Activity of the Extracts of Eugenia uniflora Leaves. Characterization of the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Aqueous Extract on Diabetes Expression in an Experimental Model of Spontaneous Type 1 Diabetes (NOD Mice).

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Nayara Simon Gonzalez; Colomeu, Talita Cristina; de Figueiredo, Daniella; Carvalho, Virginia de Campos; Cazarin, Cinthia Baú Betim; Prado, Marcelo Alexandre; Meletti, Laura Maria Molina; Zollner, Ricardo de Lima

    2015-10-09

    Medical and folklore reports suggest that Eugenia uniflora (E. uniflora) is a functional food that contains numerous compounds in its composition, with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-diabetic effects. In the present study, we investigated the best solvents (water, ethanol and methanol/acetone) for extracting bioactive compounds of E. uniflora leaves, assessing total phenols and the antioxidant activity of the extracts by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP), 2,2'-Azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assays, identifying hydrolysable tannins and three phenolic compounds (ellagic acid, gallic acid and rutin) present in the leaves. In addition, we evaluated the incidence of diabetes, degree of insulitis, serum insulin, hepatic glutathione and tolerance test glucose in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Our results suggest that the aqueous extract presents antioxidant activity and high total phenols, which were used as a type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1) treatment in NOD mice. We verified that the chronic consumption of aqueous extract reduces the inflammatory infiltrate index in pancreatic islets, maintaining serum insulin levels and hepatic glutathione, and reducing serum lipid peroxidation as well as the risk for diabetes.

  8. Immunology in the Clinic Review Series; focus on metabolic diseases: development of islet autoimmune disease in type 2 diabetes patients: potential sequelae of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Worrell, B; Palmer, J P

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the development of type 2 diabetes has been considered not to have an autoimmune component, in contrast to the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. In this review we will discuss the accumulating data supporting the concept that islet autoreactivity and inflammation is present in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and the islet autoimmunity appears to be one of the factors associated with the progressive nature of the type 2 diabetes disease process.

  9. Increased seroreactivity to proinsulin and homologous mycobacterial peptides in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    PubMed Central

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Delitala, Alessandro; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Delitala, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is a slowly progressing form of immune-mediated diabetes that combines phenotypical features of type 2 diabetes (T2D) with the presence of islet cell antigens detected in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Heterogeneous clinical picture have led to the classification of patients based on the levels of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GADA) that correlate with clinical phenotypes closer to T1D or T2D when GADA titers are high or low, respectively. To date, LADA etiology remains elusive despite numerous studies investigating on genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. To our knowledge, this is the first study aimed at evaluation of a putative role played by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) as an infective agent in LADA pathogenesis. MAP is known to cause chronic enteritis in ruminants and has been associated with autoimmune disorders in humans. We analyzed seroreactivity of 223 Sardinian LADA subjects and 182 healthy volunteers against MAP-derived peptides and their human homologs of proinsulin and zinc transporter 8 protein. A significantly elevated positivity for MAP/proinsulin was detected among patients, with the highest prevalence in the 32-41-year-old T1D-like LADA subgroup, supporting our hypothesis of a possible MAP contribution in the development of autoimmunity. PMID:28472070

  10. Clinical features of childhood diabetes mellitus focusing on latent autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the clinical characteristics of childhood diabetes mellitus (DM) according to its classification as well as the clinical course of latent autoimmune diabetes (LAD) that initially showed noninsulin dependence despite autoantibody positivity. Methods A total of 91 subjects diagnosed between 2001 and 2015 were enrolled in the study. They were classified into 3 groups: type 1 DM, LAD, and type 2 DM. Clinical features and laboratory findings were compared among groups. Results Among 91 subjects, type 1 DM, LAD, and type 2 DM were 51 (56.0%), 7 (7.7%), and 33 (36.3%), respectively. In LAD, age at diagnosis and BMI Z-scores were higher, as compared with those in type 1 DM. Initial serum c-peptide levels were higher in LAD than those in type 1 DM, but lower than those in type 2 DM. In LAD, the mean follow-up duration was 4.56 years, and 43% of the patients ultimately required intensive insulin treatment with dosage of > 0.5 U/kg/day. HbA1C and serum c-peptide levels at the time of intensive insulin treatment were 9.43±0.93% and 1.37±1.36 ng/mL, respectively. Recent serum c-peptide/glucose ratio was lower in the group requiring intensive insulin treatment than the group without intensive insulin treatment, with P-value of 0.057 (0.003±0.005 vs. 0.071±0.086). Conclusion Initial autoantibody evaluation is useful for classification and management. Close monitoring of the patients with LAD is important due to the expected need for intensive insulin treatment within several years. PMID:28164074

  11. Lack of Evidence for a Role of Islet Autoimmunity in the Aetiology of Canine Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Landegren, Nils; Grimelius, Lars; von Euler, Henrik; Sundberg, Katarina; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lobell, Anna; Hedhammar, Åke; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lernmark, Åke; Kämpe, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported. Methods Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide. Results None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted. Conclusions/Interpretations Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus. PMID:25153886

  12. Relationship between autoantibodies combination, metabolic syndrome components and diabetic complications in autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Knežević-Ćuća, Jadranka; Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to establish the possible association between double or triple antibody positivity and latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) phenotype in the context of metabolic syndrome (MS) prevalence and its individual components. This cross-sectional study population comprised 69 islet cell antibody-positive patients coming for their comprehensive annual review. They were divided into three groups according to antibody positivity. Twenty-five (36.2 %) were male, mean age of 51 years with disease duration of 8 years. Twenty-eight (40.58 %) were positive only for GAD Abs, 26 (37.68 %) were positive for ICA and GAD Abs and 15 (21.74 %) were positive for GAD, ICA, and IA2 Abs. The lowest value of waist circumference, MS, and artherial hypertension prevalence was found in the group positive for all three antibodies. In the multinomial multivariate logistic regression model, MS was negatively associated with triple Abs positivity compared to single Ab positivity and double Abs positivity. Our results highlight the importance of inverse association between simultaneous Abs positivity for ICA, GAD, and IA2 with the MS and its components present in LADA patients. This inverse relationship might implicate that LADA patients are phenotypically closer to T1DM. The contribution of IA2 Ab positivity merits is to be considered in the determination of LADA phenotypes, while its diagnostic value needs to be clarified in future follow-up studies.

  13. Insulinoma-released exosomes or microparticles are immunostimulatory and can activate autoreactive T cells spontaneously developed in non-obese diabetes mice1

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Huiming; Hassanali, Saleema; Nugent, Courtney; Wen, Li; Hamilton-Williams, Emma; Dias, Peter; Dai, Yang D.

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes (EXO) are secreted intracellular microparticles that can trigger inflammation and induce antigen-specific immune responses. To test possible roles of EXO in autoimmunity, we isolated small microparticles, mainly EXO, from mouse insulinoma and examined their activities to stimulate the autoimmune responses in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model for human type 1 diabetes. We demonstrate that the EXO contains strong innate stimuli and expresses candidate diabetes autoantigens. They can induce secretion of inflammatory cytokines through MyD88-dependent pathways, and activate purified APC and result in T cell proliferation. To address whether EXO or the secreted microparticles are possible autoimmune targets causing islet-specific inflammation, we monitored the T cell responses spontaneously developed in prediabetic NOD mice for their reactivity to the EXO, and compared this reactivity between diabetes-susceptible and -resistant congenic mouse strains. We found that older NOD females, which have advanced islet destruction, accumulated more EXO-reactive, IFN-gamma-producing lymphocytes than younger females or age-matched males, and that pancreatic lymph nodes from the prediabetic NOD, but not from the resistant mice, were also enriched with EXO-reactive Th1 cells. In vivo, immunization with the EXO accelerates insulitis development in diabetes-resistant NOR mice. Thus, EXO or small microparticles can be recognized by the diabetes-associated autoreactive T cells, supporting that EXO might be a possible autoimmune target and/or insulitis trigger in NOD or congenic mouse strains. PMID:21734072

  14. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: II--Is diabetes a central or peripheral disorder of effector and regulatory cells?

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-02-01

    Two competing hypotheses aiming to explain the onset of autoimmune reactions are discussed in the context of genetic and environmental predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The first hypothesis has evolved along characterization of the mechanisms of self-discrimination and attributes diabetic autoimmunity to escape of reactive T cells from central regulation in the thymus. The second considers frequent occurrence of autoimmune reactions within the immune homunculus, which are adequately suppressed by regulatory T cells originating from the thymus, and occasionally, insufficient suppression results in autoimmunity. Besides thymic dysfunction, deregulation of both effector and suppressor cells can in fact result from homeostatic aberrations at the peripheral level during initial stages of evolution of adaptive immunity. Pathogenic cells sensitized in the islets are efficiently expanded in the target tissue and pancreatic lymph nodes of lymphopenic neonates. In parallel, the same mechanisms of peripheral sensitization contribute to tolerization through education of naïve/effector T cells and expansion of regulatory T cells. Experimental evidence presented for each individual mechanism implies that T1D may result from a primary effector or suppressor immune abnormality. Disturbed self-tolerance leading to T1D may well result from peripheral deregulation of innate and adaptive immunity, with variable contribution of central thymic dysfunction.

  15. Familial clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Castiblanco, John; Tobón, Gabriel J; García, Jorge; Abad, Verónica; Cuervo, Héctor; Velásquez, Alejandro; Angel, Ivan D; Vega, Patricia; Arango, Alvaro

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the familial aggregation of autoimmune diseases (AIDs) among first-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). Relatives of 98 T1D patients defined according to the guidelines diagnosis of the American Diabetes Association and 113 matched controls without any AID, were interviewed using a questionnaire that sought information about demographic and medical characteristics including a list of 18 AIDs. Genetic analysis was performed using the program ASSOC and by calculating recurrent risk ratios. In cases, 25.5% of the families had at least one member having an AID, while in controls there were 9% (odds ratio [OR]: 3.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.74-9.0, p=0.0006). An AID was registered in 8.3% of 312 FDR of patients as compared with 2.4% of 362 FDR in controls (OR: 3.56, 95% CI=1.64-7.73, p=0.0008). The most frequent AIDs registered in FDR of cases were autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and T1D, which disclosed coefficients of aggregation. These results indicate that AIDs cluster within families of T1D patients adding further evidence to consider that clinically different autoimmune phenotypes may share common susceptibility gene variants, which may act pleiotropically as risk factors for autoimmunity.

  16. Risks, benefits, and therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couri, Carlos Eduardo Barra; de Oliveira, Maria Carolina; Simões, Belinda Pinto

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that results from the autoimmune response against pancreatic insulin producing β cells. Apart of several insulin regimens, since the decade of 80s various immunomodulatory regimens were tested aiming at blocking some steps of the autoimmune process against β cell mass and at promoting β cell preservation. In the last years, some independent research groups tried to cure type 1 diabetes with an "immunologic reset" provided by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed patients, and the majority of patients became free form insulin with increasing levels of C-peptide along the time. In this review, we discuss the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and the possible advantages and disadvantages related to the high dose immunosuppression followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  17. The gut microbiota modulates glycaemic control and serum metabolite profiles in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Thomas U; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Knip, Mikael; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Orešič, Matej

    2014-01-01

    Islet autoimmunity in children who later progress to type 1 diabetes is preceded by dysregulated serum metabolite profiles, but the origin of these metabolic changes is unknown. The gut microbiota affects host metabolism and changes in its composition contribute to several immune-mediated diseases; however, it is not known whether the gut microbiota is involved in the early metabolic disturbances in progression to type 1 diabetes. We rederived non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice as germ free to explore the potential role of the gut microbiota in the development of diabetic autoimmunity and to directly investigate whether the metabolic profiles associated with the development of type 1 diabetes can be modulated by the gut microbiota. The absence of a gut microbiota in NOD mice did not affect the overall diabetes incidence but resulted in increased insulitis and levels of interferon gamma and interleukin 12; these changes were counterbalanced by improved peripheral glucose metabolism. Furthermore, we observed a markedly increased variation in blood glucose levels in the absence of a microbiota in NOD mice that did not progress to diabetes. Additionally, germ-free NOD mice had a metabolite profile similar to that of pre-diabetic children. Our data suggest that germ-free NOD mice have reduced glycaemic control and dysregulated immunologic and metabolic responses.

  18. Are obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sue; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Revelo, Xavier S; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and associated insulin resistance predispose individuals to develop chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these disorders affect a significant proportion of the global population, the underlying mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. The discovery of elevated tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue as an inducer of obesity-associated insulin resistance marked a new era of understanding that a subclinical inflammatory process underlies the insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction that precedes type 2 diabetes. Advances in the field identified components of both the innate and adaptive immune response as key players in regulating such inflammatory processes. As antigen specificity is a hallmark of an adaptive immune response, its role in modulating the chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes begs the question of whether insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes can have autoimmune components. In this Perspective, we summarize current data that pertain to the activation and perpetuation of adaptive immune responses during obesity and discuss key missing links and potential mechanisms for obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to be considered as potential autoimmune diseases.

  19. Autoimmune destruction of pericytes as the cause of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Duncan D

    2008-06-01

    In diabetic retinopathy, collapse of the retinal vasculature is associated with loss of the pericytes. These are contractile cells that together with endothelial cells form the terminal arterioles of the retina. The cause of the loss of pericytes is not known. Recently, it has been discovered that type 1 diabetes is caused by forbidden clones of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which destroy the insulin-making cells with exquisite specificity. In the light of this, I postulate that an antigenically-related forbidden clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes selectively destroys the pericytes and that this is the cause of the vascular collapse of diabetic retinopathy. If this is so, the therapeutic implications are immense, involving a switch from ineffectual tight glycemic control to immunotherapy. This is already used as immunosuppression to prevent organ transplant rejection, and as the immune ablation and autologous bone marrow cell reconstitution that has saved the lives of patients with lethally-severe scleroderma. Once the pericyte surface auto-antigen for the T lymphocytes has been isolated, selective destruction of the pathogenic T lymphocytes would be possible by manufacture and use of cytotoxic auto-antigen complexes, which arrests progression of the retinopathy.

  20. Protective role of anti-idiotypic antibodies in autoimmunity – Lessons for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    HAMPE, CHRISTIANE S.

    2017-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to beta cell antigens are present in the majority of patients with Type 1 diabetes. These autoantibodies can be detected before and at time of clinical diagnosis of disease. Although the role of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of the disease is debated, their presence indicates a dysregulation of the humoral immune response. Mechanisms regulating autoantibodies in Type 1 diabetes are not well understood. In contrast, in other autoimmune diseases there is acceptance that autoantibodies are regulated not only by antigen but also by other antibodies that bind to the antigen-binding site of these autoantibodies (anti-idiotypic antibodies). The proposed purpose of this network is to maintain an equilibrium between autoantibodies and their anti-idiotypic antibodies, preventing autoimmunity, while allowing a robust response to exogenous antigen. Anti-idiotypic antibodies regulate both autoantibody binding and their levels by a) neutralizing autoantibodies, and b) inhibiting the secretion of autoantibodies. Because it has been proposed that the B lymphocytes that produce autoantibodies function as autoantigen presenting cells, inhibiting their binding to autoantigen by anti-idiotypic antibodies may prevent development of autoimmune disease. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies in healthy individuals and in patients in remission from autoimmune diseases, and by the lack of anti-idiotypic antibodies during active disease. We recently reported the presence of autoantibodies to glutamate decarboxylase in the majority of healthy individuals, where their binding to autoantigen is prevented by anti-idiotypic antibodies. These anti-idiotypic antibodies are absent at clinical diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes, revealing the presence of autoantibodies. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the dysfunction and destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T cells. Although much

  1. Smad4 in T cells plays a protective role in the development of autoimmune Sjögren's syndrome in the nonobese diabetic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Kim, Jae Young; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of Smad4, a signaling molecule of the TGF-beta pathway, in T cells on the pathology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, an animal model of SS. T cell-specific Smad4-deleted (Smad4fl/fl,CD4-Cre; Smad4 tKO) NOD mice had accelerated development of SS compared with wild-type (Smad4+/+,CD4-Cre; WT) NOD mice, including increased lymphocyte infiltration into exocrine glands, decreased tear and saliva production, and increased levels of autoantibodies at 12 weeks of age. Activated/memory T cells and cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-17)-producing T cells were increased in Smad4 tKO NOD mice, however the proportion and function of regulatory T (Treg) cells were not different between Smad4 tKO and WT NOD mice. Effector T (Teff) cells from Smad4 tKO NOD mice were less sensitive than WT Teff cells to suppression by Treg cells. Th17 differentiation capability of Teff cells was similar between Smad4 tKO and WT NOD mice, but IL-17 expression was increased under inducible Treg skewing conditions in T cells from Smad4 tKO NOD mice. Our results demonstrate that disruption of the Smad4 pathway in T cells of NOD mice increases Teff cell activation resulting in upregulation of Th17 cells, indicating that Smad4 in T cells has a protective role in the development of SS in NOD mice. PMID:27880731

  2. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Synergizes with Notch2 To Govern Marginal Zone B Cells in Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Case, James B; Bonami, Rachel H; Nyhoff, Lindsay E; Steinberg, Hannah E; Sullivan, Allison M; Kendall, Peggy L

    2015-07-01

    Expansion of autoimmune-prone marginal zone (MZ) B cells has been implicated in type 1 diabetes. To test disease contributions of MZ B cells in NOD mice, Notch2 haploinsufficiency (Notch2(+/-)) was introduced but failed to eliminate the MZ, as it does in C57BL/6 mice. Notch2(+/-)/NOD have MZ B cell numbers similar to those of wild-type C57BL/6, yet still develop diabetes. To test whether BCR signaling supports Notch2(+/-)/NOD MZ B cells, Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) deficiency was introduced. Surprisingly, MZ B cells failed to develop in Btk-deficient Notch2(+/-)/NOD mice. Expression of Notch2 and its transcriptional target, Hes5, was increased in NOD MZ B cells compared with C57BL/6 MZ B cells. Btk deficiency reduced Notch2(+/-) signaling exclusively in NOD B cells, suggesting that BCR signaling enhances Notch2 signaling in this autoimmune model. The role of BCR signaling was further investigated using an anti-insulin transgenic (Tg) BCR (125Tg). Anti-insulin B cells in 125Tg/Notch2(+/-)/NOD mice populate an enlarged MZ, suggesting that low-level BCR signaling overcomes reliance on Notch2. Tracking clonotypes of anti-insulin B cells in H chain-only VH125Tg/NOD mice showed that BTK-dependent selection into the MZ depends on strength of antigenic binding, whereas Notch2-mediated selection does not. Importantly, anti-insulin B cell numbers were reduced by Btk deficiency, but not Notch2 haploinsufficiency. These studies show that 1) Notch2 haploinsufficiency limits NOD MZ B cell expansion without preventing type 1 diabetes, 2) BTK supports the Notch2 pathway in NOD MZ B cells, and 3) autoreactive NOD B cell survival relies on BTK more than Notch2, regardless of MZ location, which may have important implications for disease-intervention strategies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Exaggerated Increases in Microglia Proliferation, Brain Inflammatory Response and Sickness Behaviour upon Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuiness, Barry; Gibney, Sinead M.; Beumer, Wouter; Versnel, Marjan A.; Sillaber, Inge; Harkin, Andrew; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an established model for autoimmune diabetes, shows an exaggerated reaction of pancreas macrophages to inflammatory stimuli. NOD mice also display anxiety when immune-stimulated. Chronic mild brain inflammation and a pro-inflammatory microglial activation is critical in psychiatric behaviour. Objective To explore brain/microglial activation and behaviour in NOD mice at steady state and after systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Methods Affymetrix analysis on purified microglia of pre-diabetic NOD mice (8-10 weeks) and control mice (C57BL/6 and CD1 mice, the parental non-autoimmune strain) at steady state and after systemic LPS (100 μg/kg) administration. Quantitative PCR was performed on the hypothalamus for immune activation markers (IL-1β, IFNγ and TNFα) and growth factors (BDNF and PDGF). Behavioural profiling of NOD, CD1, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice at steady state was conducted and sickness behaviour/anxiety in NOD and CD1 mice was monitored before and after LPS injection. Results Genome analysis revealed cell cycle/cell death and survival aberrancies of NOD microglia, substantiated as higher proliferation on BrdU staining. Inflammation signs were absent. NOD mice had a hyper-reactive response to novel environments with some signs of anxiety. LPS injection induced a higher expression of microglial activation markers, a higher brain pro-inflammatory set point (IFNγ, IDO) and a reduced expression of BDNF and PDGF after immune stimulation in NOD mice. NOD mice displayed exaggerated and prolonged sickness behaviour after LPS administration. Conclusion After stimulation with LPS, NOD mice display an increased microglial proliferation and an exaggerated inflammatory brain response with reduced BDNF and PDGF expression and increased sickness behaviour as compared to controls. PMID:27529430

  4. Early-Onset, Coexisting Autoimmunity and Decreased HLA-Mediated Susceptibility Are the Characteristics of Diabetes in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Rachel J.; Mehers, Kay L.; Williams, Alistair J.; Brown, Jamie; Bingley, Polly J.; Holl, Reinhard W.; Rohrer, Tilman R.; Schober, Edith; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Shield, Julian P.H.; Gillespie, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Down syndrome (DS) is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, particularly in young children. HLA-mediated risk is however decreased in children with DS and diabetes (DSD). We hypothesized that early-onset diabetes in children with DS is etiologically different from autoimmune diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinical and immunogenetic markers of autoimmune diabetes were studied in 136 individuals with DSD and compared with 194 age- and sex-matched individuals with type 1 diabetes, 222 with DS, and 671 healthy controls. HLA class II was analyzed by sequence-specific primed PCR. Islet autoantibodies were measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS Age at onset of diabetes was biphasic, with 22% of DS children diagnosed before 2 years of age, compared with only 4% in this age-group with type 1 diabetes in the general population (P < 0.0001). The frequency of the highest-risk type 1 diabetes–associated HLA genotype, DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8, was decreased in both early- and later-onset DSD compared with age-matched children with type 1 diabetes (P < 0.0001), although HLA DR3-DQ2 genotypes were increased (P = 0.004). Antibodies to GAD were observed in all five samples tested from children diagnosed at ≤2 years of age, and persistent islet autoantibodies were detected in 72% of DSD cases. Thyroid and celiac disease were diagnosed in 74 and 14%, respectively, of the DSD cohort. CONCLUSIONS Early-onset diabetes in children with DS is unlikely to be etiologically different from autoimmune diabetes occurring in older DS children. Overall, these studies demonstrate more extreme autoimmunity in DSD typified by early-onset diabetes with multiple autoimmunity, persistent islet autoantibodies, and decreased HLA-mediated susceptibility. PMID:23275362

  5. Fatty acid status in infancy is associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Niinistö, Sari; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Erlund, Iris; Ahonen, Suvi; Toppari, Jorma; Ilonen, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Vaarala, Outi; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the association of early serum fatty acid composition with the risk of type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity. Our hypothesis was that fatty acid status during infancy is related to type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity and that long-chain n-3 fatty acids, in particular, are associated with decreased risk. We performed a nested case-control analysis within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study birth cohort, carrying HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (n = 7782). Serum total fatty acid composition was analysed by gas chromatography in 240 infants with islet autoimmunity and 480 control infants at the age of 3 and 6 months. Islet autoimmunity was defined as repeated positivity for islet cell autoantibodies in combination with at least one of three selected autoantibodies. In addition, a subset of 43 infants with primary insulin autoimmunity (i.e. those with insulin autoantibodies as the first autoantibody with no concomitant other autoantibodies) and a control group (n = 86) were analysed. A third endpoint was primary GAD autoimmunity defined as GAD autoantibody appearing as the first antibody without other concomitant autoantibodies (22 infants with GAD autoimmunity; 42 infants in control group). Conditional logistic regression was applied, considering multiple comparisons by false discovery rate <0.05. Serum fatty acid composition differed between breastfed and non-breastfed infants, reflecting differences in the fatty acid composition of the milk. Fatty acids were associated with islet autoimmunity (higher serum pentadecanoic, palmitic, palmitoleic and docosahexaenoic acids decreased risk; higher arachidonic:docosahexaenoic and n-6:n-3 acid ratios increased risk). Furthermore, fatty acids were associated with primary insulin autoimmunity, these associations being stronger (higher palmitoleic acid, cis-vaccenic, arachidonic, docosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids decreased risk; higher α-linoleic acid

  6. Effector and Naturally Occurring Regulatory T Cells Display No Abnormalities in Activation Induced Cell Death in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S.; Askenasy, Enosh M.; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2011-01-01

    Background Disturbed peripheral negative regulation might contribute to evolution of autoimmune insulitis in type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the sensitivity of naïve/effector (Teff) and regulatory T cells (Treg) to activation-induced cell death mediated by Fas cross-linking in NOD and wild-type mice. Principal Findings Both effector (CD25−, FoxP3−) and suppressor (CD25+, FoxP3+) CD4+ T cells are negatively regulated by Fas cross-linking in mixed splenocyte populations of NOD, wild type mice and FoxP3-GFP tranegenes. Proliferation rates and sensitivity to Fas cross-linking are dissociated in Treg cells: fast cycling induced by IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation improve Treg resistance to Fas-ligand (FasL) in both strains. The effector and suppressor CD4+ subsets display balanced sensitivity to negative regulation under baseline conditions, IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation, indicating that stimulation does not perturb immune homeostasis in NOD mice. Effective autocrine apoptosis of diabetogenic cells was evident from delayed onset and reduced incidence of adoptive disease transfer into NOD.SCID by CD4+CD25− T cells decorated with FasL protein. Treg resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis retain suppressive activity in vitro. The only detectable differential response was reduced Teff proliferation and upregulation of CD25 following CD3-activation in NOD mice. Conclusion These data document negative regulation of effector and suppressor cells by Fas cross-linking and dissociation between sensitivity to apoptosis and proliferation in stimulated Treg. There is no evidence that perturbed AICD in NOD mice initiates or promotes autoimmune insulitis. PMID:21738739

  7. Tolerance Induction and Endogenous Regeneration of Pancreatic β-Cells in Established Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Charles; Homo-Delarche, Francoise

    2004-01-01

    Studies aimed at the understanding of the multifactorial development of autoimmune diabetes have made substantial contributions toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms that open the road to an effective prevention of defective immune responses. Immunomodulatory regimens capable of inducing tolerance are shown to be effective even in the reversal of established autoimmune diabetes in animal models. Experimental trials including the reeducation of autoreactive T cells, depletion of macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells, as well as the use of monoclonal antibodies, have yielded encouraging results, but have not yet been translated into beneficial clinical outcomes. In addition, we are now seeing an emergence of promising new directions aimed at the induction of islet regeneration by endogenous factors, suggesting that the repair of pancreatic tissue is possible without the need for an engraftment of donor tissue. These recent waves of technological progress have injected new hope for a combined therapy to offer diabetic patients long-term benefits of insulin independence. This article reviews the latest findings on diabetic pathogenesis and discusses promising avenues to tolerance induction and islet regeneration. PMID:17491705

  8. Suppression of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice by oral administration of a cholera toxin B subunit-insulin B chain fusion protein vaccine produced in silkworm.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhaohui; Jin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2007-02-09

    Oral tolerance has been applied successfully as a potential therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes. In this paper we constructed an edible vaccine consisting of a fusion protein composed of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and insulin B chain (InsB) that was produced in silkworm larvae. The silkworm larvae produced this fusion protein at levels of up to 0.97mg/ml of hemolymph as the pentameric CTB-InsB form, which retained the GM1-ganglioside binding affinity and the native antigenicity of CTB. Non-obese diabetic mice fed hemolymph containing microgram quantities of the CTB-InsB fusion protein showed a prominent reduction in pancreatic islet inflammation and a delay in the development of diabetic symptoms. This study demonstrates that silkworm-produced CTB-InsB fusion protein can be used as an ideal oral protein vaccine for induction of immunological tolerance against autoimmune diabetes.

  9. Humoral Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes: Prediction, Significance, and Detection of Distinct Disease Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pietropaolo, Massimo; Towns, Roberto; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an autoimmune disease encompassing the T-cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells and the production of autoantibodies against islet proteins. In humoral autoimmunity in T1D, the detection of islet autoantibodies and the examination of their associations with genetic factors and cellular autoimmunity constitute major areas in both basic research and clinical practice. Although insulin is a key autoantigen and may be primus inter pares in importance among T1D autoantigens, an abundant body of research has also revealed other autoantigens associated with the disease process. Solid evidence indicates that autoantibodies against islet targets serve as key markers to enroll newly diagnosed T1D patients and their family members in intervention trials aimed at preventing or halting the disease process. The next challenge is perfecting mechanistic bioassays to be used as end points for disease amelioration following immunomodulatory therapies aimed at blocking immune-mediated β-cell injury and, in turn, preserving β-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23028135

  10. Chronic hepatitis B with type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis development during interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Kose, Sukran; Gozaydin, Ayhan; Akkoclu, Gulgun; Ece, Gulfem

    2012-04-13

    Interferon alpha is a molecule frequently used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, C, and D, with immunomodulatory and antiviral activity. It is also used in some cancer types. It has been widely claimed that interferon alpha triggers autoimmunity, with its broad adverse effect profile. Here we present the case of a 29-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis B diagnosis who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis during treatment with interferon alfa-2b. Within four months of initiation of treatment with interferon alfa-2b, the patient presented to our clinic with dry mouth, urinary frequency (8 to 10 times per day), drinking plenty of water, night time urination, and tiredness. He was admitted to the clinic when his fasting blood glucose level was detected to be high. After examinations, the patient was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis and began to receive treatment with insulin and propranolol. Fasting blood glucose levels were controlled and thyroid hormones decreased to normal levels within one month after the treatments began. For patients who will receive treatment with interferon alpha, especially those individuals with chronic hepatitis, pancreatic autoantibodies should be checked and close monitoring should be performed as there may be glucose tolerance impairment in patients with high titers. In addition, follow-up with thyroid function tests should be performed prior to and during the treatment.

  11. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  12. Costimulation couture: a designer approach to regulating autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed Javeed; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2006-01-01

    Negative or inhibitory costimulatory pathways regulate T cell activation and play a role in peripheral tolerance. Targeting these pathways harnesses the physiologic mechanisms of regulating autoimmunity and could prove beneficial for the therapy of autoimmune diseases. However, attempts at targeting these pathways have been fraught with difficulties. In this issue of the JCI, Fife et al. describe a creative approach for targeting CTL-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) on activated T cells via genetically engineered B cells to prevent autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse (see the related article beginning on page 2252). Novel “designer” strategies targeting negative costimulatory pathways provide reasons for optimism in the search for a cure for devastating autoimmune diseases. PMID:16886054

  13. Frequency and determinants of thyroid autoimmunity in Ghanaian type 2 diabetes patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sarfo-Kantanka, Osei; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Ansah, Eunice Oparebea; Yorke, Ernest; Akpalu, Josephine; Nkum, Bernard C; Eghan, Benjamin

    2017-01-17

    The link between type 1 diabetes and thyroid autoimmunity is well described. The same cannot be said for type 2 diabetes where results have been mixed so far. We investigated the prevalence and determinants of thyroid autoimmunity among Ghanaian type 2 diabetes patients. This was a case-control study involving 302 type 2 diabetes patients and 310 non - diabetic controls aged 40-80 years. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were obtained. Fasting samples were analyzed for glucose, thyroid function, and antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity was significantly higher among T2DM subjects (12.2% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.0004). Among T2DM subjects, 44 (14.7%) tested positive for TPOAb, 5 (1.7%) tested positive for TGAb and 15 (5.0%) tested positive for both autoantibodies. Females T2DM subjects showed a 3-fold increased risk of thyroid autoimmunity compared to males (OR:3.16, p =0.004), T2DM subjects with hyperthyroidism had a 41% increased risk of thyroid autoimmunity (OR: 1.41, p < 0.001), sub-clinical hyperthyroidism increased the risk of thyroid autoimmunity by 2 fold, (OR:2.19, p < 0.001), subclinical hypothyroidism increased the risk of autoimmunity by 4-fold, (OR:3.57 95% p < 0.0001), and hypothyroidism was associated with a 61% increased risk of thyroid autoimmunity (OR: 1.61,1.35-2.23). Dyslipidaemia was associated with a 44% increased risk of thyroid autoimmunity (OR: 1.44, p = 0.01) and a percentage increase in HbA1c was associated with 46% increased risk of thyroid autoimmunity (OR:1.46, p < 0.0001). We observed a high prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in Ghanaian T2DM subjects compared to the general population. Thyroid autoimmunity in T2DM subjects was significantly associated with female gender, thyroid dysfunction, dyslipidaemia and poor glycemic control.

  14. Nonviral-Mediated Hepatic Expression of IGF-I Increases Treg Levels and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anguela, Xavier M.; Tafuro, Sabrina; Roca, Carles; Callejas, David; Agudo, Judith; Obach, Mercè; Ribera, Albert; Ruzo, Albert; Mann, Christopher J.; Casellas, Alba; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, loss of tolerance to β-cell antigens results in T-cell–dependent autoimmune destruction of β cells. The abrogation of autoreactive T-cell responses is a prerequisite to achieve long-lasting correction of the disease. The liver has unique immunomodulatory properties and hepatic gene transfer results in tolerance induction and suppression of autoimmune diseases, in part by regulatory T-cell (Treg) activation. Hence, the liver could be manipulated to treat or prevent diabetes onset through expression of key genes. IGF-I may be an immunomodulatory candidate because it prevents autoimmune diabetes when expressed in β cells or subcutaneously injected. Here, we demonstrate that transient, plasmid-derived IGF-I expression in mouse liver suppressed autoimmune diabetes progression. Suppression was associated with decreased islet inflammation and β-cell apoptosis, increased β-cell replication, and normalized β-cell mass. Permanent protection depended on exogenous IGF-I expression in liver nonparenchymal cells and was associated with increased percentage of intrapancreatic Tregs. Importantly, Treg depletion completely abolished IGF-I-mediated protection confirming the therapeutic potential of these cells in autoimmune diabetes. This study demonstrates that a nonviral gene therapy combining the immunological properties of the liver and IGF-I could be beneficial in the treatment of the disease. PMID:23099863

  15. Original hypothesis: Extracorporeal shockwaves as a homeostatic autoimmune restorative treatment (HART) for Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Craig, Kenneth; d'Agostino, Cristina; Poratt, Daniel; Walker, Marjorie

    2014-09-01

    Mononuclear invasion of Langerhans islet and the ensuing insulitis triggers signal-transduction for the autoimmune mediated pancreatic beta-cell (β-cell) apoptosis that severely disrupts insulin production resulting in hyperglycemia associated with Type-1 diabetes (T1DM). Today extensive global research is being conducted to eliminate the need for insulin, and even prevent or find a cure for T1DM. The multifactorial combination of autoimmune dysfunction, Langerhans islet hypoxia, and bio-chemical disruption are seen to be contributory factors for β-cell destruction and the consequential disruption to insulin production. Regeneration of β-cells back to physiological levels may restore homeostatic insulin levels, reversing T1DM. Evidence suggests that there are still functioning pancreatic β-cells even in long standing T1DM providing the potential for their regeneration. Although the exact mechanism of extracorporeal shockwaves (ESW) is yet to be fully elucidated, it is seen to influence a complex spectrum of bio-chemical, cellular and neuronal functions (i.e. suppression of pro-inflammatory immune response, improved tissue hemodynamics, anti-microbial properties, and the induction of progenitor cell expression including proangiogenic factors and nitric oxide syntheses). The rationale for the use of ESW as a therapeutic modality in this instance is attributed to its restorative properties and safety profile demonstrated in urology, cardiology, chronic wounds, osteogenesis, complex pain syndromes, and tendinopathies. ESW may restore autoimmune homeostasis creating a suitable environment for pancreatic β-cell proliferation which in-turn may significantly increase or normalize endogenous insulin secretion reducing or totally eliminating dependency of exogenous insulin. The devastating complications, morbidity and mortality associated with T1DM warrants the exploration of homeostatic autoimmune restorative treatment (HART) modalities that may partially or fully

  16. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Synergizes with Notch2 to Govern Marginal Zone B Cells in Nonobese Diabetic Mice1,2

    PubMed Central

    Nyhoff, Lindsay E.; Steinberg, Hannah E.; Sullivan, Allison M.; Kendall, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of autoimmune-prone marginal zone (MZ) B cells has been implicated in type 1 diabetes (T1D). To test disease contributions of MZ B cells in NOD mice, Notch2 haploinsufficiency (Notch2+/−) was introduced, but failed to eliminate the MZ, as it does in C57BL/6 mice. Notch2+/−/NOD have MZ B cell numbers similar to WT C57BL/6, yet still develop diabetes. To test whether BCR-signaling supports Notch2+/−/NOD MZ B cells, Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-deficiency was introduced. Surprisingly, MZ B cells failed to develop in Btk-deficient Notch2+/−/NOD mice. Expression of Notch2 and its transcriptional target, Hes5, were increased in NOD MZ B cells compared with C57BL/6 MZ B cells. Btk-deficiency reduced Notch2+/− signaling exclusively in NOD B cells, suggesting that BCR-signaling enhances Notch2 signaling in this autoimmune model. The role of BCR-signaling was further investigated using an anti-insulin transgenic BCR (125Tg). Anti-insulin B cells in 125Tg/Notch2+/−/NOD mice populate an enlarged MZ, suggesting that low level BCR signaling overcomes reliance on Notch2. Tracking clonotypes of anti-insulin B cells in H chain only VH125Tg/NOD mice showed that BTK-dependent selection into the MZ depends on strength of antigenic binding, while Notch2-mediated selection does not. Importantly, anti-insulin B cell numbers were reduced by Btk-deficiency, but not Notch2-haploinsufficiency. These studies show that: 1) Notch2-haploinsufficiency limits NOD MZ B cell expansion without preventing T1D, 2) BTK supports the Notch2 pathway in NOD MZ B cells, and 3) autoreactive NOD B cell survival relies on BTK more than Notch2, regardless of MZ location, which may have important implications for disease-intervention strategies. PMID:26034172

  17. Prediction of type 1 diabetes using a genetic risk model in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.

    PubMed

    Frohnert, Brigitte I; Laimighofer, Michael; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J; Winkler, Christiane; Norris, Jill M; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Rewers, Marian J; Steck, Andrea K

    2017-07-11

    Genetic predisposition for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is largely determined by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes; however, over 50 other genetic regions confer susceptibility. We evaluated a previously reported 10-factor weighted model derived from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium to predict the development of diabetes in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) prospective cohort. Performance of the model, derived from individuals with first-degree relatives (FDR) with T1D, was evaluated in DAISY general population (GP) participants as well as FDR subjects. The 10-factor weighted risk model (HLA, PTPN22 , INS , IL2RA , ERBB3 , ORMDL3 , BACH2 , IL27 , GLIS3 , RNLS ), 3-factor model (HLA, PTPN22, INS ), and HLA alone were compared for the prediction of diabetes in children with complete SNP data (n = 1941). Stratification by risk score significantly predicted progression to diabetes by Kaplan-Meier analysis (GP: P = .00006; FDR: P = .0022). The 10-factor model performed better in discriminating diabetes outcome than HLA alone (GP, P = .03; FDR, P = .01). In GP, the restricted 3-factor model was superior to HLA (P = .03), but not different from the 10-factor model (P = .22). In contrast, for FDR the 3-factor model did not show improvement over HLA (P = .12) and performed worse than the 10-factor model (P = .02) CONCLUSIONS: We have shown a 10-factor risk model predicts development of diabetes in both GP and FDR children. While this model was superior to a minimal model in FDR, it did not confer improvement in GP. Differences in model performance in FDR vs GP children may lead to important insights into screening strategies specific to these groups. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Abnormalities in chromosome 6q24 as a cause of early-onset, non-obese, non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus without history of neonatal diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, T; Matsubara, K; Sakakibara, A; Hashimoto, Y; Kawakita, R; Hosokawa, Y; Fujimaru, R; Murakami, A; Tamagawa, N; Hatake, K; Nagasaka, H; Suzuki, J; Urakami, T; Izawa, M; Kagami, M

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in the imprinted locus on chromosome 6q24 are the most common causes of transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes). 6q24-Related transient neonatal diabetes is characterized by the patient being small-for-gestational age, diabetes mellitus at birth, spontaneous remission within the first few months and frequent recurrence of diabetes after childhood. However, it is not clear whether individuals with 6q24 abnormalities invariably develop transient neonatal diabetes. This study explored the possibility that 6q24 abnormalities might cause early-onset, non-autoimmune diabetes without transient neonatal diabetes. The 6q24 imprinted locus was screened for abnormalities in 113 Japanese patients with early-onset, non-obese, non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus who tested negative for mutations in the common maturation-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) genes and without a history of transient neonatal diabetes. Positive patients were further analysed by combined loss of heterozygosity / comparative genomic hybridization analysis and by microsatellite analysis. Detailed clinical data were collected through the medical records of the treating hospitals. Three patients with paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 6q24 were identified. None presented with hyperglycaemia in the neonatal period. Characteristically, these patients were born small-for-gestational age, representing 27.2% of the 11 patients whose birth weight standard deviation score (SDS) for gestational age was below -2.0. Abnormalities in the imprinted locus on chromosome 6q24 do not necessarily cause transient neonatal diabetes. Non-penetrant 6q24-related diabetes could be an underestimated cause of early-onset, non-autoimmune diabetes in patients who are not obese and born small-for-gestational age. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  19. Potential mechanisms explaining why hydrolyzed casein-based diets outclass single amino acid-based diets in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in diabetes-prone BB rats.

    PubMed

    Visser, J T J; Bos, N A; Harthoorn, L F; Stellaard, F; Beijer-Liefers, S; Rozing, J; van Tol, E A F

    2012-09-01

    It remains controversial whether avoidance of dietary diabetogenic triggers, such as cow's milk proteins, can prevent type 1 diabetes in genetically susceptible individuals. Here, different extensive casein hydrolysates (HC) and single amino acid (AA) formulations were tested for their effect on mechanisms underlying autoimmune diabetes pathogenesis in diabetes-prone BioBreeding rats. Intestinal integrity, gut microbiota composition and mucosal immune reactivity were studies to assess whether these formulations have differential effects in autoimmune diabetes prevention. Diabetes-prone BioBreeding rats received diets in which the protein fraction was exchanged for the different hydrolysates or AA compositions, starting from weaning until the end of the experiment (d150). Diabetes development was monitored, and faecal and ileal samples were collected. Gut microbiota composition and cytokine/tight junction mRNA expression were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cytokine levels of ileum explant cultures were measured by ELISA, and intestinal permeability was measured in vivo by lactulose-mannitol assay. Both HC-diet fed groups revealed remarkable reduction of diabetes incidence with the most pronounced effect in Nutramigen®-fed animals. Interestingly, AA-fed rats only showed delayed autoimmune diabetes development. Furthermore, both HC-fed groups had improved intestinal barrier function when compared with control chow or AA-fed animals. Interestingly, higher IL-10 levels were measured in ileum tissue explants from Nutramigen®-fed rats. Beneficial gut microbiota changes (increased Lactobacilli and reduced Bacteroides spp. levels) were found associated especially with HC-diet interventions. Casein hydrolysates were found superior to AA-mix in autoimmune diabetes prevention. This suggests the presence of specific peptides that beneficially affect mechanisms that may play a critical role in autoimmune diabetes pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley

  20. The effect of diabetes-associated autoantigens on cell processes in human PBMCs and their relevance to autoimmune diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Vcelakova, Jana; Blatny, Radek; Halbhuber, Zbynek; Kolar, Michal; Neuwirth, Ales; Petruzelkova, Lenka; Ulmannova, Tereza; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Sumnik, Zdenek; Pithova, Pavlina; Krivjanska, Maria; Filipp, Dominik; Stechova, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is considered to be a T-helper- (Th-) 1 autoimmune disease; however, T1D pathogenesis likely involves many factors, and sufficient tools for autoreactive T cell detection for the study of this disease are currently lacking. In this study, using gene expression microarrays, we analysed the effect of diabetes-associated autoantigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the purpose of identifying (pre)diabetes-associated cell processes. Twelve patients with recent onset T1D, 18 first-degree relatives of the TD1 patients (DRL; 9/18 autoantibody positive), and 13 healthy controls (DV) were tested. PBMCs from these individuals were stimulated with a cocktail of diabetes-associated autoantigens (proinsulin, IA-2, and GAD65-derived peptides). After 72 hours, gene expression was evaluated by high-density gene microarray. The greatest number of functional differences was observed between relatives and controls (69 pathways), from which 15% of the pathways belonged to "immune response-related" processes. In the T1D versus controls comparison, more pathways (24%) were classified as "immune response-related." Important pathways that were identified using data from the T1D versus controls comparison were pathways involving antigen presentation by MHCII, the activation of Th17 and Th22 responses, and cytoskeleton rearrangement-related processes. Genes involved in Th17 and TGF-beta cascades may represent novel, promising (pre)diabetes biomarkers.

  1. Autoimmunity and beta cell regeneration in mouse and human type 1 diabetes: the peace is not enough.

    PubMed

    Ablamunits, Vitaly; Sherry, Nicole A; Kushner, Jake A; Herold, Kevan C

    2007-04-01

    Accumulating data from animal models of type 1 diabetes and some findings from clinical studies suggest that autoimmune destruction of islet beta cells is associated with enhanced beta cell regeneration. Successful immune therapies, aimed at preservation of islet cell mass, result in a remarkable reduction of beta cell regeneration. Treated or not, as long as the task of treatment is limited by "making peace" with autoimmunity, the process of beta cell loss continues. Additional therapeutic modalities capable of stimulating beta cell regeneration in the absence of active autoimmune destruction are urgently needed.

  2. Exposure to sequestered self-antigens in vivo is not sufficient for the induction of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Olivia; Hall, Håkan; Elford, Alisha R.; Yen, Patty; Calzascia, Thomas; Spencer, David M.; Ohashi, Pamela S.

    2017-01-01

    Although the role of T cells in autoimmunity has been explored for many years, the mechanisms leading to the initial priming of an autoimmune T cell response remain enigmatic. The ‘hit and run’ model suggests that self-antigens released upon cell death can provide the initial signal for a self-sustaining autoimmune response. Using a novel transgenic mouse model where we could induce the release of self-antigens via caspase-dependent apoptosis. We tracked the fate of CD8+ T cells specific for the self-antigen. Our studies demonstrated that antigens released from apoptotic cells were cross-presented by CD11c+ cells in the draining lymph node. This cross-presentation led to proliferation of self-antigen specific T cells, followed by a transient ability to produce IFN-γ, but did not lead to the development of autoimmune diabetes. Using this model we examined the consequences on T cell immunity when apoptosis was combined with dendritic cell maturation signals, an autoimmune susceptible genetic background, and the deletion of Tregs. The results of our study demonstrate that autoimmune diabetes cannot be initiated by the presentation of antigens released from apoptotic cells in vivo even in the presence of factors known to promote autoimmunity. PMID:28257518

  3. Inherited Variation in Vitamin D Genes Is Associated With Predisposition to Autoimmune Disease Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jason D.; Smyth, Deborah J.; Walker, Neil M.; Stevens, Helen; Burren, Oliver S.; Wallace, Chris; Greissl, Christopher; Ramos-Lopez, Elizabeth; Hyppönen, Elina; Dunger, David B.; Spector, Timothy D.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Wang, Thomas J.; Badenhoop, Klaus; Todd, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L) is commonly reported in both children and adults worldwide, and growing evidence indicates that vitamin D deficiency is associated with many extraskeletal chronic disorders, including the autoimmune diseases type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured 25(OH)D concentrations in 720 case and 2,610 control plasma samples and genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms from seven vitamin D metabolism genes in 8,517 case, 10,438 control, and 1,933 family samples. We tested genetic variants influencing 25(OH)D metabolism for an association with both circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and disease status. RESULTS Type 1 diabetic patients have lower circulating levels of 25(OH)D than similarly aged subjects from the British population. Only 4.3 and 18.6% of type 1 diabetic patients reached optimal levels (≥75 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D for bone health in the winter and summer, respectively. We replicated the associations of four vitamin D metabolism genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, and CYP24A1) with 25(OH)D in control subjects. In addition to the previously reported association between type 1 diabetes and CYP27B1 (P = 1.4 × 10−4), we obtained consistent evidence of type 1 diabetes being associated with DHCR7 (P = 1.2 × 10−3) and CYP2R1 (P = 3.0 × 10−3). CONCLUSIONS Circulating levels of 25(OH)D in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes vary seasonally and are under the same genetic control as in the general population but are much lower. Three key 25(OH)D metabolism genes show consistent evidence of association with type 1 diabetes risk, indicating a genetic etiological role for vitamin D deficiency in type 1 diabetes. PMID:21441443

  4. Autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in a patient with ureaplasma urealyticum infection and review on new triggers of immune response.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Spanò, Francesca; Ferone, Diego; Albertelli, Manuela; Schenone, Angelo; Contatore, Miriam; Guastalla, Andrea; De Bellis, Annamaria; Garibotto, Giacomo; Puppo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease in which large volumes of dilute urine (polyuria) are excreted due to vasopressin (AVP) deficiency [central diabetes insipidus (CDI)] or to AVP resistance (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). In the majority of patients, the occurrence of CDI is related to the destruction or degeneration of neurons of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. The most common and well recognized causes include local inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, vascular disorders, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), sarcoidosis, tumors such as germinoma/craniopharyngioma or metastases, traumatic brain injuries, intracranial surgery, and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. Here we have the opportunity to describe an unusual case of female patient who developed autoimmune CDI following ureaplasma urealyticum infection and to review the literature on this uncommon feature. Moreover, we also discussed the potential mechanisms by which ureaplasma urealyticum might favor the development of autoimmune CDI.

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 reduces intestinal permeability but does not modify the onset of type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Hadjiyanni, Irene; Li, Kunmin Karen; Drucker, Daniel J

    2009-02-01

    The development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to environmental factors and dietary components. Increasing evidence indicates that the integrity of the gut mucosa plays a role in the development of autoimmune diseases, and evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies demonstrates that increased leakiness of the intestinal epithelium precedes the development of type 1 diabetes. However, there is limited information on modulation of gut barrier function and its relationship to diabetes development. Here we show that the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a model of T1D, exhibits enhanced intestinal transcellular permeability before the development of autoimmune diabetes. Treatment of NOD mice with a glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analog, synthetic human [Gly(2)] glucagon-like peptide-2 (h[Gly(2)]GLP-2, increased the length and weight of the small bowel and significantly improved jejunal transepithelial resistance. However, chronic administration of once daily h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 failed to delay or reverse the onset of T1D when treatment was initiated in young, normoglycemic female NOD mice. Furthermore, h[Gly(2)]GLP-2 administration had no significant effect on lymphocyte subpopulations in NOD mice. These findings demonstrate that h[Gly(2)]GLP-2-mediated enhancement of gut barrier function in normoglycemic NOD mice disease is not sufficient to prevent or delay the development of experimental T1D.

  6. A gluten-free diet lowers NKG2D and ligand expression in BALB/c and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, E H; Weile, C; Larsen, J; Engkilde, K; Agardh, D; Buschard, K; Antvorskov, J C

    2014-08-01

    The interplay between diet and immune parameters which could affect type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis is not sufficiently clarified. Intestinal up-regulation of the activating receptor natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) (CD314) and its ligands is a hallmark of coeliac disease. However, the direct effect of gluten on NKG2D expression is not known. We studied, by fluorescence activated cell sorter (lymphoid tissues) and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (intestine and pancreatic islets), if a gluten-free diet (GF diet) from 4 weeks of age or a gluten-free diet introduced in breeding pairs (SGF diet), induced changes in NKG2D expression on DX5(+) (CD49b) natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells and in intestinal and islet levels of NKG2D and ligands in BALB/c and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Gluten-free NOD mice had lower insulitis (P < 0·0001); reduced expression of NKG2D on DX5(+) NK cells in spleen and auricular lymph nodes (P < 0·05); and on CD8(+) T cells in pancreas-associated lymph nodes (P = 0·04). Moreover, the level of CD71 on DX5(+) NK cells and CD8(+) T cells (P < 0·005) was markedly reduced. GF and SGF mice had reduced expression of NKG2D and DX5 mRNA in intestine (P < 0·05). Differences in intestinal mRNA expression were found in mice at 8, 13 and 20 weeks. Intestinal expression of NKG2D ligands was reduced in SGF mice with lower expression of all ligands. In isolated islets, a SGF diet induced a higher expression of specific NKG2D ligands. Our data show that a gluten-free diet reduces the level of NKG2D and the expression of NKG2D ligands. These immunological changes may contribute to the lower T1D incidence associated with a gluten-free diet.

  7. A targeted mutation in the IL-4Rα gene protects mice against autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Dorel L.; Noben-Trauth, Nancy; Hu-Li, Jane; Paul, William E.; Bona, Constantin A.

    2000-01-01

    Autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) occurs spontaneously in mice-bearing transgenes encoding the influenza hemagglutinin under the control of the rat insulin promoter and a T cell receptor specific for an hemagglutinin peptide associated with I-Ed. Such “double transgenic” mice expressing wild-type or targeted IL-4Rα genes were examined for the onset of IDDM. Eight of 11 mice homozygous for wild-type IL-4Rα were hyperglycemic by 8 weeks of age, whereas only 1 of 16 mice homozygous for the targeted allele were hyperglycemic at this time. Most 1L-4Rα−/− mice remained normoglycemic to 36 weeks of age. Although only 10% of double transgenic mice homozygous for the wild-type IL-4Rα allele survived to 30 weeks, 80% of mice homozygous for the targeted allele did so. Heterozygous mice displayed an intermediate frequency of diabetes. Even as late as 270 days of age, mice homozygous for the targeted allele had no insulitis or only peri-insulitis. Thus, the inability to respond to IL-4 and/or IL-13 protects mice against IDDM in this model of autoimmunity. PMID:11050183

  8. The effect of childhood cow's milk intake and HLA-DR genotype on risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Molly M; Miller, Melissa; Seifert, Jennifer A; Frederiksen, Brittni; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2015-02-01

    Cow's milk intake has been inconsistently associated with islet autoimmunity (IA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. Genetic and environmental factors may modify the effect of cow's milk on IA and T1D risk. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) follows children at increased T1D risk of IA (presence of autoantibodies to insulin, GAD65, or IA-2 twice in succession) and T1D development. We examined 1835 DAISY children with data on cow's milk intake: 143 developed IA, 40 subsequently developed T1D. Cow's milk protein and lactose intake were calculated from prospectively collected parent- and self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). High risk HLA-DR genotype: HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302; low/moderate risk: all other genotypes. We examined interactions between cow's milk intake, age at cow's milk introduction, and HLA-DR genotype in IA and T1D development. Interaction models contained the base terms (e.g., cow's milk protein and HLA-DR genotype) and an interaction term (e.g., cow's milk protein*HLA-DR genotype). In survival models adjusted for total calories, FFQ type, T1D family history, and ethnicity, greater cow's milk protein intake was associated with increased IA risk in children with low/moderate risk HLA-DR genotypes [hazard ratio (HR): 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-1.84], but not in children with high risk HLA-DR genotypes. Cow's milk protein intake was associated with progression to T1D (HR: 1.59, CI: 1.13-2.25) in children with IA. Greater cow's milk intake may increase risk of IA and progression to T1D. Early in the T1D disease process, cow's milk intake may be more influential in children with low/moderate genetic T1D risk. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Genetic interactions among Idd3, Idd5.1, Idd5.2 and Idd5.3 protective loci in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaotian; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E.; Rainbow, Daniel B; Hunter, Kara M.; Dai, Yang D.; Cheung, Jocelyn; Peterson, Laurence B.; Wicker, Linda S.; Sherman, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    In the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D), insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) loci control the development of insulitis and diabetes. Independently, protective alleles of Idd3/Il2 or Idd5 are able to partially protect congenic NOD mice from insulitis and diabetes, and to partially tolerize islet-specific CD8+ T cells. However, when the two regions are combined, mice are almost completely protected, strongly suggesting the existence of genetic interactions between the two loci. Idd5 contains at least three protective sub-regions/causative gene candidates, Idd5.1/Ctla4, Idd5.2/Slc11a1 and Idd5.3/Acadl, yet it is unknown which of them interacts with Idd3/Il2. Through the use of a series of novel congenic strains containing the Idd3/Il2 region and different combinations of Idd5 sub-region(s), we defined these genetic interactions. The combination of Idd3/Il2 and Idd5.3/Acadl was able to provide nearly complete protection from T1D, but all three Idd5 sub-regions were required to protect from insulitis and fully restore self-tolerance. By backcrossing a Slc11a1 KO allele onto the NOD genetic background, we have demonstrated that Slc11a1 is responsible for the diabetes protection resulting from Idd5.2. We also used Slc11a1 KO-SCID and Idd5.2-SCID mice to show that both loss-of-function alleles provide protection from insulitis when expressed on the SCID host alone. These results lend further support to the hypothesis that Slc11a1 is Idd5.2. PMID:23427248

  10. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  11. CD4 T cells and their antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Kathryn; Cooke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is mediated by effector T cells and CD4 Th1 and Th17 T cells have important roles in this process. While effector function of Th1 cells is well established, due to their inherent plasticity Th17 cells have been more controversial. Th17 cells contribute to pathogenicity, but several studies indicate that Th17 cells transfer disease through conversion to Th1 cells in vivo. CD4 T cells are attracted to islets by β-cell antigens which include insulin and the two new autoantigens, chromogranin A and islet amyloid polypeptide, all proteins of the secretory granule. Peptides of insulin and ChgA bind to the NOD class II molecule in an unconventional manner and since autoantigenic peptides may typically bind to MHC with low affinity, it is postulated that post-translational modifications of β-cell peptides could contribute to the interaction between peptides, MHC, and the autoreactive TCR. PMID:21917439

  12. Reduced Diabetes in btk-Deficient Nonobese Diabetic Mice and Restoration of Diabetes with Provision of an Anti-Insulin IgH Chain Transgene1

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Peggy L.; Moore, Daniel J.; Hulbert, Chrys; Hoek, Kristen L.; Khan, Wasif N.; Thomas, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells. Although elimination of B lymphocytes has proven successful at preventing disease, modulation of B cell function as a means to prevent type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. The development, fate, and function of B lymphocytes depend upon BCR signaling, which is mediated in part by Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). When introduced into NOD mice, btk deficiency only modestly reduces B cell numbers, but dramatically protects against diabetes. In NOD, btk deficiency mirrors changes in B cell subsets seen in other strains, but also improves B cell-related tolerance, as indicated by failure to generate insulin autoantibodies. Introduction of an anti-insulin BCR H chain transgene restores diabetes in btk-deficient NOD mice, indicating that btk-deficient B cells are functionally capable of promoting autoimmune diabetes if they have a critical autoimmune specificity. This suggests that the disease-protective effect of btk deficiency may reflect a lack of autoreactive specificities in the B cell repertoire. Thus, signaling via BTK can be modulated to improve B cell tolerance, and prevent T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes. PMID:19841184

  13. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches.

  14. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; diIorio, Philip; Brostowin, Dean; Leehy, Linda; Yang, Chaoxing; Urano, Fumihiko; Harlan, David M; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice treated with alogliptin show improved human insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation compared to control mice engrafted with the same donor islets. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets provide a useful model to interrogate potential therapies to improve human islet function and survival in vivo. PMID:24376359

  15. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diabetes – a prime time to treat insulitis as a disease

    PubMed Central

    Grönholm, Juha; Lenardo, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a progressive autoimmune disease with no curative treatment, making prevention critical. At the time of diagnosis, a majority of the insulin secreting β-cells has already been destroyed. Insulitis, lymphocytic infiltration to the pancreatic islets, is believed to begin months to years before the clinical symptoms of insulin deficiency appear. Insulitis should be treated as its own disease, for it is a known precursor to autoimmune diabetes. Because it is difficult to detect insulitic cellular infiltrates noninvasively, considerable interest has been focused on the levels of islet autoantibodies in blood as measurable diagnostic markers for islet autoimmunity. The traditional islet autoantibody detection assays have many limitations. New electrochemiluminescence-based autoantibody detection assays have the potential to overcome these challenges and they offer promising, cost-effective screening tools in identifying high-risk individuals for trials of preventive interventions. Here, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to overcome pancreatic β-cell destroying insulitis. PMID:25486604

  16. A recombination event in the 5' flanking region of the Ly-6C gene correlates with impaired expression in the NOD, NZB and ST strains of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Philbrick, W M; Maher, S E; Bridgett, M M; Bothwell, A L

    1990-01-01

    The murine alloantigen, Ly-6C, is found on 45% of bone marrow cells, 25% of splenocytes and 15% of lymph node cells in all inbred strains of mice tested, with the exception of NOD, NZB and ST. In these three strains, Ly-6C expression can be detected on only 5% of bone marrow cells and not at all on cells from spleen or lymph node. NOD and NZB, which are models for the autoimmune diseases, diabetes and lupus, respectively, also exhibit a depressed syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Southern blot analysis reveals a restriction fragment length polymorphism involving the Ly-6C gene which is unique to these three strains. Cloning of the affected genomic segment from the NOD mouse indicates the presence of an interruption in the flanking region of the Ly-6C gene at a point 475 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site and the consequent separation of distal 5' sequences from the body of the gene by at least 10 kb. Inspection of the recombination borders reveals a set of inverted copies of a mouse repetitive R element. Transfection of the Ly-6C genes from NOD and BALB/c into a murine carcinoma line indicates relative functional impairment of the NOD gene, thus paralleling performance in vivo. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2164472

  17. Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 protein is a novel beta-cell-specific autoantigen for type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Wu; Koya, Vijay; Li, Yi; Donelan, William; Lin, Peng; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) protein is a key transcription factor involved in the regulation of insulin gene expression that is expressed at high levels in the beta-cells of the pancreatic islets. We asked whether Pdx1 is a target of anti-islet autoimmunity in type I diabetes (T1D). Pdx1 autoantibodies (PAAs) were detected in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using ELISA, western blotting, and radioimmunoprecipitation of [(35)S]-labeled insulinoma cell line-derived Pdx1 protein. PAAs were detected as early as at 5 weeks of age, and generally peaked before the onset of clinically overt diabetes in diabetes-prone female NOD mice. Levels declined substantially after the onset of diabetes. PAAs were not detected in the sera of NOD-scid, C57BL/6, or BALB/c mice. The titers of PAAs in NOD mouse sera were as high as 1/93 750 by ELISA. The fine specificity of PAAs was determined by western blotting using a series of truncated recombinant Pdx1 proteins. The immunodominant epitopes were located to the C-terminus of the Pdx1 (p200-283) in NOD mice. PAAs also were detected in sera from human T1D patients, but the major epitopes were localized to amino acids 159-200 as well as the same region (p200-283) recognized by PAAs from NOD mice. Using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, the p83 fragment of Pdx1 specifically stimulated proliferation of splenic T cells from recent-onset diabetic NOD mice. The presence of PAAs in prediabetic NOD mice and human T1D patients, and Pdx1-specific T-cell proliferation in NOD mice provide a strong rationale for further investigation of the pathogenic role of immune responses against Pdx1 in T1D.

  18. Diabetes insipidus is an unfavorable prognostic factor for response to glucocorticoids in patients with autoimmune hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Isabella; Cosottini, Mirco; Caturegli, Patrizio; Manetti, Luca; Urbani, Claudio; Cappellani, Daniele; Scattina, Ilaria; Martino, Enio; Marcocci, Claudio; Bogazzi, Fausto

    2017-08-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) has a variable clinical presentation and natural history; likewise, its response to glucocorticoid therapy is often unpredictable. To identify clinical and radiological findings associated with response to glucocorticoids. 12 consecutive patients with AH, evaluated from 2008 to 2016. AH was the exclusion diagnosis after ruling out other pituitary masses and secondary causes of hypophysitis. Mean follow-up time was 30 ± 27 months (range 12-96 months). MRI identified two main patterns of presentation: global enlargement of the pituitary gland or panhypophysitis (n = 4, PH), and pituitary stalk abnormality only, or infundibulo-neuro-hypophysitis (n = 8, INH). Multiple tropin defects were more common in PH (100%) than those in INH (28% P = 0.014), whereas diabetes insipidus was more common in INH (100%) than that in PH (50%; P = 0.028). All 4 PH and 4 out of 8 INH were treated with glucocorticoids. Pituitary volume significantly reduced in all PH patients (P = 0.012), defective anterior pituitary function recovered only in the two patients without diabetes insipidus (50%) and panhypopituitarism persisted, along with diabetes insipidus, in the remaining 2 (50%). In all INH patients, either treated or untreated, pituitary stalk diameter reduced (P = 0.008) but diabetes insipidus persisted in all. Glucocorticoid therapy may improve anterior pituitary function in a subset of patients but has no effect on restoring posterior pituitary function. Diabetes insipidus appears as a negative prognostic factor for response to glucocorticoids. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Development of a novel autoantibody assay for autoimmune gastritis in type 1 diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Wenzlau, J M; Gardner, T J; Frisch, L M; Davidson, H W; Hutton, J C

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune atrophic body gastritis (ABG) and pernicious anaemia are prototypical, organ-specific autoimmune diseases whose prevalence in the general population is 2.0 vs 2 and 0.15-1%, respectively. The incidence of disease increases with age and is frequently associated with other autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Early diagnosis of ABG/pernicious anaemia is essential for the prevention and/or treatment before manifestations of chronic disease become irreversible. Parietal cell autoantibody detection via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is currently the most widely used biomarker of disease with diagnosis confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemistry via biopsy. To improve the assay we designed a specific, molecularly defined radioimmunoprecipitation assay for early detection of ABG, targeting its major antigen, the gastric H+/K+ ATPase 4A subunit ATP4A. The major antigenic domain in ATP4A was tested against a panel of sera from new onset patients with T1DM which tested positive for the gold standard T1DM autoantibodies (IAA, IA2A, GAD65A, and ZnT8A). Significant immunoreactivity to ATP4A was measured (25%) while 6% of first-degree relatives of subjects with T1DM who were sero-negative for T1DM autoantigens were positive for ATP4A autoantibodies. ATP4A antibody prevalence increased with age of onset of T1DM, which is atypical of other T1DM autoantibodies. Immunoreactivity to ATP4A, unlike that of T1DM antigens, demonstrates a significant gender bias in newly diagnosed individuals with T1DM. Although the utility of the assay as a biomarker for T1DM is likely limited, it may serve as an improved indicator of ABG. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Genetic interrelationship between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the autoimmune thyroid diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, C P; King, M C; Huey, B; Malmgren, J; Grumet, F C

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possible coinheritance of autoimmune diseases that are associated with the same HLA antigen, we studied 70 families in which at least two siblings had either type I diabetes mellitus (IDDM), autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or a combination of these diseases. HLA-A, B, and C typing was performed on all affected sibs in one generation or more. First, we estimated by sib-pair analysis the disease allele frequency (pD) and the mode of inheritance for each disease. According to the method of ascertainment entered into the analysis, the pD for ATD ranged from .120 to .180, for an additive (dominant) mode of inheritance. For RA, the pD ranged from .254 to .341, also for additive inheritance, although recessive inheritance could not be excluded. For IDDM, the pD ranged from .336 to .337 for recessive inheritance; additive inheritance was rejected. Second, we examined the distribution of shared parental haplotypes in pairs of siblings that were discordant for their autoimmune diseases. The results suggested that the same haplotype may predispose to both IDDM and ATD, or IDDM and RA, but not to both RA and ATD. Analysis of pedigrees supported this hypothesis. In 16 families typed for HLA-DR also, the haplotype predisposing to both IDDM and ATD was assigned from pedigree information to DR3 (44%), DR4 (39%), or DR5, DR6, or DR7 (5.5% each). In some families, these haplotypes segregated over several generations with ATD only (either clinical or subclinical), suggesting that in such families, ATD was a marker for a susceptibility to IDDM. In several families, an IDDM haplotype segregated with RA but not with ATD. This suggests that ATD- and RA-associated susceptibilities to IDDM may be biologically different and thus independently increase the risk of IDDM. PMID:3456197

  1. Does physiological beta cell turnover initiate autoimmune diabetes in the regional lymph nodes?

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Iskovich, Svetlana; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2006-05-01

    The initial immune process that triggers autoimmune beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes is not fully understood. In early infancy there is an increased beta cell turnover. Recurrent exposure of tissue-specific antigens could lead to primary sensitization of immune cells in the draining lymph nodes of the pancreas. An initial immune injury to the beta cells can be inflicted by several cell types, primarily macrophages and T cells. Subsequently, infiltrating macrophages transfer antigens exposed by apoptotic beta cells to the draining lymph nodes, where antigen presenting cells process and amplify a secondary immune reaction. Antigen presenting cells evolve as dual players in the activation and suppression of the autoimmune reaction in the draining lymph nodes. We propose a scenario where destructive insulitis is caused by recurrent exposure of specific antigens due to the physiological turnover of beta cells. This sensitization initiates the evolution of reactive clones that remain silent in the regional lymph nodes, where they succeed to evade regulatory clonal deletion.

  2. Genetic differentiation of poly I:C from B:9-23 peptide induced experimental autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Paronen, Johanna; Liu, Edwin; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Devendra, Devasenan; Ide, Akane; Taylor, Robert; Yu, Liping; Miao, Dongmei; Melanitou, Evie; Eisenbarth, George S

    2004-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells of the adaptive immune system mediate beta cell destruction. Recently the innate immune system has been linked to etiopathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, as innate effector cells (e.g. dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages and NK cells) can prime and promote or regulate (auto)immune responses. We have previously developed an experimental autoimmune diabetes (EAD) model with insulin peptide B:9-23 immunization in transgenic H-2(d)mice expressing the costimulatory molecule B7.1 in their islets (under the Rat Insulin Promotor, RIP). We compared the induction of diabetes with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C), a mimic of double stranded viral RNA versus insulin B:9-23 peptide in mice following backcrossing of the B7.1 transgene on to BALB/c mice from original B7.1 C57Bl/6 mice. We find that diabetes induction by Poly I:C is C57Bl/6 associated, whereas B:9-23 peptide induced diabetes and induction of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) are dependent on BALB/c genes. This B:9-23 peptide induced diabetes is consistent with MHC class II H-2(d)being necessary for the response to this peptide. Of note Poly I:C induction of diabetes was lost while B:9-23 induction was retained with backcrossing to BALB/c mice. Interaction of genes and environment (antigenic epitope and viral mimic) can be important in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diabetes and activation of the innate immune system (e.g. Poly I:C) may be one key determinant.

  3. Is autoimmune diabetes caused by aberrant immune activity or defective suppression of physiological self-reactivity?

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Enosh M; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-03-01

    Two competing hypotheses are proposed to cause autoimmunity: evasion of a sporadic self-reactive clone from immune surveillance and ineffective suppression of autoreactive clones that arise physiologically. We question the relevance of these hypotheses to the study of type 1 diabetes, where autoreactivity may accompany the cycles of physiological adjustment of β-cell mass to body weight and nutrition. Experimental evidence presents variable and conflicting data concerning the activities of both effector and regulatory T cells, arguing in favor and against: quantitative dominance and deficit, aberrant reactivity and expansion, sensitivity to negative regulation and apoptosis. The presence of autoantibodies in umbilical cord blood of healthy subjects and low incidence of the disease following early induction suggest that suppression of self-reactivity is the major determinant factor.

  4. Dendritic Cell Subsets in Type 1 Diabetes: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of T1D and are also used as immunotherapeutic agents. Plasmacytoid (p)DC have been shown to have both protective and pathogenic effects and a newly described merocytic DC population has been shown to break tolerance in the mouse model of T1D, the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. We have used DC populations to prevent the onset of T1D in NOD mice and clinical trials of DC therapy in T1D diabetes have been initiated. In this review we will critically examine the recent published literature on the role of DC subsets in the induction and regulation of the autoimmune response in T1D. PMID:24367363

  5. Global gene expression changes in type 1 diabetes: insights into autoimmune response in the target organ and in the periphery.

    PubMed

    Planas, Raquel; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Vives-Pi, Marta

    2010-10-30

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by the selective destruction of the insulin-producing β cells. Research into the pathogenesis of T1D has been hindered by the lack of detection of the autoimmune process during the asymptomatic period and by the inaccessibility to the target tissue. Therefore current understanding of the immunological phenomena that take place in the pancreas of the patients is very limited and much of the current knowledge on T1D has been obtained using animal models. Microarray technology and bioinformatics allow the comparison of the gene expression profile - transcriptome - in normal and pathological conditions, creating a global picture of altered processes. Microarray experiments have defined new transcriptional alterations associated with several autoimmune diseases, and are focused on the identification of specific biomarkers. In this review we summarize current data on gene expression profiles in T1D from an immunological point of view. Reported transcriptome studies have been performed in T1D patients and Non-Obese Diabetic mouse models analyzing peripheral blood, lymphoid organs and pancreas/islets. In the periphery, the distinctive profiles are inflammatory pathways inducible by IL-1β and IFNs that can help in the identification of new biomarkers. In the target organ, a remarkable finding is the overexpression of inflammatory and innate immune response genes and the active autoimmune response at longstanding stages, contrary to the pre-existing concept of acute autoimmune process in T1D.

  6. [Diabetes and autoimmune diseases: prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Mont-Serrat, Camila; Hoineff, Claudio; Meirelles, Ricardo M R; Kupfer, Rosane

    2008-12-01

    Determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in attendance in Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione (IEDE). Blood samples were analyzed in 120 children and adolescents with DM1 from IEDE Diabetes Clinic for the IgA antitissue-transglutaminase antibody and dosage of the seric IgA. Those with positive serology were guided for upper endoscopy with small-bowel biopsy to confirm the celiac disease. The antibody was positive in 3 of the 120 patients. The small-bowel biopsy was confirmatory in all of the positive patients, leading to a prevalence of celiac disease of 2.5% in the studied group. The prevalence of celiac disease is increased in children and adolescents with DM1 when compared with normality. As most are asymptomatic, it is recommended periodical screening of celiac disease in children with DM1.

  7. Extended family history of autoimmune diseases and phenotype and genotype of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parkkola, Anna; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael

    2013-08-01

    Based on the concept of clustering autoimmunity, children with a positive family history of autoimmunity could be expected to have a different pathogenetic form of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and thus a stronger autoimmune reactivity against β-cells and an increased prevalence of the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype. We tested this hypothesis in a cross-sectional observational study from the Finnish Pediatric Diabetes Register. HLA class II genotypes and β-cell autoantibodies were analyzed, and data on the extended family history of autoimmunity and clinical markers at diagnosis were collected with a structured questionnaire from 1488 children diagnosed with T1D under the age of 15 years (57% males). Only 23 children (1.5%) had another autoimmune disease (AID) known at diagnosis, and they had a milder metabolic decompensation at diabetes presentation. One-third (31.4%) had at least one relative with an AID other than T1D with affected mothers being overrepresented (8.2%) compared with fathers (2.8%). The children with a positive family history of other AIDs had higher levels of islet cell antibodies (P=0.003), and the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype in the children was associated with celiac disease in the extended family (P<0.001), but not with an increased frequency of autoimmune disorders, in general. Approximately one-third of children with newly diagnosed T1D have a first- and/or second-degree relative affected by an AID. Our data do not consistently support the hypothesis of differential pathogenetic mechanisms in such children.

  8. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant NOD1 (NLRC1), a NLR Family Member

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Nadav; Correa, Ricardo G.; Zhai, Dayong; Reed, John C.

    2011-01-01

    NOD1 (NLRC1) is a member of the NLR family of innate immunity proteins, which are important cellular sensors of various pathogens. Deregulated NOD1 signaling is involved in various autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, making it a potential target for drug discovery. However, to date, the successful high-yield purification NOD1 protein has not been reported. Here we describe the large-scale expression of recombinant NOD1 protein in non-adherent mammalian cells. One-step immunoaffinity purification was carried out, yielding highly pure protein with excellent yields. Gel-sieve chromatography studies showed that the purified NOD1 protein eluted almost exclusively as a monomer. Addition of the NOD1 ligand, (γ-Tri-DAP), stimulated NOD1 protein oligomerization. Using purified NOD1 protein for nucleotide binding studies by the Fluorescence Polarization Assay (FPA) method, we determined that NOD1 binds preferentially to ATP over ADP and AMP or dATP. We also documented that purified NOD1 protein binds directly to purified pro-apoptotic protein Bid, thus extending recent data that have identified Bid as an enhancer of NOD1 signaling. This expression and purification strategy will enable a wide variety of biochemical studies of mechanisms of NOD1 regulation, as well as laying a foundation for future attempts at drug discovery. PMID:22062585

  9. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  10. GIMAP GTPase family genes: potential modifiers in autoimmune diabetes, asthma, and allergy.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Mirkka T; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A; Kere, Juha; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2015-06-15

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype-driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene-gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded.

  11. GIMAP GTPase Family Genes: Potential Modifiers in Autoimmune Diabetes, Asthma, and Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Mirkka T.; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J.; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A.; Kere, Juha

    2015-01-01

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype–driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene–gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded. PMID:25964488

  12. Gene therapy strategies towards immune tolerance to treat the autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Siatskas, Christopher; Chan, James; Field, Judith; Murphy, Kim; Nasa, Zeyad; Toh, Ban-Hock; Alderuccio, Frank

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis pose a significant health burden on our society. As a whole, autoimmune diseases affect approximately 6% of the population and are the third largest disease burden after heart disease and cancer. Such pathologic manifestations arise by way of damaging reactions of B-cell derived antibodies and/or T-cells to self-antigens and are triggered by genetic and environmental factors. Currently there is no known cure, with treatment restricted to toxic, long-term immunosuppressive regimes, replacement therapy and in intractable cases, transplantation of autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cells. In experimental models of autoimmunity, gene therapeutic approaches have demonstrated promise in treating the autoimmune diseases. These include delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokines and exploitation of regulatory T cells. However, none of these approaches provide lasting, long-term benefit. We hypothesise that therapeutically transduced haematopoietic stem cells followed by transplantation is an alternative strategy to establish permanent immune tolerance that can not only prevent autoimmunity but also cure these diseases. Our approach is focused on directing autoimmune disease-specific autoantigen expression in the thymus by genetic manipulation of haematopoietic stem cells to establish molecular chimeras. Our hypothesis originates from experimental studies with a mouse model of experimental autoimmune gastritis (EAG) and more recently with the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model for type 1 diabetes (T1D).

  13. High prevalence of manifestations of gastric autoimmunity in parietal cell antibody-positive type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. The Belgian Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    De Block, C E; De Leeuw, I H; Van Gaal, L F

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of gastric parietal cell antibodies (PCA) in type 1 diabetes, which can be accompanied by (sub)clinical autoimmune gastric disease. This study aimed to determine the grade of associated autoimmunity and to assess the pattern of prevalence of PCA by gender, age, duration of disease, age at onset of diabetes, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type in an adult type 1 diabetic population. Furthermore, to examine the clinical significance of being PCA positive, manifestations of gastric autoimmune disease were studied in PCA-positive and PCA-negative patients. The population studied consisted of 497 type 1 diabetics (men/women, 252/245; mean age, 40.8 +/- 12.1 yr; mean duration of disease, 16.4 +/- 10.4 yr; mean age at onset, 26.9 +/- 13.5 yr; mean hemoglobin A1c, 8.1 +/- 1.6%). Associated autoantibodies were present in 39% and PCA were present in 20.9% of the subjects, particularly in older patients. Gender, duration, and age at onset of diabetes did not influence the appearance of PCA. Antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (aTPO) were more frequent in PCA-positive patients than in those without PCA (33.6% vs. 22.4%; P = 0.025), suggesting an association between gastric and thyroid autoimmunity. We could demonstrate an association between PCA and the HLA DR5 haplotype (P = 0.001) as well, but not with HLA DR3 and/or DR4. In the PCA-positive group, iron deficiency anemia was detected in 15.4%, and pernicious anemia was found in 10.5% of subjects. These autoimmune gastric manifestations were significantly more prevalent in PCA-positive diabetics than in PCA-negative subjects, in whom the percentages were 6.9% and 0.5%, respectively (P = 0.01 and P < 0.0001). PCA were prevalent in 84.6% of patients with pernicious anemia. A gastroscopic and anatomopathological examination performed in a subgroup of 30 patients with gastric symptoms revealed atrophic gastritis in 13 of 14 PCA-positive patients and in 9 of 16 PCA-negative subjects

  14. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells enhance wound healing in diabetic NOD/SCID mice through high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Whan; Zhang, Hong-Zhe; Guo, Longzhe; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Although human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs) have been recognised as a promising stem cell resource, their therapeutic potential for wound healing has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of AMMs using a diabetic mouse wound model. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA results revealed that the angiogenic factors, IGF-1, EGF and IL-8 were markedly upregulated in AMMs when compared with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMs) and dermal fibroblasts. In vitro scratch wound assays also showed that AMM-derived conditioned media (CM) significantly accelerated wound closure. Diabetic mice were generated using streptozotocin and wounds were created by skin excision, followed by AMM transplantation. AMM transplantation significantly promoted wound healing and increased re-epithelialization and cellularity. Notably, transplanted AMMs exhibited high engraftment rates and expressed keratinocyte-specific proteins and cytokeratin in the wound area, indicating a direct contribution to cutaneous closure. Taken together, these data suggest that AMMs possess considerable therapeutic potential for chronic wounds through the secretion of angiogenic factors and enhanced engraftment/differentiation capabilities.

  15. Autoimmune manifestations in aged mice arise from early-life immune dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Tamer I.; Wang, Jingya; Karnell, Jodi L.; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Shu; Naiman, Brian; Gross, Phillip; Brohawn, Philip Z.; Morehouse, Chris; Aoyama, Jordan; Wasserfall, Clive; Carter, Laura; Atkinson, Mark A.; Serreze, David V.; Braley-Mullen, Helen; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies can be present years to decades prior to the onset of disease manifestations in autoimmunity. This suggests that the initial autoimmune trigger involves a peripheral lymphoid component, which ultimately drives disease pathology in local tissues later in life. Here we show Sjögren’s Syndrome manifestations that develop in aged NOD.H-2h4 mice were driven by and dependent on peripheral dysregulation that arose in early life. Specifically, elimination of spontaneous germinal centers in spleens of young NOD.H-2h4 mice by transient blockade of CD40 ligand (CD40L) or splenectomy abolished Sjögren’s pathology of aged mice. Strikingly, a single injection of anti-CD40L at 4 weeks-of-age prevented tertiary follicle neogenesis and greatly blunted the formation of key autoantibodies implicated in glandular pathology, including anti-muscarinic receptor antibodies. Microarray profiling of the salivary gland characterized the expression pattern of genes that increased with disease progression and showed early anti-CD40L greatly repressed B cell function, while having a broader effect on multiple biological pathways including IL-12 and interferon signaling. Importantly, a single, prophylactic treatment with anti-CD40L also inhibited the development of autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes in NOD.H-2h4 and NOD mice, respectively, supporting a key role for CD40L in the pathophysiology of several autoimmune models. These results strongly suggest early peripheral immune dysregulation gives rise to autoimmune manifestations later in life and for diseases pre-dated by autoantibodies, early prophylactic intervention with biologics may prove efficacious. PMID:27798262

  16. NK T cell-induced protection against diabetes in V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic nonobese diabetic mice is associated with a Th2 shift circumscribed regionally to the islets and functionally to islet autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Laloux, V; Beaudoin, L; Jeske, D; Carnaud, C; Lehuen, A

    2001-03-15

    The onset of autoimmune diabetes is related to defective immune regulation. Recent studies have shown that NK T cells are deficient in number and function in both diabetic patients and nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. NK T cells, which are CD1d restricted, express a TCR with an invariant V alpha 14-J alpha 281 chain and rapidly produce large amounts of cytokines. V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic NOD mice have increased numbers of NK T cells and are protected against diabetes onset. In this study we analyzed where and how NK T cells interfere with the development of the anti-islet autoimmune response. NK T cells, which are usually rare in lymph nodes, are abundant in pancreatic lymph nodes and are also present in islets. IL-4 mRNA levels are increased and IFN-gamma mRNA levels decreased in islets from diabetes-free V alpha 14-J alpha 281 transgenic NOD mice; the IgG1/IgG2c ratio of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase is also increased in these mice. Treatment with IL-12 (a pro-Th1 cytokine) or anti-IL-4 Ab abolishes the diabetes protection in V alpha 14-J alpha 281 NOD mice. The protection from diabetes conferred by NK T cells is thus associated with a Th2 shift within islets directed against autoantigen such as glutamic acid decarboxylase. Our findings also demonstrate the key role of IL-4.

  17. Allicin has significant effect on autoimmune anti-islet cell antibodies in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Osman, Muhamed; Adnan, Ariza; Salmah Bakar, Nor; Alashkham, Fatma

    2012-12-01

    The research purpose was to experimentally investigate the effect of allicin administration on the levels of main type 1 diabetes (IDDM) autoantibodies which are anti-islet cell antibodies (ICA) with an attempt to find a relation between this immunological effect and histological and/or biochemical findings. We have evaluated, with the help of ELISA kits, the levels of ICA and serum insulin in male Sprague-Dawley rats with Streptozotocin-induced IDDM in addition to pancreatic histological findings. The four groups (6 rats each) under study received or not different intraperitoneal doses of allicin for a period of 30 days. Daily intraperitoneal administration of allicin (either at as low dose of 8 mg/kg or high dose of 16 mg/kg) for up to 30 days to type 1 diabetic rats effectively reduces levels of anti-islet cell antibodies and in addition, reduced the level of insulin due to damaged Langerhans islet cell was significantly increased in the serum due to a repairing tissue process in pancreatic tissues. These experimental results suggest that allicin treatment has a therapeutic protective effect against autoimmune reactions occurring in IDDM. The data may provide new strategies for using allicin to be recommended as an excellent candidate in the clinical management, control, and prevention of IDDM.

  18. Metabolomics in the Studies of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oresic, Matej

    2012-01-01

    The metabolome is sensitive to genetic and environmental factors contributing to complex diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Metabolomics is the study of biochemical and physiological processes involving metabolites. It is therefore one of the key platforms for the discovery and study of pathophysiological phenomena leading to T1D and the development of T1D-associated complications. Although the application of metabolomics in T1D research is still rare, metabolomic research has already advanced across the full spectrum, from disease progression to the development of diabetic complications. Metabolomic studies in T1D have contributed to an improved etiopathogenic understanding and demonstrated their potential in the clinic. For example, metabolomic data from recent T1D studies suggest that a specific metabolic profile, or metabotype, precedes islet autoimmunity and the development of overt T1D. These early metabolic changes are attributed to many biochemical pathways, thus suggesting a systemic change in metabolism which may be inborn. Based on this evidence, the role of the metabolome in the progression to T1D is therefore to facilitate specific biochemical processes associated with T1D, and to contribute to the development of a vulnerable state in which disease is more likely to be triggered. This may have important implications for the understanding of T1D pathophysiology and early disease detection and prevention. PMID:23804263

  19. Epigenetics: deciphering how environmental factors may modify autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Amanda J; Strom, Alexander; Scott, Fraser W

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that has increased two- to threefold over the past half century by as yet unknown means. It is generally accepted that T1D is the result of gene-environment interactions, but such rapid increases in incidence are not explained by Mendelian inheritance. There have been numerous advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of T1D. Indeed, there has been a large number of genes identified that contribute to risk for this disease and several environmental factors have been proposed. The complexity of such interactions is yet to be understood for any major chronic disease. Epigenetic regulation is one way to explain the rapid increase in incidence and could be a central mechanism by which environmental factors influence development of diabetes. However, there is remarkably little known about the contribution of epigenetics to T1D pathogenesis. Here we speculate on various candidate processes and molecules of the immune and endocrine systems that could modify risk for T1D through epigenetic regulation.

  20. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (P<0.001), I-FABP (P<0.01) and sCD14 (P<0.05) in CLD when compared to healthy controls. However, the levels of cCK-18 (P<0.01) and I-FABP (P<0.01) in CLD-GFD were higher when compared with controls. Interestingly, elevated levels of cCK-18 and I-FABP were found in T2D and T1D (P<0.001), and T1D/INS (P<0.01, P<0.001). Twenty-two out of 43 CLD patients were seropositive for cCK-18, 19/43 for I-FABP and 11/43 for sCD14; 9/30 of T2D patients were positive for cCK-18 and 5/20 of T1D/INS for sCD14, while in controls only 3/41 were positive for cCK-18, 3/41 for I-FABP and 1/41 for sCD14. We documented for the first time seropositivity for sCD14 in CLD and potential usefulness of serum cCK-18 and I-FABP as markers of gut damage in CLD, CLD-GFD, and diabetes.

  1. MicroRNAs: Novel Players in the Dialogue between Pancreatic Islets and Immune System in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ventriglia, Giuliana; Nigi, Laura; Sebastiani, Guido; Dotta, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression in all cell types. Therefore, these tiny noncoding RNA molecules are involved in a wide range of biological processes, exerting functional effects at cellular, tissue, and organ level. In pancreatic islets of Langerhans, including beta-cells, microRNAs are involved in cell differentiation as well as in insulin secretion, while in immune cells they have been shown to play pivotal roles in development, activation, and response to antigens. Indeed, it is not surprising that microRNA alterations can lead to the development of several diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Type 1 diabetes is the result of a selective autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells, characterized by islet inflammation (insulitis), which leads to chronic hyperglycemia. Given the growing importance of microRNA in the pathophysiology of T1D, the aim of this review is to summarize the most recent data on the potential involvement of microRNAs in autoimmune diabetes. Specifically, we will focus on three different aspects: (i) microRNAs as regulators of immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes; (ii) microRNA expression in pancreatic islet inflammation; (iii) microRNAs as players in the dialogue between the immune system and pancreatic endocrine cells. PMID:26339637

  2. Serum adiposity-induced biomarkers in obese and lean children with recently diagnosed autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Redondo, M J; Rodriguez, L M; Haymond, M W; Hampe, C S; Smith, E O; Balasubramanyam, A; Devaraj, S

    2014-12-01

    Obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes. Adipokines, which regulate obesity-induced inflammation, may contribute to this association. We compared serum adipokines and inflammatory cytokines in obese and lean children with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes. We prospectively studied 32 lean and 18 obese children (age range: 2-18 yr) with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes and followed them for up to 2 yr. Serum adipokines [leptin, total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, omentin, resistin, chemerin, visfatin], cytokines [interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at a median of 7 wk after diagnosis (range: 3-16 wk). Lean children were 71.9% non-Hispanic White, 21.9% Hispanic, and 6.3% African-American, compared with 27.8, 55.6, and 16.7%, respectively, for obese children (p = 0.01). Compared with lean children, obese children had significantly higher serum leptin, visfatin, chemerin, TNF-alpha and CRP, and lower total adiponectin and omentin after adjustment for race/ethnicity and Tanner stage. African-American race was independently associated with higher leptin among youth ≥10 yr (p = 0.007). Leptin levels at onset positively correlated with hemoglobin A1c after 1-2 yr (p = 0.0001) independently of body mass index, race/ethnicity, and diabetes duration. Higher TNF-alpha was associated with obesity and female gender, after adjustment for race/ethnicity (p = 0.0003). Obese children with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes have a proinflammatory profile of circulating adipokines and cytokines that may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetic complications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Autoimmune markers in young Malaysian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nazaimoon, W M; Azmi, K N; Rasat, R; Ismail, I S; Singaraveloo, M; Mohamad, W B; Letchuman, R; Sheriff, I H; Faridah, I; Khalid, B A

    2000-09-01

    This study determined the prevalence and significance of autoantibodies to GAD65 (GAD Ab), insulin (IAA), tyrosine-like phosphatase (IA2) and islet-cell (ICA) in a group of 213 young Malaysian Type 1 diabetics, diagnosed before the age of 40 years. Venous blood was taken at fasting, and at 6 minutes post-glucagon (1 mg i.v.). IAA was detected in 47.4%, GAD Ab in 33.8%, IA2 in 8.9% and ICA in 1.4% of the subjects. When based on post-glucagon C-peptide level of 600 pmol/L, 172 (80.7%) patients had inadequate pancreatic reserve, while the remainder 41(19.3%) showed normal response. The autoantibodies, either alone or in combination, were detectable in both groups of patients; higher prevalence in those with poor or no beta-cell function (73.3% versus 46.3%, p = 0.0001). Although the prevalence of GAD Ab was highest in newly diagnosed patients (< 5 years), unlike IA2 and ICA, the marker remained detectable in 24-25% of those patients with long-standing disease. Nineteen patients could probably belong to the "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA)" subset, where pancreatic reserve was adequate but patients had detectable autoantibodies and insulin-requiring. On the other hand, 68 of the 213 patients (32%) were seronegative, but presented with near or total beta-cell destruction. Thus, as has also been suggested by others, there is indeed etiological differences between the Asian and the Caucasian Type 1 diabetics, and, there is also the possibility that other, but unknown autoantigens are involved in causing the pancreatic damage.

  4. KLRG1 expression identifies short-lived Foxp3(+) Treg effector cells with functional plasticity in islets of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Kornete, Mara; Mason, Edward; Istomine, Roman; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2017-09-01

    A progressive waning in Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell function provokes autoimmunity in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D), a cellular defect rescued by prophylactic IL-2 therapy. We showed that most islet-infiltrating Treg cells express inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS) in pre-diabetic NOD mice, and that ICOS(+) Treg cells display enhanced fitness and suppressive function in situ. Moreover, T1D progression is associated with decreased expansion and suppressive activity of ICOS(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells, in islets, an observation consistent with the exacerbated T1D seen in NOD.BDC2.5 mice in which the ICOS pathway is abrogated. Here, we show that a large proportion of islet-resident Treg cells express the KLRG1 marker of terminally differentiation, in contrast to islet-infiltrating ICOS(-) Treg or Teff cells. We hypothesized that KLRG1 expression designates a subpopulation of ICOS(+) Treg cells in islets that progressively loses function, and contributes to the immune dysregulation observed at T1D onset. Indeed, KLRG1-expressing ICOS(+) Treg cells are prone to apoptosis, and have an impaired proliferative capacity and suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. T1D protective low-dose IL-2 treatment in vivo could not rescue the loss of KLRG1-expressing Treg cells in situ. While the global pool of Foxp3(+) Treg cells displays some degree of functional plasticity in vivo, the KLRG1(+) ICOS(+) Treg cell subset is particularly susceptible to lose Foxp3 expression and reprogram into Th1- or Th17-like effector T (Teff) cells in the pancreas microenvironment. Overall, KLRG1 expression delineates a subpopulation of dysfunctional Treg cells during T1D progression in autoantigen-specific TCR transgenic NOD mice.

  5. Analysis of HLA genes in families with autoimmune diabetes and thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lara; Ban, Yoshiyuki; Concepcion, Erlinda; Davies, Terry F; Greenberg, David A; Tomer, Yaron

    2004-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are the most common autoimmune endocrine disorders. The similar pathogenesis of T1D and AITD and their tendency to occur together suggest that their etiology may involve common genetic factors. We hypothesized that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus may contribute in part to the joint susceptibility to T1D and AITD. We therefore analyzed a data set of 40 multiplex families in which T1D and AITD clustered ("T1D-AITD families") for linkage and association with the HLA class II locus. We found evidence for linkage of the HLA region to T1D (maximum logarithm of odds score [MLS] = 7.3), to Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) (MLS = 1.5), and to both (MLS = 3.8). Transmission disequilibrium test analysis revealed significant association of both T1D and AITD with HLA-DR3; however, only T1D was associated with HLA-DR4. We concluded that the finding of evidence for linkage of HLA with HT is in contrast to the strong evidence against linkage found in previous studies of AITD-only families; therefore, it is possible that the AITD phenotype seen in T1D families has a different genetic etiology than the AITD phenotype in AITD-only families; that HLA-DR3 was the major HLA allele contributing to the joint genetic susceptibility to T1D and AITD, whereas other alleles (e.g., DR4) are phenotype specific; and that because the logarithm of odds score for T1D + HT was lower than for T1D alone, additional non-HLA loci must contribute to the shared genetic susceptibility to T1D and AITD.

  6. Cell-based interventions to halt autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barcala Tabarrozzi, A E; Castro, C N; Dewey, R A; Sogayar, M C; Labriola, L; Perone, M J

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from death of insulin-secreting β cells mediated by self-immune cells, and the consequent inability of the body to maintain insulin levels for appropriate glucose homeostasis. Probably initiated by environmental factors, this disease takes place in genetically predisposed individuals. Given the autoimmune nature of T1DM, therapeutics targeting immune cells involved in disease progress have been explored over the last decade. Several high-cost trials have been attempted to prevent and/or reverse T1DM. Although a definitive solution to cure T1DM is not yet available, a large amount of information about its nature and development has contributed greatly to both the improvement of patient's health care and design of new treatments. In this study, we discuss the role of different types of immune cells involved in T1DM pathogenesis and their therapeutic potential as targets and/or modified tools to treat patients. Recently, encouraging results and new approaches to sustain remnant β cell mass and to increase β cell proliferation by different cell-based means have emerged. Results coming from ongoing clinical trials employing cell therapy designed to arrest T1DM will probably proliferate in the next few years. Strategies under consideration include infusion of several types of stem cells, dendritic cells and regulatory T cells, either manipulated genetically ex vivo or non-manipulated. Their use in combination approaches is another therapeutic alternative. Cell-based interventions, without undesirable side effects, directed to block the uncontrollable autoimmune response may become a clinical reality in the next few years for the treatment of patients with T1DM. PMID:23286940

  7. Augmented LPS Responsiveness in Type 1 Diabetes-Derived Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Dana L.; Calderon, Nadia L.; Harden, Scott W.; Sorenson, Heather L.; Neiva, Kathleen G.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2012-01-01

    Bone abnormalities are frequent co-morbidities of type 1 diabetes [T1D] and are principally mediated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts which in turn are regulated by immunologic mediators. While decreased skeletal health in T1D involves alterations in osteoblast maturation and function, the affect of altered immune function on osteoclasts in T1D-associated bone and joint pathologies is less understood. Here T1D-associated osteoclast-specific differentiation and function in the presence and absence of inflammatory mediators was characterized utilizing bone marrow-derived osteoclasts [BM-OCs] isolated from non-obese diabetic [NOD] mice, a model for spontaneous autoimmune diabetes with pathology similar to individuals with T1D. Differentiation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption were evaluated along with cathepsin K, MMP-9, and immune soluble mediator expression. The affect of LPS, a pro-inflammatory cytokine cocktail, and NOD-derived conditioned supernatants on BM-OC function was also determined. Although NOD BM-OCs cultures contained smaller osteoclasts, they resorbed more bone concomitant with increased cathepsin K, MMP-9 and pro-osteoclastogenic mediator expression. NOD BM-OCs also displayed an inhibition of LPS-induced deactivation that was not a result of soluble mediators produced by NOD BM-OCs, although a pro-inflammatory milieu did enhance NOD BM-OCs bone resorption. Together these data indicate that osteoclasts from a T1D mouse model hyper-respond to RANK-L resulting in excessive bone degradation via enhanced cathepsin K and MMP-9 secretion concomitant with an increased expression of pro-osteoclastic soluble mediators. Our data also suggest that inhibition of LPS-induced deactivation in NOD-derived BM-OC cultures is most likely due to NOD osteoclast responsiveness rather than LPS-induced expression of soluble mediators. PMID:22718269

  8. Virus-induced autoimmune diabetes in the LEW.1WR1 rat requires Iddm14 and a genetic locus proximal to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Cort, Laura; Greiner, Dale L; Guberski, Dennis L; Mordes, John P

    2009-12-01

    To identify genes that confer susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes following viral infection in the LEW.1WR1 rat. About 2% of LEW.1WR1 rats develop spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. Immunological perturbants including viral infection increase both the frequency and tempo of diabetes onset. To identify diabetes susceptibility genes (LEW.1WR1 x WF), F2 rats were infected with Kilham rat virus following brief pretreatment with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. This treatment induces diabetes in 100% of parental LEW.1WR1 rats and 0% of parental WF rats. Linkage to diabetes was analyzed by genome-wide scanning. Among 182 F2 rats, 57 (31%) developed autoimmune diabetes after a mean latency of 16 days. All diabetic animals and approximately 20% of nondiabetic animals exhibited pancreatic insulitis. Genome-wide scanning revealed a requirement for the Iddm14 locus, long known to be required for diabetes in the BB rat. In addition, a new locus near the RT1 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was found to be a major determinant of disease susceptibility. Interestingly, one gene linked to autoimmune diabetes in mouse and human, UBD, lies within this region. The Iddm14 diabetes locus in the rat is a powerful determinant of disease penetrance in the LEW.1WR1 rat following viral infection. In addition, a locus near the MHC (Iddm37) conditions diabetes susceptibility in these animals. Other, as-yet-unidentified genes are required to convert latent susceptibility to overt diabetes. These data provide insight into the polygenic nature of autoimmune diabetes in the rat and the interplay of genetic and environmental factors underlying disease expression.

  9. The association between IgG4 antibodies to dietary factors, islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Molly M; Simpson, Melissa D; Seifert, Jennifer; Scott, Fraser W; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    Infant dietary exposures have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. IgG4 antibody responses to food antigens are associated with food intolerances but have not been explored prospectively in the period preceding T1D. Using a case-cohort design, IgG4 antibodies to ß-lactoglobulin, gluten, and ovalbumin were measured in plasma collected annually from 260 DAISY participants. Of those, 77 developed islet autoimmunity (IA), defined as positive for either insulin, GAD65 or IA-2 autoantibodies on two consecutive visits, and 22 developed T1D. In mixed model analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history, age and ethnicity, higher ß-lactoglobulin IgG4 concentrations were associated with shorter breastfeeding duration (beta = -0.03, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.05, -0.006) and earlier first cow's milk exposure (beta = -0.04, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.08, 0.00). Higher gluten IgG4 was associated with older age at gluten introduction (beta = 0.06, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.13). In proportional hazards analysis adjusting for HLA-DR status, T1D family history and ethnicity, IgG4 against individual or multiple dietary antigens throughout childhood were not associated with IA. In addition, mean antigen-specific IgG4 concentrations in infancy (age <2 years) were not associated with risk of IA nor progression to T1D. Higher ovalbumin IgG4 at first IA positive visit was marginally associated with progression to T1D (Hazard Ratio: 1.39, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.00, 1.92). We found no association between the IgG4 response to β-lactoglobulin, gluten, and the development of either IA or T1D. The association between higher ovalbumin and progression to T1D in children with IA should be explored in other populations.

  10. Growth and Risk for Islet Autoimmunity and Progression to Type 1 Diabetes in Early Childhood: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young Study

    PubMed Central

    Vehik, Kendra; Haller, Michael J.; Liu, Xiang; Akolkar, Beena; Hagopian, William; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lernmark, Åke; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Rewers, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Increased growth in early childhood has been suggested to increase the risk of type 1 diabetes. This study explored the relationship between weight or height and development of persistent islet autoimmunity and progression to type 1 diabetes during the first 4 years of life in 7,468 children at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes followed in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the U.S. Growth data collected every third month were used to estimate individual growth curves by mixed models. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate body size and risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. In the overall cohort, development of islet autoimmunity (n = 575) was related to weight z scores at 12 months (hazard ratio [HR] 1.16 per 1.14 kg in males or per 1.02 kg in females, 95% CI 1.06–1.27, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] = 0.008) but not at 24 or 36 months. A similar relationship was seen between weight z scores and development of multiple islet autoantibodies (1 year: HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08–1.35, P = 0.001, FDR = 0.008; 2 years: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06–1.32, P = 0.004, FDR = 0.02). No association was found between weight or height and type 1 diabetes (n = 169). In conclusion, greater weight in the first years of life was associated with an increased risk of islet autoimmunity. PMID:26993064

  11. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  12. Emetine Di-HCl Attenuates Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, LaQueta K; Dancho, Meghan E; Li, Jianhua; Bruchfeld, Johanna B; Ragab, Ahmed A; He, Mingzhu M; Bragg, Meaghan; Lenaghan, Delaney; Quinn, Michael D; Fritz, Jason R; Tanzi, Matthew V; Silverman, Harold A; Hanes, William M; Levine, Yaakov A; Pavlov, Valentin A; Olofsson, Peder S; Roth, Jesse; Al-Abed, Yousef; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J; Chavan, Sangeeta S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by β cell destruction, insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. Activated macrophages and autoimmune T cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in NOD murine diabetes models, but the molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation are unknown. We recently identified pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as an adipocyte-derived factor that activates macrophages and mediates insulin resistance. Reasoning that PEDF might participate as a proinflammatory mediator in murine diabetes, we measured PEDF levels in NOD mice. PEDF levels are significantly elevated in pancreas, in parallel with pancreatic TNF levels in NOD mice. To identify experimental therapeutics, we screened 2,327 compounds in two chemical libraries (the NIH Clinical Collection and Pharmakon-1600) for leads that inhibit PEDF mediated TNF release in macrophage cultures. The lead molecule selected, “emetine” is a widely used emetic. It inhibited PEDF-mediated macrophage activation with an EC50 or 146 nmol/L. Administration of emetine to NOD mice and to C57Bl6 mice subjected to streptozotocin significantly attenuated hyperglycemia, reduced TNF levels in pancreas and attenuated insulitis. Together, these results suggest that targeting PEDF with emetine may attenuate TNF release and hyperglycemia in murine diabetes models. This suggests that further investigation of PEDF and emetine in the pathogenesis of human diabetes is warranted. PMID:27341452

  13. Type 1 Diabetes in Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy Syndrome (APECED): A "Rare" Manifestation in a "Rare" Disease.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2016-07-12

    Type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE); the encoded Aire protein plays an important role in the establishment of the immunological tolerance acting as a transcriptional regulator of the expression of organ-specific antigens within the thymus in perinatal age. While a high prevalence for this rare syndrome is reported in Finland and Scandinavia (Norway), autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy syndrome (APECED) cohorts of patients are also detected in continental Italy and Sardinia, among Iranian Jews, as well as in other countries. The syndrome is diagnosed when patients present at least two out of the three fundamental disorders including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Among the associated conditions insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes) has been rarely reported in different series of patients and occurring more frequently in Finnish APECED patients. In this review, we analyze the incidence of Type 1 diabetes as a clinical manifestation of APECED in different populations highlighting the peculiar genetic and immunological features of the disease when occurring in the context of this syndrome.

  14. Rebranding asymptomatic type 1 diabetes: the case for autoimmune beta cell disorder as a pathological and diagnostic entity

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Ezio; Mathieu, Chantal; Nepom, Gerald T.; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Anhalt, Henry; Haller, Michael J.; Harrison, Leonard C.; Hebrok, Matthias; Kushner, Jake A.; Norris, Jill M.; Peakman, Mark; Powers, Alvin C.; Todd, John A.; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The asymptomatic phase of type 1 diabetes is recognised by the presence of beta cell autoantibodies in the absence of hyperglycaemia. We propose that an accurate description of this stage is provided by the name ‘Autoimmune Beta Cell Disorder’ (ABCD). Specifically, we suggest that this nomenclature and diagnosis will, in a proactive manner, shift the paradigm towards type 1 diabetes being first and foremost an immune-mediated disease and only later a metabolic disease, presaging more active therapeutic intervention in the asymptomatic stage of disease, before end-stage beta cell failure. Furthermore, we argue that accepting ABCD as a diagnosis will be critical in order to accelerate pharmaceutical, academic and public activities leading to clinical trials that could reverse beta cell autoimmunity and halt progression to symptomatic insulin-requiring type 1 diabetes. We recognize that there are both opportunities and challenges in the implementation of the ABCD concept but hope that the notion of ‘asymptomatic autoimmune disease’ as a disorder will be widely discussed and eventually accepted. PMID:27785529

  15. Rebranding asymptomatic type 1 diabetes: the case for autoimmune beta cell disorder as a pathological and diagnostic entity.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Ezio; Mathieu, Chantal; Nepom, Gerald T; Ziegler, Anette-G; Anhalt, Henry; Haller, Michael J; Harrison, Leonard C; Hebrok, Matthias; Kushner, Jake A; Norris, Jill M; Peakman, Mark; Powers, Alvin C; Todd, John A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    The asymptomatic phase of type 1 diabetes is recognised by the presence of beta cell autoantibodies in the absence of hyperglycaemia. We propose that an accurate description of this stage is provided by the name 'Autoimmune Beta Cell Disorder' (ABCD). Specifically, we suggest that this nomenclature and diagnosis will, in a proactive manner, shift the paradigm towards type 1 diabetes being first and foremost an immune-mediated disease and only later a metabolic disease, presaging more active therapeutic intervention in the asymptomatic stage of disease, before end-stage beta cell failure. Furthermore, we argue that accepting ABCD as a diagnosis will be critical in order to accelerate pharmaceutical, academic and public activities leading to clinical trials that could reverse beta cell autoimmunity and halt progression to symptomatic insulin-requiring type 1 diabetes. We recognize that there are both opportunities and challenges in the implementation of the ABCD concept but hope that the notion of 'asymptomatic autoimmune disease' as a disorder will be widely discussed and eventually accepted.

  16. Innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in the development of Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li; Ley, Ruth E; Volchkov, Pavel Yu; Stranges, Peter B; Avanesyan, Lia; Stonebraker, Austin C; Hu, Changyun; Wong, F Susan; Szot, Gregory L; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Chervonsky, Alexander V

    2008-10-23

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a debilitating autoimmune disease that results from T-cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells. Its incidence has increased during the past several decades in developed countries, suggesting that changes in the environment (including the human microbial environment) may influence disease pathogenesis. The incidence of spontaneous T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be affected by the microbial environment in the animal housing facility or by exposure to microbial stimuli, such as injection with mycobacteria or various microbial products. Here we show that specific pathogen-free NOD mice lacking MyD88 protein (an adaptor for multiple innate immune receptors that recognize microbial stimuli) do not develop T1D. The effect is dependent on commensal microbes because germ-free MyD88-negative NOD mice develop robust diabetes, whereas colonization of these germ-free MyD88-negative NOD mice with a defined microbial consortium (representing bacterial phyla normally present in human gut) attenuates T1D. We also find that MyD88 deficiency changes the composition of the distal gut microbiota, and that exposure to the microbiota of specific pathogen-free MyD88-negative NOD donors attenuates T1D in germ-free NOD recipients. Together, these findings indicate that interaction of the intestinal microbes with the innate immune system is a critical epigenetic factor modifying T1D predisposition.

  17. Characterization of the autoimmune response against the nerve tissue S100β in patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Touriño, I; Simón-Vázquez, R; Alonso-Lorenzo, J; Arif, S; Calviño-Sampedro, C; González-Fernández, Á; Pena-González, E; Rodríguez, J; Viñuela-Roldán, J; Verdaguer, J; Cordero, O J; Peakman, M; Varela-Calvino, R

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in pancreatic islets and is characterized by islet cell autoimmunity. Autoreactivity against non-beta cell-specific antigens has also been reported, including targeting of the calcium-binding protein S100β. In preclinical models, reactivity of this type is a key component of the early development of insulitis. To examine the nature of this response in type 1 diabetes, we identified naturally processed and presented peptide epitopes derived from S100β, determined their affinity for the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*04:01 molecule and studied T cell responses in patients, together with healthy donors. We found that S100β reactivity, characterized by interferon (IFN)-γ secretion, is a characteristic of type 1 diabetes of varying duration. Our results confirm S100β as a target of the cellular autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes with the identification of new peptide epitopes targeted during the development of the disease, and support the preclinical findings that autoreactivity against non-beta cell-specific autoantigens may have a role in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:25516468

  18. The Role of HLA Class I Gene Variation in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Charles; Weinem, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The use of DNA-based genetic typing has enabled the identification of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) susceptible and protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II alleles and haplotypes. The application of this approach has also progressed to locate MHC class I alleles that contribute to the clinicopathology of T1DM. Recent studies have shown a widespread involvement of genes from the MHC class I gene region in the clinicopathology of T1DM. These genes are shown to be involved in contributing to progression from the preclinical stage of the disease, which is characterized by the occurrence of islet-specific antibodies, to clinical disease and also to the occurrence of autoimmunity. They can either contribute directly to disease development or indirectly in concert with other susceptible MHC class II alleles or haplotypes via linkage disequilibrium. Class I alleles may also be negatively associated with T1DM. These findings are useful for the development of future strategies in designing tolerogenic approaches for the prevention or even reversal of T1DM. In this article, the latest evidence for the different kinds of participation of HLA class I genes in the etiology of T1DM is reviewed. A meta-analysis which included existing association studies was also carried out in order to re-assess the relevance of class I genes in diabetes development. The analysis of an enlarged heterogeneous sample confirmed the involvement of previously detected serotypes in the etiology of T1DM, such as A24, B8 and B18, and revealed hitherto unknown associations with B60 and B62. The analysis points out that much of the conflicting results of previous association studies originate from inadequate sample sizes and accentuate the value of future investigations of larger samples for identifying linkage in multigenic diseases. PMID:17491685

  19. Alpha1-antitrypsin gene therapy modulates cellular immunity and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Tang, Mei; Wasserfall, Clive; Kou, Zhongchen; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Gardemann, Thomas; Crawford, James; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2006-06-01

    An imbalance of the immune-regulatory pathways plays an important role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Therefore, immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory strategies hold great potential for the prevention of this autoimmune disease. Studies have demonstrated that two serine proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and elafin, act as potent antiinflammatory agents. In the present study, we sought to develop an efficient gene therapy approach to prevent type 1 diabetes. Cohorts of 4-week-old female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were injected intramuscularly with rAAV1-CB-hAAT, rAAV1-CB-hElafin, or saline. AAV1 vector mediated sustained high levels of transgene expression, sufficient to overcome a humoral immune response against hAAT. AAT gene therapy, contrary to elafin and saline, was remarkably effective in preventing type 1 diabetes. T cell receptor spectratyping indicated that AAT gene therapy altered T cell repertoire diversity in splenocytes from NOD mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that AAT gene therapy attenuated cellular immunity associated with beta cell destruction. This study demonstrates that AAT gene therapy attenuates cell-mediated autoimmunity, alters the T cell receptor repertoire, and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that rAAV1-mediated AAT gene therapy may be useful as a novel approach to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  20. Altered BCR signalling quality predisposes to autoimmune disease and a pre-diabetic state

    PubMed Central

    Königsberger, Sebastian; Prodöhl, Jan; Stegner, David; Weis, Vanessa; Andreas, Martin; Stehling, Martin; Schumacher, Theresa; Böhmer, Ruben; Thielmann, Ina; van Eeuwijk, Judith M M; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    The spleen tyrosine kinase family members Syk and Zap-70 are pivotal signal transducers downstream of antigen receptors and exhibit overlapping expression patterns at early lymphocytic developmental stages. To assess their differential kinase fitness in vivo, we generated mice, which carry a Zap-70 cDNA knock-in controlled by intrinsic Syk promoter elements that disrupts wild-type Syk expression. Kinase replacement severely compromised Erk1/2-mediated survival and proper selection of developing B cells at central and peripheral checkpoints, demonstrating critical dependence on BCR signalling quality. Furthermore, ITAM- and hemITAM-mediated activation of platelets and neutrophils was completely blunted, while surprisingly FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages was retained. The alteration in BCR signalling quality resulted in preferential development and survival of marginal zone B cells and prominent autoreactivity, causing the generation of anti-insulin antibodies and age-related glomerulonephritis. Development of concomitant fasting glucose intolerance in knock-in mice highlights aberrant B cell selection as a potential risk factor for type 1 diabetes, and suggests altered BCR signalling as a mechanism to cause biased cellular and Ig repertoire selection, ultimately contributing to B cell-mediated autoimmune predisposition. PMID:22728826

  1. Neutralization Versus Reinforcement of Proinflammatory Cytokines to Arrest Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Ash, Shifra; Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-09-27

    As physiological pathways of intercellular communication produced by all cells, cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory insulitis as well as pivotal mediators of immune homeostasis. Proinflammatory cytokines including interleukins, interferons, transforming growth factor-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide promote destructive insulitis in type 1 diabetes through amplification of the autoimmune reaction, direct toxicity to β-cells, and sensitization of islets to apoptosis. The concept that neutralization of cytokines may be of therapeutic benefit has been tested in few clinical studies, which fell short of inducing sustained remission or achieving disease arrest. Therapeutic failure is explained by the redundant activities of individual cytokines and their combinations, which are rather dispensable in the process of destructive insulitis because other cytolytic pathways efficiently compensate their deficiency. Proinflammatory cytokines are less redundant in regulation of the inflammatory reaction, displaying protective effects through restriction of effector cell activity, reinforcement of suppressor cell function, and participation in islet recovery from injury. Our analysis suggests that the role of cytokines in immune homeostasis overrides their contribution to β-cell death and may be used as potent immunomodulatory agents for therapeutic purposes rather than neutralized.

  2. I-E+ nonobese diabetic mice develop insulitis and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The development of type I diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is under the control of multiple genes, one or more of which is linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The MHC class II region has been implicated in disease development, with expression of an I-E transgene in NOD mice shown to provide protection from insulitis and diabetes. To examine the effect of expressing an I-E+ or I-E- non-NOD MHC on the NOD background, three I-E+ and three I-E- NOD MHC congenic strains (NOD.H-2i5, NOD.H-2k, and NOD.H-2h2, and NOD.H-2h4, NOD.H-2i7, and NOD.H-2b, respectively) were developed. Of these strains, both I-E+ NOD.H-2h2 and I-E- NOD.H-2h4 mice developed insulitis, but not diabetes. The remaining four congenic strains were free of insulitis and diabetes. These results indicate that in the absence of the NOD MHC, diabetes fails to develop. Each NOD MHC congenic strain was crossed with the NOD strain to produce I-E+ and I-E- F1 mice; these mice thus expressed one dose of the NOD MHC and one dose of a non-NOD MHC on the NOD background. While a single dose of a non-NOD MHC provided a large degree of disease protection to all of the F1 strains, a proportion of I-E+ and I-E- F1 mice aged 5-12 mo developed insulitis and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes. When I-E+ F1 mice were aged 9-17 mo, spontaneous diabetes developed as well. These data are the first to demonstrate that I-E+ NOD mice develop diabetes, indicating that expression of I-E in NOD mice is not in itself sufficient to prevent insulitis or diabetes. In fact, I-E- F1 strains were no more protected from diabetes than I-E+ F1 strains, suggesting that other non-NOD MHC- linked genes are important in protection from disease. Finally, transfer of NOD bone marrow into irradiated I-E+ F1 recipients resulted in high incidences of diabetes, indicating that expression of non-NOD MHC products in the thymus, in the absence of expression in bone marrow- derived cells, is not sufficient to provide protection

  3. Vitamin D intake associates with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but not in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Sánchez, Laura Ivonne; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Wacher, Niels H

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D (vitD) intake and serum concentrations and insulin secretion (assessed by C-peptide serum concentration)/insulin resistance (determined by estimated glucose disposal rate [eGDR]) in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). C-peptide, serum vitD, lipid profile, insulin, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assessed; vitD intake was determined; and eGDR was calculated. Groups were compared using the Student t or Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations were performed between insulin secretion, insulin resistance, and vitD, and linear regression models were adjusted for confounding variables. Of 107 patients included, age was 55.3 ± 11.84 years old, and time since diabetes diagnosis was 13.23 ± 5.96 years. There were significant intergroup differences in age, body mass index (BMI), hip measurements, glucose, and HbA1c. The correlation between vitD intake and C-peptide for the whole group was significant (r = 0.213; P = .032) as well as for vitD deficiency/sufficiency in T2DM (P = .042), whereas neither was significant in eGDR. After adjustment for age, HbA1c, disease progression, physical activity, solar exposure, sex, and BMI, vitD intake was only significant in T2DM (P = .028). In serum vitD, only the correlation between eGDR and vitD in T2DM was significant and intragroup when comparing vitD sufficiency. After adjustments, significance was lost. Patients with LADA had lower intake of vitD, poorer metabolic control, lower BMI, and younger age compared to T2DM patients. There was no association between serum vitD or vitD intake and insulin secretion when analyzed by group, although vitD intake was associated with insulin resistance in T2DM, but not LADA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gut microbiome metagenomics analysis suggests a functional model for the development of autoimmunity for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Giongo, Adriana; Gano, Kelsey A; Crabb, David B; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Casella, George; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Hyöty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Tuula; Simell, Olli; Neu, Josef; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A; Triplett, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a bacterial role in the development of autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Over 30 billion nucleotide bases of Illumina shotgun metagenomic data were analyzed from stool samples collected from four pairs of matched T1D case-control subjects collected at the time of the development of T1D associated autoimmunity (i.e., autoantibodies). From these, approximately one million open reading frames were predicted and compared to the SEED protein database. Of the 3,849 functions identified in these samples, 144 and 797 were statistically more prevalent in cases and controls, respectively. Genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, adhesions, motility, phages, prophages, sulfur metabolism, and stress responses were more abundant in cases while genes with roles in DNA and protein metabolism, aerobic respiration, and amino acid synthesis were more common in controls. These data suggest that increased adhesion and flagella synthesis in autoimmune subjects may be involved in triggering a T1D associated autoimmune response. Extensive differences in metabolic potential indicate that autoimmune subjects have a functionally aberrant microbiome. Mining 16S rRNA data from these datasets showed a higher proportion of butyrate-producing and mucin-degrading bacteria in controls compared to cases, while those bacteria that produce short chain fatty acids other than butyrate were higher in cases. Thus, a key rate-limiting step in butyrate synthesis is more abundant in controls. These data suggest that a consortium of lactate- and butyrate-producing bacteria in a healthy gut induce a sufficient amount of mucin synthesis to maintain gut integrity. In contrast, non-butyrate-producing lactate-utilizing bacteria prevent optimal mucin synthesis, as identified in autoimmune subjects.

  5. Mechanisms of autoimmunity in the non-obese diabetic mouse: effector/regulatory cell equilibrium during peak inflammation.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    Immune imbalance in autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes may originate from aberrant activities of effector cells or dysfunction of suppressor cells. All possible defective mechanisms have been proposed for diabetes-prone species: (i) quantitative dominance of diabetogenic cells and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells, (ii) excessive aggression of effectors and defective function of suppressors, (iii) perturbed interaction between effector and suppressor cells, and (iv) variations in sensitivity to negative regulation. The experimental evidence available to date presents conflicting information on these mechanisms, with identification of perturbed equilibrium on the one hand and negation of critical role of each mechanism in propagation of diabetic autoimmunity on the other hand. In our analysis, there is no evidence that inherent abnormalities in numbers and function of effector and suppressor T cells are responsible for the immune imbalance responsible for propagation of type 1 diabetes as a chronic inflammatory process. Possibly, the experimental tools for investigation of these features of immune activity are still underdeveloped and lack sufficient resolution, in the presence of the extensive biological viability and functional versatility of effector and suppressor elements.

  6. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis restores immune tolerance during autoimmune insulitis.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nadine; Kaber, Gernot; Johnson, Pamela Y; Gebe, John A; Preisinger, Anton; Falk, Ben A; Sunkari, Vivekananda G; Gooden, Michel D; Vernon, Robert B; Bogdani, Marika; Kuipers, Hedwich F; Day, Anthony J; Campbell, Daniel J; Wight, Thomas N; Bollyky, Paul L

    2015-10-01

    We recently reported that abundant deposits of the extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) are characteristic of autoimmune insulitis in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the relevance of these deposits to disease was unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that HA is critical for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Using the DO11.10xRIPmOVA mouse model of T1D, we determined that HA deposits are temporally and anatomically associated with the development of insulitis. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of HA synthesis, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), halted progression to diabetes even after the onset of insulitis. Similar effects were seen in the NOD mouse model, and in these mice, 1 week of treatment was sufficient to prevent subsequent diabetes. 4-MU reduced HA accumulation, constrained effector T cells to nondestructive insulitis, and increased numbers of intraislet FOXP3+ Tregs. Consistent with the observed effects of 4-MU treatment, Treg differentiation was inhibited by HA and anti-CD44 antibodies and rescued by 4-MU in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. These data may explain how peripheral immune tolerance is impaired in tissues under autoimmune attack, including islets in T1D. We propose that 4-MU, already an approved drug used to treat biliary spasm, could be repurposed to prevent, and possibly treat, T1D in at-risk individuals.

  7. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis restores immune tolerance during autoimmune insulitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Nadine; Kaber, Gernot; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Gebe, John A.; Preisinger, Anton; Falk, Ben A.; Sunkari, Vivekananda G.; Gooden, Michel D.; Vernon, Robert B.; Bogdani, Marika; Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Day, Anthony J.; Campbell, Daniel J.; Wight, Thomas N.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that abundant deposits of the extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) are characteristic of autoimmune insulitis in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the relevance of these deposits to disease was unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that HA is critical for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Using the DO11.10xRIPmOVA mouse model of T1D, we determined that HA deposits are temporally and anatomically associated with the development of insulitis. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of HA synthesis, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), halted progression to diabetes even after the onset of insulitis. Similar effects were seen in the NOD mouse model, and in these mice, 1 week of treatment was sufficient to prevent subsequent diabetes. 4-MU reduced HA accumulation, constrained effector T cells to nondestructive insulitis, and increased numbers of intraislet FOXP3+ Tregs. Consistent with the observed effects of 4-MU treatment, Treg differentiation was inhibited by HA and anti-CD44 antibodies and rescued by 4-MU in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. These data may explain how peripheral immune tolerance is impaired in tissues under autoimmune attack, including islets in T1D. We propose that 4-MU, already an approved drug used to treat biliary spasm, could be repurposed to prevent, and possibly treat, T1D in at-risk individuals. PMID:26368307

  8. MSC-derived Extracellular Vesicles Attenuate Immune Responses in Two Autoimmune Murine Models: Type 1 Diabetes and Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto-Kuroda, Taeko; Oh, Joo Youn; Kim, Dong-Ki; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Park, Se Yeon; Lee, Hyun Ju; Park, Jong Woo; Kim, Tae Wan; An, Su Yeon; Prockop, Darwin J; Lee, Ryang Hwa

    2017-05-09

    Accumulating evidence shows that extracellular vesicles (EVs) produced by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) exert their therapeutic effects in several disease models. We previously demonstrated that MSCs suppress autoimmunity in models of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Therefore, here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of MSC-derived EVs using our established mouse models for autoimmune diseases affecting the pancreas and the eye: T1D and EAU. The data demonstrate that MSC-derived EVs effectively prevent the onset of disease in both T1D and EAU. In addition, the mixed lymphocyte reaction assay with MSC-derived EVs indicated that EVs inhibit activation of antigen-presenting cells and suppress development of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. These results raise the possibility that MSC-derived EVs may be an alternative to cell therapy for autoimmune disease prevention. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A parasite-derived 68-mer peptide ameliorates autoimmune disease in murine models of Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Maria E.; Greer, Judith; Dixit, Aakanksha; Alvarado, Raquel; McCauley-Winter, Padraig; To, Joyce; Tanaka, Akane; Hutchinson, Andrew T.; Robinson, Mark W.; Simpson, Ann M.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Dalton, John P.; Donnelly, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites secrete molecules that potently modulate the immune responses of their hosts and, therefore, have potential for the treatment of immune-mediated human diseases. FhHDM-1, a 68-mer peptide secreted by the helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica, ameliorated disease in two different murine models of autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes and relapsing-remitting immune-mediated demyelination. Unexpectedly, FhHDM-1 treatment did not affect the proliferation of auto-antigen specific T cells or their production of cytokines. However, in both conditions, the reduction in clinical symptoms was associated with the absence of immune cell infiltrates in the target organ (islets and the brain tissue). Furthermore, after parenteral administration, the FhHDM-1 peptide interacted with macrophages and reduced their capacity to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-6. We propose this inhibition of innate pro-inflammatory immune responses, which are central to the initiation of autoimmunity in both diseases, prevented the trafficking of autoreactive lymphocytes from the periphery to the site of autoimmunity (as opposed to directly modulating their function per se), and thus prevented tissue destruction. The ability of FhHDM-1 to modulate macrophage function, combined with its efficacy in disease prevention in multiple models, suggests that FhHDM-1 has considerable potential as a treatment for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27883079

  10. Potential route of Th17/Treg cell dynamics in targeting type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis: an autoimmune disorder perspective.

    PubMed

    Karri, Suresh Kumar; Sheela, A

    2017-01-01

    Cytokines, small secreted proteins, have a specific effect on the interactions and communications between cells. They play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Factors in the breakdown of self-tolerance and the subsequent events leading to the induction of pathogenic responses remain unclear for most of the autoimmune diseases. Large numbers of studies have revealed a general scheme in which pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the initiation and propagation of autoimmune inflammation, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines facilitate the regression of inflammation and thereby recovery from the disease. The interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 axis that emerged as the new paradigm has compelled us to critically re-examine the cytokine-driven immune events in the pathogenesis and treatment of autoimmunity. T-helper 17 cells and Regulatory T cells are two lymphocyte subsets with opposing action. In this review, we discuss the mechanism that promotes development of these cells from common precursors and specific factors that impact their cell numbers and function. Also presented are findings that suggest how the equilibrium between pre-inflammatory T helper and regulatory T-cell subsets might be pharmacologically restored for therapeutic benefit, emphasising type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, the emerging clinical data showing anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-23 treatments for their efficacy in treating immune-mediated inflammatory diseases are presented.

  11. Adverse effect on syngeneic islet transplantation by transgenic coexpression of decoy receptor 3 and heme oxygenase-1 in the islet of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-H; Lin, G-J; Chien, M-W; Chu, C-H; Yu, J-C; Chen, T-W; Hueng, D-Y; Liu, Y-L; Sytwu, H-K

    2013-03-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) blocks both Fas ligand- and LIGHT-induced pancreatic β-cell damage in autoimmune diabetes. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) possesses antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative effects that protect cells against various forms of attack by the immune system. Previously, we have demonstrated that transgenic islets overexpressing DcR3 or murine HO-1 (mHO-1) exhibit longer survival times than nontransgenic islets in syngeneic islet transplantation. In this study, we evaluated whether DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic islets of NOD mice could provide better protective effects and achieve longer islet graft survival than DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets after islet transplantation. We generated DcR3 and mHO-1 double-transgenic NOD mice that specifically overexpress DcR3 and HO-1 in islets. Seven hundred islets isolated from double-transgenic, single-transgenic, or nontransgenic NOD mice were syngeneically transplanted into the kidney capsules of newly diabetic female recipients. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the survival time between double-transgenic or nontransgenic NOD islet grafts, and the survival times of double-transgenic NOD islet grafts were even shorter than those of DcR3 or mHO-1 single-transgenic islets. Our data indicate that transplantation of double-transgenic islets that coexpress HO-1 and DcR3 did not result in a better outcome. On the contrary, this strategy even caused an adverse effect in syngeneic islet transplantation.

  12. Gender bias in autoimmunity is influenced by microbiota.

    PubMed

    Yurkovetskiy, Leonid; Burrows, Michael; Khan, Aly A; Graham, Laura; Volchkov, Pavel; Becker, Lev; Antonopoulos, Dionysios; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Chervonsky, Alexander V

    2013-08-22

    Gender bias and the role of sex hormones in autoimmune diseases are well established. In specific pathogen-free nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, females have 1.3-4.4 times higher incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Germ-free (GF) mice lost the gender bias (female-to-male ratio 1.1-1.2). Gut microbiota differed in males and females, a trend reversed by male castration, confirming that androgens influence gut microbiota. Colonization of GF NOD mice with defined microbiota revealed that some, but not all, lineages overrepresented in male mice supported a gender bias in T1D. Although protection of males did not correlate with blood androgen concentration, hormone-supported expansion of selected microbial lineages may work as a positive-feedback mechanism contributing to the sexual dimorphism of autoimmune diseases. Gene-expression analysis suggested pathways involved in protection of males from T1D by microbiota. Our results favor a two-signal model of gender bias, in which hormones and microbes together trigger protective pathways.

  13. Cutting Edge: Origins, Recruitment, and Regulation of CD11c(+) Cells in Inflamed Islets of Autoimmune Diabetes Mice.

    PubMed

    Klementowicz, Joanna E; Mahne, Ashley E; Spence, Allyson; Nguyen, Vinh; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Murphy, Kenneth M; Tang, Qizhi

    2017-07-01

    In NOD mice, CD11c(+) cells increase greatly with islet inflammation and contribute to autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells. In this study, we investigated their origin and mechanism of recruitment. CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets resembled classical dendritic cells based on their transcriptional profile. However, the majority of these cells were not from the Zbtb46-dependent dendritic-cell lineage. Instead, monocyte precursors could give rise to CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets. Chemokines Ccl5 and Ccl8 were persistently elevated in inflamed islets and the influx of CD11c(+) cells was partially dependent on their receptor Ccr5. Treatment with islet Ag-specific regulatory T cells led to a marked decrease of Ccl5 and Ccl8, and a reduction of monocyte recruitment. These results implicate a monocytic origin of CD11c(+) cells in inflamed islets and suggest that therapeutic regulatory T cells directly or indirectly regulate their influx by altering the chemotactic milieu in the islets. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Anti-PD-L1 atezolizumab-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes: a Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hickmott, Laura; De La Peña, Hugo; Turner, Helen; Ahmed, Fathelrahman; Protheroe, Andrew; Grossman, Ashley; Gupta, Avinash

    2017-03-02

    Programmed cell death-1 and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) inhibitors trigger an immune-mediated anti-tumour response by promoting the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Although proven to be highly effective in the treatment of several malignancies they can induce significant immune-related adverse events (irAEs) including endocrinopathies, most commonly hypophysitis and thyroid dysfunction, and rarely autoimmune diabetes. Here we present the first case report of a patient with a primary diagnosis of urothelial cancer developing PD-L1 inhibitor-induced autoimmune diabetes. A euglycemic 57 year old male presented to clinic with dehydration after the fifth cycle of treatment with the novel PD-L1 inhibitor atezolizumab. Blood tests demonstrated rapid onset hyperglycaemia (BM 24 mmol/L), ketosis and a low C-peptide level (0.65 ng/mL) confirming the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. He responded well to insulin therapy and was discharged with stable blood glucose levels. Due to the widening use of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in cancer treatment clinicians need to be aware of this rare yet treatable irAE. Given the morbidity and mortality associated with undiagnosed autoimmune diabetes we recommend routine HbA1c and plasma glucose testing in all patients prior to and during treatment with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors until more evidence has accumulated on identifying those patients with a pre-treatment risk of such irAEs.

  15. Paradoxical development of polymyositis-like autoimmunity through augmented expression of autoimmune regulator (AIRE).

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hitoshi; Kajimoto, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Mouri, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Junko; Matsumoto, Minoru; Kawano, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Okazaki, Il-Mi; Okazaki, Taku; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shiraki, Ayako; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2017-09-17

    Autoimmunity is prevented by the function of the autoimmune regulator [AIRE (Aire in mice)], which promotes the expression of a wide variety of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) from medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and from a subset of peripheral antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We examined the effect of additive expression of human AIRE (huAIRE) in a model of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that mice expressing augmented AIRE/Aire developed muscle-specific autoimmunity associated with incomplete maturation of mTECs together with impaired expression of Aire-dependent TRAs. This led to failure of deletion of autoreactive T cells together with dramatically reduced production of regulatory T cells in the thymus. In peripheral APCs, expression of costimulatory molecules was augmented. We suggest that levels of Aire expression need to be tightly controlled for maintenance of immunological tolerance. Our results also highlight the importance of coordinated action between central tolerance and peripheral tolerance under the common control of Aire. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence that MHC I-E dampens thyroid autoantibodies and prevents spreading to a second thyroid autoantigen in I-A(k) NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, A-N; Aliesky, H A; Banuelos, B; Chabot-Roy, G; Rapoport, B; Lesage, S; McLachlan, S M

    2015-06-01

    NOD.H2(k) and NOD.H2(h4) mice carry the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule I-A(k) associated with susceptibility to experimentally induced thyroiditis. Dietary iodine-enhanced spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity, well known in NOD.H2(h4) mice, has not been investigated in NOD.H2(k) mice. We compared NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) strains for thyroiditis and autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (TgAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) without or with dietary sodium iodide (NaI) for up to 32 weeks. TgAb levels were significantly higher in NOD.H2(h4) compared with NOD.H2(k) mice on NaI, and TPOAb developed in NOD.H2(h4) mice but not in NOD.H2(k) mice. DNA exome analysis revealed, in addition to the differences in the chromosome (Chr) 17 MHC regions, that NOD.H2(k) mice, and particularly NOD.H2(h4) mice, have substantial non-MHC parental DNA. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis highlighted thyroid autoimmunity and immune-response genes on Chr 17 but not on Chr 7, and 15 parental B10.A4R DNA. Studies of parental strains provided no evidence for non-MHC gene contributions. The exon 10 Tg haplotype, associated with experimentally induced thyroiditis, is absent in NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) mice and is not a marker for spontaneous murine thyroid autoimmunity. In conclusion, the absence of I-E is a likely explanation for the difference between NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) mice in TgAb levels and, as in humans, autoantibody spreading to TPO.

  17. Infant exposures and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY).

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Brittni; Kroehl, Miranda; Lamb, Molly M; Seifert, Jennifer; Barriga, Katherine; Eisenbarth, George S; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing worldwide, with the most rapid increase among children younger than 5 years of age. To examine the associations between perinatal and infant exposures, especially early infant diet, and the development of T1DM. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal, observational study. Newborn screening for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was done at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, Colorado. First-degree relatives of individuals with T1DM were recruited from the Denver metropolitan area. A total of 1835 children at increased genetic risk for T1DM followed up from birth with complete prospective assessment of infant diet. Fifty-three children developed T1DM. Early (<4 months of age) and late (≥6 months of age) first exposure to solid foods compared with first exposures at 4 to 5 months of age (referent). Risk for T1DM diagnosed by a physician. Both early and late first exposure to any solid food predicted development of T1DM (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04-3.51, and HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.26-7.24, respectively), adjusting for the HLA-DR genotype, first-degree relative with T1DM, maternal education, and delivery type. Specifically, early exposure to fruit and late exposure to rice/oat predicted T1DM (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.14-4.39, and HR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.36-6.11, respectively), while breastfeeding at the time of introduction to wheat/barley conferred protection (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26-0.86). Complicated vaginal delivery was also a predictor of T1DM (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.03-3.61). These results suggest the safest age to introduce solid foods in children at increased genetic risk for T1DM is between 4 and 5 months of age. Breastfeeding while introducing new foods may reduce T1DM risk.

  18. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Minoru; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Alpha-1-antitrypsin for the improvement of autoimmunity and allograft rejection in beta cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Liao, Yu-Ting; Jian, You-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Pei; Qi, Hui; Deng, Chun-Yan; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-02-01

    Islet transplantation offers hope for patients with type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease. However, islet transplant recipients must overcome two obstacles in both allograft rejection and autoimmune reaction. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (a1-proteinase inhibitor, AAT) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, reduces cytokine-mediated islet damage, and induces specific immune tolerance. In this study, an insulinoma cell line, NIT-1, was transfected with human AAT (hAAT), named NIT-hAAT, and was transplanted to the left renal subcapsular spaces of 7-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice (n=22). Cyclophosphamide(CY) was administered to synchronize and accelerate the development of diabetes. Thus, the immunosuppressive and cytoprotective activity of hAAT in β-cell transplantation was investigated. NIT-hAAT has immunomodulatory properties, which delay the onset of autoimmune diabetes, reduce diabetes incidence, inhibit insulitis and β-cell apoptosis, and dampen transplant site inflammation. We propose that NIT-hAAT has a dual function by improving islet autoimmunity and protecting transplanted β-cells from allograft rejection. However, the low expression of hAAT in vivo results in the inability of NIT-hAAT to induce long-term specific immune tolerance and to completely block allograft rejection.

  20. Distinct clinical and laboratory characteristics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in relation to type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Elena; Marketou, Marietta; Tsirogianni, Alexandra

    2014-08-15

    Ever since its first appearance among the multiple forms of diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), has been the focus of endless discussions concerning mainly its existence as a special type of diabetes. In this mini-review, through browsing important peer-reviewed publications, (original articles and reviews), we will attempt to refresh our knowledge regarding LADA hoping to enhance our understanding of this controversial diabetes entity. A unique combination of immunological, clinical and metabolic characteristics has been identified in this group of patients, namely persistent islet cell antibodies, high frequency of thyroid and gastric autoimmunity, DR3 and DR4 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes, progressive loss of beta cells, adult disease onset, normal weight, defective glycaemic control, and without tendency to ketoacidosis. Although anthropomorphic measurements are useful as a first line screening, the detection of C-peptide levels and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies is undoubtedly the sine qua non condition for a confirmatory LADA diagnosis. In point of fact, GAD autoantibodies are far from being solely a biomarker and the specific role of these autoantibodies in disease pathogenesis is still to be thoroughly studied. Nevertheless, the lack of diagnostic criteria and guidelines still puzzle the physicians, who struggle between early diagnosis and correct timing for insulin treatment.

  1. Exposure to environmental factors in drinking water: risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes--the BABYDIAB study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, C; Mollenhauer, U; Hummel, S; Bonifacio, E; Ziegler, A-G

    2008-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by autoimmunity against pancreatic islets, and autoantibodies may be present for years before diagnosis. Environmental factors during early life, including drinking water, may play a role in pathogenesis of T1D. The German BABYDIAB study is a prospective observational study that followed newborn offspring of mothers or fathers with T1D from birth to 17 years of age. The present study was a nested case-control analysis, where subjects with islet autoimmunity were defined as cases (n=95), those without as controls (n=139). Drinking water quality was obtained from the German Water Supply Authorities for the participating families for the first year of the child's life. There was no significant association between water acidity or drinking water quality (concentration of minerals and elements) and islet autoimmunity risk. Increased progression to diabetes in islet autoantibody-positive children was associated with exposure to water with lower pH values (less than cohort median, 7.62; odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-5.7; p=0.03) but was not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, iron, aluminum, and manganese were not associated with risk of T1D progression. This is the first prospective study with water quality measured before the onset of islet autoimmunity and T1D. Consistent with a previous cross-sectional case-control study, we found an association between drinking water pH and the rate of T1D development in at-risk children. The association is marginal and requires validation in other prospective cohorts.

  2. Interaction of enterovirus infection and cow's milk-based formula nutrition in type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Lempainen, J; Tauriainen, S; Vaarala, O; Mäkelä, M; Honkanen, H; Marttila, J; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Hyöty, H; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2012-02-01

    Enteral virus infections and early introduction of cow's milk (CM)-based formula are among the suggested triggers of type 1 diabetes (T1D)-associated autoimmunity, although studies on their role have remained contradictory. Here, we aimed to analyse whether interactions between these factors might clarify the controversies. The study population comprised 107 subjects developing positivity for at least two T1D-associated autoantibodies and 446 control subjects from the Finnish diabetes prediction and prevention cohort. Enterovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus and bovine insulin-binding antibodies were analysed from prospective serum samples at 3-24 months of age. Data on infant cow's milk exposure were available for 472 subjects: 251 subjects were exposed to cow's milk before 3 months of age and 221 subjects later in infancy. Signs of an enterovirus infection by 12 months of age were associated with the appearance of autoimmunity among children who were exposed to cow's milk before 3 months of age. Cox regression analysis revealed a combined effect of enterovirus infection and early cow's milk exposure for the development of ICA and any of the biochemically defined autoantibodies (p = 0.001), of IAA (p = 0.002), GADA (p = 0.001) and IA-2A (p = 0.013). The effect of enterovirus infection on the appearance of T1D-associated autoimmunity seems to be modified by exposure to cow's milk in early infancy suggesting an interaction between these factors. Moreover, these results provide an explanation for the controversial findings obtained when analysing the effect of any single one of these factors on the appearance of T1D-associated autoimmunity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Albuminuria According to Status of Autoimmunity and Insulin Sensitivity Among Youth With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mottl, Amy K.; Lauer, Abigail; Dabelea, Dana; Maahs, David M.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Larry M.; Gilliam, Lisa K.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Marcovina, Santica M.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Kanakatti Shankar, Roopa; Afkarian, Maryam; Reynolds, Kristi; Liese, Angela D.; Mauer, Michael; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether etiologic diabetes type is associated with the degree of albuminuria in children with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS SEARCH is an observational, longitudinal study of children with diabetes. Youth with newly diagnosed diabetes were classified according to diabetes autoantibody (DAA) status and presence of insulin resistance. We defined insulin resistance as an insulin sensitivity score <25th percentile for the United States general youth population. DAA status was based on positivity for the 65-kD isoform of glutamate decarboxylase and insulinoma-associated protein 2 antigens. The four etiologic diabetes type groups were as follows: DAA+/insulin-sensitive (IS) (n = 1,351); DAA+/insulin-resistant (IR) (n = 438); DAA−/IR (n = 379); and DAA−/IS (n = 233). Urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) was measured from a random urine specimen. Multivariable regression analyses assessed the independent relationship between the four diabetes type groups and magnitude of UACR. RESULTS Adjusted UACR means across the four groups were as follows: DAA+/IS = 154 μg/mg; DAA+/IR = 137 μg/mg; DAA−/IR = 257 μg/mg; and DAA−/IS = 131 μg/mg (P < 0.005). Only DAA−/IR was significantly different. We performed post hoc multivariable regression analysis restricted to the two IR groups to explore the contribution of DAA status and insulin sensitivity (continuous) to the difference in UACR between the IR groups. Only insulin sensitivity was significantly associated with UACR (β = −0.54; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In youth with diabetes, the DAA−/IR group had a greater UACR than all other groups, possibly because of the greater magnitude of insulin resistance. Further exploration of the relationships between severity of insulin resistance, autoimmunity, and albuminuria in youth with diabetes is warranted. PMID:23846811

  4. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  5. Oral administration of a cholera toxin B subunit-insulin fusion protein produced in silkworm protects against autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhaohui; Jin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2005-09-22

    The oral administration of disease-specific autoantigens can induce oral immune tolerance and prevent or delay the onset of autoimmune disease symptoms. Here, we describe the construction of an edible vaccine consisting of a fusion protein composed of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and insulin that is produced in silkworm larvae at levels of up to 0.3 mg/ml of hemolymph. The silkworm bioreactor produced this fusion protein vaccine as the pentameric CTB-insulin form, which retained the GM1-ganglioside binding affinity and the native antigenicity of CTB and insulin. Non-obese diabetic mice fed hemolymph containing microgram quantities of the CTB-insulin fusion protein showed a prominent reduction in pancreatic islet inflammation and a delay in the development of symptoms of clinical diabetes. These results demonstrate that the silkworm bioreactor is a feasible production and delivery system for an oral protein vaccine designed to develop immunological tolerance against T-cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by regulatory T-cell induction.

  6. The prevalence and characteristics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults subset among type two diabetes mellitus patients in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Muazu, Salisu Babura; Okpe, Innocent; Anumah, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA) is a form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) that occurs in adult or with advancing age. It commonly occurs in people aged ≥30 years and is characterized by initial response to oral hypoglycemic agents, lean body mass, and presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GAD-Ab). It exhibits rapid deterioration of the pancreatic β-cells secretory function due to the destructive action of the autoantibodies. The prevalence of LADA among T2DM patients varies among population due to different diagnostic criteria, patients' characteristics, the assay used, and genetic predisposition. In this study, we intend to document prevalence and clinical characteristics of LADA subset patients in Northern Nigeria. Two-hundred noninsulin-requiring T2DM patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic based on the selection criteria. Their clinical characteristics were documented, and we measured their serum GAD-Ab, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting C-peptide, fasting plasma glucose, and fasting serum lipids. The mean (standard deviation) of these clinical and biochemical parameters was compared between GAD-Ab+ and GAD-Ab- groups. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 with P< 0.05 as statistically significant. The prevalence of LADA among the T2DM patients studied was found to be 10.5% (21/200); there were more males than females (15 [71%]:6 [29%], χ2 = 4.2, P< 0.05). The mean age of the GAD-Ab+ was 52.0 (11.0), and there was no statistical difference with GAD-Ab- group. GAD-Ab+ was found more common in the age group of 40-49 years 10/21 (48%). The body mass index, waist circumference, and serum C-peptide were found to be significantly lower in GAD-Ab+ than in GAD-Ab- group (22.1 [51], 80.1 [12.4], 0.84 [0.05] vs. 27.3 [4.9], 93.2 [10.9], 1.72 [0.43]), P< 0.05. The HbA1c was found to be significantly higher in GAD-Ab+ than in GAD-Ab- (8.3 [1.4] vs. 7.0 [2.1]). Other clinical and metabolic parameters were found not to be

  7. Altered natural killer (NK) cell frequency and phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) prior to insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akesson, C; Uvebrant, K; Oderup, C; Lynch, K; Harris, R A; Lernmark, A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2010-07-01

    Approximately 10% of the patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have detectable serum levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA). These patients usually progress to insulin dependency within a few years, and are classified as being latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). A decrease in the frequency of peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells has been reported recently in recent-onset T1D and in high-risk individuals prior to the clinical onset. As NK cells in LADA patients have been investigated scarcely, the aim of this study was to use multicolour flow cytometry to define possible deficiencies or abnormalities in the frequency or activation state of NK cells in LADA patients prior to insulin dependency. All patients were GADA-positive and metabolically compensated, but none were insulin-dependent at the time blood samples were taken. LADA patients exhibited a significant decrease in NK cell frequency in peripheral blood compared to healthy individuals (P=0.0018), as reported previously for recent-onset T1D patients. Interestingly, NKG2D expression was increased significantly (P<0.0001), whereas killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)3DL1 expression was decreased (P<0.0001) within the NK cell population. These observations highlight a defect in both frequency and activation status of NK cells in LADA patients and suggest that this immunological alteration may contribute to the development of autoimmune diabetes by affecting peripheral tolerance. Indeed, recent evidence has demonstrated a regulatory function for NK cells in autoimmunity. Moreover, the decrease in NK cell number concords with observations obtained in recent-onset T1D, implying that similar immunological dysfunctions may contribute to the progression of both LADA and T1D.

  8. No association of vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in childhood with risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, M.; Brady, H.; Yin, X.; Seifert, J.; Barriga, K.; Hoffman, M.; Bugawan, T.; Barón, A. E.; Sokol, R. J.; Eisenbarth, G.; Erlich, H.; Rewers, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of the study was to investigate the association between vitamin D intake and status and the risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes in children at increased risk of type 1 diabetes. Methods The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) in Denver, CO, USA, has been following children at increased risk of diabetes since 1993. As of February 2011, 198 children developed IA during follow-up of 2,644 DAISY children. Vitamin D intake and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were measured longitudinally. Proportional hazards regression analyses of time to IA, or type 1 diabetes in IA-positive children, were conducted, with vitamin D intake and 25(OH)D as time-varying covariates. HRs were calculated for a standard deviation difference in exposure, with adjustment for confounders. Results Intake of vitamin D was not associated with the risk of IA (adjusted HR 1.13; 95% CI 0.95, 1.35; p=0.18) nor progression to diabetes in IA-positive children (adjusted HR 1.30; 95% CI 0.91, 1.86; p=0.15). Moreover, 25(OH)D level was not associated with the risk of IA (adjusted HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.88, 1.43; p=0.36), nor progression to diabetes in IA-positive children (adjusted HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.68, 1.22; p=0.54). In the 128 children in whom we measured 25(OH)D at 9 months of age, 25(OH)D was not associated with risk of IA (n=30 IA-positive children) (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.96, 1.07; p=0.58). Conclusions/interpretation Neither vitamin D intake nor 25(OH)D levels throughout childhood were associated with the risk of IA or progression to type 1 diabetes in our population. PMID:21858504

  9. Glucose Driven Changes in Beta Cell Identity Are Important for Function and Possibly Autoimmune Vulnerability during the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This commentary explores the hypothesis that when autoimmunity leads to a fall of beta cell mass during the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D), rising glucose levels cause major changes in beta cell identity. This then leads to profound changes in secretory function and less well-understood changes in beta cell susceptibility to autoimmune destruction, which may influence of rate of progression of beta cell killing. PMID:28174593

  10. Anti-peptide autoantibodies and fatal anaphylaxis in NOD mice in response to insulin self-peptides B:9-23 and B:13-23

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Edwin; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Abiru, Norio; Miao, Dongmei; Yu, Liping; Taylor, Robert M.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2002-01-01

    There is evidence that amino acids 9–23 of the insulin B chain are a major target of anti-islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Administration of this peptide to NOD mice prevents diabetes, and phase I trials of an altered peptide ligand of B:9-23 are underway in humans. We were interested in long-term subcutaneous therapeutic administration of B:9-23 without adjuvant. To our initial surprise, the peptide consistently induced fatal anaphylaxis in NOD mice after 6 weeks of administration. Anaphylaxis could be blocked by a combination of antihistamine and platelet-activating factor antagonist (but neither alone) or by a combination of anti–IgG receptor and anti-IgE antibodies. High titers of anti–B:9-23 antibodies were induced within 3–4 weeks of immunization with the peptide. Peptide B:13-23 also induced anaphylaxis and was more potent than peptide B:9-23. Antibodies induced by peptide B:9-23 and peptide B:13-23 did not cross-react with each other. Thus, the insulin peptides B:9-23 and B:13-23, even when administered subcutaneously in the absence of adjuvant, can induce a dramatic humoral response leading to fatal anaphylaxis in NOD mice. PMID:12370280