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Sample records for automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic

  1. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  2. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  3. SPECIATION ANALYSIS OF ARSENIC IN BIOLOGICAL MATRICES BY AUTOMATED HYDRIDE GENERATION-CRYOTRAPPING-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH MULTIPLE MICROFLAME QUARTZ TUBE ATOMIZER (MULTIATOMIZER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Analyses of arsenic (As) species in tissues and body fluids of individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic (iAs) provide essential information about the exposure level and pattern of iAs metabolism. We have previously described an oxidation state-specifi...

  4. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass ...

  5. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.E.; McLain, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of natural-water samples for antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Samples are prepared for analysis by addition of potassium and hydrochloric acid followed by an autoclave digestion. After the digestion, potassium iodide and sodium borohydride are added automatically. Antimony hydride (stibine) gas is generated, then swept into a heated quartz cell for determination of antimony by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Precision and accuracy data are presented. Results obtained on standard reference water samples agree with means established by interlaboratory studies. Spike recoveries for actual samples range from 90 to 114 percent. Replicate analyses of water samples of varying matrices give relative standard deviations from 3 to 10 percent.

  7. Hydriding process

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  8. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  9. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction.

  10. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  11. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  12. On-line UV-photooxidation with peroxodisulfate for automated flow injection and for high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sperling, Michael; Welz, Bernhard

    2000-04-01

    An automated on-line UV photooxidation with peroxodisulfate of some environmentally relevant organoarsenic and organotin compounds in a system built from commercially available modules has been studied and optimised with a view to both species-independent quantification of the total arsenic or tin in samples containing different organic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HGAAS) and speciation analysis by coupled high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with HGAAS detection. For organoarsenicals, the reaction with alkaline peroxodisulfate in a 10-15-m knotted reactor for >1.5 min insures >90% transformation of inorganic As(III) and six organoarsenic species to arsenate: monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, trimethylarsine oxide and tetramethylarsonium. For organotins, the UV photooxidation with acidic peroxodisulfate at 95-100°C provides recoveries of >80% for the inorganic tin, dimethyltin, trimethyltin, triethyltin, tripropyltin, triphenyltin, monobutyltin, dibutyltin and tributyltin but only approximately 15% for tetrabutyltin. The best characteristic masses in integrated absorbance ( Aint) and peak-height ( Ap) measurements, respectively, are 30 pg and 480 pg for arsenic(V) and 22 pg and 410 pg for tin(IV), employing 100-μl injections. The RSDs are 5.5% and 8.5% at 5 ng As(V) levels and 4.3% and 6.4% at 10 ng Sn(IV) levels in Aint and Ap modes, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD, 3σ) for As are 7 μg l -1 and 4 μg l -1 in FI-UV-HGAAS and HPLC-UV-HGAAS, respectively. The LODs for i-Sn(IV) are 2 μg l -1 in FI-UV-HGAAS, with both Aint and Ap measurements. The sample throughput rates are 20 and 12 samples per hour with 10-m and 15-m knotted reactors (i.d. 0.5 mm), respectively. Urine certified reference materials containing 0.052-0.48 μg ml -1 As have been analysed for their total arsenic content.

  13. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  14. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  15. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  16. Chemistry of intermetallic hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Certain intermetallic hydrides are safe, convenient and inexpensive hydrogen storage compounds. A particular advantage of such compounds is the ease with which their properties can be modified by small changes in alloy composition or preparation. This quality can be exploited to optimize their storage properties for particular applications, e.g. as intermetallic hydride electrodes in batteries. We will be concerned herein with the more important aspects of the thermodynamic and structural principles which regulate the behavior of intermetallic hydrogen systems and then illustrate their application using the archetype hydrides of LaNi5, FeTi and Mg alloys. The practical utility of these classes of materials will be briefly noted.

  17. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  18. Hydride heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1977-01-01

    Method and apparatus for the use of hydrides to exhaust heat from one temperature source and deliver the thermal energy extracted for use at a higher temperature, thereby acting as a heat pump. For this purpose there are employed a pair of hydridable metal compounds having different characteristics working together in a closed pressure system employing a high temperature source to upgrade the heat supplied from a low temperature source.

  19. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  20. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  1. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  2. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  3. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  4. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  5. Materials engineering of metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic hydrides of the AB/sub 5/ type have enthalpies in the range valid for chemical heat pumps. A scheme for manufacturing hydrides with optimal properties for a chemical heat pump is described, using LaNi/sub 5-x/Al/sub x/ and ZrV/sub 2x/Cr/sub x as examples. The Laves-phase ternary hydrides appear to be good candidates for gettering hydrogen in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. (DLC)

  6. Superstoichiometric hydride of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.; Shchepetkin, A.A.; Zabolotskaya, E.V.; Pletnev, R.N.; Alyamovskii, S.I.; Kitaev, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    Superstoichiometric hydrides of zirconium have been obtained all the way up to the composition ZrH/sub 2.4/ by additional hydrogenation of ZrH/sub 2/ as a result of redistribution of hydrogen atoms between t- and o-positions. In the preparation of the hydrides the authors used zirconium iodide with an impurity content no greater than 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -2/ mole %; the hydrogen and helium used in this work had a minimum purity of 99.95%. The content of hydrogen in the specimens was determined by a volumetric method. The x-ray diffraction analysis was performed in a DRON-2.0 unit (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation). PMR spectra were recorded in a broad-line spectrometer in the temperature interval 150-450 K.

  7. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  8. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, R. Morris

    1990-10-30

    A process for the non-catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds, which contain at least one reducible functional group, which comprises reacting the organic compound, a hydride complex, preferably a transition metal hydride complex or an organosilane, and a strong acid in a liquid phase.

  10. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  11. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  12. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  13. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  14. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  15. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-03-10

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was imitated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized and the knowledge on the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant part of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides are collaborators in the IEA task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of the complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides and their thermodynamic properties, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  16. A new route to metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.W.; Zahurak, S.M.; Vyas, B.; Thomas, M.; Badding, M.E.; Fang, W.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Aqueous borohydride is shown to be an effective reagent for hydriding metals and intermetallics. It is the hydriding equivalent of 20-30 atm of H[sub 2]. The reaction is a convenient way to screen materials for hydride formation and possible utility in applications such as nickel-metal hydride batteries. The reaction is also a convenient alternative to decrepitation for the production of free flowing powders. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Gas-phase acidities of binary hydrides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauman, J. I.; Eyler, J. R.; Blair, L. K.; White, M. J.; Comisarow, M. B.; Smyth, K. C.

    1971-01-01

    The preferred direction of proton transfer in a reaction between a hydride molecule and a hydride ion was studied in order to determine the relative acidities of some binary hydrides. Sufficient data are presented to make clear the periodic trends in acidities and the underlying trends in other fundamental thermochemical quantities which influence acidity. The bond dissociation energies and electron affinities of the hydrides considered are listed in a table.

  18. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  19. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  20. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  1. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  2. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  3. Characterization of hydrides and delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiang

    This thesis tries to fill some of the missing gaps in the study of zirconium hydrides with state-of-art experiments, cutting edge tomographical technique, and a novel numerical algorithm. A new hydriding procedure is proposed. The new anode material and solution combination overcomes many drawbacks of the AECLRTM hydriding method and leads to superior hydriding result compared to the AECL RTM hydriding procedure. The DHC crack growth velocity of as-received Excel alloy and Zr-2.5Nb alloy together with several different heat treated Excel alloy samples are measured. While it already known that the DHC crack growth velocity increases with the increase of base metal strength, the finding that the transverse plane is the weaker plane for fatigue crack growth despite having higher resistance to DHC crack growth was unexpected. The morphologies of hydrides in a coarse grained Zircally-2 sample have been studied using synchrotron x-rays at ESRF with a new technique called Diffraction Contrast Tomography that uses simultaneous collection of tomographic data and diffraction data to determine the crystallographic orientation of crystallites (grains) in 3D. It has been previously limited to light metals such as Al or Mg (due to the use of low energy x-rays). Here we show the first DCT measurements using high energy x-rays (60 keV), allowing measurements in zirconium. A new algorithm of a computationally effcient way to characterize distributions of hydrides - in particular their orientation and/or connectivity - has been proposed. It is a modification of the standard Hough transform, which is an extension of the Hough transform widely used in the line detection of EBSD patterns. Finally, a basic model of hydrogen migration is built using ABAQUS RTM, which is a mature finite element package with tested modeling modules of a variety of physical laws. The coupling of hydrogen diffusion, lattice expansion, matrix deformation and phase transformation is investigated under

  4. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the Electro Energy, Inc.'s bipolar nickel metal hydride battery. The advantages of the design are that each cell is individually sealed, and that there are no external cell terminals, no electrode current collectors, it is compatible with plastic bonded electrodes, adaptable to heat transfer fins, scalable to large area, capacity and high voltage. The design will allow for automated flexible manufacturing, improved energy and power density and lower cost. The development and testing of the battery's component are described. Graphic presentation of the results of many of the tests are included.

  5. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  6. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  7. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  8. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  9. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-09-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  10. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  11. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  12. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  13. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  14. Multi-stage hydride-hydrogen compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golben, P. M.

    A 4-stage metal hydride/hydrogen compressor that uses low temperature hot water (75 C) as its energy source has been built and tested. The compressor utilizes a new hydride heat exchanger technique that has achieved fast cycling time (with 20 C cooling water) on the order of 1 min. This refinement substantially decreases the size, weight and cost of the unit when compared to previous hydride compressors or even conventional mechanical diaphragm compressors.

  15. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  16. Ten degree Kelvin hydride refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A compact hydride absorption refrigeration system with few moving parts for 10 Kelvin operation is disclosed and comprises liquid hydrogen producing means in combination with means for solidifying and subliming the liquid hydrogen produced. The liquid hydrogen is sublimed at about 10 Kelvin. By using a symmetrical all hydrogen redundant loop system, a 10 Kelvin refrigeration system can be operated for many years with only a fraction of the power required for prior art systems.

  17. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  18. Coinage Metal Hydrides: Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Abraham J; Lalic, Gojko; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2016-08-10

    Hydride complexes of copper, silver, and gold encompass a broad array of structures, and their distinctive reactivity has enabled dramatic recent advances in synthesis and catalysis. This Review summarizes the synthesis, characterization, and key stoichiometric reactions of isolable or observable coinage metal hydrides. It discusses catalytic processes in which coinage metal hydrides are known or probable intermediates, and presents mechanistic studies of selected catalytic reactions. The purpose of this Review is to convey how developments in coinage metal hydride chemistry have led to new organic transformations, and how developments in catalysis have in turn inspired the synthesis of reactive new complexes.

  19. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  20. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  1. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  2. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  3. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  4. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  5. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  6. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  7. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  8. High-pressure synthesis of lithium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howie, Ross T.; Narygina, Olga; Guillaume, Christophe L.; Evans, Shaun; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2012-08-01

    By compressing elemental lithium and hydrogen in a diamond anvil cell, we have synthesized lithium hydride (LiH) at pressures as low as 50 MPa at room temperature. Combined Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that, once synthesized, LiH remains stable at 300 K up to 160 GPa in the presence of molecular hydrogen. The mixture of lithium hydride and molecular hydrogen and application of pressure alone cannot form a higher H2 content hydride (LiHx, x>1) as was suggested from the theoretical ab initio calculations and therefore, cannot be considered as a route to low-pressure hydrogen rich material metallization.

  9. Computational Modeling of Uranium Hydriding and Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K; Siekhaus, W J; McLean, W

    2003-02-03

    Uranium hydriding is one of the most important processes that has received considerable attention over many years. Although many experimental and modeling studies have been carried out concerning thermochemistry, diffusion kinetics and mechanisms of U-hydriding, very little is known about the electronic structure and electronic features that govern the U-hydriding process. Yet it is the electronic feature that controls the activation barrier and thus the rate of hydriding. Moreover the role of impurities and the role of the product UH{sub 3} on hydriding rating are not fully understood. An early study by Condon and Larson concerns with the kinetics of U-hydrogen system and a mathematical model for the U-hydriding process. They proposed that diffusion in the reactant phase by hydrogen before nucleation to form hydride phase and that the reaction is first order for hydriding and zero order for dehydriding. Condon has also calculated and measures the reaction rates of U-hydriding and proposed a diffusion model for the U-hydriding. This model was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental reaction rates. From the slopes of the Arrhenius plot the activation energy was calculated as 6.35 kcal/mole. In a subsequent study Kirkpatrick formulated a close-form for approximate solution to Condon's equation. Bloch and Mintz have proposed the kinetics and mechanism for the U-H reaction over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. They have discussed their results through two models, one, which considers hydrogen diffusion through a protective UH{sub 3} product layer, and the second where hydride growth occurs at the hydride-metal interface. These authors obtained two-dimensional fits of experimental data to the pressure-temperature reactions. Kirkpatrick and Condon have obtained a linear solution to hydriding of uranium. These authors showed that the calculated reaction rates compared quite well with the experimental data at a hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Powell

  10. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  11. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  12. A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-09-28

    A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

  13. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGES

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  14. Hydride fuel behavior in LWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Donald R.; Ng, Marowen

    2005-11-01

    The U-Zr hydride U 0.31ZrH 1.6 offers a number of advantages over oxide fuel for light-water reactors. Fission-gas release appears to be very small (release fraction ˜10 -4) up to 600 °C, which is close to the maximum fuel temperature. Initial irradiation-induced swelling can be as large as 5% for temperatures exceeding 650 °C. Hydrogen redistributes due to the non-uniform temperature in the fuel from the as-fabricated H/Zr of 1.6 to one that is higher at the pellet periphery than at the centerline. Radial redistribution produces 'hydrogen' stresses in the pellet which add to the usual thermal stresses. In a helium-bonded fuel rod, the total stresses are less than the fracture stress; in a liquid-metal-bonded fuel rod, the fracture stress is exceeded in the central portion of the pellet, but the surface remains in compression. Axial redistribution moves substantial quantities of hydrogen from the middle portion of the fuel stack to the ends. The neutronic effect of this displacement of the moderator is unknown.

  15. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  16. Metal Hydride Heat Storage Technology for Directed Energy Weapon Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-16

    over time after the pulse operation. A compressor -driven metal hydride heat storage system was developed for efficient, compact heat storage and...principle and heat storage performance results of the compressor -driven metal hydride heat storage system through system modeling and prototype testing. The...hyd/m³] Subscripts A Metal hydride reactor B Hydrogen container C Hydrogen compressor s Hydrogen solid phase in hydride f Hydrogen fluid phase

  17. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  18. Reactivity of yttrium carboxylates toward alkylaluminum hydrides.

    PubMed

    Schädle, Christoph; Fischbach, Andreas; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

    2013-11-25

    Yttrocene-carboxylate complex [Cp*2Y(OOCAr(Me))] (Cp*=C5Me5, Ar(Me) =C6H2Me3-2,4,6) was synthesized as a spectroscopically versatile model system for investigating the reactivity of alkylaluminum hydrides towards rare-earth-metal carboxylates. Equimolar reactions with bis-neosilylaluminum hydride and dimethylaluminum hydride gave adduct complexes of the general formula [Cp*2Y(μ-OOCAr(Me))(μ-H)AlR2] (R=CH2SiMe3, Me). The use of an excess of the respective aluminum hydride led to the formation of product mixtures, from which the yttrium-aluminum-hydride complex [{Cp*2Y(μ-H)AlMe2(μ-H)AlMe2(μ-CH3)}2] could be isolated, which features a 12-membered-ring structure. The adduct complexes [Cp*2Y(μ-OOCAr(Me))(μ-H)AlR2] display identical (1)J(Y,H) coupling constants of 24.5 Hz for the bridging hydrido ligands and similar (89)Y NMR shifts of δ=-88.1 ppm (R=CH2SiMe3) and δ=-86.3 ppm (R=Me) in the (89)Y DEPT45 NMR experiments.

  19. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  20. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  1. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  2. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  3. Iron Group Hydrides in Noyori Bifunctional Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-12-01

    This is an overview of the hydride-containing catalysts prepared in the Morris group for the efficient hydrogenation of simple ketones, imines, nitriles and esters and the asymmetric hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of prochiral ketones and imines. The work was inspired by and makes use of Noyori metal-ligand bifunctional concepts involving the hydride-ruthenium amine-hydrogen HRuNH design. It describes the synthesis and some catalytic properties of hydridochloro, dihydride and amide complexes of ruthenium and in one case, osmium, with monodentate, bidentate and tetradentate phosphorus and nitrogen donor ligands. The iron hydride that has been identified in a very effective asymmetric transfer hydrogenation process is also mentioned. The link between the HMNH structure and the sense of enantioinduction is demonstrated by use of simple transition state models.

  4. 1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Hydride formation on deformation twin in zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Sung-Dae; Yoon, Jonghun

    2016-12-01

    Hydrides deteriorate the mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) alloys used in nuclear reactors. Intergranular hydrides that form along grain boundaries have been extensively studied due to their detrimental effects on cracking. However, it has been little concerns on formation of Zr hydrides correlated with deformation twins which is distinctive heterogeneous nucleation site in hexagonal close-packed metals. In this paper, the heterogeneous precipitation of Zr hydrides at the twin boundaries was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. It demonstrates that intragranular hydrides in the twinned region precipitates on the rotated habit plane by the twinning and intergranular hydrides precipitate along the coherent low energy twin boundaries independent of the conventional habit planes. Interestingly, dislocations around the twin boundaries play a substantial role in the nucleation of Zr hydrides by reducing the misfit strain energy.

  6. Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Knosp, Bernard; Bouet, Jacques; Jordy, Christian; Mimoun, Michel; Gicquel, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

  7. Ductility Evaluation of As-Hydrided and Hydride Reoriented Zircaloy-4 Cladding under Simulated Dry-Storage Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Plummer, Lee K; Ray, Holly B; Cook, Tyler S; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2014-01-01

    Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage expose cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to normal operation in-reactor and pool storage under these conditions. Radial hydrides could precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. As a means of simulating this behavior, unirradiated hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were fabricated by a gas charging method to levels that encompass the range of hydrogen concentrations observed in current used fuel. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression test (RCT) method at various temperatures to evaluate the sample s ductility for both as-hydrided and post-hydride reorientation treated specimens. As-hydrided samples with higher hydrogen concentration (>800 ppm) resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. Increasing RCT temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the as-hydrided cladding. A systematic radial hydride treatment was conducted at various pressures and temperatures for the hydrided samples with H content around 200 ppm. Following the radial hydride treatment, RCTs on the hydride reoriented samples were conducted and exhibited lower ductility compared to as-hydrided samples.

  8. A thermokinetically driven metal-hydride actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangmok; Kim, Kwang J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a novel thermokinetically-driven actuator technology based on the physics of metal hydrides (MH's). A metal hydride absorbs and desorbs hydrogen due to the imposed temperature swing(s). The MH can also work as an effective thermally-driven hydrogen compressor producing more than 5,000 psia net pressure swing. The MH actuation system can be built in a simple structure, exhibits high power, produces soft actuating, and is essentially noiseless. Moreover, it is much more powerful and compact than conventional pneumatic systems that require bulky auxiliary systems. It is our belief that the MH actuators are useful for many emerging industrial, biorobotic, and civil structural applications. In this paper, we report the recent preliminary experimental results for a laboratory-prototyped MH actuation system. In particular, the dynamic response characteristics, enhanced controllability, thermodynamic performances, and reliability of the metal hydride actuator were studied in order to estimate the actuation capability of the MH actuator. A unique design of the MH actuator was created. It encases a so-called "porous metal hydride (PMH)" in the reactor to effectively achieve desirable performance by improving overall thermal conductance.

  9. X-Ray Topography of Hydride Domains.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    boundaries between hydride (deuteride) domains, and the irregular boundaries correspond to incoherent twin boundaries . Trace analysis of the coherent...topographs of the NbHo.78 and NbO 0 .75 crystals. As discussed by Schober and Linke (1976b), the straight boundaries correspond to coherent twin

  10. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2006-10-17

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  11. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  12. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  13. Synthesis and properties of platinum hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Thomas; Degtyareva, Olga; Marqués, Miriam; Guillaume, Christophe L.; Proctor, John E.; Evans, Shaun; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments on compressed platinum-hydrogen mixtures reveal the formation of platinum hydride at a pressure of 27(1) GPa at room temperature. This compound exhibits two phases, PtH-I and PtH-II, coexisting up to the pressure of 42 GPa, above which the single phase of PtH-II is observed. Pt atoms in the PtH-II phase are shown to form a hexagonal closed-packed structure. This phase exhibits a high bulk modulus of 310 (10) GPa and is stable up to at least 53 GPa. Ab initio calculations show that PtH-II is superconducting with Tc = 12 K at 90 GPa, the highest temperature of superconducting transition among any known metal hydride.

  14. Unoccupied electronic states in cerium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, J.; Schlapbach, L.

    1985-05-01

    We present UV isochromat spectra of polycrystalline CeH 2.1 and CeH 2.9. The intensity at EF is small in CeH 2.1 and vanishes in CeH 2.9 as it is expected from XPS, UPS and conductivity data. In both hydrides broad features (≈2 eV FWHM) appear between 4 and 5 eV above EF. This is in qualitative agreement with bandstructure calculations.

  15. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  16. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  17. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  18. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  19. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  20. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  1. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  2. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  3. Hydride phase formation in carbon supported palladium hydride nanoparticles by in situ EXAFS and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lazzarini, A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Vitillo, J. G.; Piovano, A.; Groppo, E.; Bugaev, L. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. P.; Pellegrini, R.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the current work we present a detailed analysis of the hydride phase formation in industrial Pd/C nanocatalysts by means of combined in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and volumetric measurements for the temperatures from - 10 to 50 °C in the hydrogen pressure range from 0 to 1000 mbar. α- and β- hydride phases are clearly distinguished in XRD. For the first time, H/Pd atomic ratio were obtained by theoretical fitting of the near-edge region of the absorption spectra (XANES) and compared with volumetric measurements.

  4. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  5. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  6. Metal-hydride energy-technological processing of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovei, V. V.

    1983-03-01

    The external and internal irreversibility of the thermochemical hydrogen compression cycle is analyzed in relation to the efficiency of heat utilization in a metal-hydride energy system. The properties of the working fluid and the design of the metal-hydride elements are shown to have a considerable effect on the thermodynamic performance of a heat-utilizing installation for hydrogen processing.

  7. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  8. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  9. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  10. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  11. Hydride morphology and striation formation during delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5% Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shek, G. K.; Jovanoviċ, M. T.; Seahra, H.; Ma, Y.; Li, D.; Eadie, R. L.

    1996-08-01

    These experiments were designed to study hydride formation at the crack tip, acoustic emission (AE), potential drop (PD) and striation formation during DHC (delayed hydride cracking) in Zr-2.5% Nb. The test material was taken from an especially extrude pressure tube, which showed similar strength properties to normal pressure tube material but somewhat coarser microstructure. In testing at KI below 12 MPa √m at both 200 and 250°C very large striations (> 40 μ at 200 and >50 μm at 250°C) were produced. In simultaneous monitoring with acoustic emission and potential drop, both AE and PD jumps were shown to be monolithic. The number of striations on the fracture surface corresponded to the number of monolithic AE/PD jumps. Tapered shaped hydrides with the thick end adjacent to the crack tip were observed. These hydrides grew in size during the incubation period until they reached the striation length and then fractured monolithically. However, when KI was increased beyond about 12 MPa √m for these same specimens, the striation spacing decreased below 30 μ, the monolithic jumping dissolved into more continuous changes in signals, although the smaller striations were still visible on the fracture surface.

  12. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Yan, Yong; Wang, Hong

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  13. A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W.

    1996-08-01

    One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

  14. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, William A.; Olsen, Clayton E.

    1982-01-01

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  15. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

    1980-03-12

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  16. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  17. Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2013-06-01

    Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

  18. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen M.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  19. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  20. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  1. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  2. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2010-08-10

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  3. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  4. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  5. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S.; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-05-01

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110 GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular “H2” in YH4 and hexagonal “H6” unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84-95 K and 251-264 K at 120 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40 K in YH3.

  6. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-05-05

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110 GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular "H2" in YH4 and hexagonal "H6" unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84-95 K and 251-264 K at 120 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40 K in YH3.

  7. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S.; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110 GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular “H2” in YH4 and hexagonal “H6” unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84–95 K and 251–264 K at 120 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40 K in YH3. PMID:25942452

  8. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride Using Trimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    D Lacina; J Reilly; Y Celebi; J Wegrzyn; J Johnson; J Graetz

    2011-12-31

    Aluminum hydride is an attractive reducing agent and energy storage compound possessing a low decomposition temperature and a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density. However, it is thermodynamically unstable at room temperature and requires extremely high pressures to form the hydride from aluminum and hydrogen gas. Here, we describe an alternate method of synthesizing AlH{sub 3} using Ti-catalyzed Al powder, H{sub 2}, and trimethylamine (TMA) to form an alane adduct. The formation of trimethylamine alane occurs at modest hydrogen pressures ({approx}100 bar), forming the 2:1 bis complex (2 trimethylamine/AlH{sub 3}). Along with the hydrogenation product, mono (1:1) and bis (2:1) standards of TMA-AlH{sub 3} were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the reaction products showed that the Ti catalyst remains with the unreacted Al powder after hydrogenation and is not present in the alane adduct. We also demonstrate that TMA can be transaminated with triethylamine to form triethylamine alane, which can easily be separated to recover AlH{sub 3}.

  10. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  11. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  12. A study of hydriding kinetics of metal hydrides using a physically based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskuilen, Tyler G.

    The reaction of hydrogen with metals to form metal hydrides has numerous potential energy storage and management applications. The metal hydrogen system has a high volumetric energy density and is often reversible with a high cycle life. The stored hydrogen can be used to produce energy through combustion, reaction in a fuel cell, or electrochemically in metal hydride batteries. The high enthalpy of the metal-hydrogen reaction can also be used for rapid heat removal or delivery. However, improving the often poor gravimetric performance of such systems through the use of lightweight metals usually comes at the cost of reduced reaction rates or the requirement of pressure and temperature conditions far from the desired operating conditions. In this work, a 700 bar Sievert system was developed at the Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory to study the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of high pressure hydrogen absorption under near-ambient temperatures. This system was used to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of TiCrMn, an intermetallic metal hydride of interest due to its ambient temperature performance for vehicular applications. A commonly studied intermetallic hydride, LaNi5, was also characterized as a base case for the phase field model. The analysis of the data obtained from such a system necessitate the use of specialized techniques to decouple the measured reaction rates from experimental conditions. These techniques were also developed as a part of this work. Finally, a phase field model of metal hydride formation in mass-transport limited interstitial solute reactions based on the regular solution model was developed and compared with measured kinetics of LaNi5 and TiCrMn. This model aided in the identification of key reaction features and was used to verify the proposed technique for the analysis of gas-solid reaction rates determined volumetrically. Additionally, the phase field model provided detailed quantitative predictions of the

  13. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)].

  14. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX₃ Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-10-31

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H₂ gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)₂ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX₃ compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt₃. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+, to form B–H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔGH °) of HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX₃ compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX₃ compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)₂ was observed to transfer H to BX₃ compounds with X = H, OC₆F₅, and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)₃ is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH₃)₂ and dmpe-(BH₂(SPh))₂ products that follow from a reduction of multiple B–SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)₂ and B(SPh)₃ in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et₃N–BH₂SPh and Et₃N–BH₃ with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ with B(SPh)₃ under analogous conditions give Et₃N–BH₂SPh as the final product along with the nickel–thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)₂(SPh)]+. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)₂ (dedpe = Et₂PCH₂CH₂PPh₂) from H₂ and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)₂Co(dedpe)₂][BF₄].

  15. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  16. Hot temperatures line lists for metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, M.; Lodi, L.; Leyland, P. pC; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    The ExoMol project is an ERC funded project set up with the purpose of calculating high quality theoretical molecular line list data to facilitate the emerging field of exoplanet and cool star atmospheric haracterisation [1]. Metal hydrides are important building blocks of interstellar physical chemistry. For molecular identification and characterisation in astrophysical sources, one requires accurate and complete spectroscopic data including transitional frequencies and intensities in the form of a line list. The ab initio methods offer the best opportunity for detailed theoretical studies of free diatomic metal hydrides and other simple hydride molecules. In this contribution we present progress on theoretical line lists for AlH, CrH, MgH, NiH, NaH and TiH obtained from first principles, applicable for a large range of temperatures up to 3500 K. Among the hydrides, AlH is of special interest because of a relatively high cosmic abundance of aluminium. The presence of AlH has been detected in the spectra of M-type and S-type stars as well as in sunspots (See [2] and references therein). CrH is a molecule of astrophysical interest; under the classification scheme developed by Kirkpatrick et al [3], CrH is of importance in distinguishing L type brown dwarfs. It has been proposed that theoretical line-lists of CrH and CrD could be used to facilitate a 'Deuterium test' for use in distinguishing planets, brown dwarfs and stars [5] and also it has been speculated that CrH exists in sunspots [4] but a higherquality hot-temperature line-list is needed to confirm this finding. The presence of MgH in stellar spectra is well documented through observation of the A2 ! X 2+ and B0 2+ ! X 2+ transitions. Different spectral features of MgH have been used as an indicator for the magnesium isotope abundances in the atmospheres of different stars from giants to dwarfs including the Sun, to measure the temperature of stars, surface gravity, stars' metal abundance, gravitational, as

  17. Synthesis and some reactions of dibutyltin (S)- and (R)-camphorsulfonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kinart, Wojciech J; Kinart, Cezary M; Kozak, Monika; Kinart, Andrzej; Sendecki, Marcin; Matczak, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    The synthesis and physical properties of dibutyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (1) and dibutyltin (R)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (2), and diphenyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (3) as well as that of their organotin precursors are described. Their reactivity with different amines as triethylamine, morpholine and pyridine has been compared with other mixed hydrides as dibutyltin chloride hydride, dibutyltin acetate hydride and dibutyltin dihydride. It has been studied also the possibility of using of dibutyltin (R)- or (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydrides for the stereoselective reduction of different ketones as acetophenone, menthon, camphor and cyclopropyl-(4-metoxyphenyl)-methanone. The reduction of acetophenone with studied camphorsulfonyl hydrides carried out in benzene at room temperature afforded 1-phenylethanol with relatively low enantioselectivity. Addition of 10 equiv. of MnCl(2)*4H(2)O or ZnCl(2) to the reduction mixture involving dibutyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (1) and acetophenone and carried out in methanol and tetrahydrofuran, respectively, resulted in remarkable increase in enantioselectivity. The comparative kinetic studies of reduction of acetophenone by different hydrides proved that dibutyltin camphorsulfonyl hydride is significantly more reactive in comparison with dibutyltin chloro hydride and dibutyltin acetate hydride. Analogous results have been obtained from kinetic studies for different tin hydrides with chosen amines. The outcome of these studies supported by theoretical calculations led to the conclusion that the order of reactivity of the studied hydrides correlates with the rate of their homolytic decomposition at room temperature.

  18. Office automation.

    PubMed

    Arenson, R L

    1986-03-01

    By now, the term "office automation" should have more meaning for those readers who are not intimately familiar with the subject. Not all of the preceding material pertains to every department or practice, but certainly, word processing and simple telephone management are key items. The size and complexity of the organization will dictate the usefulness of electronic mail and calendar management, and the individual radiologist's personal needs and habits will determine the usefulness of the home computer. Perhaps the most important ingredient for success in the office automation arena relates to the ability to integrate information from various systems in a simple and flexible manner. Unfortunately, this is perhaps the one area that most office automation systems have ignored or handled poorly. In the personal computer world, there has been much emphasis recently on integration of packages such as spreadsheet, database management, word processing, graphics, time management, and communications. This same philosophy of integration has been applied to a few office automation systems, but these are generally vendor-specific and do not allow for a mixture of foreign subsystems. During the next few years, it is likely that a few vendors will emerge as dominant in this integrated office automation field and will stress simplicity and flexibility as major components.

  19. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  20. Structural Characterization of Metal Hydrides for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lyci

    Hydrogen can be an unlimited source of clean energy for future because of its very high energy density compared to the conventional fuels like gasoline. An efficient and safer way of storing hydrogen is in metals and alloys as hydrides. Light metal hydrides, alanates and borohydrides have very good hydrogen storage capacity, but high operation temperatures hinder their application. Improvement of thermodynamic properties of these hydrides is important for their commercial use as a source of energy. Application of pressure on materials can have influence on their properties favoring hydrogen storage. Hydrogen desorption in many complex hydrides occurs above the transition temperature. Therefore, it is important to study the physical properties of the hydride compounds at ambient and high pressure and/or high temperature conditions, which can assist in the design of suitable storage materials with desired thermodynamic properties. The high pressure-temperature phase diagram, thermal expansion and compressibility have only been evaluated for a limited number of hydrides so far. This situation serves as a main motivation for studying such properties of a number of technologically important hydrides. Focus of this dissertation was on X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies of Mg2FeH6, Ca(BH4) 2, Mg(BH4)2, NaBH4, NaAlH4, LiAlH4, LiNH2BH3 and mixture of MgH 2 with AlH3 or Si, at different conditions of pressure and temperature, to obtain their bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficient. These data are potential source of information regarding inter-atomic forces and also serve as a basis for developing theoretical models. Some high pressure phases were identified for the complex hydrides in this study which may have better hydrogen storage properties than the ambient phase. The results showed that the highly compressible B-H or Al-H bonds and the associated bond disordering under pressure is responsible for phase transitions observed in brorohydrides or

  1. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  2. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    a solid with six crystalline phases. In principle, alane is a promising propellant . The specific impulse of an AP/HTPB propellant mixed with alane...Distribution approved for public release. 2     Introduction Boranes (boron hydrides) were once thought to be promising propellants .1-14 The reasons...diborane, hydrogen, and a white solid . Whatley et al.8 studied the products of diborane oxidation. Roth and co-workers9 found HOBO to be the main

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-23

    In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH

  4. Relativistic effects on sixth group hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani, L.; Clementi, E.

    1994-08-01

    Dirac-Fock (DF) and Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations have been performed for the ground state configuration of the H2O, H2S, H2Se, H2Te, and H2Po molecules. Equilibrium geometries, atomization energies, and molecular orbitals energies are evaluated with both methods, compared and discussed with the help of population analysis and atomic orbital energies. Particular attention has been given to a qualitative understanding of the relativistic effects. Molecular spin-orbits corrections appear to be essential to a description of some in the sixth group hydrides set. A description of the relativistic computer program is presented elsewhere [L. Pisani and E. Clementi, J. Comput. Chem. (in press)].

  5. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  6. Far-infrared spectrum of sodium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, K. R.; Zink, L. R.; Evenson, K. M.; Jennings, D. A.

    1987-03-01

    Rotational spectra in the v = 0, 1, 2, and 3 levels of the ground ( 1Σ) state of sodium hydride have been observed using tunable far-infrared radiation generated from the difference frequency between two CO 2 lasers. The Dunham coefficients, which have been determined without the use of optical data or isotopic scaling relations, are Y01 = 146 999.138(38) MHz, Y02 = -10.29481(54) MHz, Y03 = 6.243(49) × 10 -4 MHz, Y11 = -4109.912(68) MHz, Y12 = 0.14695(68) MHz, Y21 = 33.341(34) MHz, Y22 = -2.69(20) × 10 -3 MHz, and Y31 = -1.0517(55) MHz. The constants are typically an order of magnitude more accurate than the best values previously available, and where comparison is possible, agreement is found to be excellent.

  7. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOEpatents

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  8. Process for production of a metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  9. Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

  10. Thermally unstable hydrides of titanium aluminide Ti3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, N. V.; Popov, A. G.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Skripov, A. V.; Soloninin, A. V.; Aleksashin, B. A.; Novozhenov, V. I.; Sazonova, V. A.; Kharisova, A. G.

    2011-04-01

    The hydrogen capacity of (Ti, Nb)3Al titanium aluminides subjected to mechanical activation in a hydrogen atmosphere has been studied. It has been shown that the application of this procedure allows one to prepare thermally unstable titanium aluminide (Ti3Al) hydrides with a high hydrogen content (to 2.6 wt %) at room temperature and normal pressure; in this case, no special requirements for the hydrogen purity are placed. The thermally unstable nanostructured Ti3Al hydrides were found to exhibit a higher hydrogen mobility as compared to that of the microcrystalline hydrides. Low niobium additions (to 2.1 at %) have been found to decrease the hydrogen capacity. Experiments on the preparation of bulk samples from the hydride powders obtained were performed.

  11. Life test results of hydride compressors for cryogenic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. A.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A development status assessment is made, from the viewpoint of system durability, for the hydride compressors used in such cryogenic refrigerators as that of the JPL, which has operated at 29 K for 500 hours and at lower temperatures for over 1000. Attention is given to a novel hydride compressor unit which has operated through 35,000 cycles and exhibits negligible degradation of check valves, hydride particle size, and expansion valves. The power requirement for liquid hydrogen cooling can be halved through the use of recuperative hot water heating methods, making this system comparable in power use to liquid hydrogen refrigeration systems operating on electricity. Due to the lack of moving parts in hydride refrigerator designs, potential service lifetimes of many years, and perhaps decades, are being projected.

  12. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-01

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  13. The development of lightweight hydride alloys based on magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Bauer, W.

    1996-02-01

    The development of a magnesium based hydride material is explored for use as a lightweight hydrogen storage medium. It is found that the vapor transport of magnesium during hydrogen uptake greatly influences the surface and hydride reactions in these alloys. This is exploited by purposely forming near-surface phases of Mg{sub 2}Ni on bulk Mg-Al-Zn alloys which result in improved hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior. Conditions were found where these near-surface reactions yielded a complex and heterogeneous microstructure that coincided with excellent bulk hydride behavior. A Mg-Al alloy hydride is reported with near atmospheric plateau pressures at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Additionally, a scheme is described for low temperature in-situ fabrication of Mg{sub 2}Ni single phase alloys utilizing the high vapor pressure of Mg.

  14. Metal hydrides as negative electrode materials for Ni- MH batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartys, V.; Noreus, D.; Latroche, M.

    2016-01-01

    Structural, thermodynamical and electrochemical properties of metallic hydrides belonging to the pseudo-binary family A-Mg-Ni ( A: rare earths) are reviewed and compared. Technology aspects of bipolar cells are also discussed.

  15. Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

  16. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications--metal hydride.

    PubMed

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bédard, Stéphane

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software.

  17. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

  18. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-07

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  19. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  20. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  1. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  2. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  3. Ab-Initio Study of the Group 2 Hydride Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.; Manship, Daniel R.

    2013-06-01

    The beryllium hydride (BeH)- dimer has recently been shown to be surprisingly strongly bound, with an electronic structure which is highly dependent on internuclear separation. At the equilibrium distance, the negative charge is to be found on the beryllium atom, despite the higher electronegativity of the hydrogen. The current study expands this investigation to the other Group 2 hydrides, and attempts to explain these effects. M. Verdicchio, G. L. Bendazzoli, S. Evangelisti, T. Leininger J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, 192, (2013)

  4. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  5. Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rueben L. Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

  6. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-Tc superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H4Te , H5Te2 , and HTe3 , which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H4Te and H5Te2 phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H2 and linear H3 units, respectively. Their high-Tc (e.g., 104 K for H4Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions.

  7. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  8. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  9. Effect of niobium additions on initial hydriding kinetics of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiwen; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    To study the behavior of hydrogen corrosion at the surface of U, U-2.5 wt%Nb alloy and U-5.7 wt%Nb, a gas-solid reaction system with an in situ microscope was designed. The nucleation and growth of the hydride of the alloy were continuously observed and recorded by a computer. The different characteristics of the hydrides on U metal and U-2.5 wt%Nb showed that the later alloy is more susceptible to hydrogen corrosion than the former. The growth rate of hydride of U-2.5 wt%Nb, calculated by measuring the perimeter of the hydride spots recorded by the in situ microscope, exhibited a reaction temperature dependency in the range of 40-160 °C, for pressure of 0.8 × 105 Pa. An Arrhenius plot for growth rate versus temperature yielded activation energy of 24.34 kJ/mol for the hydriding of U-2.5 wt%Nb alloy. The maximum hydriding rate was obtained at 125 °C, whose thermodynamics reason was discussed.

  10. Trialkylborane-Assisted CO(2) Reduction by Late Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2011-01-01

    Trialkylborane additives promote reduction of CO(2) to formate by bis(diphosphine) Ni(II) and Rh(III) hydride complexes. The late transition metal hydrides, which can be formed from dihydrogen, transfer hydride to CO(2) to give a formate-borane adduct. The borane must be of appropriate Lewis acidity: weaker acids do not show significant hydride transfer enhancement, while stronger acids abstract hydride without CO(2) reduction. The mechanism likely involves a pre-equilibrium hydride transfer followed by formation of a stabilizing formate-borane adduct.

  11. Designing metal hydride complexes for water splitting reactions: a molecular electrostatic potential approach.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, K S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-08-28

    The hydridic character of octahedral metal hydride complexes of groups VI, VII and VIII has been systematically studied using molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography. The absolute minimum of MESP at the hydride ligand (Vmin) and the MESP value at the hydride nucleus (VH) are found to be very good measures of the hydridic character of the hydride ligand. The increasing/decreasing electron donating feature of the ligand environment is clearly reflected in the increasing/decreasing negative character of Vmin and VH. The formation of an outer sphere metal hydride-water complex showing the HH dihydrogen interaction is supported by the location and the value of Vmin near the hydride ligand. A higher negative MESP suggested lower activation energy for H2 elimination. Thus, MESP features provided a way to fine-tune the ligand environment of a metal-hydride complex to achieve high hydridicity for the hydride ligand. The applicability of an MESP based hydridic descriptor in designing water splitting reactions is tested for group VI metal hydride model complexes of tungsten.

  12. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  13. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  15. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  16. Permeation rates for RTF metal hydride vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-05-21

    Contamination rates have been estimated for the RTF nitrogen heating and cooling system (NH and CS) due to tritium permeation through the walls of metal hydride vessels. Tritium contamination of the NH and CS will be seen shortly after start-up of the RTF with the majority of it coming from the TCAP units. Contamination rates of the NH and CS are estimated to exceed 400 Ci/year after three years of operation and will elevate tritium concentrations in the NH and CS above 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} {mu}Ci/cc. To reduce tritium activity in the NH and CS, a stripper or ``getter`` bed may need to be installed in the NH and CS. Increasing the purge rate of nitrogen from the NH and CS is shown to be an impractical method for reducing tritium activity due to the high purge rates required. Stripping of the NH and CS nitrogen in the glove box stripper system will give a temporary lowering of tritium activity in the NH and CS, but tritium activity will return to its previous level in approximately two weeks.

  17. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  18. Charging efficiency of metal-hydride electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Dou, S. X.; Bradhurst, D.; Liu, H. K.

    The charging efficiencies of MmNi 5, MmNi 4.5Mn 0.5, MmNi 3.8Co 0.7Mn 0.5, ZrV 0.6Ni 1.4, ZrV 0.6Mn 0.4Ni 1.0, ZrV 0.6Mn 0.4Co 0.2Ni 0.8 allay electrodes (Mm = Mischmetal) are investigated in terms of hydrogen evolution. Experiments are conducted to optimize: (i) elemental composition of the MmNi 5 system and Zr-based Laves-phase hydrogen storage alloys; (ii) additive materials, such as cobalt powder, nickel powder, Teflonized carbons, and acetylene black; (iii) the proportion of the additives in the alloy; (iv) the best percentage of the composite additives in the metal-hydride electrodes. The results show that the electrode activation, charging efficiency and high-rate discharge depend greatly on the active materials, as well as the type and the amount of the additives in the electrodes.

  19. Hydrides in Space: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the central questions of modern astrophysics concerns the life cycle of molecules in the Universe—from the diffuse interstellar medium to planetary systems—and the chemical pathways leading from simple atoms and diatomic molecules to complex organic species. In the past two decades, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) has contributed a number of key discoveries on these topics. Light hydrides are of particular interest for astrochemistry, as the basic building blocks of the chemical networks in both diffuse and dense clouds. Ongoing and planned submillimeter wide-field continuum surveys will yield hundreds of potential galactic targets suitable for detailed spectroscopic follow-ups. Recent advances in detector and digital spectrometer technologies promise to truly revolutionize further the field of high-resolution submillimeter spectroscopy and its application to the study of the life cycle of molecules. This will greatly improve our understanding of astrochemistry, astrobiology, the origin of life on Earth, and allow assessing the possibilities of life in other planetary systems.

  20. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  1. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim.

  2. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  3. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  4. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydride donors: new prospects for efficient multi-electron reduction.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Colbran, Stephen B

    2013-06-21

    In biological reduction processes the dihydronicotinamides NAD(P)H often transfer hydride to an unsaturated substrate bound within an enzyme active site. In many cases, metal ions in the active site bind, polarize and thereby activate the substrate to direct attack by hydride from NAD(P)H cofactor. This review looks more widely at the metal coordination chemistry of organic donors of hydride ion--organo-hydrides--such as dihydronicotinamides, other dihydropyridines including Hantzsch's ester and dihydroacridine derivatives, those derived from five-membered heterocycles including the benzimidazolines and benzoxazolines, and all-aliphatic hydride donors such as hexadiene and hexadienyl anion derivatives. The hydride donor properties--hydricities--of organo-hydrides and how these are affected by metal ions are discussed. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydrides is critically surveyed and the use of metal-organo-hydride systems in electrochemically-, photochemically- and chemically-driven reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic (e.g. carbon dioxide) substrates is highlighted. The sustainable electrocatalytic, photochemical or chemical regeneration of organo-hydrides such as NAD(P)H, including for driving enzyme-catalysed reactions, is summarised and opportunities for development are indicated. Finally, new prospects are identified for metal-organo-hydride systems as catalysts for organic transformations involving 'hydride-borrowing' and for sustainable multi-electron reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic substrates directly driven by electricity or light or by renewable reductants such as formate/formic acid.

  5. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  6. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ovshinsky, S R; Fetcenko, M A; Ross, J

    1993-04-09

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved.

  7. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L.; Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Lucas; Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  8. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  9. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; ...

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  10. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  11. Spectrophotometric detection of arsenic using flow-injection hydride generation following sorbent extraction preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Neto, J A; Montes, R; Cardoso, A A

    1999-12-06

    An automated system with a C(18) bonded silica gel packed minicolumn is proposed for spectrophotometric detection of arsenic using flow-injection hydride generation following sorbent extraction preconcentration. Complexes formed between arsenic(III) and ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate (ADDP) are retained on a C(18) sorbent. The eluted As-DDP complexes are merged with a 1.5% (w/v) NaBH(4) and the resulting solution is thereafter injected into the hydride generator/gas-liquid separator. The arsine generated is carried out by a stream of N(2) and trapped in an alkaline iodine solution in which the analyte is determined by the arsenomolybdenum blue method. With preconcentration time of 120 s, calibration in the 5.00-50.0 mug As l(-1) range and sampling rate of about 20 samples h(-1) are achieved, corresponding to 36 mg ADDP plus 36 mg ammonium heptamolybdate plus 7 mg hydrazine sulfate plus 0.7 mg stannous chloride and about 7 ml sample consumed per determination. The detection limit is 0.06 mug l(-1) and the relative standard deviation (n=12) for a typical 17.0 mug As l(-1) sample is ca. 6%. The accuracy was checked for arsenic determination in plant materials from the NIST (1572 citrus leaves; 1573 tomato leaves) and the results were in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence level. Good recoveries (94-104%) of spiked tap waters, sugars and synthetic mixtures of trivalent and pentavalent arsenic were also found.

  12. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  13. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  14. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  15. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  16. METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1958-02-11

    The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

  17. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ramesh; Shukla, Seema Dwivedi, Shalini Sharma, Yamini

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  18. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  19. Uranium Hydride Nucleation and Growth Model FY'16 ESC Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Mary Ann; Richards, Andrew Walter; Holby, Edward F.; Schulze, Roland K.

    2016-12-20

    Uranium hydride corrosion is of great interest to the nuclear industry. Uranium reacts with water and/or hydrogen to form uranium hydride which adversely affects material performance. Hydride nucleation is influenced by thermal history, mechanical defects, oxide thickness, and chemical defects. Information has been gathered from past hydride experiments to formulate a uranium hydride model to be used in a Canned Subassembly (CSA) lifetime prediction model. This multi-scale computer modeling effort started in FY’13 and the fourth generation model is now complete. Additional high resolution experiments will be run to further test the model.

  20. Heat-mass flow enhancement system for a metal hydride assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1985-02-01

    Southern California Gas Company and Solar Turbines Incorporated are cooperating in the development and demonstration of a metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP). In the design of the MHHP, heat transfer was considered to be the key technical study area. The goal of this effort is improved heat transfer and reduced thermal mass in a hydride heat exchanger/containment assembly. Phase 1 resulted in the detailed design of an advanced hydride heat exchanger. Phase 2 consisted of the experimental verification of the hydride alloy design data, fabrication of the hydride heat exchanger module components, heat transfer testing of the single heat exchanger element and preliminary performance testing of the entire module. Phase 3 was devoted to the complete characterization of the hydride heat exchanger modules through further operation and testing. A review of other possible hydride heat transfer concepts was also conducted in Phase 2.

  1. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamber, Derrick Shane

    AlN is a promising substrate material for AlGaN-based UV optoelectronic devices and high-power, high-frequency electronic devices. Since large-area bulk AlN crystals are not readily available, one approach to prepare AlN substrates is to heteroepitaxially deposit thick (e.g., 10-300+ mum) AlN layers by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Initial efforts focused on growing AlN layers on sapphire substrates with growth rates up to 75 mum/hr. The resulting layers were colorless, smooth, and specular. Subsurface cracking, attributed to the plastic relief of tensile strain from island coalescence, was observed but did not adversely affect the surface morphology of the AlN layers. The surfaces possessed rms roughnesses as low as 0.316 nm over 5 x 5 mum2 sampling areas, but hexagonal hillock formation was observed for thick films grown at high growth rates. TEM revealed that the threading dislocation (TD) density of the films was 2 x 109 cm-2. The high TD densities for direct growth of AlN films on foreign substrates motivated the development of lateral epitaxial overgrowth approaches for defect reduction. Growth of AlN layers on patterned SiC substrates produced coalesced AlN films possessing TD densities below 8.3 x 106 cm -2 in the laterally grown wing regions, as compared to 1.8 x 109 cm-2 in the seed regions. These films, however, cracked on cooldown due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients for AlN and SiC. To avoid this cracking, AlN layers were grown on patterned sapphire substrates. Although the films were able to be coalesced and contained few or no cracks, the TDs in these films were not confined to the seed regions. This produced a relatively uniform distribution of TDs over the surfaces of the films, with only a modest reduction in the TD density of 1 x 10 8 cm-2. Selective area growth of AlN was also pursued using Si3N4, SiO2, and Ti masks. Growth selectivity and film coalescence was observed for films grown on each masking material, but none of the

  2. KNH2-KH: a metal amide-hydride solid solution.

    PubMed

    Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Sørby, Magnus H; Chierotti, Michele R; Garroni, Sebastiano; Pinatel, Eugenio; Karimi, Fahim; Cao, Hujun; Bergemann, Nils; Le, Thi T; Puszkiel, Julián; Gobetto, Roberto; Baricco, Marcello; Hauback, Bjørn C; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-09-27

    We report for the first time the formation of a metal amide-hydride solid solution. The dissolution of KH into KNH2 leads to an anionic substitution, which decreases the interaction among NH2(-) ions. The rotational properties of the high temperature polymorphs of KNH2 are thereby retained down to room temperature.

  3. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  4. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  5. Electronic Principles of Some Trends in Properties of Metallic Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanović, Nenad; Novaković, Nikola; Colognesi, Daniele; Radisavljević, Ivana; Ostojić, Stanko

    Due to their extensive present, important and versatile potential applications, metal hydrides (MH) are among the most investigated solid-state systems. Theoretical, numerical and experimental studies have provided a considerable knowledge about their structure and properties, but in spite of that, the basic electronic principles of various interactions present in MH have not yet been completely resolved. Even in the simplest MH, i.e. alkali hydrides (Alk-H), some trends in physical properties, and especially their deviations, are not well understood. Similar doubts exist for the alkaline-earth hydride (AlkE-H) series, and are even more pronounced for complex systems, like transition metal-doped AlkE-H, alanates and borohydrides. This work is an attempt of explaining some trends in the physical properties of Alk-H and AlkE-H, employing the Bader analysis of the charge distribution topology evaluated by first-principle all-electron calculations. These results are related to some variables commonly used in the explanation of experimental and calculated results, and are also accompanied by simple tight-binding estimations. Such an approach provides a valuable insight in the characteristics of M-H and H-H interactions in these hydrides, and their possible changes along with external parameters, like temperature, pressure, defect or impurity introduction. The knowledge of these basic interactions and processes taking place in simple MH are essential for the design and optimisation of complex MH-systems interesting for practical hydrogen storage applications.

  6. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  7. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  8. Optimizing Misch-Metal Compositions In Metal Hydride Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical cells based on metal hydride anodes investigated experimentally in effort to find anode compositions maximizing charge/discharge-cycle performances. Experimental anodes contained misch metal alloyed with various proportions of Ni, Co, Mn, and Al, and experiments directed toward optimization of composition of misch metal.

  9. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    PubMed

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  10. Hydride generation from the Exide load-leveling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, J. J.; Smaga, J. A.

    1987-05-01

    Stibine and arsine evolution from lead-acid cells in a 36-kWh Exide load-leveling module was measured as this module approached 1900 cycles of operation. A gas-collection apparatus enabled us to determine the maximum and average rates for evolution of both toxic hydrides. Hydride generation began once the cell voltage exceeded 2.4 V. The maximum rate for arsine occurred just above 2.5 V and consistently preceded the peak rate for stibine for each sampled cell. The average rates of hydride generation were found to be 175 g/min for stibine and 12.6 g/min for arsine. The former rate proved to be the critical value in determining safe ventilation requirements for cell off-gases. The minimum airflow requirement was calculated to be 340 L/min per cell. Projections for a hypothetical 1-MWh Exide battery without an abatement system indicated that the normal ventilation capacity in the Battery Energy Storage Test facility provides nearly five times the airflow needed for safe hydride removal.

  11. Hydride Compressor Sorption Cooler and Surface Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. C.; Reiter, J. W.; Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Lanford, W. A.

    2003-07-01

    A continuous-duty hydrogen sorption cryocooler is being developed for the Planck spacecraft, a mission to map the cosmic microwave background beginning in 2007. This cryocooler uses six individual compressor elements (CEs) filled with the hydriding alloy LaNi4.78Sn0.22 to provide high-pressure (50 bar) hydrogen to a Joule-Thomson (J-T) expander and to absorb low-pressure (˜0.3 bar) gas from liquid hydrogen reservoirs cooled to ˜18K. Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (QMS) showed methane in these hydride beds after cycling during initial operation of laboratory tests of the Planck engineering breadboard (EBB) cooler. These contaminants have caused problems involving plugged J-T expanders. The contaminants probably come from reactions with residual hydrocarbon species on surfaces inside the hydride bed. The hydride bed in each CE is contained in an annular volume called a "gas-gap heat switch," which serves as a reversible, intermittent thermal path to the spacecraft radiator. The gas-gap is either "off" (i.e., its pressure <1.3 Pa), or "on" (i.e., hydrogen gas at ˜4 kPa). The hydrogen pressure is varied with an independent hydride actuator containing ZrNiHx. Early EBB cooler tests showed increasing parasitic heat losses from the inner beds, suggesting residual pressures in the gas gap during its "off" state. The pressure was shown to be due to hydrogen from outgassing from metallic surfaces in the gas gap and hydrogen permeation through the inner sorbent bed wall. This gas accumulation has serious end-of-life implications, as the ZrNi actuator has limited storage capacity and any excess hydrogen would necessarily affect its operation. This paper summarizes experiments on the behavior of hydrogen in the gas gap switch and formation of methane in the CE sorbent beds.

  12. Metal Hydrides as hot carrier cell absorber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Wen, Xiaoming; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2016-09-01

    The hot Carrier Solar Cell (HCSC) allows the photon-induced hot carriers (the carriers with energy larger than the band gap) to be collected before they completely thermalise. The absorber of the HCSC should have a large phononic band gap to supress Klemens Decay, which results in a slow carrier cooling speed. In fact, a large phononic band gap likely exists in a binary compound whose constituent elements have a large mass ratio between each other. Binary hydrides with their overwhelming mass ratio of the constituent elements are important absorber candidates. Study on different types of binary hydrides as potential absorber candidates is presented in this paper. Many binary transition metal hydrides have reported theoretical or experimental phonon dispersion charts which show large phononic band gaps. Among these hydrides, the titanium hydride (TiHX) is outstanding because of its low cost, easy fabrication process and is relatively inert to air and water. A TiHX thin film is fabricated by directly hydrogenating an evaporated titanium thin film. Characterisation shows good crystal quality and the hydrogenation process is believed to be successful. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy is used to study the electron cooling time of TiHX. The result is very noisy due to the low absorption and transmission of the sample. The evolution of the TA curves has been explained by band to band transition using the calculated band structure of TiH2. Though not reliable due to the high noise, decay time fitting at 700nm and 600nm shows a considerably slow carrier cooling speed of the sample.

  13. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  14. Hydride transfer during catalysis by dihydrofolate reductase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Javed, Masood H; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2003-01-01

    DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) catalyses the metabolically important reduction of 7,8-dihydrofolate by NADPH. DHFR from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (TmDHFR), which shares similarity with DHFR from Escherichia coli, has previously been characterized structurally. Its tertiary structure is similar to that of DHFR from E. coli but it is the only DHFR characterized so far that relies on dimerization for stability. The midpoint of the thermal unfolding of TmDHFR was at approx. 83 degrees C, which was 30 degrees C higher than the melting temperature of DHFR from E. coli. The turnover and the hydride-transfer rates in the kinetic scheme of TmDHFR were derived from measurements of the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics using absorbance and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy. The rate constant for hydride transfer was found to depend strongly on the temperature and the pH of the solution. Hydride transfer was slow (0.14 s(-1) at 25 degrees C) and at least partially rate limiting at low temperatures but increased dramatically with temperature. At 80 degrees C the hydride-transfer rate of TmDHFR was 20 times lower than that observed for the E. coli enzyme at its physiological temperature. Hydride transfer depended on ionization of a single group in the active site with a p K(a) of 6.0. While at 30 degrees C, turnover of substrate by TmDHFR was almost two orders of magnitude slower than by DHFR from E. coli; the steady-state rates of the two enzymes differed only 8-fold at their respective working temperatures. PMID:12765545

  15. 5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

  16. Hydriding performances and modeling of a small-scale ZrCo bed

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, D.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Paek, S.; Chung, H.; Chang, M.H.; Yun, S.H.; Cho, S.; Jung, K.J.

    2015-03-15

    In order to evaluate the performance of the hydriding of a ZrCo bed, a small-scale getter bed of ZrCo was designed and fabricated. The results show that the hydriding time at room temperature was somewhat shorter than that at higher temperatures of ZrCo and that the performance of hydriding at low temperatures of ZrCo was better than that at high temperatures of ZrCo. The experimental results of the hydrogen pressure of hydriding (ZrCoH{sub 2.8}) at different temperatures were in agreement with the computed values using a numerical modeling equation but with a small difference during the first 10 minutes of the hydriding of ZrCo. The model is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation. The effect of a helium blanket on hydriding was measured and analyzed. The hydriding with no helium blanket in the primary vessel of ZrCo is much faster than that with a helium blanket. The hydriding at a helium concentration of 8% is slower than that at 0%. As the helium concentration increases, the hydriding of ZrCo decreases. The experimental results of the hydriding with 0 %, 4%, and 8% of helium concentration are in agreement with the calculated values but with minimal differences during the first 10 minutes.

  17. Hydride structures in Ti-aluminides subjected to high temperature and hydrogen pressure charging conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legzdina, D.; Robertson, I. M.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and chemistry of hydrides produced in single and dual phase alloys with a composition near TiAl have been investigated by using a combination of TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The alloys were exposed at 650 C to 13.8 MPa of gaseous H2 for 100 h. In the single-phase gamma alloy, large hydrides preferentially nucleated on the grain boundaries and matrix dislocations and a population of small hydrides was distributed throughout the matrix. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from these hydrides indicated that they have an fcc structure with a lattice parameter of 0.45 nm. EDAX analysis of the hydrides showed that they were enriched in Ti. The hydrides were mostly removed by vacuum annealing at 800 C for 24 h. On dissolution of the hydrides, the chemistry of hydride-free regions of the grain boundary returned to the matrix composition, suggesting that Ti segregation accompanied the hydride formation rather than Ti enrichment causing the formation of the hydride.

  18. Dissociation potential curves of low-lying states in transition metal hydrides. 3. Hydrides of groups 6 and 7.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shiro; Matsushita, Takeshi; Gordon, Mark S

    2006-02-23

    The dissociation curves of low-lying spin-mixed states in monohydrides of groups 6 and 7 were calculated by using an effective core potential (ECP) approach. This approach is based on the multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) method, followed by first-order configuration interaction (FOCI) calculations, in which the method employs an ECP basis set proposed by Stevens and co-workers (SBKJC) augmented by a set of polarization functions. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects are estimated within the one-electron approximation by using effective nuclear charges, since SOC splittings obtained with the full Breit-Pauli Hamitonian are underestimated when ECP basis sets are used. The ground states of group 6 hydrides have Omega = (1)/(2)(X(6)Sigma(+)(1/2)), where Omega is the z component of the total angular momentum quantum number. Although the ground states of group 7 hydrides have Omega = 0(+), their main adiabatic components are different; the ground state in MnH originates from the lowest (7)Sigma(+), while in TcH and ReH the main component of the ground state is the lowest (5)Sigma(+). The present paper reports a comprehensive set of theoretical results including the dissociation energies, equilibrium distances, electronic transition energies, harmonic frequencies, anharmonicities, and rotational constants for several low-lying spin-mixed states in these hydrides. Transition dipole moments were also computed among the spin-mixed states and large peak positions of electronic transitions are suggested theoretically for these hydrides. The periodic trends of physical properties of metal hydrides are discussed, based on the results reported in this and other recent studies.

  19. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  20. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  1. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  2. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  3. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  4. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.

  5. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)(2)CH2}(2)Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.

  6. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of hydrides in Zircaloy-4 during thermomechanical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2017-04-01

    The d-spacing evolution of both in-plane and out-of-plane hydrides has been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction during thermo-mechanical cycling of cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4. The structure of the hydride precipitates is such that the δ{111} d-spacing of the planes aligned with the hydride platelet face is greater than the d-spacing of the 111 planes aligned with the platelet edges. Upon heating from room temperature, the δ{111} planes aligned with hydride plate edges exhibit bi-linear thermally-induced expansion. In contrast, the d-spacing of the (111) plane aligned with the hydride plate face initially contracts upon heating. These experimental results can be understood in terms of a reversal of stress state associated with precipitating or dissolving hydride platelets within the α-zirconium matrix.

  7. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)(2)CH2}(2)Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model formore » the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.« less

  8. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  9. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    PubMed

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications.

  10. Effect of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major degradation mechanisms for high burnup fuel cladding during reactor service and spent fuel dry storage, which is related to the hydrogen concentration, morphology and orientation of zirconium hydrides. In this work, the J-integral values for X-specimens with different hydride orientations are measured to evaluate the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding. The toughness values for Zry-4 cladding with various percentages of radial hydrides are much smaller than those with circumferential hydrides only in the same hydrogen content level at 25 °C. The fractograghic features reveal that the crack path is influenced by the orientation of zirconium hydride. Moreover, the fracture toughness measurements for X-specimens at 300 °C are not sensitive to a variation in hydride orientation but to hydrogen concentration.

  11. Orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Manuel A; Vidossich, Pietro; Conejero, Salvador; Lledós, Agustí

    2014-12-15

    Hydrogen atoms in the coordination sphere of a transition metal are highly mobile ligands. Here, a new type of dynamic process involving hydrides has been characterized by computational means. This dynamic event consists of an orbital-like motion of hydride ligands around low-coordinate metal centers containing N-heterocyclic carbenes. The hydride movement around the carbene-metal-carbene axis is the lowest energy mode connecting energy equivalent isomers. This understanding provides crucial information for the interpretation of NMR spectra.

  12. Neutral binuclear rare-earth metal complexes with four μ₂-bridging hydrides.

    PubMed

    Rong, Weifeng; He, Dongliang; Wang, Meiyan; Mou, Zehuai; Cheng, Jianhua; Yao, Changguang; Li, Shihui; Trifonov, Alexander A; Lyubov, Dmitrii M; Cui, Dongmei

    2015-03-25

    The first neutral rare-earth metal dinuclear dihydrido complexes [(NPNPN)LnH2]2 (2-Ln; Ln = Y, Lu; NPNPN: N[Ph2PNC6H3((i)Pr)2]2) bearing μ2-bridging hydride ligands have been synthesized. In the presence of THF, 2-Y undergoes intramolecular activation of the sp(2) C-H bond to form dinuclear aryl-hydride complex 3-Y containing three μ2-bridging hydride ligands.

  13. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  14. Thermodynamic studies and hydride transfer reactions from a rhodium complex to BX3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; Camaioni, Donald M; Li, Jun; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; Twamley, Brendan; DuBois, Daniel L

    2009-10-14

    This study examines the use of transition-metal hydride complexes that can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas to form B-H bonds. Specifically, these studies are focused on providing a reliable and quantitative method for determining when hydride transfer from transition-metal hydrides to three-coordinate BX(3) (X = OR, SPh, F, H; R = Ph, p-C(6)H(4)OMe, C(6)F(5), (t)Bu, Si(Me)(3)) compounds will be favorable. This involves both experimental and theoretical determinations of hydride transfer abilities. Thermodynamic hydride donor abilities (DeltaG(o)(H(-))) were determined for HRh(dmpe)(2) and HRh(depe)(2), where dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) and depe = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphinoethane), on a previously established scale in acetonitrile. This hydride donor ability was used to determine the hydride donor ability of [HBEt(3)](-) on this scale. Isodesmic reactions between [HBEt(3)](-) and selected BX(3) compounds to form BEt(3) and [HBX(3)](-) were examined computationally to determine their relative hydride affinities. The use of these scales of hydride donor abilities and hydride affinities for transition-metal hydrides and BX(3) compounds is illustrated with a few selected reactions relevant to the regeneration of ammonia borane. Our findings indicate that it is possible to form B-H bonds from B-X bonds, and the extent to which BX(3) compounds are reduced by transition-metal hydride complexes forming species containing multiple B-H bonds depends on the heterolytic B-X bond energy. An example is the reduction of B(SPh)(3) using HRh(dmpe)(2) in the presence of triethylamine to form Et(3)N-BH(3) in high yields.

  15. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  16. Isolable zirconium hydride species in the reaction of amido complexes with amine-boranes.

    PubMed

    Greño, Maider; Mena, Miguel; Pérez-Redondo, Adrián; Yélamos, Carlos

    2017-03-22

    Mono-, di- and trinuclear zirconium hydride species have been isolated in the treatment of amido complexes [Zr(η(5)-C5Me5)(NMe2)nCl3-n] (n = 3, 1) with amine-borane adducts NHR2BH3 (R2 = Me2, HtBu). The reactions involve the formation of amidoborane ligands with ZrH-B interactions which readily undergo β-hydride elimination to give hydride functions.

  17. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H.; Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D.

    2015-02-07

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuH{sub x} on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH{sub 1.9}.

  18. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  19. A low tritium hydride bed inventory estimation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Shanahan, K.L.; Baker, R.A.; Foster, P.J.

    2015-03-15

    Low tritium hydride beds were developed and deployed into tritium service in Savannah River Site. Process beds to be used for low concentration tritium gas were not fitted with instrumentation to perform the steady-state, flowing gas calorimetric inventory measurement method. Low tritium beds contain less than the detection limit of the IBA (In-Bed Accountability) technique used for tritium inventory. This paper describes two techniques for estimating tritium content and uncertainty for low tritium content beds to be used in the facility's physical inventory (PI). PI are performed periodically to assess the quantity of nuclear material used in a facility. The first approach (Mid-point approximation method - MPA) assumes the bed is half-full and uses a gas composition measurement to estimate the tritium inventory and uncertainty. The second approach utilizes the bed's hydride material pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties and a gas composition measurement to reduce the uncertainty in the calculated bed inventory.

  20. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  1. Reversible metal-hydride phase transformation in epitaxial films.

    PubMed

    Roytburd, Alexander L; Boyerinas, Brad M; Bruck, Hugh A

    2015-03-11

    Metal-hydride phase transformations in solids commonly proceed with hysteresis. The extrinsic component of hysteresis is the result of the dissipation of energy of internal stress due to plastic deformation and fracture. It can be mitigated on the nanoscale, where plastic deformation and fracture are suppressed and the transformation proceeds through formation and evolution of coherent phases. However, the phase coherency introduces intrinsic thermodynamic hysteresis, preventing reversible transformation. In this paper, it is shown that thermodynamic hysteresis of coherent metal-hydride transformation can be eliminated in epitaxial film due to substrate constraint. Film-substrate interaction leads to formation of heterophase polydomain nanostructure with variable phase fraction which can change reversibly by varying temperature in a closed system or chemical potential in an open system.

  2. Structural isotope effects in metal hydrides and deuterides.

    PubMed

    Ting, Valeska P; Henry, Paul F; Kohlmann, Holger; Wilson, Chick C; Weller, Mark T

    2010-03-07

    Historically the extraction of high-quality crystallographic information from inorganic samples having high hydrogen contents, such as metal hydrides, has involved preparing deuterated samples prior to study using neutron powder diffraction. We demonstrate, through direct comparison of the crystal structure refinements of the binary hydrides SrH(2) and BaH(2) with their deuteride analogues at 2 K and as a function of temperature, that precise and accurate structural information can be obtained from rapid data collections from samples containing in excess of 60 at.% hydrogen using modern high-flux, medium resolution, continuous wavelength neutron powder diffraction instruments. Furthermore, observed isotope-effects in the extracted lattice parameters and atomic positions illustrate the importance of investigating compounds in their natural hydrogenous form whenever possible.

  3. Reversible metal-hydride phase transformation in epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytburd, Alexander L.; Boyerinas, Brad M.; Bruck, Hugh A.

    2015-03-01

    Metal-hydride phase transformations in solids commonly proceed with hysteresis. The extrinsic component of hysteresis is the result of the dissipation of energy of internal stress due to plastic deformation and fracture. It can be mitigated on the nanoscale, where plastic deformation and fracture are suppressed and the transformation proceeds through formation and evolution of coherent phases. However, the phase coherency introduces intrinsic thermodynamic hysteresis, preventing reversible transformation. In this paper, it is shown that thermodynamic hysteresis of coherent metal-hydride transformation can be eliminated in epitaxial film due to substrate constraint. Film-substrate interaction leads to formation of heterophase polydomain nanostructure with variable phase fraction which can change reversibly by varying temperature in a closed system or chemical potential in an open system.

  4. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, Kurt; Balooch, Mehdi; Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Olander, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH1.6) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  5. Autonomy and Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous previously unknown carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions were generated in the gas phase, identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing their electronic structure. Density functional theory calculations on the CAl5-9H- and CAl5-7H2- found that several of them possess unusually high carbon atom coordination numbers. These cluster compositions have potential as the basis for new energetic materials.

  7. Microscopic calculation of the compressibility of hydrides of alkaline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krymov, V. A.; Fuks, D. L.

    1987-09-01

    Isotherms have been constructed and compressibilities and sound velocities have been calculated for the hydrides of alkaline metals on the basis of the functional theory of the local electron density, within the framework of the pseudopotential method. The expression obtained for the electron density distribution allows one to perform the analysis of the character of the binding forces and to determine the dependence of the degree of ionization on pressure in these compounds.

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan W; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H

    2016-10-21

    Numerous previously unknown carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions were generated in the gas phase, identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing their electronic structure. Density functional theory calculations on the CAl5-9H(-) and CAl5-7H2(-) found that several of them possess unusually high carbon atom coordination numbers. These cluster compositions have potential as the basis for new energetic materials.

  9. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  10. Low-pressure Structural Modification of Aluminum Hydride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    pressure release. 15. SUBJECT TERMS High - pressure , Diamond anvil cell, aluminum hydride 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...loaded into the diamond anvil cell using a specialized high - pressure gas loading system (18). The in-situ pressure within the diamond anvil cell was...Visible Absorption Study of AlH3. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 2010, 215, 012047. 18. Jayaraman, A. Diamond Anvil Cell and High -

  11. METHOD OF MAKING DELTA ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE MONOLITHIC MODERATOR PIECES

    DOEpatents

    Vetrano, J.B.

    1962-01-23

    A method is given for preparing large, sound bodies of delta zirconium hydride. The method includes the steps of heating a zirconium body to a temperature of not less than l000 deg C, providing a hydrogen atmosphere for the zirconium body at a pressure not greater than one atmosphere, reducing the temperature slowly to 800 deg C at such a rate that cracks do not form while maintaining the hydrogen pressure substantially constant, and cooling in an atmosphere of hydrogen. (AEC)

  12. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-10-23

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  13. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  14. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3. PMID:26964636

  15. Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tse, John S; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-04-24

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H(2) fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH(6) a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual "sodalite" cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H(2) of electrons donated by Ca forming an "H(4)" unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn-Teller effect helps to enhance electron-phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH(6). A superconducting critical temperature (T(c)) of 220-235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far.

  16. Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tse, John S.; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual “sodalite” cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming an “H4” unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn–Teller effect helps to enhance electron–phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220–235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far. PMID:22492976

  17. Hydrogen storage and generation using light metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, F.; Mork, B.J.; Wilkes, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    The storage of hydrogen for use in fuel cells employed as portable electric power sources is important. For many applications pressurized gas or cryogenic liquid storage is not acceptable from weight or safety standpoints. This is particularly true for moderate power systems in the 50--200 watt range. A potentially attractive technology for providing hydrogen for moderately sized fuel cell-based electric power supplies is chemical hydrides. In general, chemical hydrides are materials that store hydrogen that may be released by chemical reactions. The authors report here the use of light metal hydrides, such as lithium aluminum tetrahydride and trilithium aluminum hexahydride to store hydrogen in a very dense form; about four times the density of liquid hydrogen. The hydrogen can be released by reaction with simple chemical reagents, such as water or ammonia, at approximately atmospheric pressure and at modest temperatures. The reaction rate may be controlled to provide hydrogen at a rate appropriate to that needed by a fuel cell operating at the power levels mentioned above. Usually hydrogen is the sole gaseous product, along with several solid products.

  18. Investigation of long term stability in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, Roger W.; Lynch, Franklin E.; Chandra, Dhanesh; Lambert, Steve; Sharma, Archana

    1991-01-01

    It is apparent from the literature and the results of this study that cyclic degradation of AB(5) type metal hydrides varies widely according to the details of how the specimens are cycled. The Rapid Cycle Apparatus (RCA) used produced less degradation in 5000 to 10000 cycles than earlier work with a Slow Cycle Apparatus (SCA) produced in 1500 cycles. Evidence is presented that the 453 K (356 F) Thermal Aging (TA) time spent in the saturated condition causes hydride degradation. But increasing the cooling (saturation) period in the RCA did not greatly increase the rate of degradation. It appears that TA type degradation is secondary at low temperatures to another degradation mechanism. If rapid cycles are less damaging than slow cycles when the saturation time is equal, the rate of hydriding/dehydriding may be an important factor. The peak temperatures in the RCA were about 30 C lower than the SCA. The difference in peak cycle temperatures (125 C in the SCA, 95 C in RCA) cannot explain the differences in degradation. TA type degradation is similar to cyclic degradation in that nickel peaks and line broadening are observed in X ray diffraction patterns after either form of degradation.

  19. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-12-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ˜ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2-4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2.

  20. Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

    2011-04-01

    This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

  1. Electronic structure of ternary rhodium hydrides with lithium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonas Nils; Bauer, Jessica; Giehr, Andreas; Chu, Pui Ieng; Kunkel, Nathalie; Springborg, Michael; Kohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-21

    Chemical bonding in and electronic structure of lithium and magnesium rhodium hydrides are studied theoretically using DFT methods. For Li3RhH4 with planar complex RhH4 structural units, Crystal Orbital Hamilton Populations reveal significant Rh−Rh interactions within infinite one-dimensional ∞ 1 [RhH4] stacks in addition to strong rhodium−hydrogen bonding. These metal−metal interactions are considerably weaker in the hypothetical, heavier homologue Na3RhH4. Both compounds are small-band gap semiconductors. The electronic structures of Li3RhH6 and Na3RhH6 with rhodium surrounded octahedrally by hydrogen, on the other hand, are compatible with a classical complex hydride model according to the limiting ionic formula (M+)3[RhH6]3− without any metal−metal interaction between the 18-electron hydridorhodate complexes. In MgRhH, building blocks of the composition (RhH2)4 are formed with strong rhodium−hydrogen and significant rhodium−rhodium bonding (bond lengths of 298 pm within Rh4 squares). These units are linked together to infinite two-dimensional layers ∞ 2 [(RhH2/2)4] via common hydrogen atoms. Li3RhH4 and MgRhH are accordingly examples for border cases of chemical bonding where the classical picture of hydridometalate complexes in complex hydrides is not sufficient to properly describe the chemical bonding situation.

  2. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  3. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-03-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3.

  4. Metal hydride/chemical heat pump development project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madariaga, H. A.; Rohy, D. A.

    1982-02-01

    A mental hydride heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two different hydrides and using hydrogen as a working fluid for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. This system can be used with a variety of heat sources including industrial waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. Temperature as low as 130 F can drive the MHHP when a suitable sink is provided. A project is currently underway to develop this unique heat pump for a specific application. The goals of the project include the development of cost effective hydride containers with high heat transfer and low mass; design and fabrication of a laboratory evaluation model; and design and fabrication of a demonstration unit. Extensive component and system test will provide the data for the design processes.

  5. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  6. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  7. Thermodynamic and kinetic hydricity of ruthenium(II) hydride complexes.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yasuo; Fujita, Etsuko; Doherty, Mark D; Muckerman, James T; Creutz, Carol

    2012-09-26

    Despite the fundamental importance of the hydricity of a transition metal hydride (ΔG(H–)°(MH) for the reaction M–H → M+ + H–) in a range of reactions important in catalysis and solar energy storage, ours (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131, 2794) are the only values reported for water solvent, and there has been no basis for comparison of these with the wider range already determined for acetonitrile solvent, in particular. Accordingly, we have used a variety of approaches to determine hydricity values in acetonitrile of Ru(II) hydride complexes previously studied in water. For [Ru(η(6)-C6Me6)(bpy)H]+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine), we used a thermodynamic cycle based on evaluation of the acidity of [Ru(η(6)-C6Me6)(bpy)H]+ pKa = 22.5 ± 0.1 and the [Ru(η(6)-C6Me6)(bpy)(NCCH3)(1/0)](2+/0) electrochemical potential (−1.22 V vs Fc+/Fc). For [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H]+ (tpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) we utilized organic hydride ion acceptors (A+) of characterized hydricity derived from imidazolium cations and pyridinium cations, and determined K for the hydride transfer reaction, S + MH+ + A+ → M(S)2+ + AH (S = CD3CN, MH+ = [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H]+), by 1H NMR measurements. Equilibration of initially 7 mM solutions was slow--on the time scale of a day or more. When E°(H+/H–) is taken as 79.6 kcal/mol vs Fc+/Fc as a reference, the hydricities of [Ru(η(6)-C6Me6)(bpy)H]+ and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H]+ were estimated as 54 ± 2 and 39 ± 3 kcal/mol, respectively, in acetonitrile to be compared with the values 31 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively, found for aqueous media. The pKa estimated for [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H]+ in acetonitrile is 32 ± 3. UV–vis spectroscopic studies of [Ru(η(6)-C6Me6)(bpy)]0 and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)]0 indicate that they contain reduced bpy and tpy ligands, respectively. These conclusions are supported by DFT electronic structure results. Comparison of the hydricity values for acetonitrile and water reveals a flattening or compression of the hydricity range upon transferring the

  8. Carbene-metal hydrides can be much less acidic than phosphine-metal hydrides: significance in hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Fan, Yubo; Burgess, Kevin

    2010-05-05

    Acidities of iridium hydride intermediates were shown to be critical in some transformations mediated by the chiral analogues of Crabtree's catalyst, 1-3. To do this, several experiments were undertaken to investigate the acidities of hydrogenation mixtures formed using these iridium-oxazoline complexes. DFT calculations indicated that the acidity difference for Ir-H intermediates in these hydrogenations were astounding; iridium hydride from the N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst 1 was calculated to be around seven pK(a) units less acidic than those from the P-based complexes 2 and 3. Consistent with this, the carbene complex 1 was shown to be more effective for hydrogenations of acid-sensitive substrates. In deuteration experiments, less "abnormal" deuteration was observed, corresponding to fewer complications from acid-mediated alkene isomerization preceding the D(2)-addition step. Finally, simple tests with pH indicators provided visual evidence that phosphine-based catalyst precursors give significantly more acidic reaction mixtures than the corresponding N-heterocyclic carbene ones. These observations indicate carbene-for-phosphine (and similar) ligand substitutions may impact the outcome of catalytic reactions by modifying the acidities of the metal hydrides formed.

  9. Synthesis of Highly Active Mg-BASED Hydrides Using Hydriding Combustion Synthesis and NbF5 Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourashiya, M. G.; Park, C. N.; Park, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Superiority of the hydriding combustion (HC) technique over conventional metallurgical approach to the synthesis of cost-effective Mg based hydrides, which show promise as hydrogen storage materials, is well known. In the present research, we report further improvements in HC prepared Mg-based materials, achieved by optimizing the preparative parameters of HC and by catalytic addition. Mg90-Ni60-C40 composites prepared using optimized processing parameters were ball-milled with NbF5 (10 h) and characterized for their micro-structural and hydriding properties. The ball-milled/catalyzed powder showed decreased crystallinity with CNTs on its surfaces. Surface area of the ball-milled powder decreased to almost half of the as-HC powder, while TG analysis revealed a four-fold decrease in the desorption temperature of the milled powder compared to that of the as-HC prepared powder. Activated samples achieved the maximum absorption/desorption limits (5.3 wt.%) at as low as 100°C, underlining the possibility of the use of these materials in portable hydrogen storage devices.

  10. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  11. Shoe-String Automation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.L.

    2001-07-30

    Faced with a downsizing organization, serious budget reductions and retirement of key metrology personnel, maintaining capabilities to provide necessary services to our customers was becoming increasingly difficult. It appeared that the only solution was to automate some of our more personnel-intensive processes; however, it was crucial that the most personnel-intensive candidate process be automated, at the lowest price possible and with the lowest risk of failure. This discussion relates factors in the selection of the Standard Leak Calibration System for automation, the methods of automation used to provide the lowest-cost solution and the benefits realized as a result of the automation.

  12. Comparison of hydrogen elimination from molecular zinc and magnesium hydride clusters.

    PubMed

    Intemann, Julia; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    2014-08-25

    In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-β-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the corners of a tetrahedron in which the vertices are bridged either by dianionic bis-β-diketiminate ligands or hydride ions. Both structures are retained in solution and show examples of H(-)⋅⋅⋅H(-) NMR coupling (Mg: 8.5 Hz; Zn: 16.0 Hz). The zinc hydride cluster [NN-(ZnH)2]2 thermally decomposes at 90 °C and releases 1.8 equivalents of H2 . In contrast to magnesium hydride clusters, there is no apparent relationship between cluster size and thermal decomposition temperature for the zinc hydrides. DFT calculations reproduced the structure of the zinc hydride cluster reasonably well and charge density analysis showed no bond paths between the hydride ions. This contrasts with calculations on the analogous magnesium hydride cluster in which a counter-intuitive H(-)⋅⋅⋅H(-) bond path was observed. Forcing a reduced H(-)⋅⋅⋅H(-) distance in the zinc hydride cluster, however, gave rise to a H(-)⋅⋅⋅H(-) bond path. Such weak interactions could play a role in H2 desorption. The presumed molecular product after H2 release, a Zn(I) cluster, could not be characterized experimentally but DFT calculations predicted a cluster with two localized Zn-Zn bonds.

  13. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Hardy, B. J.; Corgnale, C.; Teprovich, J. A.; Ward, P.; Motyka, Ted

    2016-01-31

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate a metal hydride-based TES system for use with a CSP system. A unique approach has been applied to this project that combines our modeling experience with the extensive material knowledge and expertise at both SRNL and Curtin University (CU). Because of their high energy capacity and reasonable kinetics many metal hydride systems can be charged rapidly. Metal hydrides for vehicle applications have demonstrated charging rates in minutes and tens of minutes as opposed to hours. This coupled with high heat of reaction allows metal hydride TES systems to produce very high thermal power rates (approx. 1kW per 6-8 kg of material). A major objective of this work is to evaluate some of the new metal hydride materials that have recently become available. A problem with metal hydride TES systems in the past has been selecting a suitable high capacity low temperature metal hydride material to pair with the high temperature material. A unique aspect of metal hydride TES systems is that many of these systems can be located on or near dish/engine collectors due to their high thermal capacity and small size. The primary objective of this work is to develop a high enthalpy metal hydride that is capable of reversibly storing hydrogen at high temperatures (> 650 °C) and that can be paired with a suitable low enthalpy metal hydride with low cost materials. Furthermore, a demonstration of hydrogen cycling between the two hydride beds is desired.

  14. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  15. Complex transition metal hydrides: linear correlation of countercation electronegativity versus T-D bond lengths.

    PubMed

    Humphries, T D; Sheppard, D A; Buckley, C E

    2015-06-30

    For homoleptic 18-electron complex hydrides, an inverse linear correlation has been established between the T-deuterium bond length (T = Fe, Co, Ni) and the average electronegativity of the metal countercations. This relationship can be further employed towards aiding structural solutions and predicting physical properties of novel complex transition metal hydrides.

  16. First-principles study of superabundant vacancy formation in metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changjun; Alavi, Ali

    2005-07-13

    Recent experiments have established the generality of superabundant vacancies (SAV) formation in metal hydrides. Aiming to elucidate this intriguing phenomenon and to clarify previous interpretations, we employ density-functional theory to investigate atomic mechanisms of SAV formation in fcc hydrides of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au. We have found that upon H insertion, vacancy formation energies reduce substantially. This is consistent with experimental suggestions. We demonstrate that the entropy effect, which has been proposed to explain SAV formation, is not the main cause. Instead, it is the drastic change of electronic structure induced by the H in the SAV hydrides, which is to a large extent responsible. Interesting trends in systems investigated are also found: ideal hydrides of 5d metals and noble metals are unstable compared to the corresponding pure metals, but the SAV hydrides are more stable than the corresponding ideal hydrides, whereas opposite results exist in the cases of Ni, Rh, and Pd. These trends of stabilities of the SAV hydrides are discussed in detail and a general understanding for SAV formation is provided. Finally, we propose an alternative reaction pathway to generate a SAV hydride from a metal alloy.

  17. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  18. Zirconium hydrides and Fe redistribution in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrees, Y.; Yao, Z.; Cui, J.; Shek, G. K.; Daymond, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is used to fabricate the pressure tubes of the CANDU reactor. The pressure tube is the primary pressure boundary for coolant in the CANDU design and is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, reduction in fracture toughness upon hydride precipitation and potentially hydride blister formation. The morphology and nature of hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb with 100 wppm hydrogen has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of hydrides on heavy ion irradiation induced decomposition of the β phase has been reported. STEM-EDX mapping was employed to investigate the distribution of alloying elements. The results show that hydrides are present in the form of stacks of different sizes, with length scales from nano- to micro-meters. Heavy ion irradiation experiments at 250 °C on as-received and hydrided Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, show interesting effects of hydrogen on the irradiation induced redistribution of Fe. It was found that Fe is widely redistributed from the β phase into the α phase in the as-received material, however, the loss of Fe from the β phase and subsequent precipitation is retarded in the hydrided material. This preliminary work will further the current understanding of microstructural evolution of Zr based alloys in the presence of hydrogen.

  19. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  20. Getting metal-hydrides to do what you want them to

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the discovery of AB/sub 5/ compounds, intermetallic hydrides with unusual properties began to be developed (H dissociation pressures of one to several atmospheres, extremely rapid and reversible adsorption/desorption very large amounts of H adsorbed). This paper reviews the factors that must be controlled in order to modify these hydrides to make them useful. The system LaNi/sub 5/ + H/sub 2/ is used as example. Use of AB/sub 5/ hydrides to construct a chemical heat pumps is discussed. Results of a systematic study substituting Al for Ni are reported; the HYCSOS pump is described briefly. Use of hydrides as hydrogen getters (substituted ZrV/sub 2/) is also discussed. Finally, possible developments in intermetallic hydride research in the 1980's and the hydrogen economy are discussed. 10 figures. (DLC)

  1. Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, H.; Wang, G Y; Liaw, Peter K; Clausen, B; Brown, D. W.; Park, Jae-Sung; Rack, P. D.; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

  2. Hydrogenase Enzymes and Their Synthetic Models: The Role of Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Schilter, David; Camara, James M; Huynh, Mioy T; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2016-08-10

    Hydrogenase enzymes efficiently process H2 and protons at organometallic FeFe, NiFe, or Fe active sites. Synthetic modeling of the many H2ase states has provided insight into H2ase structure and mechanism, as well as afforded catalysts for the H2 energy vector. Particularly important are hydride-bearing states, with synthetic hydride analogues now known for each hydrogenase class. These hydrides are typically prepared by protonation of low-valent cores. Examples of FeFe and NiFe hydrides derived from H2 have also been prepared. Such chemistry is more developed than mimicry of the redox-inactive monoFe enzyme, although functional models of the latter are now emerging. Advances in physical and theoretical characterization of H2ase enzymes and synthetic models have proven key to the study of hydrides in particular, and will guide modeling efforts toward more robust and active species optimized for practical applications.

  3. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  4. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Blaine Kermit

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  5. Optical properties of metal-hydride switchable films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessen, Ronald

    2001-03-01

    In 1996 we discovered that yttrium-, lanthanum-, and rare-earth-hydride (REHx) films [1] protected by a thin palladium layer, exhibit spectacular changes in their optical properties when the hydrogen concentration x is increased from 2 to 3. For example, a 500 nm thick YH2 film is metallic and shiny while YH3 is yellowish and transparent. The transition is reversible, fast [2, 3], and can simply be induced by adding or removing hydrogen from the gas phase, an electrolyte or from an H containing liquid. The optical switching that occurs near the metal-insulator transition of these hydrides is remarkably robust as it is not affected by structural or compositional disorder. It occurs in polycrystalline and epitaxial films, in alloys with cubic or hexagonal crystal structures,and deuterides [4] switch as well as hydrides. At small length scales epitaxial YHx films exhibit surprising structural properties which open the way to pixel-by-pixel optical switching [5]. Colour-neutral switchable mirrors based on RE-Mg alloys [6] can be used in all-solid-state switchable devices. Newest results for Rare-Earth free switchable mirrors will be presented. [1] J. N. Huiberts, R. Griessen, J. H. Rector, R. J. Wijngaarden, J. P. Dekker, D. G. de Groot and N. J. Koeman, Nature 380 (1996) 231; [2] S. J. van der Molen, J. W. J. Kerssemakers, J. H. Rector, N. J. Koeman, B. Dam, R. Griessen, J. Appl. Phys. 86 (1999) 6107; [3] F. J. A. den Broeder, S. J. van der Molen, et al., Nature 394 (1998)656; [4] A. T. M. van Gogh, E. S. Kooij, R. Griessen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 4614; [5] J. W. J. Kerssemakers, S. J. van der Molen and R. Griessen, Nature 406 (2000) 489; [6] P. van der Sluis, M. Ouwerkerk and P. A. Duine, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70 (1997) 3356.

  6. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  7. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

    2008-12-31

    Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  8. Magnesium hydrides and the dearomatisation of pyridine and quinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael S; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F; Weetman, Catherine

    2011-12-14

    Reactions of the β-diketiminato n-butyl magnesium complex, [HC{(Me)CN(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)Mg(n)Bu], with a range of substituted pyridines and fused-ring quinolines in the presence of PhSiH(3) has been found to result in dearomatisation of the N-heterocyclic compounds. This reaction is proposed to occur through the formation of an unobserved N-heterocycle-coordinated magnesium hydride and subsequent hydride transfer via the C2-position of the heterocycle prior to hydride transfer to the C4-position and formation of thermodynamically-favoured magnesium 1,4-dihydropyridides. This reaction is kinetically suppressed for 2,6-dimethylpyridine while the kinetic product, the 1,2-dihydropyridide derivative, was isolated through reaction with 4-methylpyridine (4-methylpyridine), in which case the formation of the 1,4-dihyropyridide is prevented by the presence of the 4-methyl substituent. X-ray structures of the products of these reactions with 4-methylpyridine, 3,5-dimethylpyridine and iso-quinoline comprise a pseudo-tetrahedral magnesium centre while the regiochemistry of the particular dearomatisation reaction is determined by the substitution pattern of the N-heterocycle under observation. The compounds are all air-sensitive and exposure of the magnesium derivatives of dearomatised pyridine and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) to air resulted in ligand rearomatisation and the formation of dimeric μ(2)-η(2)-η(2)-peroxomagnesium compounds which have also been subject to analysis by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. An unsuccessful extension of this chemistry to N-heterocycle hydrosilylation is suggested to be a consequence of the low basicity of the silane reagent in comparison to the pyridine substrates which effectively impedes any further interaction with the magnesium centres.

  9. Materials for Hydrogen Storage: From Complex Hydrides to Functionalized Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. P.

    2011-07-01

    The world wide effort for a transition to renewable and clean (i.e. carbon-free) form of energy has resulted in an upsurge of interest in harnessing and utilizing Hydrogen. Apart from being the most abundant element in the universe, hydrogen offers many advantages over other fuels: it is non-toxic, clean to use, and packs more energy per mass than any other fuel. Hydrogen energy production, storage and distribution constitute a multi-disciplinary area of research. Coming to the material issues for solid state storage of hydrogen, the most desirable criteria are high storage capacity, satisfactory kinetics, and optimal thermodynamics. Complex hydrides involving light metals, such as Alanates, Imides, Borates, Amidoboranes etc. show impressive gravimetric efficiencies, although the hydrogen desorption temperatures turn out to be rather high. Apart from complex hydrides, there are other kinds of novel materials that have been investigated, e.g. carbon based materials activated with nano-catalysts, clathrate hydrates, metal-organic complexes, and more recently nanostructured cages viz. fullerenes and nanotubes decorated with simple or transition metals that serve to attract hydrogen in molecular form. In this talk, after giving a broad overview on hydrogen economy, I shall focus on first-principles design of materials for hydrogen storage, from complex hydrides to various kinds of functinalized nanostructures, and discuss the recent results obtained in our laboratory [1-6]. Some outstanding issues and challenges, like how to circumvent the problem of metal clustering on surface, or how to bring down the hydrogen desorption temperature etc. will be discussed.

  10. A compact hydrogen recycling system using metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertl, W.; Healey, D.; Zmeskal, J.; Hasinoff, M. D.; Blecher, M.; Wright, D. H.

    1995-02-01

    A gas recycling system to prevent losses of isotopically enriched hydrogen gas has been developed for the operation of a liquid target (2.7 l) used by the Radiative Muon Capture group at TRIUMF. The experimental requirements for high gas purity (chemical impurities below 10 -9), low operating pressure (below 1 bar abs) and high loading pressure (about 10 bar needed for a palladium purifier) together with the usual hydrogen safety requirements were satisfied with a metal hydride storage device in combination with a small pump/compressor system. A description of the complete system together with its characteristic operational data are given in this paper.

  11. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  12. Stereo‐ and Regioselective Alkyne Hydrometallation with Gold(III) Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Pintus, Anna; Rocchigiani, Luca; Fernandez‐Cestau, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hydroauration of internal and terminal alkynes by gold(III) hydride complexes [(C^N^C)AuH] was found to be mediated by radicals and proceeds by an unexpected binuclear outer‐sphere mechanism to cleanly form trans‐insertion products. Radical precursors such as azobisisobutyronitrile lead to a drastic rate enhancement. DFT calculations support the proposed radical mechanism, with very low activation barriers, and rule out mononuclear mechanistic alternatives. These alkyne hydroaurations are highly regio‐ and stereospecific for the formation of Z‐vinyl isomers, with Z/E ratios of >99:1 in most cases. PMID:27592697

  13. Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2013-06-25

    A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

  14. Geoneutrinos and Hydridic Earth (or primordially hydrogen-rich planet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, L.; Sinev, V.

    2015-03-01

    Geoneutrino is a new channel of information about geochemical composition of the Earth. We analyzed here the following problem. What statistics do we need to distinguish between predictions of Bulk Silicate Earth model and Hydridic Earth model for Th/U signal ratio? We obtained the simple formula for estimation of error of Th/U signal ratio. Our calculations show that we need more than 22 kt · year exposition for Gran-Sasso underground laboratory and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. We need more than 27 kt · year exposition for Kamioka site in the case of stopping of all Japanese nuclear power plants.

  15. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  16. Sintering of sponge and hydride-dehydride titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2004-04-01

    The sintering behavior of compacts produced from sponge and hydride-dehydride (HDH) Ti powders was examined. Compacts were vacuum sintered at 1200 or 1300 deg C for 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 or 960 minutes. The porosity decreased with sintering time and/or temperature in compacts produced from the HDH powders. Compacts produced from these powders could be sintered to essentially full density. However, the sintering condition did not influence the amount of porosity present in compacts produced from the sponge powders. These samples could only be sintered to a density of 97% theoretical. The sintering behavior was attributed to the chemical impurities in the powders.

  17. Studies on hydride-forming alloys as the active material of a metal hydride electrode for a nickel metal hydride cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.S.; Zelter, G.R.; Allison, D.U.; Reilly, J.J.; Srinivasan, S.; Stockel, J.F.

    1997-12-01

    Multi-component AB{sub 5} hydrides are attractive replacements for the cadmium electrode in nickel-cadmium batteries. The archetype compound of the AB{sub 5} alloy class is LaNi{sub 5}, but in a typical battery electrode mischmetal is substituted for La and Ni is substituted in part by variety of metals. This paper deals with the effect on cycle life upon the partial substitution of various lanthanides for La and Sn, In, Al, Co, and Mn for Ni. The presence of Ce was shown to enhance cycle life as did Sn in some cases. An electrode of La{sub 0.67}Ce{sub 0.33}B{sub 5} alloy gave over 3,500 cycles (to specific capacity of 200 mAh/g), indicating that it is a very attractive alloy for a practical Ni/MH{sub x} cell.

  18. Management Planning for Workplace Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDole, Thomas L.

    Several factors must be considered when implementing office automation. Included among these are whether or not to automate at all, the effects of automation on employees, requirements imposed by automation on the physical environment, effects of automation on the total organization, and effects on clientele. The reasons behind the success or…

  19. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    PubMed

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  20. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  1. GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF HYDRIDE ANION, H{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar; Yang Zhibo; Demarais, Nicholas J.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@colorado.ed E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@colorado.ed

    2010-09-01

    Rate constants were measured at 300 K for the reactions of the hydride anion, H{sup -}, with neutral molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}CN, CH{sub 3}OH, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}CHO, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 3}Cl, (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CCl, (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and D{sub 2} using a flowing-afterglow instrument. Experimental work was supplemented by ab initio calculations to provide insight into the viability of reaction pathways. Our reported rate constants should prove useful to models of astrophysical environments where conditions prevail for the existence of both H{sup -} and neutral species. The variety of neutral reactants studied includes representative species from prototypical chemical groups, effectively mapping reactivity trends for the hydride anion.

  2. Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    None, None

    2013-05-14

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  3. Interferences in electrochemical hydride generation of hydrogen selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolea, E.; Laborda, F.; Belarra, M. A.; Castillo, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    Interferences from Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(IV), As(III) and nitrate on electrochemical hydride generation of hydrogen selenide were studied using a tubular flow-through generator, flow injection sample introduction and quartz tube atomic absorption spectrometry. Comparison with conventional chemical generation using tetrahydroborate was also performed. Lead and reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC), both in particulate form, were used as cathode materials. Signal supressions up to 60-75%, depending on the cathode material, were obtained in the presence of up to 200 mg l-1 of nitrate due to the competitive reduction of the anion. Interference from As(III) was similar in electrochemical and chemical generation, being related to the quartz tube atomization process. Zinc did not interfere up to Se/Zn ratios 1:100, whereas copper and platinum showed suppression levels up to 50% for Se/interferent ratios 1:100. Total signal suppression was observed in presence of Se/Cu ratios 1:100 when RVC cathodes were used. No memory effects were observed in any case. Scanning electron microscopy and squared wave voltametry studies supported the interference mechanism based on the decomposition of the hydride on the dispersed particles of the reduced metal.

  4. Superconductivity above the lowest Earth temperature in pressurized sulfur hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Jarlborg, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    A recent experiment has shown a macroscopic quantum coherent condensate at 203 K, about 19 degrees above the coldest temperature recorded on the Earth surface, 184 K (-89.2 ^\\circ \\text{C}, -128.6 ^\\circ \\text{F}) in pressurized sulfur hydride. This discovery is relevant not only in material science and condensed matter but also in other fields ranging from quantum computing to quantum physics of living matter. It has given the start to a gold rush looking for other macroscopic quantum coherent condensates in hydrides at the temperature range of living matter 200c <400 \\text{K} . We present here a review of the experimental results and the theoretical works and we discuss the Fermiology of \\text{H}3\\text{S} focusing on Lifshitz transitions as a function of pressure. We discuss the possible role of the shape resonance near a neck disrupting Lifshitz transition, in the Bianconi-Perali-Valletta (BPV) theory, for rising the critical temperature in a multigap superconductor, as the Feshbach resonance rises the critical temperature in Fermionic ultracold gases.

  5. High-pressure phase transition observed in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Klug, Dennis D.

    2007-08-01

    The pressure-dependent structural and vibrational properties of barium hydride have been studied up to 22 GPa at room temperature by means of powder x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations. At ambient conditions, BaH2 crystallizes in the cotunnite structure (Pnma). A reversible, first-order structural phase transition is observed at 1.6 GPa. The high-pressure phase can be indexed by a hexagonal unit cell with a proposed Ni2In structure (P63/mmc), with the Ba and H atoms in special positions. The experimental volume compression of the high-pressure phase yields an isothermal bulk modulus B0=24(1) GPa (B0' fixed at 4.13). This compares favorably with the results of the first-principles calculations, which reproduce the first-order nature of the transition. The relevance of these results is discussed in the contexts of metal hydrides in particular and ionic AX2(A =metal) compounds in general.

  6. Hydriding of TiZrNiFe nanocompounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żywczak, A.; Shinya, Daigo; Gondek, Ł.; Takasaki, Akito; Figiel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ti-based quasicrystals belong to the second largest group of the stable quasicrystals, showing attractive properties as hydrogen storage materials. The Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17 intermetallic compound forms an icosahedral ( i-phase) structure, in which Ti and Zr atoms possess very good chemical affinity for hydrogen absorption. We modified the Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17 compounds by substituting 3d metals (iron) for Ni to obtain amorphous phase. The samples were produced by mechanical alloying. The 3d metal atoms are located in the same positions as nickel. The structural characterization was made by means of XRD measurements. Thermodynamic properties were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The obtained amorphous phases Ti 45Zr 38Ni (9,13)Fe (8,4) transform to the i-phase at the similar temperature range as Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17. The final concentration of absorbed hydrogen depends on the amount of Fe. When increasing the amount of iron, the hydrogen release temperature becomes lower. After hydriding, the samples decompose into simple metal hydrides.

  7. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  8. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  9. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  10. [Investigation of enhancing effect for hydride generation-atomic fluorescence of transition metal elements].

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Wen; Suo, Ran

    2008-11-01

    A mechanism of hydride generation based on disassembly reaction of hydrogen-transferred interim state [M(BH4)m]* was developed by investigating the effect of reaction medium acidity on hydride generation. The effects of Co2+ and Ni2+, phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on hydride generation-atomic fluorescence signals of Zn, Cd, Cu and Ni were studied, respectively, and their enhancing mechnism was discussed. The enhancing effect Co2+ and Ni2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd was due to the increase in transmission efficiency of hydride of Zn and Cd. There was a synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline or 8-hydroxyquinoline and Co2+ on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd, however no synergic enhancing effect between phenanthroline and 8-hydroxyquinoline on the fluorescence signals of Zn and Cd. The simulative action of cationic surfactant, anion surfactant and non-ionic surfactant surfactant to hydride generation was investigated. It is shown that both cationic surfactant and non-ionic surfactant have obvious enhancing effect on the fluorescence signals of analytes because of the decrease in surface tension of reaction solution. The release characteristics of hydride from the absorption solution containing surfactant was ulteriorly examined by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and the mechanism of enhancing effect of surfactant on hydride generation and transmission was proposed.

  11. Insertion of Group 12-16 Hydrides into NHCs: A Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Kalon J; Dutton, Jason L; Wilson, David

    2017-03-06

    The endocyclic ring expansion of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) rings by transition metal (Group 12) and main group (Group 13-16) element hydrides has been investigated in a computational study. In addition to previously reported insertion reactivity with Si, B, Be and Zn, similar reactivity is predicted to be feasible for heavier group 13 elements (Al, Ga, In, Tl), with the reaction barriers for Al-Tl calculated to be lower than for boron. Insertion is not expected with group 15-16 element hydrides, as the initial adduct formation is thermodynamically unfavourable. The reaction pathway with group 12 hydrides is calculated to be more favourable with two NHCs rather than a single NHC (analogous to Be), however hydride ring insertion with metal dihydrides is not feasible, but rather a reduced NHC is thermodynamically favoured. For group 14, ring-insertion reactivity is predicted to be feasible with the heavier dihydrides. Trends in reactivity of element hydrides may be related to the protic or hydridic character of the element hydrides.

  12. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  14. WANTED: Fully Automated Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of indexing focuses on the possibilities of fully automated indexing. Topics discussed include controlled indexing languages such as subject heading lists and thesauri, free indexing languages, natural indexing languages, computer-aided indexing, expert systems, and the need for greater creativity to further advance automated indexing.…

  15. The Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naclerio, Nick

    1979-01-01

    Clerical personnel may be able to climb career ladders as a result of office automation and expanded job opportunities in the word processing area. Suggests opportunities in an automated office system and lists books and periodicals on word processing for counselors and teachers. (MF)

  16. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherron, Gene T.

    1982-01-01

    The steps taken toward office automation by the University of Maryland are described. Office automation is defined and some types of word processing systems are described. Policies developed in the writing of a campus plan are listed, followed by a section on procedures adopted to implement the plan. (Author/MLW)

  17. Work and Programmable Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  18. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  19. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  20. Development of a used fuel cladding damage model incorporating circumferential and radial hydride responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiushi; Ostien, Jakob T.; Hansen, Glen

    2014-04-01

    At the completion of the fuel drying process, used fuel Zry4 cladding typically exhibits a significant population of δ-hydride inclusions. These inclusions are in the form of small platelets that are generally oriented both circumferentially and radially within the cladding material. There is concern that radially-oriented hydride inclusions may weaken the cladding material and lead to issues during used fuel storage and transportation processes. A high fidelity model of the mechanical behavior of hydrides has utility in both designing fuel cladding to be more resistant to this hydride-induced weakening and also in suggesting modifications to drying, storage, and transport operations to reduce the impact of hydride formation and/or the avoidance of loading scenarios that could overly stress the radial inclusions. We develop a mechanical model for the Zry4-hydride system that, given a particular morphology of hydride inclusions, allows the calculation of the response of the hydrided cladding under various loading scenarios. The model treats the Zry4 matrix material as J2 elastoplastic, and treats the hydrides as platelets oriented in predefined directions (e.g., circumferentially and radially). The model is hosted by the Albany analysis framework, where a finite element approximation of the weak form of the cladding boundary value problem is solved using a preconditioned Newton-Krylov approach. Instead of forming the required system Jacobian operator directly or approximating its action with a differencing operation, Albany leverages the Trilinos Sacado package to form the Jacobian via automatic differentiation. We present results that describe the performance of the model in comparison with as-fabricated Zry4 as well as HB Robinson fuel cladding. Further, we also present performance results that demonstrate the efficacy of the overall solution method employed to host the model.

  1. Automation in Immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-01-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  2. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  3. Studies of hydride formation and superconductivity in hydrides of alloys Th-M /M = La, Y, Ce, Zr and Bi/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oesterreicher, H.; Clinton, J.; Misroch, M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to gain a better insight into both the unusual composition of ThH15 and its superconductivity, an experimental study was conducted to assess the influence of partial replacement of Th in Th4H15 by elements which allow for a systematic alteration of spatial and electronic effects. For this purpose, substituent elements with the same number of valence electrons (4) but of smaller size (Zr) as well as elements with a smaller number of valence electrons (3) and either larger (La) or smaller size (Y) were selected. A few data with Ce and Bi as substituent atoms are also included. The matrix alloys for hydriding were obtained by induction melting under Ar in water-cooled Cu boats. Superconducting transition temperatures are found to decrease on substitution for Th in Th4H15. Hydrides derived from LaH3 by substitution for La by Th do not become superconducting. It is suggested that superconductivity in Th4H15 is connected with a deviation from the exact stoichiometry of Th4H15. A model of unsatisfied valencies may be of more general validity in predicting superconductivity.

  4. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  5. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.; Stifler, C.; Palm, K.; Steski, D.; Kanesue, T.; Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.

    2016-02-15

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam.

  6. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of the hydriding behaviour in the pulse ecm of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, G. V.; Pronichev, N. D.; Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Bogdanovich, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    The titanium alloy hydriding is a negative factor since it may result in a slow-action destruction of parts operating at small loads. The introduction of pulse electrochemical machining requires consideration and evaluation of this factor’s influence onto the operating performance of components. Since electrochemical machining is performed at small gaps, and hydrogen release is very intensive on electrodes, favourable conditions for the hydriding process are developed. The work describes a profound theoretical study of this process with proposing technological methods to reduce hydriding.

  8. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, T.

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  9. Systematic review automation technologies.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-07-09

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time.

  10. Systematic review automation technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  11. High-Frequency (1)H NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb(II) Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-10-17

    The role of relativistic effects on (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides is investigated by using fully relativistic DFT calculations. The stability of possible Pb(II) hydride isomers is studied together with their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, which are predicted in the high-frequency region, up to 90 ppm. These (1)H signals are dictated by sizable relativistic contributions due to spin-orbit coupling at the heavy atom and can be as large as 80 ppm for a hydrogen atom bound to Pb(II). Such high-frequency (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Pb(II) hydride resonances cannot be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra with standard experimental setup. Extended (1)H NMR spectral ranges are thus suggested for studies of Pb(II) compounds. Modulation of spin-orbit relativistic contribution to (1)H NMR chemical shift is found to be important also in the experimentally known Sn(II) hydrides. Because the (1)H NMR chemical shifts were found to be rather sensitive to the changes in the coordination sphere of the central metal in both Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides, their application for structural investigation is suggested.

  12. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified tritium hydride bed development, Part 2 - Experimental validation of key conceptual design features

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, K.J.; Morgan, G.A.

    2015-03-15

    The Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed is an interim replacement for the first generation (Gen1) process hydride beds currently in service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. 3 new features are implemented in the TECH Mod hydride bed prototype: internal electric cartridge heaters, porous divider plates, and copper foam discs. These modifications will enhance bed performance and reduce costs by improving bed activation and installation processes, in-bed accountability measurements, end-of-life bed removal, and He-3 recovery. A full-scale hydride bed test station was constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to evaluate the performance of the prototype TECH Mod hydride bed. Controlled hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption/ desorption experiments were conducted to validate that the conceptual design changes have no adverse effects on the gas transfer kinetics or H{sub 2} storage/release properties compared to those of the Gen1 bed. Inert gas expansions before, during, and after H{sub 2} flow tests were used to monitor changes in gas transfer rates with repeated hydriding/de-hydriding of the hydride material. The gas flow rates significantly decreased after initial hydriding of the material; however, minimal changes were observed after repeated cycling. The data presented herein confirm that the TECH Mod hydride bed would be a suitable replacement for the Gen1 bed with the added enhancements expected from the advanced design features. (authors)

  13. Atomic absorption spectroscopy for mercury, automated by sequential injection and miniaturized in lab-on-valve system.

    PubMed

    Erxleben, Holger; Ruzicka, Jaromir

    2005-08-15

    Sodium borohydride-based hydride generation was automated by using programmable flow within the lab-on-valve module. Mercury vapor, generated in the reaction mixture, was extracted in a gas/liquid separator. The gas-expansion separator was miniaturized and compared with the performance of a novel gas separator that exploits the combination of Venturi effect and reduced pressure. Cold vapor atomic spectroscopy was used as a model system, with detection of mercury by absorption at 254 nm and limit of detection of 9 microg of Hg/L, using 300 microL of sample and 100 microL of borohydride. This work introduces, for the first time, sequential injection technique for hydride generation, highlights advantages of using programmable flow, and outlines means for miniaturization of assays based on spectroscopy of volatile species.

  14. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  15. Managing laboratory automation

    PubMed Central

    Saboe, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of managing automated systems through their life cycles within the quality-control (QC) laboratory environment. The focus is on the process of directing and managing the evolving automation of a laboratory; system examples are given. The author shows how both task and data systems have evolved, and how they interrelate. A BIG picture, or continuum view, is presented and some of the reasons for success or failure of the various examples cited are explored. Finally, some comments on future automation need are discussed. PMID:18925018

  16. Atomistic modeling of the plutonium-hydride systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Baskes, Mike; Lawson, A. C.; Chen, Shaoping; Valone, Steve; Taylor, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Thermodynamic solubility data for hydrogen in plutonium and its alloys suggest the formation of vacancy-hydrogen clusters, for less than 2 at.% hydrogen. It is also known that hydrogen induces lattice contraction of the system. These data along with the low melting point of Pu meet the conditions for superabundant vacancies, which can significantly affect material properties and phase stability. Detailed mechanisms for vacancy diffusion and hydrogen trapping at the atomic scale are largely unknown, however. We investigate the equilibrium properties of Pu-hydrides using various techniques of Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrogen solubility and vacancy concentration are computed as a function of temperature. We also discuss effects of the superabundant vacancies on bulk thermal and mechanical properties.

  17. Proton–hydride tautomerism in hydrogen evolution catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luis M. Aguirre; Johnson, Samantha I.; Corona, Sydney L.; Villatoro, Walther; Goddard, William A.; Takase, Michael K.; VanderVelde, David G.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.; Blakemore, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient generation of hydrogen from renewable resources requires development of catalysts that avoid deep wells and high barriers. Information about the energy landscape for H2 production can be obtained by chemical characterization of catalytic intermediates, but few have been observed to date. We have isolated and characterized a key intermediate in 2e– + 2H+ → H2 catalysis. This intermediate, obtained by treatment of Cp*Rh(bpy) (Cp*, η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; bpy, κ2-2,2′-bipyridyl) with acid, is not a hydride species but rather, bears [η4-Cp*H] as a ligand. Delivery of a second proton to this species leads to evolution of H2 and reformation of η5-Cp* bound to rhodium(III). With suitable choices of acids and bases, the Cp*Rh(bpy) complex catalyzes facile and reversible interconversion of H+ and H2. PMID:27222576

  18. Application of vanadium hydride compressors for Joule-Thomson cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Freeman, B. D.; Phillips, J. R.

    The Joule-Thomson expansion of hydrogen gas offers efficient and reliable cryocoolers to produce temperatures between 10 and 50 K. A critical component to the development of these devices is the metal hydride storage bed that provides a nonmechanical method to compress hydrogen gas via the reversible absorption by appropriate metals or alloys. A thermodynamic model has been used to calculate the impact of operational parameters such as input/output pressure ratios and bed temperature on energy balance and system efficiency. Detailed comparisons are reported for a compressor which utilizes vanadium metal as the sorbent for either hydrogen or deuterium where the unusually large isotope differences between the phase diagrams and thermal properties for VH(x) and VD(x) have been considered. The sensitivity of heat input requirements to the uncertainties in primary variables are described.

  19. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  20. Modeling of hydride precipitation and re-orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Mitchell, John Anthony

    2015-09-18

    In this report, we present a thermodynamic-­based model of hydride precipitation in Zr-based claddings. The model considers the state of the cladding immediately following drying, after removal from cooling-pools, and presents the evolution of precipitate formation upon cooling as follows: The pilgering process used to form Zr-based cladding imparts strong crystallographic and grain shape texture, with the basal plane of the hexagonal α-Zr grains being strongly aligned in the rolling-­direction and the grains are elongated with grain size being approximately twice as long parallel to the rolling direction, which is also the long axis of the tubular cladding, as it is in the orthogonal directions.

  1. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  2. Crystal structure of the superconducting phase of sulfur hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einaga, Mari; Sakata, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shimizu, Katsuya; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Drozdov, Alexander P.; Troyan, Ivan A.; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting critical temperature above 200 K has recently been discovered in H2S (or D2S) under high hydrostatic pressure. These measurements were interpreted in terms of a decomposition of these materials into elemental sulfur and a hydrogen-rich hydride that is responsible for the superconductivity, although direct experimental evidence for this mechanism has so far been lacking. Here we report the crystal structure of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide (and deuterium sulfide) in the normal and superconducting states obtained by means of synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, combined with electrical resistance measurements at both room and low temperatures. We find that the superconducting phase is mostly in good agreement with the theoretically predicted body-centred cubic (bcc) structure for H3S. The presence of elemental sulfur is also manifest in the X-ray diffraction patterns, thus proving the decomposition mechanism of H2S to H3S + S under pressure.

  3. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10{sup {minus}7} cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results.

  4. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  5. A simple approach to metal hydride alloy optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.; Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Hildebrand-Scott (1950) solubility parameters can be obtained for metals and alloys by calculating the cohesive energy density (CED), equal to the square of the solubility parameter, and a function of the heat of sublimation and the atomic volume. It is suggested that the solubility parameter permits estimation of the hydrogen storage capacity of an alloy and that alloys with a solubility parameter approximately equal to the parameter for hydrogen will have greater hydrogen storage capacity than other alloys. Equilibrium pressure - temperature relationships for some metal hydrides are presented in conjunction with the calculated solubility parameter and correlated with characteristics which would be useful in hydrogen-powered vehicles. Alloy properties which increase the amount of nonstoichiometric reversible hydrogen absorption are discussed.

  6. Ovonic nickel metal hydride batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D. A.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Gifford, P. R.; Dhar, S. K.; Ovshinsky, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Ovonic nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries are easily adaptable to a variety of applications. Small consumer NiMH cells were developed and are now being manufactured by licensees throughout the world. This technology was successfully scaled up in larger prismatic cells aimed at electric vehicle applications. Sealed cells aimed at satellite power applications were also built and cycle tested by OBC and other outside agencies. Prototype batteries with high specific energy (over 80 Wh/kg), high energy density (245 Wh/L), and excellent power capability (400 W/kg) were produced. Ovonic NiMH batteries demonstrated an excellent cycle life of over 10,000 cycles at 30 percent DOD. Presently, Ovonic Battery Company is working on an advanced version of this battery for space applications as part of an SBIR contract from NASA.

  7. Ovonic nickel metal hydride batteries for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D. A.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Gifford, P. R.; Dhar, S. K.; Ovshinsky, S. R.

    1993-11-01

    Ovonic nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries are easily adaptable to a variety of applications. Small consumer NiMH cells were developed and are now being manufactured by licensees throughout the world. This technology was successfully scaled up in larger prismatic cells aimed at electric vehicle applications. Sealed cells aimed at satellite power applications were also built and cycle tested by OBC and other outside agencies. Prototype batteries with high specific energy (over 80 Wh/kg), high energy density (245 Wh/L), and excellent power capability (400 W/kg) were produced. Ovonic NiMH batteries demonstrated an excellent cycle life of over 10,000 cycles at 30 percent DOD. Presently, Ovonic Battery Company is working on an advanced version of this battery for space applications as part of an SBIR contract from NASA.

  8. Wall pressure exerted by hydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Yon E.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Zimmerman, Mark D.

    2009-06-01

    Wall pressure exerted by the bulk expansion of a sodium aluminum hydride bed was measured as a function of hydrogen content. A custom apparatus was designed and loaded with sodium alanates at densities of 1.0, 1.1, and 1.16 g/cc. Four complete cycles were performed to identify variations in measured pressure. Results indicated poor correlation between exerted pressure and hydrogen capacity of the sodium alanate beds. Mechanical pressure due to the hydrogenation of sodium alanates does not influence full-scale system designs as it falls within common design factors of safety. Gas pressure gradients within the porous solid were identified and may limit reaction rates, especially for high aspect ratio beds.

  9. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  10. LaNi5 hydride cryogenic refrigerator test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A complete LaNi5 hydrogen absorption cryogenic refrigerator system was developed. The system uses low temperature waste heat of approximately 100 C as a power source, and has no moving parts other than self operating valves. The cycle continues automatically by an electronic sequencing timing mechanism for the three compressors which are phased such that a constant supply of high pressure hydrogen gas is provided. It is indicated that with a fully clean hydrogen system, hundreds of thousand cycles should be attainable, even though some degradation may eventually occur. Simple vacuum reactivation of the hydride of moving parts, other than self operating, long life valves, the refrigerators predicted life is extremely long.

  11. Hydride Transfer in DHFR by Transition Path Sampling, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Heavy Enzyme Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is used to study fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. It remains controversial whether fast protein motions are coupled to the hydride transfer catalyzed by ecDHFR. Previous studies with heavy ecDHFR proteins labeled with 13C, 15N, and nonexchangeable 2H reported enzyme mass-dependent hydride transfer kinetics for ecDHFR. Here, we report refined experimental and computational studies to establish that hydride transfer is independent of protein mass. Instead, we found the rate constant for substrate dissociation to be faster for heavy DHFR. Previously reported kinetic differences between light and heavy DHFRs likely arise from kinetic steps other than the chemical step. This study confirms that fast (femtosecond to picosecond) protein motions in ecDHFR are not coupled to hydride transfer and provides an integrative computational and experimental approach to resolve fast dynamics coupled to chemical steps in enzyme catalysis. PMID:26652185

  12. Activation of C-H bonds in nitrones leads to iridium hydrides with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoda; Qian, Yong; Ben, Rong; Lu, Xiang; Zhu, Hai-Liang; Chao, Hui; Zhao, Jing

    2013-08-22

    We report the design and synthesis of a series of new cyclometalated iridium hydrides derived from the C-H bond activation of aromatic nitrones and the biological evaluation of these iridium hydrides as antitumor agents. The nitrone ligands are based on the structure of a popular antioxidant, α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Compared to cisplatin, the iridium hydrides exhibit excellent antitumor activity on HepG2 cells. The metal-coordinated compound with the most potent anticancer activity, 2f, was selected for further analysis because of its ability to induce apoptosis and interact with DNA. During in vitro studies and in vivo efficacy analysis with tumor xenograft models in Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice, complex 2f exhibited antitumor activity that was markedly superior to that of cisplatin. Our results suggest, for the first time, that metal hydrides could be a new type of metal-based antitumor agent.

  13. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  14. The diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic iridium hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Nicolas; Mazet, Clément

    2016-08-23

    We report herein the highly diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic Ir(iii) hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre following various strategies. The configurational stability of these compounds has also been investigated.

  15. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Courty, Olivier Fabrice; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  16. Hydride phase dissolution enthalpy in neutron irradiated Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaíno, P.; Banchik, A. D.; Abriata, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    The differential calorimetric technique has been applied to measure the dissolution enthalpy, ΔHδ→αirrad, of zirconium hydrides precipitated in structural components removed from the Argentine Atucha 1 PHWR nuclear power plant after 10.3 EFPY. An average value of ΔHδ→αirrad=5 kJ/mol H was obtained after the first calorimetric run. That value is seven times lower than the value of Δ Hδ→α = 37.7 kJ/mol H recently determined in Zircaloy-4 specimens taken from similar unirradiated structural components using the same calorimetric technique [P. Vizcaı´no, PhD thesis, Number TD-11/03, Inst. Tech. 'Prof. Jorge A. Sábato', CICAC, CNEA, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 24 June 2003]. Post-irradiation thermal treatments gradually increase that low value towards the unirradiated value with increasing annealing temperature similar to that observed for TSSd irrad [P. Vizcaı´no, A.D. Banchik, J.P. Abriata. J. Nucl. Mater. 304/2-3 (2002) 96-106]. Therefore the same H atom trapping mechanism during reactor operation already proposed to explain the evolution of TSSd irrad is also valid for Qδ→αirrad. As the ratio Q/Δ H is proportional to the number NH of H atoms precipitated as hydrides, the increment of Qδ→αirrad with the thermal treatment indicates that the value of NH also grows with the annealing reaching the value corresponding to the bulk H concentration when ΔHδ→αirrad≈37 kJ/mol H. That is a direct indication that the post-irradiation thermal treatment releases the H atoms from their traps increasing the number of H atoms available to precipitate at the end of each calorimetric run and/or isothermal treatment.

  17. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šíma, Jan; Rychlovský, Petr

    2003-05-01

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l -1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l -1 H 2SO 4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min -1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 °C) at a temperature of 400 °C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H 2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H 2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H 2Se using NaBH 4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml -1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation.

  18. Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

    2009-06-07

    Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

  19. Automated decision stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischendorf, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the combination of software robots and expert systems to automate everyday business tasks. Tasks which require people to repetitively interact with multiple systems screens as well as multiple systems.

  20. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  1. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Colin K.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a practical approach to planning for office automation termed the "Focused Process Approach" (the "what" phase, "how" phase, "doing" phase) which is a synthesis of the problem-solving and participatory planning approaches. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  2. Xenon International Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-05

    The Xenon International Automated Control software monitors, displays status, and allows for manual operator control as well as fully automatic control of multiple commercial and PNNL designed hardware components to generate and transmit atmospheric radioxenon concentration measurements every six hours.

  3. Automated Cyber Red Teaming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    possible attack paths for CRT. This report surveys the current state-of-the- art planning techniques, tools and frameworks, their performance at...6 3.3 State of the art Automated Planning ..................................................................... 7 3.3.1...automated planning to CRT problems. Finally, we recommend several state-of-the- art planning tools for trial and, more generally, when it is suitable to use

  4. Automating Index Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    Automating Index Preparation* Pehong Chent Michael A. Harrison Computer Science Division University of CaliforniaI Berkeley, CA 94720 March 23, 1987...Abstract Index preparation is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper we indicate * how the indexing process can be automated in a way which...identified and analyzed. Specifically, we describe a framework for placing index commands in the document and a general purpose index processor which

  5. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  6. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  7. Automated Status Notification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Automated Status Notification System (ASNS) was born out of need. To prevent "hacker attacks," Lewis' telephone system needed to monitor communications activities 24 hr a day, 7 days a week. With decreasing staff resources, this continuous monitoring had to be automated. By utilizing existing communications hardware, a UNIX workstation, and NAWK (a pattern scanning and processing language), we implemented a continuous monitoring system.

  8. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  9. Metal hydrides reactors with improved dynamic characteristics for a fast cycling hydrogen compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, G.; Coldea, I.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Ardelean, O.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer process in metal hydrides hydrogen storage reactors. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of our designed and developed reactors are studied by varying the operating parameters and analyzing the effects of metal hydride bed parameters. The metal alloy selected to characterize the cycling behaviour of reactors is LaNi5, material synthesized and characterized by us in the range 20-80°C. Four types of metal hydride reactors were tested with the aim to provide a fast hydrogen absorption-desorption cycle, able to be thermally cycled at rapid rates. Some new technical solutions have been studied to make a step forward in reducing the duration of the reactors cycle, which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity and good permeability to hydrogen gas. Dynamic characteristic of developed fast metal hydride reactors is improved using our novel mixture metal hydride-CA conductive additive due to the increased effective thermal conductivity of the alloy bed. The advanced hydride bed design with high heat transfer capabilities can be thermally cycled at a rapid rate, under 120 seconds, in order to process high hydrogen flow rates.

  10. Effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kook, Dong-Hak; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel claddings discharged from water reactors contain hydrogen up to 800 wppm depending on the burn-up and power history. During long-term dry storage, the cladding temperature slowly decreases with diminishing decay heat and absorbed hydrogen atoms are precipitated in Zr-matrix according to the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen. Under these conditions, hydrides can significantly reduce cladding ductility and impact resistance, especially when the radial hydrides are massively present in the material. In this study, the effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding were investigated using a ring compression test. The results show that circumferentially hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding is brittle at room temperature but its ductility is regained substantially as the temperature goes above 150 °C. On the other hand, radially hydrided cladding remains brittle at 150 °C and micro-cracks developed in the radial hydrides can act as crack propagation paths. Fracture energy analysis shows that ductile to brittle transition temperature is low in between 25 °C and 100 °C in the former case, whereas it lies in between 200 °C and 250 °C in the latter case.

  11. Brønsted-Lowry Acid Strength of Metal Hydride and Dihydrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydride complexes are usually amphoteric, not only acting as hydride donors, but also as Brønsted-Lowry acids. A simple additive ligand acidity constant equation (LAC for short) allows the estimation of the acid dissociation constant Ka(LAC) of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes. It is remarkably successful in systematizing diverse reports of over 450 reactions of acids with metal complexes and bases with metal hydrides and dihydrogen complexes, including catalytic cycles where these reactions are proposed or observed. There are links between pKa(LAC) and pKa(THF), pKa(DCM), pKa(MeCN) for neutral and cationic acids. For the groups from chromium to nickel, tables are provided that order the acidity of metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes from most acidic (pKa(LAC) -18) to least acidic (pKa(LAC) 50). Figures are constructed showing metal acids above the solvent pKa scales and organic acids below to summarize a large amount of information. Acid-base features are analyzed for catalysts from chromium to gold for ionic hydrogenations, bifunctional catalysts for hydrogen oxidation and evolution electrocatalysis, H/D exchange, olefin hydrogenation and isomerization, hydrogenation of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and carbon dioxide, hydrogenases and their model complexes, and palladium catalysts with hydride intermediates.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopy, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange in high-spin iron(II) hydride complexes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Thomas R; Bill, Eckhard; MacLeod, K Cory; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-03-03

    Very few hydride complexes are known in which the metals have a high-spin electronic configuration. We describe the characterization of several high-spin iron(II) hydride/deuteride isotopologues and their exchange reactions with one another and with H2/D2. Though the hydride/deuteride signal is not observable in NMR spectra, the choice of isotope has an influence on the chemical shifts of distant protons in the dimers through the paramagnetic isotope effect on chemical shift. This provides the first way to monitor the exchange of H and D in the bridging positions of these hydride complexes. The rate of exchange depends on the size of the supporting ligand, and this is consistent with the idea that H2/D2 exchange into the hydrides occurs through the dimeric complexes rather than through a transient monomer. The understanding of H/D exchange mechanisms in these high-spin iron hydride complexes may be relevant to postulated nitrogenase mechanisms.

  13. Solvent influence on the thermodynamics for hydride transfer from bis(diphosphine) complexes of nickel.

    PubMed

    Connelly Robinson, Samantha J; Zall, Christopher M; Miller, Deanna L; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-06-14

    The thermodynamic hydricity of a metal hydride can vary considerably between solvents. This parameter can be used to determine the favourability of a hydride-transfer reaction, such as the reaction between a metal hydride and CO2 to produce formate. Because the hydricities of these species do not vary consistently between solvents, reactions that are thermodynamically unfavourable in one solvent can be favourable in others. The hydricity of a water-soluble, bis-phosphine nickel hydride complex was compared to the hydricity of formate in water and in acetonitrile. Formate is a better hydride donor than [HNi(dmpe)2](+) by 7 kcal mol(-1) in acetonitrile, and no hydride transfer from [HNi(dmpe)2](+) to CO2 occurs in this solvent. The hydricity of [HNi(dmpe)2](+) is greatly improved in water relative to acetonitrile, in that reduction of CO2 to formate by [HNi(dmpe)2](+) was found to be thermodynamically downhill by 8 kcal mol(-1). Catalysis for the hydrogenation of CO2 was pursued, but the regeneration of [HNi(dmpe)2] under catalytic conditions was unfavourable. However, the present results demonstrate that the solvent dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as hydricity and acidity can be exploited in order to produce systems with balanced or favourable overall thermodynamics. This approach should be advantageous for the design of future water-soluble catalysts.

  14. Experimental study of a metal hydride driven braided artificial pneumatic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoff, Alexandra; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental study of a new actuation system that couples a braided artificial pneumatic muscle (BAPM) with a metal hydride driven hydrogen compressor to create a compact, lightweight, noiseless system capable of high forces and smooth actuation. The results indicate that the metal hydride-BAPM system has relatively good second law efficiency average of 30% over the desorption cycle. The thermal efficiency is low, due mainly to the highly endothermic chemical reaction that releases the stored hydrogen gas from the metal hydride. The force to metal hydride weight is very high (~14 000 NForce/kgMH) considering that this system has not been optimized to use the minimum amount of metal hydride required for a full actuation stroke of the fluidic muscle. Also, a thermodynamic model for the complete system is developed. The analysis is restricted in some aspects concerning the complexity of the hydriding/dehydriding chemical process of the system and the three-dimensional geometry of the reactor, but it provides a useful comparison to other actuation devices and clearly reveals the parameters necessary for optimization of the actuation system in future work. The system shows comparable work output and has the benefits of biological muscle-like properties for potential use in robotic systems.

  15. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH{sub 4} and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Myoung Youp; Kwak, Young Jun; Lee, Seong Ho; Park, Hye Ryoung

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H{sub 2}, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti and MgH{sub 2}. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti to MgH{sub 2} to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH{sub 2} was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH{sub 4} with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH{sub 2}, Mg, Ni, TiH{sub 1.924}, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample.

  17. Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

  18. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  19. Metrology automation reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Elizabeth E.

    1996-09-01

    At Motorola's MOS-12 facility automated measurements on 200- mm diameter wafers proceed in a hands-off 'load-and-go' mode requiring only wafer loading, measurement recipe loading, and a 'run' command for processing. Upon completion of all sample measurements, the data is uploaded to the factory's data collection software system via a SECS II interface, eliminating the requirement of manual data entry. The scope of in-line measurement automation has been extended to the entire metrology scheme from job file generation to measurement and data collection. Data analysis and comparison to part specification limits is also carried out automatically. Successful integration of automated metrology into the factory measurement system requires that automated functions, such as autofocus and pattern recognition algorithms, display a high degree of reliability. In the 24- hour factory reliability data can be collected automatically on every part measured. This reliability data is then uploaded to the factory data collection software system at the same time as the measurement data. Analysis of the metrology reliability data permits improvements to be made as needed, and provides an accurate accounting of automation reliability. This reliability data has so far been collected for the CD-SEM (critical dimension scanning electron microscope) metrology tool, and examples are presented. This analysis method can be applied to such automated in-line measurements as CD, overlay, particle and film thickness measurements.

  20. Elements of EAF automation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Dragna, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    Our article presents elements of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) automation. So, we present and analyze detailed two automation schemes: the scheme of electrical EAF automation system; the scheme of thermic EAF automation system. The application results of these scheme of automation consists in: the sensitive reduction of specific consummation of electrical energy of Electric Arc Furnace, increasing the productivity of Electric Arc Furnace, increase the quality of the developed steel, increasing the durability of the building elements of Electric Arc Furnace.

  1. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Provo, James L.

    2014-07-01

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83 wt. %)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600 °C–1 h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt. %), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ∼10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900 °C–1 h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450 °C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1 h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1 h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e = 20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1

  2. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (<100nm diameter) and ball-milled silicon powder (325 mesh). The increase in rate upon decreasing the particle size to 10 nm was even greater than would be expected based upon the increase in surface area. While specific surface area increased by a factor of 6 in going from <100 nm to ˜10 nm particles, the hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  3. A DFT based investigation into the electronic structure and properties of hydride rich rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Brayshaw, Simon K; Green, Jennifer C; Hazari, Nilay; Weller, Andrew S

    2007-05-14

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate the structures, bonding and properties of a family of hydride rich late transition metal clusters of the type [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = 0, +1, +2, +3 or +4), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(16)](x) (x = +1 or +2) and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](x) (x = 0, +1 or +2). The positions of the hydrogen atoms around the pseudo-octahedral Rh(6) core in the optimized structures of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = 0, +1, +2, +3 or +4) varied depending on the overall charge on the cluster. The number of semi-bridging hydrides increased (semi-bridging hydrides have two different Rh-H bond distances) as the charge on the cluster increased and simultaneously the number of perfectly bridging hydrides (equidistant between two Rh centers) decreased. This distortion maximized the bonding between the hydrides and the metal centers and resulted in the stabilization of orbitals related to the 2T(2g) set in a perfectly octahedral cluster. In contrast, the optimized structures of the 16-hydride clusters [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = +1 or +2) were similar and both clusters contained an interstitial hydride, along with one terminal hydride, ten bridging hydrides and two coordinated H(2) molecules which were bound to two rhodium centers in an eta(2):eta(1)-fashion. All the hydrides were on the outside of the Rh(6) core in the lowest energy structures of the 14-hydride clusters [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)] and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](+), which both contained eleven bridging hydrides, one terminal hydride and one coordinated H(2) molecule. Unfortunately, the precise structure of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](2+) could not be determined as structures both with and without an interstitial hydride were of similar energy. The reaction energetics for the uptake and release of two molecule of H(2) by a cycle consisting of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](2+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(16)](2+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](+) and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](2+) were modelled

  4. The effect of external stress on hydride precipitation temperature in zirconium for a given hydrogen concentration in solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, S.Q.

    1999-10-22

    In zirconium alloys, if hydrogen concentration exceeds the terminal solid solubility limit for hydride precipitation (TSSP), hydrides will form. The potential for hydride fracture at stress concentrators such as blunt flaws and sharp cracks is a concern in the nuclear industry. This report will answer the following question: Knowing the higher hydrogen concentration at a flaw tip, can the authors still use the TSSP data measured under no external stress to predict the temperature for hydride precipitation in the stressed state at a flaw tip?

  5. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds with a H/M ratio greater than unity obtained at high hydrogen pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Semenenko, K.N.; Klyamkin, S.N.

    1993-11-01

    Novel hydride phases with H/M > 1 based on Zr{sub 2}Pd, Hf{sub 2}Pd, and Hf{sub 2}Cu (structures of the MoSi{sub 2} type) have been synthesized at high H{sub 2} pressures. The X-ray diffraction investigations of the resulting hydrides have been carried out. Some factors determining the maximum hydrogen content in the hydrides of intermetallic compounds are discussed. A model structure of the hydrides obtained is proposed, which assumes the possibility of direct H-H interactions when the interatomic distances are less than 1 {angstrom}.

  6. Vibration and shock test report for the H1616-1 container and the Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Joseph, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed random vibration and shock tests on a tritium hydride transport vessel that was packaged in an H1616-1 container. The objective of the tests was to determine if the hydride transport vessel remains leaktight under vibration and shock normally incident to transport, which is a requirement that the hydride transport vessel must meet to be shipped in the H1616-1. Helium leak tests before and after the vibration and shock tests showed that the hydride transport vessel remained leaktight under the specified conditions. There were no detrimental effects on the containment vessel of the H1616-1.

  7. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; ...

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γmore » hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.« less

  8. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; Tonks, Michael R.; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γ hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.

  9. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Summary The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to

  10. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to

  11. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  12. Doped Sodium Aluminum Hydride: Fundamental Studies and Practical Development of a Promising New Hydrogen Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Craig

    2004-03-01

    In 1997, Bogdanovic and Schwickardi reported that the elimination of hydrogen from solid NaAlH4 is markedly accelerated and rendered reversible under moderate conditions upon mixing the hydride with a few mole percent of selected transition metal complexes. We found that doping the hydride through an alternative, mechanical milling method leads to considerable improvements in the practical hydrogen cycling performance of the hydride. It now appears that a variation of the doped hydride could possibly be developed as a viable means for the onboard storage of hydrogen. However, no dopant precursors have been found that give a greater kinetic enhancement than those cataloged in Bogdanovic's original, 1995 patent. Similarly, only the sodium and mixed sodium, lithium salts of the alanates have been found undergo largely reversible dehydrogenation under moderate conditions upon doping. This lack of progress is surprising in view of the recent "gold rush" flurry of activity that has been direct towards the development of alanates as practical onboard hydrogen carriers. Clearly, these efforts have been handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature and mechanism of action the dopants. We have therefore initiated efforts to elucidate the fundamental basis of the remarkable hydrogen storage properties of this material. Our efforts have pointed to a model of the material in which the dopants are substituted into the bulk hydride lattice. A detailed version of this model has emerged from our recent infra red, Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies as well as neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering, and kinetic investigations of the doped hydride. The results of these studies will be presented and discussed in terms of their relationship to our "substitutional" model of the doped hydride.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Study of CO2 Insertion into Ruthenium Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Waldie, Kate M; Warnke, Ingolf; De Crisci, Antonio G; Batista, Victor S; Waymouth, Robert M; Chidsey, Christopher E D

    2016-02-15

    The ruthenium hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1; CNN = 2-aminomethyl-6-tolylpyridine, dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane) reacts rapidly and irreversibly with CO2 under ambient conditions to yield the corresponding Ru formate complex 2. In contrast, the Ru hydride 1 reacts with acetone reversibly to generate the Ru isopropoxide, with the reaction free energy ΔG°(298 K) = -3.1 kcal/mol measured by (1)H NMR in tetrahydrofuran-d8. Density functional theory (DFT), calibrated to the experimentally measured free energies of ketone insertion, was used to evaluate and compare the mechanism and energetics of insertion of acetone and CO2 into the Ru-hydride bond of 1. The calculated reaction coordinate for acetone insertion involves a stepwise outer-sphere dihydrogen transfer to acetone via hydride transfer from the metal and proton transfer from the N-H group on the CNN ligand. In contrast, the lowest energy pathway calculated for CO2 insertion proceeds by an initial Ru-H hydride transfer to CO2 followed by rotation of the resulting N-H-stabilized formate to a Ru-O-bound formate. DFT calculations were used to evaluate the influence of the ancillary ligands on the thermodynamics of CO2 insertion, revealing that increasing the π acidity of the ligand cis to the hydride ligand and increasing the σ basicity of the ligand trans to it decreases the free energy of CO2 insertion, providing a strategy for the design of metal hydride systems capable of reversible, ergoneutral interconversion of CO2 and formate.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of metal hydride electrodes. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Reilly, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the compositional and structural parameters that affect the thermodynamics, kinetics and stability of alloy hydride electrodes and to use this information in the development of new high capacity long life hydride electrodes for rechargeable batteries. The work focuses on the development of AB{sub 5} alloys and the application of in situ methods, at NSLS, such as x-ray absorption (XAS), to elucidate the role of the alloying elements in hydrogen storage and corrosion inhibition. The most significant results to date are: The decay of electrode capacity on cycling was directly related to alloy corrosion. The rate of corrosion depended in part on both the alloy composition and the partial molar volume of hydrogen, V{sub H}. The corrosion rate depended on the composition of the A component in AB{sub 5} (LaNi{sub 5} type) alloys. Partial substitution of La with Ce in AB{sub 5} alloys substantially inhibits electrode corrosion on cycling. Recent results indicate that Co also greatly inhibits electrode corrosion, possibly by minimizing V{sub H}. The AB{sub 5} alloys investigated included LaNi{sub 5}, ternary alloys (e.g. LaN{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 0.2} and La{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 5}), alloys with various substitutions for both La and Ni (e.g. La{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 0.2}) and mischmetal (Mm) alloys of the type normally used in batteries, such as MmB{sub 5} (B = Ni{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}A1{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.75}). A major effort was devoted to the effects of La substitution in the A component. Both in situ and ex situ XAS measurements are used to study the electronic effects that occur on the addition of various metal substitutions and on the ingress of hydrogen.

  15. Understanding atomistic phenomenon for hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Irinder Singh

    The storage of hydrogen into metals in the form of complex metal hydrides is one of the most promising methods. However, the incorporation and release of hydrogen requires very high temperatures. The discovery that the addition of Ti compounds lowers NaAlH4 decomposition barriers closer to ambient conditions, has re-ignited the field, and it is believed that surface processes are responsible for H2 dissociation and mass transport required to form the hydrogenated materials. Such surface reactions mechanisms are however difficult to study with typical spectroscopic and imaging surface science tools. Alanes lack contrast under electron microscopes and can modify the Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) tips. Infrared spectroscopy would be a sensitive probe to investigate the adsorption of hydrogen providing, but has so far failed to detect chemisorbed hydrogen on Ti-doped Al surfaces due to the weak Al-H dynamic dipole moment. Thus despite extensive investigations, the fundamental mechanisms of the role of Ti and alane formation have remained elusive. In this study combining surface infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT), we provide atomistic details about the role of Ti as a catalyst for hydrogen uptake and alane formation and evolution on single crystal Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces. We are able to detect H indirectly by using CO as a probe molecule of the weak Al-H species. We demonstrate that aluminum doped with very small amounts of titanium (in a specific configuration) can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90K. Once dissociated, hydrogen spills over from these catalytic sites on to the Al surface and protects the surface from further reactions. We also show that, on Ti-doped Al surfaces, the diffusion dynamics are severely altered by Ti doping (Atomic hydrogen and AlH3 are trapped at the Ti sites) as indicated by a marked decrease of higher alane concentrations, which is deleterious for hydrogen storage for which mass

  16. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  17. Fully automated protein purification

    PubMed Central

    Camper, DeMarco V.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining highly purified proteins is essential to begin investigating their functional and structural properties. The steps that are typically involved in purifying proteins can include an initial capture, intermediate purification, and a final polishing step. Completing these steps can take several days and require frequent attention to ensure success. Our goal was to design automated protocols that will allow the purification of proteins with minimal operator intervention. Separate methods have been produced and tested that automate the sample loading, column washing, sample elution and peak collection steps for ion-exchange, metal affinity, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. These individual methods are designed to be coupled and run sequentially in any order to achieve a flexible and fully automated protein purification protocol. PMID:19595984

  18. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  19. Automating the CMS DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  20. Automated Library System Specifications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    AD-A78 95 AUTOMATED LIBRARY SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS(U) ARMY LIBRARY /i MANAGEMENT OFFICE ALEXANDRIA VA ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR INFORMATION... MANAGEMENT M B BONNETT JUN 86 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 9/2 NLEElIIhllEEEEE IllEEEEEllllEI .1lm lliml * ~I fI.L25 MI, [OCM RL,;OCLUTO fl. ’N k~ AUTOMATED LIBRARY...SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS .,I Prepared by Mary B. Bonnett ARMY LIBRARY MANAGEMENT OFFICE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Lij

  1. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  2. Automated knowledge generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.

    1988-01-01

    The general objectives of the NASA/UCF Automated Knowledge Generation Project were the development of an intelligent software system that could access CAD design data bases, interpret them, and generate a diagnostic knowledge base in the form of a system model. The initial area of concentration is in the diagnosis of the process control system using the Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) diagnostic system. A secondary objective was the study of general problems of automated knowledge generation. A prototype was developed, based on object-oriented language (Flavors).

  3. Altering user' acceptance of automation through prior automation exposure.

    PubMed

    Bekier, Marek; Molesworth, Brett R C

    2016-08-22

    Air navigation service providers worldwide see increased use of automation as one solution to overcome the capacity constraints imbedded in the present air traffic management (ATM) system. However, increased use of automation within any system is dependent on user acceptance. The present research sought to determine if the point at which an individual is no longer willing to accept or cooperate with automation can be manipulated. Forty participants underwent training on a computer-based air traffic control programme, followed by two ATM exercises (order counterbalanced), one with and one without the aid of automation. Results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation ('tipping point') decreased; suggesting it is indeed possible to alter automation acceptance. Practitioner Summary: This paper investigates whether the point at which a user of automation rejects automation (i.e. 'tipping point') is constant or can be manipulated. The results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation decreased; suggesting it is possible to alter automation acceptance.

  4. Group 14 hydrides with low valent elements for activation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Swadhin K; Roesky, Herbert W

    2012-02-21

    Transition metal compounds are well known as activators of small molecules, and they serve as efficient catalysts for a variety of homogeneous and heterogeneous transformations. In contrast, there is a general feeling that main group compounds cannot act as efficient catalysts because of their inability to activate small molecules. Traditionally, the activation of small molecules is considered one of the key steps during a catalytic cycle with transition metals. As a consequence, researchers have long neglected the full range of possibilities in harnessing main group elements for the design of efficient catalysts. Recent developments, however, have made it possible to synthesize main group compounds with low-valent elements capable of activating small molecules. In particular, the judicious use of sterically appropriate ligands has been successful in preparing and stabilizing a variety of Group 14 hydrides with low-valent elements. In this Account, we discuss recent advances in the synthesis of Group 14 hydrides with low-valent elements and assess their potential as small-molecule activators. Group 14, which comprises the nonmetal C, the semimetals Si and Ge, and the metals Sn and Pb, was for years a source of hydrides with the Group 14 element almost exclusively in tetravalent form. Synthetic difficulties and the low stability of Group 14 hydrides in lower oxidation states were difficult to overcome. But in 2000, a divalent Sn(II) hydride was prepared as a stable compound through the incorporation of sterically encumbered aromatic ligands. More recently, the stabilization of GeH(2) and SnH(2) complexes using an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) as a donor and BH(3) or a metal carbonyl complex as an acceptor was reported. A similar strategy was also employed to synthesize the Si(II) hydride. This class of hydrides may be considered coordinatively saturated, with the lone pair of electrons on the Group 14 elements taking part in coordination. We discuss the large

  5. Quantum disproportionation: The high hydrides at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kazutaka; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    A quartet of hydrogens can be dynamically bound to group-14 atoms, the resulting complexes having even valence. In macroscopic assemblies and at high pressures these can give way by dynamically assisted (quantum) disproportionation to complexes with odd valence and hence, in principle, to metallic tendencies. A new extended metallic composition of, for example, GeH3 is investigated by first-principles methods within density functional theory. Its stoichiometry and its very existence is a direct consequence of inclusion of nuclear quantum dynamical contributions to the free energy. From enthalpic comparisons GeH3 augmented with hydrogen appears preferred beyond 175 GPa, where three candidate structures are competitive, these being A15, P42/mmc, and Cccm. The pressure at which GeH3 makes its appearance is significantly influenced by zero-point energy, and quantum effects play an important role in a notable trend towards disproportionation. The ensuing systems are all metallic and the superconducting transition temperature of GeH3 has been estimated as about 100 K or higher (a common range for the three prospective structures). The general proposition of quantum disproportionation at elevated pressures appears extendable to other high hydrides.

  6. UV inverse photoemission from cerium and its hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, J.; Schlapbach, L.

    1984-11-01

    Isochromate spectra of polycrystalline Ce, CeH 2.1 and CeH 2.9 were measured at a photon energy of 9.7 eV. The intensity at E F is 4 to 5 times lower on CeH 2.1 than it is on the metal, and it vanishes on CeH 2.9. This is in accordance with XPS, UPS and conductivity data. In both hydrides broad features ( ˜2 eV FWHM) appear, centered between 4 and 5 eV. From cross section arguments and from comparison with a CeRu 2 spectrum taken at the same photon energy, we conclude that we do not see any 4f contribution in our spectra. A signal at 7 eV on the CeH 2.9 spectrum is assigned to the 2Σ +u shape resonance of the H 2- ion, formed by desorbed H 2 molecules.

  7. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Gor’kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy. PMID:27167334

  8. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  9. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  10. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  11. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  12. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents in viewgraph format an overview of NASDA's evaluation of commercial nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells and the development and testing of Ni-MH cells for use in space. The commercial cells are concluded to be feasible and suitable for use in LEO; for GEO, the durability for overcharge is needed because long-term charge retention is required. For the aerospace Ni-MH cell design, two activation procedures are applied to evaluate the effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection and precharge. Specific energy of the Ni-MH cell is nearly accomplished at 50 Wh/kg. Initial characteristics indicate the effect derived from precharge. Thirty-five amp-hour class Ni-MH cells have good performance for LEO cycle of 25 and 40 percent DOD up to 3000 cycles as similar to commercial cells. The effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection will appear in life test.

  13. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  14. Microscopy Techniques for Analysis of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Constituents.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Graham J C; Wronski, Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    With the need for improvements in the performance of rechargeable batteries has come the necessity to better characterize cell electrodes and their component materials. Electron microscopy has been shown to reveal many important features of microstructure that are becoming increasingly important for understanding the behavior of the components during the many charge/discharge cycles required in modern applications. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of how the full suite of techniques available using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy was applied to the case of materials for the positive electrode in nickel metal hydride rechargeable battery electrodes. Embedding and sectioning of battery-grade powders with an ultramicrotome was used to produce specimens that could be readily characterized by TEM. Complete electrodes were embedded after drying, and also after dehydration from the original wet state, for examination by optical microscopy and using focused ion beam techniques. Results of these studies are summarized to illustrate the significance of the microstructural information obtained.

  15. Metal hydrides form halogen bonds: measurement of energetics of binding.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dan A; Brammer, Lee; Hunter, Christopher A; Perutz, Robin N

    2014-01-29

    The formation of halogen bonds from iodopentafluorobenzene and 1-iodoperfluorohexane to a series of bis(η(5)-cyclopentadienyl)metal hydrides (Cp2TaH3, 1; Cp2MH2, M = Mo, 2, M = W, 3; Cp2ReH, 4; Cp2Ta(H)CO, 5; Cp = η(5)-cyclopentadienyl) is demonstrated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Interaction enthalpies and entropies for complex 1 with C6F5I and C6F13I are reported (ΔH° = -10.9 ± 0.4 and -11.8 ± 0.3 kJ/mol; ΔS° = -38 ± 2 and -34 ± 2 J/(mol·K), respectively) and found to be stronger than those for 1 with the hydrogen-bond donor indole (ΔH° = -7.3 ± 0.1 kJ/mol, ΔS° = -24 ± 1 J/(mol·K)). For the more reactive complexes 2-5, measurements are limited to determination of their low-temperature (212 K) association constants with C6F5I as 2.9 ± 0.2, 2.5 ± 0.1, <1.5, and 12.5 ± 0.3 M(-1), respectively.

  16. Fluorine substituent effects on dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-09-07

    Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of the fluorinated alcohol (CF(3))(2)CHOH with the transition metal complex WH(CO)(2)(NO)(PMe(3))(2) has been explored by a set of four exemplary density functional theory methods that comprises the BP86, PBE, B3LYP and TPSS functionals. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligands of the tungsten complex have been considered as sites of protonation. The main effect of fluorination is an increased dihydrogen bond strength by about 15 kJ mol(-1). The [see equation in text] dihydrogen bond is about 10 kJ mol(-1) stronger than the [W]-NOH-OR hydrogen bond. Of the four DFT methods investigated, the BP86 functional provides the most satisfying quantitative as well as qualitative agreement with experiment. The geometry of the [see equation in text] linkage is significantly influenced by secondary dispersive intermolecular bonding. Linear and bent dihydrogen bonds are separated in energy only by about 1 kJ mol(-1), and represent local minima on the corresponding energy hypersurface.

  17. Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonds in the Reactions of Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-08-10

    The dihydrogen bond-an interaction between a transition-metal or main-group hydride (M-H) and a protic hydrogen moiety (H-X)-is arguably the most intriguing type of hydrogen bond. It was discovered in the mid-1990s and has been intensively explored since then. Herein, we collate up-to-date experimental and computational studies of the structural, energetic, and spectroscopic parameters and natures of dihydrogen-bonded complexes of the form M-H···H-X, as such species are now known for a wide variety of hydrido compounds. Being a weak interaction, dihydrogen bonding entails the lengthening of the participating bonds as well as their polarization (repolarization) as a result of electron density redistribution. Thus, the formation of a dihydrogen bond allows for the activation of both the MH and XH bonds in one step, facilitating proton transfer and preparing these bonds for further transformations. The implications of dihydrogen bonding in different stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, such as hydrogen exchange, alcoholysis and aminolysis, hydrogen evolution, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation, are discussed.

  18. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-01

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd3H4 follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  19. Studying aluminum hydride by means of thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, Yu. M.; Koptelov, A. A.; Matveev, A. A.; Baranets, Yu. N.; Bakulin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical reactions and physical transformations that occur upon heating aluminum hydride (AlH3, alane), stored for 25 years, in the temperature range of 50-1200°C in an atmosphere of nitrogen, argon, and air are studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The heat of thermal decomposition and the hydrogen content are determined for the AlH3 samples and are found to be 318 ± 25 J/g and 9.32 ± 0.24 wt %, respectively. It is established that the estimated enthalpy of formation of AlH3 in stoichiometric composition (Δf H ≈ -10.3 kJ/mol) agrees with the literature data. After the release of hydrogen, the mass of the precipitate increases by 0.5 ± 0.3%, relative to the initial mass of the AlH3 samples; the most likely reason for this effect is the adsorption of nitrogen (argon) in the micropores and mesopores that form. Thermal phenomena associated with the crystallization of the amorphous aluminum that forms after hydrogen is released from the alane particles are analyzed. It is established that the aluminum contained in initial AlH3 samples is almost completely transformed into aluminum nitride and oxide (AlN and Al3O3) upon heating to 1200°C in nitrogen and air, respectively.

  20. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, C.; Goren, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH/sub 1.588/, ZrH/sub 1.629/, ZrH/sub 1.684/, ZrH/sub 1.736/, ZrH/sub 1.815/, ZrH/sub 1.910/, and ZrH/sub 1.960/. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with E/sub a/ = 13.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A = (1/2)(2-x)(45 +- 10) x 10/sup 12/ Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for approx.3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  1. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, C.; Goren, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T1 in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH1.588, ZrH1.629, ZrH1.684, ZrH1.736, ZrH1.815, ZrH1.910, and ZrH1.960. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with Ea=13.4+/-0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A=(1/2)(2-x)(45+/-10)×1012 Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for ~3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  2. Stabilization and highly metallic properties of heavy group-V hydrides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kazutaka; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed hydrides of the heavy group-15 elements Bi and Sb are investigated using ab initio methods. While the hydrides of Bi and Sb are known to be quite unstable at one atmosphere, our calculations predict that they can be stabilized at high pressures. Thus, at the composition of XH 3 (X =Bi or Sb), possible Bi hydrides are BiH2(P n m a ) + H beyond 105 GPa and BiH3(I 41/a m d ) beyond 250 GPa; for Sb hydrides, SbH2 + H hardly appears, and SbH3(P n m a ) is stabilized beyond 150 GPa. All of these hydrides are metallic with very dispersive electronic structures, this being in accordance with the predictions of the Goldhammer-Herzfeld criterion. Superconducting transition temperatures have also been estimated from the extended McMillan equation, and they turn out to be 39 K for BiH2 at 125 GPa, 65 K for BiH3 at 270 GPa, and 68 K for SbH3 at 170 GPa.

  3. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A.

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  4. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40–110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  5. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  6. Effects of electron doping on the stability of the metal hydride NaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olea-Amezcua, M. A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; de la Peña-Seaman, O.; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K. P.

    2017-04-01

    Alkali and alkali-earth metal hydrides have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities, but due to their high thermodynamic stability, they possess high dehydrogenation temperatures which may be reduced by transforming these compounds into less stable states/configurations. We present a systematic computational study of the electron doping effects on the stability of the alkali metal hydride NaH substituted with Mg, using the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the alloy Na1‑x Mg x H. The phonon dispersions were studied paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure taking into account the zero point energy contribution. We found that substitution of Na by Mg in the hydride invokes a reduction of the frequencies, leading to dynamical instabilities for Mg content of 25%. The microscopic origin of these instabilities could be related to the formation of ellipsoidal Fermi surfaces centered at the L point due to the metallization of the hydride by the Mg substitution. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, thermodynamic properties like heat capacities, vibrational entropies and vibrational free energies as a function of temperature at zero pressure are obtained. These properties determine an upper temperature for the thermodynamic stability of the hydride, which decreases from 600 K for NaH to 300 K at 20% Mg concentration. This significant reduction of the stability range indicates that dehydrogenation could be favoured by electron doping of NaH.

  7. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes from Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierlenga, Michael; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studies for years but questions remain, due to the difficulty in determining the participation of protein dynamics and quantum effects, especially hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride during the reaction allows for observation of the change in barrier height due to inclusion of quantum effects. Additionally, the same calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle to validate our methods with experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects. The change in barrier height in YADH upon inclusion of quantum effects is indicative of a zero-point energy contribution, and is evidence that the protein mediates a near-barrierless transfer of the rate-limiting hydride. Calculation of kinetic isotope effects using the average difference in barrier between hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. The authors acknowledge the support of the National Institutes of Health Grants GM068036 and GM102226.

  8. Multislice simulations for in-situ HRTEM studies of nanostructured magnesium hydride at ambient hydrogen pressure.

    PubMed

    Surrey, Alexander; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd

    2017-01-31

    The use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the structural characterization of many nanostructured hydrides, which are relevant for solid state hydrogen storage, is hindered due to a rapid decomposition of the specimen upon irradiation with the electron beam. Environmental TEM allows to stabilize the hydrides by applying a hydrogen back pressure of up to 4.5 bar in a windowed environmental cell. The feasibility of high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigations of light weight metals and metal hydrides in such a "nanoreactor" is studied theoretically by means of multislice HRTEM contrast simulations using Mg and its hydride phase, MgH2, as model system. Such a setup provides the general opportunity to study dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions at the nanoscale under technological application conditions. We analyze the dependence of both the spatial resolution and the HRTEM image contrast on parameters such as the defocus, the metal/hydride thickness, and the hydrogen pressure in order to explore the possibilities and limitations of in-situ experiments with windowed environmental cells. Such simulations may be highly valuable to pre-evaluate future experimental studies.

  9. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-08

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques.

  10. Investigation on a three-stage hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, G.; Almasan, V.; Coldea, I.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Ardelean, O.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we report our recent investigation about a there-stage hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides (HTC) in order to reach an overall compression ratio 28:1. The research was focused to: (i) elaborate hydride alloys with good storage capacity and higher thermodynamic characteristics acquired by tailoring of their properties; (ii) develop new technical solutions based on advanced materials, and fast mass and heat transfer for a hydrogen storage-compression reactor; (iii) built up a prototype of the HTC. Cyclic performance of the hydrogen compressor is studied following up the operating parameters: supply pressure, storage volumes, cold and hot fluid temperatures, cycle duration. The experiments show that the HTC can attain a high overall compression ratio 28:1, it will raise the hydrogen pressure from 2 bars to 56 bars, using three hydride compression stages working between 20 and 80°C. Cycling the compressor at a short absorption-desorption cycle, about 2 minutes, a satisfactory hydrogen flow rate was obtain 10 l/cycle, which ensures a hydrogen flow rate about 300l/hour using a small quantity of hydride alloy, about 360 g. To improve the efficiency and economics of compression process, HTC prototype based on metal hydrides must operate in conjunction with advanced hydrogen production technologies from renewable resources.

  11. Effects of electron doping on the stability of the metal hydride NaH.

    PubMed

    Olea-Amezcua, M A; Rivas-Silva, J F; de la Peña-Seaman, O; Heid, R; Bohnen, K P

    2017-04-12

    Alkali and alkali-earth metal hydrides have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities, but due to their high thermodynamic stability, they possess high dehydrogenation temperatures which may be reduced by transforming these compounds into less stable states/configurations. We present a systematic computational study of the electron doping effects on the stability of the alkali metal hydride NaH substituted with Mg, using the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the alloy Na1-x Mg x H. The phonon dispersions were studied paying special attention to the crystal stability and the correlations with the electronic structure taking into account the zero point energy contribution. We found that substitution of Na by Mg in the hydride invokes a reduction of the frequencies, leading to dynamical instabilities for Mg content of 25%. The microscopic origin of these instabilities could be related to the formation of ellipsoidal Fermi surfaces centered at the L point due to the metallization of the hydride by the Mg substitution. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, thermodynamic properties like heat capacities, vibrational entropies and vibrational free energies as a function of temperature at zero pressure are obtained. These properties determine an upper temperature for the thermodynamic stability of the hydride, which decreases from 600 K for NaH to 300 K at 20% Mg concentration. This significant reduction of the stability range indicates that dehydrogenation could be favoured by electron doping of NaH.

  12. Computationally efficient determination of hydrogen isotope effects on the thermodynamic stability of metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Kelly M.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of metal hydrides at low to moderate temperatures has been successfully described with density functional theory (DFT) calculations using 0 K total energies and simple harmonic models, it is unclear if this approach is valid for hydrides that are stable at high temperatures. To aid development of computationally efficient methods, this paper uses DFT to explore the predicted stabilities of ZrH2, HfH2, TiH2, LiH, and NaH with four levels of theory. We also investigate isotope effects to understand if these should be accounted for in screening of deuterated or tritiated materials. We show that calculations that account for vibrational corrections to the crystal lattice are not necessary to get an accurate description of relative stabilities of metal hydrides. The shifts in dissociation temperatures due to isotope substitutions are <50 K for all materials, with larger shifts for lighter materials, as expected. We show that accounting for vibrational effects due to isotope substitution in metal hydrides is unnecessary to accurately predict the relative stabilities of metal hydrides at high temperatures.

  13. Characterization of nano-scaled metal-hydrides confined in nano-porous carbon frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaslee, David Edward

    Metal hydrides are currently being studied to provide hydrogen for use in fuel cells and for transportation applications. Hydrogen can be stored in chemical compounds at higher density and lower volume than liquid H2 or compressed gas. Thermodynamic properties of metal hydrides differ between bulk and nano-sized particles. Many metal hydrides with useful volumetric and gravimetric capacities have high decomposition temperatures, but when placed in nano-sized frameworks (or templates) desorption and adsorption temperatures can be fine-tuned to meet engineering requirements for real-world systems. Additionally, some metal hydrides have shown a change in the decomposition pathway when infiltrated into these frameworks, thereby reducing the amount of unwanted byproducts, and potentially improving the cyclability of the material. The Temperature Programmed Decomposition Mass Spectrum Residual Gas Analyzer can be used to characterize gas desorption, decomposition temperatures, picogram changes in mass, and ionization energies for a variety of materials and gasses. The goal of the system is to characterize desorption of the hydrogen (including byproduct gasses) and the decomposition of the metal hydrides. The experimental apparatus is composed of four main components: the residual gas analyzer (RGA), the low temperature stage quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the high temperature heating stage, and two vacuum chambers separated by a small flow hole which allows a direct line-of-site to the RGA.

  14. Roles of texture in controlling oxidation, hydrogen ingress and hydride formation in Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Qin, Wen; Li, Hualong; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.

    2012-08-01

    This review article attempts to provide an overall description for the texture related issues of degradation of Zr alloys. Experimental observations show that the oxide formed on Zr alloys is strongly textured. The texture and grain-boundary characteristics of oxide are dependent on the texture of metal substrate. Computer simulation and thermodynamic modeling were used to explain the influence of metal substrate on structure of oxide film, and intrinsic factors affecting the oxide microstructure. Models of diffusion process of hydrogen atoms and oxygen diffusion through oxide are presented. Both intragranular and intergranular hydrides were found following (0 0 0 1)α-Zr||{1 1 1}δ-ZrH1.5 relationship under no load, but different relationships were observed under stress. The through-thickness texture inhomogeneity in fuel cladding tubes, the effects of hoop stress on the hydride orientation and the formation of interlinked hydride structure were studied. A thermodynamic model was developed to analyze the nucleation and the stress-induced reorientation of intergranular hydrides. These works provide a framework for understanding the effects of texture on the oxidation, the hydrogen ingress and the hydride formation in Zr alloys.

  15. Obtention of the constitutive equation of hydride blisters in fuel cladding from nanoindentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Rengel, M. A.; Gomez, F. J.; Rico, A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the presence of hydrides in nuclear fuel cladding may reduce its mechanical and fracture properties. This situation may be worsened as a consequence of the formation of hydride blisters. These blisters are zones with an extremely high hydrogen concentration and they are usually associated to the oxide spalling which may occur at the outer surface of the cladding. In this work, a method which allows us to reproduce, in a reliable way, hydride blisters in the laboratory has been devised. Depth-sensing indentation tests with a spherical indenter were conducted on a hydride blister produced in the laboratory with the aim of measuring its mechanical behaviour. The plastic stress-strain curve of the hydride blister was calculated for first time by combining depth-sensing indentation tests results with an iterative algorithm using finite element simulations. The algorithm employed reduces, in each iteration, the differences between the numerical and the experimental results by modifying the stress-strain curve. In this way, an almost perfect adjustment of the experimental data was achieved after several iterations. The calculation of the constitutive equation of the blister from nanoindentation tests, may involve a lack of uniqueness. To evaluate it, a method based on the optimization of parameters of analytical equations has been proposed in this paper. An estimation of the error which involves this method is also provided.

  16. Surface hydride on titanium by cathodic polarization promotes human gingival fibroblast growth.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rui; Salou, Laëtitia; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Haugen, Håvard J

    2014-05-01

    Connective tissue seal to dental abutment is crucial for peri-implant health. Several efforts have been made previously to optimize abutment surfaces, but no consensus has been reached regarding the optimal surface architecture and/or composition for soft tissue seal. Here, we report on experiments using cathodic polarization in organic acids to optimize titanium (Ti) surfaces for use as abutments. The three main factors affecting surface topography and chemistry were electrolyte composition, current density, and polarization time. Under identical conditions, oxalic acid created rougher surfaces than tartaric acid and acetic acid, and acetic acid produced more surface hydride. Surface hydride amount was suggested to first increase and then decrease with current density from 1 mA/cm(2) to 15 mA/cm(2) . The complexity of the surface topography and hydride production both increased with polarization time. Proliferation rate of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was positively correlated with surface hydride content, suggesting the positive effect of surface hydride on connective tissue growth around dental abutment. Changes in surface topography and hydrophilicity did not significantly influence HGF growth.

  17. Automating Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, James

    1996-01-01

    Presents a four-phase plan for small libraries strategizing for automation: inventory and weeding, data conversion, implementation, and enhancements. Other topics include selecting a system, MARC records, compatibility, ease of use, industry standards, searching capabilities, support services, system security, screen displays, circulation modules,…

  18. Automated conflict resolution issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  19. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  20. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  1. Personnel Department Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David

    In 1989, the Austin Independent School District's Office of Research and Evaluation was directed to monitor the automation of personnel information and processes in the district's Department of Personnel. Earlier, a study committee appointed by the Superintendent during the 1988-89 school year identified issues related to Personnel Department…

  2. Validating Automated Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Jared; Van Moere, Alistair; Cheng, Jian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that supports the valid use of scores from fully automatic tests of spoken language ability to indicate a person's effectiveness in spoken communication. The paper reviews the constructs, scoring, and the concurrent validity evidence of "facility-in-L2" tests, a family of automated spoken language tests in Spanish,…

  3. Automated Essay Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikli, Semire

    2006-01-01

    The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES) has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali,…

  4. Automated Microbial Genome Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam

    2009-05-29

    Miriam Land of the DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk on the current state and future challenges of moving toward automated microbial genome annotation at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  5. Automated Administrative Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrie, M. D.; Jarrett, J. R.; Reising, S. A.; Hodge, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Improved productivity and more effective response to information requirements for internal management, NASA Centers, and Headquarters resulted from using automated techniques. Modules developed to provide information on manpower, RTOPS, full time equivalency, and physical space reduced duplication, increased communication, and saved time. There is potential for greater savings by sharing and integrating with those who have the same requirements.

  6. Automated Management Of Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy

    1995-01-01

    Report presents main technical issues involved in computer-integrated documentation. Problems associated with automation of management and maintenance of documents analyzed from perspectives of artificial intelligence and human factors. Technologies that may prove useful in computer-integrated documentation reviewed: these include conventional approaches to indexing and retrieval of information, use of hypertext, and knowledge-based artificial-intelligence systems.

  7. Building Automation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  8. Guide to Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toohill, Barbara G.

    Directed toward librarians and library administrators who wish to procure automated systems or services for their libraries, this guide offers practical suggestions, advice, and methods for determining requirements, estimating costs and benefits, writing specifications procuring systems, negotiating contracts, and installing systems. The advice…

  9. Microcontroller for automation application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The description of a microcontroller currently being developed for automation application was given. It is basically an 8-bit microcomputer with a 40K byte random access memory/read only memory, and can control a maximum of 12 devices through standard 15-line interface ports.

  10. Automated EEG acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Hillman, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Automated self-contained portable device can be used by technicians with minimal training. Data acquired from patient at remote site are transmitted to centralized interpretation center using conventional telephone equipment. There, diagnostic information is analyzed, and results are relayed back to remote site.

  11. Silica hydride intermediate for octadecylsilica and phenyl bonded phase preparation via heterogeneous hydrosilation in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Scully, N M; Ashu-Arrah, B A; Nagle, A P; Omamogho, J O; O'Sullivan, G P; Friebolin, V; Dietrich, B; Albert, K; Glennon, J D

    2011-04-15

    Investigations into the preparation of silica hydride intermediate in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO(2)) that avoids the use of organic solvents such as toluene or dioxane are described. The effects of reaction temperature, pressure and time on the surface coverage of the supercritical fluid generated silica hydride intermediate were studied. Under optimised supercritical conditions of 120°C, 483 bar and 3 h reaction time, silica hydride (Si-H) conversion efficiencies of ca. 40% were achieved for the hydride intermediate prepared from a monofunctional silane reagent (dimethylmethoxysilane). Si-H conversion efficiencies (as determined from (29)Si CP-MAS NMR spectral analysis) for the hydride intermediate prepared from triethoxysilane (TES) in sc-CO(2) were found to be comparable to those obtained using a TES silanisation approach in an organic solvent. (13)C and (29)Si CP-MAS-NMR spectroscopy was employed to provide a complete structural assignment of the silica hydride intermediates. Furthermore, supercritical CO(2) was subsequently employed as a reaction medium for the heterogenous hydrosilation of silica hydride with octadecene and with styrene, in the presence of a free radical initiator. These supercritical fluid generated reversed-phase materials were prepared in a substantially reduced reaction time (3 h) compared to organic solvent based methods (100 h reaction time). Silica functionalisation in sc-CO(2) presents an efficient and clean alternative to organic solvent based methods for the preparation of important silica hydride intermediate and silica bonded stationary phases via a hydrosilation approach.

  12. Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, Larry D.; Lee, Patricia L.; Cook, James R.; Wilhite, Elmer L.

    2008-01-15

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducts performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. These performance assessments, which result in limits on the amounts of radiological substances that can be placed in the waste disposal facilities, consider numerous potential exposure pathways that could occur in the future. One set of exposure scenarios, known as inadvertent intruder analysis, considers the impact on hypothetical individuals who are assumed to inadvertently intrude onto the waste disposal site. Inadvertent intruder analysis considers three distinct scenarios for exposure referred to as the agriculture scenario, the resident scenario, and the post-drilling scenario. Each of these scenarios has specific exposure pathways that contribute to the overall dose for the scenario. For the inadvertent intruder analysis, the calculation of dose for the exposure pathways is a relatively straightforward algebraic calculation that utilizes dose conversion factors. Prior to 2004, these calculations were performed using an Excel spreadsheet. However, design checks of the spreadsheet calculations revealed that errors could be introduced inadvertently when copying spreadsheet formulas cell by cell and finding these errors was tedious and time consuming. This weakness led to the specification of functional requirements to create a software application that would automate the calculations for inadvertent intruder analysis using a controlled source of input parameters. This software application, named the Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application, has undergone rigorous testing of the internal calculations and meets software QA requirements. The Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application was intended to replace the previous spreadsheet analyses with an automated application that was verified to produce the same calculations and

  13. Automating spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Fred T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses the architecture of software utilized in spectroscopic measurements. As optical coatings become more sophisticated, there is mounting need to automate data acquisition (DAQ) from spectrophotometers. Such need is exacerbated when 100% inspection is required, ancillary devices are utilized, cost reduction is crucial, or security is vital. While instrument manufacturers normally provide point-and-click DAQ software, an application programming interface (API) may be missing. In such cases automation is impossible or expensive. An API is typically provided in libraries (*.dll, *.ocx) which may be embedded in user-developed applications. Users can thereby implement DAQ automation in several Windows languages. Another possibility, developed by FTG as an alternative to instrument manufacturers' software, is the ActiveX application (*.exe). ActiveX, a component of many Windows applications, provides means for programming and interoperability. This architecture permits a point-and-click program to act as automation client and server. Excel, for example, can control and be controlled by DAQ applications. Most importantly, ActiveX permits ancillary devices such as barcode readers and XY-stages to be easily and economically integrated into scanning procedures. Since an ActiveX application has its own user-interface, it can be independently tested. The ActiveX application then runs (visibly or invisibly) under DAQ software control. Automation capabilities are accessed via a built-in spectro-BASIC language with industry-standard (VBA-compatible) syntax. Supplementing ActiveX, spectro-BASIC also includes auxiliary serial port commands for interfacing programmable logic controllers (PLC). A typical application is automatic filter handling.

  14. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  15. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages

    PubMed Central

    Harker, N. J.; Hallam, K. R.; Paraskevoulakos, C.; Banos, A.; Rennie, S.; Jowsey, J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed. PMID:26176551

  16. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage.

  17. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages.

    PubMed

    Stitt, C A; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; Paraskevoulakos, C; Banos, A; Rennie, S; Jowsey, J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed.

  18. Hydrogen storage as hydrides in a fixed or fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernis, A.; Storck, A.

    The results of experimental investigations of the performances of fixed and fluidized bed reactor configurations for hydride storage are reported. Constant -20 to 50 C temperatures and 0-10 bars pressures were examined. A membrane compressor was employed to circulate the hydrogen during fluidized bed tests. Measurements were made of the quantity of hydrogen absorbed and desorbed and the reaction speeds. The quality of the FeTi hydrides used, when industrial grade, adversely affected the purity of the gas. The reactions, being exothermic during hydrogenation, indicated that heat exchangers would be required in operation configurations. The desorption evacuation in the fluidized bed was accomplished 20-30 times faster than when using the fixed bed. Storage was also faster in the fluidized bed, which moderated the hydrogenation temperature rise. The expansion of the hydrides during hydrogenation and shrinkage during evacuation will be significant factors in the design of reactor shapes and sizes.

  19. Hückel's Rule of Aromaticity Categorizes Aromatic closo Boron Hydride Clusters.

    PubMed

    Poater, Jordi; Solà, Miquel; Viñas, Clara; Teixidor, Francesc

    2016-05-23

    A direct connection is established between three-dimensional aromatic closo boron hydride clusters and planar aromatic [n]annulenes for medium and large boron clusters. In particular, the results prove the existence of a link between the two-dimensional Hückel rule, as followed by aromatic [n]annulenes, and Wade-Mingos' rule of three-dimensional aromaticity, as applied to the aromatic [Bn Hn ](2-) closo boron hydride clusters. The closo boron hydride clusters can be categorized into different series, according to the n value of the Hückel (4 n+2) π rule. The distinct categories studied in this work correspond to n=1, 2, and 3. Each category increases in geometrical difficulty but, more importantly, it is possible to associate each category with the number of pentagonal layers in the structure perpendicular to the main axis. Category 1 has one pentagonal layer, category 2 has two, and category 3 has three.

  20. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  1. (abstract) Studies on AB(sub 5) Metal Hydride Alloys with Sn Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.; Stefano, S. Di; Halpert, G.; Witham, C.; Fultz, B.

    1994-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in alkaline rechargeable cells is becoming increasingly popular, due to several advantages offered by the metal hydrides over conventional anode materials (such as Zn, Cd) in terms of specific energy environmental cycle life and compatibility. Besides, the similarities in the cell voltage pressure characteristics, and charge control methods of the Ni-MH cells to the commonly used Ni-Cd point to a projected take over of 25% of the Ni-Cd market for consumer electronics by the Ni-MH cells in the next couple of years. Two classes of metal hydrides alloys based on rare earth metals (AB(sub 5)) and titanium (AB(sub 2)) are being currently developed at various laboratories. AB(sub 2) alloys exhibit higher specific energy than the AB(sub 5) alloys but the state of the art commercial Ni-MH cells are predominately manufactured using AB(sub 5) alloys.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of Surface Oxides and Hydrides on Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zasadzinski, B. Albee, S. Bishnoi, C. Cao, G. Ciovati, L.D. Cooley, D.C. Ford, Th. Proslier

    2011-07-01

    Raman microscopy/spectroscopy has been used in conjunction with AFM, tunneling and magnetic susceptibility to identify surface oxides and hydrides on annealed, recrystallized foils of high purity Nb and on single crystals of cavity grade Nb. Cold worked regions of the Nb foil as well as rough regions near grain boundaries showed clear evidence of ordered hydride phases which were identified by VASP phonon calculations. Cold worked regions also displayed enhanced surface paramagnetism. Surface enhanced Raman spectra have also been obtained using 1.0 nm Au depositon. The SERS spectra reveal hydride molecular species which are not observable by conventional Raman. These results indicate that Raman is a useful probe of Nb surfaces relevant for cavity performance

  3. Zirconium hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 observed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmur, M. S.; Robson, J. D.; Preuss, M.; Zanellato, O.; Cernik, R. J.; Shi, S.-Q.; Ribeiro, F.; Andrieux, J.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the isothermal precipitation of δ-hydride platelets in Zircaloy-4 at a range of temperatures relevant to reactor conditions, during both normal operation and thermal transients. From an examination of the rate kinetics of the precipitation process, precipitation slows with increasing temperature above 200 °C, due to a reduction in the thermodynamic driving force. A model for nucleation rate as a function of temperature was developed, to interpret the precipitation rates seen experimentally. While the strain energy associated with the misfit between hydrides and the matrix makes a significant contribution to the energy barrier for nucleation, a larger contribution arises from the interfacial energy. Diffusion distance calculations show that hydrogen is highly mobile in the considered thermal range and on the scale of inter-hydride spacing and it is not expected to be significantly rate limiting on the precipitation process that takes place under reactor operating conditions.

  4. Predicted formation of superconducting platinum-hydride crystals under pressure in the presence of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J; Ahuja, R

    2011-09-09

    Noble metals adopt close-packed structures at ambient pressure and rarely undergo structural transformation at high pressures. Platinum (Pt) is normally considered to be unreactive and is therefore not expected to form hydrides under pressure. We predict that platinum hydride (PtH) has a lower enthalpy than its constituents solid Pt and molecular hydrogen at pressures above 21.5 GPa. PtH transforms to a hexagonal close-packed or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure between 70 and 80 GPa. Linear response calculations indicate that PtH is a superconductor at these pressures with a critical temperature of about 10-25 K. These findings help to shed light on recent observations of pressure-induced metallization and superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials. We show that the formation of fcc noble metal hydrides under pressure is common and examine the possibility of superconductivity in these materials.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Kuwano, Hiroki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  6. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  7. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-01-30

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  8. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    PubMed

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  9. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

  10. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites.

  11. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  12. First-principles screening of complex transition metal hydrides for high temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-17

    Metal hydrides with enhanced thermodynamic stability with respect to the associated binary hydrides are useful for high temperature applications in which highly stable materials with low hydrogen overpressures are desired. Though several examples of complex transition metal hydrides (CTMHs) with such enhanced stability are known, little thermodynamic or phase stability information is available for this materials class. In this work, we use semiautomated thermodynamic and phase diagram calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and grand canonical linear programming (GCLP) methods to screen 102 ternary and quaternary CTMHs and 26 ternary saline hydrides in a library of over 260 metals, intermetallics, binary, and higher hydrides to identify materials that release hydrogen at higher temperatures than the associated binary hydrides and at elevated temperatures, T > 1000 K, for 1 bar H2 overpressure. For computational efficiency, we employ a tiered screening approach based first on solid phase ground state energies with temperature effects controlled via H2 gas alone and second on the inclusion of phonon calculations that correct solid phase free energies for temperature-dependent vibrational contributions. We successfully identified 13 candidate CTMHs including Eu2RuH6, Yb2RuH6, Ca2RuH6, Ca2OsH6, Ba2RuH6, Ba3Ir2H12, Li4RhH4, NaPd3H2, Cs2PtH4, K2PtH4, Cs3PtH5, Cs3PdH3, and Rb2PtH4. The most stable CTMHs tend to crystallize in the Sr2RuH6 cubic prototype structure and decompose to the pure elements and hydrogen rather than to intermetallic phases.

  13. Computational study of sodium magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto Valle, Fernando Antonio

    Hydrogen offers considerable potential benefits as an energy carrier. However, safe and convenient storage of hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges to be resolved in the near future. Sodium magnesium hydride (NaMgH 3) has attracted attention as a hydrogen storage material due to its light weight and high volumetric hydrogen density of 88 kg/m3. Despite the advantages, hydrogen release in this material occurs at approximately 670 K, which is well above the operable range for on-board hydrogen storage applications. In this regard, hydrogen release may be facilitated by substitution doping of transition-metals. This dissertation describes first-principles computational methods that enable an examination of the hydrogen storage properties of NaMgH3. The novel contribution of this dissertation includes a combination of crystal, supercell, and surface slab calculations that provides new and relevant insights about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of NaMgH3. First-principles calculations on the pristine crystal structure provide a starting reference point for the study of this material as a hydrogen storage material. To the best of our knowledge, it is reported for the first time that a 25% mol doping concentration of Ti, V, Cu, and Zn dopants reduce the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen release for NaMgH3. The largest decrease in the DeltaH(298 K) value corresponds to the Zn-doped model (67.97 kJ/(mol H2)). Based on cohesive energy calculations, it is reported that at the 6.25% mol doping concentration, Ti and Zn dopants are the only transition metals that destabilize the NaMgH3 hydride. In terms of hydrogen removal energy, it is quantified that the energy cost to remove a single H from the Ti-doped supercell model is 0.76 eV, which is lower with respect to the pristine model and other prototypical hydrogen storage materials. From the calculation of electronic properties such as density of states, electron density difference, and charge population analysis

  14. Metal hydride heat pump engineering demonstration and evaluation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Franklin E.

    1993-01-01

    Future generations of portable life support systems (PLSS's) for space suites (extravehicular mobility units or EMU's) may require regenerable nonventing thermal sinks (RNTS's). For purposes of mobility, a PLSS must be as light and compact as possible. Previous venting PLSS's have employed water sublimators to reject metabolic and equipment heat from EMU's. It is desirable for long-duration future space missions to minimize the use of water and other consumables that need to be periodically resupplied. The emission of water vapor also interferes with some types of instrumentation that might be used in future space exploration. The test article is a type of RNTS based on a metal hydride heat pump (MHHP). The task of reservicing EMU's after use must be made less demanding in terms of time, procedures, and equipment. The capability for quick turnaround post-EVA servicing (30 minutes) is a challenging requirement for many of the RNTS options. The MHHP is a very simple option that can be regenerated in the airlock within the 30 minute limit by the application of a heating source and a cooling sink. In addition, advanced PLSS's must provide a greater degree of automatic control, relieving astronauts of the need to manually adjust temperatures in their liquid cooled ventilation garments (LCVG's). The MHHP includes automatic coolant controls with the ability to follow thermal load swings from minimum to maximum in seconds. The MHHP includes a coolant loop subsystem with pump and controls, regeneration equipment for post-EVA servicing, and a PC-based data acquisition and control system (DACS).

  15. Method and composition in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a silica network

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1999-09-28

    A silica embedded metal hydride composition and a method for making such a composition are disclosed. The composition is made via the following process: A quantity of fumed silica is blended with water to make a paste. After adding metal hydride particles, the paste is dried to form a solid. According to one embodiment of the invention, the solid is ground into granules for use of the product in hydrogen storage. Alternatively, the paste can be molded into plates or cylinders and then dried for use of the product as a hydrogen filter. Where mechanical strength is required, the paste can be impregnated in a porous substrate or wire network.

  16. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Louthan, M.; PNNL, B.

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  17. Method of production of pure hydrogen near room temperature from aluminum-based hydride materials

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Balema, Viktor P.

    2004-08-10

    The present invention provides a cost-effective method of producing pure hydrogen gas from hydride-based solid materials. The hydride-based solid material is mechanically processed in the presence of a catalyst to obtain pure gaseous hydrogen. Unlike previous methods, hydrogen may be obtained from the solid material without heating, and without the addition of a solvent during processing. The described method of hydrogen production is useful for energy conversion and production technologies that consume pure gaseous hydrogen as a fuel.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  19. Heats of formation for third-period hydrides: test of an extended basis set

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Heitzinger, J.

    1987-04-23

    The extended basis set developed by McLean and Chandler for third-period atoms is combined with the -311G hydrogen basis and augmented by polarization functions to predict the heats of formation of third-period hydrides at the full MP4 computational level. The calculated heats of formation are at least as accurate as those predicted for second-row hydrides by using MP4/6-311G(d,p) wave functions, with a root mean square error of approximately 4 kcal/mol.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants in XH4 group XIV hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Ruud, Kenneth

    2006-07-01

    Self-consistent field and multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions are used to analyse NMR shielding constants in the XH4 hydrides, X = C, Si, Ge, Sn and Pb. All relativistic corrections to order α4, where α is the fine structure constant, are included in the evaluation of the perturbation corrections to the non-relativistic shielding constants. Each of the relativistic corrections is compared to the results obtained for group XVI and XVII hydrides and noble-gas atoms. For the heavy nuclei, the computed relativistic corrections can be used to improve the absolute shielding scale.

  1. Hydridoborylene complexes and di-, tri-, and tetranuclear borido complexes with hydride ligands.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jürgen; Bertsch, Stefanie; Braunschweig, Holger; Dewhurst, Rian D; Ferkinghoff, Katharina; Hörl, Christian; Kraft, Katharina; Radacki, Krzysztof

    2013-12-16

    Mono- and dinuclear hydridoborylene complexes were prepared by intermetallic borylene transfer from Group VI borylene or metalloborylene reagents. The hydride and borylene ligands were found to interact with each other significantly, although the boron ligand retains much of its former borylene character. Zero-valent platinum fragments were successively added to the dinuclear hydridoborylene complexes, resulting in tri- and tetranuclear borido complexes, in which the B-H interaction has been lost, and the hydride ligands now bridge two metal centers. The complexes were studied spectroscopically, crystallographically, and by DFT methods, and the unusual bonding situation in the M-B-H triangles of hydridoborylene complexes were evaluated.

  2. Modulation of hydride formation energies in transition metal doped Mg by alteration of spin state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Samuels, Alex; Clark, Aurora E.

    2013-02-01

    Coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations have been used to assess the role of the transition metal spin state upon the energetic favorability of hydride formation within small, transition metal doped, magnesium clusters. The spin state is found to modulate the occupation of bonding and anti-bonding orbitals, thus having a large effect upon both geometric and energetic parameters. This chemical description provides a potential theoretical basis for unexplained experimental observations, and indicates a mechanism for using an external magnetic field to control the thermodynamics of H2 sorption and desorption in metal hydrides.

  3. Method and composition in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a silica network

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1999-01-01

    A silica embedded metal hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made via the following process: A quantity of fumed silica is blended with water to make a paste. After adding metal hydride particles, the paste is dried to form a solid. According to one embodiment of the invention, the solid is ground into granules for use of the product in hydrogen storage. Alternatively, the paste can be molded into plates or cylinders and then dried for use of the product as a hydrogen filter. Where mechanical strength is required, the paste can be impregnated in a porous substrate or wire network.

  4. Determination of antimony, arsenic, bismuth, selenium, tellurium and tin by low pressure atomic absorption spectrometry with a quartz tube furnace atomizer and hydride generation with air addition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Wang, Y; Wang, X; Chen, X; Feng, J

    1995-08-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of antimony, arsenic, bismuth, selenium, tellurium and tin by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry in an electrically heated quartz tube furnace under sub-atmospheric pressure. The hydride generator, operating at a pressure lower than atmospheric, is used to generate and collect the hydrides of these elements. A certain volume (at atmospheric pressure) of air is then added to the generator after the formation of the volatile hydride. The gaseous mixture of the hydride and air is drawn into an evacuated, heated quartz tube by a vacuum pump. The proposed method gives improved sensitivities and detection limits.

  5. Automated campaign system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondran, Gary; Chao, Hui; Lin, Xiaofan; Beyer, Dirk; Joshi, Parag; Atkins, Brian; Obrador, Pere

    2006-02-01

    To run a targeted campaign involves coordination and management across numerous organizations and complex process flows. Everything from market analytics on customer databases, acquiring content and images, composing the materials, meeting the sponsoring enterprise brand standards, driving through production and fulfillment, and evaluating results; all processes are currently performed by experienced highly trained staff. Presented is a developed solution that not only brings together technologies that automate each process, but also automates the entire flow so that a novice user could easily run a successful campaign from their desktop. This paper presents the technologies, structure, and process flows used to bring this system together. Highlighted will be how the complexity of running a targeted campaign is hidden from the user through technologies, all while providing the benefits of a professionally managed campaign.

  6. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  7. Terminal automation system maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Coffelt, D.; Hewitt, J.

    1997-01-01

    Nothing has improved petroleum product loading in recent years more than terminal automation systems. The presence of terminal automation systems (TAS) at loading racks has increased operational efficiency and safety and enhanced their accounting and management capabilities. However, like all finite systems, they occasionally malfunction or fail. Proper servicing and maintenance can minimize this. And in the unlikely event a TAS breakdown does occur, prompt and effective troubleshooting can reduce its impact on terminal productivity. To accommodate around-the-clock loading at racks, increasingly unattended by terminal personnel, TAS maintenance, servicing and troubleshooting has become increasingly demanding. It has also become increasingly important. After 15 years of trial and error at petroleum and petrochemical storage and transfer terminals, a number of successful troubleshooting programs have been developed. These include 24-hour {open_quotes}help hotlines,{close_quotes} internal (terminal company) and external (supplier) support staff, and {open_quotes}layered{close_quotes} support. These programs are described.

  8. Automated Chromosome Breakage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    An automated karyotyping machine was built at JPL in 1972. It does computerized karyotyping, but it has some hardware limitations. The image processing hardware that was available at a reasonable price in 1972 was marginal, at best, for this job. In the meantime, NASA has developed an interest in longer term spaceflights and an interest in using chromosome breakage studies as a dosimeter for radiation or perhaps other damage that might occur to the tissues. This uses circulating lymphocytes as a physiological dosimeter looking for chromosome breakage on long-term spaceflights. For that reason, we have reactivated the automated karyotyping work at JPL. An update on that work, and a description of where it appears to be headed is presented.

  9. The automation of science.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Rowland, Jem; Oliver, Stephen G; Young, Michael; Aubrey, Wayne; Byrne, Emma; Liakata, Maria; Markham, Magdalena; Pir, Pinar; Soldatova, Larisa N; Sparkes, Andrew; Whelan, Kenneth E; Clare, Amanda

    2009-04-03

    The basis of science is the hypothetico-deductive method and the recording of experiments in sufficient detail to enable reproducibility. We report the development of Robot Scientist "Adam," which advances the automation of both. Adam has autonomously generated functional genomics hypotheses about the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and experimentally tested these hypotheses by using laboratory automation. We have confirmed Adam's conclusions through manual experiments. To describe Adam's research, we have developed an ontology and logical language. The resulting formalization involves over 10,000 different research units in a nested treelike structure, 10 levels deep, that relates the 6.6 million biomass measurements to their logical description. This formalization describes how a machine contributed to scientific knowledge.

  10. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  11. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  12. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  13. The automated command transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Satoh, S.

    A technique for automated command transmission (ACT) to GEO-stationed satellites is presented. The system is intended for easing the command center workload. The ACT system determines the relation of the commands to on-board units, connects the telemetry with on-board units, defines the control path on the spacecraft, identifies the correspondence of back-up units to primary units, and ascertains sunlight or eclipse conditions. The system also has the address of satellite and command decoders, the ID and content for the mission command sequence, group and inhibit codes, a listing of all available commands, and restricts the data to a command sequence. Telemetry supplies data for automated problem correction. All other missions operations are terminated during system recovery data processing after a crash. The ACT system is intended for use with the GMS spacecraft.

  14. Automated RSO Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2016-09-01

    A methodology for assessing the attitude stability of a Resident Space Object (RSO) using visual magnitude data is presented and then scaled to run in an automated fashion across the entire satellite catalog. Results obtained by applying the methodology to the Commercial Space Operations Center (COMSpOC) catalog are presented and summarized, identifying objects that have changed stability. We also examine the timeline for detecting the transition from stable to unstable attitude

  15. Automation in Photogrammetry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-25

    Allam , 1978), and the OM-Bendix AS-lIB-X (Scarano and Bruma, 1976). The UNAMACE and GPM-2 employ analog (electronic) correlation technology. However...Survey (USGS) and the Surveys and Mapping Branch (Canada) have formed integrated systems based on the Gestalt GPM 2 (Brunson and Olson, 1978; Allam , 1978...ten years off, and the full automation of planimetric extraction may be more than 20 years in the future. REFERENCES Allam , M. M., 1978. The Role of

  16. Automated Nitrocellulose Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    is acceptable. (4) As would be expected from the theory of osmosis , a high saline content in the dialysis recipient stream (countersolution) is of...Block 39, II different from Report; IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. KEY WOROS (Continue on rereri Analysis Automated analysis Dialysis Glyceryl...Technicon AutoAnalyzer, involves aspiration of a stirred nitrocellulose suspension, dialysis against 9 percent saline, and hydrolysis with 5N sodium

  17. Automated Cooperative Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Pahle, Joseph; Brown, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the Automated Cooperative Trajectories project. An introduction to the phenomena of wake vortices is given, along with a summary of past research into the possibility of extracting energy from the wake by flying close parallel trajectories. Challenges and barriers to adoption of civilian automatic wake surfing technology are identified. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described that will support future research. Finally, a roadmap for future research and technology transition is proposed.

  18. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Sewy, D.; Pickering, C.; Sauers, R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the phase 2 of the power subsystem automation study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using computer software to manage an aspect of the electrical power subsystem on a space station. The state of the art in expert systems software was investigated in this study. This effort resulted in the demonstration of prototype expert system software for managing one aspect of a simulated space station power subsystem.

  19. Automated Microfluidics for Genomics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the automation of it, see [4]. In the Genomation Laboratory at the Univ. of Washington (http://rcs.ee.washington.edu/GNL/genomation.html) and with Orca ...reproducible biology without contamination . The high throughput capability is competitive with large scale robotic batch processing. III. INSTRUMENTATION...essentially arbitrary low volume, and without any contact that might cause contamination . A. ACAPELLA-5K Core Processor The ACAPELLA-5K was designed with

  20. Automated RTOP Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology electronic information system network from 1983 to 1985 is illustrated. The RTOP automated system takes advantage of existing hardware, software, and expertise, and provides: (1) computerized cover sheet and resources forms; (2) electronic signature and transmission; (3) a data-based information system; (4) graphics; (5) intercenter communications; (6) management information; and (7) text editing. The system is coordinated with Headquarters efforts in codes R,E, and T.