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Sample records for autologous chondrocyte grafts

  1. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  2. Incomplete defect filling after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Hammerschmid, Florian; Müller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a suitable method for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, knowledge about the development of graft thickness and the clinical relevance of incomplete defect filling in the postoperative course is low. This prospective study analyses the graft integration into the surrounding cartilage, with special consideration of the graft thickness. Material and methods A total of 71 consecutive patients with 79 cartilage defects were treated with third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (NOVOCART 3D) in the knee. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 years. Graft thickness was measured compared to the surrounding healthy cartilage. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for clinical evaluation. Cartilage defect filling was classified as the percentage of the surrounding cartilage. Results The average graft thickness showed a significant increase between 3 and 6 months after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Incomplete defect filling occurred in 44 (55.7%) cases. Of these, 33 cases showed incomplete defect filling grade I (> 75%), 10 cases were grade II (> 50%) and one case grade III (> 25%). Incomplete defect filling grade IV (< 25%) was not observed. Incomplete defect filling occurred significantly more often in women (p = 0.021), without worse clinical results. Conclusions Graft thickness after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation shows increasing graft thickness over the period of 2 years postoperatively. A high rate of incomplete defect filling in the surrounding cartilage was observed, without worse clinical results. PMID:27478460

  3. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  4. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ashvin K.; Gibson, Matthew A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Trice, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI) and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells) and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes). ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient's knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients. PMID:25210707

  5. Cell manipulation in autologous chondrocyte implantation: from research to cleanroom.

    PubMed

    Roseti, Livia; Serra, Marta; Tigani, Domenico; Brognara, Irene; Lopriore, Annamaria; Bassi, Alessandra; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2008-04-01

    In the field of orthopaedics, autologous chondrocyte implantation is a technique currently used for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. There is evidence of the neo-formation of tissue displaying characteristics similar to hyaline cartilage. In vitro chondrocyte manipulation is a crucial phase of this therapeutic treatment consisting of different steps: cell isolation from a cartilage biopsy, expansion in monolayer culture and growth onto a three-dimensional biomaterial to implant in the damaged area. To minimise the risk of in vitro cell contamination, the manipulation must be performed in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom. Moreover, the choice of reagents and raw material suitable for clinical use in humans and the translation of research protocols into standardised production processes are important. In this study we describe the preliminary results obtained by the development of chondrocyte manipulation protocols (isolation and monolayer expansion) in cleanrooms for the application of autologous implantation.

  6. AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION-SERIES OF 3 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Pécora, José Ricardo; Rezende, Múrcia Uchõa de; Filho, Tarcisio E.P Barros; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2015-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage covers joint surfaces and plays an important role in reducing friction and mechanical loading on synovial joints such as the knee. This tissue is not supplied with blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic circulation, which may be one of the reasons why joint cartilage has such poor capacity for healing. Chondral lesions that reach the subchondral bone (osteochondral lesions) do not heal and may progress to arthrosis with the passage of time. In young patients, treatment of chondral defects of the knee is still a challenge, especially in lesions larger than 4 cm. One option for treating these patients is autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation. Because this treatment does not violate the subchondral bone and repairs the defect with tissue similar to hyaline cartilage, it has the theoretical advantage of being more biological, and mechanically superior, compared with other techniques. In this paper, we describe our experience with autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of Sâo Paulo, through a report on three cases. PMID:27022579

  7. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  8. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  9. Matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation for cartilage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kon, E.; Filardo, G.; Di Matteo, B.; Perdisa, F.; Marcacci, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) has been developed and applied in the clinical practice in the last decade to overcome most of the disadvantages of the first generation procedures. The purpose of this systematic review is to document and analyse the available literature on the results of MACT in the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee. Methods All studies published in English addressing MACT procedures were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: 1) level I-IV evidence, 2) measures of functional or clinical outcome, 3) outcome related to cartilage lesions of the knee cartilage. Results The literature analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles per year. A total of 51 articles were selected: three randomised studies, ten comparative studies, 33 case series and five case reports. Several scaffolds have been developed and studied, with good results reported at short to medium follow-up. Conclusions MACT procedures are a therapeutic option for the treatment of chondral lesions that can offer a positive outcome over time for specific patient categories, but high-level studies are lacking. Systematic long-term evaluation of these techniques and randomised controlled trials are necessary to confirm the potential of this treatment approach, especially when comparing against less ambitious traditional treatments. PMID:23610698

  10. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  11. Autologous Graft-versus-Tumor Effect: Reality or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the current dogma is not an evidence of graft-versus-tumor effect in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, it is assumed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation only relies on the high-dose chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. However, recent studies argue in favor of the existence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor without the detrimental complications of graft-versus-host disease due to the nonspecific immune response from the infused donor alloreactive immune effector cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, this paper reviews the clinical evidence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor effect based on the autograft collected and infused host immune effector cells and host immunity recovery after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation affecting clinical outcomes in cancer patients.

  12. Autologous Graft-versus-Tumor Effect: Reality or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the current dogma is not an evidence of graft-versus-tumor effect in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, it is assumed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation only relies on the high-dose chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. However, recent studies argue in favor of the existence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor without the detrimental complications of graft-versus-host disease due to the nonspecific immune response from the infused donor alloreactive immune effector cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, this paper reviews the clinical evidence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor effect based on the autograft collected and infused host immune effector cells and host immunity recovery after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation affecting clinical outcomes in cancer patients. PMID:27635143

  13. Clinical Outcome 3 Years After Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Does Not Correlate With the Expression of a Predefined Gene Marker Set in Chondrocytes Prior to Implantation but Is Associated With Critical Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Johan; de Windt, Tommy S.; Synnergren, Jane; Hynsjö, Lars; van der Lee, Josefine; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Brittberg, Mats; Peterson, Lars; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a need for tools to predict the chondrogenic potency of autologous cells for cartilage repair. Purpose: To evaluate previously proposed chondrogenic biomarkers and to identify new biomarkers in the chondrocyte transcriptome capable of predicting clinical success or failure after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with clinical improvement after autologous chondrocyte implantation and 5 patients with graft failures 3 years after implantation were included. Surplus chondrocytes from the transplantation were frozen for each patient. Each chondrocyte sample was subsequently thawed at the same time point and cultured for 1 cell doubling, prior to RNA purification and global microarray analysis. The expression profiles of a set of predefined marker genes (ie, collagen type II α1 [COL2A1], bone morphogenic protein 2 [BMP2], fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 [FGFR3], aggrecan [ACAN], CD44, and activin receptor–like kinase receptor 1 [ACVRL1]) were also evaluated. Results: No significant difference in expression of the predefined marker set was observed between the success and failure groups. Thirty-nine genes were found to be induced, and 38 genes were found to be repressed between the 2 groups prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation, which have implications for cell-regulating pathways (eg, apoptosis, interleukin signaling, and β-catenin regulation). Conclusion: No expressional differences that predict clinical outcome could be found in the present study, which may have implications for quality control assessments of autologous chondrocyte implantation. The subtle difference in gene expression regulation found between the 2 groups may strengthen the basis for further research, aiming at reliable biomarkers and quality control for tissue engineering in cartilage repair. Clinical Relevance: The present study shows the possible

  14. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Robert W; Harrell, David B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG) with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are available as safe, sterile, disposable, compact systems for acquiring high-quality AFG. Presented is a detailed, step-by-step, proven protocol for performing quality autologous structural adipose

  15. Arthroscopic Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Thilo; Krauspe, Ruediger; Hufeland, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum is characterized by separation of a circumscript area of the articular surface and the subchondral bone in juvenile patients. In advanced lesions, arthroscopic fragment refixation or fragment removal with microfracturing or drilling can be successful. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an all-arthroscopic surgical technique for 3-dimensional purely autologous chondrocyte transplantation for osteochondral lesions of the humeral capitellum. PMID:27656389

  16. [Autologous fat grafting in the breast: oncological implications].

    PubMed

    Nizet, J-L; Gonzalez, A; Peulen, O; Castronovo, V

    2011-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting for breast is increasing dramatically. This fat injection needs accurate technical conditions, and shows very good and long-lasting clinical results. Nevertheless, in breast conservative treatment sequellae, fat injection could lead to difficulties in breast imaging, but also there is some concerns about the potential oncologic risks of these procedures.

  17. Prone position for minimal invasive or all-arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation at the patella.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Sartory, Nico; Yang, Yuping; Feil, Sven; Paessler, Hans H

    2011-12-01

    Full size retropatellar cartilage lesions are troublesome conditions to treat and an autologous chondrocyte implantation with or without matrix or scaffold in supine position is difficult. Usually, it is necessary to perform a large arthrotomy to evert the patella in order to get sufficient access to the retropatellar cartilage defect. The procedure is associated with a significant parapatellar soft tissue trauma to the patient. This technical note introcudes a minimal invasive approach with the patient in prone position using an all-arthroscopic or mini-open technique to treat retropatellar full size articular cartilage lesions of the patella.

  18. Autologous chondrocyte repair of an articular defect in the humeral head.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Fox, Jeff A; Freeman, Kevin B; Joy, Edward

    2002-10-01

    Articular cartilage lesions remain a difficult problem for the patient and physician. A variety of procedures and treatments have been proposed to lessen symptoms and restore the articular surface. The knee joint has been the focus of the vast majority of these cartilage restoration procedures. Articular cartilage lesions of the humerus are significantly less common, and their management remains poorly defined. This paper presents a case report of a young athlete with a large full-thickness articular cartilage defect of the proximal humerus and subsequent treatment using autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  19. Subcostal Skin Graft Donor Site for Autologous Ear Construction.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Aladdin H; Greene, Arin K

    2015-06-01

    Autologous ear construction for microtia creates an auricle using a costal cartilage framework. To separate the construct from the mastoid, a skin graft is required to form a retroauricular sulcus. Skin graft donor sites that have been described include the inguinal area (split or full-thickness) or scalp (split-thickness). The purpose of this study is to report a novel skin graft donor site for ear construction. We harvest a full-thickness graft from the subcostal area based on the previous scar from the cartilage harvest. Unlike the inguinal donor site, this method does not place an additional scar on the child. In contrast to the scalp donor site, the technique is simpler and a full-thickness graft minimizes contraction of the retroauricular sulcus. PMID:26080199

  20. Increased Production of Clusterin in Biopsies of Repair Tissue following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Malda, Jos; Richardson, James B.; Roberts, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the immunolocalization of clusterin in the repair cartilage of patients having undergone autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and evaluate correlation to clinical outcome. Design. Full-depth core biopsies of repair tissue were obtained from 38 patients who had undergone ACI at an average of 18 ± 13 months previously (range 8-67 months). The biopsies were snap frozen, cryosectioned, and clusterin production immunolocalized using a specific monoclonal clusterin antibody and compared with normal and osteoarthritic cartilage. Clinical outcome was assessed from patients preoperatively, at the time of biopsy, and annually postoperatively. Results. Intensity of immunostaining for clusterin decreased with age in healthy cartilage tissue. Clusterin was detected to a variable degree in 37 of the 38 ACI cartilage biopsies, in single and clustered chondrocytes, in the pericellular capsule and the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as the osteocytes and osteoid within the bone. Chondrocytes in hyaline repair tissue were significantly more immunopositive than those in fibrocartilage repair tissue. Clinical outcome improved significantly post-ACI, but did not correlate with the presence of clusterin in the repair tissue. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the presence of clusterin in actively repairing human cartilage and indicate a different distribution of clusterin in this tissue compared to normal cartilage. Variability in clusterin staining in the repair tissue could indicate different states of chondrogenic differentiation. The clinical significance of clusterin within repair tissue is difficult to assess, although the ideal functioning repair tissue morphology should resemble that of healthy adult cartilage. PMID:26069669

  1. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  2. Ultrastructural study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aihara, M

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium is presented. Biopsy samples were collected from four patients with full thickness burns at 9 days, 6 weeks and 5-21 months after grafting of the cultured epithelium. By the sixth week after transplantation, grafted cultured epithelial sheets had developed to consist of 10 to 20 layers of cells and the epithelium showed distinct basal, spinous, granular and horny layers, and a patchy basement membrane had formed. Langerhans cells and melanocytes were identifiable. From 5 months onwards flat basal cells became oval, and oval keratohyalin granules in the keratinocytes also assumed a normal irregular shape. Membrane-coating granules in the keratinocytes increased in number. The fine structures of desmosomes also showed a normal mature appearance. Furthermore, complete extension of the basement membrane could be observed. The maturation of cultured human epithelium is complete by 5 months after grafting.

  3. Autologous Rib Grafts in the Management of the Crooked Nose.

    PubMed

    Porter, Paul; Kriet, J David; Humphrey, Clinton D

    2015-06-01

    Rhinoplasty is arguably one of the most challenging procedures a facial plastic surgeon performs. Numerous techniques have been developed since the inception of rhinoplasty to aid in correction of aesthetic and functional issues. Congenital, iatrogenic, and traumatic etiologies can all lead to a crooked nose. Autologous rib or costal cartilage grafting is a powerful tool that can aid the surgeon in successful correction of the crooked nose. PMID:26126219

  4. Tissue-engineered autologous grafts for facial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Bernhard, Jonathan C; Alfi, David M; Yeager, Keith; Eton, Ryan E; Bova, Jonathan; Shah, Forum; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Lopez, Mandi J; Eisig, Sidney B; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-15

    Facial deformities require precise reconstruction of the appearance and function of the original tissue. The current standard of care-the use of bone harvested from another region in the body-has major limitations, including pain and comorbidities associated with surgery. We have engineered one of the most geometrically complex facial bones by using autologous stromal/stem cells, native bovine bone matrix, and a perfusion bioreactor for the growth and transport of living grafts, without bone morphogenetic proteins. The ramus-condyle unit, the most eminent load-bearing bone in the skull, was reconstructed using an image-guided personalized approach in skeletally mature Yucatán minipigs (human-scale preclinical model). We used clinically approved decellularized bovine trabecular bone as a scaffolding material and crafted it into an anatomically correct shape using image-guided micromilling to fit the defect. Autologous adipose-derived stromal/stem cells were seeded into the scaffold and cultured in perfusion for 3 weeks in a specialized bioreactor to form immature bone tissue. Six months after implantation, the engineered grafts maintained their anatomical structure, integrated with native tissues, and generated greater volume of new bone and greater vascular infiltration than either nonseeded anatomical scaffolds or untreated defects. This translational study demonstrates feasibility of facial bone reconstruction using autologous, anatomically shaped, living grafts formed in vitro, and presents a platform for personalized bone tissue engineering.

  5. Tissue-Engineered Autologous Grafts for Facial Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Bernhard, Jonathan C.; Alfi, David M.; Yeager, Keith; Eton, Ryan E.; Bova, Jonathan; Shah, Forum; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Lopez, Mandi J.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Facial deformities require precise reconstruction of the appearance and function of the original tissue. The current standard of care—the use of bone harvested from another region in the body—has major limitations, including pain and comorbidities associated with surgery. We have engineered one of the most geometrically complex facial bones by using autologous stromal/stem cells, without bone morphogenic proteins, using native bovine bone matrix and a perfusion bioreactor for the growth and transport of living grafts. The ramus-condyle unit (RCU), the most eminent load-bearing bone in the skull, was reconstructed using an image-guided personalized approach in skeletally mature Yucatan minipigs (human-scale preclinical model). We used clinically approved decellularized bovine trabecular bone as a scaffolding material, and crafted it into an anatomically correct shape using image-guided micromilling, to fit the defect. Autologous adipose-derived stromal/stem cells were seeded into the scaffold and cultured in perfusion for 3 weeks in a specialized bioreactor to form immature bone tissue. Six months after implantation, the engineered grafts maintained their anatomical structure, integrated with native tissues, and generated greater volume of new bone and greater vascular infiltration than either non-seeded anatomical scaffolds or untreated defects. This translational study demonstrates feasibility of facial bone reconstruction using autologous, anatomically shaped, living grafts formed in vitro, and presents a platform for personalized bone tissue engineering. PMID:27306665

  6. Editorial Commentary: Focal Cartilage Defects in Young Patients Indicate Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Sooner Rather Than Later.

    PubMed

    Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2016-09-01

    Articular cartilage lesions, whether acute or chronic, are among the most common and difficult-to-treat conditions of the knee in the adolescent and athletic population. The results from a study in this issue as well as some in the previous literature suggest that autologous chondrocyte implantation yields long-term improvement in function and symptoms and may be a viable treatment for young to adult athletes or patients with high physical demands and a long active lifespan. No intervention in the young symptomatic patient will yield inferior results because it appears that no treatment over time has deleterious effects. Treatment in young athletes should include (1) early stabilization of ligament injuries, (2) resurfacing chondral defects, (3) correction of malalignment, (4) restoration of meniscal integrity, and (5) utilization of a chondroprotective strategy with orthobiological interventions. PMID:27594334

  7. The dependence of autologous chondrocyte transplantation on varying cellular passage, yield and culture duration.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Gian M; Sauerschnig, Martin; Berninger, Markus T; Kaltenhauser, Theresa; Schönfelder, Martin; Vogt, Stephan; Wexel, Gabriele; Tischer, Thomas; Sudkamp, Norbert; Niemeyer, Philipp; Imhoff, Andreas B; Schöttle, Philip B

    2011-09-01

    Matrix-assisted chondrocyte transplantation (m-ACI) still lacks any standardization in its execution in terms of cell passage (P), cell yield (C) and in vitro membrane-holding time (T). It was the goal of this study to analyze the effect of shifting cell culture parameters (P, C, T) on the in vitro as well as in vivo effort of a regulated animal m-ACI. Autologous rabbit knee articular chondrocytes were seeded within bilayer collagen I/III 3-D matrices in variation of P, C and T. Each time, 2 PCT-identical by 2 PCT-identical cell-matrix-constructs (CMC)/animal were created. Simultaneously 2 (PCT-distinct) were re-implanted (CMC-e) autologous into artificial trochlear pristine chondral defects in vivo to remain for 12 weeks while the remaining 2 were harvested (CMC-i) for immediate in vitro analysis at the time of transplantation of their identical twins. mRNA of both, CMC-e regenerates and CMC-i membranes, was analyzed for Collagen-1,-2,-10, COMP, Aggrecan, Sox9 expression by use of a mixed linear model, multiple regression analysis. Generally, CMC-i values were higher than CMC-e values for differentiation targets; the opposite was true for dedifferentiation targets. Regarding individual gene expression, in vivo regenerate cell-matrix properties were significantly dependent on initial cell-matrix in vitro values as a sign of linearity. The parameter membrane-holding time (T) had strongest effects on the resulting mRNA expression with slightly less impact of the parameter passage (P), whereas cell yield (C) had clearly less effects. Noting differences between in vitro and in vivo data, in general, optimal expression patterns concerning chondrogenic differentiation were achieved by few passages, medium cellular yield, short membrane-holding time. Clinical m-ACI may benefit from optimal orchestration of the cell culture parameters passage, yield and time. PMID:21592563

  8. Computer-assisted selection of donor sites for autologous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Gerhardt, Paul; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1997-05-01

    A new method is proposed for a precise planning of autologous bone grafts in cranio- and maxillofacial surgery. In patients with defects of the facial skeleton, autologous bone transplants can be harvested from various donor sites in the body. The preselection of a donor site depends i.a. on the morphological fit of the available bone mass and the shape of the part that is to be transplanted. A thorough planning and simulation of the surgical intervention based on 3D CT studies leads to a geometrical description and the volumetric characterization of the bone part to be resected and transplanted. Both, an optimal fit and a minimal lesion of the donor site are guidelines in this process. We use surface similarity and voxel similarity measures in order to select the optimal donor region for an individually designed transplant.

  9. Outcomes of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee following Failed Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew Joseph; Yanke, Adam Blair; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marrow stimulation techniques such as drilling or microfracture are first-line treatment options for symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. For young patients who have failed microfracture, cartilage restoration techniques such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), OATS, and osteochondral allograft and are frequently employed. Nevertheless, there a few reports in the literature evaluating the results of ACI following failed microfracture and those available suggest inferior outcomes compared to primary ACI. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) following failed microfracture in the knee and compare these outcomes to those of primary ACI. Methods: Patients were identified who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic chondral lesions of the knee refractory to previous microfracture. Postoperative data were collected using several subjective scoring systems (Noyes, Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, KOOS, SF12). An age-matched cohort of 103 patients who underwent primary ACI of the knee was used as a control group. Statistics were performed in a paired manner using a Student’s t-test for ordinal data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Ninety-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age was 30.1 years (range, 14-49 years) at the time of ACI. The average duration from microfracture to ACI was 21.2 months (range, 1-88 months). ACI was performed in the tibiofemoral compartment in 42 patients, the patellofemoral compartments in 38 patients, and in both in 12 patients. The primary lesion treated with ACI involved the MFC in 38 patients, the trochlea in 25 patients, the patella in 19 patients, and the LFC in 10 patients. The lesions averaged 467mm3 in the trochlea, 445mm3 in the LFC, 265mm3 in the patella, and 295mm3 in the patella. Nineteen patients underwent concurrent ACI to multiple lesions. Thirty-one patients underwent concomitant

  10. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    The articular cartilage layer of synovial joints is commonly lesioned by trauma or by a degenerative joint disease. Attempts to repair the damage frequently involve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Healthy cartilage must be first removed from the joint, and then, on a separate occasion, following the isolation of the chondrocytes and their expansion in vitro, implanted within the lesion. The disadvantages of this therapeutic approach include the destruction of healthy cartilage-which may predispose the joint to osteoarthritic degeneration-the necessarily restricted availability of healthy tissue, the limited proliferative capacity of the donor cells-which declines with age-and the need for two surgical interventions. We postulated that it should be possible to induce synovial stem cells, which are characterized by high, age-independent, proliferative and chondrogenic differentiation capacities, to lay down cartilage within the outer juxtasynovial space after the transcutaneous implantation of a carrier bearing BMP-2 in a slow-release system. The chondrocytes could be isolated on-site and immediately used for ACI. To test this hypothesis, Chinchilla rabbits were used as an experimental model. A collagenous patch bearing BMP-2 in a slow-delivery vehicle was sutured to the inner face of the synovial membrane. The neoformed tissue was excised 5, 8, 11 and 14 days postimplantation for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Neoformed tissue was observed within the outer juxtasynovial space already on the 5th postimplantation day. It contained connective and adipose tissues, and a central nugget of growing cartilage. Between days 5 and 14, the absolute volume of cartilage increased, attaining a value of 12 mm(3) at the latter juncture. Bone was deposited in measurable quantities from the 11th day onwards, but owing to resorption, the net volume did not exceed 1.5 mm(3) (14th day). The findings confirm our hypothesis. The quantity of

  11. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    The articular cartilage layer of synovial joints is commonly lesioned by trauma or by a degenerative joint disease. Attempts to repair the damage frequently involve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Healthy cartilage must be first removed from the joint, and then, on a separate occasion, following the isolation of the chondrocytes and their expansion in vitro, implanted within the lesion. The disadvantages of this therapeutic approach include the destruction of healthy cartilage-which may predispose the joint to osteoarthritic degeneration-the necessarily restricted availability of healthy tissue, the limited proliferative capacity of the donor cells-which declines with age-and the need for two surgical interventions. We postulated that it should be possible to induce synovial stem cells, which are characterized by high, age-independent, proliferative and chondrogenic differentiation capacities, to lay down cartilage within the outer juxtasynovial space after the transcutaneous implantation of a carrier bearing BMP-2 in a slow-release system. The chondrocytes could be isolated on-site and immediately used for ACI. To test this hypothesis, Chinchilla rabbits were used as an experimental model. A collagenous patch bearing BMP-2 in a slow-delivery vehicle was sutured to the inner face of the synovial membrane. The neoformed tissue was excised 5, 8, 11 and 14 days postimplantation for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Neoformed tissue was observed within the outer juxtasynovial space already on the 5th postimplantation day. It contained connective and adipose tissues, and a central nugget of growing cartilage. Between days 5 and 14, the absolute volume of cartilage increased, attaining a value of 12 mm(3) at the latter juncture. Bone was deposited in measurable quantities from the 11th day onwards, but owing to resorption, the net volume did not exceed 1.5 mm(3) (14th day). The findings confirm our hypothesis. The quantity of

  12. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2nd group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Results: At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. Conclusion: The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged. PMID:26015603

  13. Biological Knee Reconstruction With Concomitant Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Minas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treating articular cartilage defects and meniscal deficiency is challenging. Although some short- to mid-term follow-up studies report good clinical outcomes after concurrent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), longer follow-up is needed. Purpose: To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes after combined ACI with MAT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively gathered data from patients who had undergone ACI with MAT between 1999 and 2013. A single surgeon treated 18 patients for symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects with meniscal deficiency. One patient was lost to follow-up. Thus, 17 patients (18 knees; mean age, 31.7 years) were evaluated over a mean 7.9-year follow-up (range, 2-16 years). A mean 1.8 lesions per knee were treated over a total surface area of 7.6 cm2 (range, 2.3-21 cm2) per knee. Seventeen lateral and 1 medial MATs were performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog scale, and Short Form–36 were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Patients also self-reported knee function and satisfaction. Standard radiographs were scored for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade. Results: Both 5- and 10-year survival rates were 75%. Outcomes for 6 knees were considered failures. Of the 6 failures, 4 knees were converted to arthroplasty and the other 2 knees underwent biological revision surgery. Of the 12 successfully operated knees, all clinical measures significantly improved postoperatively. Ten patients representing 11 of the 12 knees rated outcomes for their knees as good or excellent, and 1 rated their outcome as fair. Eight patients representing 9 of the 12 knees were satisfied with the procedure. There was no significant osteoarthritis progression based on K-L grading from preoperatively to a

  14. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  15. Membranous nephropathy in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant: autologous graft-versus-host disease or autoimmunity induction?

    PubMed Central

    Abudayyeh, Ala; Truong, Luan D.; Beck, Laurence H.; Weber, Donna M.; Rezvani, Katy; Abdelrahim, Maen

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing utility of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) as a treatment for cancer and noncancerous disorders, more challenges and complications associated with SCT have emerged. Renal injury immediately after transplant is common and well understood, but long-term renal injury is becoming more evident. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a known long-term complication of SCT, and membranous nephropathy (MN) is emerging as the most common cause of SCT-associated glomerular pathology. In this case report, we present a patient who developed features of anti-PLA2R antibody-negative MN following autologous SCT. The renal injury responded well to steroids and further response to rituximab therapy was noted, suggesting antibody-mediated autoimmune glomerular disease. We also present a review of the literature on autologous GVHD and the role of T and B cells in induction of autoimmunity by SCT. PMID:26251713

  16. Frontal sinus obliteration with autologous calvarial bone graft: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Vironneau, Pierre; Coste, André; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie

    2014-11-01

    Despite increasing advances in endonasal frontal sinus surgery, frontal sinus obliteration (FSO) is sometimes necessary after failure of other surgical techniques. This procedure has been reported with autologous tissue or synthetic material, but few studies have reported results with autologous calvarial bone graft. The aim of this study was to report our experience with osteoplastic FSO calvarial bone graft. A retrospective review was performed on 11 patients operated upon for FSO with autologous calvarial bone graft from 2005 to 2011. Obliteration was indicated for chronic symptomatic frontal sinusitis with nasofrontal duct stenosis in five cases of nasal polyposis with a history of endoscopic sinus surgery, two cases of frontal trauma, two of surgery for frontal inverted papilloma and two of chronic frontal purulent sinusitis. Ten patients had a history of one or two previous functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) procedures. On outcome assessment, eight patients had no residual complaints after FSO and all patients showed improvement in symptoms. Frontal sinus obliteration with autologous calvarial bone graft showed low donor site morbidity and good aesthetic results. This procedure should be considered in severe frontal sinusitis after repeated FESS procedures have failed.

  17. Safety Concern between Autologous Fat Graft, Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Osteosarcoma Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, Pierre; Rousseau, Julie; Bouffaut, Anne-Laure; Rédini, Françoise; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique; Duteille, Franck; Trichet, Valérie; Gouin, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant primary bone tumour in young adult treated by neo adjuvant chemotherapy, surgical tumor removal and adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy. For correction of soft tissue defect consecutive to surgery and/or tumor treatment, autologous fat graft has been proposed in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Principal Findings We report here a case of a late local recurrence of osteosarcoma which occurred 13 years after the initial pathology and 18 months after a lipofilling procedure. Because such recurrence was highly unexpected, we investigated the possible relationship of tumor growth with fat injections and with mesenchymal stem/stromal cell like cells which are largely found in fatty tissue. Results obtained in osteosarcoma pre-clinical models show that fat grafts or progenitor cells promoted tumor growth. Significance These observations and results raise the question of whether autologous fat grafting is a safe reconstructive procedure in a known post neoplasic context. PMID:20544017

  18. A new cost-effective and fast method of autologous fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Sorin, T; Rausky, J; Rem, K; Ozil, C; Nguyen Van Nuoi, V; Revol, M; Mazouz Dorval, S

    2016-08-01

    Due to the increasing number of fat grafting procedures, several laboratories have developed their own fat processing system (Puregraft(®), LipiVage(®), Viafill(®), etc.), such as closed harvesting systems, centrifugation or washing and filtration devices, or even simple decantation techniques. However, all these tissue-engineering systems are expensive. Our team has developed a simple and fast autologous fat grafting system, useable even for a large volume of lipofilling, and based on low-pressure suction and a sterile closed-system for processing the harvested fat tissue. It is a cost-effective system, as it only costs 9.28Eur (10.52USD) for a 500milliliters autologous fat graft procedure.

  19. The Healing Effects of Autologous Mucosal Grafts in Experimentally Injured Rabbit Maxillary Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Kara, Ahmet; Konuk, Esma; Demir, Necdet; Ozturk, Murat; Calıskan, Sebla; Topdag, Deniz Ozlem; Ulubil, Arif; Keskin, Ibrahim Gurkan; Iseri, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Healing processes of the nose and paranasal sinuses are quite complex, and poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of mucosal autologous grafts on the degenerated rabbit maxillary sinus mucosa with spontaneous wound healing. It is hypothesized that mucosal grafts will enhance ciliogenesis and improve the morphology of regenerated cilia. Methods Ten female New Zealand rabbits were included in the study. They underwent external maxillary sinus surgery through a transcutaneous approach. A total of 20 maxillary sinuses were randomly divided into 2 groups: ‘spontaneous healing group’ and ‘autologous graft group.’ The animals were sacrificed at the 14th day after the surgery. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and light microscope were used for the evaluation. Results Cellular composition of the graft group is better than the spontaneous healing group. The graft group had larger areas covered with ciliary epithelium than the spontaneous healing group, and the mean length of the cilias were also longer. Additionally, there were wider cilia with abnormal morphology areas in the spontaneous healing group. Conclusion In our opinion, covering of the denuded areas with a graft improves re-epithelization, and may prevent the early complications after sinus surgeries. PMID:26976026

  20. EVOLUTION AND EVALUATION OF AUTOLOGOUS MINI PUNCH GRAFTING IN VITILIGO

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Koushik

    2009-01-01

    Vitiligo is a result of disrupted epidermal melanization with an undecided etiology and incompletely understood pathogenesis. Various treatment options have resulted in various degrees of success. Various surgical modalities and transplantation techniques have evolved during the last few decades. Of them, miniature punch grafting (PG) has established its place as the easiest, fastest, and least expensive method. Various aspects of this particular procedure have been discussed here. The historical perspective, the instruments, evolution of mini grafting down the ages, and the methodology, advantages, and disadvantages have been discussed. A detailed discussion on the topic along with a review of relevant literature has been provided in this article. PMID:20101312

  1. [INFLUENCE OF AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTES TRANSPLANTATION ON THE INTERVERTEBRAL DISC STATE IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEOCHONDROSIS].

    PubMed

    Khyzhnyak, M V

    2015-07-01

    The degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and fibrous ring of the intervertebral discs are the basis of spinal osteochondrosis. A large number of models, including biological, where some mechanisms of their development were worked out and studied, was used to study the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of degenerative spinal changes. The deserved place in the comparative experiments and especially the different methods of therapeutic effects on the tissues of the intervertebral discs in degenerative spinal changes is taken by the experimental methods. The biochemical changes of the intervertebral disc structures were analyzed under the administration of cultured autologous cell of nucleus pulposus suspension against a background of experimental model of rat osteochondrosis. PMID:26591226

  2. Autologous Fat Grafting in Severe Lower Extremity Asymmetries: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity asymmetries are challenging problems in plastic and aesthetic surgery practice. Regardless of their origin, atrophies and asymmetries can be extremely varied and difficult to solve with simple techniques. Objectives:  The author reports his experience in the treatment of four patients suffering from severe lower extremity atrophy and asymmetry of different etiologies with autologous fat grafting. Methods: A total of four cases are presented. Patient selection was based on the severity of atrophy and asymmetry. Two patients were treated with two sessions of simple fat grafting and two patients with one session of cell-enriched fat grafting. The end point in each session was determined by tension/blanching of soft tissues. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months after the last session. During the postoperative follow-up, variables, such as objective volume improvement, objective girth loss, return to daily activities, and patient satisfaction, were analyzed. Results: The initial analysis of postoperative results showed a good patient satisfaction rate with no relevant complications and an early return to daily activities. Estimated mean volume improvement for simple fat grafting cases was estimated as 44% after two treatments. Mean volume improvement in cell-enriched fat grafting cases was estimated as 25% after only one treatment. Conclusions: Autologous fat grafting is a safe, effective, and reliable technique to perform aesthetic and reconstructive reshaping of a lower extremity in cases of atrophy or severe asymmetry. Depending on the preoperative soft tissue compliance, cell-assisted fat grafting will play an important role in reducing the number of sessions to perform. PMID:26824005

  3. Cell-seeded Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (cs-ACI) - A Simplified Implantation Technique with Maintained Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ambra, Luiz Felipe Morlin; Phan, Amy; Mastrocola, Marissa; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate whether outcomes and failure rate of a simplified ACI technique (cs-ACI) were comparable to those of the more complicated traditional technique of a chondrocyte suspension injected under membrane cover (cACI). Methods: Patients were treated with cACI prior to February 2010. After this date the senior author switched to the cs-ACI technique for all patients. For the cs-ACI technique, cultured chondrocytes were seeded in the OR onto a collagen membrane, which was subsequently placed into the cartilage defect and secured with a running suture and/or fibrin glue. Thirty-nine patients treated with the cs-ACI technique fulfilled the inclusion requirements of minimum 2 year follow-up and complete data set. A comparison group was composed of 45 patients treated prior to the switch date with standard ACI (cACI) in which a suspension of cultured chondrocytes was injected into a debrided chondral defect underneath a sutured collagen cover. Prospectively collected data were retrieved from our IRB-approved database. Both groups followed an identical post-operative protocol. The outcomes were measured with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee scale, and Tegner activity scale. We defined failure as any graft removal of more than 25% of the original defect size, for example through revision with allograft or arthroplasty. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare mean scores between groups preoperatively and at the latest follow-up; chi-square test was used to detect differences between groups. Graft survivorship was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and distributions were compared using the log rank test. Results: Group demographics were not significantly different, except for defect size (Table 1) and average follow-up: 4 years in the cACI group and 2.5 years in the cs-ACI group

  4. Substitutes of structural and non-structural autologous bone grafts in hindfoot arthrodeses and osteotomies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Structural and non-structural substitutes of autologous bone grafts are frequently used in hindfoot arthrodeses and osteotomies. However, their efficacy is unclear. The primary goal of this systematic review was to compare autologous bone grafts with structural and non-structural substitutes regarding the odds of union in hindfoot arthrodeses and osteotomies. Methods The Medline and EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant randomized and non-randomized prospective studies as well as retrospective comparative chart reviews. Results 10 studies which comprised 928 hindfoot arthrodeses and osteotomies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The quality of the retrieved studies was low due to small samples sizes and confounding variables. The pooled random effect odds for union were 12.8 (95% CI 12.7 to 12.9) for structural allografts, 5.7 (95% CI 5.5 to 6.0) for cortical autologous grafts, 7.3 (95% CI 6.0 to 8.6) for cancellous allografts and 6.0 (95% CI 5.7 to 6.4) for cancellous autologous grafts. In individual studies, the odds of union in hindfoot arthrodeses achieved with cancellous autologous grafts was similar to those achieved with demineralised bone matrix or platelet derived growth factor augmented ceramic granules. Conclusion Our results suggest an equivalent incorporation of structural allografts as compared to autologous grafts in hindfoot arthrodeses and osteotomies. There is a need for prospective randomized trials to further clarify the role of substitutes of autologous bone grafts in hindfoot surgery. PMID:23390993

  5. Feasibility of Arthroscopic Placement of Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis Grafts in the Cadaver Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Thorey, Fritz; Budde, Stefan; Ezechieli, Marco; Albrecht, Urs Vito; Ettinger, Max

    2013-01-01

    An assortment of clinical trials have been done presenting the effectiveness of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the regeneration of chondral leasions. The purpose of the study was to underline the accessability of the acetabulum and the femoral head through the known portals and prove i) the feasibility of placing the AMIC in the different zones of the hip joint and ii) check for dislocation after joint movement. Six human cadavers underwent hip arthroscopy on both hips. Two chondral lesions were set on each femoral head and two in the acetabulum to evaluate a total of 48 defects. After microfracturing an autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis graft was placed on these lesions arthroscopically. After repeated joint movement the dislocation of the graft was checked. It was possible to place the AMIC graft in all 48 chondral lesions. The time needed for placing the graft was 8±2.9 minutes. A trend of time reduction could be detected throughout this study as the surgeon gained more experience. For the femoral head, after twenty cycles of joint movement 18/24 spots showed no displacement, 4/24 showed minor displacement (<3 mm) and 2/24 showed major displacement (>3 mm). None showed total displacement. For the acetabulum 22/24 spots showed no displacement and 2/24 showed minor displacement. A combined microfracturing and placing of an AMIC graft of focal chondral lesions of the hip joint can be done arthroscopically. Prospective randomized in vivo studies should compare the results of arthroscopilally placed AMIC grafts with microfracturing and microfracturing alone. PMID:24191186

  6. Feasibility of arthroscopic placement of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis grafts in the cadaver hip joint.

    PubMed

    Thorey, Fritz; Budde, Stefan; Ezechieli, Marco; Albrecht, Urs Vito; Ettinger, Max

    2013-01-01

    An assortment of clinical trials have been done presenting the effectiveness of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the regeneration of chondral leasions. The purpose of the study was to underline the accessability of the acetabulum and the femoral head through the known portals and prove i) the feasibility of placing the AMIC in the different zones of the hip joint and ii) check for dislocation after joint movement. Six human cadavers underwent hip arthroscopy on both hips. Two chondral lesions were set on each femoral head and two in the acetabulum to evaluate a total of 48 defects. After microfracturing an autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis graft was placed on these lesions arthroscopically. After repeated joint movement the dislocation of the graft was checked. It was possible to place the AMIC graft in all 48 chondral lesions. The time needed for placing the graft was 8±2.9 minutes. A trend of time reduction could be detected throughout this study as the surgeon gained more experience. For the femoral head, after twenty cycles of joint movement 18/24 spots showed no displacement, 4/24 showed minor displacement (<3 mm) and 2/24 showed major displacement (>3 mm). None showed total displacement. For the acetabulum 22/24 spots showed no displacement and 2/24 showed minor displacement. A combined microfracturing and placing of an AMIC graft of focal chondral lesions of the hip joint can be done arthroscopically. Prospective randomized in vivo studies should compare the results of arthroscopilally placed AMIC grafts with microfracturing and microfracturing alone.

  7. [Autologous fat grafting in the surgical management of painful scar: preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Baptista, C; Iniesta, A; Nguyen, P; Legré, R; Gay, A-M

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience about the effectiveness of autologous fat injections in the management of painful scars. Between 2010 and 2012, all patients with persistent incisional pain despite a well-conduced 6 months medical treatment received an autologous fat graft according to the technique originally described by Coleman. Results interpretation was based on pain improvement thanks to a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), postoperative patient satisfaction, reduction on analgesics intake and quality of life improvement. Eleven patients were included, the mean quantity of fat injected was 11cm(3). Nine patients (1.5%) benefited from a complete or significant pain decrease, 74.5% reported being very satisfied or satisfied with the result. The mean reduction of VAS was 3.5 points. We did not observe any complication. Autologous fat grafting is an innovative therapeutic approach and appears to be an attractive concept in the management of scar neuromas resistant to drug treatment, by providing an easy effective and safe surgical treatment.

  8. Autologous Graft Thickness Affects Scar Contraction and Quality in a Porcine Excisional Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Wu, Jesse C.; Tucker, David I.; Chan, Maren M.; Christy, Robert J.; Hale, Robert G.; Leung, Kai P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Texture, color, and durability are important characteristics to consider for skin replacement in conspicuous and/or mobile regions of the body such as the face, neck, and hands. Although autograft thickness is a known determinant of skin quality, few studies have correlated the subjective and objective characters of skin graft healing with their associated morphologic and cellular profiles. Defining these relationships may help guide development and evaluation of future skin replacement strategies. Methods: Six-centimeter-diameter full-thickness wounds were created on the back of female Yorkshire pigs and covered by autografts of variable thicknesses. Skin quality was assessed on day 120 using an observer scar assessment score and objective determinations for scar contraction, erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical assessments were performed. Results: Thick grafts demonstrated lower observer scar assessment score (better quality) and decreased erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histologically, thin grafts resulted in scar-like collagen proliferation while thick grafts preserves the dermal architecture. Increased vascularity and prolonged and increased cellular infiltration were observed among thin grafts. In addition, thin grafts contained predominately dense collagen fibers, whereas thick grafts had loosely arranged collagen. α-Smooth muscle actin staining for myofibroblasts was observed earlier and persisted longer among thinner grafts. Conclusions: Graft thickness is an important determinant of skin quality. High-quality skin replacements are associated with preserved collagen architecture, decreased neovascularization, and decreased inflammatory cellular infiltration. This model, using autologous skin as a metric of quality, may give a more informative analysis of emerging skin replacement strategies. PMID:26301157

  9. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  10. Reengineering autologous bone grafts with the stem cell activator WNT3A.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wei; Smith, Andrew A; Liu, Bo; Li, Jingtao; Hunter, Daniel J; Dhamdhere, Girija; Salmon, Benjamin; Jiang, Jie; Cheng, Du; Johnson, Chelsey A; Chen, Serafine; Lee, Katherine; Singh, Gurpreet; Helms, Jill A

    2015-04-01

    Autologous bone grafting represents the standard of care for treating bone defects but this biomaterial is unreliable in older patients. The efficacy of an autograft can be traced back to multipotent stem cells residing within the bone graft. Aging attenuates the viability and function of these stem cells, leading to inconsistent rates of bony union. We show that age-related changes in autograft efficacy are caused by a loss in endogenous Wnt signaling. Blocking this endogenous Wnt signal using Dkk1 abrogates autograft efficacy whereas providing a Wnt signal in the form of liposome-reconstituted WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) restores bone forming potential to autografts from aged animals. The bioengineered autograft exhibits significantly better survival in the hosting site. Mesenchymal and skeletal stem cell populations in the autograft are activated by L-WNT3A and mitotic activity and osteogenic differentiation are significantly enhanced. In a spinal fusion model, aged autografts treated with L-WNT3A demonstrate superior bone forming capacity compared to the standard of care. Thus, a brief incubation in L-WNT3A reliably improves autologous bone grafting efficacy, which has the potential to significantly improve patient care in the elderly.

  11. A Simple, Reliable, and Inexpensive Intraoperative External Expansion System for Enhanced Autologous Structural Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Oranges, Carlo M.; Tremp, Mathias; Ling, Barbara; Wettstein, Reto; Largo, René D.

    2016-01-01

    External volume expansion of the recipient site by suction has been proposed as a way of improving fat graft survival. The objective of this study was to present an innovative and simple intraoperative external expansion system to enhance small-volume autologous fat grafting (40–80 mL) and to discuss its background and its mechanism of action. In this system, expansion is performed using a complete vacuum delivery system known as the Kiwi VAC-6000M with a PalmPump (Clinical Innovations). The recipient site is rapidly expanded intraoperatively 10 times for 30 seconds each with a negative pressure of up to 550 mm Hg before autologous fat injection. During this repetitive stimulation, the tissues become grossly expanded, developing macroscopic swelling that regresses slowly over the course of hours following the cessation of the stimulus. The system sets various mechanisms in motion, including scar release, mechanical stimulation, edema, ischemia, and inflammation, which provide an environment conducive for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. In order to maintain the graft construct in its expansive state, all patients are encouraged postoperatively to use the Kiwi three times daily for one minute per session over the course of three days. The handling of this system is simple for both the patients and the surgeon. Satisfactory clinical outcomes have been achieved without significant complications.

  12. A Simple, Reliable, and Inexpensive Intraoperative External Expansion System for Enhanced Autologous Structural Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Oranges, Carlo M.; Tremp, Mathias; Ling, Barbara; Wettstein, Reto; Largo, René D.

    2016-01-01

    External volume expansion of the recipient site by suction has been proposed as a way of improving fat graft survival. The objective of this study was to present an innovative and simple intraoperative external expansion system to enhance small-volume autologous fat grafting (40–80 mL) and to discuss its background and its mechanism of action. In this system, expansion is performed using a complete vacuum delivery system known as the Kiwi VAC-6000M with a PalmPump (Clinical Innovations). The recipient site is rapidly expanded intraoperatively 10 times for 30 seconds each with a negative pressure of up to 550 mm Hg before autologous fat injection. During this repetitive stimulation, the tissues become grossly expanded, developing macroscopic swelling that regresses slowly over the course of hours following the cessation of the stimulus. The system sets various mechanisms in motion, including scar release, mechanical stimulation, edema, ischemia, and inflammation, which provide an environment conducive for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. In order to maintain the graft construct in its expansive state, all patients are encouraged postoperatively to use the Kiwi three times daily for one minute per session over the course of three days. The handling of this system is simple for both the patients and the surgeon. Satisfactory clinical outcomes have been achieved without significant complications. PMID:27689056

  13. Reengineering autologous bone grafts with the stem cell activator WNT3A.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wei; Smith, Andrew A; Liu, Bo; Li, Jingtao; Hunter, Daniel J; Dhamdhere, Girija; Salmon, Benjamin; Jiang, Jie; Cheng, Du; Johnson, Chelsey A; Chen, Serafine; Lee, Katherine; Singh, Gurpreet; Helms, Jill A

    2015-04-01

    Autologous bone grafting represents the standard of care for treating bone defects but this biomaterial is unreliable in older patients. The efficacy of an autograft can be traced back to multipotent stem cells residing within the bone graft. Aging attenuates the viability and function of these stem cells, leading to inconsistent rates of bony union. We show that age-related changes in autograft efficacy are caused by a loss in endogenous Wnt signaling. Blocking this endogenous Wnt signal using Dkk1 abrogates autograft efficacy whereas providing a Wnt signal in the form of liposome-reconstituted WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) restores bone forming potential to autografts from aged animals. The bioengineered autograft exhibits significantly better survival in the hosting site. Mesenchymal and skeletal stem cell populations in the autograft are activated by L-WNT3A and mitotic activity and osteogenic differentiation are significantly enhanced. In a spinal fusion model, aged autografts treated with L-WNT3A demonstrate superior bone forming capacity compared to the standard of care. Thus, a brief incubation in L-WNT3A reliably improves autologous bone grafting efficacy, which has the potential to significantly improve patient care in the elderly. PMID:25682158

  14. A Simple, Reliable, and Inexpensive Intraoperative External Expansion System for Enhanced Autologous Structural Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Oranges, Carlo M; Tremp, Mathias; Ling, Barbara; Wettstein, Reto; Largo, René D; Schaefer, Dirk J

    2016-09-01

    External volume expansion of the recipient site by suction has been proposed as a way of improving fat graft survival. The objective of this study was to present an innovative and simple intraoperative external expansion system to enhance small-volume autologous fat grafting (40-80 mL) and to discuss its background and its mechanism of action. In this system, expansion is performed using a complete vacuum delivery system known as the Kiwi VAC-6000M with a PalmPump (Clinical Innovations). The recipient site is rapidly expanded intraoperatively 10 times for 30 seconds each with a negative pressure of up to 550 mm Hg before autologous fat injection. During this repetitive stimulation, the tissues become grossly expanded, developing macroscopic swelling that regresses slowly over the course of hours following the cessation of the stimulus. The system sets various mechanisms in motion, including scar release, mechanical stimulation, edema, ischemia, and inflammation, which provide an environment conducive for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. In order to maintain the graft construct in its expansive state, all patients are encouraged postoperatively to use the Kiwi three times daily for one minute per session over the course of three days. The handling of this system is simple for both the patients and the surgeon. Satisfactory clinical outcomes have been achieved without significant complications. PMID:27689056

  15. Treatment of alveolar cleft performing a pyramidal pocket and an autologous bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Giuliani, Renzo; Pinto, Valentina; Oranges, Carlo Maria; Negosanti, Luca; Tavaniello, Beatrice; Morellini, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Alveolar cleft repair is a debate topic in cleft lip and palate treatment.The aim of this article is to analyze the outcomes and the advantages of the autologous bone grafting performed during the period between 1981 and 2006. In our plastic surgery unit, 468 patients with alveolar clefts have been treated. According to our protocol, the timing for the closure of the alveolar cleft ranged from 7 to 11 years (mean, 9.4 years). Autologous bone was taken from the skull in the 45% of patients, from the iliac crest in 35% of cases, and from the chin in 20% of cases. The surgical technique of creating a pyramidal pocket to secure the bone graft was central to achieving a good result. The postoperative evaluation of the results, using clinical criteria and endoral radiography, orthopantomography, and teleradiography at 3, 6, 12 months after surgery, and more recently, in the last 82 cases by a three-dimensional computed tomography, allows us to assert that we obtained optimal results in 50% of treated cases, good results in 40%, sufficient in 4%, partial failure in 5.4%, and complete failure in 0.6%.

  16. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    2 weeks of returning to full competition. The final patient sustained a rerupture 10 months after being cleared to play. Conclusion: Compared with the transtibial technique with cross-pin graft fixation, there is an increased risk of graft failure when performing autologous hamstring ACL reconstructions using the anteromedial portal technique with cortical suspensory fixation. PMID:26535370

  17. Technical tricks when using the reamer irrigator aspirator technique for autologous bone graft harvesting.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Andres J; Tarkin, Ivan S; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    This report describes technical tricks for using the reamer irrigator aspirator to harvest autologous bone graft from the femur. This device is a focus of interest in orthopaedics because it can be used to harvest bone graft from the femoral canal and medial condyle in voluminous quantities. Moreover, according to some authors, the osteogenic potential of this graft is at least as effective as that of autogenous bone obtained from the iliac crest. The reamer irrigator aspirator device has substantially different design characteristics and technicalities compared with those of a standard reamer. First, a guidewire must be redirected into multiple areas, including the center of the distal femur and into both condyles, to harvest ample bone graft. This is accomplished by prebending the guidewire in a stronger fashion than required for regular reaming in the case of femoral nailing procedures. This bend can increase the risk for eccentric reaming as well as lodging of the suctioning device within the femoral canal. Second, the front and lateral drilling surfaces of this device are very sharp and further cleaned and maintained sharp by the irrigation process to permit the surgeon to obtain significant volumes of graft with a single passage of this device. At the same time, however, this sharp front-end cutting design can increase the risk of iatrogenic fracture if reaming is performed without caution. Third, a powerful suctioning device is connected to the reamer such that the blood loss that can occur during continuous reaming, irrigation, and aspiration must be considered with this technique. We hereby discuss these potential dangers and describe the correct use of this device with technical tricks to minimize the risk of unexpected intraoperative events. PMID:20035177

  18. Autologous Fat Grafting Reduces Pain in Irradiated Breast: A Review of Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Klinger, Francesco; Lisa, Andrea; Klinger, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pain syndromes affect women after conservative and radical breast oncological procedures. Radiation therapy influences their development. We report autologous fat grafting therapeutical role in treating chronic pain in irradiated patients. Materials and Methods. From February 2006 to November 2014, we collect a total of 209 patients who meet the definition of “Postmastectomy Pain Syndrome” (PMPS) and had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection (113 patients) or quadrantectomy (96 patients). Both procedures were followed by radiotherapy. We performed fat grafting following Coleman's procedure. Mean amount of adipose tissue injected was 52 cc (±8.9 cc) per breast. Seventy-eight in 209 patients were not treated surgically and were considered as control group. Data were gathered through preoperative and postoperative VAS questionnaires; analgesic drug intake was recorded. Results. The follow-up was at 12 months (range 11.7–13.5 months). In 120 treated patients we detected pain decrease (mean ± SD point reduction, 3.19 ± 2.86). Forty-eight in 59 patients stopped their analgesic drug therapy. Controls reported a mean ± SD decrease of pain of 1.14 ± 2.72. Results showed that pain decreased significantly in patients treated (p < 0.005, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Conclusion. Our 8-year experience confirms fat grafting effectiveness in decreasing neuropathic pain. PMID:26858758

  19. Autologous Fat Grafting Reduces Pain in Irradiated Breast: A Review of Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Klinger, Francesco; Lisa, Andrea; Klinger, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pain syndromes affect women after conservative and radical breast oncological procedures. Radiation therapy influences their development. We report autologous fat grafting therapeutical role in treating chronic pain in irradiated patients. Materials and Methods. From February 2006 to November 2014, we collect a total of 209 patients who meet the definition of "Postmastectomy Pain Syndrome" (PMPS) and had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection (113 patients) or quadrantectomy (96 patients). Both procedures were followed by radiotherapy. We performed fat grafting following Coleman's procedure. Mean amount of adipose tissue injected was 52 cc (±8.9 cc) per breast. Seventy-eight in 209 patients were not treated surgically and were considered as control group. Data were gathered through preoperative and postoperative VAS questionnaires; analgesic drug intake was recorded. Results. The follow-up was at 12 months (range 11.7-13.5 months). In 120 treated patients we detected pain decrease (mean ± SD point reduction, 3.19 ± 2.86). Forty-eight in 59 patients stopped their analgesic drug therapy. Controls reported a mean ± SD decrease of pain of 1.14 ± 2.72. Results showed that pain decreased significantly in patients treated (p < 0.005, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Conclusion. Our 8-year experience confirms fat grafting effectiveness in decreasing neuropathic pain.

  20. Protocol for Autologous Fat Grafting for Immediate Reconstruction of Lumpectomy Defects Following Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background For women undergoing breast conservative surgery or lumpectomy for early stage breast carcinoma, there are limited options for reconstruction. Options include the use of flap surgery and/or implants, and have a significant associated morbidity and cost. Autologous fat grafting is a new alternative that can achieve a good cosmetic result, while reducing patient morbidity and cost by avoiding more extensive surgery. Objective The primary objectives are to assess patient satisfaction using the Breast-Q questionnaire and to evaluate fat graft volume. The secondary objectives are fat survival and assessment for complication (eg, fat necrosis, cysts), local recurrence, and the number of sessions needed for a satisfactory outcome. Methods This study is a case series of 100 patients, at a single-center institute spanning one year. The inclusion criteria include: female sex, age 18 to 75, early state breast cancer (confirmed on ultrasound/ positron emission tomography-computed tomography and cytology), amenable to breast conservative surgery, and at least 6 months post-completion of radiotherapy/ hormone/chemotherapy. Exclusion criteria include patients with more advanced stages of breast cancer necessitating total mastectomy, those unsuitable for surgical excision, and those in whom lumpectomy is not feasible. The patients will have follow-up data collected at 6 months, 12 months and 5 years post-operatively. Results This study will begin enrolment in January 2017. We anticipate that there will be good patient satisfaction with fat grafting. The risk for long-term breast cancer recurrence hasn’t been evaluated extensively in literature, however some clinical studies have shown no increased risk of breast cancer in appropriately selected patients at one year. Although some patients may develop complications from fat grafting (eg, necrosis/cysts) this should not confuse the radiological detection of breast cancer recurrence. Conclusions Fat grafting is proving

  1. Computer-aided osteotomy design for harvesting autologous bone grafts in reconstructive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Zerfass, Peter; von Rymon-Lipinski, Bartosz; Jansen, Thomas; Hauck, Wolfgang; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Keeve, Erwin

    2001-05-01

    Autologous grafts serve as the standard grafting material in the treatment of maxillofacial bone tumors, traumatic defects or congenital malformations. The pre-selection of a donor site depends primarily on the morphological fit of the available bone mass and the shape of the part that has to be transplanted. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention based on 3D CT studies is required. This paper presents a method to identify an optimal donor site by performing an optimization of appropriate similarity measures between donor region and a given transplant. At the initial stage the surgeon has to delineate the osteotomy border lines in the template CT data set and to define a set of constraints for the optimization of appropriate similarity measures between donor region and a given transplant. At the initial stage the surgeon has to delineate the osteotomy border lines in the template CT data set and to define a set of constraints for the optimization task in the donor site CT data set. The following fully automatic optimization stage delivers a set of sub-optimal and optimal donor sites for a given template. All generated solutions can be explored interactively on the computer display using an efficient graphical interface. Reconstructive operations supported by our system were performed on 28 patients. We found that the operation time can be considerably shortened by this approach.

  2. Solitary haemangioma of the shaft of long bones: resection and reconstruction with autologous bone graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoxu; Tang, Jicun; Ye, Zhaoming

    2013-04-01

    Bone haemangiomas are uncommon lesions, occurring in the skull or spine. A solitary haemangioma in the diaphysis of a long bone is rare. We retrospectively investigated six patients who presented with a solitary haemangioma in a long bone diaphysis. After segmental bone resection, the bone defect was replaced by a bone autograft. Patients were reviewed clinically and with radiographs. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range : 1-20 years). At the time of latest follow-up, no patient had a recurrence. Postoperative complications were one wound necrosis and one superficial wound infection. Union of the gap filling graft with the host bone was achieved in all patients at an average of 4 months (range: 3-8 months). The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional score was 77% (range: 53%-90%) of normal at 6 months postoperatively, and 97% (range: 95%-99%) at the last follow-up evaluation. Segmental resection for solitary haemangioma and reconstruction with autologous bone graft can be considered as a suitable treatment option.

  3. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R. W. Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-09-15

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation.

  4. Self-patterning of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes cocultured on hyaluronan-grafted chitosan surface.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2016-03-01

    The articular cartilage, once injured, has a limited capacity for intrinsic repair. Preparation of functionally biocartilage substitutes in vitro for cartilage repair is an attractive concept with the recent advances in tissue engineering. In this study, adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and chondrocytes (Ch) were cocultured in different population ratios on the surface of hyaluronan-grafted chitosan (CS-HA) membranes. The two types of cells could self-assemble into cospheroids with different morphologies. In particular, when ADAS and Ch were cocultured at an initial ratio of 7:3 on CS-HA surface, the expression of chondrogenic markers was upregulated, leading to preferred chondrogenesis of the cospheroids. Therefore, using the ADAS/Ch 7:3 cospheroids derived on CS-HA surface instead of using only a single type of cells may be favorable for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26916660

  5. Functionality, growth and accelerated aging of tissue engineered living autologous vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Jens M; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Zürcher, Armin; Schmidt, Dörthe; Begus Nahrmann, Yvonne; Rudolph, Karl L; Weber, Benedikt; Brokopp, Chad E; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Leschka, Sebastian; Odermatt, Bernhard; Jenni, Rolf; Falk, Volkmar; Zünd, Gregor; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2012-11-01

    Living autologous tissue engineered vascular-grafts (TEVGs) with growth-capacity may overcome the limitations of contemporary artificial-prostheses. However, the multi-step in vitro production of TEVGs requires extensive ex vivo cell-manipulations with unknown effects on functionality and quality of TEVGs due to an accelerated biological age of the cells. Here, the impact of biological cell-age and tissue-remodeling capacity of TEVGs in relation to their clinical long-term functionality are investigated. TEVGs were implanted as pulmonary-artery (PA) replacements in juvenile sheep and followed for up to 240 weeks (∼4.5years). Telomere length and telomerase activity were compared amongst TEVGs and adjacent native tissue. Telomerase-activity of in vitro expanded autologous vascular-cells prior to seeding was <5% as compared to a leukemic cell line, indicating biological-aging associated with decreasing telomere-length with each cellular-doubling. Up to 100 weeks, the cells in the TEVGs had consistently shorter telomeres compared to the native counterpart, whereas no significant differences were detectable at 240 weeks. Computed tomography (CT) analysis demonstrated physiological wall-pressures, shear-stresses, and flow-pattern comparable to the native PA. There were no signs of degeneration detectable and continuous native-analogous growth was confirmed by vessel-volumetry. TEVGs exhibit a higher biological age compared to their native counterparts. However, despite of this tissue engineering technology related accelerated biological-aging, growth-capacity and long-term functionality was not compromised. To the contrary, extensive in-vivo remodeling processes with substantial endogenous cellular turnover appears to result in "TEVG rejuvenation" and excellent clinical performance. As these large-animal results can be extrapolated to approximately 20 human years, this study suggests long-term clinical-safety of cardiovascular in vitro tissue engineering and may

  6. Late spontaneous nonanastomotic transgraft hemorrhage from biological material-impregnated fabric vascular graft may be due to autologous tissue detachment: a clinical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous nonanastomotic transgraft hemorrhage occurring several years after grafting may be a new late complication of biological material-impregnated fabric vascular grafts (BMIFVs). Autologous connective tissue detachment may be caused by high porosity of the fabric graft and high blood pressure. Bleeding around the fiber is the first sign of development. Fabric grafts with optimal porosity and biocompatibility should be used for manufacturing BMIFVs.

  7. [Viability of autologous fat grafts harvested with the Coleman technique and the tissu trans system (shippert method): a comparative study].

    PubMed

    Herold, C; Pflaum, M; Utz, P; Wilhelmi, M; Rennekampff, H-O; Vogt, P M

    2011-12-01

    Various methods for harvesting and refining autologous fat grafts have been described. One of the standard procedures, the Coleman technique, is based on manual aspiration to reduce the negative presssure and the centrifugation of the grafts. The Shippert technique uses automatic liposuction with reduced negative pressure and abstains from centifugation in order not to reduce viability of the graft by exposing it to centrifugal forces. This study intends to compare the viability of fat grafts processed with the above-mentioned methods.Fat grafts were obtained in 9 patients by using both the Tissu Trans system (Shippert technique) and the Coleman technique. To evaluate the impact of centrifugation forces, the grafts harvested with the Coleman technique were treated with standard adjustment of the centrifuge and also with doubled g-force. Viability of fat grafts was analysed with the WST-8 test and with annexin V/PI assay FACS analysis.The viability of fat grafts processed by the Coleman technique was significantly higher compared to the Shippert technique on applying the WST-8 test. Applying the annexin V/PI analysis, the viability of fat grafts was almost equal with both techniques. Whereas the fat grafts processed with the Tissu Trans system are injected without condensation, the grafts refined with the Coleman technique were concentrated 3 times by centrifugation compared to the primary liposuctioned graft volumes.The Coleman technique allows the preparation of a fat graft containing more viable cells than the Shippert technique. This is in part due to the condensation of the graft by centrifugation using the Coleman technique. The factor of condensation of the grafts harvested and refined with the Coleman technique exceeds the factor of increased fat graft viability in comparison to the Shippert technique. The Tissu Trans system is more than twice as fast and easier to use with a preferential use for large volume grafts like in breast augmentation, whereas the

  8. Heterotopic implantation of autologous bone marrow in rock pigeons (Columba livia): possible applications in avian bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Sanaei, M Reza; Abu, Jalila; Nazari, Mojgan; Faiz, Nik Mohd; Bakar, Mohd Zuki Abu; Allaudin, Zeenathul N

    2011-12-01

    Autologous bone marrow, alone or as a composite marrow graft, has received much attention in various species. To assess the potential osteogenicity of autologous, extramedullary bone marrow implants in an avian model, 24 adult pigeons (Columba livia) were given intramuscular implantations of autologous marrow aspirated from the medial tibiotarsus. Birds were euthanatized at 1, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after surgery to evaluate whether ectopic bone had formed at the implant sites. Primary evaluations by in situ radiography and postmortem histologic examinations showed no evidence of bone formation. Further evaluation with histologic scores and histomorphometry revealed a significantly increased rate of angiogenesis at the implant sites by the sixth and tenth week postimplantation (P < .05). No significant differences between the treatment and control sites were present at any other endpoints. Results of this study show that, although autologous bone marrow lacks heterotopic osteogenic potentials in this avian model, it could still function as a useful adjunct to routine bone grafting techniques because of its unique capabilities to promote early angiogenesis. PMID:22458179

  9. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts.

    PubMed

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that's constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  10. Autologous plasma and its supporting role in fat graft survival: A relevant vector to counteract resorption in lipofilling.

    PubMed

    Stillaert, Filip; Depypere, Bernard; Doornaert, Maarten; Creytens, David; De Clercq, Heidi; Cornelissen, Ria; Monstrey, Stan; Blondeel, Phillip

    2016-07-01

    Fat grafting has become a widespread technique for different reconstructive and esthetic purposes. However, the disadvantage of fat grafting is the unpredictable resorption rate that often necessitates repetitive procedures, which in turn may have an impact on the morbidity. During the immediate, post-graft, ischemic period, cells survive due to the process of plasmatic imbibition. This biological phenomenon precedes the ingrowth of neo-capillaries that eventually nourish the graft and help establish a long-term homeostatic equilibrium. Both partners, the graft and the recipient bed, contribute to the revascularization process. Hypothetically, enrichment of the recipient site with autologous plasma could have a beneficial role to enhance fat graft survival. We investigated whether plasma supported the viability of the lipoaspirate (LA) material. Plasma was isolated from blood samples collected from eight patients during the elective lipofilling procedures. An in vitro study assessed the viability of LA cells using plasma as a culture medium compared to the traditional culture media. In vitro analysis confirmed sustained viability of LA cells compared to the standard media and control media during 7 consecutive days. The behavior of the fat grafts in plasma showed similarities with those incubated in the traditional culture media. In future, these findings could be translated to a clinical setting. Plasma is the only autologous substrate available in large quantities in the human body. The addition of the supporting agents, such as plasma, could contribute to a better graft survival with more stable clinical outcomes in the long term. The rationale behind the technique is based on the phenomenon of plasmatic imbibition and the reasoning that the extracellular matrix plays a pivotal role in cellular survival. PMID:27117776

  11. Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings After Autologous Osteochondral Plug Grafts For Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Humeral Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Harada, Mikio; Satake, Hiroshi; Uno, Tomohiro; Takagi, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although good clinical outcomes of autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) have been reported, the timing of return to sports was various and still controversial. The period of graft incorporation and the lesion healing at repair site is important to establish the rehabilitation protocol, however there is little information. The aim of this study was to investigate early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical outcomes after autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar OCD. Methods: Fifteen young baseball players with advanced lesions of capitellar OCD underwent a procedure using autologous osteochondral plug grafts and underwent MRI (1.5 T) scan at 3 and 6 months, postoperatively. Their mean age at the time of surgery was 13.5 years (range, 13-15 years). Four lesions were classified as International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) OCD III and 11 lesions as OCD IV. The mean size of the lesions (sagittal × coronal) was 16 × 14 mm and the mean surface area was 181 mm2. One to two osteochondral plug grafts, with a mean diameter of 7 mm (range, 6-8 mm), were harvested from the lateral femoral condyle and transplanted to the defects. The mean reconstruction rate was 41% (range, 12%-65%), which was calculated as (total surface area of the grafts × 100%)/ (surface area of the lesion). Patients were allowed to begin throwing after 3 months and to return to sports after 6 months. The mean follow-up was 21 months (range, 12-36 months). The MRI findings were assessed graft incorporation, which was indicated by no T1-low-signal-intensity at the graft and no fluid surrounding the graft on T2-weighted fat-suppression (Figure 1), and the lesion healing according to the scoring system of Henderson (4, complete healing; 16, no healing). MRI were blinded and randomized, and two observers reviewed independently and conferred when they differed. Clinical outcomes were evaluated as elbow pain

  12. A case of autologous microfat grafting in lip reconstruction of a whistle deformity following cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Belyea, James; Hart, Robert; Trites, Jonathan; Taylor, Sm

    2010-01-01

    A whistle deformity is defined as a deficiency in the vertical length of the lip so that the free margins of the upper and lower lips do not meet normally, giving the appearance of whistling. This is a common secondary deformity of the vermilion in patients with cleft lip. A case involving a 61-year-old man who developed a whistle deformity as a result of two wedge resections and postoperative radiotherapy for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip is presented. Hyaluronic acid-based tissue filler and autologous microfat transplantation to the lower lip were used for definitive management of the patient's whistle deformity. After one year of follow-up, the patient was pleased with the overall result and noted marked improvement of his oral competence and overall appearance of the lip. The present case demonstrates that microfat transplantation is a viable option for correcting a whistle deformity, not only after surgery, but also following adjuvant radiotherapy - both of which potentially reduce graft viability secondary to decreased vascularity of the recipient site.

  13. A case of autologous microfat grafting in lip reconstruction of a whistle deformity following cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, James; Hart, Robert; Trites, Jonathan; Taylor, SM

    2010-01-01

    A whistle deformity is defined as a deficiency in the vertical length of the lip so that the free margins of the upper and lower lips do not meet normally, giving the appearance of whistling. This is a common secondary deformity of the vermilion in patients with cleft lip. A case involving a 61-year-old man who developed a whistle deformity as a result of two wedge resections and postoperative radiotherapy for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip is presented. Hyaluronic acid-based tissue filler and autologous microfat transplantation to the lower lip were used for definitive management of the patient’s whistle deformity. After one year of follow-up, the patient was pleased with the overall result and noted marked improvement of his oral competence and overall appearance of the lip. The present case demonstrates that microfat transplantation is a viable option for correcting a whistle deformity, not only after surgery, but also following adjuvant radiotherapy – both of which potentially reduce graft viability secondary to decreased vascularity of the recipient site. PMID:22131849

  14. Autologous Cricoid Cartilage as a Graft for Airway Reconstruction in an Emergent Technique - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Farzad; Vaghardoost, Reza; Derakhshandeh, Vita; Sobouti, Behnam; Ghavami, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngotracheal stenosis can be caused after traumatic injuries to the neck from the subglottic larynx to the trachea. Patients with laryngotracheal stenosis often need a tracheotomy and occasionally may become tracheotomy dependent. Different procedures have been described for the management of these lesions. Management options include techniques of endoscopic dilation, laser resection, laryngo-fissure, and an innovative array of plastic reconstructions with or without the use of stents. Case Report: This paper presents airway reconstruction in a young patient with severe subglottic stenosis due to a blunt trauma to the neck, who was treated using particles of an autologous fractured cricoid cartilage as the source for airway augmentation. An incision was made in the anterior midline of the cricoid lamina and deepened through the scar tissue to the posterior cricoid lamina. Then two lateral incisions (right & left) were made in the cricoid lamina and fractured cartilage particles and the scar tissue were removed via these two lateral incisions. The mucosal lining at the right and left of the midline incision, after debulking, were sutured to a lateral position. Thereafter three cartilage particles were used to reconstruct the anterior cricoid lamina and augment the lumen. Conclusion: It is worth to mention that an autologus cartilage graft can be used for certain cases with traumatic airway stenosis. Further follow up and more patients are needed to approve this method of reconstructive surgery in emergent situations. PMID:27280104

  15. Debridement of cartilage lesions before autologous chondrocyte implantation by open or transarthroscopic techniques: a comparative study using post-mortem materials.

    PubMed

    Drobnic, M; Radosavljevic, D; Cör, A; Brittberg, M; Strazar, K

    2010-04-01

    We compared the quality of debridement of chondral lesions performed by four arthroscopic (SH, shaver; CU, curette; SHCU, shaver and curette; BP, bipolar electrodes) and one open technique (OPEN, scalpel and curette) which are used prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The ex vivo simulation of all five techniques was carried out on six juvenile equine stifle joints. The OPEN, SH and SHCU techniques were tested on knees harvested from six adult human cadavers. The most vertical walls with the least adjacent damage to cartilage were obtained with the OPEN technique. The CU and SHCU methods gave inferior, but still acceptable results whereas the SH technique alone resulted in a crater-like defect and the BP method undermined the cartilage wall. The subchondral bone was severely violated in all the equine samples which might have been peculiar to this model. The predominant depth of the debridement in the adult human samples was at the level of the calcified cartilage. Some minor penetrations of the subchondral end-plate were induced regardless of the instrumentation used. Our study suggests that not all routine arthroscopic instruments are suitable for the preparation of a defect for ACI. We have shown that the preferred debridement technique is either open or arthroscopically-assisted manual curettage. The use of juvenile equine stifles was not appropriate for the study of the cartilage-subchondral bone interface. PMID:20357342

  16. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. Methods and analysis All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case–control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about ‘fat grafting and breast reconstruction’ and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and

  17. The Safety, Effectiveness, and Efficiency of Autologous Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Courtney N.; Leung, Braden K.; Gitlin, Matthew; Parekh, Mousam; Macarios, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: For years, the safety and effectiveness of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for breast reconstruction have been in question, with particular concern over fat necrosis, calcifications, cyst formation, and interfering with the detection of breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that the complication rates and clinical results are generally acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The emerging challenge is the numerous AFG techniques and systems, where there are limited knowledge and data. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review that focuses on the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of various AFG techniques as applied to the breast. Methods: A PubMed search using terms related to AFG was performed over a 5-year period (April 1, 2010–April 30, 2015). Original articles focused on AFG to the breast, with outcomes on safety, effectiveness, and efficiency, were included. Results: Five hundred ninety-eight articles were identified with 36 articles included (n = 4306 patients). Satisfaction rates were high although the prevalence of complications was low—similar to previous findings. Seven studies reported average operating room time with an overall mean of 125 minutes (range: 40–210). The mean volume of fat harvested was 558 mL (range: 120–1299), and fat injected was 145 mL (range: 20–607). A positive association between injection volume and operating time was observed. Conclusions: This review validates previous findings on the safety and effectiveness of AFG to the breast and highlights its efficiency. The efficiency data available, although limited, suggest that there is an opportunity to achieve time and cost savings while not sacrificing safety and effectiveness. PMID:27622095

  18. The Safety, Effectiveness, and Efficiency of Autologous Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Courtney N.; Leung, Braden K.; Gitlin, Matthew; Parekh, Mousam; Macarios, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: For years, the safety and effectiveness of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for breast reconstruction have been in question, with particular concern over fat necrosis, calcifications, cyst formation, and interfering with the detection of breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that the complication rates and clinical results are generally acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The emerging challenge is the numerous AFG techniques and systems, where there are limited knowledge and data. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review that focuses on the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of various AFG techniques as applied to the breast. Methods: A PubMed search using terms related to AFG was performed over a 5-year period (April 1, 2010–April 30, 2015). Original articles focused on AFG to the breast, with outcomes on safety, effectiveness, and efficiency, were included. Results: Five hundred ninety-eight articles were identified with 36 articles included (n = 4306 patients). Satisfaction rates were high although the prevalence of complications was low—similar to previous findings. Seven studies reported average operating room time with an overall mean of 125 minutes (range: 40–210). The mean volume of fat harvested was 558 mL (range: 120–1299), and fat injected was 145 mL (range: 20–607). A positive association between injection volume and operating time was observed. Conclusions: This review validates previous findings on the safety and effectiveness of AFG to the breast and highlights its efficiency. The efficiency data available, although limited, suggest that there is an opportunity to achieve time and cost savings while not sacrificing safety and effectiveness.

  19. Penetrating sclerokeratoplasty and autologous pinnal cartilage and conjunctival grafting to treat a large limbal melanoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Rachel L; Moore, Philip A; Ellis, Angela E

    2015-03-01

    A four-year-old neutered male Labrador retriever presented to Portland Veterinary Specialists Ophthalmology Service for evaluation of a pigmented mass oculus sinister (OS) of approximately 4-month duration. Complete ophthalmic examination revealed a large, pigmented, raised, well-demarcated, epibulbar mass appearing to originate from the nasodorsal limbal region. The mass was smooth and roughly circular, extending approximately 4 mm into the sclera and 14 mm into the nasodorsal cornea. Gonioscopy directly under the mass was not possible due to mass size. The visible iridocorneal angle was normal. High-resolution B-scan ultrasound showed mass extension to Descemet's membrane and deep sclera, but no intraocular invasion. Penetrating sclerokeratoplasty was performed followed by autologous pinnal cartilage and conjunctival grafting to repair the corneoscleral defect (20 mm x 19 mm) and to restore globe integrity and function. Histopathology confirmed the mass to be a benign limbal melanoma with complete excision. The surgery site healed without complication, and the pinnal cartilage became fully incorporated into the globe. Twelve months postoperatively, the patient remains visual with a normal intraocular and fundic examination. The pinnal harvest site on the right ear healed without complication. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of corneoscleral grafting using autologous pinnal cartilage. This may represent a viable alternative to other corneoscleral grafting procedures for large defects and is an attractive treatment option due to lack of host rejection, readily available source of donor cartilage, and provision of tectonic support to the globe.

  20. Scaffold-free Three-dimensional Graft From Autologous Adipose-derived Stem Cells for Large Bone Defect Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dufrane, Denis; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Delloye, Christian; Poirel, Hélène A.; André, Wivine; Aouassar, Najima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Long bone nonunion in the context of congenital pseudarthrosis or carcinologic resection (with intercalary bone allograft implantation) is one of the most challenging pathologies in pediatric orthopedics. Autologous cancellous bone remains the gold standard in this context of long bone nonunion reconstruction, but with several clinical limitations. We then assessed the feasibility and safety of human autologous scaffold-free osteogenic 3-dimensional (3D) graft (derived from autologous adipose-derived stem cells [ASCs]) to cure a bone nonunion in extreme clinical and pathophysiological conditions. Human ASCs (obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of 6 patients and expanded up to passage 4) were incubated in osteogenic media and supplemented with demineralized bone matrix to obtain the scaffold-free 3D osteogenic structure as confirmed in vitro by histomorphometry for osteogenesis and mineralization. The 3D “bone-like” structure was finally transplanted for 3 patients with bone tumor and 3 patients with bone pseudarthrosis (2 congenital, 1 acquired) to assess the clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. Although minor clones with structural aberrations (aneuploidies, such as tri or tetraploidies or clonal trisomy 7 in 6%–20% of cells) were detected in the undifferentiated ASCs at passage 4, the osteogenic differentiation significantly reduced these clonal anomalies. The final osteogenic product was stable, did not rupture with forceps manipulation, did not induce donor site morbidity, and was easily implanted directly into the bone defect. No acute (<3 mo) side effects, such as impaired wound healing, pain, inflammatory reaction, and infection, or long-term side effects, such as tumor development, were associated with the graft up to 4 years after transplantation. We report for the first time that autologous ASC can be fully differentiated into a 3D osteogenic-like implant without any scaffold. We demonstrated that this engineered tissue can

  1. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that’s constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  2. The Subfascial Approach to Primary and Secondary Breast Augmentation with Autologous Fat Grafting and Form-Stable Implants.

    PubMed

    Sampaio Goes, João Carlos; Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Gemperli, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    This article presents an overview of the subfascial approach to primary and secondary breast augmentation with form-stable implants associated with autologous fat grafting. Although breast augmentation is a well-studied procedure, there are few previous reports concerning the subfascial technique and, especially, this technique associated with lipofilling. Consequently, the authors present their experience with a form-stable, anatomically shaped silicone gel breast implant, which has recently been approved in the United States following FDA clinical trials. Primary and secondary breast augmentations using form-stable implants resulted in satisfactory outcomes.

  3. Allogeneic Versus Autologous Derived Cell Sources for Use in Engineered Bone-Ligament-Bone Grafts in Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use. PMID:25397361

  4. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  5. Effect of zoledronate acid treatment on osseointegration and fixation of implants in autologous iliac bone grafts in ovariectomized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mengchun; Hu, Jing; Li, Jianping; Li, Jinyuan; Dong, Wei; Feng, Xiaojie; Yu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    One main problem associated with alveolar bone augmentation in implant dentistry is resorption of grafted bone, which may be further compromised by systemic skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis. Zoledronate acid (ZOL) is the most potent bisphosphonate to treat osteoporosis and therefore it is hypothesized to be able to invert the negative effect of osteoporosis on osseointegration and fixation of dental implants in autologous bone grafts. In this study, 56 rabbits received bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) (40 rabbits) or sham operation (16 rabbits). Three months later, 8 animals from each group were sacrificed for bone mineral density (BMD) examination. Then the remaining animals underwent bilateral autologous iliac bone grafting with simultaneous implantation of titanium implants in tibiae and were divided into 5 groups (n=8): Sham, OVX, Loc-ZOL (local treatment), Sys-ZOL (systemic treatment) and Loc+Sys-ZOL (local plus systemic) group. At 3 months after implantation, all animals were sacrificed and specimens were harvested for examinations. Both BMD and histological examinations of femurs showed osteoporotic changes after ovariectomy, while systemic treatment with ZOL restored mineralized bone. Micro-CT examination demonstrated that OVX group showed significant decrease of mineralized bone and implant-bone contact when compared with sham control, whereas both systemic and local treatments of ZOL significantly increased mineralized bone and implant-bone contact in ovariectomized animals. However, the best effects were observed in Loc+Sys-ZOL group (combined use of ZOL) and most of bone indices were similar to (IBCR, p>0.05) or higher than (BV/TV, Conn.D and Tb.N) (p<0.01) those of the sham group, except Tb.Th, which was still significantly lower (p<0.01), and Tb.Sp, which was further decreased (p<0.01). The aforementioned effects were also confirmed by histomorphometric analysis of bone indices on implant-bone contact and mineralized bone. In addition, biomechanical

  6. Inside-out autologous vein grafts fail to restore erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve crush injury after nerve-sparing prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Bessede, T; Moszkowicz, D; Alsaid, B; Zaitouna, M; Diallo, D; Peschaud, F; Benoit, G; Droupy, S

    2015-01-01

    Some autologous tissues can restore erectile function (EF) in rats after a resection of the cavernous nerve (CN). However, a cavernous nerve crush injury (CNCI) better reproduces ED occurring after a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). The aim was to evaluate the effect on EF of an autologous vein graft after CNCI, compared with an artificial conduit. Five groups of rats were studied: those with CN exposure, exposure+vein, crush, crush+guide and crush+vein. Four weeks after surgery, the EF of rats was assessed by electrical stimulation of the CNs. The intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored during stimulations at various frequencies. The main outcome, that is, the rigidity of the erections, was defined as the ICP/MAP ratio. At 10 Hz, the ICP/MAP ratios were 41.8%, 34.7%, 20.9%, 33.9% and 20.5%, respectively. The EF was significantly lower in rats if the CNCI was treated with a vein graft instead of an artificial guide. Contrary to cases of CN resection, autologous vein grafts did not improve EF after CNCI. In terms of clinical use, the study suggests to limit an eventual use of autologous vein grafts to non-nerve-sparing RPs.

  7. The graft of autologous adipose-derived stem cells in the corneal stromal after mechanic damage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Yun; Bao, Hui-Jing; Cui, Lei; Zou, Jun

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the feasibility of using autologous rabbit adipose derived stem cells (rASCs) as seed cells and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) as a scaffold for repairing corneal stromal defects. rASCs isolated from rabbit nape adipose tissue were expanded and seeded on a PLGA scaffold to fabricate cell-scaffold constructs. After 1 week of cultivation in vitro, the cell-scaffold complexes were transplanted into corneal stromal defects in rabbits. In vivo, the autologous rASCs-PLGA constructed corneal stroma gradually became transparent without corneal neovascularization after 12 weeks. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy examination revealed that their histological structure and collagen fibril distribution at 24 weeks after implantation were similar to native counterparts. As to the defect treated with PLGA alone, the stromal defects remained. And scar tissue was observed in the untreated-group. The implanted autologous ASCs survived up to 24 weeks post-transplantation and differentiated into functional keratocytes, as assessed by the expression of aldehyde-3-dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1) and cornea-specific proteoglycan keratocan. Our results revealed that autologous rASCs could be one of the cell sources for corneal stromal restoration in diseased corneas or for tissue engineering of a corneal equivalent.

  8. Flap revascularization in patients following immediate reconstruction using an autologous free dermal fat graft for breast cancer: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hiroaki; Kutomi, Goro; Kyuno, Takuro; Satomi, Fukino; Uno, Satoko; Maeda, Hideki; Kameshima, Hidekazu; Omura, Tosei; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Takemasa, Ichiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been reported that use of the free dermal fat graft (FDFG) technique produces a good cosmetic outcome for breast cancer. An FDFG is harvested from the lower abdomen as a columnar-shaped specimen and implanted into the defect of the breast after a partial mastectomy as a volume replacement technique. In this report, two patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery with immediate reconstruction using an autologous FDFG are described in order to show the difference in status between one case with and one without blood flow in the graft. To assess the benefit of this technique using FDFGs, their cosmetic satisfaction was evaluated using a questionnaire, graft shrinkage was measured by CT, and blood flow was assessed using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Both patients scored 10 of 12 points on the questionnaire. After 2 years, shrinkage of the grafts was 21.6 and 25.2 %, respectively. Although one patient had no blood flow in the center of the graft, the other had blood flow from the pectoralis major muscle to the center of the graft. While satisfaction and graft shrinkage were similar in the two patients, one case showed blood flow and had a somewhat softer graft than the other. The graft status was maintained with a good cosmetic outcome for 3 years after breast-conserving surgery with immediate reconstruction using an autologous FDFG, despite mild shrinkage and hardness of the graft. It is notable that blood flow was observed into the graft on CEUS, and more distinct perfusion was seen in the softer graft case after more than 3 years.

  9. Successful treatment of a humeral capitulum osteonecrosis with bone morphogenetic protein-7 combined with autologous bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Marsell, Richard; Hailer, Nils P

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 27-year-old female with subcortical osteonecrosis of the humeral capitulum. Percutaneous retrograde drilling of the lesion and application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 were combined with autologous bone grafting. At follow-up the patient was almost pain-free, had normalized her range of motion, and radiography showed consolidation of the lesion without any heterotopic bone formation. By timing surgery prior to subchondral collapse, biomechanical stability of the subchondral bone was maintained. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the treatment of an osteonecrosis in this location with a BMP, and this strategy could potentially be applied in other locations with juxta-articular osteonecrosis. PMID:25017508

  10. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  11. Patient-Oriented and Performance-Based Outcomes After Knee Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation: A Timeline for the First Year of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jennifer S.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Mullineaux, David R.; English, Robert A.; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Context It is well established that autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) can require extended recovery postoperatively; however, little information exists to provide clinicians and patients with a timeline for anticipated function during the first year after ACI. Objective To document the recovery of functional performance of activities of daily living after ACI. Patients ACI patients (n = 48, 29 male; 35.1 ± 8.0 y). Intervention All patients completed functional tests (weight-bearing squat, walk-across, sit-to-stand, step-up/over, and forward lunge) using the NeuroCom long force plate (Clackamas, OR) and completed patient-reported outcome measures (International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, Lysholm, Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC], and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 mo postoperatively. Main Outcome Measures A covariance pattern model was used to compare performance and self-reported outcome across time and provide a timeline for functional recovery after ACI. Results Participants demonstrated significant improvement in walk-across stride length from baseline (42.0% ± 8.9% height) at 6 (46.8% ± 8.1%) and 12 mo (46.6% ± 7.6%). Weight bearing on the involved limb during squatting at 30°, 60°, and 90° was significantly less at 3 mo than presurgery. Step-up/over time was significantly slower at 3 mo (1.67 ± 0.69 s) than at baseline (1.49 ± 0.33 s), 6 mo (1.51 ± 0.36 s), and 12 mo (1.40 ± 0.26 s). Step-up/over lift-up index was increased from baseline (41.0% ± 11.3% body weight [BW]) at 3 (45.0% ± 11.7% BW), 6 (47.0% ± 11.3% BW), and 12 mo (47.3% ± 11.6% BW). Forward-lunge time was decreased at 3 mo (1.51 ± 0.44 s) compared with baseline (1.39 ± 0.43 s), 6 mo (1.32 ± 0.05 s), and 12 mo (1.27 ± 0.06). Similarly, forward-lunge impact force was decreased at 3 mo (22.2% ± 1.4% BW) compared with baseline (25.4% ± 1.5% BW). The WOMAC demonstrated significant

  12. Complications associated with negative pressure reaming for harvesting autologous bone graft: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jason A; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Murtha, Yvonne; Liporace, Frank A; Stover, Michael D; Nork, Sean E; Crist, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    A technical benefit of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system (Synthes, Paoli, PA) is the ability to harvest large volumes (40-90 cm3) of autogenous bone graft. Early evaluations of this technique have reported few problems, all of which were attributed to technical error. This case series reviews 6 RIA-associated complications including 4 fractures and their contributing risk factors. Cases were collected from 4 independent orthopaedic centers, and all patients underwent RIA bone graft harvesting in a lower extremity long bone injuries. In this population, 2 patients experienced acute RIA-associated events, necessitating an additional procedure or altered postoperative rehabilitation, whereas 4 patients fractured through their donor site in the early postoperative period. This series suggests that surgeons should (1) preoperatively assess cortical diameters at long bone harvest sites, (2) carefully monitor intraoperative reaming, and (3) avoid RIA bone graft harvesting in patients with a history of osteoporosis or osteopenia unless postharvest intramedullary stabilization is considered.

  13. Computer-based planning of optimal donor sites for autologous osseous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Chlebiej, Michal; Zerfass, Peter; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Mikolajczak, Pawel; Keeve, Erwin

    2002-05-01

    Bone graft surgery is often necessary for reconstruction of craniofacial defects after trauma, tumor, infection or congenital malformation. In this operative technique the removed or missing bone segment is filled with a bone graft. The mainstay of the craniofacial reconstruction rests with the replacement of the defected bone by autogeneous bone grafts. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention is required. The major problem is to determine as accurately as possible the donor site where the graft should be dissected from and to define the shape of the desired transplant. A computer-aided method for semi-automatic selection of optimal donor sites for autografts in craniofacial reconstructive surgery has been developed. The non-automatic step of graft design and constraint setting is followed by a fully automatic procedure to find the best fitting position. In extension to preceding work, a new optimization approach based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method has been implemented and embedded into our computer-based surgical planning system. This new technique enables, once the pre-processing step has been performed, selection of the optimal donor site in time less than one minute. The method has been applied during surgery planning step in more than 20 cases. The postoperative observations have shown that functional results, such as speech and chewing ability as well as restoration of bony continuity were clearly better compared to conventionally planned operations. Moreover, in most cases the duration of the surgical interventions has been distinctly reduced.

  14. Obesity phenotypes and resorption percentage after breast autologous fat grafting: Rule of low-grade inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; Sarlo, Francesca; De Angelis, Barbara; De Lorenzo, Antonio; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the main reasons why the breast fat grafting was questioned is that there may be lipofilling resorption. In the literature, the resorption rate reported over the 1st year is highly variable (20–90%). Objective: The aim of this work was to identify the biochemical and clinical parameters, which increase fat graft maintenance in breast reconstruction. Materials and Methods: A sample of 19 patients was treated with fat grafting mixed with platelet-rich plasma. A complete screening of anthropometry, body composition, and blood biochemical parameters was assessed using the standardized equipment. Pre- and post-operative evaluation was performed, which included a complete clinical examination, photographic assessment, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the soft tissue, and ultrasound. The follow-up period was 2 years. Results: The authors divided the results into two types of patients: “responder” and “not a responder.” In the “responder” group patients with normal weight, gynoid fat distribution, obese, with normal blood biochemical parameters, and atherogenic indices but with high preoperative values of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (174.49) and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (2.65) showed a greater increase of fat graft maintenance at 6 and 12 months after the last lipofilling session. In the “not responder group” patients with overweight, android fat distribution, obese, high values of atherogenic indices, but with normal preoperative NLR and PLR ratios showed a lower fat graft maintenance at 6 and 12 months. Conclusion: We assume, the problem of fat resorption may be resolved by analysis of body composition and by examine the predictive role of preoperative markers of low-grade inflammation.

  15. Obesity phenotypes and resorption percentage after breast autologous fat grafting: Rule of low-grade inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; Sarlo, Francesca; De Angelis, Barbara; De Lorenzo, Antonio; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the main reasons why the breast fat grafting was questioned is that there may be lipofilling resorption. In the literature, the resorption rate reported over the 1st year is highly variable (20–90%). Objective: The aim of this work was to identify the biochemical and clinical parameters, which increase fat graft maintenance in breast reconstruction. Materials and Methods: A sample of 19 patients was treated with fat grafting mixed with platelet-rich plasma. A complete screening of anthropometry, body composition, and blood biochemical parameters was assessed using the standardized equipment. Pre- and post-operative evaluation was performed, which included a complete clinical examination, photographic assessment, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the soft tissue, and ultrasound. The follow-up period was 2 years. Results: The authors divided the results into two types of patients: “responder” and “not a responder.” In the “responder” group patients with normal weight, gynoid fat distribution, obese, with normal blood biochemical parameters, and atherogenic indices but with high preoperative values of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (174.49) and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (2.65) showed a greater increase of fat graft maintenance at 6 and 12 months after the last lipofilling session. In the “not responder group” patients with overweight, android fat distribution, obese, high values of atherogenic indices, but with normal preoperative NLR and PLR ratios showed a lower fat graft maintenance at 6 and 12 months. Conclusion: We assume, the problem of fat resorption may be resolved by analysis of body composition and by examine the predictive role of preoperative markers of low-grade inflammation. PMID:27656603

  16. Efficacy of Autologous Microfat Graft on Facial Handicap in Systemic Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Nolwenn; Daumas, Aurélie; Truillet, Romain; Jouve, Elisabeth; Magalon, Jéremy; Veran, Julie; Casanova, Dominique; Frances, Yves; Magalon, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Autologous adipose tissue injection is used in plastic surgery for correction of localized tissue atrophy and has also been successfully offered for treatment of localized scleroderma. We aimed to evaluate whether patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and facial handicap could also benefit from this therapy. Methods: We included 14 patients (mean age of 53.8 ± 9.6 years) suffering from SSc with facial handicap defined by Mouth Handicap in Systemic Sclerosis Scale (MHISS) score more than or equal to 20, a Rodnan skin score on the face more than or equal to 1, and maximal mouth opening of less than 55 mm. Autologous adipose tissue injection was performed under local anesthesia using the technique of subcutaneous microinjection. The main objective of this study was an improvement of the MHISS score 6 months after the surgical treatment. Results: The procedure was well tolerated. We observed a mean decrease in the MHISS score of 10.7 points (±5.1; P < 0.0001) at 6 months (35% improvement). Secondary efficacy parameters assessing perioral skin sclerosis, maximum mouth opening, sicca syndrome, and facial pain significantly improved at 3 and 6 months postsurgery. At a 6-month follow-up, 75% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied of the adipose tissue microinjection therapy. Conclusions: Our study suggests that subcutaneous perioral microfat injection in patients with SSc is beneficial in the treatment of facial handicap, skin sclerosis, mouth opening limitation, sicca syndrome, and facial pain. Thus, this minimally invasive approach offers a new hope for face therapy for patients with SSc. PMID:27257590

  17. Complications associated with negative pressure reaming for harvesting autologous bone graft: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jason A; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Murtha, Yvonne; Liporace, Frank A; Stover, Michael D; Nork, Sean E; Crist, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    A technical benefit of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system (Synthes, Paoli, PA) is the ability to harvest large volumes (40-90 cm3) of autogenous bone graft. Early evaluations of this technique have reported few problems, all of which were attributed to technical error. This case series reviews 6 RIA-associated complications including 4 fractures and their contributing risk factors. Cases were collected from 4 independent orthopaedic centers, and all patients underwent RIA bone graft harvesting in a lower extremity long bone injuries. In this population, 2 patients experienced acute RIA-associated events, necessitating an additional procedure or altered postoperative rehabilitation, whereas 4 patients fractured through their donor site in the early postoperative period. This series suggests that surgeons should (1) preoperatively assess cortical diameters at long bone harvest sites, (2) carefully monitor intraoperative reaming, and (3) avoid RIA bone graft harvesting in patients with a history of osteoporosis or osteopenia unless postharvest intramedullary stabilization is considered. PMID:20035178

  18. Autologous dermal graft combined with a modified degloving procedure for penile augmentation in young adults: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-X; Weng, M; Wang, M-D; Bai, W-J

    2016-09-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of penile enhancement, we retrospectively reviewed the data of the patients operated with autologous dermal graft implantation combined with a modified penile degloving procedure. The patients with the complaints of small penis, asking for penile augmentation, and normal erectile function were psychologically screened and enrolled. Data of follow-up visit including patient demographics, medical history, surgical procedure, patient-reported outcomes were analysed. In all, 30 eligible persons were operated. After degloving of the penis, the suspensory ligament was incised and the tunica albuginea was fixed to the proximal tunica dartos at the penile base. Then, the dermis graft was implanted on the dorsal surface of the tunica albuginea. The file of follow-up visit was available in 17 (57%) patients. The mean age was 23.7 years (19-35 years) and the mean follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-24 months). During the follow-up period, the average gain in the penis length was 2.7 cm in flaccid and 0.8 cm in erection, respectively. And the average gain in the penis circumference was 1.5 cm in flaccid and 1.2 cm in erection, respectively. Also, psychosexual sexual self-esteem and confidence of the patients were significantly improved (p < 0.001). Overall, 13 (76%) patients reported satisfaction with the penile appearance. We believe that the surgery is both safe and effective in the enhancement of the penis, however, further clinical studies with a larger patient population are necessary. PMID:27115979

  19. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  20. Sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Abo El Ezz, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many reconstructive techniques have been proposed to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. However, no total agreement has been reached to the best technique. Aim: Assessment of the efficacy of sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain. Study Design: This is a retrospective case series study, level IV evidence. Materials and Methods : Twenty three patients were involved in this study. Seventeen patients had intraoperative CSF leakage and were treated immediately by our technique. Six patients had postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and had delayed treatment with our technique after failure of conservative measures and external lumbar CSF drainage for more than three days. The technique involved intradural placement of autologous muscle graft supplemented with extradural composite septal cartilage graft, composed of a piece of the posterior cartilaginous septum with its covering mucoperichondrium on one side only to fit into the sellar defect as a double layer button. Results: CSF leak was of grade 1 in 6 patients (26.1%), grade 2 in 10 patients (43.5%) and grade 3 in 7 patients (30.4%). None of the patients in our study had postoperative CSF leak after the use of our technique during the follow up period (mean 24 ± 10.47 standard deviation months). None of the patients developed treatment-related complications. All the patients had well developed mucosal covering of the sellar defect after two months. Conclusion: Our technique of sellar repair by using autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts is effective in treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain even in

  1. Sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Abo El Ezz, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many reconstructive techniques have been proposed to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. However, no total agreement has been reached to the best technique. Aim: Assessment of the efficacy of sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain. Study Design: This is a retrospective case series study, level IV evidence. Materials and Methods : Twenty three patients were involved in this study. Seventeen patients had intraoperative CSF leakage and were treated immediately by our technique. Six patients had postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and had delayed treatment with our technique after failure of conservative measures and external lumbar CSF drainage for more than three days. The technique involved intradural placement of autologous muscle graft supplemented with extradural composite septal cartilage graft, composed of a piece of the posterior cartilaginous septum with its covering mucoperichondrium on one side only to fit into the sellar defect as a double layer button. Results: CSF leak was of grade 1 in 6 patients (26.1%), grade 2 in 10 patients (43.5%) and grade 3 in 7 patients (30.4%). None of the patients in our study had postoperative CSF leak after the use of our technique during the follow up period (mean 24 ± 10.47 standard deviation months). None of the patients developed treatment-related complications. All the patients had well developed mucosal covering of the sellar defect after two months. Conclusion: Our technique of sellar repair by using autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts is effective in treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain even in

  2. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  3. Muscle derived stem cell contains the potential to enhance long term retention as well as an aesthetic outcome of autologous fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Han, Duanyang; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Peipei; Yang, Jenny F; Zhang, Yingbo; Yang, Daping; Liu, Jianyu

    2011-06-01

    Autologous fat graft has been mentioned as a prospective source of soft-tissue filler for decades. It gives a natural consistency, is easy and safe to harvest, exhibits no hypersensitivity or foreign body reactions, and is readily available. However, the traditional fat grafting has its limitations in long term process, such as partial necrosis, loss of volume, and internal calcification. They all compromise the functional and aesthetic outcome of this procedure. In recent studies, the best results were obtained by transplanting fat tissue inside muscle, thus benefiting from its better blood supply. Muscle-derived stem cells have recently emerged as a promising source of multipotent cells which give rise to muscle fibers within muscular environment. Previous studies have also proved that muscle-derived stem cells are capable of releasing various kinds of angiogenesis agents, such as VEGF, HGF, and FGF. These cytokines are known to promote revascularization. Based on the foregoing facts, we postulate that co-transplant of autologous fat and muscle derived stem cells may enhance the long term retention and aesthetic outcome of fat grafting. PMID:21419577

  4. Scaffold-free Three-dimensional Graft From Autologous Adipose-derived Stem Cells for Large Bone Defect Reconstruction: Clinical Proof of Concept.

    PubMed

    Dufrane, Denis; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Delloye, Christian; Poirel, Hélène A; André, Wivine; Aouassar, Najima

    2015-12-01

    Long bone nonunion in the context of congenital pseudarthrosis or carcinologic resection (with intercalary bone allograft implantation) is one of the most challenging pathologies in pediatric orthopedics. Autologous cancellous bone remains the gold standard in this context of long bone nonunion reconstruction, but with several clinical limitations. We then assessed the feasibility and safety of human autologous scaffold-free osteogenic 3-dimensional (3D) graft (derived from autologous adipose-derived stem cells [ASCs]) to cure a bone nonunion in extreme clinical and pathophysiological conditions. Human ASCs (obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of 6 patients and expanded up to passage 4) were incubated in osteogenic media and supplemented with demineralized bone matrix to obtain the scaffold-free 3D osteogenic structure as confirmed in vitro by histomorphometry for osteogenesis and mineralization. The 3D "bone-like" structure was finally transplanted for 3 patients with bone tumor and 3 patients with bone pseudarthrosis (2 congenital, 1 acquired) to assess the clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. Although minor clones with structural aberrations (aneuploidies, such as tri or tetraploidies or clonal trisomy 7 in 6%-20% of cells) were detected in the undifferentiated ASCs at passage 4, the osteogenic differentiation significantly reduced these clonal anomalies. The final osteogenic product was stable, did not rupture with forceps manipulation, did not induce donor site morbidity, and was easily implanted directly into the bone defect. No acute (<3 mo) side effects, such as impaired wound healing, pain, inflammatory reaction, and infection, or long-term side effects, such as tumor development, were associated with the graft up to 4 years after transplantation. We report for the first time that autologous ASC can be fully differentiated into a 3D osteogenic-like implant without any scaffold. We demonstrated that this engineered tissue can safely promote

  5. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. Methods: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. Results: arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. Conclusion: therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit. PMID:27004173

  6. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  7. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus.

  8. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  9. Three-Dimensional Upper Lip and Nostril Sill Changes After Cleft Alveolus Reconstruction Using Autologous Bone Grafting Versus Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2.

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Denadai, Rafael; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2016-06-01

    Cleft alveolus in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate has been alternatively reconstructed with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2. However, its effects on upper lip and nostril sill anatomy are not known. Thus, the objective of this investigation was to assess and compare upper lip and nostril sill changes after cleft alveolus reconstruction with autologous bone from the iliac crest region and rhBMP-2. Patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups. In group 1, autologous bone from the iliac crest region was used to fill the cleft alveolus (n = 4), and in group 2, rhBMP-2 was used to fill the cleft alveolus (n = 8). Preoperatively and at one after the surgery, computerized tomography (CT) was performed. Reformatted CT imaging was used to perform cephalometric linear measurements of the upper lip and nostril sill regions. Inter- and intragroup data of the pre and postoperative reformatted CT measurements of the upper lip and nostril sill regions did not show differences (P >0.05) in cutaneous upper lip height and projection, nostril sill elevation, and subnasale projection. There were no significant upper lip and nostril sill anatomical changes after cleft alveolus reconstruction using autologous bone grafting and rhBMP-2. PMID:27244210

  10. The Use Of Laser Irradiation To Stimulate Adipose Derived Stem Cell Proliferation And Differentiation For Use In Autologous Grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2009-09-01

    fluences on ADSC viability and proliferation. This paper reviews the development of MSCs as potential therapeutic interventions such as autologous grafts as well as the contribution of low intensity laser irradiation on the maintenance of these cells.

  11. Utilizing muscle-derived stem cells to enhance long-term retention and aesthetic outcome of autologous fat grafting: pilot study in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Han, Duanyang; Zhang, Peipei; Yang, Jenny F; Wang, Yiqiang; Zhang, Yingbo; Yang, Daping; Liu, Jianyu

    2012-02-01

    Autologous fat grafting has been regarded as the ideal soft tissue filler for more than a century. Low long-term retention rate and unpredictability limit it from widespread clinical practice. Many theories for this have been proposed: lack of sufficient blood supply and subsequent necrosis is the most accepted. In this pilot study, we showed both macroscopically and microscopically the viability of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) cotransplanted with fat placed intramuscularly for 3 months. MRI scanning showed a stronger fat signal in the MDSC-treated group than that of the control group. Moreover, histological evaluation exhibited well-preserved and intact fat cells in the MDSC-treated group. In contrast, the control group showed extensive fibrosis and fat graft loss. Furthermore, the MDSC-treated group possessed almost threefold greater capillary density than the control group. We conclude that cotransplantation of muscle-derived stem cells and autologous fat tissue improves the long-term survival of intramuscular fat transplants by promoting neovascularization. PMID:21607534

  12. Three-Dimensional Changes of Maxilla after Secondary Alveolar Cleft Repair: Differences Between rhBMP-2 and Autologous Iliac Crest Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Denadai, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 has been used as an alternative to autologous bone transferring, a standard method of treatment. However, its potential adverse effect on anterior maxillary arch is unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to quantify sagittal and transversal changes of anterior maxilla after secondary alveolar cleft repair using traditional iliac crest bone grafting versus rhBMP-2. Methods: Twelve unilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. In group 1, patients underwent traditional iliac crest bone grafting transferring (n = 4), and in group 2, patients underwent alveolar cleft reconstruction using collagen matrix with lyophilized rhBMP-2 (n = 8). Computed tomography (CT) imaging was performed preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively, using a previously standardized protocol. A three-dimensional (3D) CT cephalometric analysis of the linear and angular measurements of the sagittal and transverse maxilla planes was performed to assess intra- and intergroup maxillary changes. Results: Intra- and intergroup comparisons of the pre- and postoperative 3D CT cephalometric linear and angular measurements of the sagittal and transverse maxilla planes showed no significant (all P > 0.05) differences among all studied variables. Conclusions: There were no significant anterior maxilla changes after maxillary cleft repair either using iliac crest bone grafting or rhBMP-2. PMID:26301140

  13. Unique Presentation of Orf Virus Infection in a Thermal-Burn Patient After Receiving an Autologous Skin Graft.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christopher H; Rokni, Ghasem Rahmatpour; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Brinster, Nooshin; Li, Yu; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Zhao, Hui; Petersen, Brett; McCollum, Andrea M; Reynolds, Mary G

    2016-10-15

    We describe a burn patient who developed skin lesions on her skin-graft harvest and skin-graft recipient (burn) sites. Orf virus infection was confirmed by a combination of diagnostic assays, including molecular tests, immunohistochemical analysis, pathologic analysis, and electron microscopy. DNA sequence analysis grouped this orf virus isolate among isolates from India. Although no definitive source of infection was determined from this case, this is the first reported case of orf virus infection in a skin graft harvest. Skin graft recipients with exposures to animals may be at risk for this viral infection. PMID:27456708

  14. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  15. Acellular Dermal Matrix Combined with Autologous Skin Grafts for Closure of Chronic Wounds after Reconstruction of Skull Defects with Titanium Mesh.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu; Lin, Cai; Wang, Xinling; Lin, Xiangwei; He, Sunyue; Liu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Ruijin; Zhu, Xinguo

    2016-07-01

    Objective The closure of chronic wounds after skull defect reconstruction with titanium mesh is one of the most challenging problems for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Current approaches are disappointing. Methods In 10 patients, we explored the role of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in combination with autologous skin grafts (ASGs) for closure of chronic wounds after skull reconstruction with titanium. Results ADM and ASG survived in all patients. Grade A healing (healing well without defect) was achieved. The average operating time was 30 to 45 minutes, and the average blood loss 30 to 50 mL. After 3 months, the wound was still closed in all patients. Conclusion The combination of ADM plus ASG obtained a high wound closure rate. ADM plus ASG allows avoiding other procedures such as rotational flaps and free flaps that require more operating time, special equipment, and adequate training. PMID:27088591

  16. Monolayer expansion induces an oxidative metabolism and ROS in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heywood, H.K. Lee, D.A.

    2008-08-22

    This study tests the hypothesis that articular chondrocytes shift from a characteristically glycolytic to an oxidative energy metabolism during population expansion in monolayer. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer under standard incubator conditions for up to 14 days. Cellular proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, protein content, ROS generation and mitochondrial morphology were examined. Lactate release increased {approx}5-fold within 1 week, but this was limited to {approx}2-fold increase when normalized to cellular protein content. By contrast, per cell oxidative phosphorylation increased 98-fold in 1 week. The increase in oxidative phosphorylation was evident within 24 h, preceding cell proliferation and was associated with augmented reactive oxygen species generation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure requires 14-21 days for population expansion. The alterations in metabolic phenotype we report within 7 days in vitro are thus pertinent to autologous chondrocyte implantation with significant implications for the chondrocyte functionality.

  17. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  18. State of the art. Autologous fat graft and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction injection for hand therapy in systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Jugnot, P; Daumas, A; Magalon, J; Sautereau, N; Veran, J; Magalon, G; Sabatier, F; Granel, B

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by sclerosis (hardening) of the skin and deep viscera associated with microvascular functional and structural alteration, which leads to chronic ischemia. In the hands of patients, ischemic and fibrotic damages lead to both pain and functional impairment. Hand disability creates a large burden in professional and daily activities, with social and psychological consequences. Currently, the proposed therapeutic options for hands rely mainly on hygienic measures, vasodilatator drugs and physiotherapy, but have many constraints and limited effects. Developing an innovative therapeutic approach is crucial to reduce symptoms and improve the quality of life. The discovery of adult stem cells from adipose tissue has increased the interest to use adipose tissue in plastic and regenerative surgery. Prepared as freshly isolated cells for immediate autologous transplantation, adipose tissue-derived stem cell therapy has emerged as a therapeutic alternative for the regeneration and repair of damaged tissues. We aim to update literature in the interest of autologous fat graft or adipose derived from stromal vascular fraction cell-based therapy for the hands of patients who suffer from systemic sclerosis. PMID:27140597

  19. State of the art. Autologous fat graft and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction injection for hand therapy in systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Jugnot, P; Daumas, A; Magalon, J; Sautereau, N; Veran, J; Magalon, G; Sabatier, F; Granel, B

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by sclerosis (hardening) of the skin and deep viscera associated with microvascular functional and structural alteration, which leads to chronic ischemia. In the hands of patients, ischemic and fibrotic damages lead to both pain and functional impairment. Hand disability creates a large burden in professional and daily activities, with social and psychological consequences. Currently, the proposed therapeutic options for hands rely mainly on hygienic measures, vasodilatator drugs and physiotherapy, but have many constraints and limited effects. Developing an innovative therapeutic approach is crucial to reduce symptoms and improve the quality of life. The discovery of adult stem cells from adipose tissue has increased the interest to use adipose tissue in plastic and regenerative surgery. Prepared as freshly isolated cells for immediate autologous transplantation, adipose tissue-derived stem cell therapy has emerged as a therapeutic alternative for the regeneration and repair of damaged tissues. We aim to update literature in the interest of autologous fat graft or adipose derived from stromal vascular fraction cell-based therapy for the hands of patients who suffer from systemic sclerosis.

  20. Autologous grafts of double-strut fibular cortical bone plate to treat the fractures and defects of distal femur: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Li, Jian-Jun; Kong, Zhan; Yang, Dong-Xiang; Yuan, Xiang-Nan

    2011-01-01

    We reported a 23-year-old man who was involved in a high-speed motorcycle accident. He sustained a closed fracture at the right distal femur. The primary fracture happened on February 2008. He underwent open reduction and internal fixation with cloverleaf plate. And one hundred days after the surgery, the proximal screws were pulled-out, but the bone union was not achieved. Treatment consisted of exchanging the cloverleaf plate with a locking compression plate and using an auto-iliac bone graft to fill the nonunion gap. In July 2009, the patient had a sharp pain in the right lower limb. The X-ray revealed that the plate implanted last year was broken, causing a nonunion at the fracture site. Immediately the plate and screws were removed and an intramedullary nail was inserted reversely from the distal femur as well as a 7 cm long bone from the right fibula was extracted and longitudinally split into two pieces to construct cortical bone plates. Then we placed them laterally and medially to fracture site, drilled two holes respectively, and fastened them with suture. We carried on auto-iliac bone grafting with the nonunion bone grafts. The follow-up at 15 months after operation showed that the treatment was successful, X-ray confirmed that there was no rotation and no angular or short deformity. We briefly reviewed the literature regarding such an unusual presentation and discussed in details the possible etiology and the advantages of autologous double-strut fibular grafts to cope with such an intractable situation.

  1. Cytokine profile of autologous platelet-derived eye drops in patients with ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Valentini, C G; Nuzzolo, E R; Orlando, N; Metafuni, E; Bianchi, M; Chiusolo, P; Zini, G; Teofili, L

    2016-02-01

    Ocular chronic GVHD is efficaciously treated with autologous platelet-derived eye drops. We investigated the cytokine content of eye drops produced using a non-gelified lysate obtained from autologous platelet-rich plasma in six patients with ocular GVHD. In both the responding (n = 4) and the resistant (n = 2) patients, the eye drops were significantly enriched with various growth factors, in amounts proportional with the platelet counts. In contrast, chemokine ligand and interleukin levels were similar to those of plasma. The non-responding patients showed the highest levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10. These findings provide possible explanations for beneficial or detrimental effects of eye drops. PMID:26383050

  2. An exploratory clinical trial for idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head by cultured autologous multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells augmented with vascularized bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Ueda, Michiko; Kasai, Yasunari; Maekawa, Taira; Tada, Harue; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ION) is a painful disorder that progresses to collapse of the femoral head and destruction of the hip joint. Although its precise pathology remains unknown, the loss of blood supply causing the loss of living bone-forming cells is a hallmark of the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. Transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a promising tool for regenerating the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of transplantation of cultured autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs mixed with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in combination with vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of advanced stage ION in a clinical trial. Ten patients with stage 3 ION were enrolled in this study. Autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured with autologous serum, and cells (0.5-1.0×10(8)) were transplanted after mixing with β-TCP granules in combination with vascularized iliac bone grafts. Patients were assessed 24 months after treatment. The primary and secondary endpoints were progression of the radiological stage and changes in bone volume at the femoral head, and clinical score, respectively. Nine of ten patients completed the protocol, seven of whom remained at stage 3, and the remaining two cases progressed to stage 4. The average bone volume increased from 56.5±8.5 cm(3) to 57.7±10.6 cm(3). The average clinical score according to the Japan Orthopaedic Association improved from 65.6±25.5 points to 87.9±19.0 points. One severe adverse event was observed, which was not related to the clinical trial. Although the efficacy of cell transplantation was still to be determined, all procedures were successfully performed and some young patients with extensive necrotic lesions with pain demonstrated good bone regeneration with amelioration of symptoms. Further improvements in our method using MSCs and the proper selection of patients will open a new approach for

  3. Coating of Mesh Grafts for Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence Repair with Autologous Plasma: Exploration Stage of a Surgical Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Andreas; Lammers, Bernhard; Ramon, Albert; Ysebaert, Dirk; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Boros, Mihaly; Otto, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Optimized biocompatibility is a major requirement for alloplastic materials currently applied for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair. In the preliminary studies the mesh modification by coating with autologous plasma resulted in the increased adherence score in vitro and improved biocompatibility in an animal model. The first use of plasma coated meshes in human is presented. Materials and Methods. Between 04/2013 and 05/2014, 20 patients with the indication for SUI and POP repair were selected in a single institution. The applied meshes were modified by autologous plasma coating prior to implantation. A retrospective chart review for peri- and early postoperative complications was performed. Functional outcome and QoL were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Results. The functional outcome and QoL improved significantly in all groups. Two reoperations (Grade IIIB) with the release of TVT-mesh in anesthesia due to the obstruction were needed. No other severe complications were registered. Conclusion. For the first time we applied a mesh modification in a human setting according to IDEAL criteria of surgical innovations. The procedure of mesh coating with autologous plasma is safe and a prospective randomized trial proving a positive effect of plasma coating on the biocompatibility and morbidity outcome with long-term registry is planned. PMID:25313358

  4. Orthogonal Double Plating and Autologous Bone Grafting of Postoperative Humeral Shaft Nonunion – A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Metikala, Sreenivasulu; Bhogadi, Prabhudheer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonunion following surgical stabilization of humeral shaft fractures, although infrequent, remains a challenge as limited surgical options are available. The difficulties in re-fixation are due to osteolysis produced by the loose implant components and disuse osteopenia of the entire bone segment. We share our experience in the management of a long standing diaphyseal nonunion of humerus following titanium LCP fixation. Case Report: A 58 years old woman presented with 20 months old nonunion following titanium LCP fixation of her closed humeral shaft fracture, done elsewhere. The interesting intraoperative findings, noteworthy, are about the extensive metallosis and the gross cortical defect measuring 10cm x 1cm x 1cm, corresponding to the foot print of the previous plate with exposed medullary canal. It was managed by debridement, dual plate fixation using 9 holed and 12 holed stainless steel LCPs in an orthogonal fashion and autologous bone grafting. The nonunion healed in 5 months and she regained all the movements except for terminal 10° of elbow extension and 15° of shoulder abduction at her final follow up of 30 months. According to Stewart and Hundley classification the final result was found to be good. Conclusion: We recommend the judicious use of long and short plates in 90-90 orientation along with autogenous bone grafting in the management of a long standing humeral shaft nonunion having extensive cortical resorption following surgical stabilization by plating. PMID:27299099

  5. Cytokine networking of chondrocyte dedifferentiation in vitro and its implications for cell-based cartilage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Ma, Bin; Liang, Yujie; Chen, Jielin; Zhu, Weimin; Li, Mingtao; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a golden treatment for large defects of the knee joint without osteoarthritis or other complications. Despite notable progresses, generation of a stable chondrocyte phenotype using progenitor cells remains a main obstacle for chondrocyte-based cartilage treatment. Monolayer chondrocyte expansion in vitro is accompanied by chondrocyte dedifferentiation, which produces a non-specific mechanically inferior extracellular matrix (ECM) unsuitable for ACI. In-depth understanding of the molecular events during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is required to maintain the capacity of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to produce hyaline cartilage-specific ECM. This review discusses key cytokines and signaling pathways involved in chondrocyte dedifferentiation from the standpoint of catabolism and anabolism. Some potential therapeutic strategies are also presented to counteract chondrocyte dedifferentiation for cell-based cartilage therapy. PMID:25901191

  6. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after human marrow transplantation. II. Deficient T and non-T lymphocyte function within 3-4 months of allogeneic, syngeneic, or autologous marrow grafting for hematologic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, R.P.; Lum, L.G.; Storb, R.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-04-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion was studied in 37 patients between 19 and 106 days after allogeneic HLA-identical (30 patients), allogeneic one HLA-haplotype-identical (three patients), syngeneic (three patients), or autologous (one patient) marrow grafting. E rosette-positive (T) and E rosette-negative (non-T) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cocultured with pokeweed mitogen for 6 days. Polyvalent immunoglobulin secretion was determined by counting plaque forming cells in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. The number of antibody secreting cells in cocultures of autologous T and non-T lymphocytes was low in 40 of 44 tests conducted on samples from the 37 patients. Mononuclear or non-T cells from 38 of 40 tests failed to produce antibody when cultured with normal helper T cells. T cells from 23 of 37 tests failed to help normal non-T cells secrete antibody. T lymphocytes from 23 of 41 tests suppressed antibody production greater than 80% by normal T and non-T cells. The suppressor cells were radiosensitive in 17 of the 25 tests. The abnormal function of lymphocyte subpopulations in patients during the first 3 mo after syngeneic, allogeneic or autologous marrow grafting was similar regardless of the type of graft or the presence of acute graft versus host disease.

  7. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  8. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Phull, Abdul-Rehman; Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  9. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  10. Retrospective long-term analysis of bone level changes after horizontal alveolar crest reconstruction with autologous bone grafts harvested from the posterior region of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term success of horizontal alveolar crest augmentation of the retromolar region of the mandible with particulated bone, as well as factors affecting subsequent peri-implant bone loss. Methods A total of 109 patients (68 female, 41 male) suffering from alveolar ridge deficiencies of the maxilla and mandible were included in this study. All patients were treated with particulated retromolar bone grafts from the mandible prior to the insertion of endosseous dental implants. Mesial and distal peri-implant crestal bone changes were assessed at six time points. Several parameters, including implant survival and the influence of age, gender, localisation of the implant, diameter, covering procedures, and time points of implant placement, were analysed to identify associations with bone level changes using the Mann-Whitney U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient. Results A total of 164 dental implants were placed in the maxilla (n=97) and in the mandible (n=67). The mean observation period was 105.26±21.58 months after implantation. The overall survival rate was 97.6% after 10 years. Overall, peri-implant bone loss was highest during the first year, but decreased over time. The mean amount of bone loss after 10 years was 2.47 mm mesially and 2.50 mm distally. Bone loss was significantly influenced by implant type and primary stability. Conclusions The use of particulated autologous retromolar bone grafts is a reliable technique for the horizontal reconstruction of local alveolar ridge deficiencies. Our results demonstrate that implants placed in augmented bone demonstrated similar bone level changes compared to implants inserted in non-augmented regions. PMID:27127688

  11. In vitro fabrication of autologous living tissue-engineered vascular grafts based on prenatally harvested ovine amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Benedikt; Kehl, Debora; Bleul, Ulrich; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sébastien; Frese, Laura; Ksiazek, Agnieszka; Achermann, Josef; Stranzinger, Gerald; Robert, Jérôme; Sanders, Bart; Sidler, Michele; Brokopp, Chad E; Proulx, Steven T; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schoenauer, Roman; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Falk, Volkmar; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFCs) have been proposed as a valuable source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, before clinical implementation, rigorous evaluation of this cell source in clinically relevant animal models accepted by regulatory authorities is indispensable. Today, the ovine model represents one of the most accepted preclinical animal models, in particular for cardiovascular applications. Here, we investigate the isolation and use of autologous ovine AFCs as cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Fetal fluids were aspirated in vivo from pregnant ewes (n = 9) and from explanted uteri post mortem at different gestational ages (n = 91). Amniotic non-allantoic fluid nature was evaluated biochemically and in vivo samples were compared with post mortem reference samples. Isolated cells revealed an immunohistochemical phenotype similar to ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and showed expression of stem cell factors described for embryonic stem cells, such as NANOG and STAT-3. Isolated ovine amniotic fluid-derived MSCs were screened for numeric chromosomal aberrations and successfully differentiated into several mesodermal phenotypes. Myofibroblastic ovine AFC lineages were then successfully used for the in vitro fabrication of small- and large-diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts (n = 10) and cardiovascular patches (n = 34), laying the foundation for the use of this relevant pre-clinical in vivo assessment model for future amniotic fluid cell-based therapeutic applications.

  12. Subclinical pulmonary function defects following autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: relationship to total body irradiation and graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, R.C.; Burnett, A.K.; Robertson, A.G.; McNee, S.; Riyami, B.M.; Carter, R.; Stevenson, R.D. )

    1991-06-01

    Pulmonary function results pre- and post-transplant, to a maximum of 4 years, were analyzed in 98 patients with haematological disorders undergoing allogeneic (N = 53) or autologous bone marrow transplantation (N = 45) between 1982 and 1988. All received similar total body irradiation based regimens ranging from 9.5 Gy as a single fraction to 14.4 Gy fractionated. FEV1/FVC as a measure of airway obstruction showed little deterioration except in patients experiencing graft-versus-host disease in whom statistically significant obstructive ventilatory defects were evident by 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). These defects appeared to be permanent. Restrictive ventilatory defects, as measured by reduction in TLC, and defects in diffusing capacity (DLCO and KCO) were also maximal at 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). Both were related, at least in part, to the presence of GVHD (p less than 0.01) or use of single fraction TBI with absorbed lung dose of 8.0 Gy (p less than 0.05). Fractionated TBI resulted in less marked restricted ventilation and impaired gas exchange, which reverted to normal by 2 years, even when the lung dose was increased from 11.0 Gy to between 12.0 and 13.5 Gy. After exclusion of patients with GVHD (30% allografts) there was no significant difference in pulmonary function abnormalities between autograft and allograft recipients.

  13. In vivo cartilage formation from growth factor modulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bradham, D M; Horton, W E

    1998-07-01

    Recent procedures for autologous repair of cartilage defects may be difficult in elderly patients because of the loss of stem cells and chondrocytes that occurs with age and the slow in vitro proliferation of chondrocytes from aged cartilage. In this study secondary chondroprogenitor cells were obtained by modulating the phenotype of articular chondrocytes with growth factors and stimulating the proliferation of these cells in culture. Chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage of mature New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to a combination of transforming growth factor beta and basic fibroblast growth factor treatment. These cells ceased the production of Collagen II (a marker for the chondrocyte phenotype) and underwent a 136-fold increase in cell number. Next, the cells were placed in high density culture and reexpressed the chondrocyte phenotype in vitro and formed hyaline cartilage in an in vivo assay. Primary chondrocytes obtained from articular cartilage of elderly humans could be manipulated in a similar fashion in vitro. These human secondary chondroprogenitor cells formed only cartilage tissue when assayed in vivo and in tissue bioreactors. This approach may be essential for autologous repair of degenerated articular cartilage in elderly patients with osteoarthritis.

  14. Flow cytometry crossmatching and primary cadaver kidney graft outcome: relevance of T and B cell targets, historic sera and autologous controls.

    PubMed

    LeFor, W M; Ackermann, J R; Alveranga, D Y; Bowers, V D; Heinrichs, D F; Kahana, L; Shires, D L; Weinstein, S S; Wright, C E

    1996-12-01

    There is limited information regarding the role of flow cytometry crossmatching (FCXM) in primary cadaver kidney allografting and even less about B cell reactivity and graft survival (GS). Furthermore, there is little or no published data concerning reaction strength (cutoff value), the effect of historic sera reactions, and the usefulness of performing autologous crossmatches (XMs) on GS. These factors were examined retrospectively on 214 primary transplants performed from August 1991 to January 1994 with follow-up to July 1995. Three-color FCXMs were done on a 1024-channel BD-FACScan, and the shift in median channel fluorescence (MCF) over the negative control was calculated. All patients had a negative T cell (AHG) and warm B cell (2 was, extended incubation) cytotoxicity XM, and none was excluded in calculating GS. A quantitative effect was noted as stronger MCF shifts vs. T or B cells correlated with decreased GS (r = 0.98 and 0.92, respectively). Significant differences were seen with cutoff values of T = 50 and B = 110 which were 1.7-1.8 times the SD above the mean MCF of normal sera controls T neg patients (n = 198) and 1- and 3-yr actuarial GS of 86% and 79% compared to T pos patients (n = 16) of 75% and 49%, p = 0.008. B neg patients (n = 177) had 1- and 3-yr GS od 86% and 81% compared to B pos patients (n = 37) of 78% and 47%, p = 0.005. Most informative was the analysis of combined T and B cell FCXM results. Three years GS for T neg - B neg patients (n = 171) was 81% and for T pos - B neg patients (n = 6), it was 83%, p = 0.98. The 27 T neg - B pos group's GS was lower at 62% but did reach significance. Poorest GS was seen for T pos - B pos patients (n = 10) at 23%, p = 0.0001. Reaction patterns showed that T cells detected only HLA Class I antibodies, whereas B cells detected both Class I and II. Historic sera (> or = 1 month old) reactivity influenced GS. Patients with > or = 2 past sera positive but current serum negative reactions vs. T or T plus B

  15. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  16. Radiographic evaluation of the symphysis menti as a donor site for an autologous bone graft in pre-implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Di Bari, Roberto; Coronelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the cortical and cancellous bone graft harvestable from the mental and canine regions, and to evaluate the cortical vestibular thickness. Materials and Methods This study collected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images of 100 Italian patients. The limits of the mental region were established: 5 mm in front of the medial margin of each mental foramen, 5 mm under the apex of each tooth present, and above the inferior mandibular cortex. Cortical and cancellous bone volumes were evaluated using SimPlant software (SimPlant 3-D Pro, Materialize, Leuven, Belgium) tools. In addition, the cortical vestibular thickness (minimal and maximal values) was evaluated in 3 cross-sections corresponding to the right canine tooth (3R), the median section (M), and the left canine tooth (3L). Results The cortical volume was 0.71±0.23 mL (0.27-1.96 mL) and the cancellous volume was 2.16±0.76 mL (0.86-6.28 mL). The minimal cortical vestibular thickness was 1.54±0.41 mm (0.61-3.25 mm), and the maximal cortical vestibular thickness was 3.14±0.75mm(1.01-5.83 mm). Conclusion The use of the imaging software allowed a patient-specific assessment of mental and canine region bone availability. The proposed evaluation method might help the surgeon in the selection of the donor site by the comparison between bone availability in the donor site and the reconstructive exigency of the recipient site. PMID:24083206

  17. A Meta Analysis of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Autologous Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Feng; Ding, Lin; Zhang, Zhiyu; Sun, Deri; Feng, Xinmin; An, Jiuli; Zhu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) as a substitute for iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) has been increasingly widely used in lumbar fusion. The purpose of this study is to systematically compare the effectiveness and safety of fusion with BMPs for the treatment of lumbar disease. Methods Cochrane review methods were used to analyze all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to nov 2013. Results 19 RCTs (1,852 patients) met the inclusion criteria. BMPs group significantly increased fusion rate (RR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.05–1.23, P = 0.001), while there was no statistical difference in overall success of clinical outcomes (RR: 1.04; 95% CI 0.95–1.13, P = 0.38) and complications (RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.85–1.09, p = 0.54). A significant reduction of the reoperation rate was found in BMPs group (RR: 0.57; 95% CI 0.42–0.77, p = 0.0002). Significant difference was found in the operating time (MD−0.32; 95% CI−0.55, −0.08; P = 0.009), but no significant difference was found in the blood loss, the hospital stay, patient satisfaction, and work status. Conclusion Compared with ICBG, BMPs in lumbar fusion can increase the fusion rate, while reduce the reoperation rate and operating time. However, it doesn’t increase the complication rate, the amount of blood loss and hospital stay. No significant difference was found in the overall success of clinical outcome of the two groups. PMID:24886911

  18. [Vascular graft prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakfé, N; Dieval, F; Thaveau, F; Rinckenbach, S; Hassani, O; Camelot, G; Durand, B; Kretz, J-G

    2004-06-01

    Performed since the 1950s, vascular grafting has opened modern era of vascular surgery. Autologous venous grafts are of first choice for revascularisation of small arteries. Synthetic grafts are mainly modelled using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene or terephtalate polyethylene. These prosthesis are mainly used for revascularization of medium and large size arteries. PMID:15220107

  19. The Role of E-Cadherin in Maintaining the Barrier Function of Corneal Epithelium after Treatment with Cultured Autologous Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheet Grafts for Limbal Stem Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, Richard H.; Wood, Andrew; Oliva, Joan; Niihara, Hope; Makalinao, Andrew; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Pan, Derek; Tiger, Kumar; Garcia, Julio; Laporte, Amanda; French, Samuel W.; Niihara, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS. E-cadherin and beta-catenin localization at the cell membrane was reduced in LSCD corneas, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a restoration of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. LSCD corneas did not show continuous staining for ZO-1 or for Cnx43, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a positive expression of ZO-1 and Cnx43. Cascade Blue® hydrazide did not pass through CAOMECS. Because E-cadherin interactions are calcium-dependent, EGTA was used to chelate calcium and disrupt cell adhesion. EGTA-treated CAOMECS completely detached from cell culture surface, and E-cadherin levels were significantly decreased. In conclusion, E cadherin high expression contributed to CAOMECS tight and gap junction protein recruitment at the cell membrane, thus promoting cellular adhesion and a functional barrier to protect the ocular surface. PMID:27777792

  20. Microfluidics-based optimization of neuroleukin-mediated regulation of articular chondrocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, KANG; ZHONG, WEILIANG; ZHANG, YINGQIU; YIN, BAOSHENG; ZHANG, WEIGUO; LIU, HAN

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low proliferative and migratory capacities of chondrocytes, cartilage repair remains a challenging clinical problem. Current therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair result in unsatisfactory outcomes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell based therapy that relies on the in vitro expansion of healthy chondrocytes from the patient, during which proliferation-promoting factors are frequently used. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that possesses growth factor functions, and its expression has been associated with cartilage development and bone regeneration, however its direct role in chondrocyte proliferation remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of NLK in chondrocyte proliferation in vitro in addition to its potential to act as an exogenous factor during ACI was investigated. Furthermore, the concentration of NLK for in vitro chondrocyte culture was optimized using a microfluidic device. An NLK concentration of 12.85 ng/ml was observed to provide optimal conditions for the promotion of chondrocyte proliferation. Additionally, NLK stimulation resulted in an increase in type II collagen synthesis by chondrocytes, which is a cartilaginous secretion marker and associated with the phenotype of chondrocytes. Together these data suggest that NLK is able to promote cell proliferation and type II collagen synthesis during in vitro chondrocyte propagation, and thus may serve as an exogenous factor for ACI. PMID:26573126

  1. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC): Combining Microfracturing and a Collagen I/III Matrix for Articular Cartilage Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Benthien, J P; Behrens, P

    2010-01-01

    Options for the treatment of cartilage defects include chondral resurfacing with abrasion, debridement, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT), matrix-induced chondrocyte transplantation (MACI), or osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS). This article describes the new method of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), a 1-step procedure combining subchondral microfracture with the fixation of a collagen I/III membrane by a partially autologous fibrin glue. Indications and contraindications are provided; a technical note is given. This method is primarily applied in osteochondral lesions of the knee and ankle joints; other joints may qualify.

  2. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Genya; Sato, Masato; Lee, Jeong IK; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Ishihara, Miya; Ota, Naoshi; Kokubo, Mami; Sakai, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Mochida, Joji

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. PMID:19267909

  3. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  4. Autologous fibrin glue in peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Han, Sang-Gyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Zhu, Shi-Jiang; Huh, Jin-Young; Jung, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Yong

    2005-01-01

    The activity of several growth factors on peripheral nerve regeneration is reported. Autologous fibrin glue contains a large number of platelets, which release significant quantities of growth factors. In order to understand the role of autologous fibrin glue in peripheral nerve regeneration, a 15-mm rabbit peroneal nerve defect was repaired using a vein graft filled with autologous fibrin glue. Axonal regeneration was examined using histological and electrophysiological methods. The extent of axonal regeneration was superior when treated with autologous fibrin glue. Our data suggest that fibrin nets formed by fibrinogen, in combination with growth factors present in autologous fibrin glue, might effectively promote peripheral nerve regeneration in nerve defects.

  5. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  6. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft. PMID:26091219

  7. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft.

  8. Effect of oxygen tension on tissue-engineered human nasal septal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Chih-Wen; Reuther, Marsha S.; Briggs, Kristen K.; Sah, Robert L.; Masuda, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered nasal septal cartilage may provide a source of autologous tissue for repair of craniofacial defects. Although advances have been made in manipulating the chondrocyte culture environment for production of neocartilage, consensus on the best oxygen tension for in vitro growth of tissue-engineered cartilage has not been reached. The objective of this study was to determine whether in vitro oxygen tension influences chondrocyte expansion and redifferentiation. Proliferation of chondrocytes from 12 patients expanded in monolayer under hypoxic (5% or 10%) or normoxic (21%) oxygen tension was compared over 14 days of culture. The highest performing oxygen level was used for further expansion of the monolayer cultures. At confluency, chondrocytes were redifferentiated by encapsulation in alginate beads and cultured for 14 days under hypoxic (5 or 10%) or normoxic (21%) oxygen tension. Biochemical and histological properties were evaluated. Chondrocyte proliferation in monolayer and redifferentiation in alginate beads were supported by all oxygen tensions tested. Chondrocytes in monolayer culture had increased proliferation at normoxic oxygen tension (p = 0.06), as well as greater accumulation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) during chondrocyte redifferentiation (p < 0.05). Chondrocytes released from beads cultured under all three oxygen levels showed robust accumulation of GAG and type II collagen with a lower degree of type I collagen immunoreactivity. Finally, formation of chondrocyte clusters was associated with decreasing oxygen tension (p < 0.05). Expansion of human septal chondrocytes in monolayer culture was greatest at normoxic oxygen tension. Both normoxic and hypoxic culture of human septal chondrocytes embedded in alginate beads supported robust extracellular matrix deposition. However, GAG accumulation was significantly enhanced under normoxic culture conditions. Chondrocyte cluster formation was associated with hypoxic oxygen tension. PMID:25565047

  9. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661891

  10. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  11. Reconstruction of a large osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia with an iliac crest graft and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC): a case report.

    PubMed

    Miska, Matthias; Wiewiorski, Martin; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Isolated osteochondral lesions (OCL) of the distal tibia are rare and lack clear treatment guidelines. With the case we present here, we suggest a novel surgical approach and report the successful use of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis-aided reconstruction for OCL of the distal tibia. A 29-year-old male patient complained about persisting pain of the left ankle joint and a restricted activity level 12 months after an ankle sprain. Imaging revealed edema of the subchondral bone and thinning of the cartilage above the osseous defect at the lateral distal tibia. The OCL was debrided followed by microfracturing of the underlying sclerotic bone. A cancellous bone plug was harvested from the iliac crest and impacted into the defect. A collagen matrix was then fixed on the defect. After 12 months, the patient was free of pain and returned to full activity. Conventional radiographs at 1 year showed successful osseous integration of the plug and a nearly anatomic shape of the tibial joint line. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage scans at 36 months showed an intact cartilage layer over the defect and glycosaminoglycan content, indicating hyaline-like cartilage repair. This case demonstrates autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis-aided reconstruction of large osteochondral lesions of distal tibia to be a promising treatment method. Our aim was to describe the case of a patient with a large isolated osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia treated by a novel operative technique using cancellous bone from the iliac crest and a collagen I/III matrix.

  12. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  13. Autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with tantalum rod implantation and vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Baoyi; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Xie, Hui; Huang, Shibo; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum rod implantation with vascularized iliac grafting has been reported to be an effective method for the treatment of young patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to avert the need for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been unsatisfactory success rates for end-stage ONFH. The authors describe a modified technique using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) associated with porous tantalum rod implantation combined with vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage ONFH. A total of 24 patients (31 hips) with end-stage ONFH were treated with surgery; ARCO IIIc stage was observed in 19 hips and ARCO IV stage was observed in 12 hips. All patients were followed for a mean time of 64.35 ± 13.03 months (range 26-78). Operations on only five hips were converted to THA. The joint-preserving success rate of the entire group was 89.47% for ARCO stage IIIc and 75% for ARCO stage IV. The mean Harris hip score of the 31 hips improved significantly from 38.74 ± 5.88 points (range 22-50) to 77.23 ± 14.75 points (range 33-95). This intervention was safe and effective in delaying or avoiding total hip replacement for end-stage ONFH.

  14. Corneal recovery in a rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency model by autologous grafts of tertiary outgrowths from cultivated limbal biopsy explants

    PubMed Central

    Durak, Ismet; Gürdal, Mehmet; Baysal, Kemal; Ates, Halil; Ozbek, Zeynep; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Albert; Wolosin, J. Mario

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the corneal regenerative capacity of sequentially generated primary, secondary, and tertiary limbal explant outgrowths in a limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) surgical model. Methods Two-millimeter-long limbal shallow biopsies were surgically excised from the upper quadrant of the right eye of rabbits and set on preserved amniotic membrane for explant culture. After the generation of primary outgrowth, the biopsies were sequentially transferred to new amniotic membrane to generate secondary and then tertiary outgrowths. Eighteen rabbits were subjected to a 360° limbal peritomy extending into the scleral zone and combined with superficial keratectomy of the corneal periphery and thorough mechanical debridement of the central cornea in their left eye. Right eye outgrowths, six of each generation, were engrafted on the ocular surface. Clinical outcomes (neovascularization, corneal clarity, and corneal fluorescein staining) were graded after 6 months. Post-mortem corneas were compared with histology, immunochemistry for p63 and Krt3, ABCG2-dependent dye exclusion, and capacity for outgrowths in explant culture. Results Immunohistology and western blot of the outgrowths for p63 and Krt3 indicated no differences in expression between the primary and tertiary outgrowths for these two markers of growth and differentiation. Clinically, all rabbits treated with amniotic membrane alone developed severe LSCD. Most rabbits grafted with cell outgrowths from all three outgrowth generations achieved stable (>6 months) recovery of the ocular surface. There were partial failures of grafts performed with two secondary and tertiary outgrowths. However, Kruskal–Wallis statistical analysis of the clinical scores yielded no significant difference between the three groups (p=0.524). Histology showed full anatomic recovery of grafts made with primary and tertiary outgrowths. Krt3 and p63 expression throughout the whole limbal corneal epithelium with primary or

  15. In vitro effect of a synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate on articular chondrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Liu, Qin; Liu, Buming; Jiang, Bingli; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lin, Cuiwu

    2014-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a promising strategy for cartilage repair and reconstitution. However, limited cell numbers and the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes present major difficulties to the success of ACI therapy. Therefore, it is important to find effective pro-chondrogenic agents that restore these defects to ensure a successful therapy. In this study, we synthesized a sulfonamido-based gallate, namely N-[4-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-3,4,5-trihydroxy-benzamide (EJTC), and investigated its effects on rabbit articular chondrocytes through an examination of its specific effects on cell proliferation, morphology, viability, GAG synthesis, and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results show that EJTC can effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of cartilage ECM by upregulating the expression levels of the aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes. The expression of the collagen I gene was effectively downregulated, which indicates that EJTC inhibits chondrocytes dedifferentiation. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EJTC-treated groups. The recommended dose of EJTC ranges from 3.125 μg/mL to 7.8125 μg/mL, and the most profound response was observed with 7.8125 μg/mL. This study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  16. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Woo; Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Ahmed, Saif; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Seok Jung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic articular cartilage defects are common, difficult to treat, and progressive lesions that cause significant morbidity in the general population. There have been multiple approaches to treat such lesions, including arthroscopic debridement, microfracture, multiple drilling, osteochondral transplantation and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) that are currently being used in clinical practice. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC) is a single-staged arthroscopic procedure. This method combines a modified microfracture technique with the application of a bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), hyaluronic acid and fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We reviewed the current literatures and surgical techniques for mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis. PMID:27489409

  17. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion. PMID:27098659

  18. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion.

  19. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  20. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  1. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27566509

  2. The Chondrogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Cells and Chondrocytes from Osteoarthritic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Agar, Gabriel; Blumenstein, Sara; Bar-Ziv, Yaron; Kardosh, Rami; Schrift-Tzadok, Michal; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Fischler, Tali; Goldschmid, Revital; Yayon, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The multipotential nature of stem or progenitor cells apparently makes them the ideal choice for any cell therapy, but this as yet remains to be proven. This study (30 subjects) was designed to compare the potential to repair articular cartilage of chondrocytes taken from different regions in osteoarthritic cartilage with that of mesenchymal stem cells prepared from bone marrow of the same subject. Design: Cartilage biopsies, bone marrow, and blood samples were taken from each of 30 individuals with chronic osteoarthritis (aged 62-85 years) undergoing total knee replacement. The chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes isolated from cartilage biopsies taken from different regions of osteoarthritic cartilage was compared with that of mesenchymal cells by quantitative analysis of several chondrocyte specific markers and an ex vivo cartilage differentiation assay. Results: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow–derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential. Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage. When cultured in the presence of a fibroblast growth factor 2 variant, all cell samples from both tissues showed a high degree of chondrogenic potential. Conclusions: Although bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential. PMID:26069568

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  4. Role of autologous bladder-neck slings: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Dani; Karram, Mickey

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the autologous pubovaginal sling involves supporting the proximal urethra and bladder neck with a piece of graft material, achieving continence either by providing a direct compressive force on the urethra/bladder outlet or by reestablishing a reinforcing platform or hammock against which the urethra is compressed during transmission of increased abdominal pressure. Pubovaginal slings using a biological sling material (whether autologous, allograft, or xenograft) can be used successfully to manage primary or recurrent stress incontinence. This article addresses the indications for the use of an autologous bladder-neck sling, describes the surgical techniques, and discusses outcomes and technical considerations. PMID:22877713

  5. Autologous fibrin tissue adhesive for ossicular reconstruction in cats.

    PubMed

    Peters, B R; Strunk, C L; Fulmer, R P

    1992-11-01

    Autologous fibrin tissue adhesive is currently the most promising adhesive for otologic use with respect to strength and biocompatibility without the risk of transmissable disease that is of concern with the commercially prepared fibrin adhesive. We set out to evaluate the practicality of preparing autologous fibrin adhesive in cats and to see if the adhesive's duration and strength of bonding was sufficient to allow natural tissue union to occur with various grafting materials. Autologous fibrin adhesive was prepared preoperatively from ten cats using the ammonium sulfate precipitation technique. Twenty otologic procedures were performed in which the incus long process was resected and the defect bridged with one of four grafting materials: autograft ossicular bone, bone pate-fibrin glue, porous hydroxylapatite, and Plastipore-bone pate. All grafts were secured with the autologous adhesive. The cats were sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks. We found the the autologous adhesive provided adequate duration and strength of support to enable a firm tissue union between all the grafting materials and the adjoining incus and stapes. PMID:1449181

  6. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  7. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  8. Thermally reversible colloidal gels for three-dimensional chondrocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Lapworth, James W.; Hatton, Paul V.; Goodchild, Rebecca L.; Rimmer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Healthy cells are required in large numbers to form a tissue-engineered construct and primary cells must therefore be increased in number in a process termed ‘expansion’. There are significant problems with existing procedures, including cell injury and an associated loss of phenotype, but three-dimensional culture has been reported to offer a solution. Reversible gels, which allow for the recovery of cells after expansion would therefore have great value in the expansion of chondrocytes for tissue engineering applications, but they have received relatively little attention to date. In this study, we examined the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers that form reversible three-dimensional gels for chondrocyte cell culture. A series of polymers comprising N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and styrene was synthesized before studying their thermoresponsive solution behaviour and gelation. A poly(NIPAM-co-styrene-graft-N-vinylpyrrolidone) variant was also synthesized in order to provide increased water content. Both random- and graft-copolymers formed particulate gels above the lower critical solution temperature and, on cooling, re-dissolved to allow enzyme-free cell recovery. Chondrocytes remained viable in all of these materials for 24 days, increased in number and produced collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:21775322

  9. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  10. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  11. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  12. A Role For Photodynamic Therapy In Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Fritz

    1988-02-01

    Simultaneous exposure to the amphipathic fluorescent dye merocyanine 540 (MC 540) and light of a suitable wavelength rapidly kills leukemia, lymphoma, and neuroblastoma cells but spares normal pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Tests in several preclinical models and early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that MC 540-mediated photosensitization may be useful for the extracorporeal purging of autologous remission bone marrow grafts.

  13. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. PMID:16875525

  14. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction.

  15. Vascular grafting strategies in coronary intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Darryl; Gillies, Elizabeth; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-06-01

    With the growing need for coronary revascularizations globally, several strategies to restore blood flow to the heart have been explored. Bypassing the atherosclerotic coronary arteries with autologous grafts, synthetic prostheses and tissue-engineered vascular grafts continue to be evaluated in search of a readily available vascular graft with clinically acceptable outcomes. The development of such a vascular graft including tissue engineering approaches both in situ and in vitro is herein reviewed, facilitating a detailed comparison on the role of seeded cells in vascular graft patency.

  16. [Autologous blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rosencher, N; Conseiller, C

    2001-06-30

    Autologous blood transfusion techniques are the principal means of reducing allogeneic blood exposure. Those techniques were developed in order to prevent the risk of contamination by viruses, mainly HVB, HCV and HIV. However that risk has become so small that all studies show an exorbitant cost/efficiency ratio. Autologous blood transfusion would therefore be of no interest in terms of public health but a recent experimental study suggested a possible transmission of the BSE agent through blood. Until the matter is settled, the precaution principle means we should prefer alternative techniques to allogeneic blood whenever possible, hence a renewed interest in autologous transfusion. PMID:11503506

  17. Cartilage Defect Treatments: With or without Cells? Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Chondrocytes? Traditional or Matrix-Assisted? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhantao; Jin, Jiewen; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed by using multiple strategies. In the last two decades, promising new strategies by using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce tissue regeneration have emerged, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and mesenchymal stem cell implantation (MSCI). However, it is still controversial in the clinical strategies when to choose these treatments. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses to compare the efficacy and safety of different cartilage treatments. In our study, 17 studies were selected to compare different treatments for cartilage defects. The results of meta-analyses indicated that cell-based cartilage treatments showed significant better efficacy than cell-free treatments did (OR: 4.27, 95% CI: 2.19–8.34; WMD: 10.11, 95% CI: 2.69–16.53). Another result indicated that MACT had significant better efficacy than traditional ACI did (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.30–0.82). Besides, the incidence of graft hypertrophy of MACT was slightly lower than that of traditional ACI (OR: 2.43, 95% CI: 1.00–5.94). Current data showed that the cell-based treatments and MACT are better options for cartilage treatments, but more well-designed comparative studies are still needed to enhance our understanding of different treatments for cartilage defects. PMID:26839570

  18. Osteogenetic activity in composite grafts of demineralized compact bone and marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wittbjer, J.; Palmer, B.; Rohlin, M.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of a composite graft of autologous marrow and demineralized autologous compact bone on the healing of a surgically created bone defect were observed in adult rabbits. A segment of the radius was bilaterally resected, demineralized, and replaced. On one side the bone graft was supplemented with autologous marrow. The new bone formation was measured 14 and 28 days after operation by roentgenography, including planimetry with scintigraphy and autoradiography using /sup 99m/Tc-labelled MDP. The composite graft, i.e., demineralized compact bone and marrow, had a significantly higher (p less than 0.01) bone formation rate 14 days after operation compared with the graft with demineralized compact bone in the opposite radius. At 28 days, however, there were no differences between the sides. Viable autologous marrow cells and demineralized autologous compact bone graft accelerate the rate of osteogenesis, but only at the beginning of the healing process.

  19. Breast Augmentation With Autologous Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fa-Cheng; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Autologous fat transplantation has attracted great interest in breast augmentation for cosmetic purpose. In the present study, we reported our experience in fat grafting in breast in 105 cases, and some detailed procedure concerning efficacy and safety of grafting was evaluated. Methods Fat was harvested using 20-mL syringe attached to a 3-hole blunt cannula in a diameter not beyond 3 mm. After washing with cool normal saline to remove blood, the fat was managed with open method using cotton towel as a platform for concentration fat tissue and separating them from fluids, oil, and debris. A 14-gauge, 1-hole blunt cannula was used to place the fat through 3-mm incision on inframammary fold. The fat was infiltrated into the breast from deep to superficial subcutaneous plane. Results Between July 2002 and August 2010, 105 patients have undergone this procedure. The age distribution of the patients ranged from 18 to 45 years, with a mean of 31.3 years. Grafted fat volume has ranged from 120 to 250 mL (average, 205 mL) per breast per session. All women had a significant improvement in their breast size and shape postoperatively, and the breasts were soft and natural in appearance. Conclusions Liposuction and autologous fat transplantation is a suitable approach for augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:25003461

  20. Fibrin sealant promotes migration and proliferation of human articular chondrocytes: possible involvement of thrombin and protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Kirilak, Yaowanuj; Pavlos, Nathan J; Willers, Craig R; Han, Renzhi; Feng, Haotian; Xu, Jiake; Asokananthan, Nithiananthan; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Henry, Peter; Wood, David; Zheng, Ming H

    2006-04-01

    Fibrin sealant (FS), a biological adhesive material, has been recently recommended as an adjunct in autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). While FS has been shown to possess osteoinductive potential, little is known about its effects on chondrogenic cells. In this study, we assessed the bioactivity of FS (Tisseel) on the migration and proliferation of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. Using a co-culture assay to mimic matrix-induced ACI (MACI), chondrocytes were found to migrate from collagen membranes towards FS within 12 h of culture, with significant migratory activity evident by 24 h. In addition, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments revealed that thrombin, the active component of the tissue glue, stimulated chondrocyte proliferation, with maximal efficacy observed at 48 h post-stimulation (1-10 U/ml). In an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these thrombin-induced effects, we examined the expression and activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs), established thrombin receptors. Using a combination of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, all four PARs were detected in human chondrocytes, with PAR-1 being the major isoform expressed. Moreover, thrombin and a PAR-1, but not other PAR-isotype-specific peptide agonists, were found to induce rapid intracellular Ca2+ responses in human chondrocytes in calcium mobilization assays. Together, these data demonstrate that FS supports both the migration and proliferation of human chondrocytes. We propose that these effects are mediated, at least in part, via thrombin-induced PAR-1 signalling in human chondrocytes. PMID:16525709

  1. Lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rathakrishnan, C; Tiku, M L

    1993-08-01

    We were recently able to measure intracellular levels of hydrogen peroxide within normal articular chondrocytes using the trapped indicator 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Further studies have shown that stimulated chondrocytes produce luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, suggesting that these cells produce hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen. In the present study, we have investigated the lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence response in normal articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes either in suspension or adhered to cover slips showed lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. There was a dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence response when chondrocytes were incubated with soluble stimuli like phorbol-myristate-acetate, concanavalin A, and f-met-leu-phe. Catalase and the metabolic inhibitor, sodium azide, which inhibits the enzyme myeloperoxidase, had no inhibitory effect on lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence production. Only the antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, prevented lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, indicating that this assay measures the production of superoxide anions by chondrocytes. We confirmed that chondrocytes release superoxide radicals using the biochemical assay of ferricytochrome c reduction. Since cartilage tissue is semi-transparent, we were able to measure chemiluminescence response in live cartilage tissue, showing that chondrocytes which are embedded within the matrix can also generate superoxide anion radicals. Reactive oxygen intermediates have been shown to play a significant role in the degradation of matrix in arthritis. Our previous and present studies suggest that oxygen radicals produced by chondrocytes may be an important mechanism by which chondrocytes induce cartilage matrix degradation.

  2. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). A one-step procedure for retropatellar articular resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Benthien, Jan Philipp; Behrens, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this technical note is to describe the autologous matrix induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) procedure and to evaluate its possible role for resurfacing of retropatellar cartilage defects. AMIC is a one-step procedure combining microfracturing with application of a collagen I/III membrane to protect the initial blood clot and to serve as a scaffold for the developing chondrocytes. A retrospective analysis of our experience in three patients followed for 18 months is presented.

  3. Species variability in the differentiation potential of in vitro-expanded articular chondrocytes restricts predictive studies on cartilage repair using animal models.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Crovace, Antonio; Malpeli, Mara; Maggi, Ettore; Arbicò, Rafaella; Cancedda, Ranieri; Dozin, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is currently applied in clinics as an innovative tool for articular cartilage repair. Animal models have been and still are being used to validate and further improve the technique. However, in various species, the outcome varies from hyaline-like cartilage to fibrocartilage. This may be due partly to the spontaneous dedifferentiation of chondrocytes once cultured in vitro. Here we assessed whether the extent of dedifferentiation varies between species and we hypothesized that the level of chondrocyte phenotype stability during expansion may contribute to the maintenance of their chondrogenic commitment and redifferentiation potential. Condyle chondrocytes were harvested from sheep, dog, and human, and expanded for 1, 6, or 12 cell duplications. At each interval, cell phenotype was monitored (morphology and biosynthesis of cartilage markers) and redifferentiation was assessed by an in vitro assay of chondrogenesis in micromass pellet and an in vivo assay of ectopic cartilage formation in immunodeficient mice. Results indicate that, during culture, the sheep chondrocyte phenotype is maintained better than that of human chondrocytes, which in turn dedifferentiate to a lesser extent than dog chondrocytes Accordingly, after expansion, sheep chondrocytes spontaneously reform hyaline-like cartilage; human chondrocytes redifferentiate only under stimulation with chondrogenic inducers whereas, after a few passages, dog chondrocytes lose any capacity to redifferentiate regardless of the presence of inducers. Thus, conditions allowing cartilage formation in one species are not necessarily transposable to other species. Therefore, results with animal models should be cautiously applied to humans. In addition, for tissue-engineering purposes, the number of cell duplications must be, for each species, carefully monitored to remain in the range of amplification allowing redifferentiation and chondrogenesis.

  4. Autologous adventitial overlay method reinforces anastomoses in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Minato, Naoki; Okada, Takayuki; Sumida, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Kenichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Kusunose, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we present an inexpensive and effective method for providing a secure and hemostatic anastomosis using autologous adventitia obtained from a dissected or aneurysmal wall. The resected aortic wall is separated between the adventitia and media, and a soft, 2 × 10-cm adventitial strip is overlaid to cover the anastomotic margin. A graft is sutured to the aortic stump. This autologous adventitial overlay method can inexpensively and strongly reinforce the anastomosis during aortic surgery for dissection or aneurysm and will contribute to anastomotic hemostasis and long-term stability.

  5. Novel expansion techniques for skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    The quest for skin expansion is not restricted to cover a large area alone, but to produce acceptable uniform surfaces, robust engraftment to withstand mechanical shear and infection, with a minimal donor morbidity. Ease of the technique, shorter healing period and reproducible results are essential parameters to adopt novel techniques. Significant advances seen in four fronts of autologous grafting are: (1) Dermal-epidermal graft expansion techniques, (2) epidermal graft harvests technique, (3) melanocyte-rich basal cell therapy for vitiligo and (4) robust and faster autologous cell cultures. Meek's original concept that the sum of perimeter of smaller grafts is larger than the harvested graft, and smaller the graft size, the greater is the potential for regeneration is witnessed in newer modification. Further, as graft size becomes smaller or minced, these micrografts can survive on the wound bed exudate irrespective of their dermal orientation. Expansion produced by 4 mm × 4 mm sized Meek micrografts is 10-folds, similarly 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm size micrografts produce 100-fold expansion, which becomes 700-fold with pixel grafts of 0.3 mm × 0.3 mm size. Fractional skin harvest is another new technique with 700 μ size full thickness graft. These provide instant autologous non-cultured graft to cover extensive areas with similar quality of engraftment surface as split skin grafts. Newer tools for epidermal blister graft harvest quickly, with uniform size to produce 7-fold expansions with reproducible results. In addition, donor area heals faster with minimal scar. Melanocyte-rich cell suspension is utilised in vitiligo surgery tapping the potential of hair root melanocytes. Further advances in the cell culture to reduce the cultivation time and provide stronger epidermal sheets with dermal carrier are seen in trials. PMID:27274117

  6. Novel expansion techniques for skin grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    The quest for skin expansion is not restricted to cover a large area alone, but to produce acceptable uniform surfaces, robust engraftment to withstand mechanical shear and infection, with a minimal donor morbidity. Ease of the technique, shorter healing period and reproducible results are essential parameters to adopt novel techniques. Significant advances seen in four fronts of autologous grafting are: (1) Dermal–epidermal graft expansion techniques, (2) epidermal graft harvests technique, (3) melanocyte-rich basal cell therapy for vitiligo and (4) robust and faster autologous cell cultures. Meek's original concept that the sum of perimeter of smaller grafts is larger than the harvested graft, and smaller the graft size, the greater is the potential for regeneration is witnessed in newer modification. Further, as graft size becomes smaller or minced, these micrografts can survive on the wound bed exudate irrespective of their dermal orientation. Expansion produced by 4 mm × 4 mm sized Meek micrografts is 10-folds, similarly 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm size micrografts produce 100-fold expansion, which becomes 700-fold with pixel grafts of 0.3 mm × 0.3 mm size. Fractional skin harvest is another new technique with 700 μ size full thickness graft. These provide instant autologous non-cultured graft to cover extensive areas with similar quality of engraftment surface as split skin grafts. Newer tools for epidermal blister graft harvest quickly, with uniform size to produce 7-fold expansions with reproducible results. In addition, donor area heals faster with minimal scar. Melanocyte-rich cell suspension is utilised in vitiligo surgery tapping the potential of hair root melanocytes. Further advances in the cell culture to reduce the cultivation time and provide stronger epidermal sheets with dermal carrier are seen in trials. PMID:27274117

  7. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  8. Current use of biologic graft extenders for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Coseo, N M; Saldua, N; Harrop, J

    2012-09-01

    Use of biologic graft extenders in spinal fusions is increasing. Multiple allograft alternatives exist to the "gold-standard" autologous bone grafting. The ideal graft extender is osteoconductive, osteoinductive and has osteogenic potential. While the ideal graft extender has yet to be found, available bone graft extenders have varying degrees of predominantly osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties. This review will provide an update on available graft extenders including bone morphogenetic proteins, mesenchymal stem cells, and demineralized bone matrix. The goal is to provide a review of the current use in spinal fusions and future directions in biologics for spinal fusion.

  9. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix.

  10. Operative considerations in implantation of the Perma-Flow graft.

    PubMed

    Emery, R W; Joyce, L D; Arom, K V; King, R M; Nicoloff, D M

    1994-12-01

    The Perma-Flow coronary bypass graft (Possis Medical, Inc, Minneapolis, MN) currently is undergoing expanded clinical trial. From November 1992 through June 1994 we have used this artificial conduit in 8 patients without autologous alternatives. These cases allowed the establishment of a technical basis for successful implantation of this graft. All studied coronary anastomoses are patent.

  11. Optimal transport time and conditions for cartilage tissue samples and expanded chondrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Banu Coskun; Yilmaz, Cengiz; Yilmaz, Necat S; Balli, Ebru; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2010-01-01

    For autologous chondrocyte implantation, the chondral tissue obtained is transferred from the operating room to the laboratory using specialized carrier systems within 24 hours. Similar expenses are used for the transport of cultured chondrocytes. The purpose of this study was to find the optimal temperature, size of tissue, and time that the chondrocytes can stand without losing viability and proliferative capacity. Fresh calf cartilage was harvested and divided into 24 groups. Half of the samples were diced into 1- to 2-mm(3) pieces. All 12 groups were kept at either 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, or 37 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days and were seeded for cell culture. Times to reach confluence values were compared. Produced cell suspensions were grouped similarly and tested similarly. Neither the temperature nor the waiting days caused any difference in the proliferative capacity of the cells. Diced tissues yielded a shorter time to reach confluence values. Chondral tissue obtained from the patient can be transferred to the laboratory at temperatures ranging from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C in up to 7 days. These conditions did not affect the proliferative capacity or the viability of the chondrocytes. Dicing the tissue prior to transport will shorten total culturing time. The expanded cell suspensions should be transferred at temperatures from 4 degrees C to 25 degrees C within 3 days. Specialized carrier systems to get the chondral tissue from the operating room to the laboratory and to take the expanded chondrocytes back to the operating room within hours may not be necessary.

  12. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lones, M A; Kirov, I; Said, J W; Shintaku, I P; Neudorf, S

    2000-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Rare cases of PTLD after autologous BMT have been reported only in adults. This case report is the first to describe PTLD in a pediatric patient after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (PSCT). This 2-year-old male with stage IV neuroblastoma underwent autologous PSCT. The post-PSCT course was complicated by fever with hematochezia and a lung mass. On day 94 post PSCT, colonoscopy revealed an ulcer due to a PTLD, monomorphic type, B cell phenotype, associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Fine needle aspiration identified the lung mass as neuroblastoma. PTLD can occur in pediatric autologous PSCT recipients, and may occur more frequently in autologous grafts manipulated by T cell depletion or CD34+ cell selection.

  13. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Characterized Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huylebroek, José; Van Der Bauwhede, Jan; Saris, Daniël; Veeckman, Geert; Bobic, Vladimir; Victor, Jan; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Verdonk, Peter; Fortems, Yves; Van Lommel, Nel; Haazen, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical outcome of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation using ChondroCelect in daily practice. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional analysis of an open-label, noninterventional cohort. The setting was a compassionate use program, involving 43 orthopaedic centers in 7 European countries. The participants were patients treated with ChondroCelect between October 13, 2004 and July 2, 2008. The measurements used were Clinical Global Impression–Improvement and –Efficacy and solicited adverse event reports. Results: Safety data were collected from 334 patients (90.3%), and effectiveness data were from 282 (76.2%) of the 370 patients treated. Mean age at baseline was 33.6 years (range, 12-57 years), 57% were male, and mean body mass index was 25 kg/m2. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range, 0.4-4.1 years). A femoral condyle lesion was reported in 66% (288/379) and a patellar lesion in 19% (84/379). Mean lesion size was 3.5 cm2; a collagen membrane was used in 92.4% (328/355). A therapeutic effect was reported in 89% (234/264) of patients overall and in 87% (40/46) of patellar lesion patients. Rates of much or very much improved patients were similar in patients with short- (<18 months: 71% [115/163]) and long-term follow-up (>18 months: 68% [70/103]) (P = 0.68) and were independent of lesion size (>4 cm2: 75.5% [37/49]; ≤4 cm2: 67.7% [111/164]) (P = 0.38). Adverse events were similar to those reported in the randomized trial with the same product, with more arthrofibrosis, more reduced joint mobility, and more crepitations reported in patellar lesions. Overall, less cartilage hypertrophy was noted, probably due to the use of a biological membrane cover. Conclusions: Implantation of ChondroCelect appeared to result in a positive benefit/risk ratio when used in an unselected heterogenous population, irrespective of the follow-up period, lesion size, and type of lesion treated. PMID:26069630

  15. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Design and methods: Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms “AMIC” or “Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis.” A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Results: Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Conclusions: Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future. PMID:26069694

  16. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  17. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hale, Gregory A

    2005-10-01

    While advances in the treatment of pediatric cancers have increased cure rates, children with metastatic or recurrent solid tumors have a dismal prognosis despite initial transient responses to therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation takes advantage of the steep dose-response relationship observed with many chemotherapeutic agents. While clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also frequently used to treat patients with other high-risk diseases such as Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms' tumor, retinoblastoma, germ cell tumors, lymphomas and brain tumors. Most published experience consists of retrospective, single-arm studies; randomized clinical trials are lacking, due in part to the rarity of pediatric cancers treatable by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These published literature demonstrate that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation results in most cases in equivalent or superior outcomes when compared with conventional therapies. However, patient heterogeneity, patient selection, graft characteristics and processing and the varied conditioning regimens are additional factors to consider. Since the inception of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, regimen-related toxicity has markedly decreased and the vast majority of treatment failures are now due to disease recurrence. Prospective clinical trials are needed to identify specific high-risk patient populations, with randomization (when possible) to compare outcomes of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with those receiving standard therapy. In addition, investigators need to better define the role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in these solid tumors, particularly in combination with other therapeutic modalities such as immunotherapy and novel cell processing methodologies.

  18. Dielectric Characterization of Costal Cartilage Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Michael W.; Sabuncu, Ahmet Can; Beskok, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Chondrocytes respond to biomechanical and bioelectrochemical stimuli by secreting appropriate extracellular matrix proteins that enables the tissue to withstand the large forces it experiences. Although biomechanical aspects of cartilage are well described, little is known of the bioelectrochemical responses. The focus of this study is to identify bioelectrical characteristics of human costal cartilage cells using dielectric spectroscopy. Methods Dielectric spectroscopy allows non-invasive probing of biological cells. An in house computer program is developed to extract dielectric properties of human costal cartilage cells from raw cell suspension impedance data measured by a microfluidic device. The dielectric properties of chondrocytes are compared with other cell types in order to comparatively assess the electrical nature of chondrocytes. Results The results suggest that electrical cell membrane characteristics of chondrocyte cells are close to cardiomyoblast cells, cells known to possess an array of active ion channels. The blocking effect of the non-specific ion channel blocker gadolinium is tested on chondrocytes with a significant reduction in both membrane capacitance and conductance. Conclusions We have utilized a microfluidic chamber to mimic biomechanical events through changes in bioelectrochemistry and described the dielectric properties of chondrocytes to be closer to cells derived from electrically excitably tissues General significance and interest The studydescribes dielectric characterization of human costal chondrocyte cells using physical tools, where results and methodology can be used to identify potential anomalies in bioelectrochemical responses that may lead to cartilage disorders. PMID:24016606

  19. Cartilage grafting in facial reconstruction with special consideration of irradiated grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, P.J.

    1986-07-01

    The search for the perfect facial implant for reconstruction of the face continues. Cartilage, once thought to be an undesirable graft material because of its propensity for absorption, has regained popularity in the past decade. Various preparation techniques have been employed to ensure graft sterility and diminished absorption. An improved understanding of cartilage structure and physiology has shed considerable light on the host-graft relationship. Gamma irradiation is a time-honored method of preservation. An experiment was undertaken to investigate the physiology of irradiated cartilage grafts following prolonged implantation on the facial skeleton of sheep and dog. Merthiolate preserved grafts were used as controls. Direct observation, histochemical techniques, autoradiography, and transmission electron micrography were used to determine chondrocyte viability and matrix composition. It was surprising to note that following implantation of 16 to 72 months, complete resorption was seen in 87.7% of the irradiated grafts and in 43.8% of the Merthiolate stored controls. Many of the grafts acquired chondrocytes from the host and produced new proteoglycan matrix as well as undergoing some degree of ossification. A comparison to the clinical situation in humans is made. 98 references.

  20. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  1. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction.

  2. Dural repair using autologous fat: Our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Ricci, Alessandro; Dechordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Millimaggi, Daniele F.; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various materials have been proposed to obliterate dead spaces and to reconstruct dural defects during a neurosurgical approach. This study describes our technique of using the abdominal autologous fat graft and evaluates the complications and characteristics related to the use of this tissue during cranial procedures. Methods: Autologous fat grafts were used in 296 patients with basicranial and convexity extraaxial tumors from April 2005 to January 2015. The adipose tissue was removed from the paraumbilical abdominal region and was transformed into a thin foil. When possible, a watertight suture was made between the dural or bone edge with a fat graft. We always used fibrin glue to reinforce the dural closure. Results: Complications occurred between 2 days and 1 year following procedure. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks were found in 11 cases. No case of mortality, pseudomeningoceles, fistula, infections, bacterial meningitides, or lipoid meningitides was reported. No patient required removal of the graft. No adhesion was observed between the brain and the autologous fat. Other fat-related complications observed were 2 cases of fat necrosis in the abdomen and 2 cases of abdominal hemorrhage. Conclusion: The technique of harvesting and applying fat grafts is fairly simple, although it must be performed meticulously to be effective. Our experience has led us to believe that the use of fat grafts presents low morbidity and mortality. However, a neurosurgeon should never forget the possible late or early complications related to the use of fat grafts. PMID:27500007

  3. Bioengineered Self-assembled Skin as an Alternative to Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Climov, Mihail; Medeiros, Erika; Farkash, Evan A.; Qiao, Jizeng; Rousseau, Cecile F.; Dong, Shumin; Zawadzka, Agatha; Racki, Waldemar J.; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Sachs, David H.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with extensive burns or donor site scarring, the limited availability of autologous and the inevitable rejection of allogeneic skin drive the need for new alternatives. Existing engineered biologic and synthetic skin analogs serve as temporary coverage until sufficient autologous skin is available. Here we report successful engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered skin construct derived from autologous skin punch biopsies in a porcine model. Dermal fibroblasts were stimulated to produce an extracellular matrix and were then seeded with epidermal progenitor cells to generate an epidermis. Autologous constructs were grafted onto partial- and full-thickness wounds. By gross examination and histology, skin construct vascularization and healing were comparable to autologous skin grafts and were superior to an autologous bilayered living cellular construct fabricated with fibroblasts cast in bovine collagen. This is the first demonstration of spontaneous vascularization and permanent engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered bioengineered skin that could supplement existing methods of reconstruction. PMID:27482479

  4. Bioengineered Self-assembled Skin as an Alternative to Skin Grafts.

    PubMed

    Climov, Mihail; Medeiros, Erika; Farkash, Evan A; Qiao, Jizeng; Rousseau, Cecile F; Dong, Shumin; Zawadzka, Agatha; Racki, Waldemar J; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Sachs, David H; Randolph, Mark A; Huang, Christene A; Bollenbach, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    For patients with extensive burns or donor site scarring, the limited availability of autologous and the inevitable rejection of allogeneic skin drive the need for new alternatives. Existing engineered biologic and synthetic skin analogs serve as temporary coverage until sufficient autologous skin is available. Here we report successful engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered skin construct derived from autologous skin punch biopsies in a porcine model. Dermal fibroblasts were stimulated to produce an extracellular matrix and were then seeded with epidermal progenitor cells to generate an epidermis. Autologous constructs were grafted onto partial- and full-thickness wounds. By gross examination and histology, skin construct vascularization and healing were comparable to autologous skin grafts and were superior to an autologous bilayered living cellular construct fabricated with fibroblasts cast in bovine collagen. This is the first demonstration of spontaneous vascularization and permanent engraftment of a self-assembled bilayered bioengineered skin that could supplement existing methods of reconstruction. PMID:27482479

  5. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  6. Autologous fat injection in Poland's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinsolle, V; Chichery, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J P

    2008-07-01

    Poland's syndrome is a deformity of the breast and sometimes of the chest wall. Several techniques, which may be combined if necessary, are generally used to treat the forms involving both the breast and chest wall (breast implants, customised chest wall implants, latissimus dorsi pedicled flap). For some years, we have also grafted autologous fat cells according to Coleman's method to treat this rare disorder. We report the preliminary results of this technique and demonstrate its value in the treatment of Poland's syndrome. We studied patients treated for Poland's syndrome by autologous fat injection between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005. We recorded their age, gender, the other surgical techniques used, and grade of Poland's syndrome according to the classification of Foucras. Concerning fat injections, we recorded the number of sessions, volumes injected and complications. The series was composed of seven women and one man, mean age 25 years (range 13 to 40 years). Four patients were grade I, three were grade II and one grade III. The mean number of fat injection sessions was 2.1 (range 1-5) and mean volume injected 96 cc (range 25-200 cc). Lipofilling was used alone in one case and associated with other reconstruction techniques in seven. We had one complication, fat necrosis which progressed favourably after surgical drainage. Autologous fat injection appears to us to be a treatment which can be used alone, or more often associated with traditional reconstruction techniques in all grades of Poland's syndrome. This technique is useful to add volume and especially to correct the contour defects of this syndrome such as the subclavicular hollow and absence of anterior axillary fold.

  7. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  8. Infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease and can be used to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yurong; Buckley, Conor Timothy; Almeida, Henrique V; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kelly, Daniel John

    2014-11-01

    A therapy for regenerating large cartilaginous lesions within the articular surface of osteoarthritic joints remains elusive. While tissue engineering strategies such as matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used in the repair of focal cartilage defects, extending such approaches to the treatment of osteoarthritis will require a number of scientific and technical challenges to be overcome. These include the identification of an abundant source of chondroprogenitor cells that maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease, as well as the development of novel approaches to engineer scalable cartilaginous grafts that could be used to resurface large areas of damaged joints. In this study, it is first demonstrated that infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) isolated from osteoarthritic (OA) donors possess a comparable chondrogenic capacity to FPSCs isolated from patients undergoing ligament reconstruction. In a further validation of their functionality, we also demonstrate that FPSCs from OA donors respond to the application of physiological levels of cyclic hydrostatic pressure by increasing aggrecan gene expression and the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We next explored whether cartilaginous grafts could be engineered with diseased human FPSCs using a self-assembly or scaffold-free approach. After examining a range of culture conditions, it was found that continuous supplementation with both transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) and bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP-6) promoted the development of tissues rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. The final phase of the study sought to scale-up this approach to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions (≥2 cm in diameter) by assembling FPSCs onto electrospun PLLA fiber membranes. Over 6 weeks in culture, it was possible to generate robust, flexible cartilage-like grafts of scale, opening up the possibility that tissues engineered using FPSCs

  9. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  10. Growth factor transgenes interactively regulate articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuiliang; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2013-04-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes lack an effective repair response to correct damage from injury or osteoarthritis. Polypeptide growth factors that stimulate articular chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix synthesis may augment this response. Gene transfer is a promising approach to delivering such factors. Multiple growth factor genes regulate these cell functions, but multiple growth factor gene transfer remains unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that multiple growth factor gene transfer selectively modulates articular chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We tested the hypothesis by delivering combinations of the transgenes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and bone morphogenetic protien-7 (BMP-7) to articular chondrocytes and measured changes in the production of DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. The transgenes differentially regulated all these chondrocyte activities. In concert, the transgenes interacted to generate widely divergent responses from the cells. These interactions ranged from inhibitory to synergistic. The transgene pair encoding IGF-I and FGF-2 maximized cell proliferation. The three-transgene group encoding IGF-I, BMP-2, and BMP-7 maximized matrix production and also optimized the balance between cell proliferation and matrix production. These data demonstrate an approach to articular chondrocyte regulation that may be tailored to stimulate specific cell functions, and suggest that certain growth factor gene combinations have potential value for cell-based articular cartilage repair.

  11. Clinical Experience and Best Practices Using Epidermal Skin Grafts on Wounds.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bernstein, Brent; Bhatia, Animesh; Lantis, John; Le, Lam; Lincoln, Katherine; Liu, Paul; Rodgers, Lee; Shaw, Mark; Young, David

    2015-11-01

    Over the years, autologous skin grafting has been used extensively to achieve wound closure, optimize a functional scar, and improve aesthetic outcomes for the patient. Although a vast majority of the literature is on the use of full-thickness and split-thickness skin grafts, epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) have emerged as a viable option in the reconstructive ladder when only the epidermal layer is needed. These grafts are distinct from other types of autologous skin grafts in that they can be harvested without anesthesia and leave minimal or no scarring at the donor site. In order to explore the use of ESGs in the continuum of primary wound closure, a multidisciplinary expert panel convened in October 2014, in Las Vegas, NV, to review the scientific basis and clinical uses of epidermal grafting. This publication provides an overview of epidermal grafting, recommendations for graft application, and potential roles for its use in wound care and closure.

  12. Graft preservation solutions in cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Bernhard; Reineke, David; Heinisch, Paul Philip; Schönhoff, Florian; Huber, Christoph; Kadner, Alexander; Englberger, Lars; Carrel, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Vein grafts are still the most commonly used graft material in cardiovascular surgery and much effort has been spent in recent years on investigating the optimal harvesting technique. One other related topic of similar importance remained more or less an incidental one. The storage solutions of vein grafts following procurement and prior to implantation are, despite their assumed impact, a relatively neglected theme. There is no doubt that the endothelium plays a key role in long-term patency of vein grafts, but the effects of the different storage solutions on the endothelium remain unclear : In a review of the literature, we could find 20 specific papers that addressed the question, of which the currently available preservation solutions are superior, harmless, damaging or ineffective. The focus lies on saline and autologous whole blood. Besides these two storage media, novel or alternative solutions have been investigated with surprising findings. In addition, a few words will be spent on potential alternatives and novel solutions on the market. As there is currently no randomized clinical trial regarding saline versus autologous whole blood available, this review compares all previous studies and methods of analysis to provide a certain level of evidence on this topic. In summary, saline has negative effects on the endothelial layers and therefore may compromise graft patency. Related factors, such as distension pressure, may outbalance the initial benefit of autologous whole blood or storage solutions and intensify the harmful effects of warm saline. In addition, there is no uniform consent on the superiority of autologous whole blood for vein graft storage. This may open the door to alternatives such as the University of Wisconsin solution or one of the specific designed storage solutions like TiProtec™ or Somaluthion™. Whether these preservation solutions are superior or advantageous remains the subject of further studies. PMID:27068248

  13. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins in chondrocyte-derived matrices on chondrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamada, Tomoe; Chen, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cartilaginous phenotype during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes is a major barrier to the application of chondrocytes for tissue engineering. In previous study, we showed that dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the passage culture was delayed by matrices formed by primary chondrocytes (P0-ECM). In this study, we investigated bovine chondrocyte functions when being cultured on isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-coated substrata and P0-ECM. Low chondrocyte attachment was observed on aggrecan-coated substratum and P0-ECM. Cell proliferation on aggrecan- and type II collagen/aggrecan-coated substrata and P0-ECM was lower than that on the other ECM protein (type I collagen and type II collagen)-coated substrata. When chondrocytes were subcultured on aggrecan-coated substratum, decline of cartilaginous gene expression was delayed, which was similar to the cells subcultured on P0-ECM. These results indicate that aggrecan plays an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte functions and P0-ECM may be a good experimental control for investigating the role of each ECM protein in cartilage ECM.

  14. Construction of a chondrocyte cell sheet using temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Viravaidya-Pasuwat, Kwanchanok; Wong-in, Sopita; Sakulaue, Phongphot; Siriwatwechakul, Wanwipa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide was used to prepare a chondrocyte cell sheet. Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage and plated on the copolymer film grafted tissue culture plates. The cell attachment on the copolymer film was shown to be similar to that of the ungrafted surface. To harvest a cell sheet, the incubation temperature was reduced to 10°C for 30 minutes to allow the polymer chain to fully extend, changing the copolymer's phase from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity. Additional incubation at 20°C for 60 minutes was necessary to activate the cellular metabolism required for cytoskeletal organization and cell detachment. A complete cell sheet recovery was achieved when a PVDF membrane was used as a cell sheet carrier. Unfortunately, the shrinkage of the cell sheet was observed. Nonetheless, the harvested cell sheet was shown to be viable and healthy. PMID:24111348

  15. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  16. Facial lipohypertrophy in HIV-infected subjects who underwent autologous fat tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; De Fazio, Domenico; Orlando, Gabriella; Murri, Rita; Wu, Albert; Guaraldi, Pietro; Esposito, Roberto

    2005-01-15

    Of 41 HIV-infected patients with facial lipoatrophy who underwent autologous fat transplantation, disfiguring facial lipohypertrophy at the graft site occurred at the same time as recurrent fat accumulation at the tissue harvest site in 4 patients who had had fat transferred from the dorsocervical fat pad or from subcutaneous abdominal tissue.

  17. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling Is Essential for the Autonomous Formation of Cartilage-Like Tissue by Expanded Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J.

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease in the activity of

  18. Laryngospasm after autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung; Grecu, Loreta

    2006-07-01

    Although perioperative autologous blood transfusions are associated with few side effects, transfusion reactions can occur and can be life-threatening. We report the occurrence of postoperative laryngospasm in a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia for hip surgery. The laryngospasm could not be attributed to any cause other than the autologous blood transfusion and recurred when the transfusion was restarted. Laryngospasm was successfully treated both times with positive pressure ventilation. Autologous transfusions can trigger febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, which may result in airway compromise.

  19. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  20. Electrospun Vascular Grafts with Improved Compliance Matching to Native Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nezarati, Roya M.; Eifert, Michelle B.; Dempsey, David K.; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is one of the most commonly performed major surgeries in the United States. Autologous vessels such as the saphenous vein are the current gold standard for treatment; however, synthetic vascular prostheses made of expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (ePTFE) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) are used when autologous vessels are unavailable. These synthetic grafts have a high failure rate in small diameter (<4 mm) applications due to rapid re-occlusion via intimal hyperplasia. Current strategies to improve clinical performance are focused on preventing intimal hyperplasia by fabricating grafts with compliance and burst pressure similar to native vessels. To this end, we have developed an electrospun vascular graft from segmented polyurethanes with tunable properties by altering material chemistry and graft microarchitecture. Relationships between polyurethane tensile properties and biomechanical properties were elucidated to select polymers with desirable properties. Graft thickness, fiber tortuosity, and fiber fusions were modulated to provide additional tools for controlling graft properties. Using a combination of these strategies, a vascular graft with compliance and burst pressure exceeding the saphenous vein autograft was fabricated (compliance = 6.0 ± 0.6 %/mmHg × 10−4, burst pressure = 2260 ± 160 mmHg). This graft is hypothesized to reduce intimal hyperplasia associated with low compliance in synthetic grafts and improve long term clinical success. Additionally, the fundamental relationships between electrospun mesh microarchitecture and mechanical properties identified in this work can be utilized in various biomedical applications. PMID:24846218

  1. Considerations on the use of ear chondrocytes as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Mandl, Erik W; Jahr, Holger; Koevoet, Wendy; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2004-01-01

    Articular cartilage is often used for research on cartilage tissue engineering. However, ear cartilage is easier to harvest, with less donor-site morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adult human ear chondrocytes were capable of producing cartilage after expansion in monolayer culture. Cell yield per gram of cartilage was twice as high for ear than for articular cartilage. Moreover, ear chondrocytes proliferated faster. Cell proliferation could be further stimulated by the use of serum-free medium with Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) in stead of medium with 10% serum. To evaluate chondrogenic capacity, multiplied chondrocytes were suspended in alginate and implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice. After 8 weeks the constructs demonstrated a proteoglycan-rich matrix that contained collagen type II. Constructs of ear chondrocytes showed a faint staining for elastin. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression of collagen type II was 2-fold upregulated whereas expression of collagen type I was 2-fold down regulated in ear chondrocytes expanded in serum-free medium with FGF2 compared to serum-containing medium. Expression of alkaline phosphatase and collagen type X were low indicating the absence of terminal differentiation. We conclude that ear chondrocytes can be used as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering. Furthermore, it may proof to be a promising alternative cell source to engineer cartilage for articular repair.

  2. Plant grafting.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Charles W; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2015-03-01

    Since ancient times, people have cut and joined together plants of different varieties or species so they would grow as a single plant - a process known as grafting (Figures 1 and 2). References to grafting appear in the Bible, ancient Greek and ancient Chinese texts, indicating that grafting was practised in Europe, the Middle East and Asia by at least the 5(th) century BCE. It is unknown where or how grafting was first discovered, but it is likely that natural grafting, the process by which two plants touch and fuse limbs or roots in the absence of human interference (Figure 3), influenced people's thinking. Such natural grafts are generally uncommon, but are seen in certain species, including English ivy. Parasitic plants, such as mistletoe, that grow and feed on often unrelated species may have also contributed to the development of grafting as a technique, as people would have observed mistletoe growing on trees such as apples or poplars. PMID:25734263

  3. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  4. Grafting techniques for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a benign fibrotic condition of the penile tunica albuginea. PD can be associated with penile pain, curvature, shortening, and erectile dysfunction (ED). The predominant and most bothersome symptom in affected patients is penile curvature, which can lead to inability to have sexual intercourse. In such cases, surgical correction of the curvature may be required. Plication techniques to correct curvature can cause penile shortening and therefore are generally reserved for curvatures <60°. Penile prosthesis implantation with simultaneous correction of curvature by various means is recommended in PD patients with ED not responding to medical therapy. Grafting techniques are the preferred surgical treatment in patients with penile curvatures >60°, short penis, or hourglass deformity. Patients scheduled for grafting surgery are required to have satisfactory erectile rigidity preoperatively. There are various grafting materials that can be used for closure of the tunica albuginea defect following plaque incision/excision. Both autologous and non-autologous grafts have been used for PD reconstructive surgery, and each graft has its advantages and disadvantages. Novel grafting materials are presented and discussed in this review. A major advantage of the available “off-the-shelf” grafts is that there is no harvesting from a donor site and, thus, morbidity is reduced, and operative times are minimized. Further investigations in regard to tissue-engineered grafts to improve surgical handling and postoperative outcomes are ongoing. Surgeon experience, careful patient selection, patient preference and type of penile deformity affect the choice of graft. This review summarizes the literature within the past 5 years regarding grafting techniques in PD. Surgical outcomes and limitations of grafting techniques are reported. A major objective of this review is dedicated to preoperative considerations and indications for grafting procedures, with

  5. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation.

  6. Effect of Fiber Diameter on the Spreading, Proliferation and Differentiation of Chondrocytes on Electrospun Chitosan Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra E.; Hasanova, Gulnara I.; Schneider, Min Jeong; Larsen, Gustavo F.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-engineered neocartilage with appropriate biomechanical properties holds promise not only for graft applications but also as a model system for controlled studies of chondrogenesis. Our objective in the present research study is to better understand the impact of fiber diameter on the cellular activity of chondrocytes cultured on nanofibrous matrices. By using the electrospinning process, fibrous scaffolds with fiber diameters ranging from 300 nm to 1 μm were prepared and the physicomechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. Bovine articular chondrocytes were then seeded and maintained on the scaffolds for 7 and 14 days in culture. An upregulation in the gene expression of collagen II was noted with decreasing fiber diameters. For cells that were cultured on scaffolds with a mean fiber diameter of 300 nm, a 2-fold higher ratio of collagen II/collagen I was noted when compared to cells cultured on sponge-like scaffolds prepared by freeze drying and lyophilization. Integrin (α5, αv, β1) gene expression was also observed to be influenced by matrix morphology. Our combined results suggest that matrix geometry can regulate and promote the retention of the chondrocyte genotype. PMID:21540560

  7. Autologous bone marrow transplantation following chemotherapy and irradiation in dogs with spontaneous lymphomas. [. gamma. rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, C.A.; Bull, M.; McCormick, K.; Kadin, M.; Lucas, D.

    1980-09-01

    Thirty dogs with spontaneous lymphomas were administered two to six cycles of chemotherapy and were randomized into 3 groups to receive 800 rads of total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Of 10 dogs irradiated after chemotherapy-induced remission and infused with remission marrow (group 1), 8 (80%) had successful grafts and experienced remissions lasting 62 to 1024 days. Of 9 dogs irradiated during remission and infused with remission marrow mixed with autologous tumor cells (group 2), 6 (66%) had remission lasting 15 to 45 days. Eleven dogs with progressive tumor growth (relapse) following chemotherapy were irradiated and infused with remission marrow (group 3). Tumor remission lasting 39 to 350 days was observed in 5 dogs (45%) in this group, and 6 dogs died in less than 30 days. Dogs in groups 1 to 3 had median survival times of 216, 60, and 45 days, respectively. The prolonged survival times for dogs in group 1 compared to dogs in groups 2 and 3 suggest that protocols involving irradiation and autologous marrow grafting in this model would be most effective when these protocols are applied to animals having a minimum tumor burden at the time of irradiation and when the grafting is done with tumor-free autologous marrow.

  8. Thyroid-specific gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2011-12-16

    Previously, we demonstrated that Runx2 (Cbfa1/AML3), a chondrocyte-specific transcription factor, is expressed in thyroid glands of mice, where it stimulates expression of the thyroglobulin (Tg) gene. Here, we reverse transcribed thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), Pax-8, Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) cDNAs from mouse trachea and bronchus RNA samples, but were unable to recover these cDNAs from mouse liver RNA samples. Tg mRNA levels in trachea and bronchus were about 5.1% and 2.1% of those in thyroid glands. ATDC-5 cells, cultured chondrocytes, expressed about 30-fold more Tg mRNA than undifferentiated cells. Gel shift and Tg gene reporter assay revealed that TTF-1 stimulated Tg gene expression in these cells. These results indicate that chondrocytes turn on some aspects of the thyroid gene expression program and that TTF-1 plays important roles in Tg gene expression in chondrocyte. PMID:21945616

  9. Poly-L-lactic acid facial rejuvenation: an alternative to autologous fat?

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Edward D

    2013-05-01

    Facial volume loss is an important component of facial aging and tends to present at an earlier age than other aspects of aging. Several surgical and nonsurgical products and techniques are available to replace volume loss associated with aging. One surgical technique uses a patient's fat cells to replace or augment volume deficiency. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) injection is a nonsurgical option. This article compares these 2 volume augmentation procedures and discusses characteristics of facial aging, the consultation process involved in assessing individual volume loss, procedure details of autologous fat grafting and PLLA injection, the decision of PLLA versus autologous fat, and patient outcomes.

  10. Vein Graft-Coated Vascular Stents: A Feasibility Study in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Haberstroh, Joerg; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Gottschalk, Eva; Schumacher, Martin

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different vein grafts for luminal coating of endovascular stents in normal canine arteries. Methods: Twenty-four tantalum Strecker stents were coated with either autologous (n= 10), denatured heterologous (n= 11), or denatured homologous vein grafts (n= 3). The carotid artery (n= 11) and the iliac artery (n= 13) were stented using a transfemoral approach. Angiograms were performed at days 0, 7, and 21, and months 3, 6, and 9. All grafts underwent histological examination. Results: Eight of 10 autologous vein grafts showed patency during the whole observation period of 9 months, without histological signs of inflammation. Denatured heterologous vein grafts revealed acute (n= 3), subacute (n= 5), or delayed (n= 3) vessel occlusion. Hyaloid transformation of the vein graft and lympho-plasmacellular formations were seen. Denatured homologous vein grafts showed acute vessel occlusion. Although significant inflammatory tissue response was seen, no host-versus-graft reaction was present. Conclusion: Autologous vein graft-coated stents showed good biocompatibility in canine arteries. Preparation was cumbersome and required surgical venae-sectio. Denatured vein grafts, however, were limited by inflammatory reactions.

  11. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  12. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension.

  13. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates the actin organization of chondrocytes and chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koichi; Kitaori, Toshiyuki; Oishi, Shinya; Watanabe, Naoki; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Tanida, Shimei; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Kasahara, Takashi; Shibuya, Hideyuki; Fujii, Nobutaka; Nagasawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ito, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12/PBSF) plays important roles in the biological and physiological functions of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. This chemokine regulates the formation of multiple organ systems during embryogenesis. However, its roles in skeletal development remain unclear. Here we investigated the roles of SDF-1 in chondrocyte differentiation. We demonstrated that SDF-1 protein was expressed at pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the newly formed endochondral callus of rib fracture as well as in the growth plate of normal mouse tibia by immunohistochemical analysis. Using SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo, we histologically showed that the total length of the whole humeri of SDF-1(-/-) mice was significantly shorter than that of wild-type mice, which was contributed mainly by shorter hypertrophic and calcified zones in SDF-1(-/-) mice. Actin cytoskeleton of hypertrophic chondrocytes in SDF-1(-/-) mouse humeri showed less F-actin and rounder shape than that of wild-type mice. Primary chondrocytes from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the enhanced formation of philopodia and loss of F-actin. The administration of SDF-1 to primary chondrocytes of wild-type mice and SDF-1(-/-) mice promoted the formation of actin stress fibers. Organ culture of embryonic metatarsals from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the growth delay, which was recovered by an exogenous administration of SDF-1. mRNA expression of type X collagen in metatarsals and in primary chondrocytes of SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo was down-regulated while the administration of SDF-1 to metatarsals recovered. These data suggests that SDF-1 regulates the actin organization and stimulates bone growth by mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  14. Cryopreservation of the tracheal grafts

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of the trachea may become the preferred method for the reconstruction of extensive tracheal defects, however, several unresolved problems must be addressed, such as immunosuppression, preservation and donor shortage. In this manuscript, the cryopreservation of tracheal grafts is reviewed, which potentially is associated with a lessened immunological response. Cryopreservation may be used clinically for long-term preservation and may solve the donor shortage. It is very important to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of cryopreservation on tracheal allografts in order to expand the potential clinical application of tracheal transplantation in the future. The cartilage as well as the epithelium and lamina propria serve as targets for rejection. However, the effect of cryopreservation on chondrocytes could be associated with reduced allogenicity of the trachea. The long-term cryopreservation of cartilage must be investigated in basic research models of chondrocyte viability. Growth of cryopreserved tracheal allografts is less well understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effects of both cryopreservation and adequate immunosuppression for tracheal xenografts. PMID:20046673

  15. Evolution of instruments for harvest of the skin grafts

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Faisal; Singh, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Background: The harvest of autologous skin graft is considered to be a fundamental skill of the plastic surgeon. The objective of this article is to provide an interesting account of the development of skin grafting instruments as we use them today in various plastic surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: The authors present the chronological evolution and modifications of the skin grafting knife, including those contributions not often cited in the literature, using articles sourced from MEDLINE, ancient manuscripts, original quotes, techniques and illustrations. Results: This article traces the evolution of instrumentation for harvest of skin grafts from free hand techniques to precise modern automated methods. Conclusions: Although skin grafting is one of the basic techniques used in reconstructive surgery yet harvest of a uniform graft of desired thickness poses a challenge. This article is dedicated to innovators who have devoted their lives and work to the advancement of the field of plastic surgery. PMID:23960303

  16. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  17. The potential benefit of allogeneic over autologous transplantation in patients with very early relapsed and refractory follicular lymphoma with prior remission duration of ≤12 months.

    PubMed

    Lunning, Matthew A; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Hilden, Patrick; Devlin, Sean M; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Giralt, Sergio; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Moskowitz, Craig H; Sauter, Craig S

    2016-04-01

    Early relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) warrants consolidation with transplantation, though graft source modality remains controversial. We analysed the outcomes of 44 patients transplanted with either autologous or allogeneic graft sources in the post-rituximab era. No difference in event-free (EFS) or overall survival (OS) was observed between allogeneic (81% and 81%) and autologous transplantation (64% and 70%) at 3 years. There was a significant difference in EFS between allogeneic and autologous transplantation patients with previous remission duration of ≤12 months (80% and 42% at 3 years, P < 0·015). Very early relapsed FL may warrant consideration of allogeneic over autologous transplantation in the appropriate setting.

  18. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities. PMID:3606909

  19. Inhibition of phosphate-induced apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes by thrombin peptide 508.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Carney, Darrell H; Ryaby, James T; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2009-01-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes are susceptible to apoptosis. Terminally differentiated chondrocytes are deleted via apoptosis, which primes the growth plate to vascular invasion and subsequent bone formation. Whether less differentiated resting zone chondrocytes are subject to the same mechanism that governs the apoptotic pathway of more differentiated growth zone chondrocytes is not known. In our current study, we demonstrated that inorganic phosphate, a key inducer of growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, also causes apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes, via a pathway similar to the one in growth zone chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that the conditions that cause growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis lie in the external environment, instead of the differences in differentiation state.

  20. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored. PMID:26069698

  1. Harvest of autologous clavipectoral fascia for use in duraplasty: cadaveric feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Louis, Robert G; Tubbs, R Shane; Mortazavi, Martin M; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2013-03-01

    Techniques and materials for repair of dural defects following neurosurgical procedures vary. Given higher complication rates with nonautologous duraplasty materials, most authors strongly recommend autologous grafts. To expand the arsenal of possible materials available to the neurosurgeon, we propose the use of autologous clavipectoral fascia as an alternative donor for duraplasty. Eight embalmed adult cadavers underwent dissection of the pectoral region. A 12-cm curvilinear skin incision was made 2 cm inferior to the nipple in males and along the inferior breast edge in females. Dissection was continued until the clavipectoral fascia was encountered, and a tissue plane was developed between this fascia and the deeper pectoralis major muscle. Sections of clavipectoral fascia were used for duraplasty in the same specimens. In all specimens, removal of clavipectoral fascia was easily performed with tissue separation between the overlying fascia and underlying muscle. Only small adhesions were found between the fascia and underlying muscle, and these were easily transected. No obvious gross neurovascular injuries were identified. Large portions of clavipectoral fascia were available, and at least a 10 × 10-cm piece (average thickness, 1.2 mm) was easily harvested for all specimens. Clavipectoral fascia shares characteristics with materials such as pericranium and fascia lata that have been used successfully in duraplasty, and most importantly, it is autologous. Theoretically, using clavipectoral fascia would reduce the risk of muscle herniation. It offers an alternative source for autologous dural grafting when other sources are unavailable or exhausted. Clinical experience with this fascia is warranted.

  2. Autologous Fat Transfer for Esthetic Contouring of Face in Posttraumatic Nonfunctional Maxillofacial Deformities.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kapil S; Bachhav, Manoj; Naik, Charudatta S; Tanwar, Harshwardhan; Sankhe, Shilpa S

    2016-06-01

    The transfer of autologous fat has been performed since the 1890s; however, its popularity has increased owing to better understanding of fat harvesting and processing techniques. In this article, fat grafting procedure has been used to correct posttraumatic facial deformities in 25 cases. As healing of grafted fat is unpredictable, we have used longer follow-up of 2 years. Evaluation was performed using facial photographs and MRI scans. Scientific literature describes an absorption rate ranging from 20 to 90%. High fat graft resorption rates have been attributed to traumatic handling of the graft during harvest, processing, and injection. Various processing techniques have been suggested. The goal of these techniques is to obtain greater adipocyte cell survival and, consequently, more reliable clinical results. In our study, we have used syringe aspiration and low-speed centrifuge for processing of fat which has resulted in good clinical outcomes. PMID:27162566

  3. Autologous Fat Transfer for Esthetic Contouring of Face in Posttraumatic Nonfunctional Maxillofacial Deformities.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kapil S; Bachhav, Manoj; Naik, Charudatta S; Tanwar, Harshwardhan; Sankhe, Shilpa S

    2016-06-01

    The transfer of autologous fat has been performed since the 1890s; however, its popularity has increased owing to better understanding of fat harvesting and processing techniques. In this article, fat grafting procedure has been used to correct posttraumatic facial deformities in 25 cases. As healing of grafted fat is unpredictable, we have used longer follow-up of 2 years. Evaluation was performed using facial photographs and MRI scans. Scientific literature describes an absorption rate ranging from 20 to 90%. High fat graft resorption rates have been attributed to traumatic handling of the graft during harvest, processing, and injection. Various processing techniques have been suggested. The goal of these techniques is to obtain greater adipocyte cell survival and, consequently, more reliable clinical results. In our study, we have used syringe aspiration and low-speed centrifuge for processing of fat which has resulted in good clinical outcomes.

  4. Bone marrow concentrate for autologous transplantation in minipigs. Characterization and osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Herten, M; Grassmann, J P; Sager, M; Benga, L; Fischer, J C; Jäger, M; Betsch, M; Wild, M; Hakimi, M; Jungbluth, P

    2013-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow plays an increasing role in the treatment of bone, cartilage and tendon healing disorders. Cell-based therapies display promising results in the support of local regeneration, especially therapies using intra-operative one-step treatments with autologous progenitor cells. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells were concentrated in a point-of-care device and investigated for their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics and their osteogenic potential. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of 16 minipigs. The mononucleated cells (MNC) were concentrated by gradient density centrifugation, cultivated, characterized by flow cytometry and stimulated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Cell differentiation was investigated by histological and immunohistological staining of relevant lineage markers. The proliferation capacity was determined via colony forming units of fibroblast and of osteogenic alkaline-phosphatase-positive-cells. The MNC could be enriched 3.5-fold in nucleated cell concentrate in comparison to bone marrow. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a positive signal for the MSC markers. Cells could be differentiated into the three lines confirming the MSC character. The cellular osteogenic potential correlated significantly with the percentage of newly formed bone in vivo in a porcine metaphyseal long-bone defect model. This study demonstrates that bone marrow concentrate from minipigs display cells with MSC character and their osteogenic differentiation potential can be used for osseous defect repair in autologous transplantations.

  5. [Conservation and destruction of autologous and allogeneic cryopreserved cellular products: recommendations from the SFGM-TC].

    PubMed

    Calmels, B; Boulanger, F; Baudoux, E; Decot, V; Fawaz, A; Giraud, C; Hivert, B; Garderet, L; Milpied, N; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-08-01

    Thousands of autologous and at less extent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) bags are cryopreserved in France. The majority of autologous HSC grafts are used within a year after collection. However, many bags are still unused and cryopreserved for many years. In France and on a European scale, the ever-growing number of cryopreserved bags represents a real economic health concern. Indeed, the cost of storage is about 100€ per bag and per year. In addition, quality and therapeutic value of these long-term cryopreserved grafts needs to be evaluated. In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC) set up its fourth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from its member centers across France. These workshops took place in September 2013 in Lille. In this article, we addressed the issue of the destruction of long-term cryopreserved grafts be them autologous or allogeneic and provide recommendations regarding their destruction. PMID:24996844

  6. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  7. Autologous umbilical cord blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, A.; Arbel, E.; Kenet, G.; Berar, M.; Kohelet, D.; Tanay, A.; Zakut, H.; Meytes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of umbilical cord blood collection for autologous transfusion in premature infants. All 120 microbacterial cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) of cord blood samples as well as 30 cultures of mycoplasma were treated. Cord prothrombin fragment (F 1 + 2) concentrations were quantified at one and 10 minutes after clamping of the cord. F 1 + 2 concentrations assessed on 25 newborn infants were similar and no linear association with time of clamping could be drawn. This means that cord blood thrombosis is not activated for at least 10 minutes following clamping of the cord. As far as is known, the first newborn infant to benefit from this method of transfusion is reported here. The premature infant received two portions of autologous blood (on days 5 and 7). No untoward effects were noted. Blood, collected from the umbilical cord, is a safe source for autotransfusion, provided that bacteriological testing has been carried out. PMID:8535878

  8. Articular cartilage repair with autologous bone marrow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okabe, Takahiro; Ikawa, Tesshu; Iida, Takahiro; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage defects that do not repair spontaneously induce osteoarthritic changes in joints over a long period of observation. In this study, we examined the usefulness of transplanting culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into osteochondral defects of joints with cartilage defects. First, we performed experiments on rabbits and up on obtaining good results proceeded to perform the experiments on humans. Macroscopic and histological repair with this method was good, and good clinical results were obtained although there was no significant difference with the control group. Recent reports have indicated that this procedure is comparable to autologous chondrocyte implantation, and concluded that it was a good procedure because it required one step less than that required by surgery, reduced costs for patients, and minimized donor site morbidity. Although some reports have previously shown that progenitor cells formed a tumor when implanted into immune-deficient mice after long term in vitro culture, the safety of the cell transplantation was confirmed by our clinical experience. Thus, this procedure is useful, effective, and safe, but the repaired tissues were not always hyaline cartilage. To obtain better repair with this procedure, treatment approaches using some growth factors during in vitro culture or gene transfection are being explored.

  9. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  10. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  11. Chondrocyte behavior on nanostructured micropillar polypropylene and polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Prittinen, Juha; Jiang, Yu; Ylärinne, Janne H; Pakkanen, Tapani A; Lammi, Mikko J; Qu, Chengjuan

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether patterned polypropylene (PP) or polystyrene (PS) could enhance the chondrocytes' extracellular matrix (ECM) production and phenotype maintenance. Bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured on smooth PP and PS, as well as on nanostructured micropillar PP (patterned PP) and PS (patterned PS) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the samples were collected for fluorescein diacetate-based cell viability tests, for immunocytochemical assays of types I and II collagen, actin and vinculin, for scanning electronic microscopic analysis of cell morphology and distribution, and for gene expression assays of Sox9, aggrecan, procollagen α1(II), procollagen α1(X), and procollagen α2(I) using quantitative RT-PCR assays. After two weeks of culture, the bovine primary chondrocytes had attached on both patterned PP and PS, while practically no adhesion was observed on smooth PP. However, the best adhesion of the cells was on smooth PS. The cells, which attached on patterned PP and PS surfaces synthesized types I and II collagen. The chondrocytes' morphology was extended, and an abundant ECM network formed around the attached chondrocytes on both patterned PP and PS. Upon passaging, no significant differences on the chondrocyte-specific gene expression were observed, although the highest expression level of aggrecan was observed on the patterned PS in passage 1 chondrocytes, and the expression level of procollagen α1(II) appeared to decrease in passaged chondrocytes. However, the expressions of procollagen α2(I) were increased in all passaged cell cultures. In conclusion, the bovine primary chondrocytes could be grown on patterned PS and PP surfaces, and they produced extracellular matrix network around the adhered cells. However, neither the patterned PS nor PP could prevent the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. PMID:25175232

  12. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  13. Autologous endothelial progenitor cells improve allograft survival in porcine lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yi-Ting; Roan, Jun-Neng; Fang, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Shi-Wei; Tseng, Yau-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background As endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) attenuated acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbit model, we hypothesized that autologous EPCs preserved lung graft function during the acute reperfusion period of lung transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of EPCs in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged graft ischemia. Methods Day-7 EPCs isolated from the recipient subjects or plain culture media were administered into the left pulmonary artery immediately before restoration of pulmonary blood flow in a porcine lung allotransplantation model, with the transplantation surgeons blinded to the content of injection. Hemodynamics and arterial blood gas were recorded, and the right pulmonary artery was occluded 30 min after reperfusion to evaluate the lung graft function. The lung grafts were sectioned for histological examination at the end of experiments. The total ischemic time for lung graft was approximately 14 h. Results All animals receiving plain medium died within 40 min after reperfusion, but 3 out of 5 (60%) piglets receiving EPCs survived up to 4 h after diversion of the entire cardiac output into the lung graft (P<0.01). The donor body weight, recipient body weight, cold ischemic time, and time for anastomosis were comparable between the EPC and control group (P=0.989, 0.822, 0.843, and 0.452, respectively). The mean aortic pressure decreased, and the cardiac output and mean pulmonary artery pressure elevated after right pulmonary artery occlusion. All these parameters were gradually compensated in the EPC group but decompensated in the control group. Better preservation of gas exchange function, reduced thrombi formation in the terminal pulmonary arterioles, and attenuated interstitial hemorrhage of the lung graft were observed in the EPC group. Conclusions We concluded autologous EPCs significantly enhanced the function of lung allograft and improved survival in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

  14. COMPOUNDING PHARMACIES' POTENTIAL TO CREATE Graft Storage Solutions for Bypass Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the optimal storage conditions for vascular grafts during bypass surgery. These studies have repeatedly shown that placing vascular graft conduits in isotonic saline solutions, and to a lesser extent in heparinized autologous blood, leads to a profound decline in endothelial cell viability. Endothelial damage to vein grafts can occur at multiple points during a coronary artery bypass graft surgery procedure: graft harvesting, handling, flushing, storage, anastomosis, and arterialization (e.g., damage caused by exposure to arterial blood pressure). This damage to endothelial cells causes the release of pro-inflammatory chemical signals that trigger thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and accelerated graft atherosclerosis, all of which ultimately contribute to graft failure. Cardiothoracic surgeons performing coronary artery bypass graft surgery and vascular surgeons performing peripheral artery bypass graft surgery have attempted to overcome the damage to the vascular grafts by using buffers to maintain the physiological pH of the storage solution. However, the endothelial layers in the grafts would benefit from having proper oxygenation and antioxidants added to the storage solution. Compounding pharmacies can perform a vital role in ensuring the patency of the vascular grafts by creating compounded flushing and storage solutions that have an optimal mix of nitric oxide substrates, antioxidants, and other nutrients for the endothelium. Maintaining structural and functional viability of the endothelia in grafts by using an appropriate vessel storage medium would lead to improved long-term graft patency.

  15. Fibroblast growth factor is an inhibitor of chondrocyte terminal differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-04-05

    The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and cartilage-matrix calcification were investigated. Rabbit growth-plate chondrocytes maintained as a pelleted mass in a centrifuge tube produced an abundant proteoglycan matrix during the matrix-maturation stage, yielding a cartilage-like tissue. Thereafter, they terminally differentiated to hypertrophic chondrocytes which produced high levels of alkaline phosphatase. These cells induced extensive calcification of the matrix in the absence of additional phosphate. Addition of bFGF to the chondrocyte cultures abolished the increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca deposition, and the calcium content. These effects were dose-dependent, reversible, and observed in the presence of cytosine arabinoside, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. The inhibitory effects could be observed only when chondrocytes were exposed to bFGF in a transition period between the matrix-maturation and hypertrophic stages. As chondrocytes differentiated to hypertrophic cells, bFGF became less effective in inhibiting the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes. The present study also shows that although the rate of ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation into large, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the cell-matrix fraction is very high during the matrix-maturation stage, it abruptly decreases by 90% after terminal differentiation. Furthermore, the terminal differentiation-associated decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was delayed by bFGF. These results provide evidence that bFGF inhibits terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and calcification.

  16. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  17. Autologous Bone Marrow Aspirate Therapy in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Nandhagopal, Vijayaraghavan; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Thiruvoth, Friji Meethale; Sivakumar, Dinesh Kumar; Asokan, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of autologous bone marrow aspirate therapy (ABMAT) in wound healing. Approach: This is a retrospective analysis of 9 patients (11 chronic nonhealing wounds) in whom ABMAT was used. Patients (wounds) were grouped into two groups. Group 1 included 4 patients (5 wounds) refusing/unfit for reconstruction and managed only with ABMAT. Group 2 included 5 patients (6 wounds) who agreed/fit for reconstruction after wound bed preparation with ABMAT. End point of the study was complete wound healing. Results: ABMAT helped in complete healing of chronic nonhealing wounds by secondary intention in group 1 patients and enhanced process of wound bed preparation for reconstruction in group 2 patients. Innovation: This study highlights the importance of ABMAT in the management of chronic nonhealing wounds. Conclusion: ABMAT helps in wound bed preparation to allow the wound to heal completely or cover by skin graft/flap. PMID:26989576

  18. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  19. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P; Post, Janine N; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model's results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  20. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P.; Post, Janine N.; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model’s results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  1. Autologus parietal grafts in preprosthethic surgery

    PubMed Central

    GHERLONE, E.F.; VINCI, R.; D’AVERSA, L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Edentulous patients usually request implant supported/fixed rehabilitation. Ridge resorption after teeth loss usually affect three-dimensional implant position. Vertical and/or horizontal bone augmentation procedures are often the only choice the clinician has to deliver prosthetic guided restoration. Gold standard for augmentation procedures such as sinus lift, onlay or inlay grafts, is still autologous bone. The patient in this report underwent a pre-prosthetic reconstruction of the jaws with parietal bone, followed by fixtures insertion and fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. This clinical report aims to underline the importance of multidisciplinary treatment to optimize the results of the rehabilitation. PMID:23285358

  2. Chondrogenic Potency Analyses of Donor-Matched Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow, Infrapatellar Fat Pad, and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; McCarthy, Helen S.; Roberts, Sally; Richardson, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell-based therapy that has been used clinically for over 20 years to treat cartilage injuries more efficiently in order to negate or delay the need for joint replacement surgery. In this time, very little has changed in the ACI procedure, but now many centres are considering or using alternative cell sources for cartilage repair, in particular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we have tested the chondrogenic potential of donor-matched MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM), infrapatellar fat pad (FP), and subcutaneous fat (SCF), compared to chondrocytes. We have confirmed that there is a chondrogenic potency hierarchy ranging across these cell types, with the most potent being chondrocytes, followed by FP-MSCs, BM-MSCs, and lastly SCF-MSCs. We have also examined gene expression and surface marker profiles in a predictive model to identify cells with enhanced chondrogenic potential. In doing so, we have shown that Sox-9, Alk-1, and Coll X expressions, as well as immunopositivity for CD49c and CD39, have predictive value for all of the cell types tested in indicating chondrogenic potency. The findings from this study have significant clinical implications for the refinement and development of novel cell-based cartilage repair strategies.

  3. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in irradiated dogs reconstituted with autologous bone marrow. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Akiyama, N.; Sato, T.; Ferrebee, J.W.

    1980-07-01

    Hemopoietic reconstitution of supralethally irradiated adult dogs of the Cooperstown colony with their own stored bone marrow can produce long-term unresponsiveness to DLA-identical kidney allografts with no need for any additional immunosuppression. Eleven of 18 kidneys transplanted 12 h after replacement of autologous marrow into irradiated recipients currently survive with normal function for as long as 1417 d; 8 of 13 organs transplanted 28 h after marrow replacement, and 8 of 13 organs transplanted 36 h after marrow injection, currently survive up to 502 d, with no further treatment. Alterations in the timing and sequence of each procedure decrease the incidence of unresponsiveness. Survival and function of the kidney allografts were not affected by the rejection of successive skin grafts from the kidney donor. Skin grafts from other DLA-identical donors and DLA-incompatible skin grafts were rejected by the same recipients in uniform fashion.

  4. Control of collagen production in mouse chondrocytes by using a combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and small interfering RNA targeting Col1a1 for hydrogel-based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte-agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  5. Autologous tracheal replacement for cancer.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Dominique; Fadel, Elie; Mussot, Sacha; Kolb, Frederic; Leymarie, Nicolas; Mercier, Olaf; Le Chevalier, Thierry; Dartevelle, Philippe G

    2015-12-01

    Surgical research has failed during fifty years to find an ideal substitute for the trachea after extended resection. All the prostheses could erode the adjacent structures or lead to infection or obstructive issues. Innovation in surgery development has been improved using novel techniques of plastic surgery. During the last ten years, we have developed a technique using free fasciocutaneous flaps. This allows us to construct tubes for tracheal replacement. The most accurate flap used for this technique is the forearm free flap (FFF). Reinforcement of the flap with autologous strips of cartilage harvested from the last ribs offers sufficient resistance to respiratory pressure. This technique is also completely autologous without any stent in the tracheal lumen. From 2004 to 2015 we have already reconstructed the trachea of 16 patients for 12 primary tracheal neoplasms [including 9 adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and 3 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)], 3 secondary tracheal Neoplasms and one for benign lesion. This article describes the indications, determination of resectability, patient selection, subheading for surgery, postoperative management and results of this technique. PMID:26730758

  6. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  7. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  8. Vascular tissue engineering: towards the next generation vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Duncan, Daniel; Hibino, Narutoshi; Solomon, Daniel; Cleary, Muriel; Rathore, Animesh; Fein, Corey; Church, Spencer; Breuer, Christopher

    2011-04-30

    The application of tissue engineering technology to cardiovascular surgery holds great promise for improving outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Currently used synthetic vascular grafts have several limitations including thrombogenicity, increased risk of infection, and lack of growth potential. We have completed the first clinical trial evaluating the feasibility of using tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVG) created by seeding autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) onto biodegradable tubular scaffolds. Despite an excellent safety profile, data from the clinical trial suggest that the primary graft related complication of the TEVG is stenosis, affecting approximately 16% of grafts within the first seven years after implantation. Continued investigation into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying vascular neotissue formation will improve our basic understanding and provide insights that will enable the rationale design of second generation TEVG. PMID:21421015

  9. [Biomaterials and technologies for vascular grafts: from bench to bedside].

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Vaghetti, Marco; Soldani, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease and related revascularization procedures are increasing, due to the aging population and growing incidence of diabetes mellitus. Up to now, autologous saphenous vein is the conduit of choice for peripheral by-pass. Synthetic vascular graft in polyethylene terephthalate (Dacron®) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) are used if vein access cannot be obtained. These synthetic grafts are successfully used to replace large diameter vessels, but they fail in small diameters (<6 mm) such as for infragenicular by-pass. Reasons for failure are early thrombosis and late intimal hyperplasia. Novel small-diameter vascular grafts with an acceptable clinical outcome are therefore needed. Here, the main materials and technologies for the manufacturing of vascular grafts and the pathway from bench to bedside are discussed .

  10. Effect of thiram on avian growth plate chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Rasaputra, Komal Singh; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O; Slavik, Michael F; Rath, Narayan C

    2013-02-01

    Thiram is a dithiocarbamate pesticide that causes tibial dyschondroplasia (TD), a growth plate defect, in poultry. Deaths of transitional zone chondrocytes appear to interrupt endochondral bone development leading to the broadening of growth plate. The mechanism of action of thiram on chondrocytes is not well understood. Since proteins play major roles in different aspects of cell's metabolism, growth, and survival, the objective of this study was to find whether thiram produces proteomic changes that could impair the development of chondrocytes. The chondrocytes, isolated from proximal tibial growth plates, were cultured with or without a sub-lethal concentration of thiram for 48 hr, and the cell proteins were extracted, and subjected to 2-D gel electrophoresis. The gel images were compared and statistically evaluated using Melanie software to identify differentially expressed protein spots. Of a total of 72 identifiable spots 3 were down-regulated and 2 up-regulated in thiram treated chondrocytes. In-gel trypsin digestion of the protein spots followed by their characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of- flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry identified 25 spots comprising of 23 proteins. Two of 3 down-regulated proteins were identified as a heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and a GALE (UDP-galactose-4 epimerase) protein isoform I. The up-regulated proteins were Serpin H1, a protein involved in collagen metabolism and a redox sensor NmrA-like (NMRAL) family domain protein-1. Both GALE and NMRAL proteins are implicated in energy metabolism and redox regulation whereas the HSP 70 protects cells against stress, and implicated in chondrocyte hypertrophy, an important event in endochondral bone formation. The failure of chondrocyte protective mechanisms such as associated with protection against cellular stress and energy metabolism appear to be the likely cause for chondrocyte death induced by thiram.

  11. Linoleate impairs collagen synthesis in primary cultures of avian chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B A; Xu, H; Turek, J J

    1996-06-01

    The effects of supplemental fatty acids, vitamin E (VIT E), and iron-induced oxidative stress on collagen synthesis, cellular injury, and lipid peroxidation were evaluated in primary cultures of avian epiphyseal chondrocytes. The treatments included oleic and linoleic acids (O or 50 microM) complexed with BSA and dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (VIT E at 0 or 100 microM). After 14 days of preculture, the chondrocytes were enriched with fatty acids for 8 days then cultured with VIT E for 2 days. The chondrocytes were then treated with ferrous sulfate (O or 20 microM) for 24 hr to induce oxidative stress. Collagen synthesis was the lowest and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the highest in chondrocyte cultures treated with 50 microM linoleic acid and 0 VIT E. In contrast, VIT E supplemented at 100 microM partially restored collagen synthesis in the chondrocytes enriched with linoleic acid and lowered LDH activity in the media. The iron oxidative inducer significantly increased the values of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in the culture medium. The data showed that linoleic acid impaired chondrocyte cell function and caused cellular injury but that VIT E reversed these effects. Results from a previous study demonstrated that VIT E stimulated bone formation in chicks fed unsaturated fat, and the present findings in cultures of epiphyseal chondrocytes suggest that VIT E is important for chondrocyte function in the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids. VIT E appears to be beneficial for growth cartilage biology and in optimizing bone growth.

  12. Telomerase Activity in Articular Chondrocytes Is Lost after Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brooke; Novakofski, Kira D.; Donocoff, Rachel Sacher; Liang, Yan-Xiang Amber

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Telomere length and telomerase activity are important indicators of cellular senescence and replicative ability. Loss of telomerase is associated with ageing and the development of osteoarthritis. Implantation of telomerase-positive cells, chondrocytes, or stem cells expressing a normal chondrocyte phenotype is desired for cartilage repair procedures. The objective of this study was to identify at what age chondrocytes and at what passage bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become senescent based on telomerase activity. The effect of osteogenic protein–1 (OP-1) or interleukin-1α (IL-1α) treatment on telomerase activity in chondrocytes was also measured to determine the response to anabolic or catabolic stimuli. Methods: Articular cartilage was collected from horses (n = 12) aged 1 month to 18 years. Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses (<15 months) were treated with OP-1 or IL-1α. Bone marrow aspirate from adult horses was collected and cultured for up to 10 days to isolate MSCs. Telomerase activity was measured using the TeloTAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISA kit. Results: Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses were positive for telomerase activity. Treatment with IL-1α resulted in a decrease in chondrocyte telomerase activity; however, treatment with OP-1 did not change telomerase activity. One MSC culture sample was positive for telomerase activity on day 2; all samples were negative for telomerase activity on day 10. Conclusions: These results suggest that chondrocytes from prepubescent donors are potentially more suitable for cartilage repair procedures and that telomerase activity is diminished by anabolic and catabolic cytokine stimulation. If MSCs are utilized in cartilage repair, minimal passaging should be performed prior to implantation. PMID:26069700

  13. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asmar, A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Werner, A; Kelly, R; Stacey, M

    2016-04-01

    Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca(2+) activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  14. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  15. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  16. Effect of autophagy induced by dexamethasone on senescence in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Enxing; Zhang, Yu; Song, Bing; Xiao, Jun; Shi, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of dexamethasone (DXM) on autophagy and senescence in chondrocytes. Collagen II and aggrecan were examined in normal chondrocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats. Following stimulation with DXM, LysoTracker Red staining, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, green fluorescent protein-red fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (LC3) and western blotting were used to detect autophagy levels in the chondrocytes. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway-associated molecules were investigated by western blotting. Cell senescence was analyzed by senescence-associated (SA)-β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining. A dose-dependent increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was observed in the DXM-treated chondrocytes, as demonstrated by LysoTracker Red and MDC staining. A dose-dependent increase in autophagosome formation was observed in the DXM-treated chondrocytes. Expression of LC3-II and beclin-1 was increased by DXM, in particular in the cells treated with DXM for 4 days. However, P62 expression was reduced as a result of treatment. SA-β-gal staining indicated that DXM increased cell senescence. Notably, DXM-induced cell senescence was exacerbated by the autophagic inhibitor 3-MA. Autophagy induced by DXM protected chondrocytes from senescence, and it is suggested that the mTOR pathway may be involved in the activation of DXM-induced autophagy. PMID:27572674

  17. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J. . E-mail: immuno@ua.ac.be; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY{sup 581/591} was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. ATF3 deficiency in chondrocytes alleviates osteoarthritis development.

    PubMed

    Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Inoue, Makoto; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Muneta, Takeshi; Takeda, Shu; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Yuki; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancer and inflammation, as well as in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the involvement of Atf3 in developmental skeletogenesis and joint disease has not been well studied to date. Here, we show that Atf3 is a critical mediator of osteoarthritis (OA) development through its expression in chondrocytes. ATF3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the OA cartilage of both mice and humans. Conditional deletion of Atf3 in chondrocytes did not result in skeletal abnormalities or affect the chondrogenesis, but alleviated the development of OA generated by surgically inducing knee joint instability in mice. Inflammatory cytokines significantly up-regulated Atf3 expression through the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway, while cytokine-induced interleukin-6 (Il6) expression was repressed, in ATF3-deleted murine and human chondrocytes. Mechanistically, Atf3 deficiency decreased cytokine-induced Il6 transcription in chondrocytes through repressing NF-kB signalling by the attenuation of the phosphorylation status of IkB and p65. These findings suggest that Atf3 is implicated in the pathogenesis of OA through modulation of inflammatory cytokine expression in chondrocytes, and the feed-forward loop of inflammatory cytokines/NF-kB/Atf3 in chondrocytes may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment for OA. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  20. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  1. Histomorphometric Evaluation of Superovulation Effect on Follicular Development after Autologous Ovarian Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Raayat Jahromi, Alireza; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Ayaseh, Mohammad; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Moghiminasr, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The effect of superovulation by pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) on autologous transplanted ovaries in the lumbar muscles of mice was histomorphometrically evaluated using the indices of number and volume of different kind of follicles and volume of corpora lutea, ovary, and stroma. Angiogenesis was observed after mouse ovarian transplantation on days 14 and 21 after ovarian grafting. After transplantation, the total number and volume of primary and secondary follicles reduced, while PMSG superovulation increased the total number and total volume of tertiary follicles and also the ovarian volume after transplantation. Transplantation increased the average size of primary, secondary, and tertiary follicles. Therefore, primary and secondary follicles can survive after autologous transplantation but their reservations diminished by increasing the time of transplantation. However, number of tertiary follicles and their response to superovulation increased over time after transplantation. PMID:26693385

  2. PTHrP and Indian hedgehog control differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Chung, Ung-Il; Schipani, Ernestina; Starbuck, Michael; Karsenty, Gerard; Katagiri, Takenobu; Goad, Dale L; Lanske, Beate; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2002-06-01

    In developing murine growth plates, chondrocytes near the articular surface (periarticular chondrocytes) proliferate, differentiate into flat column-forming proliferating cells (columnar chondrocytes), stop dividing and finally differentiate into hypertrophic cells. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which is predominantly expressed in prehypertrophic cells, stimulates expression of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) which negatively regulates terminal chondrocyte differentiation through the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR). However, the roles of PTHrP and Ihh in regulating earlier steps in chondrocyte differentiation are unclear. We present novel mouse models with PPR abnormalities that help clarify these roles. In mice with chondrocyte-specific PPR ablation and mice with reduced PPR expression, chondrocyte differentiation was accelerated not only at the terminal step but also at an earlier step: periarticular to columnar differentiation. In these models, upregulation of Ihh action in the periarticular region was also observed. In the third model in which the PPR was disrupted in about 30% of columnar chondrocytes, Ihh action in the periarticular chondrocytes was upregulated because of ectopically differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes that had lost PPR. Acceleration of periarticular to columnar differentiation was also noted in this mouse, while most of periarticular chondrocytes retained PPR signaling. These data suggest that Ihh positively controls differentiation of periarticular chondrocytes independently of PTHrP. Thus, chondrocyte differentiation is controlled at multiple steps by PTHrP and Ihh through the mutual regulation of their activities. PMID:12050144

  3. Treatment of mandibular class II furcation defects by the use of amelogenins and autologous bone. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Aimetti, M; Pigella, E; Romano, F; Debernardi, C

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the association of amelogenins and autologous bone graft in the management of mandibular class II furcation defects. This randomized case-controlled study was conducted on 2 patients who presented 2 contralateral mandibular buccal class II furcation lesions. One defect was treated by amelogenins and autologous bone graft (test site) and the other one by open flap debridement (control site). At baseline and at 12 months postoperatively, the full-mouth plaque score (FMPS) and the full-mouth bleeding score (FMBS), the probing depth (PD), the clinical attachment level (CAL) and the recession (REC) were recorded and a periapical radiograph of the selected area was taken. In addition, at 12 months a surgical re-entry was performed. Test sites had a greater horizontal PD reduction and radiographic bone filling compared to control sites. None of the treated sites achieved complete furcation closure. At the time of re-entry, furcations treated by amelogenins were partially filled by newly formed not soundable hard tissue, while furcations treated by conventional flap surgery were filled by epithelial and connective tissue. These findings suggest that the treatment of mandibular class II furcations by amelogenins and autologous bone graft may result in a significant clinical improvement. Further long-term studies conducted on a larger sample size are therefore needed to confirm our results. PMID:16224378

  4. Control of Collagen Production in Mouse Chondrocytes by Using a Combination of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Small Interfering RNA Targeting Col1a1 for Hydrogel-Based Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte–agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  5. Aging-related differences in chondrocyte viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Steklov, Nikolai; Srivastava, Ajay; Sung, K L P; Chen, Peter C; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2009-06-01

    The biomechanical properties of articular cartilage change profoundly with aging. These changes have been linked with increased potential for cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, less is known about the change in biomechanical properties of chondrocytes with increasing age. Cell stiffness can affect mechanotransduction pathways and may alter cell function. We measured aging-related changes in the biomechanical properties of chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from knee articular cartilage within 48 hours after death or from osteochondral specimens obtained from knee arthroplasty. Cells were divided into two age groups: between 18 and 35 years (18 - 35); and greater than 55 years (55+) of age. The 55+ group was further subdivided based on visual grade of osteoarthritis: normal (N) or osteoarthritic (OA). The viscoelastic properties of the cell were measured using the previously described micropipette cell aspiration technique. The equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, and apparent viscosity were significantly higher in the 55+ year age group than in the 18 - 35 age group. On the other hand, no differences were found in the equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, or apparent viscosity between the N and OA groups. The increase in cell stiffness can be attributed to altered mechanical properties of the cell membrane, the cytoplasm, or the cytoskeleton. Increased stiffness has been reported in osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which in turn has been attributed to the actin cytoskeleton. A similar mechanism may be responsible for our finding of increased stiffness in aging chondrocytes. With advancing age, changes in the biomechanical properties of the cell could alter molecular and biochemical responses.

  6. ECM stiffness primes the TGFβ pathway to promote chondrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Cooke, Margaret E.; Alliston, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Cells encounter physical cues such as extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in a microenvironment replete with biochemical cues. However, the mechanisms by which cells integrate physical and biochemical cues to guide cellular decision making are not well defined. Here we investigate mechanisms by which chondrocytes generate an integrated response to ECM stiffness and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), a potent agonist of chondrocyte differentiation. Primary murine chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells grown on 0.5-MPa substrates deposit more proteoglycan and express more Sox9, Col2α1, and aggrecan mRNA relative to cells exposed to substrates of any other stiffness. The chondroinductive effect of this discrete stiffness, which falls within the range reported for articular cartilage, requires the stiffness-sensitive induction of TGFβ1. Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activity are specifically increased in cells grown on 0.5-MPa substrates. ECM stiffness also primes cells for a synergistic response, such that the combination of ECM stiffness and exogenous TGFβ induces chondrocyte gene expression more robustly than either cue alone through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–dependent mechanism. In this way, the ECM stiffness primes the TGFβ pathway to efficiently promote chondrocyte differentiation. This work reveals novel mechanisms by which cells integrate physical and biochemical cues to exert a coordinated response to their unique cellular microenvironment. PMID:22833566

  7. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  8. Identification of Chondrocyte-Binding Peptides by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S.F.; Lui, Julian C.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    As an initial step toward targeting cartilage tissue for potential therapeutic applications, we sought cartilage-binding peptides using phage display, a powerful technology for selection of peptides that bind to molecules of interest. A library of phage displaying random 12-amino acid peptides was iteratively incubated with cultured chondrocytes to select phage that bind cartilage. The resulting phage clones demonstrated increased affinity to chondrocytes by ELISA, when compared to a wild-type, insertless phage. Furthermore, the selected phage showed little preferential binding to other cell types, including primary skin fibroblast, myocyte and hepatocyte cultures, suggesting a tissue-specific interaction. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the selected phage bound chondrocytes themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. FITC-tagged peptides were synthesized based on the sequence of cartilage-binding phage clones. These peptides, but not a random peptide, bound cultured chondrocytes, and extracelluar matrix. In conclusion, using phage display, we identified peptide sequences that specifically target chondrocytes. We anticipate that such peptides may be coupled to therapeutic molecules to provide targeted treatment for cartilage disorders. PMID:23440926

  9. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  10. Autologous Bone-Marrow-Derived-Mononuclear-Cells-Enriched Fat Transplantation in Breast Augmentation: Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes and Aesthetic Results in a 30-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Vrabic, Erik; Hodzic, Enes

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer (lipofilling) is becoming an invaluable tool for breast augmentation as well as for breast reconstruction. Autologous lipofilling has several advantages, including biocompatibility, versatility, natural appearance, and low donor site morbidity. The main limitation is unpredictable fat graft resorption, which ranges from 25% to 80%, probably as a result of ischaemia and lack of neoangiogenesis. To obviate these disadvantages, several studies have searched for new ways of increasing the viability of the transplanted fat tissue. One promising approach is to enrich the fat graft with autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) before transplantation. BMMNCs produce many angiogenic and antiapoptotic growth factors, and their secretion is significantly enhanced by hypoxia. All of these mechanisms of actions could be beneficial for the stimulation of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues by BMMNCs administration. In our aesthetic surgery practice, we use fat transplantation enriched with BMMNCs, which caused a significant improvement in survival of fat grafts, compared with that of traditional lipofilling. Our experience with freshly isolated autologous fat enriched with BMMNCs for breast augmentation procedures is presented. The concept of this surgical and tissue handling technique is based on ability of BMMNCs to stimulate blood vessel growth. PMID:24024064

  11. Morphologic stages of the terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte of growth plate cartilage.

    PubMed

    Farnum, C E; Wilsman, N J

    1987-11-01

    Recent biochemical and morphologic evidence supports the concept that hypertrophic chondrocytes of growth plate cartilage are fully viable cells that play a major functional role in controlling endochondral ossification. However, events associated with chondrocyte death remain unknown. In this study we assess the viability of terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes in situ in an organ culture system viewed simultaneously with rectified Nomarski interference contrast optics and with vital staining under fluorescence optics. Second, we use two methods of optimal chemical fixation at the ultrastructural level to define morphologically distinct stages of the terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte, which we interpret as the stages preceding chondrocyte death. An analysis of serial sections at the light microscope level showed that terminal chondrocytes were found, with different probabilities, in three morphologically distinguishable stages. Seventy-five percent of all profiles were fully hydrated cells with an intact plasma membrane making direct contact with the pericellular matrix, a morphology identical to that of living terminal chondrocytes viewed in Nomarski optics. Approximately 1% of terminal chondrocytes, while still in a fully hydrated state, consistently made a direct asymmetrical contact of the plasma membrane with the last transverse septum. In 24% of the profiles, terminal chondrocytes were found as condensed cells that retained their attachment to the last transverse septum. The stages were not characteristic of chondrocytes positioned more proximally in the growth plate. We hypothesize that a condensed morphology eventually characterizes each hypertrophic chondrocyte, and we relate these observations to current hypotheses concerning the mechanism of death of hypertrophic chondrocytes. PMID:3425941

  12. In vivo application of poly-3-hydroxyoctanoate as peripheral nerve graft

    PubMed Central

    Hazer, D. Burcu; Bal, Ercan; Nurlu, Gülay; Benli, Kemal; Balci, Serdar; Öztürk, Feral; Hazer, Baki

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the degree of biocompatibility and neuroregeneration of a polymer tube, poly-3-hydroxyoctanoate (PHO) in nerve gap repair. Methods: Forty Wistar Albino male rats were randomized into two groups: autologous nerve gap repair group and PHO tube repair group. In each group, a 10-mm right sciatic nerve defect was created and reconstructed accordingly. Neuroregeneration was studied by sciatic function index (SFI), electromyography, and immunohistochemical studies on Days 7, 21, 45 and 60 of implantation. Biocompatibility was analyzed by the capsule formation around the conduit. Biodegradation was analyzed by the molecular weight loss in vivo. Results: Electrophysiological and histomorphometric assessments demonstrated neuroregeneration in both groups over time. In the experimental group, a straight alignment of the Schwann cells parallel to the axons was detected. However, autologous nerve graft seems to have a superior neuroregeneration compared to PHO grafts. Minor biodegradation was observed in PHO conduit at the end of 60 d. Conclusions: Although neuroregeneration is detected in PHO grafts with minor degradation in 60 d, autologous nerve graft is found to be superior in axonal regeneration compared to PHO nerve tube grafts. PHO conduits were found to create minor inflammatory reaction in vivo, resulting in good soft tissue response. PMID:24190445

  13. Treatment with mPEG-SPA improves the survival of corneal grafts in rats by immune camouflage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangyong; Li, Liangliang; Liu, Ying; Li, Chaoyang; Zhang, Min; Wang, Bowen; Huang, Zheqian; Gao, Xinbo; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the immune camouflage effects of methoxy polyethylene glycol succinimidyl propionate (mPEG-SPA) on corneal antigens and explored a novel approach for reducing corneal antigenicity, thereby decreasing corneal graft rejection. Importantly, this approach did not alter normal local immunity. Corneal grafts were treated with mPEG-SPA 5KD or 20KD (3% W/V), which could shield major histocompatibility antigen class I molecules (RT1-A) of corneal grafts. Skin grafts of Wistar rats were transplanted to SD rats. Then the splenic lymphocytes were isolated from SD rats. Subsequently, the lymphocytes were co-cultured with autologous corneal grafts or untreated corneal grafts and PEGylated grafts treated with mPEG-SPA 5KD or 20KD obtained from the counterpart skin donors, which were used as autologous control, allogeneic control, mPEG-SPA 5KD group and mPEG-SPA 20KD group, respectively. Lymphocyte proliferation was lower in mPEG-SPA 5KD group and mPEG-SPA 20KD group than in the allogeneic control. SD rats with corneal neovascularisation were used as recipients for high-risk corneal transplantation and were randomly divided into four groups: autologous control, allogeneic control, mPEG-SPA 5KD group and mPEG-SPA 20KD group. The recipients received corneal grafts from Wistar rats. Corneal graft survival was prolonged and graft rejection was reduced in the mPEG-SPA 5KD group and the mPEG-SPA 20KD group compared to the allogeneic control. Thus, we think that mPEG-SPA could immunologically camouflage corneal antigens to prolong corneal grafts survival in high-risk transplantation.

  14. FOXO transcription factors support oxidative stress resistance in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Saito, Masahiko; Caramés, Beatriz; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Lotz, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A major signaling pathway that regulates cellular aging is the Insulin/IGF-1/Pl3k/Akt/forkhead-box class O (FOXO) transcription factor axis. Previously, we observed that FOXO factors are dysregulated in aged and OA cartilage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of downregulated FOXOs on chondrocytes. Methods Small interference RNAs (siRNAs) for FOXO1 and FOXO3 were transfected into human articular chondrocytes. Cell viability following treatment with the oxidant tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) was measured by MTT assay. Caspase-3/7 activation and apoptotic cell were examined. Gene and protein expression of antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins and changes in inflammatory mediators following treatment with IL-1β were analyzed. Cells transfected with FOXO plasmids were also analyzed. Results Cell viability was significantly reduced by siFOXO under treatment with t-BHP. Apoptosis accompanied by caspase activation was significantly induced in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Knock-down of FOXO1 and FOXO1+3 resulted in significant reductions of GPX-1, catalase, LC3, Beclin1, and SIRT1 proteins following treatment with t-BHP. In contrast, constitutive active form of FOXO 3 increased cell viability while inducing GPX1, Beclin1, and LC3 in response to t-BHP. Expression and production of ADAMTS-4 and Chemerin were significantly increased in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Conclusions Reduced expression of FOXO transcription factors in chondrocytes increased susceptibility to cell death induced by oxidative stress. This was associated with reduced antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins. Our data provide evidence for a key role of FOXO transcription factors as regulators of chondrocyte oxidative stress resistance and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25186470

  15. Pericellular coat of chick embryo chondrocytes: structural role of hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Chondrocytes produce large pericellular coats in vitro that can be visualized by the exclusion of particles, e.g., fixed erythrocytes, and that are removed by treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, which is specific for hyaluronate. In this study, we examined the kinetics of formation of these coats and the relationship of hyaluronate and proteoglycan to coat structure. Chondrocytes were isolated from chick tibia cartilage by collagenase-trypsin digestion and were characterized by their morphology and by their synthesis of both type II collagen and high molecular weight proteoglycans. The degree of spreading of the chondrocytes and the size of the coats were quantitated at various times subsequent to seeding by tracing phase-contrast photomicrographs of the cultures. After seeding, the chondrocytes attached themselves to the tissue culture dish and exhibited coats within 4 h. The coats reached a maximum size after 3-4 d and subsequently decreased over the next 2-3 d. Subcultured chondrocytes produced a large coat only if passaged before 4 d. Both primary and first passage cells, with or without coats, produced type II collagen but not type I collagen as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase (1.0 mU/ml, 15 min), which completely removed the coat, released 58% of the chondroitin sulfate but only 9% of the proteins associated with the cell surface. The proteins released by hyaluronidase were not digestible by bacterial collagenase. Monensin and cycloheximide (0.01-10 microM, 48 h) caused a dose-dependent decrease in coat size that was linearly correlated to synthesis of cell surface hyaluronate (r = 0.98) but not chondroitin sulfate (r = 0.2). We conclude that the coat surrounding chondrocytes is dependent on hyaluronate for its structure and that hyaluronate retains a large proportion of the proteoglycan in the coat. PMID:6501414

  16. Chondrocytes Transdifferentiate into Osteoblasts in Endochondral Bone during Development, Postnatal Growth and Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  17. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  18. Comparison of a microsliced modified chondroperichondrium shield graft and a temporalis fascia graft in primary type I tympanoplasty: A prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shambhu Nath; Pal, Sudipta; Saha, Somnath; Gure, Prasanta Kumar; Roy, Anupam

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial to compare outcomes in type I tympanoplasty patients who received an autologous microsliced modified cartilage perichondrium shield graft (cartilage group) and those who received an autologous temporalis muscle fascia graft (fascia group). Our three outcomes measures were (1) anatomic success rates at 3 months, (2) hearing results at 6 months, and (3) rates of morphologic success (i.e., the absence of reperforation, retraction, and graft displacement) at 2 years among those in each group who had an intact graft at 3 months. Of 56 patients who were initially enrolled and who underwent one of these type I tympanoplasty procedures, 51 completed the study-28 in the cartilage group and 23 in the fascia group. The former was made up of 11 males and 17 females, aged 15 to 48 years (mean: 27.4), and the latter included 9 males and 14 females, aged 15 to 52 years (mean: 31.7). The overall graft take rate at 3 months with respect to perforation closure (anatomic success) was 93.3% in the cartilage group and 91.7% in the fascia group, which was not a statistically significant difference. The mean hearing gain at 6 months was 11.7 ± 7.6 dB in the cartilage group and 12.6 ± 6.0 dB in the fascia group-again, not statistically significant. At 2 years, morphologic success rates were 92.3 and 81.0%, respectively-again, not statistically significant. We conclude that autologous microsliced modified cartilage perichondrium shield graft tympanoplasty is as effective as conventional temporalis fascia tympanoplasty in terms of graft take rates and functional results. Indeed, medium-term outcomes (2-yr follow-up) revealed that sustainable morphologic success was actually better with the cartilage technique than with the fascia technique because it was associated with fewer revision surgeries. PMID:27434476

  19. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An electrostrictive graft elastomer has a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules. The polar graft moieties have been rotated by an applied electric field, e.g., into substantial polar alignment. The rotation is sustained until the electric field is removed. In another embodiment, a process for producing strain in an elastomer includes: (a) providing a graft elastomer having a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules; and (b) applying an electric field to the graft elastomer to rotate the polar graft moieties, e.g., into substantial polar alignment.

  20. In vitro chondrocyte behavior on porous biodegradable poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid scaffolds for articular chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V; Dertien, Janet S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid (PCL/PGA) scaffolds for repairing articular cartilage were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling along with compression molding and porogen leaching. Four distinct scaffolds were fabricated using this approach by four independent cryomilling times. These scaffolds were assessed for their suitability to promote articular cartilage regeneration with in vitro chondrocyte cell culture studies. The scaffolds were characterized for pore size, porosity, swelling ratio, compressive, and thermal properties. Cryomilling time proved to significantly affect the physical, mechanical, and morphological properties of the scaffolds. In vitro bovine chondrocyte culture was performed dynamically for 1, 7, 14, 28, and 35 days. Chondrocyte viability and adhesion were tested using MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy micrographs. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays were performed to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell proliferation, respectively. PCL/PGA scaffolds demonstrated high porosity for all scaffold types. Morphological analysis and poly(ethylene oxide) continuity demonstrated the existence of a co-continuous network of interconnected pores with pore sizes appropriate for tissue engineering and chondrocyte ingrowth. While mean pore size decreased, water uptake and compressive properties increased with increasing cryomilling times. Compressive modulus of 12, 30, and 60 min scaffolds matched the compressive modulus of human articular cartilage. Viable cells increased besides increase in cell proliferation and ECM formation with progress in culture period. Chondrocytes exhibited spherical morphology on all scaffold types. The pore size of the scaffold affected chondrocyte adhesion, proliferation, and GAG secretion. The results indicated that the 12 min scaffolds delivered promising results for applications in articular cartilage repair.

  1. Runx2 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy through its expression in the perichondrium

    PubMed Central

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Bialek, Peter; Chen, You-Tzung; Rached, Marie-Therese; Groner, Yoram; Behringer, Richard R.; Ornitz, David M.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The perichondrium, a structure made of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells surrounding growth plate cartilage, regulates chondrocyte maturation through poorly understood mechanisms. Analyses of loss- and gain-of-function models show that Twist-1, whose expression in cartilage is restricted to perichondrium, favors chondrocyte maturation in a Runx2-dependent manner. Runx2, in turn, enhances perichondrial expression of Fgf18, a regulator of chondrocyte maturation. Accordingly, compound heterozygous embryos for Runx2 and Fgf18 deletion display the same chondrocyte maturation phenotype as Fgf18-null embryos. This study identifies a transcriptional basis for the inhibition of chondrocyte maturation by perichondrium and reveals that Runx2 fulfills antagonistic functions during chondrogenesis. PMID:17050674

  2. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  3. Autologous cell therapy: will it replace dermal fillers?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert A

    2013-05-01

    This article discusses autologous cell therapy for wrinkles in the face. Autologous fibroblast therapy is compared with dermal fillers. Study outcomes of LaViv are detailed, including a summary of adverse events. The technique for injection of autologous cells is described in addition to the duration of effect of treatment.

  4. First jejunal artery, an alternative graft for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Komokata, Teruo; Kadono, Jun; Motodaka, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tetsuya; Furoi, Akira; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Common bile duct cancer invading right hepatic artery is sometimes diagnosed intraoperatively. Excision and safe reconstruction of the artery with suitable graft is essential. Arterial reconstruction with autologous saphenous vein graft is the preferred method practiced routinely. However the right hepatic artery reconstruction has also been carried out with several other vessels like gastroduodenal artery, right gastroepiploic artery or the splenic artery. We report a case of 63-year-old man presenting with history of progressive jaundice, pruritus and impaired appetite. Following various imaging modalities including computed tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, intraductal ultrasound extrahepatic bile duct cancer was diagnosed; however, none of those detected vessel invasion. Intraoperatively, right hepatic artery invasion was revealed. Right hepatic artery was resected and reconstructed with a graft harvested from the first jejunal artery (JA). Postoperative outcome was satisfactory with a long-term graft patency. First JA can be a reliable graft option for right hepatic artery reconstruction.

  5. Role of Adipose-derived Stem Cells in Fat Grafting and Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shaun S; Ng, Zhi Yang; Zhan, Weiqing; Rozen, Warren

    2016-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting is commonly utilised to reconstruct soft tissue defects caused by ageing, trauma, chronic wounds and cancer resection. The benefits of fat grafting are minimal donor site morbidity and ease of availability through liposuction or lipectomy. Nonetheless, survival and longevity of fat grafts remain poor post-engraftment. Various methods to enhance fat graft survival are currently under investigation and its stem cell constituents are of particular interest. Cell-assisted lipotransfer refers to the addition of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) rich component of stromal vascular fraction to lipoaspirate, the results of which have proven promising. This article aims to review the role of ASCs in fat grafting and reconstructive surgery. PMID:27761084

  6. The mechanical properties of infrainguinal vascular bypass grafts: their role in influencing patency.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Salacinski, H J; Hamilton, G; Seifalian, A M

    2006-06-01

    When autologous vein is unavailable, prosthetic graft materials, particularly expanded polytetrafluoroethylene are used for peripheral arterial revascularisation. Poor long term patency of prosthetic materials is due to distal anastomotic intimal hyperplasia. Intimal hyperplasia is directly linked to shear stress abnormalities at the vessel wall. Compliance and calibre mismatch between native vessel and graft, as well as anastomotic line stress concentration contribute towards unnatural wall shear stress. High porosity reduces graft compliance by causing fibrovascular infiltration, whereas low porosity discourages the development of an endothelial lining and hence effective antithrombogenicity. Therefore, consideration of mechanical properties is necessary in graft development. Current research into synthetic vascular grafts concentrates on simulating the mechanical properties of native arteries and tissue engineering aims to construct a new biological arterial conduit.

  7. Endothelial cell seeding of a 4-mm I.D. polyurethane vascular graft.

    PubMed

    Fields, Charles; Cassano, Anthony; Allen, Cynthia; Meyer, Andrew; Pawlowski, Kristin J; Bowlin, Gary L; Rittgers, Stanley E; Szycher, Michael

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the extent (luminal coverage) of the endothelial cell (EC) lining/neointimal development and the thromboresistance of electrostatically EC seeded small diameter ChronoFlex-polyurethane vascular grafts. The evaluation consisted of harvesting autologous, canine jugular vein ECs, electrostatically seeding the polyurethane grafts (4-mm I.D., length = 6 cm) with the harvested ECs, implanting the grafts in a canine femoral artery model for four to six weeks, and excising the grafts for histological and scanning electron microscopy evaluations. Results of the histological evaluation (mid-graft region only) indicated that electrostatic EC seeding led to neointimal development and to minimal to no thrombus formation within the EC seeded grafts. The unseeded control grafts resulted in no neointimal development and substantial thrombus formation on the graft luminal surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy examination demonstrated a mature, confluent endothelium with a "cobblestone" appearance on the EC seeded graft luminal surface after six weeks. We conclude that electrostatic EC seeding enhanced the development of a neointima and reduced the incidence of thrombosis in polyurethane grafts implanted in a canine femoral artery model. PMID:12222757

  8. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-06-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA.

  9. Lithium chloride modulates chondrocyte primary cilia and inhibits Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Clare L; Wiles, Anna; Poole, C Anthony; Knight, Martin M

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) exhibits significant therapeutic potential as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Hedgehog signaling is activated in osteoarthritis, where it promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Hedgehog signaling requires the primary cilium such that maintenance of this compartment is essential for pathway activity. Here we report that LiCl (50 mM) inhibits Hedgehog signaling in bovine articular chondrocytes such that the induction of GLI1 and PTCH1 expression is reduced ​ by 71 and 55%, respectively. Pathway inhibition is associated with a 97% increase in primary cilia length from 2.09 ± 0.7 μm in untreated cells to 4.06 ± 0.9 μm in LiCl-treated cells. We show that cilia elongation disrupts trafficking within the axoneme with a 38% reduction in Arl13b ciliary localization at the distal region of the cilium, consistent with the role of Arl13b in modulating Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we demonstrate similar increases in cilia length in human chondrocytes in vitro and after administration of dietary lithium to Wistar rats in vivo. Our data provide new insights into the effects of LiCl on chondrocyte primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling and shows for the first time that pharmaceutical targeting of the primary cilium may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499268

  10. Collagen and chondrocyte concentrations control ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, S; Liukkonen, J; Ylärinne, J H; Puhakka, P H; Lammi, M J; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed for diagnostics of osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries in vivo. However, the specific contribution of chondrocytes and collagen to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage has not been systematically studied. We investigated the role of these tissue structures by measuring ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds with varying collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Ultrasound catheters with center frequencies of 9 MHz (7.1-11.0 MHz, -6 dB) and 40 MHz (30.1-45.3 MHz, -6 dB) were applied using an intravascular ultrasound device. Ultrasound backscattering quantified in a region of interest starting right below sample surface differed significantly (p < 0.05) with the concentrations of collagen and chondrocytes. An ultrasound frequency of 40 MHz, as compared with 9 MHz, was more sensitive to variations in collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. The present findings may improve diagnostic interpretation of arthroscopic ultrasound imaging and provide information necessary for development of models describing ultrasound propagation within cartilage. PMID:24972499

  11. Induction and prevention of chondrocyte hypertrophy in culture

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Primary chondrocytes from whole chick embryo sterna can be maintained in suspension culture stabilized with agarose for extended periods of time. In the absence of FBS, the cells remain viable only when seeded at high densities. They do not proliferate at a high rate but they deposit extracellular matrix with fibrils resembling those of authentic embryonic cartilage in their appearance and collagen composition. The cells exhibit many morphological and biochemical characteristics of resting chondrocytes and they do not produce collagen X, a marker for hypertrophic cartilage undergoing endochondral ossification. At low density, cells survive in culture without FBS when the media are conditioned by chondrocytes grown at high density. Thus, resting cartilage cells in agarose cultures can produce factors required for their own viability. Addition of FBS to the culture media leads to profound changes in the phenotype of chondrocytes seeded at low density. Cells form colonies at a high rate and assume properties of hypertrophic cells, including the synthesis of collagen X. They extensively deposit extracellular matrix resembling more closely that of adult rather than embryonic cartilage. PMID:2808534

  12. Effect of thiram on avian growth plate chondrocytes in culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiram (tetramethyl thiuram disulfide) is a general use pesticide. It causes tibial dyschondroplasia, a cartilage defect in poultry leading to growth plate deformation and lameness. The mechanism of its action on chondrocytes is not understood. Since proteins play significant role in development an...

  13. [Molecular mechanisms of cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2004-07-01

    Cartilage plays multiple roles in vertebrate animals. In an embryonic stage and early postnatal life, cartilage is important not only as a structural support of early embryo but also as a template of endochondral bone. In a later postnatal life, cartilage provides smooth joint movement and tissue elasticity. A number of critical signaling molecules that regulate cartilage formation and chondrocytes maturation in endochondral bone formation have been identified to date. The interplay of those important molecules is also actively studied. However, several fundamental questions still remain unsolved. What signal initiates mesenchymal cell condensation? Does condensation enough to make cells competent for BMP-induced chondrogenesis? Is there chondrocyte stem cell in cartilage? Likewise, it is not known which factor triggers chondrocytes maturation. In this review article, we summarized the action of several key factors including BMP, hedgehog, PTHrP, and Wnt in condensation, chondrogenenic differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Towards further understanding of above fundamental questions, this review article also tried to propose future direction of cartilage biology research. PMID:15577071

  14. Quantitative evaluation of extraction socket healing following the use of autologous platelet-rich fibrin matrix in humans.

    PubMed

    Simon, Barry I; Gupta, Priyu; Tajbakhsh, Shereen

    2011-06-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM) is an autologous biologic material created by centrifugation of blood. This study quantified ridge changes associated with the healing of 21 extraction sites using PRFM alone as a graft. Standardized measurements of ridge width and height were recorded at extraction, after graft placement, and after 4 months of healing. Mean width resorption 3 and 5 mm apical to the crest was 0.32 mm (4.71% loss) and 0.57 mm (7.38% loss), respectively. Mean height resorption was 0.67 mm (7.13% loss). Sites grafted with PRFM alone displayed rapid clinical healing, minimal flap reopening, and excellent bone density. Advantages of PRFM alone include less surgical time, elimination of techniques and potential healing difficulties associated with membranes, and less resorption during healing, as compared to guided bone regeneration procedures.

  15. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Methods: Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×106/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may

  16. RAGE, receptor of advanced glycation endoproducts, negatively regulates chondrocytes differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Tatsuya; Fukui, Rino; Matsui, Mio; Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms.

  17. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  18. Juvenile Swine Surgical Alveolar Cleft Model to Test Novel Autologous Stem Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Montserrat; Morse, Justin C.; Halevi, Alexandra E.; Emodi, Omri; Pharaon, Michael R.; Wood, Jeyhan S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of craniofacial congenital bone defects has historically relied on autologous bone grafts. Engineered bone using mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord on electrospun nanomicrofiber scaffolds offers an alternative to current treatments. This preclinical study presents the development of a juvenile swine model with a surgically created maxillary cleft defect for future testing of tissue-engineered implants for bone generation. Five-week-old pigs (n=6) underwent surgically created maxillary (alveolar) defects to determine critical-sized defect and the quality of treatment outcomes with rib, iliac crest cancellous bone, and tissue-engineered scaffolds. Pigs were sacrificed at 1 month. Computed tomography scans were obtained at days 0 and 30, at the time of euthanasia. Histological evaluation was performed on newly formed bone within the surgical defect. A 1 cm surgically created defect healed with no treatment, the 2 cm defect did not heal. A subsequently created 1.7 cm defect, physiologically similar to a congenitally occurring alveolar cleft in humans, from the central incisor to the canine, similarly did not heal. Rib graft treatment did not incorporate into adjacent normal bone; cancellous bone and the tissue-engineered graft healed the critical-sized defect. This work establishes a juvenile swine alveolar cleft model with critical-sized defect approaching 1.7 cm. Both cancellous bone and tissue engineered graft generated bridging bone formation in the surgically created alveolar cleft defect. PMID:25837453

  19. Autologous preconditioned mesenchymal stem cell sheets improve left ventricular function in a rabbit old myocardial infarction model

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuya; Shirasawa, Bungo; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Kawamura, Daichi; Nakamura, Tamami; Samura, Makoto; Nishimoto, Arata; Ueno, Koji; Morikage, Noriyasu; Hosoyama, Tohru; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) constitute one of the most powerful tools for therapeutic angiogenesis in infarcted hearts. However, conventional MSC transplantation approaches result in insufficient therapeutic effects due to poor retention of graft cells in severe ischemic diseases. Cell sheet technology has been developed as a new method to prolong graft cell retention even in ischemic tissue. Recently, we demonstrated that hypoxic pretreatment enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cell sheet implantation in infarcted mouse hearts. In this study, we investigated whether hypoxic pretreatment activates the therapeutic functions of bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) sheets and improves cardiac function in rabbit infarcted hearts following autologous transplantation. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was increased in BM-MSC monolayer sheets and it peaked at 48 h under hypoxic culture conditions (2% O2). To examine in vivo effects, preconditioned autologous BM-MSC sheets were implanted into a rabbit old myocardial infarction model. Implantation of preconditioned BM-MSC sheets accelerated angiogenesis in the peri-infarcted area and decreased the infarcted area, leading to improvement of the left ventricular function of the infarcted heart. Importantly, the therapeutic efficacy of the preconditioned BM-MSC sheets was higher than that of standardly cultured sheets. Thus, implantation of autologous preconditioned BM-MSC sheets is a feasible approach for enhancing therapeutic angiogenesis in chronically infarcted hearts. PMID:27347329

  20. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  1. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  2. Initial experience with a composite autologous skin substitute.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, R L; Morgan, J R; Cusick, J L; Petras, L M; Lydon, M M; Tompkins, R G

    2001-08-01

    Patients with large burns are surviving in increasing numbers, but there remains no durable and reliable permanent skin replacement. After initial favorable small animal experiments, a pilot trial of a composite skin replacement was performed in patients with massive burns. A composite skin replacement (CSR) was developed by culturing autologous keratinocytes on acellular allogenic dermis. This material was engrafted in patients with massive burns and compared to a matched wound covered with split thickness autograft. With human studies committee approval, 12 wounds in 7 patients were grafted with CSR while a matched control wound was covered with split thickness autograft. These 7 children had an average age of 6.4+/-1.4 yr and burn size of 75.9+/-5.0% of the body surface. Nine wounds were acute burns and three were reconstructive releases. Successful vascularization at 14 days averaged 45.7+/-14.2% (range 0-100%) in the study wounds and 98+/-1% (range 90-100%) in the control sites (P<0.05). Reduced CSR take seemed to correlate with wound colonization. All children survived. While CSR did not engraft with the reliability of standard autograft, this pilot experience is encouraging in that successful wound closure with this material is possible, if not yet dependable. It is hoped that a more mature epidermal layer may facilitate engraftment, and trials to explore this possibility are in progress.

  3. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  4. Transplantatation of scaffold-free spheroids composed of synovium-derived cells and chondrocytes for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee.

    PubMed

    Lee, J I; Sato, M; Kim, H W; Mochida, J

    2011-11-09

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is the treatment of choice for osteoarthritis. However, to regenerate articular cartilage using this method, the procedure paradoxically demands that the cell source of the articular chondrocytes (ACs) for ex vivo expansion be from the patient's own healthy cartilage, which can result in donor site morbidity. Accordingly, it is essential to develop a substitute for AC. In the present study, we investigated whether synovium-derived cells (SYs) could be used as a partial replacement for ACs in ACI. ACs and SYs from the knees of rabbits were isolated and cultured, and the growth rates of the cells were compared. To manufacture the cellular transplants, we developed a high-density suspension-shaking culture method (HDSS), which circulates the cells in culture media, promoting self-assembly of scaffold-free cellular aggregates. ACs and SYs were mixed in various ratios using HDSS. Injectable cellular transplants were harvested and transplanted into full-thickness osteochondral defects. Simultaneously, histological evaluations were conducted with toluidine blue and safranin O, and immunohistochemistry of collagen type I and II was conducted. Gene expression to evaluate chondrocyte-specific differentiation was also performed. We successfully prepared a large quantity of spheroids (spheroidal cell aggregates) in a short time using mixed ACs and SYs, for all cellular composition ratios. Our data showed that the minimal therapeutic unit for the transplants contributed to in situ regeneration of cartilage. In summary, SYs can be used as a replacement for ACs in clinical cases of ACI in patients with broad areas of osteoarthritic lesions.

  5. Autologous fat and fillers in periocular rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Edward D; Bader, Bradford; Smith, Stephen P

    2010-08-01

    Facial volume loss is an important component of facial aging, especially in the periocular region. The authors evaluate the normal and aging anatomy of the periocular region and then discuss volume restoration of this region using hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and autologous fat transfer. Preoperative assessment, operative technique, postoperative care, and complications are addressed.

  6. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  7. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  8. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  9. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  10. A Biphasic Multiscale Study of the Mechanical Microenvironment of Chondrocytes within Articular Cartilage under Unconfined Compression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Computational analyses have been used to study the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocyte that cannot be assessed by in vitro experimental studies; yet all computational studies thus far have focused on the effect of zonal location (superficial, middle, and deep) on the mechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes. The aim of this paper was to study the effect of both zonal and radial locations on the biomechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes in inhomogeneous cartilage under unconfined stress relaxation. A biphasic multiscale approach was employed and nine chondrocytes in different locations were studied. Hyperelastic biphasic theory and depth-dependent aggregate modulus and permeability of articular cartilage were included in the models. It was found that both zonal and radial locations affected the biomechanical stresses and strains of the chondrocytes. Chondrocytes in the mid-radial location had increased volume during the early stage of the loading process. Maximum principal shear stress at the interface between the chondrocyte and the extracellular matrix (ECM) increased with depth, yet that at the ECM-pericellular matrix (PCM) interface had an inverse trend. Fluid pressure decreased with depth, while the fluid pressure difference between the top and bottom boundaries of the microscale model increased with depth. Regardless of location, fluid was exchanged between the chondrocyte, PCM, and ECM. These findings suggested that even under simple compressive loading conditions, the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes, PCM and ECM were spatially dependent. The current study provides new insight on chondrocyte biomechanics. PMID:24882738

  11. Hand rejuvenation with structural fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R

    2002-12-01

    A simple, reliable technique of autologous fat grafting for long-lasting rejuvenation of the dorsum of the hand is presented. With this technique, small intact parcels of fatty tissue are harvested with a syringe and a blunt 3-mm cannula. Then, most of the nonviable components are removed from the harvested subcutaneous material by centrifugation, decanting, and wicking. Finally, a 17-gauge blunt cannula places the fat in minuscule parcels of tissue with many passes through five or six tiny incisions in the hand. Separation of the tiny parcels of fat maximizes contact between the surfaces of the transplanted fat and surrounding recipient tissues to encourage integration, anchoring, and long-term survival. Structured, purposeful placement of a thin layer of transplanted fat rejuvenates the dorsal hand by restoring a slight fullness to atrophic subcutaneous tissue, by softening the color and definition of exposed extensor tendons and dorsal hand veins, and by supporting the aging skin.

  12. Indium 111-labeled platelet deposition in woven and knitted Dacron bifurcated aortic grafts with the same patient as a clinical model

    SciTech Connect

    Robicsek, F.; Duncan, G.D.; Anderson, C.E.; Daugherty, H.K.; Cook, J.W.; Selle, J.G.; Hess, P.J.; Easton, E.J.; Burtoft, J.N.

    1987-06-01

    A study was designed to compare platelet deposition between knitted and woven Dacron grafts in the same patient. Twenty patients received aortoiliac or aortofemoral bifurcated Dacron grafts, each composed of one woven and one double-velour knitted limb. External nuclear graft imaging was carried out after injection of autologous platelets labeled with indium 111. The patients were studied postoperatively in time periods ranging from 6 days to 42 months. Platelet accumulation was almost identical in knitted and woven limbs in all patients. This study appears to indicate that there is no difference in thrombogenicity between knitted and woven bifurcated Dacron grafts in the aortoiliac or aortofemoral positions measured by platelet accumulation.

  13. Hydroxyapatite crystals as a bone graft substitute in benign lytic lesions of bone

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Praganesh; Keshav, Kumar; Singh, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone grafts are required to fill a cavity created after curettage of benign lytic lesions of the bone. To avoid the problems associated at donor site with autologous bone graft, we require allograft or bone graft substitutes. We evaluated the healing of lytic lesions after hydroxyapatite (HA) grafting by serial radiographs. Materials and Methods: Forty cases of benign lytic lesions of bone were managed by simple curettage and grafting using HA blocks. Commercially available HA of bovine origin (Surgiwear Ltd., Shahjahanpur, India) was used for this purpose. Mean duration of followup was 34.8 months (range 12–84 months). Mean patient age was 19.05 years (range 3–55 years). Radiological staging of graft incorporation was done as per criteria of Irwin et al. 2001. Results: In our series, two cases were in stage I. A total of 11 cases were in stage II and 27 were in stage III. Graft incorporation was radiologically complete by 15 months. Clinical recovery was observed before radiological healing. The average time taken to return to preoperative function was 3 months. Recurrence was observed in giant cell tumor (n = 3) and chondromyxoid fibroma (n = 1). There was no incidence of graft rejection, collapse, growth plate disturbances or antigenic response. Conclusions: We conclude that calcium HA is biologically acceptable bone graft substitute in the management of benign lytic lesions of bone. PMID:26806973

  14. Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation with tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts and demineralized freeze-dried bone

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aashish; Kalra, Rinku; Chhadva, Shruti; Shetye, Angad

    2015-01-01

    The pneumatization of the maxillary sinus often results in a lack of sufficient alveolar bone for implant placement. In the last decades, maxillary sinus lift has become a very popular procedure with predictable results. Sinus floor augmentation procedures are generally carried out using autologous bone grafts, bone substitutes, or composites of bone and bone substitutes. However, the inherent limitations associated with each of these, have directed the attention of investigators to new technologies like bone tissue engineering. Bone marrow stromal cells have been regarded as multi-potent cells residing in bone marrow. These cells can be harvested from a person, multiplied outside his body using bioengineering principles and technologies and later introduced into a tissue defect. We present a case where tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts were used along with demineralized freeze-dried bone for sinus floor augmentation. PMID:26097364

  15. Hyaluronic acid enhancement of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene for small diameter vascular grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicole R.

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States and other developed countries. In the United States alone, 8 million people are diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease per year and over 250,000 patients have coronary bypass surgery each year. Autologous blood vessels are the standard graft used in small diameter (<6mm) arterial bypass procedures. Synthetic small diameter grafts have had limited success. While polyethylene (Dacron) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) are the most commonly used small diameter synthetic vascular graft materials, there are significant limitations that make these materials unfavorable for use in the low blood flow conditions of the small diameter arteries. Specifically, Dacron and ePTFE grafts display failure due to early thrombosis or late intimal hyperplasia. With the shortage of tissue donors and the limited supply of autologous blood vessels available, there is a need for a small diameter synthetic vascular graft alternative. The aim of this research is to create and characterize ePTFE grafts prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA), evaluate thrombogenic potential of ePTFE-HA grafts, and evaluate graft mechanical properties and coating durability. The results in this work indicate the successful production of ePTFE-HA materials using a solvent infiltration technique. Surface interactions with blood show increased platelet adhesion on HA-modified surfaces, though evidence may suggest less platelet activation and erythrocyte lysis. Significant changes in mechanical properties of HA-modified ePTFE materials were observed. Further investigation into solvent selection, uniformity of HA, endothelialization, and dynamic flow testing would be beneficial in the evaluation of these materials for use in small diameter vascular graft bypass procedures.

  16. Reduced platelet deposition on seeded versus unseeded segments of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafts: Clinical observations after a 6-month follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Ortenwall, P.; Wadenvik, H.; Risberg, B. )

    1989-10-01

    The concept of autologous endothelial cell seeding has proved successful in animal models with respect to decrease of graft thrombogenicity and increase in patency. In the present study, application of this method in humans was explored. In 23 patients, random halves of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, used for lower limb arterial reconstructions, were seeded with endothelial cells at a seeding density of 3500 cells/cm{sup 2}. These cells were derived from the saphenous vein by enzymatic harvesting. The other half was sham seeded with culture medium. Graft thrombogenicity was estimated by measuring platelet deposition on graft surface 1 and 6 months after surgery, with indium 111-labeled platelets and external gamma-camera imaging. Seeded graft segments accumulated significantly (p less than 0.03) fewer platelets at all imaging times. It is concluded that seeding of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular grafts in humans reduces graft surface thrombogenicity. The clinical implications of this remain to be demonstrated.

  17. Yap1 Regulates Multiple Steps of Chondrocyte Differentiation during Skeletal Development and Bone Repair.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yujie; Wu, Ailing; Li, Pikshan; Li, Gang; Qin, Ling; Song, Hai; Mak, Kinglun Kingston

    2016-03-01

    Hippo signaling controls organ size and tissue regeneration in many organs, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation and bone repair remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Yap1, an effector of Hippo pathway inhibits skeletal development, postnatal growth, and bone repair. We show that Yap1 regulates chondrocyte differentiation at multiple steps in which it promotes early chondrocyte proliferation but inhibits subsequent chondrocyte maturation both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that Yap1 requires Teads binding for direct regulation of Sox6 expression to promote chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast, Yap1 inhibits chondrocyte maturation by suppression of Col10a1 expression through interaction with Runx2. In addition, Yap1 also governs the initiation of fracture repair by inhibition of cartilaginous callus tissue formation. Taken together, our work provides insights into the mechanism by which Yap1 regulates endochondral ossification, which may help the development of therapeutic treatment for bone regeneration.

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation aids autoimmune patients by functional renewal and TCR diversification of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Delemarre, Eveline M; van den Broek, Theo; Mijnheer, Gerdien; Meerding, Jenny; Wehrens, Ellen J; Olek, Sven; Boes, Marianne; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Broere, Femke; van Royen, Annet; Wulffraat, Nico M; Prakken, Berent J; Spierings, Eric; van Wijk, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly considered for patients with severe autoimmune diseases whose prognosis is poor with standard treatments. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to be important for disease remission after HSCT. However, eliciting the role of donor and host Tregs in autologous HSCT is not possible in humans due to the autologous nature of the intervention. Therefore, we investigated their role during immune reconstitution and re-establishment of immune tolerance and their therapeutic potential following congenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in a proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PGIA) mouse model. In addition, we determined Treg T-cell receptor (TCR) CDR3 diversity before and after HSCT in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis. In the PGIA BMT model, after an initial predominance of host Tregs, graft-derived Tregs started dominating and displayed a more stable phenotype with better suppressive capacity. Patient samples revealed a striking lack of diversity of the Treg repertoire before HSCT. This ameliorated after HSCT, confirming reset of the Treg compartment following HSCT. In the mouse model, a therapeutic approach was initiated by infusing extra Foxp3(GFP+) Tregs during BMT. Infusion of Foxp3(GFP+) Tregs did not elicit additional clinical improvement but conversely delayed reconstitution of the graft-derived T-cell compartment. These data indicate that HSCT-mediated amelioration of autoimmune disease involves renewal of the Treg pool. In addition, infusion of extra Tregs during BMT results in a delayed reconstitution of T-cell compartments. Therefore, Treg therapy may hamper development of long-term tolerance and should be approached with caution in the clinical autologous setting. PMID:26480932

  19. Clinical results of autologous bone augmentation harvested from the mandibular ramus prior to implant placement. An analysis of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Andreas; Ioannis, Konstantinidis; Winter, Karsten; Schramm, Alexander; Wilde, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was the evaluation of the clinical success and complication rates associated with autologous bone grafts harvested from the mandibular ramus for alveolar ridge augmentation and the identification of possible risk factors for graft failure. Methods: In a consecutive retrospective study 86 patients could be included. In these patients a total of 104 bone grafts from the mandibular ramus were harvested for alveolar ridge augmentation. Medical history, age of patient, smoking status, periodontal status and complications were recorded. The need for bone grafting was defined by the impossibility of installing dental implants of adequate length or diameter to fulfill prosthetic requirements, or for aesthetic reasons. The surgical outcome was evaluated concerning complications at the donor or at the recipient site, risk factors associated with the complications and graft survival. All patients were treated using a two-stage technique. In the first operation bone blocks harvested from the retromolar region were placed as lateral or vertical onlay grafts using augmentation templates and were fixed with titanium osteosynthesis screws after exposure of the deficient alveolar ridge. After a healing period of 3–5 months computed tomography scans were performed followed by virtual implant planning and the implants were inserted using guided dental implantation. Results: 97 of the 104 onlay bone grafts were successful. In only 7 patients a graft failure occurred after a postsurgical complication. No long-term nerve damage occurred. Postoperative nerve disturbances were reported by 11 patients and had temporary character only. After the healing period between 4 to 5 months, 155 implants were placed (39 in the maxilla, 116 in the mandible). A final rehabilitation with dental implants was possible in 82 of the 86 patients. Except the 7 graft failures, all recorded complications were minor complications which could be easily treated successfully

  20. Functional regeneration of ligament-bone interface using a triphasic silk-based graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguo; Fan, Jiabing; Sun, Liguo; Liu, Xincheng; Cheng, Pengzhen; Fan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    The biodegradable silk-based scaffold with unique mechanical property and biocompatibility represents a favorable ligamentous graft for tissue-engineering anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the low efficiency of ligament-bone interface restoration barriers the isotropic silk graft to common ACL therapeutics. To enhance the regeneration of the silk-mediated interface, we developed a specialized stratification approach implementing a sequential modification on isotropic silk to constitute a triphasic silk-based graft in which three regions respectively referring to ligament, cartilage and bone layers of interface were divided, followed by respective biomaterial coating. Furthermore, three types of cells including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and osteoblasts were respectively seeded on the ligament, cartilage and bone region of the triphasic silk graft, and the cell/scaffold complex was rolled up as a multilayered graft mimicking the stratified structure of native ligament-bone interface. In vitro, the trilineage cells loaded on the triphasic silk scaffold revealed a high proliferative capacity as well as enhanced differentiation ability into their corresponding cell lineage. 24 weeks postoperatively after the construct was implanted to repair the ACL defect in rabbit model, the silk-based ligamentous graft exhibited the enhancement of osseointegration detected by a robust pullout force and formation of three-layered structure along with conspicuously corresponding matrix deposition via micro-CT and histological analysis. These findings potentially broaden the application of silk-based ligamentous graft for ACL reconstruction and further large animal study. PMID:27566867

  1. Hand Rejuvenation: A Comprehensive Review of Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Don; Orgel, Matthew I; Kulber, David A

    2016-05-01

    Dermal atrophy, bulging reticular veins, and prominent bones and tendons are characteristic of the aging hand. Demand for cosmetic procedures to restore a youthful appearance to the dorsum of the hand has risen in recent years. A review of the literature reveals that of the many options for hand restoration, autologous fat grafting stands out as the most promising choice compared with many available alternative options such as microdermabrasion, peeling agents, and dermal fillers. This article details the surgical technique and relevant anatomy necessary for successful hand rejuvenation. Future advancements may rely on further study into adipose-derived stem cells. PMID:27113709

  2. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing.

  3. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaowei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum–host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  4. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  5. Structural differences in epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Frederic; Flynn, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    We have observed that epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes in BALB/c mice show considerable differences of light microscopic and ultrastructural appearance, even when the cells are at the same stage of differentiation. In addition, cell structure maintenance improved with tissue preparation controlled for osmolarity and for membrane stabilization using 0.5% ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT) for both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) or 0.5% lanthanum nitrate for LM. Physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes showed a gradual increase in size closer to the metaphysis and a change in shape as cells elongated along the long axis. The nucleus remained central, with uniformly dispersed chromatin, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was randomly dispersed throughout cytoplasm with little to no presence against the cell membrane. Even the lowermost cells showed thin elongated or dilated cisternae of RER and intact cell membranes. Epiphyseal chondrocytes remained circular to oval with no elongation. Nucleus and RER were positioned as a complete transcellular central nucleocytoplasmic column or as an incomplete bud with RER of the column/bud always continuous with RER peripherally against the intact cell membrane. RER was densely packed with parallel cisternae with adjacent cytoplasm empty of organelles but often filled with circular deposits of moderately electron-dense material consistent with fat. Optimal technique for LM involved fixation using glutaraldehyde (GA) 1.3%, paraformaldehyde (PFA) 1% and RHT 0.5% (mOsm 606) embedded in JB-4 plastic and stained with 0.5% toluidine blue. Optimal technique for EM used fixation with GA 1.3%, PFA 1%, RHT 0.5% and cacodylate buffer 0.03 M (mOsm 511) and post-fixation including 1% osmium tetroxide. These observations lead to the possibility that the same basic cell, the hypertrophic chondrocyte, has differing functional mechanisms at different regions of the developing bone. PMID:25987982

  6. A practical way to prepare primer human chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Isyar, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Yasar Sirin, Duygu; Yalcin, Sercan; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2016-09-01

    Biological cartilage repair is one of the most important targets for orthopedic surgeons currently. For this purpose, it is mandatory to know how to prepare a chondrocyte culture. In this study, our purpose was to introduce a method enabling orthopedic surgeons to practice their knowledge and skills on molecular experimental setup at cellular level, based on our experiences from previous pilot studies. Thus, we believe it will encourage orthopedic surgeons.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  8. Can microcarrier-expanded chondrocytes synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro?

    PubMed

    Surrao, Denver C; Khan, Aasma A; McGregor, Aaron J; Amsden, Brian G; Waldman, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it is challenging to produce adequate amounts of tissue in vitro from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from an individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of de-differentiation and/or loss of potency. Recently, however, several studies have noted the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) over monolayer expansion, but the ability of 3D expanded chondrocytes to synthesize cartilaginous tissue constructs has not been demonstrated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the properties of engineered cartilage constructs from expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarriers) to those developed from primary chondrocytes. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown for 3 weeks in either monolayer (T-Flasks) or 3D microcarrier (Cytodex 3) expansion culture. Expanded and isolated primary cells were then seeded in high density culture on Millicell™ filters for 4 weeks to evaluate the ability to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. While microcarrier expansion was twice as effective as monolayer expansion (microcarrier: 110-fold increase, monolayer: 52-fold increase), the expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarrier) were not effectively able to synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro. Tissues developed from primary cells were substantially thicker and accumulated significantly more extracellular matrix (proteoglycan content: 156%-292% increase; collagen content: 70%-191% increase). These results were attributed to phenotypic changes experienced during the expansion phase. Monolayer expanded chondrocytes lost their native morphology within 1 week, whereas microcarrier-expanded cells were spreading by 3 weeks of expansion. While the use of 3D microcarriers can lead to large cellular yields, preservation of chondrogenic phenotype during expansion is required in order to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. PMID:21449621

  9. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  10. Regulation of collagenase inhibitor production in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.; Harper, E.

    1987-05-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes produce an inhibitor of collagenase. This inhibitor is similar to those isolated from normal cartilage tissues. These cells will synthesize proteins in the absence of serum. Since serum contains inhibitors of collagenase, it is necessary to culture cells without serum in order to obtain accurate measurements of enzyme and inhibitor levels. They examined the effect of insulin on inhibitor secretion by cultures of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. They observed a 2.5 to 3.5 fold stimulation of inhibitory activity in the presence of as little as 10 ng/ml insulin as compared to controls in serum free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 4.5 g/l glucose. The units of inhibitor were determined over a 7 day culture period. Medium was harvested daily and assayed for collagenase activity and for inhibition of a known collagenase from rabbit skin or human skin, using the /sup 14/C-glycine peptide release assay. The amount of inhibitor obtained from days 2 through 7 were: 1.4 unit (control), 3.8 units (10 ng/ml insulin), 5.2 units (1 ..mu..g/ml insulin). The addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP to these chondrocytes in the presence of 1 ..mu..g/ml insulin caused a decrease in the level of inhibitor, suggesting that a dephosphorylation event may be necessary for this stimulation by insulin to occur.

  11. DEXAMETHASONE PROMOTES CPPD CRYSTAL FORMATION BY ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Mark; Mitton, Elizabeth; Muth, Emily; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals (CPPD) are commonly found in osteoarthritic joints and correlate with a poor prognosis. Intra-articular corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone (Dxm), are commonly used therapies for osteoarthritis with or without CPPD deposition. Dxm has variable effects in mineralization models. We investigated the effects of Dxm on CPPD crystal formation in a well established tissue culture model. Methods Porcine articular chondrocytes were incubated with ATP to generate CPPD crystals. Chondrocytes incubated with or without ATP were exposed to 1–100 nM Dxm in the presence of 45Ca. Mineralization was measured by 45Ca uptake in the cell layer. We also investigated the effect of Dxm on mineralization-regulating enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, NTPPPH and transglutaminase. Results Dxm significantly increased ATP-induced mineralization by articular chondrocytes. While alkaline phosphatase and NTPPPH activities were unchanged by Dxm, transglutaminase activity increased in a clear dose responsive manner. Levels of factor XIIIA mRNA and protein were increased by Dxm, while type II Tgase protein was unchanged. Transglutaminase inhibitors suppressed Dxm-induced increases in CPPD crystal formation. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential for Dxm to contribute to pathologic mineralization in cartilage and reinforce a central role for the transglutaminase enzymes in CPPD crystal formation. PMID:19132782

  12. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, YI; XU, QINGLI; ZHANG, JIAN; NIU, JIALING; YUAN, GUANGYIN; JIANG, YAO; HE, YAOHUA; WANG, XINLING

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C-JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen II (Col II) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  13. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  14. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  15. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  16. Costochondral grafts in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint after condylectomy: an experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, H; Miyamoto, H; Ishimaru, J I; Kurita, K; Goss, A N

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of costochondral grafts in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in sheep. Five pure-bred adult Merino sheep were used. The condyle alone was resected and replaced with a costochondral graft from the 13th rib. The sheep were killed 3 months after operation. The range of jaw movements before and after operation and at death were recorded. The joints were examined radiologically, macroscopically, and histologically. A new condylar head with normal configuration and function developed. Histologically, the chondrocytes were arranged in a fashion similar to that of a normal joint. All inferior joint spaces showed fibrous adhesions between the condylar head and disc. This study showed that, when such grafts are used to replace the condyle in an otherwise normal sheep TMJ, they fused to the ramus and reconstituted a nearly normal, fully functional joint. PMID:11384115

  17. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  18. Disruption of endogenous perlecan function improves differentiation of rat articular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Fumio; Fukunaga, Shigeharu

    2015-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) are necessary for normal cartilage development and chondrocyte differentiation. However, recent studies demonstrated that HSPG accelerate dedifferentiation and catabolism in chondrocytes from degenerative cartilage. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of HSPG on chondrocyte differentiation in vitro. Rat articular chondrocytes were cultured at low (0.3 × 10(4) cells/cm(2) ) and high (1.5 × 10(5) cells/cm(2) ) density in the presence or absence of heparitinase I, an HS degrading enzyme. Cells cultured at low density dedifferentiated and exhibited an elongated morphology, and treatment with heparitinase I precluded cell elongation. Conversely, populations of chondrocytes cultured at high density exhibited either a dedifferentiated or differentiated phenotype. Glycosaminoglycan accumulation increased in heparitinase I-treated cells. To determine the function of perlecan, an important HSPG for cartilage development, in chondrocyte differentiation, rat chondrocyte cultures were exposed to an anti-perlecan antiserum to inhibit perlecan function. Western blotting analysis indicated that preventing perlecan activity increased type II collagen synthesis. Our results suggest that HSPG are negative regulators of chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and that perlecan contributes to chondrocyte dedifferentiation in vitro.

  19. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    LIN, PINGDONG; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; MA, YUHUAN; CHEN, HOUHUANG; SHAO, XIANG; ZHENG, WENWEI; LIU, XIANXIANG; YE, HONGZHI; LI, XIHAI

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)-stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). We found that 4-PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), caspase-9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase-9, caspase-3

  20. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  1. Notch signaling indirectly promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy via regulation of BMP signaling and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xifu; Wang, Jinwu; Luo, Zhengliang; Wang, Yongjun; Morandi, Massimo M.; Marymont, John V.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Dong, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is critical for chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy. Recently we identified the Notch signaling pathway as an important regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during mouse cartilage development. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we assessed the role for Notch signaling regulation of the cell cycle during chondrocyte differentiation. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that over-expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) significantly induced the expression of p57, a cell cycle inhibitor, in chondrocytes. Flow cytometric analyses further confirmed that over-expression of NICD in chondrocytes enhances the G0/G1 cell cycle transition and cell cycle arrest. In contrast, treatment of chondrocytes with the Notch inhibitor, DAPT, decreased both endogenous and BMP2-induced SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation and knockdown of SMAD 1/5/8 impaired NICD-induced chondrocyte differentiation and p57 expression. Co-immunoprecipitation using p-SMAD 1/5/8 and NICD antibodies further showed a strong interaction of these proteins during chondrocyte maturation. Finally, RT-PCR and Western blot results revealed a significant reduction in the expression of the SMAD-related phosphatase, PPM1A, following NICD over-expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch signaling induces cell cycle arrest and thereby initiates chondrocyte hypertrophy via BMP/SMAD-mediated up-regulation of p57. PMID:27146698

  2. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  3. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingdong; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Ma, Yuhuan; Chen, Houhuang; Shao, Xiang; Zheng, Wenwei; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi; Li, Xihai

    2015-12-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type Ⅱ collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)‑stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4‑PBA). We found that 4‑PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM‑induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X‑box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP‑homologous protein (Chop), caspase‑9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase

  4. Computer-Aided Design and Rapid Prototyping–Assisted Contouring of Costal Cartilage Graft for Facial Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shu Jin; Lee, Heow Pueh; Tse, Kwong Ming; Cheong, Ee Cherk; Lim, Siak Piang

    2012-01-01

    Complex 3-D defects of the facial skeleton are difficult to reconstruct with freehand carving of autogenous bone grafts. Onlay bone grafts are hard to carve and are associated with imprecise graft-bone interface contact and bony resorption. Autologous cartilage is well established in ear reconstruction as it is easy to carve and is associated with minimal resorption. In the present study, we aimed to reconstruct the hypoplastic orbitozygomatic region in a patient with left hemifacial microsomia using computer-aided design and rapid prototyping to facilitate costal cartilage carving and grafting. A three-step process of (1) 3-D reconstruction of the computed tomographic image, (2) mirroring the facial skeleton, and (3) modeling and rapid prototyping of the left orbitozygomaticomalar region and reconstruction template was performed. The template aided in donor site selection and extracorporeal contouring of the rib cartilage graft to allow for an accurate fit of the graft to the bony model prior to final fixation in the patient. We are able to refine the existing computer-aided design and rapid prototyping methods to allow for extracorporeal contouring of grafts and present rib cartilage as a good alternative to bone for autologous reconstruction. PMID:23730421

  5. A comparative analysis of advanced techniques for skin reconstruction with autologous keratinocyte culture in severely burned children: own experience

    PubMed Central

    Nessler, Michał B.; Drukala, Justyna; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Mądry, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The local treatment in burns larger than 50% of total body surface area is still the great challenge for surgeons. Aim This paper presents a review of different solutions for deep burn wound healing in children and the early outcomes of treatment with combined autologous cell culture technique. Material and methods For this study, 20 children aged between 4 and 12 years with 55–65% of TBSA III grade burn injury were analyzed. A skin sample, 1 cm × 1 cm in size, for keratinocyte cultivation, was taken on the day of the burn. After necrotic tissue excision, the covering of the burned area with an isolated meshed skin graft was carried out between day 4 and 7. After 7 days of keratinocyte cultivation, the mentioned areas were covered with cells from the culture. We divided the burned regions, according to the way of wound closure, into 3 groups each consisting of 15 treated regions of the body. We used meshed split thickness skin grafts (SSG group), cultured autologous keratinocytes (CAC group), and both techniques applied in one stage (SSG + CAC group). Results In the SSG group, the mean time for complete closure of wounds was 12.7 days. Wounds treated with CAC only needed a non-significantly longer time to heal – 14.2 days (p = 0.056) when compared to SSG. The shortest time to heal was observed in the group treated with SSG + CAC – 8.5 days, and it was significantly shorter when compared to the SSG and CAC groups (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study suggests that cultured keratinocytes obtained after short-time multiplication, combined with meshed autologous split thickness skin grafts, constitute the optimal wound closure in burned children. PMID:25097488

  6. Matrix molecule influence on chondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan 4 expression by alginate-embedded zonal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coates, Emily E; Riggin, Corinne N; Fisher, John P

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage resists load and provides frictionless movement at joint surfaces. The tissue is organized into the superficial, middle, deep, and calcified zones throughout its depth, each which serve distinct functions. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), found in the superficial zone, is a critical component of the joint's lubricating mechanisms. Maintenance of both the chondrocyte and zonal chondrocyte phenotype remain challenges for in vitro culture and tissue engineering. Here we investigate the expression of PRG4 mRNA and protein by primary bovine superficial zone chondrocytes, middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) additives. Chondrogenic phenotype and differentiation markers are evaluated by mRNA expression, histochemical, and immunohistochemical staining. Results show middle/deep cells express no measurable PRG4 mRNA by day 7. In contrast, superficial zone cells express elevated PRG4 mRNA throughout culture time. This expression can be significantly enhanced up to 15-fold by addition of both HA and CS to scaffolds. Conversely, PRG4 mRNA expression is downregulated (up to 5-fold) by CS and HA in differentiating MSCs, possibly due to build up of entrapped protein. HA and CS demonstrate favorable effects on chondrogenesis by upregulating transcription factor Sox9 mRNA (up to 4.6-fold) and downregulating type I collagen mRNA (up to 18-fold). Results highlight the important relationship between matrix components and expression of critical lubricating proteins in an engineered cartilage scaffold. PMID:22674584

  7. Renal function in high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Shpall, E J; Jones, R B; Archer, P G; Schrier, R W

    1996-09-01

    Autologous and allogeneic bone marrow grafting both require cytoreductive therapy but only the allogeneic procedure requires immunosuppressive agents. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of both renal failure and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver, the combination of which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. There is less known about the frequency and severity of these complications in patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation. In the present study renal, hepatic and other complications were examined in 232 patients with Stages II/III and IV breast cancer who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support with either marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells. The post-treatment severity of the renal dysfunction was classified as follows: Grade 0, normal renal function [< 25% decrement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]; Grade 1. mild renal dysfunction (> 25% decrement in GFR but < a twofold increase in serum creatinine); Grade 2, > twofold rise in serum creatinine but no need for dialysis; Grade 3 > than twofold rise in serum creatinine and need for dialysis. There were 102 patients (44%) who were classified as Grade 0 and 81 patients (35%) who were classified as Grade 1 renal dysfunction. Severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) was observed in 49 of the 232 patients (21%). This severe renal dysfunction of 21% compares with a previously reported 53% incidence of severe renal dysfunction for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Similarly, the frequency of hepatic VOD was less (4.7% or 11 of 232 patients) in this autologous bone marrow transplant study as compared to a reported incidence of hepatic VOD ranging from 22 to 53% in large series of allogeneic bone marrow transplant patients. The severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) in the present autologous hematopoietic cell support study correlated most significantly with

  8. Dystrophic calcifications after autologous fat injection on face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Jang, Hee Won; Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-06-01

    Autologous fat injection is widely used procedure for various functional and aesthetic purposes. However, it could result in many immediate or delayed complications including dystrophic calcifications. Almost all of the case reports about dystrophic calcification after autologous fat injection were result from the iatrogenic tissue trauma of breast augmentation. This is a report of a 30-year-old patient who developed pathologically proven multiple dystrophic calcifications on the face after autologous fat injection. PMID:24131074

  9. Quantitative Comparison of Volume Maintenance between Inlay and Onlay Bone Grafts in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Rosenthal, Andrew H.; Ozaki, Wayne; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonvascularized autologous bone grafts are the criterion standard in craniofacial reconstruction for bony defects involving the craniofacial skeleton. The authors have previously demonstrated that graft microarchitecture is the major determinant of volume maintenance for both inlay and onlay bone grafts following transplantation. This study performs a head-to-head quantitative analysis of volume maintenance between inlay and onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton using a rabbit model to comparatively determine their resorptive kinetics over time. Methods Fifty rabbits were divided randomly into six experimental groups: 3-week inlay, 3-week onlay, 8-week inlay, 8-week onlay, 16-week inlay, and 16-week onlay. Cortical bone from the lateral mandible and both cortical and cancellous bone from the ilium were harvested from each animal and placed either in or on the cranium. All bone grafts underwent micro–computed tomographic analysis at 3, 8, and 16 weeks. Results All bone graft types in the inlay position increased their volume over time, with the greatest increase in endochondral cancellous bone. All bone graft types in the onlay position decreased their volume over time, with the greatest decrease in endochondral cancellous bone. Inlay bone grafts demonstrated increased volume compared with onlay bone grafts of identical embryologic origin and microarchitecture at all time points (p < 0.05). Conclusions Inlay bone grafts, irrespective of their embryologic origin, consistently display less resorption over time compared with onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton. Both inlay and onlay bone grafts are driven by the local mechanical environment to recapitulate the recipient bed. PMID:23629083

  10. Effect of oblique nerve grafting on peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kotulska, Katarzyna; Marcol, Wiesław; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Tendera, Zofia; Malinowska-Kołodziej, Izabela; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Jedrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of peripheral nerve repair are to rejoin cut nerve stumps directly or to bridge large gaps with autologous nerve grafts. In both cases the surface of nerve stump endings is typically cut perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve. The outcome of such operations, however, is still not satisfactory. In this study, we examine the effect of oblique nerve cutting and grafting on morphological as well as functional features of regeneration. In adult rats, sciatic nerve was cut and rejoined either directly or using an autologous graft, at 90 degrees or 30 degrees angle. Functional regeneration was assessed by walking track analysis during 12-week follow-up. Afterwards muscle weight was measured and histological studies were performed. The latter included nerve fibers and Schwann cells counting, as well as visualization of scar formation and epineural fibrosis. Nerves cut obliquely and rejoined showed better functional recovery than perpendicularly transected. Similar effect was observed after oblique grafting when compared to perpendicular one. Numbers of nerve fibers growing into the distal stump of the nerve as well as the number of Schwann cells were significantly higher in obliquely than in perpendicularly operated nerves. Moreover, growing axons were arranged more regularly following oblique treatment. These data indicate that joining or grafting the nerve stumps at acute angle is a more profitable method of nerve repair than the standard procedure performed at right angle. PMID:17066410

  11. Transcription Factor Erg Variants and Functional Diversification of Chondrocytes during Limb Long Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshinobu; Koyama, Eiki; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Kurisu, Kojiro; Yeh, Helena; Abrams, William R.; Rosenbloom, Joel; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2000-01-01

    During limb development, chondrocytes located at the epiphyseal tip of long bone models give rise to articular tissue, whereas the more numerous chondrocytes in the shaft undergo maturation, hypertrophy, and mineralization and are replaced by bone cells. It is not understood how chondrocytes follow these alternative pathways to distinct fates and functions. In this study we describe the cloning of C-1-1, a novel variant of the ets transcription factor ch-ERG. C-1-1 lacks a short 27–amino acid segment located ∼80 amino acids upstream of the ets DNA binding domain. We found that in chick embryo long bone anlagen, C-1-1 expression characterizes developing articular chondrocytes, whereas ch-ERG expression is particularly prominent in prehypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate. To analyze the function of C-1-1 and ch-ERG, viral vectors were used to constitutively express each factor in developing chick leg buds and cultured chondrocytes. We found that virally driven expression of C-1-1 maintained chondrocytes in a stable and immature phenotype, blocked their maturation into hypertrophic cells, and prevented the replacement of cartilage with bone. It also induced synthesis of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix protein that is a unique product of developing articular chondrocytes. In contrast, virally driven expression of ch-ERG significantly stimulated chondrocyte maturation in culture, as indicated by increases in alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix; however, it had modest effects in vivo. The data show that C-1-1 and ch-ERG have diverse biological properties and distinct expression patterns during skeletogenesis, and are part of molecular mechanisms by which limb chondrocytes follow alternative developmental pathways. C-1-1 is the first transcription factor identified to date that appears to be instrumental in the genesis and function of epiphyseal articular chondrocytes. PMID:10893254

  12. Autophagy protects end plate chondrocytes from intermittent cyclic mechanical tension induced calcification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-guang; Yu, Yun-fei; Zheng, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chuang-dong; Zhao, Xiao-yn; Tong, Wen-xue; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2014-09-01

    Calcification of end plate chondrocytes is a major cause of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of end plate chondrocyte calcification is still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify whether autophagy in end plate chondrocytes could protect the calcification of end plate chondrocytes. Previous studies showed that intermittent cyclic mechanical tension (ICMT) contributes to the calcification of end plate chondrocytes in vitro. While autophagy serves as a cell survival mechanism, the relationship of autophagy and induced end plate chondrocyte calcification by mechanical tension in vitro is unknown. Thus, we investigated autophagy, the expression of the autophagy genes, Beclin-1 and LC3, and rat end plate chondrocyte calcification by ICMT. The viability of end plate chondrocytes was examined using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression of Beclin-1; LC3; type I, II and X collagen; aggrecan; and Sox-9 genes. Immunofluorescent and fluorescent microscopy showed decreased autophagy in the 10- and 20-day groups loaded with ICMT. Additionally, Alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase staining detected the palpable calcification of end plate chondrocytes after ICMT treatment. We found that increased autophagy induced by short-term ICMT treatment was accompanied by an insignificant calcification of end plate chondrocytes. To the contrary, the suppressive autophagy inhibited by long-term ICMT was accompanied by a more significant calcification. The process of calcification induced by ICMT was partially resisted by increased autophagy activity induced by rapamycin, implicating that autophagy may prevent end plate chondrocyte calcification.

  13. Autologous Growth Factor Injections in Chronic Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sandrey, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Reference: de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63–77. Clinical Question: The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich–plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? Data Sources: The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). Data Extraction: All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of

  14. Cyclic pull-out strength of hamstring tendon graft fixation with soft tissue interference screws. Influence of screw length.

    PubMed

    Stadelmaier, D M; Lowe, W R; Ilahi, O A; Noble, P C; Kohl, H W

    1999-01-01

    Blunt-threaded interference screws used for fixation of hamstring tendons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions provide aperture fixation and may provide a biomechanically more stable graft than a graft fixed further from the articular surface. It is unknown if soft tissue fixation strength using interference screws is affected by screw length. We compared the cyclic and time-zero pull-out forces of 7 x 25 mm and 7 x 40 mm blunt-threaded metal interference screws for hamstring graft tibial fixation in eight paired human cadaveric specimens. A four-stranded autologous hamstring tendon graft was secured by a blunt-threaded interference screw into a proximal tibial tunnel with a diameter corresponding to the graft width. Eight grafts were secured with a 25-mm length screw while the other eight paired grafts were secured with a 40-mm length screw. During cyclic testing, slippage of the graft occurred as the force of pull became greater with each cycle until the graft-screw complex ultimately failed. All grafts failed at the fixation site, with the tendon being pulled past the screw. There were no measurable differences in the mean cyclic failure strength, pull-out strength, or stiffness between the two sizes of screws. Although use of the longer screw would make removal technically easier should revision surgery be necessary, it did not provide stronger fixation strength than the shorter, standard screw as had been postulated. PMID:10569365

  15. Complication Rate of Autologous Cartilage Microtia Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Yu, Nanze; Huang, Jiuzuo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autologous cartilage has been widely accepted as the frame material of ear reconstruction for patients with microtia. Although rare, there are multiple complications related with the surgical reconstruction techniques. The authors performed a systematic review of the English literature of microtia reconstruction to determine significant surgical factors that are predictors of postoperative complications. Methods: A PubMed search using the terms “ear reconstruction” and “microtia” was conducted. Articles were screened using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data collected included patient characteristics, surgical techniques, the incidence of all kinds of complications, and the specific postoperative morbidity. Patient cohorts were pooled, and the incidence of complications was calculated. Significant predictors such as the use of tissue expander, simultaneously mid-ear reconstruction, with/without skin graft, and different fascia coverage were analyzed by chi-square test. Result: Of 320 articles found, 60 met the inclusion criteria. Totally 9415 patients with microtia were analyzed in this review with 1525 cases with complications. The overall complication incidence is 16.2% in average with a range of 0–72.9%. There was no significant difference when comparing the overall complication rate between with/without preexpansion 2-stage and multiple-stage techniques or with/without mid-ear reconstruction simultaneously. Conclusion: Although there is little agreement in literature regarding risk factors for complications, the authors were able to demonstrate several significant predictors by systematically analyzing 60 articles. Improved knowledge of the incidence of different complications related with various surgical methods can help surgeons provide improved preoperative counseling and take measures to minimize the risk. PMID:25289252

  16. Histology and Long-term Stability of Diced Cartilage Graft for Revision Rhinoplasty in a Cleft Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Susie I.; Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Ueng, Shir-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Diced cartilage graft wrapped in Surgicel or fascia has been widely reported in the literature. Pure diced cartilage graft without the use of a “sleeve,” on the contrary, is not as commonly reported. This could be due to concerns of graft dispersion, palpability, or visibility. In this case report, histologic findings of a pure diced cartilage graft placed 4½ years ago are reported. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed in detail. Two pieces of the diced cartilage graft placed 4½ years prior were excised and sent for histologic analysis during a revision procedure. The microscopic examination reveals several small blocks of mature hyaline cartilage embedded in dense fibrous connective tissue with widely scattered small vascular channels. The cartilage is vital with scattered chondrocytes within their lacunae. Histology of the diced cartilage graft demonstrated viability and stability of the graft 4½ years after insertion. This case report also suggests that pure diced cartilage graft can provide reliable volume augmentation of nasal dorsum in cleft rhinoplasty. PMID:27482502

  17. Calcar bone graft

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, W.L.; Paul, H.A.; Merritt, K.; Sharkey, N.

    1986-01-01

    A canine model was developed to investigate the use of an autogeneic iliac bone graft to treat the calcar deficiency commonly found at the time of revision surgery for femoral component loosening. Five large male mixed-breed dogs had bilateral total hip arthroplasty staged at three-month intervals, and were sacrificed at six months. Prior to cementing the femoral component, an experimental calcar defect was made, and a bicortical iliac bone graft was fashioned to fill the defect. Serial roentgenograms showed the grafts had united with no resorption. Technetium-99 bone scans showed more uptake at three months than at six months in the graft region. Disulfine blue injection indicated all grafts were perfused at both three and six months. Thin section histology, fluorochromes, and microradiographs confirmed graft viability in all dogs. Semiquantitative grading of the fluorochromes indicated new bone deposition in 20%-50% of each graft at three months and 50%-80% at six months. Although the calcar bone graft was uniformly successful in this canine study, the clinical application of this technique should be evaluated by long-term results in humans.

  18. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Are Targets for Allogeneic and Autologous Natural Killer (NK) Cells and Killing Is Partly Mediated by the Activating NK Receptor DNAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Sebastian; Cyganek, Lukas; Elsner, Leslie; Hübscher, Daniela; Walter, Lutz; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Guan, Kaomei; Dressel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) could be used to generate autologous cells for therapeutic purposes, which are expected to be tolerated by the recipient. However, iPSC-derived grafts are at risk of giving rise to teratomas in the host, if residuals of tumorigenic cells are not rejected by the recipient. We have analyzed the susceptibility of hiPSC lines to allogeneic and autologous natural killer (NK) cells. IL-2-activated, in contrast to resting NK cells killed hiPSC lines efficiently (P=1.69x10-39). Notably, the specific lysis of the individual hiPSC lines by IL-2-activated NK cells was significantly different (P=1.72x10-6) and ranged between 46 % and 64 % in 51Cr-release assays when compared to K562 cells. The hiPSC lines were killed by both allogeneic and autologous NK cells although autologous NK cells were less efficient (P=8.63x10-6). Killing was partly dependent on the activating NK receptor DNAM-1 (P=8.22x10-7). The DNAM-1 ligands CD112 and CD155 as well as the NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed on the hiPSC lines. Low amounts of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I proteins, which serve as ligands for inhibitory and activating NK receptors were also detected. Thus, the susceptibility to NK cell killing appears to constitute a common feature of hiPSCs. Therefore, NK cells might reduce the risk of teratoma formation even after autologous transplantations of pluripotent stem cell-derived grafts that contain traces of pluripotent cells. PMID:25950680

  19. Delayed skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Ceilley, R I; Bumsted, R M; Panje, W R

    1983-04-01

    The use of skin grafts on granulating wounds is an established practice. Delaying the application of a full- or split-thickness skin graft may be an advantageous alternative method of surgical reconstruction in selected cases. Partial healing by secondary intention is useful for filling in deeper defects and usually produces a wound that is much smaller and of more normal contour than the original defect. Contraction of the graft bed is markedly influenced by location, tissue laxity, surface tension lines, motion, and wound geometry. Proper wound care, correct surgical preparation of the defect, and timing of the graft procedure are all important considerations in maximizing the overall result. Through-and-through defects and wounds produced over areas with little underlying support (eyelids and lip) often need flap reconstruction or immediate grafting to prevent undesirable functional and cosmetic results. By combining delayed healing and conventional reconstructive techniques, major tissue loss can often be restored while minimizing patient morbidity.

  20. Grafts in "closed" rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Scattolin, A; D'Ascanio, L

    2013-06-01

    Rhinoplasty is a fascinating and complex surgical procedure aiming at attaining a well-functioning and aesthetically pleasant nose. The use of grafts is of the utmost importance for the nasal surgeon to achieve such results. However, the philosophy and technical use of nasal grafts are different in "closed" and "open" rhinoplasty. The aim of this paper is not detailed description of the numerous grafts reported in the literature; we will describe the main principles of grafts use in "closed" rhinoplasty derived from our experience, with special reference to the philosophical and technical differences in their employment between "closed" and "open" rhinoplasty. Some cases are reported as an example of graft use in "endonasal" approach rhinoplasty.

  1. Chondrocyte death in mechanically injured articular cartilage--the influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anish K; Huntley, James S; Bush, Peter G; Simpson, A Hamish R W; Hall, Andrew C

    2009-06-01

    Calcium is thought to be an important regulator of chondrocyte death associated with articular cartilage injury. Our objective was to determine the influence of extracellular calcium on chondrocyte death following mechanical injury. Using a surgically relevant model of sharp mechanical injury (with a scalpel) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), in situ chondrocyte death was quantified within the full thickness of articular cartilage as a function of medium calcium concentration and time (2.5 h and 7 days). Exposure of articular cartilage to calcium-free media (approximately 0 mM) significantly reduced superficial zone chondrocyte death after mechanical injury compared with exposure to calcium-rich media (2-20 mM, ANOVA at 2.5 h, p = 0.002). In calcium-rich media, although the extent of chondrocyte death increased with increasing medium calcium concentration, cell death remained localized to the superficial zone of articular cartilage over 7 days (ANOVA, p < 0.05). However, in calcium-free media, there was an increase in chondrocyte death within deeper zones of articular cartilage over 7 days. The early (within hours) chondroprotective effect in calcium-free media suggests that the use of joint irrigation solutions without added calcium may decrease chondrocyte death from mechanical injury during articular surgery. The delayed (within days) increase in chondrocyte death in calcium-free media supports the use of calcium supplementation in media used during cartilage culture for tissue engineering or transplantation.

  2. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells protect chondrocytes from degeneration associated with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maumus, Marie; Manferdini, Cristina; Toupet, Karine; Peyrafitte, Julie-Anne; Ferreira, Rosanna; Facchini, Andrea; Gabusi, Elena; Bourin, Philippe; Jorgensen, Christian; Lisignoli, Gina; Noël, Danièle

    2013-09-01

    Our work aimed at evaluating the role of adipose stem cells (ASC) on chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) patients and identifying the mediators involved. We used primary chondrocytes, ASCs from different sources and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from OA donors. ASCs or MSCs were co-cultured with chondrocytes in a minimal medium and using cell culture inserts. Under these conditions, ASCs did not affect the proliferation of chondrocytes but significantly decreased camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Both MSCs and ASCs from different sources allowed chondrocytes in the cocultures maintaining a stable expression of markers specific for a mature phenotype, while expression of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers was decreased. A number of factors known to regulate the chondrocyte phenotype (IL-1β, IL-1RA, TNF-α) and matrix remodeling (TIMP-1 and -2, MMP-1 and -9, TSP-1) were not affected. However, a significant decrease of TGF-β1 secretion by chondrocytes and induction of HGF secretion by ASCs was observed. Addition of a neutralizing anti-HGF antibody reversed the anti-fibrotic effect of ASCs whereas hypertrophic markers were not modulated. In summary, ASCs are an interesting source of stem cells for efficiently reducing hypertrophy and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, at least partly via the secretion of HGF. This supports the interest of using these cells in therapies for osteo-articular diseases.

  3. Notch signaling controls chondrocyte hypertrophy via indirect regulation of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Anat; Rutkowski, Timothy P; Liu, Zhaoyang; Mirando, Anthony J; Zuscik, Michael J; O’Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling regulates both the onset of chondrocyte hypertrophy and the progression to terminal chondrocyte maturation during endochondral ossification. It has been suggested that Notch signaling can regulate Sox9 transcription, although how this occurs at the molecular level in chondrocytes and whether this transcriptional regulation mediates Notch control of chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage development is unknown or controversial. Here we have provided conclusive genetic evidence linking RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling to the regulation of Sox9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy by examining tissue-specific Rbpjk mutant (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f), Rbpjk mutant/Sox9 haploinsufficient (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f;Sox9f/+), and control embryos for alterations in SOX9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development. These studies demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates the onset of chondrocyte maturation in a SOX9-dependent manner, while Notch-mediated regulation of terminal chondrocyte maturation likely functions independently of SOX9. Furthermore, our in vitro molecular analyses of the Sox9 promoter and Notch-mediated regulation of Sox9 gene expression in chondrogenic cells identified the ability of Notch to induce Sox9 expression directly in the acute setting, but suppresses Sox9 transcription with prolonged Notch signaling that requires protein synthesis of secondary effectors. PMID:26558140

  4. Human serum provided additional values in growth factors supplemented medium for human chondrocytes monolayer expansion and engineered cartilage construction.

    PubMed

    Chua, K H; Aminuddin, B S; Fuzina, N H; Ruszymah, B H I

    2004-05-01

    We have previously formulated an optimized human chondrocytes growth medium based on 2% fetal bovine serum supplementation. For clinical usage, the animal serum must be replaced by patient own serum. We investigated the effects of human serum concentration for human nasal septum chondrocytes monolayer culture and cartilage reconstruction. Human serum demonstrated a dose dependent manner in promoting chondrocytes growth and cartilage engineering.

  5. Carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) for corneal epithelium reconstruction: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Wood, Andrew; Hoft, Richard; Pan, Derek; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Makalinao, Andrew; French, Samuel W; Niihara, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the therapeutic effects of carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) transplantation for experimentally induced severe rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Buccal biopsies were performed and CAOMECS were cultured and transplanted onto diseased corneas. Six-month follow-up examinations indicated that three out of four corneas with CAOMECS grafts showed a decrease in superficial vascularization, while almost all the sham corneas did not show a similar decrease. H&E staining of corneas showed that CAOMECS transplantation reduced blood vessel invasion of central cornea, reduced lymphocyte infiltration and fibrotic tissue formation. DeltaNp63 stained markedly in the grafted cornea and to a lesser extent in the sham corneas. PCNA and Ki-67 staining were much greater in the sham corneas than in the grafted and normal corneas. K3 and K13 staining demonstrated that CAOMECS transplanted corneas had much more K3- and less K13- positive cells compared to the sham corneas. Muc5AC was decreased in the central region of grafted corneas. Very little alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA) staining was detected in grafted corneas, while there was a greater amount of aSMA staining in sham corneas. Staining for anti-angiogenic factor TIMP -3 was also increased, and pro-angiogenic factor MMP-3 was decreased in grafted corneas compared to sham corneas. Our results indicate that CAOMECS grafts resulted in improved epithelialization of the corneal surface and decreased vascularization and fibrosis of the diseased corneas.

  6. Carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) for corneal epithelium reconstruction: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Wood, Andrew; Hoft, Richard; Pan, Derek; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Makalinao, Andrew; French, Samuel W; Niihara, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the therapeutic effects of carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) transplantation for experimentally induced severe rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Buccal biopsies were performed and CAOMECS were cultured and transplanted onto diseased corneas. Six-month follow-up examinations indicated that three out of four corneas with CAOMECS grafts showed a decrease in superficial vascularization, while almost all the sham corneas did not show a similar decrease. H&E staining of corneas showed that CAOMECS transplantation reduced blood vessel invasion of central cornea, reduced lymphocyte infiltration and fibrotic tissue formation. DeltaNp63 stained markedly in the grafted cornea and to a lesser extent in the sham corneas. PCNA and Ki-67 staining were much greater in the sham corneas than in the grafted and normal corneas. K3 and K13 staining demonstrated that CAOMECS transplanted corneas had much more K3- and less K13- positive cells compared to the sham corneas. Muc5AC was decreased in the central region of grafted corneas. Very little alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA) staining was detected in grafted corneas, while there was a greater amount of aSMA staining in sham corneas. Staining for anti-angiogenic factor TIMP -3 was also increased, and pro-angiogenic factor MMP-3 was decreased in grafted corneas compared to sham corneas. Our results indicate that CAOMECS grafts resulted in improved epithelialization of the corneal surface and decreased vascularization and fibrosis of the diseased corneas. PMID:25881998

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  8. The Role of Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Leona; Maloney, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Hodgkin lymphoma are usually cured by primary therapy using chemotherapy alone or combined modality therapy with external beam radiation. Patients who do not experience a complete remission or those who experience relapse may by salvaged by high-dose therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Success of this approach is largely dependent on the tumor being sensitive to salvage chemotherapy before transplant. More studies are showing the predictive value of functional imaging in this setting. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has greater risk of nonrelapse mortality and is generally reserved for patients who experience relapse post-ASCT, but may provide long-term survival for some patients through graft-versus-tumor immune effects. PMID:21917627

  9. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes in a novel three-dimensional microcavitary hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lei; Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qing; Yu, Feng; Li, Yuli; Yao, Yongchang

    2015-05-01

    Although chondrocytes exist in native cartilage all over the body, it is still a challenge to use them as therapeutic cells for cartilage tissue engineering (TE) because of their easy dedifferentiation in in vitro culture. An improved culture system to maintain the characteristics of chondrocytes or recover their chondrocytic phenotype should be developed. In this study, we have set up an innovative microcavitary alginate hydrogel in an easy way. We compared this culture system with the conventional hydrogel and found that the microcavitary hydrogel exhibited outstanding superiorities in helping the dedifferentiated chondrocytes recover the capability for synthesizing cartilaginous extracellular matrix. In addition, we explored the correlation between chondrocyte redifferentiation in microcavitary hydrogels and changes in p38 and Erk1/2 activity. Our findings indicated that this microcavitary hydrogel would be a promising culture system to provide sufficient competent cells for cartilage regeneration and TE.

  10. Perspective. Osteoclastogenesis and growth plate chondrocyte differentiation: emergence of convergence.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Paul R; Philbrick, William M; Gartland, Alison

    2003-01-01

    A "bone" is really a dynamic and highly interactive complex of many cell and tissue types. In particular, for the majority of skeletal elements to develop and grow, the process of endochondral ossification requires a constantly moving interface between cartilage, invading blood vessels, and bone. A great deal has been learned in recent years about the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation by hormones, growth factors, and physiologic stimuli during skeletal development and growth. Likewise, the discovery that colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, or M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL, a tumor necrosis factor superfamily member also called TRANCE, ODF, OPGL, and TNFSF11) are pivotal in communicating from osteoblasts to osteoclasts has led to deeper insights into bone growth, turnover, and maintenance. Little is known, however, about how these two quite different systems communicate to solve the problem of providing integrated, continuous mechanical support during the dynamic invasion of cartilage by bone that characterizes endochondral bone growth. Evidence has accumulated in recent years that provides insight into the communication between growing bone and cartilage in the form of a subset of osteopetrotic mutations, which share a lack of osteoclasts and an accompanying chondrodysplasia of the growth plate. These mutations thus implicate some of the same gene products in regulating chondrocyte differentiation and bone resorption. We also consider expression studies of some known growth plate regulators, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), in light of this and propose a model in which the osteoclastogenic factors act also on chondrocytes, but downstream of PTRrP and Ihh in regulating proliferation and differentiation, and after early morphogenic patterns are established.

  11. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  12. Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Schippinger, Gert; Prüller, Florian; Divjak, Manuela; Mahla, Elisabeth; Fankhauser, Florian; Rackemann, Steve; Raggam, Reinhard Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used for the treatment of sports injuries. It has been associated with improved healing and regeneration of soft tissues in elite athletes. Athletes are commonly receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As yet, the effect of these drugs on platelet function in PRP formulations has not been taken into consideration. Hypothesis The function of platelets in PRP produced under the influence of NSAIDs is inhibited and may lessen a possible healing effect on the site of injury. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods PRP was collected from patients receiving NSAIDs after elective orthopaedic surgery, and platelet function was evaluated using light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Results were compared with those obtained from healthy volunteers without a history of NSAID intake during the previous 2 weeks. Two different systems for blood collection and PRP production (Arthrex ACP double-syringe system and standard 4.5-mL sodium citrate blood collection tubes) were used and compared regarding the quality of PRP that was produced. Results For both groups, the baseline platelet counts of whole blood and the platelet counts of PRP formulations were found to be in the normal range. Both collection systems for PRP produced comparable results without significant differences between the groups. Platelet function testing with LTA revealed significantly impaired platelet aggregation in both PRP preparations, obtained from patients taking NSAIDs, irrespective of the type of NSAID (P < .001). All subjects from the control group showed normal platelet aggregation patterns when tested with LTA. Conclusion Autologous PRP produced from subjects after NSAID medication shows significantly impaired platelet function and may result in lower quality regarding the content of bioactive compounds. Clinical Relevance If required, the administration of NSAIDs should be performed after blood collection for

  13. Uses of Various Grafting Techniques in External Approach Rhinoplasty: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazir A; Rehman, Ayaz; Yadav, Rajshri

    2016-09-01

    The surgeons performing rhinoplasty found Graft selection the greatest challenge. To avoid an immune response the preferred choice thus far for nasal reconstruction would be autograft compared to allograft due to its lower rate of rejection. We have evaluated 30 patients who underwent open rhinoplasty and We used conchal and septal cartilaginous grafts in various forms by the open approach to correct various nasal deformities compared our experience regarding the operative technique, graft availability, indications, and limitations. No bony graft material or synthetic materials were used. Preoperative extensive evaluation of the patient was done in order to determine the type of deformity and the type of graft to be used in order to correct the deformity. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken in four basic views: frontal, lateral, lateral-oblique and basal in order to assess the results of the surgery. The study was done on 30 patients (20 male and 10 females) using the external rhinoplasty approach using the septal and conchal cartilages in different forms. Autologous septal cartilage was used in most of the patients (25 out of 30) and conchal cartilage was used in 5 patients. Multiple grafting techniques were used in some patients. Three patients had traumatic etiology. Columellar strut graft along with TIG technique was used in 16 patients, spreader graft was used in 8 patients, and septal extension graft was used in 5 patient and shield graft in 1 patient. Septorhinoplasty continues to evolve through various new techniques and modifications with the main goal to improve functional nasal airway and to restore cosmetic harmony to the face. Optimum result is very much dependent on the surgeon's attention to functional, aesthetic, and reconstructive principles and graft selection.

  14. Bone regeneration in sheep using acropora coral, a natural resorbable scaffold, and autologous mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Manassero, Mathieu; Viateau, Véronique; Deschepper, Mickael; Oudina, Karim; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Petite, Hervé; Bensidhoum, Morad

    2013-07-01

    Tissue constructs containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are an appealing strategy for repairing massive segmental bone defects. However, their therapeutic effectiveness does not match that of autologous bone grafts; among the complicating reasons, the scaffold resorbability has been identified as a critical feature for achieving bone regeneration. In the present study, the osteogenic potential of constructs obtained by expanding autologous MSC onto granules of Acropora coral, a natural fully-resorbable scaffold, was investigated. MSC adhered and proliferated well in vitro after 1 week. When implanted in vivo into long-bone, critical-size defects in sheep (n=5), these constructs exhibited a two-fold increase in bone formation 6 months postimplantation compared to Acropora scaffolds alone (n=5). Interestingly, osteogenesis, mediated by MSC, within these constructs was found continuous not only with the bony stumps, but also at the core of the implants. Scaffold resorption was almost complete at 6 months, leading to full bone regeneration in one animal. Acropora coral appear to be an appealing scaffold for bone tissue engineering because it supported in vitro MSC adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, these results provided evidence that MSC could promote bone regeneration in sheep when loaded one a natural fully resorbable scaffold.

  15. Healing of segmental bone defects with granular porous hydroxyapatite augmented with recombinant human osteogenic protein-1 or autologous bone marrow.

    PubMed

    den Boer, Frank C; Wippermann, Burkhard W; Blokhuis, Taco J; Patka, Peter; Bakker, Fred C; Haarman, Henk J Th M

    2003-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a synthetic bone graft, which is used for the treatment of bone defects and nonunions. However, it is a rather inert material with no or little intrinsic osteoinductive activity. Recombinant human osteogenic protein-1 (rhOP-1) is a very potent biological agent, that enhances osteogenesis during bone repair. Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells, which are capable of new bone formation. Biosynthetic bone grafts were created by the addition of rhOP-1 or bone marrow to granular porous hydroxyapatite. The performance of these grafts was tested in a sheep model and compared to the results of autograft, which is clinically the standard treatment of bone defects and nonunions. A 3 cm segmental bone defect was made in the tibia and fixed with an interlocking intramedullary nail. There were five treatment groups: no implant (n=6), autograft (n=8), hydroxyapatite alone (n=8), hydroxyapatite loaded with rhOP-1 (n=8), and hydroxyapatite loaded with autologous bone marrow (n=8). At 12 weeks, healing of the defect was evaluated with radiographs, a torsional test to failure, and histological examination of longitudinal sections through the defect. Torsional strength and stiffness of the healing tibiae were about two to three times higher for autograft and hydroxyapatite plus rhOP-1 or bone marrow compared to hydroxyapatite alone and empty defects. The mean values of both combination groups were comparable to those of autograft. There were more unions in defects with hydroxyapatite plus rhOP-1 than in defects with hydroxyapatite alone. Although the differences were not significant, histological examination revealed that there was more often bony bridging of the defect in both combination groups and the autograft group than in the group with hydroxyapatite alone. Healing of bone defects, treated with porous hydroxyapatite, can be enhanced by the addition of rhOP-1 or autologous bone marrow. The results of these composite biosynthetic grafts are equivalent to

  16. Autologous bone marrow transplantation by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.

    1992-06-01

    Simultaneous exposure of Merocyanine 540 dye containing cultured tumor cells to 514-nm laser light (93.6 J/cm2) results in virtually complete cell destruction. Under identical conditions, 40% of the normal progenitor (CFU-GM) cells survive the treatment. Laser- photoradiation treated, cultured breast cancer cells also were killed, and living tumor cells could not be detected by clonogenic assays or by anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody method. Thus, laser photoradiation therapy could be useful for purging of contaminating tumor cells from autologous bone marrow.

  17. Technical Refinements in Autologous Hand Rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Nathaniel L; Hill, Sean M; Small, Kevin H; Rohrich, Rod J

    2015-12-01

    The aging hand is characterized by skin changes and soft-tissue deflation, which leads to rhytides, dermal atrophy, and distinct anatomical structures. Soft-tissue deflation and prominent hand anatomy can be corrected with volume augmentation using dermal fillers or lipofilling. Fat transfer volumizes the hand with prolonged durability and efficacy, autologous tissue replacement, and possible dermal regeneration. The senior author's (R.J.R.) technique for hand rejuvenation is described, which uses minimal access and blunt dissection to effectively augment the soft-tissue compartments of the hand. This approach addresses the prominent aged anatomy of the hand, providing excellent contour and aesthetic outcomes.

  18. The Use of Bone Graft Substitute in Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liodaki, Eirini; Kraemer, Robert; Mailaender, Peter; Stang, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bone defects are a very common problem in hand surgery, occurring in bone tumor surgery, in complicated fractures, and in wrist surgery. Bone substitutes may be used instead of autologous bone graft to avoid donor site morbidity. In this article, we will review our experience with the use of Cerament bone void filler (Bonesupport, Lund, Sweden) in elective and trauma hand surgery. A prospective clinical study was conducted with 16 patients treated with this bone graft substitute in our department over a period of 3.5 years. Twelve patients (2 female, 10 male; with an average age of 42.42 years) with monostoic enchondroma of the phalanges were treated and 4 patients (1 female, 3 male; with an average age of 55.25 years) with complicated metacarpal fractures with bone defect. Data such as postoperative course with rating of pain, postoperative complications, functional outcome assessment at 1, 2, 3, 6 months, time to complete remodeling were registered. Postoperative redness and swelling after bone graft substitute use was noticed in 7 patients with enchondroma surgery due to the thin soft-tissue envelope of the fingers. Excellent total active motion of the involved digit was noticed in 10 of 12 enchondroma patients and in all 4 fracture patients at 2-month follow-up. In summary, satisfying results are described, making the use of injectable bone graft substitute in the surgical treatment of enchondromas, as well as in trauma hand surgery a good choice. PMID:27310946

  19. Detection of accessory spleens with indium 111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.H., II; Varki, A.; Heaton, W.A.; Siegel, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    In two patients with recurrent immune thrombocytopenia, accessory splenic tissue was demonstrated by radionuclide imaging following administration of indium 111-labeled autologous platelets. In one of these patients, no accessory splenic tissue was seen on images obtained with technetium 99m sulfur colloid. This new technique provides a simple means for demonstrating accessory spleens and simultaneously evaluating the life-span of autologous platelets.

  20. Leptin Receptor Metabolism Disorder in Primary Chondrocytes from Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Girls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Jia; Yu, Hong-Gui; Zhou, Zhen-Hai; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Long-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of low metabolic activity of primary chondrocytes obtained from girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS); AIS is a spine-deforming disease that often occurs in girls. AIS is associated with a lower bone mass than that of healthy individuals and osteopenia. Leptin was shown to play an important role in bone growth. It can also regulate the function of chondrocytes. Changes in leptin and Ob-R levels in AIS patients have been reported in several studies. The underlying mechanisms between the dysfunction of peripheral leptin signaling and abnormal chondrocytes remain unclear; The following parameters were evaluated in AIS patients and the control groups: total serum leptin levels; Ob-R expression in the plasma membrane of primary chondrocytes; JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation status. Then, we inhibited the lysosome and proteasome and knocked down clathrin heavy chain (CHC) expression in primary chondrocytes isolated from girls with AIS and evaluated Ob-R expression. We investigated the effects of leptin combined with a lysosome inhibitor or CHC knockdown in primary chondrocytes obtained from AIS patients; Compared with the controls, AIS patients showed similar total serum leptin levels, reduced JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased cartilage matrix synthesis in the facet joint. Lower metabolic activity and lower membrane expression of Ob-R were observed in primary chondrocytes from the AIS group than in the controls. Lysosome inhibition increased the total Ob-R content but had no effect on the membrane expression of Ob-R or leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes. CHC knockdown upregulated the membrane Ob-R levels and enhanced leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes; The underlying mechanism of chondrocytes that are hyposensitive to leptin in some girls with AIS is low plasma membrane Ob-R expression that results from an imbalance between the rate of receptor endocytosis and the insertion of newly

  1. Leptin Receptor Metabolism Disorder in Primary Chondrocytes from Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Girls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Jia; Yu, Hong-Gui; Zhou, Zhen-Hai; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Long-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of low metabolic activity of primary chondrocytes obtained from girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS); AIS is a spine-deforming disease that often occurs in girls. AIS is associated with a lower bone mass than that of healthy individuals and osteopenia. Leptin was shown to play an important role in bone growth. It can also regulate the function of chondrocytes. Changes in leptin and Ob-R levels in AIS patients have been reported in several studies. The underlying mechanisms between the dysfunction of peripheral leptin signaling and abnormal chondrocytes remain unclear; The following parameters were evaluated in AIS patients and the control groups: total serum leptin levels; Ob-R expression in the plasma membrane of primary chondrocytes; JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation status. Then, we inhibited the lysosome and proteasome and knocked down clathrin heavy chain (CHC) expression in primary chondrocytes isolated from girls with AIS and evaluated Ob-R expression. We investigated the effects of leptin combined with a lysosome inhibitor or CHC knockdown in primary chondrocytes obtained from AIS patients; Compared with the controls, AIS patients showed similar total serum leptin levels, reduced JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased cartilage matrix synthesis in the facet joint. Lower metabolic activity and lower membrane expression of Ob-R were observed in primary chondrocytes from the AIS group than in the controls. Lysosome inhibition increased the total Ob-R content but had no effect on the membrane expression of Ob-R or leptin's effects on AIS primary chondrocytes. CHC knockdown upregulated the membrane Ob-R levels and enhanced leptin's effects on AIS primary chondrocytes; The underlying mechanism of chondrocytes that are hyposensitive to leptin in some girls with AIS is low plasma membrane Ob-R expression that results from an imbalance between the rate of receptor endocytosis and the insertion of newly

  2. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  3. Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n = 4), 12 (n = 4), 24 (n = 4) or 48 weeks (n = 3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a

  4. Autologous transplantation followed closely by reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation as consolidative immunotherapy in advanced lymphoma patients: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gutman, J A; Bearman, S I; Nieto, Y; Sweetenham, J W; Jones, R B; Shpall, E J; Zeng, C; Baron, A; McSweeney, P A

    2005-09-01

    We report outcomes in advanced lymphoma patients (n = 32) who enrolled in a trial of prospectively planned combined autologous/reduced-intensity transplantation (RIT) (n = 25) or who received RIT shortly after prior autografting because of high relapse risk or progressive disease (n = 7). Nine patients on the autologous/RIT transplant protocol did not proceed to planned RIT because of patient choice (n = 4), disease progression (n = 3), toxicity (n = 1), or no adequate donor (n = 1). Among the 23 other patients, RIT was started a median of 59 days (range 31-123) after autologous transplant. Fifteen patients had related donors, five patients had unrelated donors, and three patients had cord blood donors. Among all patients completing RIT, the median overall survival time was 385 days (95% CI 272-792), and the median relapse-free survival time was 157 days (95% CI 119-385). At the time of reporting, six patients (26%) remain alive and three patients (13%) remain alive without relapse. The 100-day transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 9% among all patients and was 0% among matched sibling donors. Overall TRM was 43%. Tandem transplant is feasible in advanced lymphoma with low early TRM. However, practical challenges associated with the strategy were significant and high levels of late TRM due to graft-versus-host disease and infections suggest that modifications of the procedure will be needed to improve outcomes and patient retention.

  5. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  6. Autologous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Kidney Transplantation: A Pilot Study of Safety and Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Perico, Norberto; Casiraghi, Federica; Introna, Martino; Gotti, Eliana; Todeschini, Marta; Cavinato, Regiane Aparecida; Capelli, Chiara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cassis, Paola; Rizzo, Paola; Cortinovis, Monica; Marasà, Maddalena; Golay, Josee; Noris, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) abrogate alloimmune response in vitro, suggesting a novel cell-based approach in transplantation. Moving this concept toward clinical application in organ transplantation should be critically assessed. Design, setting, participants & measurements A safety and clinical feasibility study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00752479) of autologous MSC infusion was conducted in two recipients of kidneys from living-related donors. Patients were given T cell–depleting induction therapy and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. On day 7 posttransplant, MSCs were administered intravenously. Clinical and immunomonitoring of MSC-treated patients was performed up to day 360 postsurgery. Results Serum creatinine levels increased 7 to 14 days after cell infusion in both MSC-treated patients. A graft biopsy in patient 2 excluded acute graft rejection, but showed a focal inflammatory infiltrate, mostly granulocytes. In patient 1 protocol biopsy at 1-year posttransplant showed a normal graft. Both MSC-treated patients are in good health with stable graft function. A progressive increase of the percentage of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127− Treg and a marked inhibition of memory CD45RO+RA−CD8+ T cell expansion were observed posttransplant. Patient T cells showed a profound reduction of CD8+ T cell activity. Conclusions Findings from this study in the two patients show that MSC infusion in kidney transplant recipients is feasible, allows enlargement of Treg in the peripheral blood, and controls memory CD8+ T cell function. Future clinical trials with MSCs to look with the greatest care for unwanted side effects is advised. PMID:20930086

  7. The adjuvant use of stromal vascular fraction and platelet-rich fibrin for autologous adipose tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Tan, Xin-Ying; Liu, Yan-Pu; Xu, Xiao-Fang; Li, Long; Xu, Hai-Yan; An, Ran; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Autologous adipose transplantation is rapidly gaining popularity for the restoration of soft tissue defects and lipoatrophy as well as for aesthetic improvements (e.g., facial reconstruction and rejuvenation). However, the current technique is crude that suffers from serious demerits, particularly the long-term unpredictability of volume maintenance due to resorption of the grafted adipose tissue and limited adipogenesis. We hypothesized that the adjuvant use of patient-derived adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) may enhance the overall outcome of autologous fat grafting in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Autologous SVF, with a mean cell number of (4.8±3.79)×10⁷ cells/mL and a mean cell viability of 71.8%, and autologous PRF, with sustained release of multiple angiogenic growth factors, were created before surgical use. The following adipose tissue implants were injected subcutaneously into a rabbit ear's auricula according to the following study design: 2 mL adipose granules and 0.2 mL normal saline solution (AG+NS group), 2 mL adipose granules and 0.2 mL SVF (AG+SVF group), 2 mL adipose granules and 0.2 mL PRF (AG+PRF group), or 2 mL adipose granules combined with 0.1 mL SVF and 0.1 mL PRF (AG+SVF+PRF group). Histological examinations showed that the implanted adipose granules were well engrafted in the AG+SVF+PRF group, with a higher microvessel density 4 weeks postimplantation compared with the other three groups (p<0.01). Twenty-four weeks postimplantation, the resorption rates of implanted tissue in each group were 49.39%±9.47%, 27.25%±4.37%, 36.41%±8.47%, and 17.37%±6.22%, respectively, and were significantly different (p<0.01). The results demonstrated that the efficacy of adipose tissue implantation can be enhanced by using autologous PRF and SVF as therapeutic adjuvants, offering a clinically translatable strategy for soft tissue augmentation and reconstruction.

  8. Development of Small Diameter Nanofiber Tissue Engineered Arterial Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Tara, Shuhei; Rocco, Kevin A.; Bagi, Paul S.; Yi, Tai; Udelsman, Brooks; Zhuang, Zhen W.; Cleary, Muriel; Iwakiri, Yasuko; Breuer, Christopher K.; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The surgical repair of heart and vascular disease often requires implanting synthetic grafts. While synthetic grafts have been successfully used for medium-to-large sized arteries, applications for small diameter arteries (<6 mm) is limited due to high rates of occlusion by thrombosis. Our objective was to develop a tissue engineered vascular graft (TEVG) for small diameter arteries. TEVGs composed of polylactic acid nanofibers with inner luminal diameter between 0.5 and 0.6 mm were surgically implanted as infra-renal aortic interposition conduits in 25 female C17SCID/bg mice. Twelve mice were given sham operations. Survival of mice with TEVG grafts was 91.6% at 12 months post-implantation (sham group: 83.3%). No instances of graft stenosis or aneurysmal dilatation were observed over 12 months post-implantation, assessed by Doppler ultrasound and microCT. Histologic analysis of explanted TEVG grafts showed presence of CD31-positive endothelial monolayer and F4/80-positive macrophages after 4, 8, and 12 months in vivo. Cells positive for α-smooth muscle actin were observed within TEVG, demonstrating presence of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Neo-extracellular matrix consisting mostly of collagen types I and III were observed at 12 months post-implantation. PCR analysis supports histological observations. TEVG group showed significant increases in expressions of SMC marker, collagen-I and III, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9, and itgam (a macrophage marker), when compared to sham group. Overall, patency rates were excellent at 12 months after implantation, as structural integrity of these TEVG. Tissue analysis also demonstrated vessel remodeling by autologous cell. PMID:25830942

  9. Infrainguinal anastomotic arterial graft infections treated by selective graft preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Calligaro, K D; Westcott, C J; Buckley, R M; Savarese, R P; DeLaurentis, D A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of graft material and bacteria involved in an infrainguinal arterial anastomotic infection can be used as guidelines for graft preservation. Between 1972 and 1990, the authors treated 35 anastomotic infections involving a common femoral or distal artery. The graft material was Dacron in 14 patients, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in 14, and vein in 7. Of the 14 Dacron grafts, immediate graft excision was required for overwhelming infection in eight patients (bleeding in five, sepsis in three) and for an occluded graft in one patient. Three of five patients failed attempted graft preservation because of nonhealing wounds. Thus, 12 of the 14 Dacron grafts ultimately required graft excision. Of the 21 "smooth-walled" vein and PTFE grafts, 10 required immediate graft excision for occluded grafts (five PTFE, one vein) or bleeding (three PTFE, one vein). Ten of the remaining 11 (91%) patients with patent "smooth-walled" grafts, intact anastomoses, and absence of sepsis managed by graft preservation healed their wounds and maintained distal arterial perfusion. Wound cultures grew pure gram-positive cocci in 17 of 21 "smooth-walled" graft infections versus 8 of 14 Dacron graft infections. In the absence of systemic sepsis, graft preservation is the treatment of choice for gram-positive infections involving an intact anastomosis of patent PTFE and vein grafts. Regardless of the bacterial cause, the authors recommend that any infrainguinal anastomotic infection of a Dacron graft be treated by immediate excision of all infected graft material. PMID:1632705

  10. Autologous stem cells for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasongchean, Weerapong; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2012-09-15

    Increasing understanding of stem cell biology, the ability to reprogramme differentiated cells to a pluripotent state and evidence of multipotency in certain adult somatic stem cells has opened the door to exciting therapeutic advances as well as a great deal of regulatory and ethical issues. Benefits will come from the possibility of modelling human diseases and develop individualised therapies, and from their use in transplantation and bioengineering. The use of autologous stem cells is highly desirable, as it avoids the problem of tissue rejection, and also reduces ethical and regulatory issues. Identification of the most appropriate cell sources for different potential applications, development of appropriate clinical grade methodologies and large scale well controlled clinical trials will be essential to assess safety and value of cell based therapies, which have been generating much hope, but are by and large not yet close to becoming standard clinical practice. We briefly discuss stem cells in the context of tissue repair and regenerative medicine, with a focus on individualised clinical approaches, and give examples of sources of autologous cells with potential for clinical intervention.

  11. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  12. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  13. Adipose tissue-derived stem cell-seeded small intestinal submucosa for tunica albuginea grafting and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Yang, Yijun; Sikka, Suresh C.; Kadowitz, Philip J.; Ignarro, Louis J.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) has been widely used in tunica albuginea (TA) reconstructive surgery. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can repair damaged tissue, augment cellular differentiation, and stimulate release of multiple growth factors. The aim of this rat study was to assess the feasibility of seeding ADSCs onto SIS grafts for TA reconstruction. Here, we demonstrate that seeding syngeneic ADSCs onto SIS grafts (SIS-ADSC) resulted in significant cavernosal tissue preservation and maintained erectile responses, similar to controls, in a rat model of bilateral incision of TA, compared with sham-operated animals and rats grafted with SIS graft (SIS) alone. In addition to increased TGF-β1 and FGF-2 expression levels, cross-sectional studies of the rat penis with SIS and SIS-ADSC revealed mild to moderate fibrosis and an increase of 30% and 40% in mean diameter in flaccid and erectile states, respectively. SIS grafting induced transcriptional up-regulation of iNOS and down-regulation of endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS, and VEGF, an effect that was restored by seeding ADCSs on the SIS graft. Taken together, these data show that rats undergoing TA incision with autologous SIS-ADSC grafts maintained better erectile function compared with animals grafted with SIS alone. This study suggests that SIS-ADSC grafting can be successfully used for TA reconstruction procedures and can restore erectile function. PMID:22308363

  14. Experimental and clinical analysis of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone graft fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Min; Wu, Hong; Ye, Ming; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the animal experimental and clinical results of the bone graft fusion of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone. Methods: 1. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Posterolateral lumbar bone graft with the appendicular bone and iliac bones, respectively, was then performed on these two groups. A lumbar spine X-ray was performed on the postoperative 4th, 8th and 16th weeks, and the gray value changes of the bone graft fusion area were measured to calculate fusion rates. Histology analysis was also performed to observe and count osteoblasts. 2. The appendicular bones of 106 patients who suffered from lumbar disorders were cut during lumbar surgery, and a posterolateral lumbar bone graft was performed. The postoperative follow-up used the Steffee criteria to evaluate clinical efficacy and the White criteria to evaluate fusion conditions. Results: No significant difference was observed in the relative gray values of X-ray bone density, bone graft fusion rates, and osteoblast counts in the bone graft regions between the two groups (P > 0.05). The follow-up duration of the 106 patients were 4-8 years (6.12 years), the clinical efficacy rate was 85.85%, and the fusion rate was 83.02%. Conclusions: The animal experimental and clinical results of posterolateral lumbar bone graft fusion with autologous iliac and appendicular bones were similar. PMID:26885221

  15. Hypoxia promotes redifferentiation and suppresses markers of hypertrophy and degeneration in both healthy and osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia is considered to be a positive influence on the healthy chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage matrix formation. However, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, we assessed whether healthy and OA chondrocytes have distinct responses to oxygen, particularly with regard to hypertrophy and degradation during redifferentiation. Methods Monolayer-expanded healthy and OA chondrocytes were redifferentiated for 14 days in pellet cultures under standard (20% oxygen) or hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions. Cartilage matrix gene expression, matrix quality and quantity, degradative enzyme expression and HIF expression were measured. Results In hypoxia, both healthy and OA chondrocytes had higher human collagen type II, α1 gene (COL2A1), and aggrecan (ACAN) expression and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, concomitant with lower human collagen type X, α1 gene (COL10A1), and human collagen type I, α1 gene (COL1A1), expression and collagen I extracellular accumulation. OA chondrocytes had significantly lower sGAGs/DNA than healthy chondrocytes, but only in high oxygen conditions. Hypoxia also caused significantly greater sGAG retention and hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2) expression by OA chondrocytes. Both healthy and OA chondrocytes had significantly lower expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP1, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP13 in hypoxia and less active MMP2 enzyme, consistent with lower MMP14 expression. However, aggrecanase (ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5) expression was significantly lowered by hypoxia only in healthy cells, and COL10A1 and MMP13 remained significantly higher in OA chondrocytes than in healthy chondrocytes in hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α and HIF-2α had similar expression profiles in healthy and OA cells, increasing to maximal levels early in hypoxia and decreasing over time. Conclusions Hypoxic culture of human chondrocytes has long been acknowledged to result in increased

  16. Crosslinked grafted PVC obtained by direct radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, El-Sayed A.; Dessouki, Ahmed M.; El-Dessouky, Maher M.; El-Sawy, Naeem M.

    Direct radition-induced grafting of 4-vinylpyridine onto both pure and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) has been studied. The effect of grafting conditions such as solvent, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, and inhibitor concentration on the grafting yield was investigated. The grafting process was enhanced by using distilled water as diluent and higher degrees of grafting were obtained as compared with other solvents used (benzene, methanol, and a mixture of methanol and water). The homopolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine was reduced to a minimum using ammonium ferrous sulfate and the suitable optimum concentration of the inhibitor was found to be 0.25 wt %. It was observed that the degrees of grafting onto plasticized PVC were higher than those onto pure one, at constant grafting conditions. The diffusibility of the monomer solution through the trunk polymers enhanced at higher monomer concentrations. The higher the monomer concentration the higher the degrees of grafting obtained. The dependence of the grafting rate on monomer concentration was found to be 0.15 and 0.4 order for the grafting onto pure and plasticized PVC films, respectively. The degree of grafting, at the higher irradiation doses, deviated from linearity and it tends to level off due to the recombination of some of the free radicals without initiating graft polymerization. Gel determination in the grafted films was investigated. The gel content in both grafted extracted pure and plasticized PVC films increased with the degree of grafting to reach a certain limiting values.

  17. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Alexander M; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Kasper, F Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material.

  18. Autologously Generated Tissue-Engineered Bone Flaps for Reconstruction of Large Mandibular Defects in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Kretlow, James D.; Spicer, Patrick P.; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D.; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J.J.P.; Jansen, John A.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material. PMID:25603924

  19. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Alexander M; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Kasper, F Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material. PMID:25603924

  20. Loss of the Mammalian DREAM Complex Deregulates Chondrocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A.; MacDonald, James I.; Bush, Jason R.; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T.; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A.; Thwaites, Michael J.; Norley, Chris J.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W.; Beier, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  1. Loss of the mammalian DREAM complex deregulates chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A; MacDonald, James I; Bush, Jason R; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A; Thwaites, Michael J; Norley, Chris J; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W; Beier, Frank; Dick, Frederick A

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  2. The use of a biostatic fascia lata thigh allograft as a scaffold for autologous human culture of fibroblasts--An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Żurek, Jarek; Dominiak, Marzena; Botzenhart, Ute; Bednarz, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    The method for covering gingival recession defects and augmenting keratinized gingiva involves the use of autogenuous connective tissue grafts obtained from palatal mucosa in combination with various techniques of flap repositioning or tunnel techniques. In the case of multiple gingival recession defects the amount of connective tissue available for grafting is insufficient. Therefore, the use of substitutes is necessary. The most widely used material in recent years has been the acellular dermal matrix allograft. The disadvantage of its application lies in the absence of cells and blood vessels, which increases incorporation time. Primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts are commonly used to optimize the healing process. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro biocompatibility of human fascia lata allograft as a new scaffold for primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts. For that, a fibroblast culture obtained from a fragment of gingival tissue taken from the hard palate mucosa of a subject was used. After 14 days the colony cells were inoculated on a fragment of human fascia lata allograft. After a further 7 days of incubation the material was frozen, cut and prepared for histochemical examination. After two weeks of incubation, and 7 days after inoculation on a fragment of fascia lata allograft numerous accumulations of the cultured fibroblast were found that had a typical structure and produced collagen fibres. A human fascia lata allograft can be used as a scaffold for primary cultured human autologic fibroblasts. Further studies should confirm the clinical efficacy of this solution.

  3. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  4. Treatment of severe post-traumatic bone defects with autologous stem cells loaded on allogeneic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Murena, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo; Falvo, Daniele A; Rossi, Antonio; Baj, Andreina; Toniolo, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into angiogenic and osteoprogenitor cells. The effectiveness of autologous pluripotent mesenchymal cells for treating bone defects has not been investigated in humans. We present a case series to evaluate the rationale of using nucleated cells from autologous bone marrow aspirates in the treatment of severe bone defects that failed to respond to traditional treatments. Ten adult patients (mean age, 49.6-years-old) with severe bone defects were included in this study. Lower limb bone defects were >or=5 cm3 in size, and upper limb defects .or=2 cm3. Before surgery, patients were tested for antibodies to common pathogens. Treatment consisted of bone allogeneic scaffold enriched with bone marrow nucleated cells harvested from the iliac crest and concentrated using an FDA-approved device. Postsurgery clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. To assess viability, morphology, and immunophenotype, bone marrow nucleated cells were cultured in vitro, tested for sterility, and assayed for the possible replication of adventitious (contaminating) viruses. In 9 of 10 patients, both clinical and radiographic healing of the bone defect along with bone graft integration were observed (mean time, 5.6 months); one patient failed to respond. No post-operative complications were observed. Bone marrow nucleated cells were enriched 4.49-fold by a single concentration step, and these enriched cells were free of microbial contamination. The immunophenotype of adherent cells was compatible with that of mesenchymal stem cells. We detected the replication of Epstein-Barr virus in 2/10 bone marrow cell cultures tested. Hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and endogenous retrovirus HERV-K replication were not detected. Overall, 470 to 1,150 million nucleated cells were grafted into each patient. This case series, with a mean follow-up of almost 2 years, demonstrates that an allogeneic bone scaffold

  5. Crucial Role of Elovl6 in Chondrocyte Growth and Differentiation during Growth Plate Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Manami; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Takayanagi, Misa; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ELOVL family member 6, elongation of very long chain fatty acids (Elovl6) is a microsomal enzyme, which regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 has been shown to be associated with various pathophysiologies including insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. To investigate a potential role of Elovl6 during bone development, we here examined a skeletal phenotype of Elovl6 knockout (Elovl6-/-) mice. The Elovl6-/- skeleton was smaller than that of controls, but exhibited no obvious patterning defects. Histological analysis revealed a reduced length of proliferating and an elongated length of hypertrophic chondrocyte layer, and decreased trabecular bone in Elovl6-/- mice compared with controls. These results were presumably due to a modest decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and accelerated differentiation of cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Consistent with the increased length of the hypertrophic chondrocyte layer in Elovl6-/- mice, Collagen10α1 was identified as one of the most affected genes by ablation of Elovl6 in chondrocytes. Furthermore, this elevated expression of Collagen10α1 of Elovl6-null chondrocytes was likely associated with increased levels of Foxa2/a3 and Mef2c mRNA expression. Relative increases in protein levels of nuclear Foxa2 and cytoplasmic histone deacethylase 4/5/7 were also observed in Elovl6 knockdown cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Collectively, our data suggest that Elovl6 plays a critical role for proper development of embryonic growth plate. PMID:27467521

  6. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25755694

  8. Softening Substrates Promote Chondrocytes Phenotype via RhoA/ROCK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Tengfei; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Due to its evascular, aneural, and alymphatic conditions, articular cartilage shows extremely poor regenerative ability. Thus, directing chondrocyte toward a desired location and function by utilizing the mechanical cues of biomaterials is a promising approach for effective tissue regeneration. However, chondrocytes cultured on Petri dish will lose their typical phenotype which may lead to compromised results. Therefore, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials with various stiffness as culture substrates. Cell morphology and focal adhesion of chondrocytes displayed significant changes. The cytoskeletal tension of the adherent cells observed by average myosin IIA fluorescent intensity increased as stiffness of the underlying substrates decreased, consistent with the alteration of chondrocyte phenotype in our study. Immunofluorescent images and q-PCR results revealed that chondrocyte cultured on soft substrates showed better chondrocyte functionalization by more type II collagen and aggrecan expression, related to the lowest mRNA level of Rac-1, RhoA, ROCK-1, and ROCK-2. Taken together, this work not only points out that matrix elasticity can regulate chondrocyte functionalization via RhoA/ROCK pathway, but also provides new prospect for biomechanical control of cell behavior in cell-based cartilage regeneration.

  9. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  10. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  11. Softening Substrates Promote Chondrocytes Phenotype via RhoA/ROCK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Tengfei; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Due to its evascular, aneural, and alymphatic conditions, articular cartilage shows extremely poor regenerative ability. Thus, directing chondrocyte toward a desired location and function by utilizing the mechanical cues of biomaterials is a promising approach for effective tissue regeneration. However, chondrocytes cultured on Petri dish will lose their typical phenotype which may lead to compromised results. Therefore, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials with various stiffness as culture substrates. Cell morphology and focal adhesion of chondrocytes displayed significant changes. The cytoskeletal tension of the adherent cells observed by average myosin IIA fluorescent intensity increased as stiffness of the underlying substrates decreased, consistent with the alteration of chondrocyte phenotype in our study. Immunofluorescent images and q-PCR results revealed that chondrocyte cultured on soft substrates showed better chondrocyte functionalization by more type II collagen and aggrecan expression, related to the lowest mRNA level of Rac-1, RhoA, ROCK-1, and ROCK-2. Taken together, this work not only points out that matrix elasticity can regulate chondrocyte functionalization via RhoA/ROCK pathway, but also provides new prospect for biomechanical control of cell behavior in cell-based cartilage regeneration. PMID:27534990

  12. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  13. Core Binding Factor β Plays a Critical Role During Chondrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Na-Rae; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Han, Min-Su; Che, Xiangguo; Park, Clara Yongjoo; Kim, Jung-Eun; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Bae, Suk-Chul; Choi, Je-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Core binding factor β (Cbfβ) is a partner protein of Runx family transcription factors with minimally characterized function in cartilage. Here we address the role of Cbfβ in cartilage by generating chondrocyte-specific Cbfβ-deficient mice (Cbfb(Δch/Δch) ) from Cbfb-floxed mice crossed with mice expressing Cre from the Col2a1 promoter. Cbfb(Δch/Δch) mice died soon after birth and exhibited delayed endochondral bone formation, shorter appendicular skeleton length with increased proliferative chondrocytes, and nearly absent hypertrophic chondrocyte zones. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the number and size of proliferative chondrocytes increased and the expression of chondrocyte maturation markers at the growth plates, including Runx2, osterix, and osteopontin, significantly diminished in Cbfb(Δch/Δch) mice compared to wild type mice. With regard to signaling pathways, both PTHrP-Ihh and BMP signaling were compromised in Cbfb(Δch/Δch) mice. Mechanistically, Cbfβ deficiency in chondrocytes caused a decrease of protein levels of Runx transcription factors by accelerating polyubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation in vitro. Indeed, Runx2 and Runx3, but not Runx1, decreased in Cbfb(Δch/Δch) mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that Cbfβ plays a critical role for chondrocyte differentiation through stabilizing Runx2 and Runx3 proteins in cartilage. PMID:26058470

  14. Antiangiogenic treatment delays chondrocyte maturation and bone formation during limb skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Melinda; Gentili, Chiara; Koyama, Eiki; Zasloff, Michael; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes have important roles in promoting invasion of cartilage by blood vessels and its replacement with bone. However, it is unclear whether blood vessels exert reciprocal positive influences on chondrocyte maturation and function. Therefore, we implanted beads containing the antiangiogenic molecule squalamine around humeral anlagen in chick embryo wing buds and monitored the effects over time. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the drug diffused from the beads and accumulated in humeral perichondrial tissues, indicating that these tissues were the predominant targets of drug action. Diaphyseal chondrocyte maturation was indeed delayed in squalamine-treated humeri, as indicated by reduced cell hypertrophy and expression of type X collagen, transferrin, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh). Although reduced in amount, Ihh maintained a striking distribution in treated and control humeri, being associated with diaphyseal chondrocytes as well as inner perichondrial layer. These decreases were accompanied by lack of cartilage invasion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) cells and a significant longitudinal growth retardation. Recovery occurred at later developmental times, when in fact expression in treated humeri of markers such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appeared to exceed that in controls. Treating primary cultures of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts with squalamine revealed no obvious changes in cell phenotype. These data provide evidence that perichondrial tissues and blood vessels in particular influence chondrocyte maturation in a positive manner and may cooperate with hypertrophic chondrocytes in dictating the normal pace and location of the transition from cartilage to bone. PMID:11771670

  15. Endothelial cell transplantation onto polymeric arteriovenous grafts evaluated using a canine model.

    PubMed

    Williams, S K; Jarrell, B E; Kleinert, L B

    1994-01-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) placed for hemodialysis access fail in humans due to the thrombogenicity of the flow surface and development of cellular intimal hyperplasia, particularly at the venous anastomosis. The poor patency rates of prosthetic AVG result in significant morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Consequently, investigators have been evaluating methods to improve the patency of prosthetic grafts by examining endothelial cell transplantation as a means of creating an antithrombogenic lining on artificial polymers. A canine model was developed to study the effects of cell transplantation of autologous, fat-derived microvessel endothelial cells (MVEC) onto the luminal surface of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) grafts. Microvessel endothelial cells were isolated from falciform ligament fat, with each dog receiving its own endothelial cells. Isolated cells were subsequently placed into the lumen of the graft (4 mm by 20 cm ePTFE). The graft lumen was pressurized to 5 pounds per square inch (psi) resulting in the partial denucleation of the graft, due to the flow of buffer into the interstices of the graft, and the forced deposition of cells onto the luminal surface. Animals were maintained on aspirin and persantine during the implant phase. During the implant phase, grafts were evaluated by both duplex ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). At explant, gross observation of the sodded grafts revealed a glistening white flow surface with no evidence of thrombosis. Morphologic and scanning electron microscopic evaluations revealed the presence of a cellular lining on the luminal flow surface that exhibited characteristics of antithrombogenic endothelial cells. Midgraft samples were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and indicated that cells on the luminal surface react positively with antibodies to von Willebrand factor. Results from this study demonstrate that the canine model provides an excellent method of studying the

  16. Cathepsin B expression and down-regulation by gene silencing and antisense DNA in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zwicky, Roman; Müntener, Kathrin; Goldring, Mary B; Baici, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Cathepsin B, a marker of the dedifferentiated chondrocyte phenotype, contributes to cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis and pathological proteolysis in rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. In search of possible means for neutralizing the action of this enzyme, we compared its expression, biosynthesis and distribution in articular chondrocytes and two lines of immortalized human chondrocytes. Native articular chondrocytes in primary culture and the polyclonal T/C-28a2 chondrocyte cell line were similar with respect to the number of endosomes and lysosomes, the distribution of three alternatively spliced cathepsin B mRNA forms, and the cathepsin B activity. In contrast, the clonal C-28/I2 cell line contained four times higher levels of intracellular cathepsin B activity, slightly higher numbers of endosomes and lysosomes, and uniform distribution of all three cathepsin B transcripts and thus resembled subcultured chondrocytes at an early stage of dedifferentiation. Transfection of T/C-28a2 chondrocytes with double-stranded cathepsin B mRNA resulted in inhibition of cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 70% due to RNA interference, and single-stranded antisense DNAs of various sizes decreased cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 78%. An antisense oligonucleotide designed to hybridize to the end of cathepsin B's exons 1 and the beginning of exon 3 was successful in specifically inhibiting the mRNA splice variant lacking exon 2. These results indicate that cathepsin B expression and activity may be targeted for gene silencing by RNA interference and antisense DNA in chondrocytes. Furthermore, the differential expression and distribution of cathepsin B and presence of the necessary molecular apparatus for gene silencing in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell lines indicate that they may serve as a useful model for studying the function of relevant enzymes in cartilage pathologies. PMID:12086583

  17. Effects of intermittent versus continuous parathyroid hormone administration on condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qi; Wan, Qilong; Yang, Rongtao; Zhou, Haihua; Li, Zubing

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different PTH administration exerts different effects on condylar chondrocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration suppresses condylar chondrocyte proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous PTH administration maintains condylar chondrocyte proliferating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration enhances condylar chondrocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Endochondral ossification is a complex process involving chondrogenesis and osteogenesis regulated by many hormones and growth factors. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), one of the key hormones regulating bone metabolism, promotes osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis by intermittent administration, whereas continuous PTH administration inhibits bone formation. However, the effects of PTH on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are still unclear. In this study, intermittent PTH administration presented enhanced effects on condylar chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation, as demonstrated by increased mineral nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), ALP, collagen type X (COL10a1), collagen type I (COL1a1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and osterix (OSX) mRNA and/or protein expression. On the contrary, continuous PTH administration promoted condylar chondrocyte proliferation and suppressed its differentiation, as demonstrated by up-regulated collagen type II (COL2a1) mRNA expression, reduced mineral nodule formation and down-regulated expression of the mRNAs and/or proteins mentioned above. Our data suggest that PTH can regulate condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, depending on the type of PTH administration. These results provide new insight into the effects of PTH on condylar chondrocytes and new evidence for using local PTH administration to cure mandibular

  18. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  19. An analysis of a preoperative pediatric autologous blood donation program

    PubMed Central

    Letts, Merv; Perng, Richard; Luke, Brian; Jarvis, James; Lawton, Louis; Hoey, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a pediatric autologous blood donation program. Design A retrospective study of patient charts and blood-bank records. Setting The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, a tertiary care, pediatric centre. Patients One hundred and seventy-three children who received blood transfusions for a total of 182 procedures between June 1987 and June 1997. Interventions Autologous and homologous blood transfusion required for major surgical intervention, primarily spinal fusion. Main outcome measures Surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous blood units required for a given procedure, compliance rate (children’s ability to donate the requested volume of blood), utilization rate of autologous units and rate of allogeneic transfusion. Results The surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous units required for a given procedure was 53.8%. The compliance rate of children to donate the requested amount of blood was 80.3%. In children below the standard age and weight criteria for blood donation the compliance rate was 75.5%. The utilization rate of autologous units obtained was 84.4% and the incidence of allogeneic transfusion was 26.6%. Conclusions There was a high rate of compliance and utilization of predonated autologous blood in the children in the study. Preoperative blood donation programs are safe and effective in children, even in those below the standard age and weight criteria of 10 years and 40 kg. PMID:10812347

  20. Using the diamond intermediate anastomosis in composite sequential bypass grafting for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ailín C; Reddy, Paul W; Cross, K Simon; McMonagle, Morgan P

    2016-04-01

    Composite sequential bypass grafting is an effective alternative in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease when autologous vein is limited. We describe a modified technique for composite sequential bypass grafting anastomosis using a combination of synthetic graft with native vein connected via a common intermediate anastomotic junction, which also benefits from having additional outflow at the native, noncontiguous arteriotomy in a diamond configuration. This technique was piloted on six patients to treat critical limb ischemia when no other revascularization options were deemed suitable. Limb salvage with resolution of symptoms was achieved in all six patients at the 6-month follow-up. The diamond anastomosis is a promising method to maximize limb salvage using a unique composite sequential bypass configuration when native vein is limited. PMID:27016861

  1. Using the diamond intermediate anastomosis in composite sequential bypass grafting for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ailín C; Reddy, Paul W; Cross, K Simon; McMonagle, Morgan P

    2016-04-01

    Composite sequential bypass grafting is an effective alternative in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease when autologous vein is limited. We describe a modified technique for composite sequential bypass grafting anastomosis using a combination of synthetic graft with native vein connected via a common intermediate anastomotic junction, which also benefits from having additional outflow at the native, noncontiguous arteriotomy in a diamond configuration. This technique was piloted on six patients to treat critical limb ischemia when no other revascularization options were deemed suitable. Limb salvage with resolution of symptoms was achieved in all six patients at the 6-month follow-up. The diamond anastomosis is a promising method to maximize limb salvage using a unique composite sequential bypass configuration when native vein is limited.

  2. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  3. Autologous Dendritic Cells Prolong Allograft Survival Through Tmem176b-Dependent Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Charnet, P.; Savina, A.; Tilly, G.; Gautreau, L.; Carretero-Iglesia, L.; Beriou, G.; Cebrian, I.; Cens, T.; Hepburn, L.; Chiffoleau, E.; Floto, R. A.; Anegon, I.; Amigorena, S.; Hill, M.; Cuturi, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The administration of autologous (recipient-derived) tolerogenic dendritic cells (ATDCs) is under clinical evaluation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these cells prolong graft survival in a donor-specific manner is unknown. Here, we tested mouse ATDCs for their therapeutic potential in a skin transplantation model. ATDC injection in combination with anti-CD3 treatment induced the accumulation of CD8+CD11c+ T cells and significantly prolonged allograft survival. TMEM176B is an intracellular protein expressed in ATDCs and initially identified in allograft tolerance. We show that Tmem176b−/− ATDCs completely failed to trigger both phenomena but recovered their effect when loaded with donor peptides before injection. These results strongly suggested that ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present antigens in a tolerogenic fashion. In agreement with this, Tmem176b−/− ATDCs specifically failed to cross-present male antigens or ovalbumin to CD8+ T cells. Finally, we observed that a Tmem176b-dependent cation current controls phagosomal pH, a critical parameter in cross-presentation. Thus, ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present donor antigens to induce donor-specific CD8+CD11c+ T cells with regulatory properties and prolong graft survival. PMID:24731243

  4. Use of novel chitosan hydrogels for chemical tissue bonding of autologous chondral transplants.

    PubMed

    Gittens, Jamila; Haleem, Amgad M; Grenier, Stephanie; Smyth, Niall A; Hannon, Charles P; Ross, Keir A; Torzilli, Peter A; Kennedy, John G

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical tissue bonding (CTB) on adhesion strength, fluid permeability, and cell viability across a cartilaginous graft-host interface in an in vitro autologous chondral transplant (ACT) model. Chitosan-based cross-linkers; Chitosan-Rose Bengal [Chi-RB (Ch-ABC)], Chitosan-Genipin [Chi-GP (Ch-ABC)], and Chitosan-Rose Bengal-Genipin [Chi-RB-GP (Ch-ABC)] were applied to bovine immature cartilage explants after pre-treatment with surface degrading enzyme, Chondroitinase-ABC (Ch-ABC). Adhesion strength, fluid permeability and cell viability were assessed via mechanical push-out shear testing, fluid transport and live/dead cell staining, respectively. All three chitosan-based cross-linkers significantly increased the adhesion strength at the graft-host interface, however, only a statistically significant decrease in fluid permeability was noted in Chi-GP (Ch-ABC) specimen compared to untreated controls. Cell viability was maintained for 7 days of culture across all three treatment groups. These results show the potential clinical relevance of novel chitosan-based hydrogels in enhancing tissue integration and reducing synovial fluid penetration after ACT procedures in diarthoidal joints such as the knee and ankle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1139-1146, 2016.

  5. A novel technique for treating cartilage defects in the hip: a fully arthroscopic approach to using autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Microfracture is the standard of care for the treatment of small cartilage defects in the hip. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a novel, 1-step approach that combines microfracture with a type I/III collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen, Switzerland) to cover the microfractured defect area. The AMIC procedure has been successfully established for treating cartilage defects in the knee and talus, and we report, for the first time, its application in the hip. More importantly, at our center, we have developed a fully arthroscopic approach for the use of AMIC in the hip. Arthroscopic procedures are more desirable than open surgery because they are less invasive and hence reduce the risk of complications, such as infection or avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and allow for a shorter recovery time, resulting not only in lower overall treatment costs but also higher patient satisfaction. The arthroscopic AMIC procedure as described in this report, though surgically challenging, represents a viable, cost-effective treatment option for the repair of chondral lesions of the hip, especially when compared with autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  6. Grafting of burns with widely meshed autograft split skin and Langerhans cell-depressed allograft split skin overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbjoern, B.F.S.; Sorensen, B.

    1986-12-01

    Extensively burned patients suffer from lack of sufficient autologous donor skin. Meshing and wide expansion of the obtained split skin has met the requirement to a large degree. However, the wider the expansion, the less chance of a proper take. By covering widely expanded autografts with viable cadaver split skin, the take has been improved. If the epidermal Langerhans cells in the cadaver split skin are depressed by ultraviolet B light and glucocorticosteroids before grafting, a prolonged allograft take can be achieved and the healing of the underlying autografts is ensured for an extended period. Grafting results in 6 patients with extensive burns are reported.

  7. Maintenance of graft compression in the adult cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Ciaran; Bourlion, Maurice; Leroy, Xavier; Petit, Dominique; Vanacker, Gerard; McEvoy, Linda; Nagaria, Jabir

    2006-08-01

    It is generally advised that the graft inserted in adult cervical spine should be pre-loaded with a compressive force or that the screws are inserted in a divergent orientation, in order to maximise compression and the chance of graft incorporation (Truumees et al. in Spine 28:1097-1102, 2003). However, there is little evidence that a compressive force is maintained once the force applicator has been removed, or that the divergent screws enhance compression. This study compared the maintenance of applied pre-load force, across cervical spine graft, between standard anterior plating technique with pre-load and divergent screws and a novel plate technique, which allows its application prior to removal of the force applicator. Six intact adult cadaveric human cervical spines were exposed by standard surgical technique. A Casper type distracter was inserted across the disc space of interest, the disc was removed. In 14 experiments, following the disc removal, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was inserted under distraction, together with a strain gauge pressure transducer. A resting output from the transducer was recorded. The voltage output has a linear relationship with compressive force. A standardised compressive force was applied across the graft through the "Casper type" distracter/compressor (7.5 kg, torque). The pre-load compressive force was measured using a torque drill. Then two different procedures were used in order to compare the final applied strain on the bone graft. In eight experiments (procedure 1), the "Casper type" distracter/compressor was removed and a standard anterior cervical plate with four divergent screws was inserted. In six experiments (procedure 2), a novel plate design was inserted prior to removal of the distracter/compressor, which is not possible with the standard plate design. A final compressive force across the graft was measured. For the standard plate construct (procedure 1), the applied compression force is significantly

  8. A New Medical Device Rigeneracons Allows to Obtain Viable Micro-Grafts From Mechanical Disaggregation of Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Letizia; Monti, Manuela; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Lampinen, Milla; Ambrosio, Lucia; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Perotti, Cesare; Kankuri, Esko; Ambrosio, Gennaro; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ruggero; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Graziano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Autologous graft is considered the gold standard of graft materials; however, this approach is still limited due to both small amount of tissue that can be collected and to reduced cell viability of cells that can be obtained. The aim of this preliminary study was to demonstrate the efficacy of an innovative medical device called Rigeneracons® (CE certified Class I) to provide autologous micro-grafts immediately available to be used in the clinical practice. Moreover, Rigeneracons® is an instrument able to create micro-grafts enriched of progenitors cells which maintain their regenerative and differentiation potential. We reported preliminary data about viability cell of samples derived from different kind of human tissues, such as periosteum, cardiac atrial appendage biopsy, and lateral rectus muscle of eyeball and disaggregated by Rigeneracons®. In all cases we observed that micro-grafts obtained by Rigeneracons® displayed high cell viability. Furthermore, by cell characterization of periosteum samples, we also evidenced an high positivity to mesenchymal cell markers, suggesting an optimal regenerative potential.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-08-29

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis.

  10. Potassium channels of pig articular chondrocytes are blocked by propofol.

    PubMed

    Mozrzymas, J W; Visintin, M; Vittur, F; Ruzzier, F

    1994-07-15

    The effect of propofol on the voltage-activated potassium channels in pig articular chondrocytes was investigated. Propofol was found to reversibly block the potassium channels in a dose-dependent manner. The blocking effect was voltage-independent and the Hill coefficient was 1.85 +/- 0.18. No changes either in the slope conductance or in the single channel kinetics were observed. The half-blocking concentration (Ec50) was 6.0 +/- 0.49 microM which is much lower than the concentrations used to observe the scavenging effect of the drug in an artificial synovial fluid. Interestingly, Ec50 found in our experiments is also smaller than the blood concentration of propofol used in anaesthesia. These results show that propofol may strongly affect the potassium channels in some non-excitable cells.

  11. Alveolar bone graft with Platelet Rich Plasma in cleft alveolus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandan; Mehrotra, Divya; Mohammad, Shadab; Khanna, Vaibhav; Kumar Singh, Gulshan; Singh, Geeta; Chellappa, Arul A.L.; Passi, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cleft of the lip, palate and alveolus are the commonest congenital anomaly to affect the orofacial region. Currently, there is great interest in the alveolar bone grafting procedures that involve use of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP), to enhance bone formation and specifically to promote bone graft healing. Materials and methods 20 patients with residual alveolar cleft, in the age group of 9–29 years, having unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate were selected. They were randomly assigned in either group A (with PRP) or group B (without PRP). Results Primary healing was observed in 90% patients in group A. Secondary healing was seen in 30% patients in group B. There was no graft rejection in group A but was seen in one patient (10%) in group B. Pain and swelling persisted longer in group B then group A. Bone grafts with added PRP presented with increased bone density (1028.00 ± 11.30 HU) in comparison to grafts without PRP (859.50 ± 27.73 HU) at end of 6-month postoperative. However, the mean bone density (as determined by the Dentascan image analyzer software) was 1.04 times more in the PRP group than non PRP group at 3-month and 1.2 times more at 6 months. Conclusion We conclude that on preliminary investigations, PRP seems to enhance bone formation in alveolar clefts when admixed with autologous cancellous bone harvested from the iliac crest. PMID:25737872

  12. Use of the Vectra polyetherurethaneurea graft for dialysis access in HIV-positive patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schild, A Frederick; Perez, Eduardo A; Gillaspie, Erin; Patel, Asha R; Noicely, Karlene; Baltodano, Neyton

    The primary objective of this study was to establish the safety, efficacy, infection rate, and patency of the Vectra graft (polyetherurethaneurea) for dialysis access in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and end-stage renal disease. The Vectra graft has a unique self-sealing property; therefore we hypothesize that these patients will have fewer infections. A Vectra graft was implanted in 30 consecutive HIV-positive patients without sufficient veins for an autologous fistula. These surgeries were carried out over a 2.5-year period. Primary graft patency was 42% at 12 months and 3 (10%) of the grafts developed infection. This rate of graft infection was less (10% vs 45%) than both our prior experience and published reports using polytetrafluorothene bridge grafts. The unique self-sealing property of the Vectra graft minimizes the development of perigraft hematoma with repetitive needle cannulation and in the immunosuppressed HIV-positive patient, may account for the observed decrease in dialysis access infection.

  13. Posterolateral spinal fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen/PLA composite and autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Bin; Cao, Jun-Kai; Wen, Ning; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Zhong-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Jin; Duan, Cui-Mi; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Wang, Chang-Yong

    2012-04-01

    Spinal fusion is routinely performed to treat low back pain caused by degeneration of intervertebral discs. An autologous bone graft derived from the iliac crest is the standard procedure used for spinal fusion. However, several shortcomings, including pseudarthrosis, pain and the need for blood transfusion are known to be associated with the procedure. Our study analysed the effectiveness of a new mineralized collagen matrix, nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen-polylactic acid (nHAC-PLA), combined with autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) as a graft material for posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model. Forty rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: autologous iliac crest bone group (ACB), nHAC-PLA composite group (nHAC-PLA), autologous iliac crest bone mixed with nHAC-PLA composite group (ACB + nHAC-PLA), and nHAC-PLA composite combined with ADMSCs (ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA). The viability and the proliferation of the ADMSCs seeded on the scaffolds were evaluated by live/dead kit and MTT assay in vitro, respectively. Lumbar posterolateral fusions were assessed by manual palpation, radiographical and histological procedures, mechanical strength and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) in 10 weeks of observation. The results showed that the rate of fusion was significantly higher in the ACB and ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA groups than that in the nHAC-PLA and ACB + nHAC-PLA groups. It was not significantly higher in the ACB group than in the ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA group. From microstructural analysis of the samples using histological staining methods, there was more new bone-like tissue formation in the ACB and ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA groups than that in the other two groups at the 10th postoperative week. Our study demonstrated the effective impact of nHAC-PLA combined with ADMSCs in rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion.

  14. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  15. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes