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Sample records for automated multistep genetic

  1. An Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System.

    2003-07-14

    Version 02 MONTEBURNS Version 2 calculates coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and produces a large number of criticality and burnup results based on various material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. MONTEBURNS is a fully automated tool that links the LANL MCNP Monte Carlo transport code with a radioactive decay and burnup code. Highlights on changes to Version 2 are listed in the transmittal letter. Along with other minor improvements in MONTEBURNS Version 2,more » the option was added to use CINDER90 instead of ORIGEN2 as the depletion/decay part of the system. CINDER90 is a multi-group depletion code developed at LANL and is not currently available from RSICC. This MONTEBURNS release was tested with various combinations of CCC-715/MCNPX 2.4.0, CCC-710/MCNP5, CCC-700/MCNP4C, CCC-371/ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN2.1 and CINDER90. Perl is required software and is not included in this distribution. MCNP, ORIGEN2, and CINDER90 are not included.« less

  2. An Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    TRELLUE, HOLLY R.

    2003-07-14

    Version 02 MONTEBURNS Version 2 calculates coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and produces a large number of criticality and burnup results based on various material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. MONTEBURNS is a fully automated tool that links the LANL MCNP Monte Carlo transport code with a radioactive decay and burnup code. Highlights on changes to Version 2 are listed in the transmittal letter. Along with other minor improvements in MONTEBURNS Version 2, the option was added to use CINDER90 instead of ORIGEN2 as the depletion/decay part of the system. CINDER90 is a multi-group depletion code developed at LANL and is not currently available from RSICC. This MONTEBURNS release was tested with various combinations of CCC-715/MCNPX 2.4.0, CCC-710/MCNP5, CCC-700/MCNP4C, CCC-371/ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN2.1 and CINDER90. Perl is required software and is not included in this distribution. MCNP, ORIGEN2, and CINDER90 are not included.

  3. Genetic circuit design automation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Alec A K; Der, Bryan S; Shin, Jonghyeon; Vaidyanathan, Prashant; Paralanov, Vanya; Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Ross, David; Densmore, Douglas; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    Computation can be performed in living cells by DNA-encoded circuits that process sensory information and control biological functions. Their construction is time-intensive, requiring manual part assembly and balancing of regulator expression. We describe a design environment, Cello, in which a user writes Verilog code that is automatically transformed into a DNA sequence. Algorithms build a circuit diagram, assign and connect gates, and simulate performance. Reliable circuit design requires the insulation of gates from genetic context, so that they function identically when used in different circuits. We used Cello to design 60 circuits forEscherichia coli(880,000 base pairs of DNA), for which each DNA sequence was built as predicted by the software with no additional tuning. Of these, 45 circuits performed correctly in every output state (up to 10 regulators and 55 parts), and across all circuits 92% of the output states functioned as predicted. Design automation simplifies the incorporation of genetic circuits into biotechnology projects that require decision-making, control, sensing, or spatial organization.

  4. Genetic circuit design automation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Alec A K; Der, Bryan S; Shin, Jonghyeon; Vaidyanathan, Prashant; Paralanov, Vanya; Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Ross, David; Densmore, Douglas; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    Computation can be performed in living cells by DNA-encoded circuits that process sensory information and control biological functions. Their construction is time-intensive, requiring manual part assembly and balancing of regulator expression. We describe a design environment, Cello, in which a user writes Verilog code that is automatically transformed into a DNA sequence. Algorithms build a circuit diagram, assign and connect gates, and simulate performance. Reliable circuit design requires the insulation of gates from genetic context, so that they function identically when used in different circuits. We used Cello to design 60 circuits forEscherichia coli(880,000 base pairs of DNA), for which each DNA sequence was built as predicted by the software with no additional tuning. Of these, 45 circuits performed correctly in every output state (up to 10 regulators and 55 parts), and across all circuits 92% of the output states functioned as predicted. Design automation simplifies the incorporation of genetic circuits into biotechnology projects that require decision-making, control, sensing, or spatial organization. PMID:27034378

  5. Automated multi-step purification protocol for Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE).

    PubMed

    Eisele, Thomas; Stressler, Timo; Kranz, Bertolt; Fischer, Lutz

    2012-12-12

    Highly purified proteins are essential for the investigation of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. The purification of a protein requires several steps, which are often time-consuming. In our study, the Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) was solubilised from pig lung without additional detergents, which are commonly used, under mild alkaline conditions in a Tris-HCl buffer (50mM, pH 9.0) for 48h. An automation of the ACE purification was performed using a multi-step protocol in less than 8h, resulting in a purified protein with a specific activity of 37Umg(-1) (purification factor 308) and a yield of 23.6%. The automated ACE purification used an ordinary fast-protein-liquid-chromatography (FPLC) system equipped with two additional switching valves. These switching valves were needed for the buffer stream inversion and for the connection of the Superloop™ used for the protein parking. Automated ACE purification was performed using four combined chromatography steps, including two desalting procedures. The purification methods contained two hydrophobic interaction chromatography steps, a Cibacron 3FG-A chromatography step and a strong anion exchange chromatography step. The purified ACE was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native-PAGE. The estimated monomer size of the purified glycosylated ACE was determined to be ∼175kDa by SDS-PAGE, with the dimeric form at ∼330kDa as characterised by a native PAGE using a novel activity staining protocol. For the activity staining, the tripeptide l-Phe-Gly-Gly was used as the substrate. The ACE cleaved the dipeptide Gly-Gly, releasing the l-Phe to be oxidised with l-amino acid oxidase. Combined with peroxidase and o-dianisidine, the generated H(2)O(2) stained a brown coloured band. This automated purification protocol can be easily adapted to be used with other protein purification tasks. PMID:23217308

  6. A miniature integrated device for automated multistep genetic assays

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rolfe C.; Su, Xing; Bogdan, Gregory J.; Fenton, Jeffery

    2000-01-01

    A highly integrated monolithic device was developed that automatically carries out a complex series of molecular processes on multiple samples. The device is capable of extracting and concentrating nucleic acids from milliliter aqueous samples and performing microliter chemical amplification, serial enzymatic reactions, metering, mixing and nucleic acid hybridization. The device, which is smaller than a credit card, can manipulate over 10 reagents in more than 60 sequential operations and was tested for the detection of mutations in a 1.6 kb region of the HIV genome from serum samples containing as few as 500 copies of the RNA. The elements in this device are readily linked into complex, flexible and highly parallel analysis networks for high throughput sample preparation or, conversely, for low cost portable DNA analysis instruments in point-of-care medical diagnostics, environmental testing and defensive biological agent detection. PMID:10871383

  7. Power Calculation of Multi-step Combined Principal Components with Applications to Genetic Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengbang; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Dongdong; Li, Qizhai

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a useful tool to identify important linear combination of correlated variables in multivariate analysis and has been applied to detect association between genetic variants and human complex diseases of interest. How to choose adequate number of principal components (PCs) to represent the original system in an optimal way is a key issue for PCA. Note that the traditional PCA, only using a few top PCs while discarding the other PCs, might significantly lose power in genetic association studies if all the PCs contain non-ignorable signals. In order to make full use of information from all PCs, Aschard and his colleagues have proposed a multi-step combined PCs method (named mCPC) recently, which performs well especially when several traits are highly correlated. However, the power superiority of mCPC has just been illustrated by simulation, while the theoretical power performance of mCPC has not been studied yet. In this work, we attempt to investigate theoretical properties of mCPC and further propose a novel and efficient strategy to combine PCs. Extensive simulation results confirm that the proposed method is more robust than existing procedures. A real data application to detect the association between gene TRAF1-C5 and rheumatoid arthritis further shows good performance of the proposed procedure. PMID:27189724

  8. A computational method for automated characterization of genetic components.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Boyan; Dalchau, Neil; Grant, Paul K; Pedersen, Michael; Emmott, Stephen; Haseloff, Jim; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The ability to design and construct synthetic biological systems with predictable behavior could enable significant advances in medical treatment, agricultural sustainability, and bioenergy production. However, to reach a stage where such systems can be reliably designed from biological components, integrated experimental and computational techniques that enable robust component characterization are needed. In this paper we present a computational method for the automated characterization of genetic components. Our method exploits a recently developed multichannel experimental protocol and integrates bacterial growth modeling, Bayesian parameter estimation, and model selection, together with data processing steps that are amenable to automation. We implement the method within the Genetic Engineering of Cells modeling and design environment, which enables both characterization and design to be integrated within a common software framework. To demonstrate the application of the method, we quantitatively characterize a synthetic receiver device that responds to the 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone signal, across a range of experimental conditions.

  9. Automation of genetic linkage analysis using florescent microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Brown, A.F.; Green, D.K.

    1994-11-15

    Automation of the typing of genetic markers offers advantages of speed, accuracy, and cost in the mapping of genetic traits and the construction of high-resolution linkage maps. The authors have developed an automated linkage analysis system by (i) using a robotic pipettor to set up polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to amplify microsatellites with incorporation of a single fluorescent label; (ii) using an automated sequencing apparatus for detection of the PCR products; (iii) sizing alleles automatically by the use of internal and external standards; (iv) iteratively filtering out nonallelic fragments and checking for Mendelian consistency; (v) calculating the probabilities of selected genotypes; and (vi) automatically formatting the results for input to linkage analysis programs. The method provides accurate sizing of alleles, minimizes the risk of error during manual reading and transcription of data, and increases the throughput of reliable data. It brings any consistencies or ambiguities in the data to the attention of the user and facilitates examination of the raw data. The ALF/ALP system, together with new, optimized microsatellite sets, particularly tetranucleotide repeats, is likely to be well-suited to fully automatic genetic linkage analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. AutoBioCAD: full biodesign automation of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2013-05-17

    Synthetic regulatory networks with prescribed functions are engineered by assembling a reduced set of functional elements. We could also assemble them computationally if the mathematical models of those functional elements were predictive enough in different genetic contexts. Only after achieving this will we have libraries of models of biological parts able to provide predictive dynamical behaviors for most circuits constructed with them. We thus need tools that can automatically explore different genetic contexts, in addition to being able to use such libraries to design novel circuits with targeted dynamics. We have implemented a new tool, AutoBioCAD, aimed at the automated design of gene regulatory circuits. AutoBioCAD loads a library of models of genetic elements and implements evolutionary design strategies to produce (i) nucleotide sequences encoding circuits with targeted dynamics that can then be tested experimentally and (ii) circuit models for testing regulation principles in natural systems, providing a new tool for synthetic biology. AutoBioCAD can be used to model and design genetic circuits with dynamic behavior, thanks to the incorporation of stochastic effects, robustness, qualitative dynamics, multiobjective optimization, or degenerate nucleotide sequences, all facilitating the link with biological part/circuit engineering.

  11. An automated multistep high-throughput screening assay for the identification of lead inhibitors of the inducible enzyme mPGES-1.

    PubMed

    Massé, Frédéric; Guiral, Sébastien; Fortin, Louis-Jacques; Cauchon, Elizabeth; Ethier, Diane; Guay, Jocelyne; Brideau, Christine

    2005-09-01

    Prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES-1), the enzyme which catalyzes the synthesis of PGE2, is induced during the inflammatory response. For this reason, mPGES-1 could be a potential therapeutic target. A high-throughput screening assay was developed to identify potential inhibitors of mPGES-1. The assay consisted of a 30-s mPGES-1 enzymatic reaction followed by the detection of PGE2 by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The enzymatic reaction was performed in a batch mode because the instability of the substrate (10 min) limited the number of plates assayed within a working day. The detection of the product by EIA was performed on 3 instruments requiring 14 different steps for complete automation. The authors describe here the optimization and implementation of a 2-part assay on a Thermo CRS robotic system. More than 315,000 compounds were tested, and a hit rate of 0.84% was obtained for this assay. Although the entire assay required multiple steps, the assay was successfully miniaturized and automated for a high-throughput screening campaign.

  12. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Automated Electronic Circuit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Haith, Gary L.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris

    2000-01-01

    Parallelized versions of genetic algorithms (GAs) are popular primarily for three reasons: the GA is an inherently parallel algorithm, typical GA applications are very compute intensive, and powerful computing platforms, especially Beowulf-style computing clusters, are becoming more affordable and easier to implement. In addition, the low communication bandwidth required allows the use of inexpensive networking hardware such as standard office ethernet. In this paper we describe a parallel GA and its use in automated high-level circuit design. Genetic algorithms are a type of trial-and-error search technique that are guided by principles of Darwinian evolution. Just as the genetic material of two living organisms can intermix to produce offspring that are better adapted to their environment, GAs expose genetic material, frequently strings of 1s and Os, to the forces of artificial evolution: selection, mutation, recombination, etc. GAs start with a pool of randomly-generated candidate solutions which are then tested and scored with respect to their utility. Solutions are then bred by probabilistically selecting high quality parents and recombining their genetic representations to produce offspring solutions. Offspring are typically subjected to a small amount of random mutation. After a pool of offspring is produced, this process iterates until a satisfactory solution is found or an iteration limit is reached. Genetic algorithms have been applied to a wide variety of problems in many fields, including chemistry, biology, and many engineering disciplines. There are many styles of parallelism used in implementing parallel GAs. One such method is called the master-slave or processor farm approach. In this technique, slave nodes are used solely to compute fitness evaluations (the most time consuming part). The master processor collects fitness scores from the nodes and performs the genetic operators (selection, reproduction, variation, etc.). Because of dependency

  13. Assessing genetic diversity in a sugarcane germplasm collection using an automated AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Besse, P; Taylor, G; Carroll, B; Berding, N; Burner, D; McIntyre, C L

    1998-10-01

    An assessment of genetic diversity within and between Saccharum, Old World Erianthus sect. Ripidium, and North American E.giganteus (S.giganteum) was conducted using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP(TM)) markers. An automated gel scoring system (GelCompar(TM)) was successfully used to analyse the complex AFLP patterns obtained in sugarcane and its relatives. Similarity coefficient calculations and clustering revealed a genetic structure for Saccharum and Erianthus sect. Ripidium that was identical to the one previously obtained using other molecular marker types, showing the appropriateness of AFLP markers and the associated automated analysis in assessing genetic diversity in sugarcane. A genetic structure that correlated with cytotype (2n=30, 60, 90) was revealed within the North American species, E. giganteus (S.giganteum). Complex relationships among Saccharum, Erianthus sect. Ripidium, and North American E.giganteus were revealed and are discussed in the light of a similar study which involved RAPD markers.

  14. Programming Cells: Towardsan automatedGenetic Compiler”

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Kevin; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    I. Summary The increasing scale and sophistication of genetic engineering will necessitate a new generation of computer-aided design (CAD). For large genetic programs, keeping track of the DNA on the level of nucleotides becomes tedious and error prone. To push the size of projects, it is important to abstract the designer from the process of part selection and optimization. The vision is to specify genetic programs in a higher-level language, which a genetic compiler could automatically convert into a DNA sequence. Steps towards this goal include: defining the semantics of the higher-level language, algorithms to select and assemble parts, and biophysical methods to link DNA sequence to function. These will be coupled to graphic design interfaces and simulation packages to aid in the prediction of program dynamics, optimize genes, and scan projects for errors. PMID:20702081

  15. Genetic Influences on Cognitive Function Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Jamie J.; MacGregor, Alex J.; Cherkas, Lynn F.; Spector, Tim D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic relationship between intelligence and components of cognition remains controversial. Conflicting results may be a function of the limited number of methods used in experimental evaluation. The current study is the first to use CANTAB (The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). This is a battery of validated computerised…

  16. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  17. A Droplet Microfluidic Platform for Automating Genetic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Shih, Steve C C; Sustarich, Jess; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Anup K

    2016-05-20

    We present a water-in-oil droplet microfluidic platform for transformation, culture and expression of recombinant proteins in multiple host organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. The platform consists of a hybrid digital microfluidic/channel-based droplet chip with integrated temperature control to allow complete automation and integration of plasmid addition, heat-shock transformation, addition of selection medium, culture, and protein expression. The microfluidic format permitted significant reduction in consumption (100-fold) of expensive reagents such as DNA and enzymes compared to the benchtop method. The chip contains a channel to continuously replenish oil to the culture chamber to provide a fresh supply of oxygen to the cells for long-term (∼5 days) cell culture. The flow channel also replenished oil lost to evaporation and increased the number of droplets that could be processed and cultured. The platform was validated by transforming several plasmids into Escherichia coli including plasmids containing genes for fluorescent proteins GFP, BFP and RFP; plasmids with selectable markers for ampicillin or kanamycin resistance; and a Golden Gate DNA assembly reaction. We also demonstrate the applicability of this platform for transformation in widely used eukaryotic organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Duration and temperatures of the microfluidic heat-shock procedures were optimized to yield transformation efficiencies comparable to those obtained by benchtop methods with a throughput up to 6 droplets/min. The proposed platform offers potential for automation of molecular biology experiments significantly reducing cost, time and variability while improving throughput.

  18. A Droplet Microfluidic Platform for Automating Genetic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Shih, Steve C C; Sustarich, Jess; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Anup K

    2016-05-20

    We present a water-in-oil droplet microfluidic platform for transformation, culture and expression of recombinant proteins in multiple host organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. The platform consists of a hybrid digital microfluidic/channel-based droplet chip with integrated temperature control to allow complete automation and integration of plasmid addition, heat-shock transformation, addition of selection medium, culture, and protein expression. The microfluidic format permitted significant reduction in consumption (100-fold) of expensive reagents such as DNA and enzymes compared to the benchtop method. The chip contains a channel to continuously replenish oil to the culture chamber to provide a fresh supply of oxygen to the cells for long-term (∼5 days) cell culture. The flow channel also replenished oil lost to evaporation and increased the number of droplets that could be processed and cultured. The platform was validated by transforming several plasmids into Escherichia coli including plasmids containing genes for fluorescent proteins GFP, BFP and RFP; plasmids with selectable markers for ampicillin or kanamycin resistance; and a Golden Gate DNA assembly reaction. We also demonstrate the applicability of this platform for transformation in widely used eukaryotic organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Duration and temperatures of the microfluidic heat-shock procedures were optimized to yield transformation efficiencies comparable to those obtained by benchtop methods with a throughput up to 6 droplets/min. The proposed platform offers potential for automation of molecular biology experiments significantly reducing cost, time and variability while improving throughput. PMID:26830031

  19. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Automated Electronic Circuit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Haith, Gary L.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We describe a parallel genetic algorithm (GA) that automatically generates circuit designs using evolutionary search. A circuit-construction programming language is introduced and we show how evolution can generate practical analog circuit designs. Our system allows circuit size (number of devices), circuit topology, and device values to be evolved. We present experimental results as applied to analog filter and amplifier design tasks.

  20. Automating data manipulation for genetic analysis using a data base management system.

    PubMed

    Farrer, L A; Haines, J L; Yount, E A

    1985-01-01

    Inefficient coding and manipulation of pedigree data have often hindered the progress of genetic studies. In this paper we present the methodology for interfacing a data base management system (DBMS) called MEGADATS with a linkage analysis program called LIPED. Two families that segregate a dominant trait and one test marker were used in a simulated exercise to demonstrate how a DBMS can be used to automate tedious clerical steps and improve the efficiency of a genetic analysis. The merits of this approach to data management are discussed. We conclude that a standardized format for genetic analysis programs would greatly facilitate data analysis. PMID:3840122

  1. Automating data manipulation for genetic analysis using a data base management system.

    PubMed

    Farrer, L A; Haines, J L; Yount, E A

    1985-01-01

    Inefficient coding and manipulation of pedigree data have often hindered the progress of genetic studies. In this paper we present the methodology for interfacing a data base management system (DBMS) called MEGADATS with a linkage analysis program called LIPED. Two families that segregate a dominant trait and one test marker were used in a simulated exercise to demonstrate how a DBMS can be used to automate tedious clerical steps and improve the efficiency of a genetic analysis. The merits of this approach to data management are discussed. We conclude that a standardized format for genetic analysis programs would greatly facilitate data analysis.

  2. Using digital electronic design flow to create a Genetic Design Automation tool.

    PubMed

    Gendrault, Y; Madec, M; Wlotzko, V; Andraud, M; Lallement, C; Haiech, J

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic bio-systems become increasingly more complex and their development is lengthy and expensive. In the same way, in microelectronics, the design process of very complex circuits has benefited from many years of experience. It is now partly automated through Electronic Design Automation tools. Both areas present analogies that can be used to create a Genetic Design Automation tool inspired from EDA tools used in digital electronics. This tool would allow moving away from a totally manual design of bio-systems to assisted conception. This ambitious project is presented in this paper, with a deep focus on the tool that automatically generates models of bio-systems directly usable in electronic simulators.

  3. Application of automation and information systems to forensic genetic specimen processing.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Benoît; Scholl, Tom

    2005-03-01

    During the last 10 years, the introduction of PCR-based DNA typing technologies in forensic applications has been highly successful. This technology has become pervasive throughout forensic laboratories and it continues to grow in prevalence. For many criminal cases, it provides the most probative evidence. Criminal genotype data banking and victim identification initiatives that follow mass-fatality incidents have benefited the most from the introduction of automation for sample processing and data analysis. Attributes of offender specimens including large numbers, high quality and identical collection and processing are ideal for the application of laboratory automation. The magnitude of kinship analysis required by mass-fatality incidents necessitates the application of computing solutions to automate the task. More recently, the development activities of many forensic laboratories are focused on leveraging experience from these two applications to casework sample processing. The trend toward increased prevalence of forensic genetic analysis will continue to drive additional innovations in high-throughput laboratory automation and information systems.

  4. Deadlock-free genetic scheduling algorithm for automated manufacturing systems based on deadlock control policy.

    PubMed

    Xing, KeYi; Han, LiBin; Zhou, MengChu; Wang, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Deadlock-free control and scheduling are vital for optimizing the performance of automated manufacturing systems (AMSs) with shared resources and route flexibility. Based on the Petri net models of AMSs, this paper embeds the optimal deadlock avoidance policy into the genetic algorithm and develops a novel deadlock-free genetic scheduling algorithm for AMSs. A possible solution of the scheduling problem is coded as a chromosome representation that is a permutation with repetition of parts. By using the one-step look-ahead method in the optimal deadlock control policy, the feasibility of a chromosome is checked, and infeasible chromosomes are amended into feasible ones, which can be easily decoded into a feasible deadlock-free schedule. The chromosome representation and polynomial complexity of checking and amending procedures together support the cooperative aspect of genetic search for scheduling problems strongly.

  5. Single-Cell Genetic Analysis Using Automated Microfluidics to Resolve Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S.; Gonzales, Michael L.; Sun, Gang; Unger, Marc A.; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism occurs throughout normal development and contributes to numerous disease etiologies, including tumorigenesis and neurological disorders. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity is inherent to many cancers, creating challenges for effective treatments. Unfortunately, analysis of bulk DNA masks subclonal phylogenetic architectures created by the acquisition and distribution of somatic mutations amongst cells. As a result, single-cell genetic analysis is becoming recognized as vital for accurately characterizing cancers. Despite this, methods for single-cell genetics are lacking. Here we present an automated microfluidic workflow enabling efficient cell capture, lysis, and whole genome amplification (WGA). We find that ~90% of the genome is accessible in single cells with improved uniformity relative to current single-cell WGA methods. Allelic dropout (ADO) rates were limited to 13.75% and variant false discovery rates (SNV FDR) were 4.11x10-6, on average. Application to ER-/PR-/HER2+ breast cancer cells and matched normal controls identified novel mutations that arose in a subpopulation of cells and effectively resolved the segregation of known cancer-related mutations with single-cell resolution. Finally, we demonstrate effective cell classification using mutation profiles with 10X average exome coverage depth per cell. Our data demonstrate an efficient automated microfluidic platform for single-cell WGA that enables the resolution of somatic mutation patterns in single cells. PMID:26302375

  6. Automated, quantitative cognitive/behavioral screening of mice: for genetics, pharmacology, animal cognition and undergraduate instruction.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Balci, Fuat; Freestone, David; Kheifets, Aaron; King, Adam

    2014-02-26

    We describe a high-throughput, high-volume, fully automated, live-in 24/7 behavioral testing system for assessing the effects of genetic and pharmacological manipulations on basic mechanisms of cognition and learning in mice. A standard polypropylene mouse housing tub is connected through an acrylic tube to a standard commercial mouse test box. The test box has 3 hoppers, 2 of which are connected to pellet feeders. All are internally illuminable with an LED and monitored for head entries by infrared (IR) beams. Mice live in the environment, which eliminates handling during screening. They obtain their food during two or more daily feeding periods by performing in operant (instrumental) and Pavlovian (classical) protocols, for which we have written protocol-control software and quasi-real-time data analysis and graphing software. The data analysis and graphing routines are written in a MATLAB-based language created to simplify greatly the analysis of large time-stamped behavioral and physiological event records and to preserve a full data trail from raw data through all intermediate analyses to the published graphs and statistics within a single data structure. The data-analysis code harvests the data several times a day and subjects it to statistical and graphical analyses, which are automatically stored in the "cloud" and on in-lab computers. Thus, the progress of individual mice is visualized and quantified daily. The data-analysis code talks to the protocol-control code, permitting the automated advance from protocol to protocol of individual subjects. The behavioral protocols implemented are matching, autoshaping, timed hopper-switching, risk assessment in timed hopper-switching, impulsivity measurement, and the circadian anticipation of food availability. Open-source protocol-control and data-analysis code makes the addition of new protocols simple. Eight test environments fit in a 48 in x 24 in x 78 in cabinet; two such cabinets (16 environments) may be

  7. Automated, quantitative cognitive/behavioral screening of mice: for genetics, pharmacology, animal cognition and undergraduate instruction.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Balci, Fuat; Freestone, David; Kheifets, Aaron; King, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We describe a high-throughput, high-volume, fully automated, live-in 24/7 behavioral testing system for assessing the effects of genetic and pharmacological manipulations on basic mechanisms of cognition and learning in mice. A standard polypropylene mouse housing tub is connected through an acrylic tube to a standard commercial mouse test box. The test box has 3 hoppers, 2 of which are connected to pellet feeders. All are internally illuminable with an LED and monitored for head entries by infrared (IR) beams. Mice live in the environment, which eliminates handling during screening. They obtain their food during two or more daily feeding periods by performing in operant (instrumental) and Pavlovian (classical) protocols, for which we have written protocol-control software and quasi-real-time data analysis and graphing software. The data analysis and graphing routines are written in a MATLAB-based language created to simplify greatly the analysis of large time-stamped behavioral and physiological event records and to preserve a full data trail from raw data through all intermediate analyses to the published graphs and statistics within a single data structure. The data-analysis code harvests the data several times a day and subjects it to statistical and graphical analyses, which are automatically stored in the "cloud" and on in-lab computers. Thus, the progress of individual mice is visualized and quantified daily. The data-analysis code talks to the protocol-control code, permitting the automated advance from protocol to protocol of individual subjects. The behavioral protocols implemented are matching, autoshaping, timed hopper-switching, risk assessment in timed hopper-switching, impulsivity measurement, and the circadian anticipation of food availability. Open-source protocol-control and data-analysis code makes the addition of new protocols simple. Eight test environments fit in a 48 in x 24 in x 78 in cabinet; two such cabinets (16 environments) may be

  8. A novel automated behavioral test battery assessing cognitive rigidity in two genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Puścian, Alicja; Łęski, Szymon; Górkiewicz, Tomasz; Meyza, Ksenia; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors are a key feature of many pervasive developmental disorders, such as autism. As a heterogeneous group of symptoms, repetitive behaviors are conceptualized into two main subgroups: sensory/motor (lower-order) and cognitive rigidity (higher-order). Although lower-order repetitive behaviors are measured in mouse models in several paradigms, so far there have been no high-throughput tests directly measuring cognitive rigidity. We describe a novel approach for monitoring repetitive behaviors during reversal learning in mice in the automated IntelliCage system. During the reward-motivated place preference reversal learning, designed to assess cognitive abilities of mice, visits to the previously rewarded places were recorded to measure cognitive flexibility. Thereafter, emotional flexibility was assessed by measuring conditioned fear extinction. Additionally, to look for neuronal correlates of cognitive impairments, we measured CA3-CA1 hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). To standardize the designed tests we used C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, representing two genetic backgrounds, for induction of autism by prenatal exposure to the sodium valproate. We found impairments of place learning related to perseveration and no LTP impairments in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice. In contrast, BALB/c valproate-treated mice displayed severe deficits of place learning not associated with perseverative behaviors and accompanied by hippocampal LTP impairments. Alterations of cognitive flexibility observed in C57BL/6 valproate-treated mice were related to neither restricted exploration pattern nor to emotional flexibility. Altogether, we showed that the designed tests of cognitive performance and perseverative behaviors are efficient and highly replicable. Moreover, the results suggest that genetic background is crucial for the behavioral effects of prenatal valproate treatment. PMID:24808839

  9. Modelling molecule-surface interactions--an automated quantum-classical approach using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Herbers, Claudia R; Johnston, Karen; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2011-06-14

    We present an automated and efficient method to develop force fields for molecule-surface interactions. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to parameterise a classical force field so that the classical adsorption energy landscape of a molecule on a surface matches the corresponding landscape from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The procedure performs a sophisticated search in the parameter phase space and converges very quickly. The method is capable of fitting a significant number of structures and corresponding adsorption energies. Water on a ZnO(0001) surface was chosen as a benchmark system but the method is implemented in a flexible way and can be applied to any system of interest. In the present case, pairwise Lennard Jones (LJ) and Coulomb potentials are used to describe the molecule-surface interactions. In the course of the fitting procedure, the LJ parameters are refined in order to reproduce the adsorption energy landscape. The classical model is capable of describing a wide range of energies, which is essential for a realistic description of a fluid-solid interface. PMID:21594260

  10. Development of an automated fluorescence microscopy system for photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins (optogenetics) in live cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Nobukazu; Ikeda, Yuka; Kato, Takuma; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Egami, Youhei; Miyake, Katsuya; Tsurumaki, Nobuhide; Yamaguchi, Mitsunari

    2014-06-01

    Photomanipulation of genetically encoded light-sensitive protein activity, also known as optogenetics, is one of the most innovative recent microscopy techniques in the fields of cell biology and neurobiology. Although photomanipulation is usually performed by diverting the photobleaching mode of a confocal laser microscope, photobleaching by the laser scanning unit is not always suitable for photoactivation. We have developed a simple automated wide-field fluorescence microscopy system for the photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins in live cells. An electrically automated fluorescence microscope can be controlled through MetaMorph imaging software, making it possible to acquire time-lapse, multiwavelength images of live cells. Using the journal (macro recording) function of MetaMorph, we wrote a macro program to change the excitation filter for photoactivation and illumination area during the intervals of image acquisition. When this program was run on the wide-field fluorescence microscope, cells expressing genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac1, which is activated under blue light, showed morphological changes such as lamellipodial extension and cell surface ruffling in the illuminated region. Using software-based development, we successfully constructed a fully automated photoactivation microscopy system for a mercury lamp-based fluorescence microscope.

  11. Automated synthesis of both the topology and numerical parameters for seven patented optical lens systems using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lee W.; Al-Sakran, Sameer H.; Koza, John R.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes how genetic programming was used as an automated invention machine to synthesize both the topology and numerical parameters for seven previously patented optical lens systems, including one aspherical system and one issued in the 21st-century. Two of the evolved optical lens systems infringe the claims of the patents and the others are novel solutions that satisfy the design goals stated in the patent. The automatic synthesis was done "from scratch"--that is, without starting from a pre-existing good design and without pre-specifying the number of lenses, the topological layout of the lenses, or the numerical parameters of the lenses. Genetic programming is a form of evolutionary computation used to automatically solve problems. It starts from a high-level statement of what needs to be done and progressively breeds a population of candidate individuals over many generations using the principle of Darwinian natural selection and genetic recombination. The paper describes how genetic programming created eyepieces that duplicated the functionality of seven previously patented lens systems. The seven designs were created in a substantially similar and routine way, suggesting that the use of genetic programming in the automated design of both the topology and numerical parameters for optical lens systems may have widespread utility.

  12. 48 CFR 15.202 - Advisory multi-step process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advisory multi-step... Information 15.202 Advisory multi-step process. (a) The agency may publish a presolicitation notice (see 5.204... participate in the acquisition. This process should not be used for multi-step acquisitions where it...

  13. Rapid sensitive analysis of IDH1 mutation in lower-grade gliomas by automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Michihiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Aoki, Kosuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kondo, Goro; Motomura, Kazuya; Iijima, Kentaro; Yamamichi, Akane; Ranjit, Melissa; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The authors recently found that 80% of lower-grade gliomas (LGGs) harbored a mutation in IDH1. Intraoperative detection of the mutated IDH1 helps not only differentiate LGGs from other type of brain tumors, but determine the resection border. In the current study, the authors have applied an automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe to detect the mutated IDH1. If tumor cells with the mutated IDH1 contained 10% or more in the mixture of normal and tumor cells, the device could detect it sensitively. The intraoperative assessment of IDH1 mutation is useful in brain tumor surgeries.

  14. Multistep sintering to synthesize fast lithium garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Biyi; Duan, Huanan; Xia, Wenhao; Guo, Yiping; Kang, Hongmei; Li, Hua; Liu, Hezhou

    2016-01-01

    A multistep sintering schedule is developed to synthesize Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) doped with 0.2 mol% Al3+. The effect of sintering steps on phase, relative density and ionic conductivity of Al-doped LLZO has been evaluated using powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 27Al magic spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that by holding the sample at 900 °C for 6 h, the mixture of tetragonal and cubic garnet phases are obtained; by continuously holding at 1100 °C for 6 h, the tetragonal phase completely transforms into cubic phase; by holding at 1200 °C, the relative density increases without decomposition of the cubic phase. The Al-LLZO pellets after multistep sintering exhibit cubic phase, relative density of 94.25% and ionic conductivity of 4.5 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature. Based on the observation, a sintering model is proposed and discussed.

  15. Synthesis of Silver Nanostructures by Multistep Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Song, Yuan-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Wu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The shape of plasmonic nanostructures such as silver and gold is vital to their physical and chemical properties and potential applications. Recently, preparation of complex nanostructures with rich function by chemical multistep methods is the hotspot of research. In this review we introduce three typical multistep methods to prepare silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, including the double reductant method, etching technique and construction of core-shell nanostructures. The growth mechanism of double the reductant method is that different favorable facets of silver nanocrystals are produced in different reductants, which can be used to prepare complex nanostructures such as nanoflags with ultranarrow resonant band bandwidth or some silver nanostructures which are difficult to prepare using other methods. The etching technique can selectively remove nanoparticles to achieve the aim of shape control and is widely used for the synthesis of nanoflowers and hollow nanostructures. Construction of core-shell nanostructures is another tool to control shape and size. The three methods can not only prepare various silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, which exhibit unique optical properties, such as strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, but also have potential application in many areas. PMID:24670722

  16. Differential genetic regulation of motor activity and anxiety-related behaviors in mice using an automated home cage task.

    PubMed

    Kas, Martien J H; de Mooij-van Malsen, Annetrude J G; Olivier, Berend; Spruijt, Berry M; van Ree, Jan M

    2008-08-01

    Traditional behavioral tests, such as the open field test, measure an animal's responsiveness to a novel environment. However, it is generally difficult to assess whether the behavioral response obtained from these tests relates to the expression level of motor activity and/or to avoidance of anxiogenic areas. Here, an automated home cage environment for mice was designed to obtain independent measures of motor activity levels and of sheltered feeding preference during three consecutive days. Chronic treatment with the anxiolytic drug chlordiazepoxide (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) in C57BL/6J mice reduced sheltered feeding preference without altering motor activity levels. Furthermore, two distinct chromosome substitution strains, derived from C57BL/6J (host strain) and A/J (donor strain) inbred strains, expressed either increased sheltering preference in females (chromosome 15) or reduced motor activity levels in females and males (chromosome 1) when compared to C57BL/6J. Longitudinal behavioral monitoring revealed that these phenotypic differences maintained after adaptation to the home cage. Thus, by using new automated behavioral phenotyping approaches, behavior can be dissociated into distinct behavioral domains (e.g., anxiety-related and motor activity domains) with different underlying genetic origin and pharmacological responsiveness.

  17. 48 CFR 15.202 - Advisory multi-step process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advisory multi-step... Information 15.202 Advisory multi-step process. (a) The agency may publish a presolicitation notice (see 5.204... submitted and the criteria that will be used in making the initial evaluation. Information sought may...

  18. Spi-1/PU.1 transgenic mice develop multistep erythroleukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau-Gachelin, F; Wendling, F; Molina, T; Denis, N; Titeux, M; Grimber, G; Briand, P; Vainchenker, W; Tavitian, A

    1996-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of the spi-1 gene is associated with the emergence of malignant proerythroblasts during Friend virus-induced acute erythroleukemia. To determine the role of spi-1/PU.1 in the genesis of leukemia, we generated spi-1 transgenic mice. In one founder line the transgene was overexpressed as an unexpected-size transcript in various mouse tissues. Homozygous transgenic animals gave rise to live-born offspring, but 50% of the animals developed a multistep erythroleukemia within 1.5 to 6 months of birth whereas the remainder survived without evidence of disease. At the onset of the disease, mice became severely anemic. Their hematopoietic tissues were massively invaded with nontumorigenic proerythroblasts that express a high level of Spi-1 protein. These transgenic proerythroblasts are partially blocked in differentiation and strictly dependent on erythropoietin for their proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. A complete but transient regression of the disease was observed after erythrocyte transfusion, suggesting that the constitutive expression of spi-1 is related to the block of the differentiation of erythroid precursors. At relapse, erythropoietin-independent malignant proerythroblasts arose. Growth factor autonomy could be partially explained by the autocrine secretion of erythropoietin; however, other genetic events appear to be necessary to confer the full malignant phenotype. These results reveal that overexpression of spi-1 is essential for malignant erythropoiesis and does not alter other hematopoietic lineages. PMID:8628313

  19. Automated microscopy system for detection and genetic characterization of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravkin, Ilya; Temov, Vladimir

    1998-04-01

    The detection and genetic analysis of fetal cells in maternal blood will permit noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic defects. Applied Imaging has developed and is currently evaluating a system for semiautomatic detection of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides and acquisition of their DNA probe FISH images. The specimens are blood smears from pregnant women (9 - 16 weeks gestation) enriched for nucleated red blood cells (NRBC). The cells are identified by using labeled monoclonal antibodies directed to different types of hemoglobin chains (gamma, epsilon); the nuclei are stained with DAPI. The Applied Imaging system has been implemented with both Olympus BX and Nikon Eclipse series microscopes which were equipped with transmission and fluorescence optics. The system includes the following motorized components: stage, focus, transmission, and fluorescence filter wheels. A video camera with light integration (COHU 4910) permits low light imaging. The software capabilities include scanning, relocation, autofocusing, feature extraction, facilities for operator review, and data analysis. Detection of fetal NRBCs is achieved by employing a combination of brightfield and fluorescence images of nuclear and cytoplasmic markers. The brightfield and fluorescence images are all obtained with a single multi-bandpass dichroic mirror. A Z-stack of DNA probe FISH images is acquired by moving focus and switching excitation filters. This stack is combined to produce an enhanced image for presentation and spot counting.

  20. Multistep, effective drug distribution within solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shemi, Amotz; Khvalevsky, Elina Zorde; Gabai, Rachel Malka; Domb, Abraham; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of drugs within solid tumors presents a long-standing barrier for efficient cancer therapies. Tumors are highly resistant to diffusion, and the lack of blood and lymphatic flows suppresses convection. Prolonged, continuous intratumoral drug delivery from a miniature drug source offers an alternative to both systemic delivery and intratumoral injection. Presented here is a model of drug distribution from such a source, in a multistep process. At delivery onset the drug mainly affects the closest surroundings. Such ‘priming’ enables drug penetration to successive cell layers. Tumor ‘void volume’ (volume not occupied by cells) increases, facilitating lymphatic perfusion. The drug is then transported by hydraulic convection downstream along interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) gradients, away from the tumor core. After a week tumor cell death occurs throughout the entire tumor and IFP gradients are flattened. Then, the drug is transported mainly by ‘mixing’, powered by physiological bulk body movements. Steady state is achieved and the drug covers the entire tumor over several months. Supporting measurements are provided from the LODER™ system, releasing siRNA against mutated KRAS over months in pancreatic cancer in-vivo models. LODER™ was also successfully employed in a recent Phase 1/2 clinical trial with pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26416413

  1. Development of a Genetic Algorithm to Automate Clustering of a Dependency Structure Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.; Korte, John J.; Bilardo, Vincent J.

    2006-01-01

    Much technology assessment and organization design data exists in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. Tools are needed to put this data into a form that can be used by design managers to make design decisions. One need is to cluster data that is highly coupled. Tools such as the Dependency Structure Matrix (DSM) and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) can be of great benefit. However, no tool currently combines the DSM and a GA to solve the clustering problem. This paper describes a new software tool that interfaces a GA written as an Excel macro with a DSM in spreadsheet format. The results of several test cases are included to demonstrate how well this new tool works.

  2. A taste of individualized medicine: physicians' reactions to automated genetic interpretations.

    PubMed

    Lærum, Hallvard; Bremer, Sara; Bergan, Stein; Grünfeld, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The potential of pharmacogenomics is well documented, and functionality exploiting this knowledge is about to be introduced into electronic medical records. To explore physicians' reactions to automatic interpretations of genetic tests, we built a prototype with a simple interpretive algorithm. The algorithm was adapted to the needs of physicians handling immunosuppressive treatment during organ transplantation. Nine physicians were observed expressing their thoughts while using the prototype for two patient scenarios. The computer screen and audio were recorded, and the qualitative results triangulated with responses to a survey instrument. The physicians' reactions to the prototype were very positive; they clearly trusted the results and the theory behind them. The explanation of the algorithm was prominently placed in the user interface for transparency, although this design led to considerable confusion. Background information and references should be available, but considerably less prominent than the result and recommendation. PMID:24001515

  3. Numerical solution of integral-algebraic equations for multistep methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnikova, O. S.; Bulatov, M. V.

    2012-05-01

    Systems of Volterra linear integral equations with identically singular matrices in the principal part (called integral-algebraic equations) are examined. Multistep methods for the numerical solution of a selected class of such systems are proposed and justified.

  4. High-Throughput Automated Phenotyping of Two Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Balci, Fuat; Oakeshott, Stephen; Shamy, Jul Lea; El-Khodor, Bassem F; Filippov, Igor; Mushlin, Richard; Port, Russell; Connor, David; Paintdakhi, Ahmad; Menalled, Liliana; Ramboz, Sylvie; Howland, David; Kwak, Seung; Brunner, Dani

    2013-01-01

    Phenotyping with traditional behavioral assays constitutes a major bottleneck in the primary screening, characterization, and validation of genetic mouse models of disease, leading to downstream delays in drug discovery efforts. We present a novel and comprehensive one-stop approach to phenotyping, the PhenoCube™. This system simultaneously captures the cognitive performance, motor activity, and circadian patterns of group-housed mice by use of home-cage operant conditioning modules (IntelliCage) and custom-built computer vision software. We evaluated two different mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD), the R6/2 and the BACHD in the PhenoCube™ system. Our results demonstrated that this system can efficiently capture and track alterations in both cognitive performance and locomotor activity patterns associated with these disease models. This work extends our prior demonstration that PhenoCube™ can characterize circadian dysfunction in BACHD mice and shows that this system, with the experimental protocols used, is a sensitive and efficient tool for a first pass high-throughput screening of mouse disease models in general and mouse models of neurodegeneration in particular. PMID:23863947

  5. Genetic Algorithm Based Framework for Automation of Stochastic Modeling of Multi-Season Streamflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, R. K.; Srinivasan, K.; Sudheer, K.

    2009-05-01

    bootstrap (MABB) ) based on the explicit objective functions of minimizing the relative bias and relative root mean square error in estimating the storage capacity of the reservoir. The optimal parameter set of the hybrid model is obtained based on the search over a multi- dimensional parameter space (involving simultaneous exploration of the parametric (PAR(1)) as well as the non-parametric (MABB) components). This is achieved using the efficient evolutionary search based optimization tool namely, non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm - II (NSGA-II). This approach helps in reducing the drudgery involved in the process of manual selection of the hybrid model, in addition to predicting the basic summary statistics dependence structure, marginal distribution and water-use characteristics accurately. The proposed optimization framework is used to model the multi-season streamflows of River Beaver and River Weber of USA. In case of both the rivers, the proposed GA-based hybrid model yields a much better prediction of the storage capacity (where simultaneous exploration of both parametric and non-parametric components is done) when compared with the MLE-based hybrid models (where the hybrid model selection is done in two stages, thus probably resulting in a sub-optimal model). This framework can be further extended to include different linear/non-linear hybrid stochastic models at other temporal and spatial scales as well.

  6. Comparing multistep immobilized metal affinity chromatography and multistep TiO2 methods for phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Schunter, Alissa; Hummon, Amanda B

    2015-09-01

    Phosphopeptide enrichment from complicated peptide mixtures is an essential step for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic studies to reduce sample complexity and ionization suppression effects. Typical methods for enriching phosphopeptides include immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) beads, which have selective affinity and can interact with phosphopeptides. In this study, the IMAC enrichment method was compared with the TiO2 enrichment method, using a multistep enrichment strategy from whole cell lysate, to evaluate their abilities to enrich for different types of phosphopeptides. The peptide-to-beads ratios were optimized for both IMAC and TiO2 beads. Both IMAC and TiO2 enrichments were performed for three rounds to enable the maximum extraction of phosphopeptides from the whole cell lysates. The phosphopeptides that are unique to IMAC enrichment, unique to TiO2 enrichment, and identified with both IMAC and TiO2 enrichment were analyzed for their characteristics. Both IMAC and TiO2 enriched similar amounts of phosphopeptides with comparable enrichment efficiency. However, phosphopeptides that are unique to IMAC enrichment showed a higher percentage of multiphosphopeptides as well as a higher percentage of longer, basic, and hydrophilic phosphopeptides. Also, the IMAC and TiO2 procedures clearly enriched phosphopeptides with different motifs. Finally, further enriching with two rounds of TiO2 from the supernatant after IMAC enrichment or further enriching with two rounds of IMAC from the supernatant TiO2 enrichment does not fully recover the phosphopeptides that are not identified with the corresponding multistep enrichment. PMID:26237447

  7. Automated extraction of DNA from blood and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler for forensic genetic STR typing of reference samples.

    PubMed

    Stangegaard, Michael; Frøslev, Tobias G; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2011-04-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler mounted with the Te-MagS magnetic separation device (Tecan, Männedorf, Switzerland). The protocols were validated for accredited forensic genetic work according to ISO 17025 using the Qiagen MagAttract DNA Mini M48 kit (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany) from fresh whole blood and blood from deceased individuals. The workflow was simplified by returning the DNA extracts to the original tubes minimizing the risk of misplacing samples. The tubes that originally contained the samples were washed with MilliQ water before the return of the DNA extracts. The PCR was setup in 96-well microtiter plates. The methods were validated for the kits: AmpFℓSTR Identifiler, SGM Plus and Yfiler (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA), GenePrint FFFL and PowerPlex Y (Promega, Madison, WI). The automated protocols allowed for extraction and addition of PCR master mix of 96 samples within 3.5h. In conclusion, we demonstrated that (1) DNA extraction with magnetic beads and (2) PCR setup for accredited, forensic genetic short tandem repeat typing can be implemented on a simple automated liquid handler leading to the reduction of manual work, and increased quality and throughput. PMID:21609694

  8. Multi-step motion planning: Application to free-climbing robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Timothy Wolfe

    This dissertation addresses the problem of planning the motion of a multi-limbed robot to "free-climb" vertical rock surfaces. Free-climbing relies on natural features and friction (such as holes or protrusions) rather than special fixtures or tools. It requires strength, but more importantly it requires deliberate reasoning: not only must the robot decide how to adjust its posture to reach the next feature without falling, it must plan an entire sequence of steps, where each one might have future consequences. This process of reasoning is called multi-step planning. A multi-step planning framework is presented for computing non-gaited, free-climbing motions. This framework derives from an analysis of a free-climbing robot's configuration space, which can be decomposed into constraint manifolds associated with each state of contact between the robot and its environment. An understanding of the adjacency between manifolds motivates a two-stage strategy that uses a candidate sequence of steps to direct the subsequent search for motions. Three algorithms are developed to support the framework. The first algorithm reduces the amount of time required to plan each potential step, a large number of which must be considered over an entire multi-step search. It extends the probabilistic roadmap (PRM) approach based on an analysis of the interaction between balance and the topology of closed kinematic chains. The second algorithm addresses a problem with the PRM approach, that it is unable to distinguish challenging steps (which may be critical) from impossible ones. This algorithm detects impossible steps explicitly, using automated algebraic inference and machine learning. The third algorithm provides a fast constraint checker (on which the PRM approach depends), in particular a test of balance at the initially unknown number of sampled configurations associated with each step. It is a method of incremental precomputation, fast because it takes advantage of the sample

  9. Digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional ballscrew surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Yen, Tzu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    A digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional (3-D) ballscrew surface imaging is presented. The 3-D digital imaging system is capable of capturing fringe pattern images. The straight fringe patterns generated by software in the computer are projected onto the ballscrew surface by the DLP projector. The distorted fringe patterns are captured by the CCD camera at different detecting directions for reconstruction algorithms. The seven-step phase-shifting algorithm and quality guided path unwrapping algorithm are used to calculate absolute phase at each pixel position. The 3-D calibration method is used to obtain the relationship between the absolute phase map and ballscrew shape. The angular dependence of 3-D shape imaging for ballscrews is analyzed and characterized. The experimental results may provide a novel, fast, and high accuracy imaging system to inspect the surface features of the ballscrew without length limitation for automated optical inspection industry.

  10. Mechanisms of multistep carcinogenesis and carcinogen risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    Many different types of chemical exposures can increase the incidence of tumors in animals and humans, but usually a long period of time is required before the carcinogenic risk of an exposure is manifested. Both of these observations can be explained by a multistep/multigene model of carcinogenesis. In this model, a normal cell evolves into a cancer cell as the result of heritable changes in multiple, independent genes. The two-stage model of initiation and promotion for chemical carcinogenesis has provided a paradigm by which chemicals can act by qualitatively different mechanisms, but the process of carcinogenesis is now recognized as more complex than simply initiation and promotion. Even a three-stage model of initiation, promotion, and progression, which can be operationally defined, is not adequate to describe the carcinogenic process. The number of genes altered in a cancer cell compared to a normal cell is not known; recent evidence suggests that 3-10 genetic events are involved in common adult malignancies in humans. Two distinct classes of genes, protooncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, are involved in the cancer process. Multiple oncogenes may be activated in a tumor, while multiple tumor-suppressor genes may be inactivated. Identification of the genes involved in carcinogenesis and elucidation of the mechanisms of their activation or inactivation allows a better understanding of how chemical carcinogens influence the process of neoplastic evolution. The findings of multiple genetic changes (including point mutations, chromosomal translocations, deletions, gene amplification, and numerical chromosome changes) in activated protooncogenes and inactivated tumor-suppressor genes provide experimental support for Boveri's somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. In addition to mutagenic mechanisms, chemicals may heritably alter cells by epigenetic mechanisms and enhance the clonal expansion of altered cells. Most chemical carcinogens operate via a

  11. A Multistep Synthesis for an Advanced Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang Ji; Peters, Dennis G.

    2006-01-01

    Multistep syntheses are often important components of the undergraduate organic laboratory experience and a three-step synthesis of 5-(2-sulfhydrylethyl) salicylaldehyde was described. The experiment is useful as a special project for an advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course and offers opportunities for students to master a…

  12. Multistep and Multistage Boundary Integral Methods for the Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjai, Lehel

    2009-09-01

    We describe how time-discretized wave equation in a homogeneous medium can be solved by boundary integral methods. The time discretization can be a multistep, Runge-Kutta, or a more general multistep-multistage method. The resulting convolutional system of boundary integral equations falls in the family of convolution quadratures of Ch. Lubich. In this work our aim is to discuss a new technique for efficiently solving the discrete convolutional system and to present large scale 3D numerical experiments with a wide range of time-discretizations that have up to now not appeared in print. One of the conclusions is that Runge-Kutta methods are often the method of choice even at low accuracy; yet, in connection with hyperbolic problems BDF (backward difference formulas) have been predominant in the literature on convolution quadrature.

  13. DEFORMATION DEPENDENT TUL MULTI-STEP DIRECT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    WIENKE,H.; CAPOTE, R.; HERMAN, M.; SIN, M.

    2007-04-22

    The Multi-Step Direct (MSD) module TRISTAN in the nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended in order to account for nuclear deformation. The new formalism was tested in calculations of neutron emission spectra emitted from the {sup 232}Th(n,xn) reaction. These calculations include vibration-rotational Coupled Channels (CC) for the inelastic scattering to low-lying collective levels, ''deformed'' MSD with quadrupole deformation for inelastic scattering to the continuum, Multi-Step Compound (MSC) and Hauser-Feshbach with advanced treatment of the fission channel. Prompt fission neutrons were also calculated. The comparison with experimental data shows clear improvement over the ''spherical'' MSD calculations and JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 evaluations.

  14. Optimal Installation Locations for Automated External Defibrillators in Taipei 7-Eleven Stores: Using GIS and a Genetic Algorithm with a New Stirring Operator

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tzai-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Immediate treatment with an automated external defibrillator (AED) increases out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patient survival potential. While considerable attention has been given to determining optimal public AED locations, spatial and temporal factors such as time of day and distance from emergency medical services (EMSs) are understudied. Here we describe a geocomputational genetic algorithm with a new stirring operator (GANSO) that considers spatial and temporal cardiac arrest occurrence factors when assessing the feasibility of using Taipei 7-Eleven stores as installation locations for AEDs. Our model is based on two AED conveyance modes, walking/running and driving, involving service distances of 100 and 300 meters, respectively. Our results suggest different AED allocation strategies involving convenience stores in urban settings. In commercial areas, such installations can compensate for temporal gaps in EMS locations when responding to nighttime OHCA incidents. In residential areas, store installations can compensate for long distances from fire stations, where AEDs are currently held in Taipei. PMID:25045396

  15. Automated discovery of structural features of the optic nerve head on the basis of image and genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Mark; Tang, Li; Fingert, John H.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of optic nerve head (ONH) structure is a commonly used clinical technique for both diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma. Glaucoma is associated with characteristic changes in the structure of the ONH. We present a method for computationally identifying ONH structural features using both imaging and genetic data from a large cohort of participants at risk for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Using 1054 participants from the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study, ONH structure was measured by application of a stereo correspondence algorithm to stereo fundus images. In addition, the genotypes of several known POAG genetic risk factors were considered for each participant. ONH structural features were discovered using both a principal component analysis approach to identify the major modes of variance within structural measurements and a linear discriminant analysis approach to capture the relationship between genetic risk factors and ONH structure. The identified ONH structural features were evaluated based on the strength of their associations with genotype and development of POAG by the end of the OHTS study. ONH structural features with strong associations with genotype were identified for each of the genetic loci considered. Several identified ONH structural features were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with the development of POAG after Bonferroni correction. Further, incorporation of genetic risk status was found to substantially increase performance of early POAG prediction. These results suggest incorporating both imaging and genetic data into ONH structural modeling significantly improves the ability to explain POAG-related changes to ONH structure.

  16. Event-triggered logical flow control for comprehensive process integration of multi-step assays on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, David J; Kearney, Sinéad M; Dimov, Nikolay; Glynn, Macdara T; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-07-01

    The centrifugal "lab-on-a-disc" concept has proven to have great potential for process integration of bioanalytical assays, in particular where ease-of-use, ruggedness, portability, fast turn-around time and cost efficiency are of paramount importance. Yet, as all liquids residing on the disc are exposed to the same centrifugal field, an inherent challenge of these systems remains the automation of multi-step, multi-liquid sample processing and subsequent detection. In order to orchestrate the underlying bioanalytical protocols, an ample palette of rotationally and externally actuated valving schemes has been developed. While excelling with the level of flow control, externally actuated valves require interaction with peripheral instrumentation, thus compromising the conceptual simplicity of the centrifugal platform. In turn, for rotationally controlled schemes, such as common capillary burst valves, typical manufacturing tolerances tend to limit the number of consecutive laboratory unit operations (LUOs) that can be automated on a single disc. In this paper, a major advancement on recently established dissolvable film (DF) valving is presented; for the very first time, a liquid handling sequence can be controlled in response to completion of preceding liquid transfer event, i.e. completely independent of external stimulus or changes in speed of disc rotation. The basic, event-triggered valve configuration is further adapted to leverage conditional, large-scale process integration. First, we demonstrate a fluidic network on a disc encompassing 10 discrete valving steps including logical relationships such as an AND-conditional as well as serial and parallel flow control. Then we present a disc which is capable of implementing common laboratory unit operations such as metering and selective routing of flows. Finally, as a pilot study, these functions are integrated on a single disc to automate a common, multi-step lab protocol for the extraction of total RNA from

  17. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  18. Hard-X-Ray-Induced Multistep Ultrafast Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travnikova, Oksana; Marchenko, Tatiana; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Jänkälä, Kari; Sisourat, Nicolas; Carniato, Stéphane; Guillemin, Renaud; Journel, Loïc; Céolin, Denis; Püttner, Ralph; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Eiji; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Creation of deep core holes with very short (τ ≤1 fs ) lifetimes triggers a chain of relaxation events leading to extensive nuclear dynamics on a few-femtosecond time scale. Here we demonstrate a general multistep ultrafast dissociation on an example of HCl following Cl 1 s →σ* excitation. Intermediate states with one or multiple holes in the shallower core electron shells are generated in the course of the decay cascades. The repulsive character and large gradients of the potential energy surfaces of these intermediates enable ultrafast fragmentation after the absorption of a hard x-ray photon.

  19. GARLig: a fully automated tool for subset selection of large fragment spaces via a self-adaptive genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Patrick; Fober, Thomas; Hüllermeier, Eyke; Klebe, Gerhard

    2010-09-27

    In combinatorial chemistry, molecules are assembled according to combinatorial principles by linking suitable reagents or decorating a given scaffold with appropriate substituents from a large chemical space of starting materials. Often the number of possible combinations greatly exceeds the number feasible to handle by an in-depth in silico approach or even more if it should be experimentally synthesized. Therefore, powerful tools to efficiently enumerate large chemical spaces are required. They can be provided by genetic algorithms, which mimic Darwinian evolution. GARLig (genetic algorithm using reagents to compose ligands) has been developed to perform subset selection in large chemical compound spaces subject to target-specific 3D-scoring criteria. GARLig uses different scoring schemes, such as AutoDock4 Score, GOLDScore, and DrugScore(CSD), as fitness functions. Its genetic parameters have been optimized to characterize combinatorial libraries with respect to the binding to various targets of pharmaceutical interest. A large tripeptide library of 20(3) members has been used to profile amino acid frequencies in putative substrates for trypsin, thrombin, factor Xa, and plasmin. A peptidomimetic scaffold assembled from a selection of a 25(3) building block was used to test the performance of the evolutionary algorithm in suggesting potent inhibitors of the enzyme cathepsin D. In a final case study, our program was used to characterize and rank a combinatorial drug-like library comprising 33,750 potential thrombin inhibitors. These case studies demonstrate that GARLig finds experimentally confirmed potent leads by processing a significantly smaller subset of the fully enumerated combinatorial library. Furthermore, the profiles of amino acids computed by the genetic algorithm match the observed amino acid frequencies found by screening peptide libraries in substrate cleavage assays.

  20. Performance of "look-ahead" linear multistep methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Taketomo

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the initial-value problem of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). LALMM, which stands for "look-ahead" linear multistep methods, is a new class among the discrete variable methods (DVMs) for the problem. Here we refer DVMs to the methods which yield a sequence of approximations yn ≈ y(xn) on the set of points xn+1 = xn + hn (n = 0, 1, 2, …). Along with the look-for value yn+k and the back-values yn, yn+1, …, yn+k-1, we include the look-ahead value yn+k+1 in the stepping mechanism of the method upon the equi-distant step points {xn}. By employing two different linear multistep schemes, we approximate the look-for value with the predictor-corrector iteration. The core issue of numerical analysis of new methods is whether they can perform better than the existing methods. We derived several LALMM schemes of two-step (k = 2) family (LALTM) and examine their performance through test examples of ODEs. We will report their test results by several numerical examples and describe a possible way to overcome their difficulties shown in the examples.

  1. Modeling biology with HDL languages: a first step toward a genetic design automation tool inspired from microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Gendrault, Yves; Madec, Morgan; Lallement, Christophe; Haiech, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, synthetic biology is a hot research topic. Each day, progresses are made to improve the complexity of artificial biological functions in order to tend to complex biodevices and biosystems. Up to now, these systems are handmade by bioengineers, which require strong technical skills and leads to nonreusable development. Besides, scientific fields that share the same design approach, such as microelectronics, have already overcome several issues and designers succeed in building extremely complex systems with many evolved functions. On the other hand, in systems engineering and more specifically in microelectronics, the development of the domain has been promoted by both the improvement of technological processes and electronic design automation tools. The work presented in this paper paves the way for the adaptation of microelectronics design tools to synthetic biology. Considering the similarities and differences between the synthetic biology and microelectronics, the milestones of this adaptation are described. The first one concerns the modeling of biological mechanisms. To do so, a new formalism is proposed, based on an extension of the generalized Kirchhoff laws to biology. This way, a description of all biological mechanisms can be made with languages widely used in microelectronics. Our approach is therefore successfully validated on specific examples drawn from the literature.

  2. Multistep carcinogenesis in the formation of basal cell carcinoma of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Gailani, M.; Leffell, D.; Ziegler, A.

    1994-09-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (BCC) is the most common cancer in humans, a slow growing tumor whose incidence strongly correlates with exposure to UV light. Although the molecular basis of BCC formation is not well understood, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 9q in 70% of BCCs suggests that inactivation of a tumor suppressor on 9q22 is an important early step. UV induced mutations in the p53 gene have also been found in over 50% of sporadic BCCs. We analyzed 18 sporadic BCCs for allelic loss on chromosome 9 and point mutations in the p53 gene and attempted to correlate genetic alteration with pathological subtype and relative UV light exposure. Eight of eighteen tumors (45%) showed LOH on chromosome 9 as well as point mutation of the p53 gene, three of eighteen tumors (17%) showed mutation of the p53 gene without LOH on chromosome 9, five of eighteen tumors (27%) showed LOH for chromosome 9 without evidence of mutation in the p53 gene, and two of eighteen tumors (11%) showed neither LOH on chromosome 9 nor mutation in the p53 gene. Tumor pathology showed no obvious correlation between mutation and tumor aggressiveness. However, one tumor of a unique, aggressive growth subtype had no genetic alteration suggesting a different genetic mechanism in this particular subgroup. 38% of tumors from areas of greatest sun-exposure showed both mutations. The data suggests a strong correlation between inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 9 and mutation in the p53 gene though the sequence of events cannot be determined. Because carcinogenesis is a multistep process and genetic injury from UV light is only one factor, further correlation with degree of tumor differentiation may clarify the genetic process in BCCs.

  3. [Use of artificial neuronal nets in automation of analysis and genetic identification of electrophoretic spectra of gliadin from durum wheat].

    PubMed

    Ruanet, V V; Kudriavtsev, A M; Dadashev, S Ia

    2001-10-01

    Each wheat cultivar has a characteristic spectrum of gliadins. This makes it possible to use blocks of the components of reserve proteins as genetic markers when estimating seed quality. However, identification of the blocks that constitute the electrophoretic spectrum is a complicated task. For this purpose artificial neural network (ANN) technology is proposed. Based on experimental data, a teaching database and testing databases have been created. ANN was shown to be highly efficient (efficiency up to 100%) expert system for deciphering the electrophoretic spectra of gliadins of durum wheat cultivars.

  4. Vitamin B12 transport from food to the body's cells--a sophisticated, multistep pathway.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marianne J; Rasmussen, Mie R; Andersen, Christian B F; Nexø, Ebba; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) (B(12); also known as cobalamin) is a cofactor in many metabolic processes; deficiency of this vitamin is associated with megaloblastic anaemia and various neurological disorders. In contrast to many prokaryotes, humans and other mammals are unable to synthesize B(12). Instead, a sophisticated pathway for specific uptake and transport of this molecule has evolved. Failure in the gastrointestinal part of this pathway is the most common cause of nondietary-induced B(12) deficiency disease. However, although less frequent, defects in cellular processing and further downstream steps in the transport pathway are also known culprits of functional B(12) deficiency. Biochemical and genetic approaches have identified novel proteins in the B(12) transport pathway--now known to involve more than 15 gene products--delineating a coherent pathway for B(12) trafficking from food to the body's cells. Some of these gene products are specifically dedicated to B(12) transport, whereas others embrace additional roles, which explains the heterogeneity in the clinical picture of the many genetic disorders causing B(12) deficiency. This Review describes basic and clinical features of this multistep pathway with emphasis on gastrointestinal transport of B(12) and its importance in clinical medicine.

  5. Cockpit automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1988-01-01

    The aims and methods of aircraft cockpit automation are reviewed from a human-factors perspective. Consideration is given to the mixed pilot reception of increased automation, government concern with the safety and reliability of highly automated aircraft, the formal definition of automation, and the ground-proximity warning system and accidents involving controlled flight into terrain. The factors motivating automation include technology availability; safety; economy, reliability, and maintenance; workload reduction and two-pilot certification; more accurate maneuvering and navigation; display flexibility; economy of cockpit space; and military requirements.

  6. Multi-step pancreatic carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, G H; Tsiotou, A G

    1999-12-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer relates mainly to its delayed diagnosis. It has been repeatedly shown that earlier diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is associated with a better outcome. Molecular diagnostic methods (mainly detection of K-ras mutations in pure pancreatic or duodenal juice, on specimens obtained by percutaneous fine-needle aspirations or in stool specimens) can achieve earlier diagnosis in selected subgroups of patients, such as patients with chronic pancreatitis (especially hereditary), adults with recent onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and patients with some inherited disorders that predispose to the development of pancreatic cancer. There is increasing evidence that pancreatic carcinogenesis is a multi-step phenomenon. Screening procedures for precursor lesions in these selected subgroups of patients may reduce the incidence and mortality from pancreatic cancer.

  7. Multistep prediction of physiological tremor for surgical robotics applications.

    PubMed

    Veluvolu, Kalyana C; Tatinati, Sivanagaraja; Hong, Sun-Mog; Ang, Wei Tech

    2013-11-01

    Accurate canceling of physiological tremor is extremely important in robotics-assisted surgical instruments/procedures. The performance of robotics-based hand-held surgical devices degrades in real time due to the presence of phase delay in sensors (hardware) and filtering (software) processes. Effective tremor compensation requires zero-phase lag in filtering process so that the filtered tremor signal can be used to regenerate an opposing motion in real time. Delay as small as 20 ms degrades the performance of human-machine interference. To overcome this phase delay, we employ multistep prediction in this paper. Combined with the existing tremor estimation methods, the procedure improves the overall accuracy by 60% for tremor estimation compared to single-step prediction methods in the presence of phase delay. Experimental results with developed methods for 1-DOF tremor estimation highlight the improvement.

  8. Controlled multistep synthesis in a three-phase droplet reactor

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Adrian M.; Phillips, Thomas W.; Bannock, James H.; de Mello, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Channel-fouling is a pervasive problem in continuous flow chemistry, causing poor product control and reactor failure. Droplet chemistry, in which the reaction mixture flows as discrete droplets inside an immiscible carrier liquid, prevents fouling by isolating the reaction from the channel walls. Unfortunately, the difficulty of controllably adding new reagents to an existing droplet stream has largely restricted droplet chemistry to simple reactions in which all reagents are supplied at the time of droplet formation. Here we describe an effective method for repeatedly adding controlled quantities of reagents to droplets. The reagents are injected into a multiphase fluid stream, comprising the carrier liquid, droplets of the reaction mixture and an inert gas that maintains a uniform droplet spacing and suppresses new droplet formation. The method, which is suited to many multistep reactions, is applied to a five-stage quantum dot synthesis wherein particle growth is sustained by repeatedly adding fresh feedstock. PMID:24797034

  9. Properties of true quaternary fission of nuclei with allowance for its multistep and sequential character

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Titova, L. V.; Bulychev, A. O.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of basicmechanisms of binary and ternary fission of nuclei led to the conclusion that true ternary and quaternary fission of nuclei has a sequential two-step (three-step) character, where, at the first step, a fissile nucleus emits a third light particle (third and fourth light particles) under shakeup effects associated with a nonadiabatic character of its collective deformation motion, whereupon the residual nucleus undergoes fission to two fission fragments. Owing to this, the formulas derived earlier for the widths with respect to sequential two- and three-step decays of nuclei in constructing the theory of two-step twoproton decays and multistep decays in chains of genetically related nuclei could be used to describe the relative yields and angular and energy distributions of third and fourth light particles emitted in (α, α), (t, t), and (α, t) pairs upon the true quaternary spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and thermal-neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 233}U target nuclei. Mechanisms that explain a sharp decrease in the yield of particles appearing second in time and entering into the composition of light-particle pairs that originate from true quaternary fission of nuclei in relation to the yields of analogous particles in true ternary fission of nuclei are proposed.

  10. Properties of true quaternary fission of nuclei with allowance for its multistep and sequential character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Titova, L. V.; Bulychev, A. O.

    2015-07-01

    An analysis of basicmechanisms of binary and ternary fission of nuclei led to the conclusion that true ternary and quaternary fission of nuclei has a sequential two-step (three-step) character, where, at the first step, a fissile nucleus emits a third light particle (third and fourth light particles) under shakeup effects associated with a nonadiabatic character of its collective deformation motion, whereupon the residual nucleus undergoes fission to two fission fragments. Owing to this, the formulas derived earlier for the widths with respect to sequential two- and three-step decays of nuclei in constructing the theory of two-step twoproton decays and multistep decays in chains of genetically related nuclei could be used to describe the relative yields and angular and energy distributions of third and fourth light particles emitted in ( α, α), ( t, t), and ( α, t) pairs upon the true quaternary spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 233U target nuclei. Mechanisms that explain a sharp decrease in the yield of particles appearing second in time and entering into the composition of light-particle pairs that originate from true quaternary fission of nuclei in relation to the yields of analogous particles in true ternary fission of nuclei are proposed.

  11. Space station automation study: Automation requirements derived from space manufacturing concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The electroepitaxial process and the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits (chips) facilities were chosen because each requires a very high degree of automation, and therefore involved extensive use of teleoperators, robotics, process mechanization, and artificial intelligence. Both cover a raw materials process and a sophisticated multi-step process and are therfore highly representative of the kinds of difficult operation, maintenance, and repair challenges which can be expected for any type of space manufacturing facility. Generic areas were identified which will require significant further study. The initial design will be based on terrestrial state-of-the-art hard automation. One hundred candidate missions were evaluated on the basis of automation portential and availability of meaning ful knowldege. The design requirements and unconstrained design concepts developed for the two missions are presented.

  12. Solvent recyclability in a multistep direct liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Direct liquefaction research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has, for a number of years, concentrated on developing a direct liquefaction process specifically for low-rank coals (LRCs) through the use of hydrogen-donating solvents and solvents similar to coal-derived liquids, the water/gas shift reaction, and lower-severity reaction conditions. The underlying assumption of all of the research was that advantage could be taken of the reactivity and specific qualities of LRCs to produce a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble material that might be easier to upgrade than the soluble residuum produced during direct liquefaction of high-rank coals. A multistep approach was taken to produce the THF-soluble material, consisting of (1) preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, (2) solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and (3) polishing to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrotreatment step. The results of the EERC`s research indicated that additional studies to develop this process more fully were justified. Two areas were targeted for further research: (1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and (2) determination of the minimum severity required for hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The current project was funded to investigate these two areas.

  13. A Multistep Chaotic Model for Municipal Solid Waste Generation Prediction.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingwei; He, Jiaying

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a univariate local chaotic model is proposed to make one-step and multistep forecasts for daily municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in Seattle, Washington. For MSW generation prediction with long history data, this forecasting model was created based on a nonlinear dynamic method called phase-space reconstruction. Compared with other nonlinear predictive models, such as artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square-support vector machine (PLS-SVM), and a commonly used linear seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (sARIMA) model, this method has demonstrated better prediction accuracy from 1-step ahead prediction to 14-step ahead prediction assessed by both mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and root mean square error (RMSE). Max error, MAPE, and RMSE show that chaotic models were more reliable than the other three models. As chaotic models do not involve random walk, their performance does not vary while ANN and PLS-SVM make different forecasts in each trial. Moreover, this chaotic model was less time consuming than ANN and PLS-SVM models.

  14. Statistical properties of multistep enzyme-mediated reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; De Ronde, Wiet H; Daniels, Bryan C; Mugler, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated reactions may proceed through multiple intermediate conformational states before creating a final product molecule, and one often wishes to identify such intermediate structures from observations of the product creation. In this paper, we address this problem by solving the chemical master equations for various enzymatic reactions. We devise a perturbation theory analogous to that used in quantum mechanics that allows us to determine the first () and the second (variance) cumulants of the distribution of created product molecules as a function of the substrate concentration and the kinetic rates of the intermediate processes. The mean product flux V=d/dt (or 'dose-response' curve) and the Fano factor F=variance/ are both realistically measurable quantities, and while the mean flux can often appear the same for different reaction types, the Fano factor can be quite different. This suggests both qualitative and quantitative ways to discriminate between different reaction schemes, and we explore this possibility in the context of four sample multistep enzymatic reactions. We argue that measuring both the mean flux and the Fano factor can not only discriminate between reaction types, but can also provide some detailed information about the internal, unobserved kinetic rates, and this can be done without measuring single-molecule transition events.

  15. Expression of TFF3 during multistep colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    John, R; El-Rouby, N M; Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C; Karam, S M

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is not well understood. This common type of cancer is generally believed to occur in a multistep process which involves alterations of various tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes during the progression through benign lesions towards carcinoma. TFF3 is a product of the colonic epithelium and has been implicated in colonic mucosal protection and also in the aggressiveness of colon cancer cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of TFF3 during propagation towards cancer development in the human colon. Colonic tissues representing colitis, adenomatous polyposis, tubulovillous adenoma, and mucoid/adeno-carcinomas were processed for immunohistochemistry using an antibody specific for human TFF3. The results were correlated with those of PCNA-labeling, quantified, and compared with those of control tissues obtained from the safe margin of macroscopically normal colonic mucosa of patients with colon cancer. The data showed marked down-regulation of TFF3 expression in adenomatous polyposis, then TFF3 expression returns to about control level during adenoma and remains high during mucoid- and adeno-carcinomas. Colonic tissues with highly invasive cancer cells were characterized by statistically significant down-regulation of TFF3 expression. The changes observed in expression of TFF3 showed an inverse correlation with cell proliferation and suggest that it might play a protective role against colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Blastocyst microinjection automation.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Leonardo S; Grant, Edward; Thresher, Randy; Kluckman, Kimberly

    2009-09-01

    Blastocyst microinjections are routinely involved in the process of creating genetically modified mice for biomedical research, but their efficiency is highly dependent on the skills of the operators. As a consequence, much time and resources are required for training microinjection personnel. This situation has been aggravated by the rapid growth of genetic research, which has increased the demand for mutant animals. Therefore, increased productivity and efficiency in this area are highly desired. Here, we pursue these goals through the automation of a previously developed teleoperated blastocyst microinjection system. This included the design of a new system setup to facilitate automation, the definition of rules for automatic microinjections, the implementation of video processing algorithms to extract feedback information from microscope images, and the creation of control algorithms for process automation. Experimentation conducted with this new system and operator assistance during the cells delivery phase demonstrated a 75% microinjection success rate. In addition, implantation of the successfully injected blastocysts resulted in a 53% birth rate and a 20% yield of chimeras. These results proved that the developed system was capable of automatic blastocyst penetration and retraction, demonstrating the success of major steps toward full process automation.

  17. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  18. Stability with large step sizes for multistep discretizations of stiff ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majda, George

    1986-01-01

    One-leg and multistep discretizations of variable-coefficient linear systems of ODEs having both slow and fast time scales are investigated analytically. The stability properties of these discretizations are obtained independent of ODE stiffness and compared. The results of numerical computations are presented in tables, and it is shown that for large step sizes the stability of one-leg methods is better than that of the corresponding linear multistep methods.

  19. Process automation

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs.

  20. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  1. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  2. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-08-24

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models.

  3. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  4. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  5. Contributions of dopamine-related genes and environmental factors to highly sensitive personality: a multi-step neuronal system-level approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Chuansheng; Moyzis, Robert; Stern, Hal; He, Qinghua; Li, He; Li, Jin; Zhu, Bi; Dong, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Traditional behavioral genetic studies (e.g., twin, adoption studies) have shown that human personality has moderate to high heritability, but recent molecular behavioral genetic studies have failed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) with consistent effects. The current study adopted a multi-step approach (ANOVA followed by multiple regression and permutation) to assess the cumulative effects of multiple QTLs. Using a system-level (dopamine system) genetic approach, we investigated a personality trait deeply rooted in the nervous system (the Highly Sensitive Personality, HSP). 480 healthy Chinese college students were given the HSP scale and genotyped for 98 representative polymorphisms in all major dopamine neurotransmitter genes. In addition, two environment factors (stressful life events and parental warmth) that have been implicated for their contributions to personality development were included to investigate their relative contributions as compared to genetic factors. In Step 1, using ANOVA, we identified 10 polymorphisms that made statistically significant contributions to HSP. In Step 2, these polymorphism's main effects and interactions were assessed using multiple regression. This model accounted for 15% of the variance of HSP (p<0.001). Recent stressful life events accounted for an additional 2% of the variance. Finally, permutation analyses ascertained the probability of obtaining these findings by chance to be very low, p ranging from 0.001 to 0.006. Dividing these loci by the subsystems of dopamine synthesis, degradation/transport, receptor and modulation, we found that the modulation and receptor subsystems made the most significant contribution to HSP. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of a multi-step neuronal system-level approach in assessing genetic contributions to individual differences in human behavior. It can potentially bridge the gap between the high heritability estimates based on traditional behavioral genetics

  6. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  7. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  8. Modeling the Auto-Ignition of Biodiesel Blends with a Multi-Step Model

    SciTech Connect

    Toulson, Dr. Elisa; Allen, Casey M; Miller, Dennis J; McFarlane, Joanna; Schock, Harold; Lee, Tonghun

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in using biodiesel in place of or in blends with petrodiesel in diesel engines; however, biodiesel oxidation chemistry is complicated to directly model and existing surrogate kinetic models are very large, making them computationally expensive. The present study describes a method for predicting the ignition behavior of blends of n-heptane and methyl butanoate, fuels whose blends have been used in the past as a surrogate for biodiesel. The autoignition is predicted using a multistep (8-step) model in order to reduce computational time and make this a viable tool for implementation into engine simulation codes. A detailed reaction mechanism for n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends was used as a basis for validating the multistep model results. The ignition delay trends predicted by the multistep model for the n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends matched well with that of the detailed CHEMKIN model for the majority of conditions tested.

  9. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  10. Automated dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.M.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1989-04-06

    An automated dispenser having a conventional pipette attached to an actuating cylinder through a flexible cable for delivering precise quantities of a liquid through commands from remotely located computer software. The travel of the flexible cable is controlled by adjustable stops and a locking shaft. The pipette can be positioned manually or by the hands of a robot. 1 fig.

  11. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  12. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  13. High-Temperature Boc Deprotection in Flow and Its Application in Multistep Reaction Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Andrew R; Charaschanya, Manwika; Dombrowski, Amanda W; Wang, Ying; Djuric, Stevan W

    2016-04-15

    A simplified Boc deprotection using a high-temperature flow reactor is described. The system afforded the qualitative yield of a wide variety of deprotected substrates within minutes using acetonitrile as the solvent and without the use of acidic conditions or additional workups. Highly efficient, multistep reaction sequences in flow are also demonstrated wherein no extraction or isolation was required between steps.

  14. Second derivative multistep method for solving first-order ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Mohammed Yousif; Ismail, Fudziah; Senu, Norazak; Ibrahim, Zarina Bibi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new second derivative multistep method was constructed to solve first order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In particular, we used the new method as a corrector method and 5-steps Adam's Bashforth method as a predictor method to solve first order (ODEs). Numerical results were compared with the existing methods which clearly showed the efficiency of the new method.

  15. Multistep Synthesis of a Terphenyl Derivative Showcasing the Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Elizabeth A. Colby

    2015-01-01

    An adaptable multistep synthesis project designed for the culmination of a second-year organic chemistry laboratory course is described. The target compound is a terphenyl derivative that is an intermediate in the synthesis of compounds used in organic light-emitting devices. Students react a conjugated diene with dimethylacetylene dicarboxylate…

  16. Controlled growth of silica-titania hybrid functional nanoparticles through a multistep microfluidic approach.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Sugiyama, T; Takei, T; Yoshikawa, G

    2015-11-11

    Silica/titania-based functional nanoparticles were prepared through controlled nucleation of titania and subsequent encapsulation by silica through a multistep microfluidic approach, which was successfully applied to obtaining aminopropyl-functionalized silica/titania nanoparticles for a highly sensitive humidity sensor.

  17. A Multistep Synthesis Incorporating a Green Bromination of an Aromatic Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Pascal; Greer, Brandon; Luong, Horace; Tyagunova, Yevgeniya

    2012-01-01

    Electrophilic aromatic substitution is a fundamental topic taught in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum. A multistep synthesis that includes a safer and greener method for the bromination of an aromatic ring than traditional bromination methods is described. This experiment is multifaceted and can be used to teach students about…

  18. Attention and Multistep Problem Solving in 24-Month-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrico, Renee L.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the role of increased attentional load in 24 month-old children's multistep problem-solving behavior. Children solved an object-based nonspatial working-memory search task, to which a motor component of varying difficulty was added. Significant disruptions in search performance were observed with the introduction of…

  19. Two-dimensional Paper‡ Networks: programmable fluidic disconnects for multi-step processes in shaped paper

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Philip; Ball, Cameron; Fu, Elain; Yager, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most laboratory assays take advantage of multi-step protocols to achieve high performance, but conventional paper-based tests (e.g., lateral flow tests) are generally limited to assays that can be carried out in a single fluidic step. We have developed two-dimensional paper networks (2DPNs) that use materials from lateral flow tests but reconfigure them to enable programming of multi-step reagent delivery sequences. The 2DPN uses multiple converging fluid inlets to control the arrival time of each fluid to a detection zone or reaction zone, and it requires a method to disconnect each fluid source in a corresponding timed sequence. Here, we present a method that allows programmed disconnection of fluid sources required for multi-step delivery. A 2DPN with legs of different lengths is inserted into a shared buffer well, and the dropping fluid surface disconnects each leg at in a programmable sequence. This approach could enable multi-step laboratory assays to be converted into simple point-of-care devices that have high performance yet remain easy to use. PMID:22037591

  20. Mechanical and Metallurgical Evolution of Stainless Steel 321 in a Multi-step Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M.; Bridier, F.; Gholipour, J.; Jahazi, M.; Wanjara, P.; Bocher, P.; Savoie, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the metallurgical evolution of AISI Stainless Steel 321 (SS 321) during multi-step forming, a process that involves cycles of deformation with intermediate heat treatment steps. The multi-step forming process was simulated by implementing interrupted uniaxial tensile testing experiments. Evolution of the mechanical properties as well as the microstructural features, such as twins and textures of the austenite and martensite phases, was studied as a function of the multi-step forming process. The characteristics of the Strain-Induced Martensite (SIM) were also documented for each deformation step and intermediate stress relief heat treatment. The results indicated that the intermediate heat treatments considerably increased the formability of SS 321. Texture analysis showed that the effect of the intermediate heat treatment on the austenite was minor and led to partial recrystallization, while deformation was observed to reinforce the crystallographic texture of austenite. For the SIM, an Olson-Cohen equation type was identified to analytically predict its formation during the multi-step forming process. The generated SIM was textured and weakened with increasing deformation.

  1. Use of Chiral Oxazolidinones for a Multi-Step Synthetic Laboratory Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betush, Matthew P.; Murphree, S. Shaun

    2009-01-01

    Chiral oxazolidinone chemistry is used as a framework for an advanced multi-step synthesis lab. The cost-effective and robust preparation of chiral starting materials is presented, as well as the use of chiral auxiliaries in a synthesis scheme that is appropriate for students currently in the second semester of the organic sequence. (Contains 1…

  2. A Multistep Synthesis Featuring Classic Carbonyl Chemistry for the Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, David B.; Abbe, Tyler G.; Goess, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 5-isopropyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione is carried out from three commodity chemicals. The sequence involves an aldol condensation, Dieckmann-type annulation, ester hydrolysis, and decarboxylation. No purification is required until after the final step, at which point gravity column chromatography provides the desired product in…

  3. Automated rapid iterative negative geotaxis assay and its use in a genetic screen for modifiers of Aβ(42)-induced locomotor decline in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Han, Meng; Li, Qingyi; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Wen-An; Huang, Fu-De

    2015-10-01

    The negative-geotaxis climbing assay is used to efficiently study aging and neurodegeneration in Drosophila. To make it suitable for large-scale study, a method called the rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay has been established by simultaneously photographing the climbing of multiple groups of flies when they are manually tapped down in test tubes. Here, we automated the assay by using a well-controlled electric motor to drive the tapping, and a homemade program to analyze the climbing height of flies. Using the automated RING (aRING) assay, we found that the climbing ability of a strain of wild-type flies, males in particular, declined rapidly before day 21 after eclosion, but slowly from day 21 to 35. We also found that the expression of arctic mutant Aβ42 accelerated the age-dependent decline in the climbing ability of flies. Moreover, using aRING, we examined the effect of third chromosome deficiencies on the accelerated locomotor decline in Aβ42-expressing flies, and isolated 7 suppressors and 15 enhancers. PMID:26077703

  4. Automated lithocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englisch, Andreas; Deuter, Armin

    1990-06-01

    Integration and automation have gained more and more ground in modern IC-manufacturing. It is difficult to make a direct calculation of the profit these investments yield. On the other hand, the demands to man, machine and technology have increased enormously of late; it is not difficult to see that only by means of integration and automation can these demands be coped with. Here are some salient points: U the complexity and costs incurred by the equipment and processes have got significantly higher . owing to the reduction of all dimensions, the tolerances within which the various process steps have to be carried out have got smaller and smaller and the adherence to these tolerances more and more difficult U the cycle time has become more and more important both for the development and control of new processes and, to a great extent, for a rapid and reliable supply to the customer. In order that the products be competitive under these conditions, all sort of costs have to be reduced and the yield has to be maximized. Therefore, the computer-aided control of the equipment and the process combined with an automatic data collection and a real-time SPC (statistical process control) has become absolutely necessary for successful IC-manufacturing. Human errors must be eliminated from the execution of the various process steps by automation. The work time set free in this way makes it possible for the human creativity to be employed on a larger scale in stabilizing the processes. Besides, a computer-aided equipment control can ensure the optimal utilization of the equipment round the clock.

  5. Production of the cannibalism toxin SDP is a multistep process that requires SdpA and SdpB.

    PubMed

    Pérez Morales, Tiara G; Ho, Theresa D; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2013-07-01

    During the early stages of sporulation, a subpopulation of Bacillus subtilis cells secrete toxins that kill their genetically identical siblings in a process termed cannibalism. One of these toxins is encoded by the sdpC gene of the sdpABC operon. The active form of the SDP toxin is a 42-amino-acid peptide with a disulfide bond which is processed from an internal fragment of pro-SdpC. The factors required for the processing of pro-SdpC into mature SDP are not known. We provide evidence that pro-SdpC is secreted via the general secretory pathway and that signal peptide cleavage is a required step in the production of SDP. We also demonstrate that SdpAB are essential to produce mature SDP, which has toxin activity. Our data indicate that SdpAB are not required for secretion, translation, or stability of SdpC. Thus, SdpAB may participate in a posttranslation step in the production of SDP. The mature form of the SDP toxin contains a disulfide bond. Our data indicate that while the disulfide bond does increase activity of SDP, it is not essential for SDP activity. We demonstrate that the disulfide bond is formed independently of SdpAB. Taken together, our data suggest that SDP production is a multistep process and that SdpAB are required for SDP production likely by controlling, directly or indirectly, cleavage of SDP from the pro-SdpC precursor. PMID:23687264

  6. Automated Sampling Procedures Supported by High Persistence of Bacterial Fecal Indicators and Bacteroidetes Genetic Microbial Source Tracking Markers in Municipal Wastewater during Short-Term Storage at 5°C.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R E; Vierheilig, J; Egle, L; Reischer, G H; Saracevic, E; Mach, R L; Kirschner, A K T; Zessner, M; Sommer, R; Farnleitner, A H

    2015-08-01

    Because of high diurnal water quality fluctuations in raw municipal wastewater, the use of proportional autosampling over a period of 24 h at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to evaluate carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal has become a standard in many countries. Microbial removal or load estimation at municipal WWTPs, however, is still based on manually recovered grab samples. The goal of this study was to establish basic knowledge regarding the persistence of standard bacterial fecal indicators and Bacteroidetes genetic microbial source tracking markers in municipal wastewater in order to evaluate their suitability for automated sampling, as the potential lack of persistence is the main argument against such procedures. Raw and secondary treated wastewater of municipal origin from representative and well-characterized biological WWTPs without disinfection (organic carbon and nutrient removal) was investigated in microcosm experiments at 5 and 21°C with a total storage time of 32 h (including a 24-h autosampling component and an 8-h postsampling phase). Vegetative Escherichia coli and enterococci, as well as Clostridium perfringens spores, were selected as indicators for cultivation-based standard enumeration. Molecular analysis focused on total (AllBac) and human-associated genetic Bacteroidetes (BacHum-UCD, HF183 TaqMan) markers by using quantitative PCR, as well as 16S rRNA gene-based next-generation sequencing. The microbial parameters showed high persistence in both raw and treated wastewater at 5°C under the storage conditions used. Surprisingly, and in contrast to results obtained with treated wastewater, persistence of the microbial markers in raw wastewater was also high at 21°C. On the basis of our results, 24-h autosampling procedures with 5°C storage conditions can be recommended for the investigation of fecal indicators or Bacteroidetes genetic markers at municipal WWTPs. Such autosampling procedures will contribute to better

  7. Automated Sampling Procedures Supported by High Persistence of Bacterial Fecal Indicators and Bacteroidetes Genetic Microbial Source Tracking Markers in Municipal Wastewater during Short-Term Storage at 5°C

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, R. E.; Vierheilig, J.; Egle, L.; Reischer, G. H.; Saracevic, E.; Mach, R. L.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Zessner, M.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Because of high diurnal water quality fluctuations in raw municipal wastewater, the use of proportional autosampling over a period of 24 h at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to evaluate carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal has become a standard in many countries. Microbial removal or load estimation at municipal WWTPs, however, is still based on manually recovered grab samples. The goal of this study was to establish basic knowledge regarding the persistence of standard bacterial fecal indicators and Bacteroidetes genetic microbial source tracking markers in municipal wastewater in order to evaluate their suitability for automated sampling, as the potential lack of persistence is the main argument against such procedures. Raw and secondary treated wastewater of municipal origin from representative and well-characterized biological WWTPs without disinfection (organic carbon and nutrient removal) was investigated in microcosm experiments at 5 and 21°C with a total storage time of 32 h (including a 24-h autosampling component and an 8-h postsampling phase). Vegetative Escherichia coli and enterococci, as well as Clostridium perfringens spores, were selected as indicators for cultivation-based standard enumeration. Molecular analysis focused on total (AllBac) and human-associated genetic Bacteroidetes (BacHum-UCD, HF183 TaqMan) markers by using quantitative PCR, as well as 16S rRNA gene-based next-generation sequencing. The microbial parameters showed high persistence in both raw and treated wastewater at 5°C under the storage conditions used. Surprisingly, and in contrast to results obtained with treated wastewater, persistence of the microbial markers in raw wastewater was also high at 21°C. On the basis of our results, 24-h autosampling procedures with 5°C storage conditions can be recommended for the investigation of fecal indicators or Bacteroidetes genetic markers at municipal WWTPs. Such autosampling procedures will contribute to better

  8. Multistep impregnation method for incorporation of high amount of titania into SBA-15

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Song Mo . E-mail: m.song@lboro.ac.uk

    2006-02-02

    A multistep impregnation method was employed to incorporate high amount of titania into the mesoporous SBA-15 silica. No damage to the SBA-15 silica mesostructures was caused by the loading of titania in every cycle. The existence of titania small nanodomains were confirmed to be present by Raman spectra and UV-vis DRS measurements. High dispersion of them was realized via this method according to the results of low-angle X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption measurements. Importantly, no blockage of mesostructures was acknowledged with titania content up to 24.4 wt.%. In comparison, normally used one-step impregnation method led to serious blockage of mesopores as the results of formation of bulk titania particles in the mesochannels. Photo-activity test for the removal of oestrogen showed the superiority of the materials synthesized by multistep impregnation method to one-step impregnation method.

  9. The discrepancies in multistep damage evolution of yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tengfei; Taylor, Caitlin A.; Kong, Shuyan; Wang, Chenxu; Zhang, Yanwen; Huang, Xuejun; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive investigation of structural damage in yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions over a wide fluence range. A similar multistep damage accumulation exists for the irradiations of different ions, but the critical doses for occurrence of second damage step, characterized by a faster increase in damage fraction, and the maximum elastic strain at the first damage step are varied and depend on ion mass. For irradiations of heavier ions, the second damage step occurs at a higher dose with a lower critical elastic strain. Furthermore, larger extended defects were observed in the irradiations of heavy ions at the second damage step. Associated with other experiment results and multistep damage accumulation model, the distinct discrepancies in the damage buildup under irradiations of different ions were interpreted by the effects of electronic excitation, energy of primary knock-on atom and chemistry contributions of deposited ions.

  10. Teaching multi-step math skills to adults with disabilities via video prompting.

    PubMed

    Kellems, Ryan O; Frandsen, Kaitlyn; Hansen, Blake; Gabrielsen, Terisa; Clarke, Brynn; Simons, Kalee; Clements, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching multi-step math skills to nine adults with disabilities in an 18-21 post-high school transition program using a video prompting intervention package. The dependent variable was the percentage of steps completed correctly. The independent variable was the video prompting intervention, which involved several multi-step math calculation skills: (a) calculating a tip (15%), (b) calculating item unit prices, and (c) adjusting a recipe for more or fewer people. Results indicated a functional relationship between the video prompting interventions and prompting package and the percentage of steps completed correctly. 8 out of the 9 adults showed significant gains immediately after receiving the video prompting intervention. PMID:27589151

  11. Region-based multi-step optic disk and cup segmentation from color fundus image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Lock, Jane; Manresa, Javier Moreno; Vignarajan, Janardhan; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogesan

    2013-02-01

    Retinal optic cup-disk-ratio (CDR) is a one of important indicators of glaucomatous neuropathy. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-step 4-quadrant thresholding method for optic disk segmentation and a multi-step temporal-nasal segmenting method for optic cup segmentation based on blood vessel inpainted HSL lightness images and green images. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on a group of color fundus images and compared with the manual outlining results from two experts. Dice scores of detected disk and cup regions between the auto and manual results were computed and compared. Vertical CDRs were also compared among the three results. The preliminary experiment has demonstrated the robustness of the method for automatic optic disk and cup segmentation and its potential value for clinical application.

  12. Optimal generalized multistep integration formulae for real-time digital simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, D. D.; Halyo, N.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of discretizing a dynamical system for real-time digital simulation is considered. Treating the system and its simulation as stochastic processes leads to a statistical characterization of simulator fidelity. A plant discretization procedure based on an efficient matrix generalization of explicit linear multistep discrete integration formulae is introduced, which minimizes a weighted sum of the mean squared steady-state and transient error between the system and simulator outputs.

  13. Multi-Step Deep Reactive Ion Etching Fabrication Process for Silicon-Based Terahertz Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile (Inventor); Reck, Theodore (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Perez, Jose Vicente Siles (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Peralta, Alejandro (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-step silicon etching process has been developed to fabricate silicon-based terahertz (THz) waveguide components. This technique provides precise dimensional control across multiple etch depths with batch processing capabilities. Nonlinear and passive components such as mixers and multipliers waveguides, hybrids, OMTs and twists have been fabricated and integrated into a small silicon package. This fabrication technique enables a wafer-stacking architecture to provide ultra-compact multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the THz range.

  14. Metabolome-scale prediction of intermediate compounds in multistep metabolic pathways with a recursive supervised approach

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Masaaki; Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Muto, Ai; Moriya, Yuki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Goto, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolic pathway analysis is crucial not only in metabolic engineering but also in rational drug design. However, the biosynthetic/biodegradation pathways are known only for a small portion of metabolites, and a vast amount of pathways remain uncharacterized. Therefore, an important challenge in metabolomics is the de novo reconstruction of potential reaction networks on a metabolome-scale. Results: In this article, we develop a novel method to predict the multistep reaction sequences for de novo reconstruction of metabolic pathways in the reaction-filling framework. We propose a supervised approach to learn what we refer to as ‘multistep reaction sequence likeness’, i.e. whether a compound–compound pair is possibly converted to each other by a sequence of enzymatic reactions. In the algorithm, we propose a recursive procedure of using step-specific classifiers to predict the intermediate compounds in the multistep reaction sequences, based on chemical substructure fingerprints/descriptors of compounds. We further demonstrate the usefulness of our proposed method on the prediction of enzymatic reaction networks from a metabolome-scale compound set and discuss characteristic features of the extracted chemical substructure transformation patterns in multistep reaction sequences. Our comprehensively predicted reaction networks help to fill the metabolic gap and to infer new reaction sequences in metabolic pathways. Availability and implementation: Materials are available for free at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/kot/ismb2014/ Contact: goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931980

  15. Evidence for the multistep nature of in vitro human epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rhim, J.S.; Yoo, J.H.; Park, J.H.; Thraves, P.; Salehi, Z.; Dritschilo, A. )

    1990-09-01

    In keeping with the multistep development of human cancer in vivo, a stepwise approach to neoplastic transformation in vitro presents a reasonable strategy. We have recently developed an in vitro multistep model suitable for the study of human epithelial cell carcinogenesis. Upon infection with the adenovirus 12-simian virus 40 hybrid virus, primary human epidermal keratinocytes acquired an indefinite life span in culture but did not undergo malignant conversion. Subsequent addition of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus and human ras oncogene or chemical carcinogens (N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide) to these cells induced morphological alterations and the acquisition of neoplastic properties. Subsequently it was found that this line could be transformed neoplastically by a variety of retrovirus-containing H-ras, bas, fes, fms, erbB, and src oncogenes. In addition, we found that the immortalized human epidermal keratinocyte (RHEK-1) line can be transformed neoplastically by exposure to ionizing radiation. Thus, this in vitro system may be useful in studying the interaction of a variety of carcinogenic agents and human epithelial cells. These findings demonstrate the malignant transformation of human primary epithelial cells in culture by the combined action of viruses, oncogenes, chemical carcinogens, or X-ray irradiation and support a multistep process for neoplastic conversion.

  16. Photon Production through Multi-step Processes Important in Nuclear Fluorescence Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Pruet, J

    2006-10-26

    The authors present calculations describing the production of photons through multi-step processes occurring when a beam of gamma rays interacts with a macroscopic material. These processes involve the creation of energetic electrons through Compton scattering, photo-absorption and pair production, the subsequent scattering of these electrons, and the creation of energetic photons occurring as these electrons are slowed through Bremsstrahlung emission. Unlike single Compton collisions, during which an energetic photon that is scattered through a large angle loses most of its energy, these multi-step processes result in a sizable flux of energetic photons traveling at large angles relative to an incident photon beam. These multi-step processes are also a key background in experiments that measure nuclear resonance fluorescence by shining photons on a thin foil and observing the spectrum of back-scattered photons. Effective cross sections describing the production of backscattered photons are presented in a tabular form that allows simple estimates of backgrounds expected in a variety of experiments. Incident photons with energies between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV are considered. These calculations of effective cross sections may be useful for those designing NRF experiments or systems that detect specific isotopes in well-shielded environments through observation of resonance fluorescence.

  17. Multistep-Ahead Air Passengers Traffic Prediction with Hybrid ARIMA-SVMs Models

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Wei; Xiong, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid ARIMA-SVMs prediction models have been established recently, which take advantage of the unique strength of ARIMA and SVMs models in linear and nonlinear modeling, respectively. Built upon this hybrid ARIMA-SVMs models alike, this study goes further to extend them into the case of multistep-ahead prediction for air passengers traffic with the two most commonly used multistep-ahead prediction strategies, that is, iterated strategy and direct strategy. Additionally, the effectiveness of data preprocessing approaches, such as deseasonalization and detrending, is investigated and proofed along with the two strategies. Real data sets including four selected airlines' monthly series were collected to justify the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Empirical results demonstrate that the direct strategy performs better than iterative one in long term prediction case while iterative one performs better in the case of short term prediction. Furthermore, both deseasonalization and detrending can significantly improve the prediction accuracy for both strategies, indicating the necessity of data preprocessing. As such, this study contributes as a full reference to the planners from air transportation industries on how to tackle multistep-ahead prediction tasks in the implementation of either prediction strategy. PMID:24723814

  18. Estimating unique soil hydraulic parameters for sandy media from multi-step outflow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il Hwang, Sang; Powers, Susan E.

    Estimating unique soil hydraulic parameters is required to provide input for numerical models simulating transient water flow in the vadose zone. In this paper, we analyze the capability of six soil hydraulic functions to provide unique parameter sets for sandy soils from multi-step outflow data. Initial parameter estimates and experimental boundary conditions were explored to determine their affect on the uniqueness of soil hydraulic functions. Of the hydraulic functions tested, the lognormal distribution-Mualem (LDM) function provided the best performance and a unique solution for error-free numerically generated multi-step outflow data. For experimental multi-step outflow data with inherent measurement errors, the LDM function again showed better performance and uniqueness than the van Genuchten-Mualem and Gardner-Mualem functions. In experiments with different boundary conditions, the LDM function provided the best fitting ability, resulting in unique parameter sets when the intrinsic permeability ( k) was fixed at its measured value. The experiment that had a greater number of pneumatic pressure steps, thereby causing a lower flow rate, provided better fitting ability and more unique solutions than faster experiments.

  19. Contaminant source and release history identification in groundwater: a multi-step approach.

    PubMed

    Gzyl, G; Zanini, A; Frączek, R; Kura, K

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents a new multi-step approach aiming at source identification and release history estimation. The new approach consists of three steps: performing integral pumping tests, identifying sources, and recovering the release history by means of a geostatistical approach. The present paper shows the results obtained from the application of the approach within a complex case study in Poland in which several areal sources were identified. The investigated site is situated in the vicinity of a former chemical plant in southern Poland in the city of Jaworzno in the valley of the Wąwolnica River; the plant has been in operation since the First World War producing various chemicals. From an environmental point of view the most relevant activity was the production of pesticides, especially lindane. The application of the multi-step approach enabled a significant increase in the knowledge of contamination at the site. Some suspected contamination sources have been proven to have minor effect on the overall contamination. Other suspected sources have been proven to have key significance. Some areas not taken into consideration previously have now been identified as key sources. The method also enabled estimation of the magnitude of the sources and, a list of the priority reclamation actions will be drawn as a result. The multi-step approach has proven to be effective and may be applied to other complicated contamination cases. Moreover, the paper shows the capability of the geostatistical approach to manage a complex real case study.

  20. Contaminant source and release history identification in groundwater: A multi-step approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gzyl, G.; Zanini, A.; Frączek, R.; Kura, K.

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents a new multi-step approach aiming at source identification and release history estimation. The new approach consists of three steps: performing integral pumping tests, identifying sources, and recovering the release history by means of a geostatistical approach. The present paper shows the results obtained from the application of the approach within a complex case study in Poland in which several areal sources were identified. The investigated site is situated in the vicinity of a former chemical plant in southern Poland in the city of Jaworzno in the valley of the Wąwolnica River; the plant has been in operation since the First World War producing various chemicals. From an environmental point of view the most relevant activity was the production of pesticides, especially lindane. The application of the multi-step approach enabled a significant increase in the knowledge of contamination at the site. Some suspected contamination sources have been proven to have minor effect on the overall contamination. Other suspected sources have been proven to have key significance. Some areas not taken into consideration previously have now been identified as key sources. The method also enabled estimation of the magnitude of the sources and, a list of the priority reclamation actions will be drawn as a result. The multi-step approach has proven to be effective and may be applied to other complicated contamination cases. Moreover, the paper shows the capability of the geostatistical approach to manage a complex real case study.

  1. [Study on the identification of ganoderma by multi-steps infrared macro-fingerprint method].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-kang; Huang, Dong-lan; Sun, Su-qin; Cao, Jia-jia; Wang, Shao-ling

    2010-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, ganoderma atrum, ganderma tsugae Murr. and ganoderma lipsiense can be discriminated and identified by using multi-steps infrared macro-fingerprint method. The 1D-1R spectra, based on the peaks intensity at 1153 and 1078 cm(-1), which are the fingerprint characteristic peaks of glucoside compounds, show that the content of glucoside compounds of them was in the order of: ganoderma lucidum>ganoderma atrum>ganderma tsugae Murr. >ganoderma lipsiense. Generally, the second derivative IR spectra can clearly enhance the spectra resolution. In the range of 1600-1720 cm(-1), the position and sharpness of characteristics peaks were very different, and it's proved that amino acid peptide compounds of them were different. In the 2D-IR spectra, four of them have the same autopeak at 1100 cm(-1), which is the autopeaks of glucoside, but the number of autopeaks of ganoderma lucidum was 4 and its strongest autopeak was 1040 cm(-1), while 5 autopeaks, 4 autopeaks and 5 autopeaks were for ganoderma atrum, ganderma tsugae Murr. and ganoderma lipsiense respectively, and their strongest autopeaks were 1040, 1139, 1140 and 1134 cm(-1) respectively. The multi-steps infrared maro-fingerprint identification testified that the contents of glucoside compounds and amino acid peptide compounds in these four kinds of ganoderma are different. It's proved that multi-steps infrared maro-fingerprint method can be used to analyze and distinguish ganoderma lucidum, ganoderma atrum, ganderma tsugae Murr. and ganoderma lipsiense.

  2. Protein fabrication automation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. Colin; Lape, Janel; Sayed, Mahmood A.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2007-01-01

    Facile “writing” of DNA fragments that encode entire gene sequences potentially has widespread applications in biological analysis and engineering. Rapid writing of open reading frames (ORFs) for expressed proteins could transform protein engineering and production for protein design, synthetic biology, and structural analysis. Here we present a process, protein fabrication automation (PFA), which facilitates the rapid de novo construction of any desired ORF from oligonucleotides with low effort, high speed, and little human interaction. PFA comprises software for sequence design, data management, and the generation of instruction sets for liquid-handling robotics, a liquid-handling robot, a robust PCR scheme for gene assembly from synthetic oligonucleotides, and a genetic selection system to enrich correctly assembled full-length synthetic ORFs. The process is robust and scalable. PMID:17242375

  3. Protein fabrication automation.

    PubMed

    Cox, J Colin; Lape, Janel; Sayed, Mahmood A; Hellinga, Homme W

    2007-03-01

    Facile "writing" of DNA fragments that encode entire gene sequences potentially has widespread applications in biological analysis and engineering. Rapid writing of open reading frames (ORFs) for expressed proteins could transform protein engineering and production for protein design, synthetic biology, and structural analysis. Here we present a process, protein fabrication automation (PFA), which facilitates the rapid de novo construction of any desired ORF from oligonucleotides with low effort, high speed, and little human interaction. PFA comprises software for sequence design, data management, and the generation of instruction sets for liquid-handling robotics, a liquid-handling robot, a robust PCR scheme for gene assembly from synthetic oligonucleotides, and a genetic selection system to enrich correctly assembled full-length synthetic ORFs. The process is robust and scalable.

  4. Stochastic modelling of biochemical systems of multi-step reactions using a simplified two-variable model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A fundamental issue in systems biology is how to design simplified mathematical models for describing the dynamics of complex biochemical reaction systems. Among them, a key question is how to use simplified reactions to describe the chemical events of multi-step reactions that are ubiquitous in biochemistry and biophysics. To address this issue, a widely used approach in literature is to use one-step reaction to represent the multi-step chemical events. In recent years, a number of modelling methods have been designed to improve the accuracy of the one-step reaction method, including the use of reactions with time delay. However, our recent research results suggested that there are still deviations between the dynamics of delayed reactions and that of the multi-step reactions. Therefore, more sophisticated modelling methods are needed to accurately describe the complex biological systems in an efficient way. Results This work designs a two-variable model to simplify chemical events of multi-step reactions. In addition to the total molecule number of a species, we first introduce a new concept regarding the location of molecules in the multi-step reactions, which is the second variable to represent the system dynamics. Then we propose a simulation algorithm to compute the probability for the firing of the last step reaction in the multi-step events. This probability function is evaluated using a deterministic model of ordinary differential equations and a stochastic model in the framework of the stochastic simulation algorithm. The efficiency of the proposed two-variable model is demonstrated by the realization of mRNA degradation process based on the experimentally measured data. Conclusions Numerical results suggest that the proposed new two-variable model produces predictions that match the multi-step chemical reactions very well. The successful realization of the mRNA degradation dynamics indicates that the proposed method is a promising approach to

  5. Multistep cascade annihilations of dark matter and the Galactic Center excess

    SciTech Connect

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2015-05-26

    If dark matter is embedded in a non-trivial dark sector, it may annihilate and decay to lighter dark-sector states which subsequently decay to the Standard Model. Such scenarios - with annihilation followed by cascading dark-sector decays - can explain the apparent excess GeV gamma-rays identified in the central Milky Way, while evading bounds from dark matter direct detection experiments. Each 'step' in the cascade will modify the observable signatures of dark matter annihilation and decay, shifting the resulting photons and other final state particles to lower energies and broadening their spectra. We explore, in a model-independent way, the effect of multi-step dark-sector cascades on the preferred regions of parameter space to explain the GeV excess. We find that the broadening effects of multi-step cascades can admit final states dominated by particles that would usually produce too sharply peaked photon spectra; in general, if the cascades are hierarchical (each particle decays to substantially lighter particles), the preferred mass range for the dark matter is in all cases 20-150 GeV. Decay chains that have nearly-degenerate steps, where the products are close to half the mass of the progenitor, can admit much higher DM masses. We map out the region of mass/cross-section parameter space where cascades (degenerate, hierarchical or a combination) can fit the signal, for a range of final states. In the current paper, we study multi-step cascades in the context of explaining the GeV excess, but many aspects of our results are general and can be extended to other applications.

  6. Multistep cascade annihilations of dark matter and the Galactic Center excess

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2015-05-26

    If dark matter is embedded in a non-trivial dark sector, it may annihilate and decay to lighter dark-sector states which subsequently decay to the Standard Model. Such scenarios - with annihilation followed by cascading dark-sector decays - can explain the apparent excess GeV gamma-rays identified in the central Milky Way, while evading bounds from dark matter direct detection experiments. Each 'step' in the cascade will modify the observable signatures of dark matter annihilation and decay, shifting the resulting photons and other final state particles to lower energies and broadening their spectra. We explore, in a model-independent way, the effect ofmore » multi-step dark-sector cascades on the preferred regions of parameter space to explain the GeV excess. We find that the broadening effects of multi-step cascades can admit final states dominated by particles that would usually produce too sharply peaked photon spectra; in general, if the cascades are hierarchical (each particle decays to substantially lighter particles), the preferred mass range for the dark matter is in all cases 20-150 GeV. Decay chains that have nearly-degenerate steps, where the products are close to half the mass of the progenitor, can admit much higher DM masses. We map out the region of mass/cross-section parameter space where cascades (degenerate, hierarchical or a combination) can fit the signal, for a range of final states. In the current paper, we study multi-step cascades in the context of explaining the GeV excess, but many aspects of our results are general and can be extended to other applications.« less

  7. Generalized universal cloning and purification in quantum information by multistep state symmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masullo, L.; Ricci, M.; de Martini, F.

    2005-12-01

    A general multistep linear state symmetrization device for photonic qubits is presented together with the experimental realizations of the 1→3 and 2→3 universal optimal quantum cloning machines and of a 3-qubit purification procedure. Since the present method exploits the bosonic nature of the photons, it can be applied to any particle obeying to the Bose statistics. On a technological perspective, the present protocol is expected to find relevant applications as a multiqubit symmetrization device to be used in modern quantum-information networks.

  8. High speed quantitative digital beta autoradiography using a multistep avalanche detector and an Apple II microcomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, J. E.; Connolly, J. F.; Stephenson, R.

    1985-11-01

    The development of an electronic, digital beta autoradiography system is described. Using a multistep avalanche/multiwire proportional counter (MSA/MWPC) detector system fitted with delay line readout, high speed digital imaging is demonstrated with submillimeter spatial resolution. In the case of autoradiography with a tritium label, image acquisition requires about one hour compared with several weeks for conventional film techniques. Good proportionality of observed counting rate relative to the known tritium activity is demonstrated. The application of the system to autoradiography in immunoelectrophoresis, histopathology and DNA sequencing is described (using 125I, 14C and 35S labels in addition to 3H).

  9. Fabrication and magnetism of α-Fe2O3 nanotubes via a multistep ac electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Wang, Y.; Lu, T.; Yang, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Song, X. P.

    2015-07-01

    Hematite Fe2O3 nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a multistep ac electro-deposition on anodic aluminum oxide templates remaining the barrier layers. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and magnetic measurements were used to characterize the morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of α-Fe2O3 nanotubes. Based on the characterization results, a self-assemble mechanism for electro-deposition α-Fe2O3 nanotubes was proposed. The magnetic property investigation showed that hematite Fe2O3 nanotubes exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with the Morin transition.

  10. Automated Assay of Telomere Length Measurement and Informatics for 100,000 Subjects in the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lapham, Kyle; Kvale, Mark N.; Lin, Jue; Connell, Sheryl; Croen, Lisa A.; Dispensa, Brad P.; Fang, Lynn; Hesselson, Stephanie; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Iribarren, Carlos; Jorgenson, Eric; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Ludwig, Dana; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya; McGuire, William B.; Miles, Sunita; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Sakoda, Lori C.; Smethurst, David; Somkin, Carol P.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Walter, Lawrence; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Risch, Neil; Schaefer, Catherine; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    The Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment, and Health (RPGEH) Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort includes DNA specimens extracted from saliva samples of 110,266 individuals. Because of its relationship to aging, telomere length measurement was considered an important biomarker to develop on these subjects. To assay relative telomere length (TL) on this large cohort over a short time period, we created a novel high throughput robotic system for TL analysis and informatics. Samples were run in triplicate, along with control samples, in a randomized design. As part of quality control, we determined the within-sample variability and employed thresholds for the elimination of outlying measurements. Of 106,902 samples assayed, 105,539 (98.7%) passed all quality control (QC) measures. As expected, TL in general showed a decline with age and a sex difference. While telomeres showed a negative correlation with age up to 75 years, in those older than 75 years, age positively correlated with longer telomeres, indicative of an association of longer telomeres with more years of survival in those older than 75. Furthermore, while females in general had longer telomeres than males, this difference was significant only for those older than age 50. An additional novel finding was that the variance of TL between individuals increased with age. This study establishes reliable assay and analysis methodologies for measurement of TL in large, population-based human studies. The GERA cohort represents the largest currently available such resource, linked to comprehensive electronic health and genotype data for analysis. PMID:26092717

  11. Automated External Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Automated External Defibrillator? An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that ... Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  12. Multistep triaxial strength tests: Investigating strength parameters and pore pressure effects on Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräsle, W.

    Natural variability between rock samples often hampers a detailed analysis of material properties. For the investigation of strength parameters the concept of multistep triaxial strength tests was developed to avoid the impact of sample variability. The limit of linear elastic behavior, shear strength and residual strength were measured at different confining pressure on a single specimen. Appropriate tools for near real time data analysis were developed to facilitate a precise and timely control of the test procedure. This is essential to minimize the problem of sample degradation during the test. The feasibility of the test concept was proven on three samples of Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri rock laboratory. Each investigated strength parameter displayed a distinct deviation from a linear dependency on confining pressure or mean stress respectively. Instead, curves consisting of two linear branches almost perfectly fit the test results. These results could be explained in the framework of poroelastic theory. Although it is not possible to determine Skempton’s B-parameter ( Skempton, 1954) and the Biot-Willis poroelastic parameter ( Biot and Willis, 1957) separately from multistep strength tests, the product of both parameters can be derived from the test results. Although material anisotropy was found by the test results, numerous simple strength tests ( Gräsle and Plischke, 2010) as well as true triaxial tests ( Naumann et al., 2007) provide a more efficient way to investigate anisotropy.

  13. Chiral transformation in protonated and deprotonated adipic acids through multistep internal proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Seung Kyu; Park, Mina; Singh, N Jiten; Lee, Han Myoung; Lee, Eun Cheol; Kim, Kwang S; Lagutschenkov, Anita; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2010-09-10

    Protonated and deprotonated adipic acids (PAA: HOOC-(CH(2))(4)--COOH(2) (+) and DAA: HOOC-(CH(2))(4)-COO(-)) have a charged hydrogen bond under the influence of steric constraint due to the molecular skeleton of a circular ring. Despite the similarity between PAA and DAA, it is surprising that the lowest energy structure of PAA is predicted to have (H(2)O...H...OH(2))(+) Zundel-like symmetric hydrogen bonding, whereas that of DAA has H(3)O(+) Eigen-like asymmetric hydrogen bonding. The energy profiles show that direct proton transfer between mirror image structures is unfavorable. Instead, the chiral transformation is possible by subsequent backbone twistings through stepwise proton transfer along multistep intermediate structures, which are Zundel-like ions for PAA and Eigen-like ions for DAA. This type of chiral transformation by multistep intramolecular proton transfers is unprecedented. Several prominent OH...O short hydrogen-bond stretching peaks are predicted in the range of 1000-1700 cm(-1) in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations, which show distinctive signatures different from ordinary hydrogen-bond peaks. The O-H-O stretching peaks in the range of 1800-2700 cm(-1) become insignificant above around 150 K and are almost washed out at about 300 K. PMID:20652911

  14. Research on processing medicinal herbs with multi-steps infrared macro-fingerprint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu; Sun, Su-Qin; Fan, Ke-Feng; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2005-11-01

    How to apply rapid and effective method to research medicinal herbs, the representative of complicated mixture system, is the current study focus for analysts. The functions of non-processed and processed medicinal herbs are greatly different, so controlling the processing procedure is highly important for guarantee of the curative effect. Almost, the conventional criteria of processing are based on personal sensory experience. There is no scientific and impersonal benchmark. In this article, we take Rehmannia for example, conducting a systematic study on the process of braising Rehmannia with yellow wine by using the multi-steps infrared (IR) macro-fingerprint method. The method combines three steps: conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative spectroscopy, and two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation spectroscopy. Based on the changes in different types of IR spectra during the process, we can infer the optimal end-point of processing Rehmannia and the main transformations during the process. The result provides a scientific explanation to the traditional sensory experience based recipe: the end-point product is "dark as night and sweet as malt sugar". In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method, which is rapid and reasonable, can play an important role in controlling the processing of medicinal herbs.

  15. Uniform metal patterning on micromachined 3D surfaces using multistep exposure of UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriadi, Arief; Berauer, Frank; Yasunaga, Akari; Pan, Alfred I.; Vander Plas, Hubert A.

    2002-07-01

    Focal depth limitations prevent use of normal lithography tools and processes on three-dimensional structures. A relatively little known form of uniform metal trace patterning over extreme 3-D structured wafers by a multi-step exposure method, called stitching technology, has recently been developed by Hewlett-Packard Company, with equipment support from the Ultratech Stepper Company, the result of which is being reported in this paper. The basic idea is to slice the metal lines to be patterned into topographic layers that can each be exposed in one step. Patches of patterned metal lines can thus be stitch-ed to one another (thus, the term stitching). Exposure of one photo-resist layer by stitching takes several individual exposures at different focus planes. A patent has been applied for this method on behalf of the Hewlett Packard Company. Results of the present investigation demonstrate the superior uniformity of metal trace pattern over 350-um deep trenches produced by multi-step exposure, as compared to the conventional single-step exposure method, typically used on planar semiconductor wafer. The integrated method offers an enabling technology for patterning of extensive topography typically required for a multitude of MEMS structures and designs, novel interconnect structures as well as advanced packaging applications. The method is simple, accurate and relatively low-cost in comparison with other 3-D exposure techniques available and capable of 3-D structure patterning.

  16. Impact of user influence on information multi-step communication in a micro-blog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Hu, Yong; He, Xiao-Hai; Deng, Ken

    2014-06-01

    User influence is generally considered as one of the most critical factors that affect information cascading spreading. Based on this common assumption, this paper proposes a theoretical model to examine user influence on the information multi-step communication in a micro-blog. The multi-steps of information communication are divided into first-step and non-first-step, and user influence is classified into five dimensions. Actual data from the Sina micro-blog is collected to construct the model by means of an approach based on structural equations that uses the Partial Least Squares (PLS) technique. Our experimental results indicate that the dimensions of the number of fans and their authority significantly impact the information of first-step communication. Leader rank has a positive impact on both first-step and non-first-step communication. Moreover, global centrality and weight of friends are positively related to the information non-first-step communication, but authority is found to have much less relation to it.

  17. Research on processing medicinal herbs with multi-steps infrared macro-fingerprint method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Sun, Su-Qin; Fan, Ke-Feng; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2005-11-01

    How to apply rapid and effective method to research medicinal herbs, the representative of complicated mixture system, is the current study focus for analysts. The functions of non-processed and processed medicinal herbs are greatly different, so controlling the processing procedure is highly important for guarantee of the curative effect. Almost, the conventional criteria of processing are based on personal sensory experience. There is no scientific and impersonal benchmark. In this article, we take Rehmannia for example, conducting a systematic study on the process of braising Rehmannia with yellow wine by using the multi-steps infrared (IR) macro-fingerprint method. The method combines three steps: conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative spectroscopy, and two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation spectroscopy. Based on the changes in different types of IR spectra during the process, we can infer the optimal end-point of processing Rehmannia and the main transformations during the process. The result provides a scientific explanation to the traditional sensory experience based recipe: the end-point product is "dark as night and sweet as malt sugar". In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method, which is rapid and reasonable, can play an important role in controlling the processing of medicinal herbs.

  18. Automation: triumph or trap?

    PubMed

    Smythe, M H

    1997-01-01

    Automation, a hot topic in the laboratory world today, can be a very expensive option. Those who are considering implementing automation can save time and money by examining the issues from the standpoint of an industrial/manufacturing engineer. The engineer not only asks what problems will be solved by automation, but what problems will be created. This article discusses questions that must be asked and answered to ensure that automation efforts will yield real and substantial payoffs.

  19. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  20. Shoe-String Automation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.L.

    2001-07-30

    Faced with a downsizing organization, serious budget reductions and retirement of key metrology personnel, maintaining capabilities to provide necessary services to our customers was becoming increasingly difficult. It appeared that the only solution was to automate some of our more personnel-intensive processes; however, it was crucial that the most personnel-intensive candidate process be automated, at the lowest price possible and with the lowest risk of failure. This discussion relates factors in the selection of the Standard Leak Calibration System for automation, the methods of automation used to provide the lowest-cost solution and the benefits realized as a result of the automation.

  1. Automation of industrial bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, W; DaPra, E; Schneider, K

    2000-01-01

    The dramatic development of new electronic devices within the last 25 years has had a substantial influence on the control and automation of industrial bioprocesses. Within this short period of time the method of controlling industrial bioprocesses has changed completely. In this paper, the authors will use a practical approach focusing on the industrial applications of automation systems. From the early attempts to use computers for the automation of biotechnological processes up to the modern process automation systems some milestones are highlighted. Special attention is given to the influence of Standards and Guidelines on the development of automation systems.

  2. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  3. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16 and Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway12

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, David; Vicent, Silvestre; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Freire, Javier; Lujambio, Amaia; Esteller, Manel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Pio, Ruben; Lecanda, Fernando; Montuenga, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers and genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR), proliferative stress, and telomeric stress: γ-H2AX, p16, p53, and TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic and genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A), APC, CDH13, Rassf1, and Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, and c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase and p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression and was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias and tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras and epidermal growth factor receptor, and a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A), CDH13, and APC, but not in Rassf1 and Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer. PMID:17971904

  4. [Molecular and genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Kang, D H

    2001-04-21

    Molecular epidemiology is defined as "the use of biological markers in epidemiologic research" and genetic epidemiology is defined as "the study of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in epidemiologic research". Traditional epidemiologic approaches defined as "the study of the distribution and determinants of disease frequency in human population" could not address the importance of genetic susceptibility of humans in disease occurrence. However, the use of biological or genetic markers identified and characterized by the help of advance in molecular biology and human genetics now can provide us better understanding of multi-factorial or multistep disease occurrence in humans. Biological markers used in molecular epidemiology are classified into three groups: biomarkers of exposure (i.e., carcinogen metabolites in human urine, DNA-adducts, etc.), biomarkers of effects (i.e., oncoproteins, tumor markers, etc.), and biomarkers of susceptibility (i.e., genetic polymorphisms of carcinogen metabolism enzymes, DNA repair, etc.). Susceptibility genes involved in disease pathogenesis are categorized into two groups: high penetrance genes (i.e., BRAC1, RB, etc.) and low penetrance genes (i.e., GSTs, XRCC1, etc.). This paper will address the usefulnesses of bomarkers in edpidemiologic research and will show the examples of the use of selected low penetrance genes involved in human carcinogenesis. The importance of multidisciplinary approaches among epidemiologists, molecular biologists, and human geneticists will also be discussed.

  5. Automated Design of Quantum Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.; Gray, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    In order to design a quantum circuit that performs a desired quantum computation, it is necessary to find a decomposition of the unitary matrix that represents that computation in terms of a sequence of quantum gate operations. To date, such designs have either been found by hand or by exhaustive enumeration of all possible circuit topologies. In this paper we propose an automated approach to quantum circuit design using search heuristics based on principles abstracted from evolutionary genetics, i.e. using a genetic programming algorithm adapted specially for this problem. We demonstrate the method on the task of discovering quantum circuit designs for quantum teleportation. We show that to find a given known circuit design (one which was hand-crafted by a human), the method considers roughly an order of magnitude fewer designs than naive enumeration. In addition, the method finds novel circuit designs superior to those previously known.

  6. A Multi-Step Assessment Scheme for Seismic Network Site Selection in Densely Populated Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkers, Katrin; Husen, Stephan; Kraft, Toni

    2015-10-01

    We developed a multi-step assessment scheme for improved site selection during seismic network installation in densely populated areas. Site selection is a complex process where different aspects (seismic background noise, geology, and financing) have to be taken into account. In order to improve this process, we developed a step-wise approach that allows quantifying the quality of a site by using, in addition to expert judgement and test measurements, two weighting functions as well as reference stations. Our approach ensures that the recording quality aimed for is reached and makes different sites quantitatively comparable to each other. Last but not least, it is an easy way to document the decision process, because all relevant parameters are listed, quantified, and weighted.

  7. The solution of Parrondo’s games with multi-step jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the general case of Parrondo’s games, when there is a finite probability to stay in the current state as well as multi-step jumps. We introduce a modification of the model: the transition probabilities between different games depend on the choice of the game in the previous round. We calculate the rate of capital growth as well as the variance of the distribution, following large deviation theory. The modified model allows higher capital growth rates than in standard Parrondo games for the range of parameters considered in the key articles about these games, and positive capital growth is possible for a much wider regime of parameters of the model.

  8. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  9. A multistep process gave rise to RNA polymerase IV of land plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Hall, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    Since their discovery in Metazoa, the three nuclear RNA polymerases (RNAPs) have been found in fungi, plants, and diverse protists. In all eukaryotes studied to date, RNAPs I, II, and III collectively transcribe all major RNAs made in the nucleus. We have found genes for the largest subunit (RPD1/RPE1) of a new DNA-dependent RNAP, RNAP IV, in all major land plant taxa and in closely related green algae. Genes for the second-largest subunit (RPD2) of this enzyme were found in all land plants. Phylogenetic study indicates that RNAP IV genes are sister to the corresponding RNAP II genes. Our results show the genesis of RNAP IV to be a multistep process in which the largest and second-largest subunit genes evolved by independent duplication events in the ancestors of Charales and land plants. These findings provide insights into evolutionary mechanisms that can explain the origin of multiple RNAPs in the eukaryotic nucleus.

  10. Multistep divergent synthesis of benzimidazole linked benzoxazole/benzothiazole via copper catalyzed domino annulation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Yu; Selvaraju, Manikandan; Chen, Chih-Hau; Sun, Chung-Ming

    2013-04-21

    An efficient, facile synthesis of structurally diverse benzimidazole integrated benzoxazole and benzothiazoles has been developed. In a multi-step synthetic sequence, 4-fluoro-3-nitrobenzoic acid was converted into benzimidazole bis-heterocycles, via the intermediacy of benzimidazole linked ortho-chloro amines. The amphiphilic reactivity of this intermediate was designed to achieve the title compounds by the reaction of various acid chlorides and isothiocyanates in a single step through the in situ formation of ortho-chloro anilides and thioureas under microwave irradiation. A versatile one pot domino annulation reaction was developed to involve the reaction of benzimidazole linked ortho-chloro amines with acid chlorides and isothiocyanates. The initial acylation and urea formation followed by copper catalyzed intramolecular C-O and C-S cross coupling reactions furnished the angularly oriented bis-heterocycles which bear a close resemblance to the streptomyces antibiotic UK-1.

  11. A multistep game of kind between two economic systems under complete information

    SciTech Connect

    Malyukov, V.P.; Linder, N.V.

    1995-03-01

    We consider the problem of conflict interaction between two economic systems described by Leontief type single-commodity dynamic models. The problem is solved in the framework of a positional multistep game of kind under complete information assuming several terminal sets. The solution constructs optimality sets of the players that control the dynamic models and finds the winning strategies. As in the analysis of related games, the solution of the problem is found to depend on the relationship of the parameters that define the conflict interaction. Contrary to, our study does not assume nonnegativity of some of the game parameters. The solution is obtained for all possible relationships of game parameters; examples of a conflict interaction in dynamic economic models are given.

  12. Multistep Photosynthesis of Metastable Compounds —The Origin of Life on the Earth—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyozawa, Yutaka

    1997-12-01

    On the basis of the thermodynamic argument of the characteristic feature distinguishing the living world from the nonliving, it is postulated that the radiation from the sun created living organisms on the earth and has been their constant driving force. In view of the fact that the basic biomolecules have chemical energies of several or more electron volts, significantly higher than the average energy of a photon from the sun, we propose a mechanism of multistep photoexcitations of inorganic material for the photosynthesis of these metastable molecules which would not exist at ambient temperature. The preference of the photoexcitation against the radiative and nonradiative de-excitation is ascribed to the suppression of the latter by rapid and large relaxations (reactions) in intermediate states. An experiment to confirm the mechanism is proposed in which geological time is reduced to an accessible one.

  13. Effect of a magnetic field on the resonant multistep selective photoionization of gadolinium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guyadec, E.; Ravoire, J.; Botter, R.; Lambert, F.; Petit, A.

    1990-04-01

    A multistep photoionization with three resonant polarized photons has been used to separate the odd and even isotopes of gadolinium. Due to their hyperfine structure ( I= {3}/{2}), the 155,157Gd isotopes can be photoionized via a J=2→2→1→0 scheme with three п photons whereas the even isotopes cannot. If a time delay is introduced between the three laser pulses we show that the presence of a low intensity dc magnetic field affects the selectivity. The effect of this weak field on the 156Gd photoionization rate has been calculated independently of the optical pumping and the result is in good agreement with the experiment.

  14. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation of instruments assessing breastfeeding determinants: a multi-step approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-cultural adaptation is a necessary process to effectively use existing instruments in other cultural and language settings. The process of cross-culturally adapting, including translation, of existing instruments is considered a critical set to establishing a meaningful instrument for use in another setting. Using a multi-step approach is considered best practice in achieving cultural and semantic equivalence of the adapted version. We aimed to ensure the content validity of our instruments in the cultural context of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods The Iowa Infant Feeding Attitudes Scale, Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form and additional items comprise our consolidated instrument, which was cross-culturally adapted utilizing a multi-step approach during August 2012. Cross-cultural adaptation was achieved through steps to maintain content validity and attain semantic equivalence in the target version. Specifically, Lynn’s recommendation to apply an item-level content validity index score was followed. The revised instrument was translated and back-translated. To ensure semantic equivalence, Brislin’s back-translation approach was utilized followed by the committee review to address any discrepancies that emerged from translation. Results Our consolidated instrument was adapted to be culturally relevant and translated to yield more reliable and valid results for use in our larger research study to measure infant feeding determinants effectively in our target cultural context. Conclusions Undertaking rigorous steps to effectively ensure cross-cultural adaptation increases our confidence that the conclusions we make based on our self-report instrument(s) will be stronger. In this way, our aim to achieve strong cross-cultural adaptation of our consolidated instruments was achieved while also providing a clear framework for other researchers choosing to utilize existing instruments for work in other cultural, geographic and population

  16. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  17. A Multistep Organocatalysis Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory: An Enantioselective Aldol Reaction Catalyzed by Methyl Prolinamide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Edmir O.; Walsh, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of research concerning the area of organocatalysis. A multistep capstone laboratory project that combines traditional reactions frequently found in organic laboratory curriculums with this new field of research is described. In this experiment, the students synthesize a prolinamide-based organocatalyst…

  18. Self-Regulated Strategy Development Instruction for Teaching Multi-Step Equations to Middle School Students Struggling in Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca-Carlino, Yojanna; Freeman-Green, Shaqwana; Stephenson, Grant W.; Hauth, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Six middle school students identified as having a specific learning disability or at risk for mathematical difficulties were taught how to solve multi-step equations by using the self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) model of instruction. A multiple-probe-across-pairs design was used to evaluate instructional effects. Instruction was provided…

  19. Synthesis of Two Local Anesthetics from Toluene: An Organic Multistep Synthesis in a Project-Oriented Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demare, Patricia; Regla, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    This article describes one of the projects in the advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course concerning the synthesis of two local anesthetic drugs, prilocaine and benzocaine, with a common three-step sequence starting from toluene. Students undertake, in a several-week independent project, the multistep synthesis of a…

  20. Synthesis of Frontalin, the Aggregation Pheromone of the Southern Pine Beetle: A Multistep Organic Synthesis for Undergraduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Paul A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information and experimental procedures are provided for the multistep synthesis of frontalin. The experiment exposes students to a range of practical laboratory problems and important synthetic reactions and provides experiences in working on a medium-size, as well as a relatively small-size scale. (JN)

  1. Dynamical genetic programming in XCSF.

    PubMed

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2013-01-01

    A number of representation schemes have been presented for use within learning classifier systems, ranging from binary encodings to artificial neural networks. This paper presents results from an investigation into using a temporally dynamic symbolic representation within the XCSF learning classifier system. In particular, dynamical arithmetic networks are used to represent the traditional condition-action production system rules to solve continuous-valued reinforcement learning problems and to perform symbolic regression, finding competitive performance with traditional genetic programming on a number of composite polynomial tasks. In addition, the network outputs are later repeatedly sampled at varying temporal intervals to perform multistep-ahead predictions of a financial time series.

  2. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    PubMed

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  3. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples.

  4. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  5. Work and Programmable Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  6. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  7. Library Automation Style Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord Bros., Liverpool, NY.

    This library automation style guide lists specific terms and names often used in the library automation industry. The terms and/or acronyms are listed alphabetically and each is followed by a brief definition. The guide refers to the "Chicago Manual of Style" for general rules, and a notes section is included for the convenience of individual…

  8. More Benefits of Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that measured the benefits of an automated catalog and automated circulation system from the library user's point of view in terms of the value of time saved. Topics discussed include patterns of use, access time, availability of information, search behaviors, and the effectiveness of the measures used. (seven references)…

  9. Educating Archivists for Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Lisa B.

    1988-01-01

    Archivists indicate they want to learn more about automation in archives, the MARC AMC (Archival and Manuscripts Control) format, and emerging computer technologies; they look for educational opportunities through professional associations, publications, and college coursework; future archival automation education needs include standards, shared…

  10. Automation and robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montemerlo, Melvin

    1988-01-01

    The Autonomous Systems focus on the automation of control systems for the Space Station and mission operations. Telerobotics focuses on automation for in-space servicing, assembly, and repair. The Autonomous Systems and Telerobotics each have a planned sequence of integrated demonstrations showing the evolutionary advance of the state-of-the-art. Progress is briefly described for each area of concern.

  11. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  12. Automation in Immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-01-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  13. Automation in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-07-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  14. Automation in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-07-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  15. Development of Multistep and Degenerate Variational Integrators for Applications in Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Charles Leland

    Geometric integrators yield high-fidelity numerical results by retaining conservation laws in the time advance. A particularly powerful class of geometric integrators is symplectic integrators, which are widely used in orbital mechanics and accelerator physics. An important application presently lacking symplectic integrators is the guiding center motion of magnetized particles represented by non-canonical coordinates. Because guiding center trajectories are foundational to many simulations of magnetically confined plasmas, geometric guiding center algorithms have high potential for impact. The motivation is compounded by the need to simulate long-pulse fusion devices, including ITER, and opportunities in high performance computing, including the use of petascale resources and beyond. This dissertation uses a systematic procedure for constructing geometric integrators --- known as variational integration --- to deliver new algorithms for guiding center trajectories and other plasma-relevant dynamical systems. These variational integrators are non-trivial because the Lagrangians of interest are degenerate - the Euler-Lagrange equations are first-order differential equations and the Legendre transform is not invertible. The first contribution of this dissertation is that variational integrators for degenerate Lagrangian systems are typically multistep methods. Multistep methods admit parasitic mode instabilities that can ruin the numerical results. These instabilities motivate the second major contribution: degenerate variational integrators. By replicating the degeneracy of the continuous system, degenerate variational integrators avoid parasitic mode instabilities. The new methods are therefore robust geometric integrators for degenerate Lagrangian systems. These developments in variational integration theory culminate in one-step degenerate variational integrators for non-canonical magnetic field line flow and guiding center dynamics. The guiding center integrator

  16. Recent advances in molecular genetics of melanoma progression: implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Iwei

    2016-01-01

    According to the multi-step carcinogenesis model of cancer, initiation results in a benign tumor and subsequent genetic alterations lead to tumor progression and the acquisition of the hallmarks of cancer. This article will review recent discoveries in our understanding of initiation and progression in melanocytic neoplasia and the impact on diagnostic dermatopathology. PMID:27408703

  17. Recent advances in molecular genetics of melanoma progression: implications for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Iwei

    2016-01-01

    According to the multi-step carcinogenesis model of cancer, initiation results in a benign tumor and subsequent genetic alterations lead to tumor progression and the acquisition of the hallmarks of cancer. This article will review recent discoveries in our understanding of initiation and progression in melanocytic neoplasia and the impact on diagnostic dermatopathology. PMID:27408703

  18. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (Δδ(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and Δδ(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of αC=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and αH=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with π-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation.

  19. Constrained Broyden Dimer Method with Bias Potential for Exploring Potential Energy Surface of Multistep Reaction Process.

    PubMed

    Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-07-10

    To predict the chemical activity of new matter is an ultimate goal in chemistry. The identification of reaction pathways using modern quantum mechanics calculations, however, often requires a high demand in computational power and good chemical intuition on the reaction. Here, a new reaction path searching method is developed by combining our recently developed transition state (TS) location method, namely, the constrained Broyden dimer method, with a basin-filling method via bias potentials, which allows the system to walk out from the energy traps at a given reaction direction. In the new method, the reaction path searching starts from an initial state without the need for preguessing the TS-like or final state structure and can proceed iteratively to the final state by locating all related TSs and intermediates. In each elementary reaction step, a reaction direction, such as a bond breaking, needs to be specified, the information of which is refined and preserved as a normal mode through biased dimer rotation. The method is tested successfully on the Baker reaction system (50 elementary reactions) with good efficiency and stability and is also applied to the potential energy surface exploration of multistep reaction processes in the gas phase and on the surface. The new method can be applied for the computational screening of new catalytic materials with a minimum requirement of chemical intuition.

  20. Discovery of novel new Delhi metallo-β-lactamases-1 inhibitors by multistep virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuequan; Lu, Meiling; Shi, Yang; Ou, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of NDM-1 containing multi-antibiotic resistant "Superbugs" necessitates the needs of developing of novel NDM-1inhibitors. In this study, we report the discovery of novel NDM-1 inhibitors by multi-step virtual screening. From a 2,800,000 virtual drug-like compound library selected from the ZINC database, we generated a focused NDM-1 inhibitor library containing 298 compounds of which 44 chemical compounds were purchased and evaluated experimentally for their ability to inhibit NDM-1 in vitro. Three novel NDM-1 inhibitors with micromolar IC50 values were validated. The most potent inhibitor, VNI-41, inhibited NDM-1 with an IC50 of 29.6 ± 1.3 μM. Molecular dynamic simulation revealed that VNI-41 interacted extensively with the active site. In particular, the sulfonamide group of VNI-41 interacts directly with the metal ion Zn1 that is critical for the catalysis. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying virtual screening methodologies in identifying novel inhibitors for NDM-1, a metallo-β-lactamase with a malleable active site and provide a mechanism base for rational design of NDM-1 inhibitors using sulfonamide as a functional scaffold. PMID:25734558

  1. Discovery of Novel New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamases-1 Inhibitors by Multistep Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuequan; Lu, Meiling; Shi, Yang; Ou, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of NDM-1 containing multi-antibiotic resistant "Superbugs" necessitates the needs of developing of novel NDM-1inhibitors. In this study, we report the discovery of novel NDM-1 inhibitors by multi-step virtual screening. From a 2,800,000 virtual drug-like compound library selected from the ZINC database, we generated a focused NDM-1 inhibitor library containing 298 compounds of which 44 chemical compounds were purchased and evaluated experimentally for their ability to inhibit NDM-1 in vitro. Three novel NDM-1 inhibitors with micromolar IC50 values were validated. The most potent inhibitor, VNI-41, inhibited NDM-1 with an IC50 of 29.6 ± 1.3 μM. Molecular dynamic simulation revealed that VNI-41 interacted extensively with the active site. In particular, the sulfonamide group of VNI-41 interacts directly with the metal ion Zn1 that is critical for the catalysis. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying virtual screening methodologies in identifying novel inhibitors for NDM-1, a metallo-β-lactamase with a malleable active site and provide a mechanism base for rational design of NDM-1 inhibitors using sulfonamide as a functional scaffold. PMID:25734558

  2. Multistep continuous-flow synthesis of (R)- and (S)-rolipram using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubogo, Tetsu; Oyamada, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-04-01

    Chemical manufacturing is conducted using either batch systems or continuous-flow systems. Flow systems have several advantages over batch systems, particularly in terms of productivity, heat and mixing efficiency, safety, and reproducibility. However, for over half a century, pharmaceutical manufacturing has used batch systems because the synthesis of complex molecules such as drugs has been difficult to achieve with continuous-flow systems. Here we describe the continuous-flow synthesis of drugs using only columns packed with heterogeneous catalysts. Commercially available starting materials were successively passed through four columns containing achiral and chiral heterogeneous catalysts to produce (R)-rolipram, an anti-inflammatory drug and one of the family of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivatives. In addition, simply by replacing a column packed with a chiral heterogeneous catalyst with another column packed with the opposing enantiomer, we obtained antipole (S)-rolipram. Similarly, we also synthesized (R)-phenibut, another drug belonging to the GABA family. These flow systems are simple and stable with no leaching of metal catalysts. Our results demonstrate that multistep (eight steps in this case) chemical transformations for drug synthesis can proceed smoothly under flow conditions using only heterogeneous catalysts, without the isolation of any intermediates and without the separation of any catalysts, co-products, by-products, and excess reagents. We anticipate that such syntheses will be useful in pharmaceutical manufacturing.

  3. Investigation of the reactions of acrylamide during in vitro multistep enzymatic digestion of thermally processed foods.

    PubMed

    Hamzalıoğlu, Aytül; Gökmen, Vural

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fate of acrylamide in thermally processed foods after ingestion. An in vitro multistep enzymatic digestion system simulating gastric, duodenal and colon phases was used to understand the fate of acrylamide in bakery and fried potato products. Acrylamide levels gradually decreased through gastric, duodenal and colon phases during in vitro digestion of biscuits. At the end of digestion, acrylamide reduction was between 49.2% and 73.4% in biscuits. Binary model systems composed of acrylamide and amino acids were used to understand the mechanism of acrylamide reduction. High-resolution mass spectrometry analyses confirmed Michael addition of amino acids to acrylamide during digestion. In contrast to bakery products, acrylamide levels increased significantly during gastric digestion of fried potatoes. The Schiff base formed between reducing sugars and asparagine disappeared rapidly, whereas the acrylamide level increased during the gastric phase. This suggests that intermediates like the Schiff base that accumulate in potatoes during frying are potential precursors of acrylamide under gastric conditions.

  4. Multistep Reaction Based De Novo Drug Design: Generating Synthetically Feasible Design Ideas.

    PubMed

    Masek, Brian B; Baker, David S; Dorfman, Roman J; DuBrucq, Karen; Francis, Victoria C; Nagy, Stephan; Richey, Bree L; Soltanshahi, Farhad

    2016-04-25

    We describe a "multistep reaction driven" evolutionary algorithm approach to de novo molecular design. Structures generated by the approach include a proposed synthesis path intended to aid the chemist in assessing the synthetic feasibility of the ideas that are generated. The methodology is independent of how the design ideas are scored, allowing multicriteria drug design to address multiple issues including activity at one or more pharmacological targets, selectivity, physical and ADME properties, and off target liabilities; the methods are compatible with common computer-aided drug discovery "scoring" methodologies such as 2D- and 3D-ligand similarity, docking, desirability functions based on physiochemical properties, and/or predictions from 2D/3D QSAR or machine learning models and combinations thereof to be used to guide design. We have performed experiments to assess the extent to which known drug space can be covered by our approach. Using a library of 88 generic reactions and a database of ∼20 000 reactants, we find that our methods can identify "close" analogs for ∼50% of the known small molecule drugs with molecular weight less than 300. To assess the quality of the in silico generated synthetic pathways, synthesis chemists were asked to rate the viability of synthesis pathways: both "real" and in silico generated. In silico reaction schemes generated by our methods were rated as very plausible with scores similar to known literature synthesis schemes. PMID:27031173

  5. Investigation of the reactions of acrylamide during in vitro multistep enzymatic digestion of thermally processed foods.

    PubMed

    Hamzalıoğlu, Aytül; Gökmen, Vural

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fate of acrylamide in thermally processed foods after ingestion. An in vitro multistep enzymatic digestion system simulating gastric, duodenal and colon phases was used to understand the fate of acrylamide in bakery and fried potato products. Acrylamide levels gradually decreased through gastric, duodenal and colon phases during in vitro digestion of biscuits. At the end of digestion, acrylamide reduction was between 49.2% and 73.4% in biscuits. Binary model systems composed of acrylamide and amino acids were used to understand the mechanism of acrylamide reduction. High-resolution mass spectrometry analyses confirmed Michael addition of amino acids to acrylamide during digestion. In contrast to bakery products, acrylamide levels increased significantly during gastric digestion of fried potatoes. The Schiff base formed between reducing sugars and asparagine disappeared rapidly, whereas the acrylamide level increased during the gastric phase. This suggests that intermediates like the Schiff base that accumulate in potatoes during frying are potential precursors of acrylamide under gastric conditions. PMID:25468219

  6. Shutdown Dose Rate Analysis Using the Multi-Step CADIS Method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Step Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (MS-CADIS) hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic radiation transport method was proposed to speed up the shutdown dose rate (SDDR) neutron MC calculation using an importance function that represents the neutron importance to the final SDDR. This work applied the MS-CADIS method to the ITER SDDR benchmark problem. The MS-CADIS method was also used to calculate the SDDR uncertainty resulting from uncertainties in the MC neutron calculation and to determine the degree of undersampling in SDDR calculations because of the limited ability of the MC method to tally detailed spatial and energy distributions. The analysismore » that used the ITER benchmark problem compared the efficiency of the MS-CADIS method to the traditional approach of using global MC variance reduction techniques for speeding up SDDR neutron MC calculation. Compared to the standard Forward-Weighted-CADIS (FW-CADIS) method, the MS-CADIS method increased the efficiency of the SDDR neutron MC calculation by 69%. The MS-CADIS method also increased the fraction of nonzero scoring mesh tally elements in the space-energy regions of high importance to the final SDDR.« less

  7. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, J.L.

    1990-07-10

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed. 7 figs.

  8. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed.

  9. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  10. Shutdown Dose Rate Analysis Using the Multi-Step CADIS Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Step Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (MS-CADIS) hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic radiation transport method was proposed to speed up the shutdown dose rate (SDDR) neutron MC calculation using an importance function that represents the neutron importance to the final SDDR. This work applied the MS-CADIS method to the ITER SDDR benchmark problem. The MS-CADIS method was also used to calculate the SDDR uncertainty resulting from uncertainties in the MC neutron calculation and to determine the degree of undersampling in SDDR calculations because of the limited ability of the MC method to tally detailed spatial and energy distributions. The analysis that used the ITER benchmark problem compared the efficiency of the MS-CADIS method to the traditional approach of using global MC variance reduction techniques for speeding up SDDR neutron MC calculation. Compared to the standard Forward-Weighted-CADIS (FW-CADIS) method, the MS-CADIS method increased the efficiency of the SDDR neutron MC calculation by 69%. The MS-CADIS method also increased the fraction of nonzero scoring mesh tally elements in the space-energy regions of high importance to the final SDDR.

  11. Exact free vibration of multi-step Timoshenko beam system with several attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, S. H.; El-Sayed, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of the natural frequencies, mode shapes of an axially loaded multi-step Timoshenko beam combined system carrying several attachments. The influence of system design and the proposed sub-system non-dimensional parameters on the combined system characteristics are the major part of this investigation. The effect of material properties, rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam system for each span are included. The end masses are elastically supported against rotation and translation at an offset point from the point of attachment. A sub-system having two degrees of freedom is located at the beam ends and at any of the intermediate stations and acts as a support and/or a suspension. The boundary conditions of the ordinary differential equation governing the lateral deflections and slope due to bending of the beam system including the shear force term, due to the sub-system, have been formulated. Exact global coefficient matrices for the combined modal frequencies, the modal shape and for the discrete sub-system have been derived. Based on these formulae, detailed parametric studies of the combined system are carried out. The applied mathematical model is valid for wide range of applications especially in mechanical, naval and structural engineering fields.

  12. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas. PMID:25246577

  13. Stochastic diffusion model of multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    The energy barrier to the activated state for the S4 voltage sensor of a K channel is dependent on the electrostatic force between positively charged S4 residues and negatively charged groups on neighboring segments, the potential difference across the membrane, and the dielectric boundary force on the charged residues near the interface between the solvent and the low dielectric region of the membrane gating pore. The variation of the potential function with transverse displacement and rotation of the S4 sensor across the membrane may be derived from a solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. By approximating the energy of an S4 sensor along a path between stationary states by a piecewise linear function of the transverse displacement, the dynamics of slow activation, in the millisecond range, may be described by the lowest frequency component of an analytical solution of interacting diffusion equations of Fokker-Planck type for resting and barrier regions. The solution of the Smoluchowski equations for an S4 sensor in an energy landscape with several barriers is in accord with an empirical master equation for multistep activation in a voltage-dependent K channel.

  14. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in aberrant DNA methylation along multistep gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Jung, Younmu; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2010-06-01

    CpG island hypermethylation is frequently found during gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated methylation profiles of p16, LOX, HAND1, THBD, p41ARC, and APC along multistep gastric carcinogenesis and determined their association with Helicobacter pylori infection. Methylation levels in these six genes were evaluated in noncancerous gastric biopsy specimens using quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 459 patients with gastric cancer (GC), 137 with dysplasia, and 248 controls. Controls were divided into four subgroups sorted by current H. pylori infection status (active vs past or negative infection) and the presence of intestinal metaplasia (IM). In controls, active H. pylori infection significantly increased methylation levels in THBD, LOX, and HAND1 (all P < 0.001), and hypermethylation of THBD, HAND1, and APC was associated with IM. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation was correlated well with activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis. However, methylation levels in LOX, HAND1, THBD, and p41ARC remained increased in cases with past H. pylori infection compared to those that were H. pylori negative (all P < 0.05). Hypermethylation of THBD, and possibly p16, was significantly associated with GC, regardless of the status of current H. pylori infection (all P < 0.05). These results suggest that aberrant DNA hypermethylation caused by H. pylori-associated gastritis occurs in a gene-specific manner along gastric carcinogenesis, which can be persistent even after the disappearance of H. pylori. Aberrant methylation of THBD might provide a link between H. pylori infection and development of GC.

  15. Systematic review automation technologies.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-07-09

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time.

  16. Systematic review automation technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  17. Mass-Transfer-Induced Multistep Phase Separation in Emulsion Droplets: Toward Self-Assembly Multilayered Emulsions and Onionlike Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuaishuai; Li, Jiang; Man, Jia; Chen, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Mass-transfer-induced multistep phase separation was found in emulsion droplets. The agent system consists of a monomer (ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, ETPTA), an oligomer (polyethylene glycol diacrylate, PEGDA 700), and water. The PEGDA in the separated layers offered partial miscibility of all the components throughout the multistep phase-separation procedure, which was terminated by the depletion of PEGDA in the outermost layer. The number of separated portions was determined by the initial PEGDA content, and the initial droplet size influenced the mass-transfer process and consequently determined the sizes of the separated layers. The resultant multilayered emulsions were demonstrated to offer an orderly temperature-responsive release of the inner cores. Moreover, the emulsion droplets can be readily solidified into onionlike microspheres by ultraviolet light curing, providing a new strategy in designing particle structures.

  18. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  19. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  20. Mass-Transfer-Induced Multistep Phase Separation in Emulsion Droplets: Toward Self-Assembly Multilayered Emulsions and Onionlike Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuaishuai; Li, Jiang; Man, Jia; Chen, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Mass-transfer-induced multistep phase separation was found in emulsion droplets. The agent system consists of a monomer (ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, ETPTA), an oligomer (polyethylene glycol diacrylate, PEGDA 700), and water. The PEGDA in the separated layers offered partial miscibility of all the components throughout the multistep phase-separation procedure, which was terminated by the depletion of PEGDA in the outermost layer. The number of separated portions was determined by the initial PEGDA content, and the initial droplet size influenced the mass-transfer process and consequently determined the sizes of the separated layers. The resultant multilayered emulsions were demonstrated to offer an orderly temperature-responsive release of the inner cores. Moreover, the emulsion droplets can be readily solidified into onionlike microspheres by ultraviolet light curing, providing a new strategy in designing particle structures. PMID:27427849

  1. Multiple genetic alterations in human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, T; Terada, M; Yokota, J; Hirohashi, S; Wakabayashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Cancer development in man appeared to be a multistage process as suggested by epidemiological studies on commonly occurring gastric, colon, and breast cancers and also on human retrovirus-related leukemia, and by the finding by physicians and surgeons of precancerous lesions for many types of neoplasias. In the last 10 years it has become evident that human cancers have multiple genetic alterations caused by point mutations, recombinations, amplifications, and/or deletions. The genes affected include both oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes and genes that accelerate cell proliferation and metastasis. Cancers with more malignant properties and poorer prognosis are generally associated with larger numbers of genetic alterations. These multiple genetic alterations are considered to be a direct reflection of the multiple steps involved in carcinogenesis. The multiple genetic alterations are caused by multiple environmental carcinogenic substances or factors, each of which usually exists only at minute concentrations and does not exert any major impact alone except under particular occupational, iatrogenic, and locally geographic conditions. The fact that carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving multiple genetic alterations clearly needs to be taken into consideration in assessing the risks of environmental carcinogenic substances or factors. The increasing incidence of multiple primary cancers is also most easily understood from the viewpoint of multiple steps in carcinogenesis. Possible multiple approaches to cancer prevention should therefore be considered in relation to multistep carcinogenesis and multiple carcinogenic factors. PMID:1486862

  2. Multistep energy migration between 3,3‧-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide monomers in uniaxially oriented polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarski, Piotr; Gryczyński, Ignacy; Kułak, Leszek; Synak, Anna; Bharill, Shashank; Rangełowa, Simeonika; Szabelski, Mariusz

    2007-05-01

    Multistep energy migration was studied for 3,3'-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide (MDTCI) in uniaxially stretched and unstretched poly(vinyl alcohol) films. At low and intermediate concentrations fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements yield completely different results for disordered and ordered systems due to strong redistribution and angular correlation of fluorophores transition moments in ordered polymer matrix. These results and other selected properties of energy transport in uniaxially stretched polymer films were analyzed using the technique of Monte-Carlo simulation.

  3. Automation synthesis modules review.

    PubMed

    Boschi, S; Lodi, F; Malizia, C; Cicoria, G; Marengo, M

    2013-06-01

    The introduction of (68)Ga labelled tracers has changed the diagnostic approach to neuroendocrine tumours and the availability of a reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator has been at the bases of the development of (68)Ga radiopharmacy. The huge increase in clinical demand, the impact of regulatory issues and a careful radioprotection of the operators have boosted for extensive automation of the production process. The development of automated systems for (68)Ga radiochemistry, different engineering and software strategies and post-processing of the eluate were discussed along with impact of automation with regulations.

  4. Multistep conversion of para-substituted phenols by phenol hydroxylase and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Shi, Shengnan; Ma, Qiao; Kong, Chunlei; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Xuwang; Zhou, Jiti

    2013-04-01

    A multistep conversion system of para-substituted phenols by recombinant phenol hydroxylase (PH(IND)) and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase (BphC(LA-4)) was constructed in this study. Docking studies with different para-substituted phenols and corresponding catechols inside of the active site of PH(IND) and BphC(LA-4) predicted that all the substrates should be transformed. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the products of multistep conversion were the corresponding para-substituted catechols and semialdehydes. For the first-step conversion, the formation rate of 4-fluorocatechol (0.39 μM/min/mg dry weight) by strain PH(IND) hydroxylation was 1.15, 6.50, 3.00, and 1.18-fold higher than the formation of 4-chlorocatechol, 4-bromocatechol, 4-nitrocatechol, and 4-methylcatechol, respectively. For the second-step conversion, the formation rates of semialdehydes by strain BphC(LA-4) were as follows: 5-fluoro-HODA>5-chloro-HODA>2-hydroxy-5-nitro-ODA>5-bromo-HODA>2-hydroxy-5-methyl-ODA. The present study suggested that the multistep conversion by both ring hydroxylase and cleavage dioxygenase should be potential in the synthesis of industrial precursors and provide a novel avenue in the wastewater recycling treatment.

  5. Roughness reduction of large-area high-quality thick Al films for echelle gratings by multi-step deposition method.

    PubMed

    Li, Zizheng; Gao, Jinsong; Yang, Haigui; Wang, Tongtong; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2015-09-01

    Generally, echelle grating ruling is performed on a thick Al film. Consequently, high-quality large-area thick Al films preparation becomes one of the most important factors to realize a high-performance large-size echelle grating. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-step deposition process to improve thick Al films quality. Compared with the traditional single-step deposition process, it is found that the multi-step deposition process can effectively suppress large-size grains growth resulting in a low surface roughness and high internal compactness of thick Al films. The differences between single- and multi-step deposition processes are discussed in detail. By using multi-step deposition process, we prepared high-quality large-area Al films with a thickness more than 10 μm on a 520 mm × 420 mm neoceramic glass substrate.

  6. DE-FG02-05ER64001 Overcoming the hurdles of multi-step targeting (MST) for effective radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    P.I. Steven M. Larson MD Co P.I. Nai-Kong Cheung MD, Ph.D.

    2009-09-21

    The 4 specific aims of this project are: (1) Optimization of MST to increase tumor uptake; (2) Antigen heterogeneity; (3) Characterization and reduction of renal uptake; and (4) Validation in vivo of optimized MST targeted therapy. This proposal focussed upon optimizing multistep immune targeting strategies for the treatment of cancer. Two multi-step targeting constructs were explored during this funding period: (1) anti-Tag-72 and (2) anti-GD2.

  7. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  8. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  9. Automated Status Notification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Automated Status Notification System (ASNS) was born out of need. To prevent "hacker attacks," Lewis' telephone system needed to monitor communications activities 24 hr a day, 7 days a week. With decreasing staff resources, this continuous monitoring had to be automated. By utilizing existing communications hardware, a UNIX workstation, and NAWK (a pattern scanning and processing language), we implemented a continuous monitoring system.

  10. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  11. Automated imagery orthorectification pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Johnson, Brad; McMahon, Joe

    2009-10-01

    Automated orthorectification of raw image products is now possible based on the comprehensive metadata collected by Global Positioning Systems and Inertial Measurement Unit technology aboard aircraft and satellite digital imaging systems, and based on emerging pattern-matching and automated image-to-image and control point selection capabilities in many advanced image processing systems. Automated orthorectification of standard aerial photography is also possible if a camera calibration report and sufficient metadata is available. Orthorectification of historical imagery, for which only limited metadata was available, was also attempted and found to require some user input, creating a semi-automated process that still has significant potential to reduce processing time and expense for the conversion of archival historical imagery into geospatially enabled, digital formats, facilitating preservation and utilization of a vast archive of historical imagery. Over 90 percent of the frames of historical aerial photos used in this experiment were successfully orthorectified to the accuracy of the USGS 100K base map series utilized for the geospatial reference of the archive. The accuracy standard for the 100K series maps is approximately 167 feet (51 meters). The main problems associated with orthorectification failure were cloud cover, shadow and historical landscape change which confused automated image-to-image matching processes. Further research is recommended to optimize automated orthorectification methods and enable broad operational use, especially as related to historical imagery archives.

  12. Multistep photochemical charge separation in rod-like molecules based on aromatic insides and diimides

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Svec, W.A.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1996-07-17

    A series of intramolecular triads with linear, rod-like structures has been developed that undergo very efficient two-step electron transfer following direct excitation of a chromophore possessing a charge transfer (CT) excited state. The CT state of 4-aminonaphthalene-1,8-imide (ANI), produced by direct excitation of the chromophore, has about 70% of a negative charge transferred from the amine to the imide. Attachment of aniline (AN) and p-methoxyaniline (MeOAn) donors to ANI by means of a piperazine bridge results in linear dyads. An-ANI and MeOAn-ANI, that undergo rapid electron transfer in about 10{sup -11} s to give a >99% yield of the ion pairs, An{sup +}-ANI{sup -} and MeOAn{sup +}-ANI{sup -}, in which the charges are separated by 7.7 A. Further attachment of a 1,8:4,5-naphthalene-dimide (NI) electron acceptor to the imide group of ANI using a 2,5-dimethyphenyl spacer results in triads An-ANI-NI and MeOAn-ANI-NI. Excitation of the CT state of ANI within these triads results in the same high yield charge separation step observed in the corresponding dyads followed by a subnanosecond charge shift reaction to yield the giant dipole states An{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} and MeOAn{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} in 72% and 92% yield, respectively, in toluene. The lifetime of MeOAn{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} is 310 ns. These triad molecules make explicit use of a CT excited state to initiate a multistep electron transfer process. 67 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. On the Analysis of Multistep-Out-of-Grid Method for Celestial Mechanics Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olifer, L.; Choliy, V.

    2016-09-01

    Occasionally, there is a necessity in high-accurate prediction of celestial body trajectory. The most common way to do that is to solve Kepler's equation analytically or to use Runge-Kutta or Adams integrators to solve equation of motion numerically. For low-orbit satellites, there is a critical need in accounting geopotential and another forces which influence motion. As the result, the right side of equation of motion becomes much bigger, and classical integrators will not be quite effective. On the other hand, there is a multistep-out-of-grid (MOG) method which combines Runge-Kutta and Adams methods. The MOG method is based on using m on-grid values of the solution and n × m off-grid derivative estimations. Such method could provide stable integrators of maximum possible order, O (hm+mn+n-1). The main subject of this research was to implement and analyze the MOG method for solving satellite equation of motion with taking into account Earth geopotential model (ex. EGM2008 (Pavlis at al., 2008)) and with possibility to add other perturbations such as atmospheric drag or solar radiation pressure. Simulations were made for satellites on low orbit and with various eccentricities (from 0.1 to 0.9). Results of the MOG integrator were compared with results of Runge-Kutta and Adams integrators. It was shown that the MOG method has better accuracy than classical ones of the same order and less right-hand value estimations when is working on high orders. That gives it some advantage over "classical" methods.

  14. Two- and multi-step annealing of cereal starches in relation to gelatinization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2008-02-13

    Two- and multi-step annealing experiments were designed to determine how much gelatinization temperature of waxy rice, waxy barley, and wheat starches could be increased without causing a decrease in gelatinization enthalpy or a decline in X-ray crystallinity. A mixture of starch and excess water was heated in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) pan to a specific temperature and maintained there for 0.5-48 h. The experimental approach was first to anneal a starch at a low temperature so that the gelatinization temperature of the starch was increased without causing a decrease in gelatinization enthalpy. The annealing temperature was then raised, but still was kept below the onset gelatinization temperature of the previously annealed starch. When a second- or third-step annealing temperature was high enough, it caused a decrease in crystallinity, even though the holding temperature remained below the onset gelatinization temperature of the previously annealed starch. These results support that gelatinization is a nonequilibrium process and that dissociation of double helices is driven by the swelling of amorphous regions. Small-scale starch slurry annealing was also performed and confirmed the annealing results conducted in DSC pans. A three-phase model of a starch granule, a mobile amorphous phase, a rigid amorphous phase, and a crystalline phase, was used to interpret the annealing results. Annealing seems to be an interplay between a more efficient packing of crystallites in starch granules and swelling of plasticized amorphous regions. There is always a temperature ceiling that can be used to anneal a starch without causing a decrease in crystallinity. That temperature ceiling is starch-specific, dependent on the structure of a starch, and is lower than the original onset gelatinization of a starch.

  15. Comparability of river quality assessment using macrophytes: a multi-step procedure to overcome biogeographical differences.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F C; Segurado, P; Urbanič, G; Cambra, J; Chauvin, C; Ciadamidaro, S; Dörflinger, G; Ferreira, J; Germ, M; Manolaki, P; Minciardi, M R; Munné, A; Papastergiadou, E; Ferreira, M T

    2014-04-01

    This paper exposes a new methodological approach to solve the problem of intercalibrating river quality national methods when a common metric is lacking and most of the countries share the same Water Framework Directive (WFD) assessment method. We provide recommendations for similar works in future concerning the assessment of ecological accuracy and highlight the importance of a good common ground to make feasible the scientific work beyond the intercalibration. The approach herein presented was applied to highly seasonal rivers of the Mediterranean Geographical Intercalibration Group for the Biological Quality Element Macrophytes. The Mediterranean Group of river macrophytes involved seven countries and two assessment methods with similar acquisition data and assessment concept: the Macrophyte Biological Index for Rivers (IBMR) for Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain, and the River Macrophyte Index (RMI) for Slovenia. Database included 318 sites of which 78 were considered as benchmarks. The boundary harmonization was performed for common WFD-assessment methods (all countries except Slovenia) using the median of the Good/Moderate and High/Good boundaries of all countries. Then, whenever possible, the Slovenian method, RMI was computed for the entire database. The IBMR was also computed for the Slovenian sites and was regressed against RMI in order to check the relatedness of methods (R(2)=0.45; p<0.00001) and to convert RMI boundaries into the IBMR scale. The boundary bias of RMI was computed using direct comparison of classification and the median boundary values following boundary harmonization. The average absolute class differences after harmonization is 26% and the percentage of classifications differing by half of a quality class is also small (16.4%). This multi-step approach to the intercalibration was endorsed by the WFD Regulatory Committee.

  16. In situ estimation of soil hydraulic functions using a multistep soil-water extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Å Imunek, J.; Hopmans, J. W.; Clausnitzer, V.

    1998-05-01

    Estimation of the retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions is essential to effectively provide input for water flow and transport simulation and prediction. A parameter optimization procedure is shown as a promising tool to estimate inversely these hydraulic function parameters from transient soil matric potential and cumulative soil solution extraction measurements. Sensitivity analyses from synthetic data generated from forward numerical model simulations showed that optimum tensiometer locations will depend on soil type. Experiments were carried out in both a laboratory column (Columbia sandy loam) and in the field (Yolo silt loam). In both cases a series of vacuum extraction pressures was applied to a ceramic soil solution sampler, and cumulative soil solution extraction volume and matric potentials at various positions near the extraction device were monitored as the soil solution was extracted. In the laboratory a zero-flux boundary condition was maintained at the bottom of the column, whereas matric potential measurements were used in the field to define the lower boundary. In both the field and laboratory experiments, flow at the upper boundary was zero. Cumulative extraction volume and matric potential data were included in the objective function to be minimized to estimate the hydraulic function parameters. We determined that the optimized solution was sensitive to the contact between the ceramic ring and the surrounding soil. By also optimizing the hydraulic resistance of the ceramic ring of the extraction device, optimization improved the fit between measured and optimized flow variables. Comparison of the optimized with the independently measured hydraulic functions indicated that the in situ estimation using a multistep extraction procedure can provide accurate soil hydraulic data.

  17. Detection of Heterogeneous Small Inclusions by a Multi-Step MUSIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Dell'Aversano, Angela; Leone, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution the problem of detecting and localizing scatterers with small (in terms of wavelength) cross sections by collecting their scattered field is addressed. The problem is dealt with for a two-dimensional and scalar configuration where the background is given as a two-layered cylindrical medium. More in detail, while scattered field data are taken in the outermost layer, inclusions are embedded within the inner layer. Moreover, the case of heterogeneous inclusions (i.e., having different scattering coefficients) is addressed. As a pertinent applicative context we identify the problem of diagnose concrete pillars in order to detect and locate rebars, ducts and other small in-homogeneities that can populate the interior of the pillar. The nature of inclusions influences the scattering coefficients. For example, the field scattered by rebars is stronger than the one due to ducts. Accordingly, it is expected that the more weakly scattering inclusions can be difficult to be detected as their scattered fields tend to be overwhelmed by those of strong scatterers. In order to circumvent this problem, in this contribution a multi-step MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) detection algorithm is adopted [1]. In particular, the first stage aims at detecting rebars. Once rebars have been detected, their positions are exploited to update the Green's function and to subtract the scattered field due to their presence. The procedure is repeated until all the inclusions are detected. The analysis is conducted by numerical experiments for a multi-view/multi-static single-frequency configuration and the synthetic data are generated by a FDTD forward solver. Acknowledgement This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar." [1] R. Solimene, A. Dell'Aversano and G. Leone, "MUSIC algorithms for rebar detection," J. of Geophysics and Engineering, vol. 10, pp. 1

  18. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-12-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  19. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  20. Analysis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a multistep process: a population-based modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Calvo, Andrea; Chio, Adriano; Colville, Shuna; Ellis, Cathy M; Hardiman, Orla; Heverin, Mark; Howard, Robin S; Huisman, Mark H B; Keren, Noa; Leigh, P Nigel; Mazzini, Letizia; Mora, Gabriele; Orrell, Richard W; Rooney, James; Scott, Kirsten M; Scotton, William J; Seelen, Meinie; Shaw, Christopher E; Sidle, Katie S; Swingler, Robert; Tsuda, Miho; Veldink, Jan H; Visser, Anne E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Pearce, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis shares characteristics with some cancers, such as onset being more common in later life, progression usually being rapid, the disease affecting a particular cell type, and showing complex inheritance. We used a model originally applied to cancer epidemiology to investigate the hypothesis that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multistep process. Methods We generated incidence data by age and sex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population registers in Ireland (registration dates 1995–2012), the Netherlands (2006–12), Italy (1995–2004), Scotland (1989–98), and England (2002–09), and calculated age and sex-adjusted incidences for each register. We regressed the log of age-specific incidence against the log of age with least squares regression. We did the analyses within each register, and also did a combined analysis, adjusting for register. Findings We identified 6274 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from a catchment population of about 34 million people. We noted a linear relationship between log incidence and log age in all five registers: England r2=0·95, Ireland r2=0·99, Italy r2=0·95, the Netherlands r2=0·99, and Scotland r2=0·97; overall r2=0·99. All five registers gave similar estimates of the linear slope ranging from 4·5 to 5·1, with overlapping confidence intervals. The combination of all five registers gave an overall slope of 4·8 (95% CI 4·5–5·0), with similar estimates for men (4·6, 4·3–4·9) and women (5·0, 4·5–5·5). Interpretation A linear relationship between the log incidence and log age of onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is consistent with a multistage model of disease. The slope estimate suggests that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a six-step process. Identification of these steps could lead to preventive and therapeutic avenues. Funding UK Medical Research Council; UK Economic and Social Research Council; Ireland Health Research Board; The

  1. Achieving effective terminal exciton delivery in quantum dot antenna-sensitized multistep DNA photonic wires.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Ancona, Mario G; Buckhout-White, Susan; Algar, W Russ; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L; Goldman, Ellen R; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-08-27

    exciton transfer efficiencies approaching 100% are seen when the dye spacings are 0.5 × R0. However, as additional dyes are included in each wire, strong nonidealities appear that are suspected to arise predominantly from the poor photophysical performance of the last two acceptor dyes (Cy5 and Cy5.5). The results are discussed in the context of improving exciton transfer efficiency along photonic wires and the contributions these architectures can make to understanding multistep FRET processes. PMID:23844838

  2. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  3. Materials Testing and Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

    1980-07-01

    The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

  4. Automated Factor Slice Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Tibbits, Matthew M.; Groendyke, Chris; Haran, Murali; Liechty, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms offer a very general approach for sampling from arbitrary distributions. However, designing and tuning MCMC algorithms for each new distribution, can be challenging and time consuming. It is particularly difficult to create an efficient sampler when there is strong dependence among the variables in a multivariate distribution. We describe a two-pronged approach for constructing efficient, automated MCMC algorithms: (1) we propose the “factor slice sampler”, a generalization of the univariate slice sampler where we treat the selection of a coordinate basis (factors) as an additional tuning parameter, and (2) we develop an approach for automatically selecting tuning parameters in order to construct an efficient factor slice sampler. In addition to automating the factor slice sampler, our tuning approach also applies to the standard univariate slice samplers. We demonstrate the efficiency and general applicability of our automated MCMC algorithm with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:24955002

  5. Automation in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Reader, John C

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of appropriate automation can make a significant improvement in productivity at each stage of the drug discovery process, if it is incorporated into an efficient overall process. Automated chemistry has evolved rapidly from the 'combinatorial' techniques implemented in many industrial laboratories in the early 1990's which focused primarily on the hit discovery phase, and were highly dependent on solid-phase techniques and instrumentation derived from peptide synthesis. Automated tools and strategies have been developed which can impact the hit discovery, hit expansion and lead optimization phases, not only in synthesis, but also in reaction optimization, work-up, and purification of compounds. This article discusses the implementation of some of these techniques, based especially on experiences at Millennium Pharmaceuticals Research and Development Ltd.

  6. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  7. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  8. Automated fiber pigtailing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, O. T.; Lowry, M. E.; Lu, S. Y.; Nelson, D. C.; Nikkel, D. J.; Pocha, M. D.; Young, K. D.

    1994-02-01

    The high cost of optoelectronic (OE) devices is due mainly to the labor-intensive packaging process. Manually pigtailing such devices as single-mode laser diodes and modulators is very time consuming with poor quality control. The Photonics Program and the Engineering Research Division at LLNL are addressing several issues associated with automatically packaging OE devices. A furry automated system must include high-precision fiber alignment, fiber attachment techniques, in-situ quality control, and parts handling and feeding. This paper will present on-going work at LLNL in the areas of automated fiber alignment and fiber attachment. For the fiber alignment, we are building an automated fiber pigtailing machine (AFPM) which combines computer vision and object recognition algorithms with active feedback to perform sub-micron alignments of single-mode fibers to modulators and laser diodes. We expect to perform sub-micron alignments in less than five minutes with this technology. For fiber attachment, we are building various geometries of silicon microbenches which include on-board heaters to solder metal-coated fibers and other components in place; these designs are completely compatible with an automated process of OE packaging. We have manually attached a laser diode, a thermistor, and a thermo-electric heater to one of our microbenches in less than 15 minutes using the on-board heaters for solder reflow; an automated process could perform this same exercise in only a few minutes. Automated packaging techniques such as these will help lower the costs of OE devices.

  9. Multi-steps infrared spectroscopic characterization of the effect of flowering on medicinal value of Cistanche tubulosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zuliang; Xu, Peng; Wu, Peiyi

    2009-01-01

    Multi-steps infrared spectroscopic methods, including conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation spectroscopy, have been proved to be effective methods to examine complicated mixture system such as Chinese herbal medicine. The focus of this paper is the investigation on the effect of flowering on the pharmaceutical components of Cistanche tubulosa by using the Multi-steps infrared spectroscopic method. Power-spectrum analysis is applied to improve the resolution of 2D-IR contour maps and much more details of overlapped peaks are detected. According to the results of FT-IR and second derivative spectra, the peak at 1732 cm -1 assigned to C dbnd O is stronger before flowering than that after flowering in the stem, while more C dbnd O groups are found in the top after flowering. The spectra of root change a lot in the process of flowering for the reason that many peaks shift and disappear after flowering. Seven peaks in the spectra of stem, which are assigned to different kinds of glycoside components, are distinguished by Power-spectra in the range of 900-1200 cm -1. The results provide a scientific explanation to the traditional experience that flowering consumes the pharmaceutical components in stem and the seeds absorb some nutrients of stem after flowering. In conclusion, the Multi-steps infrared spectroscopic method combined with Power-spectra is a promising method to investigate the flowering process of C. tubulosa and discriminate various parts of the herbal medicine.

  10. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  11. Ground based automated telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Thompson, W.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendation that a ground-based automated telescope of the 2-meter class be built for remote multiuser use as a natural facility. Experience dictates that a primary consideration is a time shared multitasking operating system with virtual memory overlayed with a real time priority interrupt. The primary user facility is a remote terminal networked to the single computer. Many users must have simultaneous time shared access to the computer for program development. The telescope should be rapid slewing, and hence a light weight construction. Automation allows for the closed loop pointing error correction independent of extreme accuracy of the mount.

  12. Automated software development workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering software development was automated using an expert system (rule-based) approach. The use of this technology offers benefits not available from current software development and maintenance methodologies. A workstation was built with a library or program data base with methods for browsing the designs stored; a system for graphical specification of designs including a capability for hierarchical refinement and definition in a graphical design system; and an automated code generation capability in FORTRAN. The workstation was then used in a demonstration with examples from an attitude control subsystem design for the space station. Documentation and recommendations are presented.

  13. Automating the CMS DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  14. Automated knowledge generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.

    1988-01-01

    The general objectives of the NASA/UCF Automated Knowledge Generation Project were the development of an intelligent software system that could access CAD design data bases, interpret them, and generate a diagnostic knowledge base in the form of a system model. The initial area of concentration is in the diagnosis of the process control system using the Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) diagnostic system. A secondary objective was the study of general problems of automated knowledge generation. A prototype was developed, based on object-oriented language (Flavors).

  15. Automation of analytical isotachophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thormann, Wolfgang

    1985-01-01

    The basic features of automation of analytical isotachophoresis (ITP) are reviewed. Experimental setups consisting of narrow bore tubes which are self-stabilized against thermal convection are considered. Sample detection in free solution is discussed, listing the detector systems presently used or expected to be of potential use in the near future. The combination of a universal detector measuring the evolution of ITP zone structures with detector systems specific to desired components is proposed as a concept of an automated chemical analyzer based on ITP. Possible miniaturization of such an instrument by means of microlithographic techniques is discussed.

  16. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  17. Influence of the drawing process on the defect generation in multistep-index germanium-doped optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Origlio, G; Cannas, M; Girard, S; Boscaino, R; Boukenter, A; Ouerdane, Y

    2009-08-01

    Variation of germanium lone pair center (GLPC) concentration in germanosilicate multistep-index optical fibers and preforms was studied using confocal microscopy luminescence technique. The experimental results provide evidence that in the central core region ([Ge] approximately 11 wt.%) of our specific canonical samples the ratio [GLPC]/[Ge] is five times larger in fiber than in preforms. The relative influence of the glass composition and of the drawing process on the generation efficiency of the GLPC defects that drive the glass photosensitivity is discussed. The radial distribution of these defects suggests a possible enhancement of the defect creation related to the internal stress of the fiber core.

  18. Multi-Step Ka/Ka Dichroic Plate with Rounded Corners for NASA's 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, Watt; Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel; Long, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    A multi-step Ka/Ka dichroic plate Frequency Selective Surface (FSS structure) is designed, manufactured and tested for use in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas. The proposed design allows ease of manufacturing and ability to handle the increased transmit power (reflected off the FSS) of the DSN BWG antennas from 20kW to 100 kW. The dichroic is designed using HFSS and results agree well with measured data considering the manufacturing tolerances that could be achieved on the dichroic.

  19. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning.

  20. Human Factors In Aircraft Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Report presents survey of state of art in human factors in automation of aircraft operation. Presents examination of aircraft automation and effects on flight crews in relation to human error and aircraft accidents.

  1. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  2. Library Automation: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffady, William

    1989-01-01

    Surveys the current state of computer applications in six areas of library work: circulation control; descriptive cataloging; catalog maintenance and production; reference services; acquisitions; and serials control. Motives for automation are discussed, and examples of representative vendors, products, and services are given. (15 references) (LRW)

  3. Automation in haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Huber, A R; Méndez, A; Brunner-Agten, S

    2013-01-01

    Automatia, an ancient Greece goddess of luck who makes things happen by themselves and on her own will without human engagement, is present in our daily life in the medical laboratory. Automation has been introduced and perfected by clinical chemistry and since then expanded into other fields such as haematology, immunology, molecular biology and also coagulation testing. The initial small and relatively simple standalone instruments have been replaced by more complex systems that allow for multitasking. Integration of automated coagulation testing into total laboratory automation has become possible in the most recent years. Automation has many strengths and opportunities if weaknesses and threats are respected. On the positive side, standardization, reduction of errors, reduction of cost and increase of throughput are clearly beneficial. Dependence on manufacturers, high initiation cost and somewhat expensive maintenance are less favourable factors. The modern lab and especially the todays lab technicians and academic personnel in the laboratory do not add value for the doctor and his patients by spending lots of time behind the machines. In the future the lab needs to contribute at the bedside suggesting laboratory testing and providing support and interpretation of the obtained results. The human factor will continue to play an important role in testing in haemostasis yet under different circumstances.

  4. Building Automation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  5. Automated CCTV Tester

    2000-09-13

    The purpose of an automated CCTV tester is to automatically and continuously monitor multiple perimeter security cameras for changes in a camera's measured resolution and alignment (camera looking at the proper area). It shall track and record the image quality and position of each camera and produce an alarm when a camera is out of specification.

  6. Library Automation in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of Australia's move toward library automation highlights development of a national bibliographic network, local and regional cooperation, integrated library systems, telecommunications, and online systems, as well as microcomputer usage, ergonomics, copyright issues, and national information policy. Information technology plans of the…

  7. Automated Management Of Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy

    1995-01-01

    Report presents main technical issues involved in computer-integrated documentation. Problems associated with automation of management and maintenance of documents analyzed from perspectives of artificial intelligence and human factors. Technologies that may prove useful in computer-integrated documentation reviewed: these include conventional approaches to indexing and retrieval of information, use of hypertext, and knowledge-based artificial-intelligence systems.

  8. Mining Your Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Patricia M., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Four articles address issues of collecting, compiling, reporting, and interpreting statistics generated by automated library systems for administrative decision making. Topics include using a management information system to forecast growth and assess areas for downsizing; statistics for collection development and analysis; and online system…

  9. Automated conflict resolution issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  10. Automating Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavulla, Timothy A.

    1986-01-01

    The Wichita, Kansas, Public Schools' Food Service Department Project Reduction in Paperwork (RIP) is designed to automate certain paperwork functions, thus reducing cost and flow of paper. This article addresses how RIP manages free/reduced meal applications and meets the objectives of reducing paper and increasing accuracy, timeliness, and…

  11. Automated Estimating System (AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, D.A.

    1989-09-01

    This document describes Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System, a personal computer-based software package designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Engineering Division. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System is capable of running in a multiuser environment across a token ring network. The token ring network makes possible services and applications that will more fully integrate all aspects of information processing, provides a central area for large data bases to reside, and allows access to the data base by multiple users. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System also has been enhanced to include an Assembly pricing data base that may be used to retrieve cost data into an estimate. A WBS Title File program has also been included in Version 3.1. The WBS Title File program allows for the creation of a WBS title file that has been integrated with the Automated Estimating System to provide WBS titles in update mode and in reports. This provides for consistency in WBS titles and provides the capability to display WBS titles on reports generated at a higher WBS level.

  12. Automated Administrative Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrie, M. D.; Jarrett, J. R.; Reising, S. A.; Hodge, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Improved productivity and more effective response to information requirements for internal management, NASA Centers, and Headquarters resulted from using automated techniques. Modules developed to provide information on manpower, RTOPS, full time equivalency, and physical space reduced duplication, increased communication, and saved time. There is potential for greater savings by sharing and integrating with those who have the same requirements.

  13. Automating Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, James

    1996-01-01

    Presents a four-phase plan for small libraries strategizing for automation: inventory and weeding, data conversion, implementation, and enhancements. Other topics include selecting a system, MARC records, compatibility, ease of use, industry standards, searching capabilities, support services, system security, screen displays, circulation modules,…

  14. CLAN Automation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Library and Archives, Carson City.

    The Central Libraries Automated Network (CLAN) of Nevada is a cooperative system which shares circulation, cataloging, and acquisitions systems and numerous online databases. Its mission is to provide public access to information and efficient library administration through shared computer systems, databases, and telecommunications. This document…

  15. Automated EEG acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Hillman, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Automated self-contained portable device can be used by technicians with minimal training. Data acquired from patient at remote site are transmitted to centralized interpretation center using conventional telephone equipment. There, diagnostic information is analyzed, and results are relayed back to remote site.

  16. Automated Essay Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikli, Semire

    2006-01-01

    The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES) has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali,…

  17. Fabrication of homogenous multilayered W films by multi-step sputtering deposition: a novel grain boundary enrichment strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hailin; Yang, Jijun; Wan, Qiang; Lin, Liwei; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Liu, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Using a multi-step deposition approach, we develop a strategy of homogeneous multilayered (HM) structure to enrich the grain boundary (GB) of sputtered W films. In comparison with the single-layered film, the HM W film is easily controllable for the film GB density. When decreasing the film modulation period t m from 160 nm to 7 nm, the GB density gradually increased from 0.065 nm(-1) to 0.275 nm(-1) without changing the phase structure of the films. Accordingly, the film's electrical resistivity and mechanical hardness, which are related to the GBs, changed from 40.1 μΩ · cm to 75.3 μΩ · cm and from 12.1 GPa to 16.2 GPa, respectively. Detailed analysis showed that the formation of an HM structure is related to the temperature evolution of the film growing surface during the multi-step sputtering process. This study could provide a general engineering approach to enrich film interfaces and allows for the development of thin films with novel microstructures.

  18. Grouped and Multistep Nanoheteroepitaxy: Toward High-Quality GaN on Quasi-Periodic Nano-Mask.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaohui; Yu, Tongjun; Wei, Yang; Ji, Cheng; Cheng, Yutian; Zong, Hua; Wang, Kun; Yang, Zhijian; Kang, Xiangning; Zhang, Guoyi; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-07-20

    A novel nanoheteroepitaxy method, namely, the grouped and multistep nanoheteroepitaxy (GM-NHE), is proposed to attain a high-quality gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. This method combines the effects of sub-100 nm nucleation and multistep lateral growth by using a low-cost but unique carbon nanotube mask, which consists of nanoscale growth windows with a quasi-periodic 2D fill factor. It is found that GM-NHE can facilely reduce threading dislocation density (TDD) and modulate residual stress on foreign substrate without any regrowth. As a result, high-quality GaN epilayer is produced with homogeneously low TDD of 4.51 × 10(7) cm(-2) and 2D-modulated stress, and the performance of the subsequent 410 nm near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode is greatly boosted. In this way, with the facile fabrication of nanomask and the one-off epitaxy procedure, GaN epilayer is prominently improved with the assistance of nanotechnology, which demonstrates great application potential for high-efficiency TDD-sensitive optoelectronic and electronic devices. PMID:27351723

  19. Multi-step damped multichannel singular spectrum analysis for simultaneous reconstruction and denoising of 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yangkang; Huang, Weilin; Gan, Shuwei

    2016-10-01

    Multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA) is an effective approach for simultaneous seismic data reconstruction and denoising. MSSA utilizes truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) to decompose the noisy signal into a signal subspace and a noise subspace and weighted projection onto convex sets (POCS)-like method to reconstruct the missing data in the appropriately constructed block Hankel matrix at each frequency slice. However, there still exists some residual noise in signal space due to two major factors: the deficiency of traditional TSVD and the iteratively inserted observed noisy data during the process of weighted POCS like iterations. In this paper, we first further extend the recently proposed damped MSSA (DMSSA) for random noise attenuation, which is more powerful in distinguishing between signal and noise, to simultaneous reconstruction and denoising. Then combined with DMSSA, we propose a multi-step strategy, named multi-step damped MSSA (MS-DMSSA), to efficiently reduce the inserted noise during the POCS like iterations, thus can improve the final performance of simultaneous reconstruction and denoising. Application of the MS-DMSSA approach on 3D synthetic and field seismic data demonstrates a better performance compared with the conventional MSSA approach.

  20. Grouped and Multistep Nanoheteroepitaxy: Toward High-Quality GaN on Quasi-Periodic Nano-Mask.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaohui; Yu, Tongjun; Wei, Yang; Ji, Cheng; Cheng, Yutian; Zong, Hua; Wang, Kun; Yang, Zhijian; Kang, Xiangning; Zhang, Guoyi; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-07-20

    A novel nanoheteroepitaxy method, namely, the grouped and multistep nanoheteroepitaxy (GM-NHE), is proposed to attain a high-quality gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. This method combines the effects of sub-100 nm nucleation and multistep lateral growth by using a low-cost but unique carbon nanotube mask, which consists of nanoscale growth windows with a quasi-periodic 2D fill factor. It is found that GM-NHE can facilely reduce threading dislocation density (TDD) and modulate residual stress on foreign substrate without any regrowth. As a result, high-quality GaN epilayer is produced with homogeneously low TDD of 4.51 × 10(7) cm(-2) and 2D-modulated stress, and the performance of the subsequent 410 nm near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode is greatly boosted. In this way, with the facile fabrication of nanomask and the one-off epitaxy procedure, GaN epilayer is prominently improved with the assistance of nanotechnology, which demonstrates great application potential for high-efficiency TDD-sensitive optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  1. Multistep Lattice-Voxel method utilizing lattice function for Monte-Carlo treatment planning with pixel based voxel model.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Saito, K; Nakamura, T; Sakae, T; Sakurai, H; Matsumura, A; Ono, K

    2011-12-01

    Treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy generally utilizes Monte-Carlo methods for calculation of the dose distribution. The new treatment planning system JCDS-FX employs the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo code PHITS to calculate the dose distribution. JCDS-FX allows to build a precise voxel model consisting of pixel based voxel cells in the scale of 0.4×0.4×2.0 mm(3) voxel in order to perform high-accuracy dose estimation, e.g. for the purpose of calculating the dose distribution in a human body. However, the miniaturization of the voxel size increases calculation time considerably. The aim of this study is to investigate sophisticated modeling methods which can perform Monte-Carlo calculations for human geometry efficiently. Thus, we devised a new voxel modeling method "Multistep Lattice-Voxel method," which can configure a voxel model that combines different voxel sizes by utilizing the lattice function over and over. To verify the performance of the calculation with the modeling method, several calculations for human geometry were carried out. The results demonstrated that the Multistep Lattice-Voxel method enabled the precise voxel model to reduce calculation time substantially while keeping the high-accuracy of dose estimation.

  2. Abundance and composition of indigenous bacterial communities in a multi-step biofiltration-based drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Karin; Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Liu, Wen-Tso; Boon, Nico; Köster, Oliver; Egli, Thomas; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-10-01

    Indigenous bacterial communities are essential for biofiltration processes in drinking water treatment systems. In this study, we examined the microbial community composition and abundance of three different biofilter types (rapid sand, granular activated carbon, and slow sand filters) and their respective effluents in a full-scale, multi-step treatment plant (Zürich, CH). Detailed analysis of organic carbon degradation underpinned biodegradation as the primary function of the biofilter biomass. The biomass was present in concentrations ranging between 2-5 × 10(15) cells/m(3) in all filters but was phylogenetically, enzymatically and metabolically diverse. Based on 16S rRNA gene-based 454 pyrosequencing analysis for microbial community composition, similar microbial taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Nitrospira and Chloroflexi) were present in all biofilters and in their respective effluents, but the ratio of microbial taxa was different in each filter type. This change was also reflected in the cluster analysis, which revealed a change of 50-60% in microbial community composition between the different filter types. This study documents the direct influence of the filter biomass on the microbial community composition of the final drinking water, particularly when the water is distributed without post-disinfection. The results provide new insights on the complexity of indigenous bacteria colonizing drinking water systems, especially in different biofilters of a multi-step treatment plant.

  3. A multi-step system for screening and localization of hard exudates in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopardikar, Ajit S.; Bhola, Vishal; Raghavendra, B. S.; Narayanan, Rangavittal

    2012-03-01

    The number of people being affected by Diabetes mellitus worldwide is increasing at an alarming rate. Monitoring of the diabetic condition and its effects on the human body are therefore of great importance. Of particular interest is diabetic retinopathy (DR) which is a result of prolonged, unchecked diabetes and affects the visual system. DR is a leading cause of blindness throughout the world. At any point of time 25 - 44% of people with diabetes are afflicted by DR. Automation of the screening and monitoring process for DR is therefore essential for efficient utilization of healthcare resources and optimizing treatment of the affected individuals. Such automation would use retinal images and detect the presence of specific artifacts such as hard exudates, hemorrhages and soft exudates (that may appear in the image) to gauge the severity of DR. In this paper, we focus on the detection of hard exudates. We propose a two step system that consists of a screening step that classifies retinal images as normal or abnormal based on the presence of hard exudates and a detection stage that localizes these artifacts in an abnormal retinal image. The proposed screening step automatically detects the presence of hard exudates with a high sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV ). The detection/localization step uses a k-means based clustering approach to localize hard exudates in the retinal image. Suitable feature vectors are chosen based on their ability to isolate hard exudates while minimizing false detections. The algorithm was tested on a benchmark dataset (DIARETDB1) and was seen to provide a superior performance compared to existing methods. The two-step process described in this paper can be embedded in a tele-ophthalmology system to aid with speedy detection and diagnosis of the severity of DR.

  4. The surveillance state of behavioral automation.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Andreas T; Claridge-Chang, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Genetics' demand for increased throughput is driving automatization of behavior analysis far beyond experimental workhorses like circadian monitors and the operant conditioning box. However, the new automation is not just faster: it is also allowing new kinds of experiments, many of which erase the boundaries of the traditional neuroscience disciplines (psychology, ethology and physiology) while producing insight into problems that were otherwise opaque. Ironically, a central theme of current automatization is to improve observation of animals in increasingly naturalistic environments. This is not just a return to 19th century priorities: the new observational methods provide unprecedented quantitation of actions and ever-closer integration with experimentation.

  5. A universal method for automated gene mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zipperlen, Peder; Nairz, Knud; Rimann, Ivo; Basler, Konrad; Hafen, Ernst; Hengartner, Michael; Hajnal, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Small insertions or deletions (InDels) constitute a ubiquituous class of sequence polymorphisms found in eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present an automated high-throughput genotyping method that relies on the detection of fragment-length polymorphisms (FLPs) caused by InDels. The protocol utilizes standard sequencers and genotyping software. We have established genome-wide FLP maps for both Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster that facilitate genetic mapping with a minimum of manual input and at comparatively low cost. PMID:15693948

  6. Rapid access to compound libraries through flow technology: fully automated synthesis of a 3-aminoindolizine library via orthogonal diversification.

    PubMed

    Lange, Paul P; James, Keith

    2012-10-01

    A novel methodology for the synthesis of druglike heterocycle libraries has been developed through the use of flow reactor technology. The strategy employs orthogonal modification of a heterocyclic core, which is generated in situ, and was used to construct both a 25-membered library of druglike 3-aminoindolizines, and selected examples of a 100-member virtual library. This general protocol allows a broad range of acylation, alkylation and sulfonamidation reactions to be performed in conjunction with a tandem Sonogashira coupling/cycloisomerization sequence. All three synthetic steps were conducted under full automation in the flow reactor, with no handling or isolation of intermediates, to afford the desired products in good yields. This fully automated, multistep flow approach opens the way to highly efficient generation of druglike heterocyclic systems as part of a lead discovery strategy or within a lead optimization program.

  7. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  8. Automated theorem proving.

    PubMed

    Plaisted, David A

    2014-03-01

    Automated theorem proving is the use of computers to prove or disprove mathematical or logical statements. Such statements can express properties of hardware or software systems, or facts about the world that are relevant for applications such as natural language processing and planning. A brief introduction to propositional and first-order logic is given, along with some of the main methods of automated theorem proving in these logics. These methods of theorem proving include resolution, Davis and Putnam-style approaches, and others. Methods for handling the equality axioms are also presented. Methods of theorem proving in propositional logic are presented first, and then methods for first-order logic. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:115-128. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1269 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304304

  9. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  10. Automated breeder fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.; Frederickson, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Project is to develop remotely operated equipment for the processing and manufacturing of breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line will be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The FMEF is presently under construction at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The fabrication and support systems of the SAF line are designed for computer-controlled operation from a centralized control room. Remote and automated fuel fabriction operations will result in: reduced radiation exposure to workers; enhanced safeguards; improved product quality; near real-time accountability, and increased productivity. The present schedule calls for installation of SAF line equipment in the FMEF beginning in 1984, with qualifying runs starting in 1986 and production commencing in 1987. 5 figures.

  11. The automation of science.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Rowland, Jem; Oliver, Stephen G; Young, Michael; Aubrey, Wayne; Byrne, Emma; Liakata, Maria; Markham, Magdalena; Pir, Pinar; Soldatova, Larisa N; Sparkes, Andrew; Whelan, Kenneth E; Clare, Amanda

    2009-04-01

    The basis of science is the hypothetico-deductive method and the recording of experiments in sufficient detail to enable reproducibility. We report the development of Robot Scientist "Adam," which advances the automation of both. Adam has autonomously generated functional genomics hypotheses about the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and experimentally tested these hypotheses by using laboratory automation. We have confirmed Adam's conclusions through manual experiments. To describe Adam's research, we have developed an ontology and logical language. The resulting formalization involves over 10,000 different research units in a nested treelike structure, 10 levels deep, that relates the 6.6 million biomass measurements to their logical description. This formalization describes how a machine contributed to scientific knowledge. PMID:19342587

  12. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  13. Automated campaign system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondran, Gary; Chao, Hui; Lin, Xiaofan; Beyer, Dirk; Joshi, Parag; Atkins, Brian; Obrador, Pere

    2006-02-01

    To run a targeted campaign involves coordination and management across numerous organizations and complex process flows. Everything from market analytics on customer databases, acquiring content and images, composing the materials, meeting the sponsoring enterprise brand standards, driving through production and fulfillment, and evaluating results; all processes are currently performed by experienced highly trained staff. Presented is a developed solution that not only brings together technologies that automate each process, but also automates the entire flow so that a novice user could easily run a successful campaign from their desktop. This paper presents the technologies, structure, and process flows used to bring this system together. Highlighted will be how the complexity of running a targeted campaign is hidden from the user through technologies, all while providing the benefits of a professionally managed campaign.

  14. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  15. Automated Testing System

    2006-05-09

    ATS is a Python-language program for automating test suites for software programs that do not interact with thier users, such as scripted scientific simulations. ATS features a decentralized approach especially suited to larger projects. In its multinode mode it can utilize many nodes of a cluster in order to do many test in parallel. It has features for submitting longer-running tests to a batch system and would have to be customized for use elsewhere.

  16. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Sewy, D.; Pickering, C.; Sauers, R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the phase 2 of the power subsystem automation study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using computer software to manage an aspect of the electrical power subsystem on a space station. The state of the art in expert systems software was investigated in this study. This effort resulted in the demonstration of prototype expert system software for managing one aspect of a simulated space station power subsystem.

  17. Cavendish Balance Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report for a project carried out to modify a manual commercial Cavendish Balance for automated use in cryostat. The scope of this project was to modify an off-the-shelf manually operated Cavendish Balance to allow for automated operation for periods of hours or days in cryostat. The purpose of this modification was to allow the balance to be used in the study of effects of superconducting materials on the local gravitational field strength to determine if the strength of gravitational fields can be reduced. A Cavendish Balance was chosen because it is a fairly simple piece of equipment for measuring gravity, one the least accurately known and least understood physical constants. The principle activities that occurred under this purchase order were: (1) All the components necessary to hold and automate the Cavendish Balance in a cryostat were designed. Engineering drawings were made of custom parts to be fabricated, other off-the-shelf parts were procured; (2) Software was written in LabView to control the automation process via a stepper motor controller and stepper motor, and to collect data from the balance during testing; (3)Software was written to take the data collected from the Cavendish Balance and reduce it to give a value for the gravitational constant; (4) The components of the system were assembled and fitted to a cryostat. Also the LabView hardware including the control computer, stepper motor driver, data collection boards, and necessary cabling were assembled; and (5) The system was operated for a number of periods, data collected, and reduced to give an average value for the gravitational constant.

  18. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  19. Automated Cooperative Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Pahle, Joseph; Brown, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the Automated Cooperative Trajectories project. An introduction to the phenomena of wake vortices is given, along with a summary of past research into the possibility of extracting energy from the wake by flying close parallel trajectories. Challenges and barriers to adoption of civilian automatic wake surfing technology are identified. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described that will support future research. Finally, a roadmap for future research and technology transition is proposed.

  20. Algorithms for automated DNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, Douglas; Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Kittleson, Joshua T.; DeLoache, Will; Batten, Christopher; Anderson, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Generating a defined set of genetic constructs within a large combinatorial space provides a powerful method for engineering novel biological functions. However, the process of assembling more than a few specific DNA sequences can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Even if a correct theoretical construction scheme is developed manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and formal approaches are needed for exploring these vast design spaces. By automating the design of DNA fabrication schemes using computational algorithms, we can eliminate human error while reducing redundant operations, thus minimizing the time and cost required for conducting biological engineering experiments. Here, we provide algorithms that optimize the simultaneous assembly of a collection of related DNA sequences. We compare our algorithms to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with random search approaches on two real-world datasets show that our algorithms can also quickly find lower-cost solutions for large datasets. PMID:20335162

  1. Automation in biological crystallization.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  2. Automation in biological crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Stewart, Patrick; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given. PMID:24915074

  3. Automation model of sewerage rehabilitation planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, M D; Su, T C

    2006-01-01

    The major steps of sewerage rehabilitation include inspection of sewerage, assessment of structural conditions, computation of structural condition grades, and determination of rehabilitation methods and materials. Conventionally, sewerage rehabilitation planning relies on experts with professional background that is tedious and time-consuming. This paper proposes an automation model of planning optimal sewerage rehabilitation strategies for the sewer system by integrating image process, clustering technology, optimization, and visualization display. Firstly, image processing techniques, such as wavelet transformation and co-occurrence features extraction, were employed to extract various characteristics of structural failures from CCTV inspection images. Secondly, a classification neural network was established to automatically interpret the structural conditions by comparing the extracted features with the typical failures in a databank. Then, to achieve optimal rehabilitation efficiency, a genetic algorithm was used to determine appropriate rehabilitation methods and substitution materials for the pipe sections with a risk of mal-function and even collapse. Finally, the result from the automation model can be visualized in a geographic information system in which essential information of the sewer system and sewerage rehabilitation plans are graphically displayed. For demonstration, the automation model of optimal sewerage rehabilitation planning was applied to a sewer system in east Taichung, Chinese Taiwan.

  4. Automation model of sewerage rehabilitation planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, M D; Su, T C

    2006-01-01

    The major steps of sewerage rehabilitation include inspection of sewerage, assessment of structural conditions, computation of structural condition grades, and determination of rehabilitation methods and materials. Conventionally, sewerage rehabilitation planning relies on experts with professional background that is tedious and time-consuming. This paper proposes an automation model of planning optimal sewerage rehabilitation strategies for the sewer system by integrating image process, clustering technology, optimization, and visualization display. Firstly, image processing techniques, such as wavelet transformation and co-occurrence features extraction, were employed to extract various characteristics of structural failures from CCTV inspection images. Secondly, a classification neural network was established to automatically interpret the structural conditions by comparing the extracted features with the typical failures in a databank. Then, to achieve optimal rehabilitation efficiency, a genetic algorithm was used to determine appropriate rehabilitation methods and substitution materials for the pipe sections with a risk of mal-function and even collapse. Finally, the result from the automation model can be visualized in a geographic information system in which essential information of the sewer system and sewerage rehabilitation plans are graphically displayed. For demonstration, the automation model of optimal sewerage rehabilitation planning was applied to a sewer system in east Taichung, Chinese Taiwan. PMID:17302324

  5. Predictions for rapid methods and automation in food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Fung, Daniel Y C

    2002-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the present status of rapid methods and automation in microbiology. Predictions are also presented for development in the following areas: viable cell counts; real-time monitoring of hygiene; polymerase chain reaction, ribotyping, and genetic tests in food laboratories; automated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunotests; rapid dipstick technology; biosensors for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point programs; instant detection of target pathogens by computer-generated matrix; effective separation and concentration for rapid identification of target cells; microbiological alert systems in food packages; and rapid alert kits for detecting pathogens at home.

  6. Discovery of novel, non-acidic mPGES-1 inhibitors by virtual screening with a multistep protocol

    PubMed Central

    Noha, Stefan M.; Fischer, Katrin; Koeberle, Andreas; Garscha, Ulrike; Werz, Oliver; Schuster, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) inhibitors are considered as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory pain and certain types of cancer. So far, several series of acidic as well as non-acidic inhibitors of mPGES-1 have been discovered. Acidic inhibitors, however, may have issues, such as loss of potency in human whole blood and in vivo, stressing the importance of the design and identification of novel, non-acidic chemical scaffolds of mPGES-1 inhibitors. Using a multistep virtual screening protocol, the Vitas-M compound library (∼1.3 million entries) was filtered and 16 predicted compounds were experimentally evaluated in a biological assay in vitro. This approach yielded two molecules active in the low micromolar range (IC50 values: 4.5 and 3.8 μM, respectively). PMID:26088337

  7. Ultra-fast consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems with multi-step predictive output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the ultra-fast consensus problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems based on a unified consensus framework. A novel multi-step predictive output mechanism is proposed under a directed communication topology containing a spanning tree. By predicting the outputs of a network several steps ahead and adding this information into the consensus protocol, it is shown that the asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q + 1 compared to the routine consensus. The difficult problem of selecting the optimal control gain is solved well by introducing a variable called convergence step. In addition, the ultra-fast formation achievement is studied on the basis of this new consensus protocol. Finally, the ultra-fast consensus with respect to a reference model and robust consensus is discussed. Some simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  8. Statistical investigation of a blank holder force distribution system for a multi-step deep drawing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommerup, So/ren; Endelt, Benny; Nielsen, Karl Brian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates process control possibilities obtained from a new tool concept for adaptive blank holder force (BHF) distribution. The investigation concerns the concept's application to a multi-step deep drawing process exemplified by the NUMISHEET2014 benchmark 2: Springback of draw-redraw pan. An actuator system, where several cavities are embedded into the blank holder plate is used. By independently controlling the pressure of hydraulic fluid in these cavities, a controlled deflection of the blank holder plate surface can be achieved whereby the distribution of the BHF can be controlled. Using design of experiments, a full 3-level factorial experiments is conducted with respect to the cavity pressures, and the effects and interactions are evaluated.

  9. Catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis as a principal strategy in multistep synthesis design: a concise route to (+)-neopeltolide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Molybdenum-, tungsten-, and ruthenium-based complexes that control the stereochemical outcome of olefin metathesis reactions have been recently introduced. However, the complementary nature of these systems through their combined use in multistep complex molecule synthesis has not been illustrated. A concise diastereo- and enantioselective route that furnishes the anti-proliferative natural product neopeltolide is now disclosed. Catalytic transformations are employed to address every stereochemical issue. Among the featured processes are an enantioselective ring-opening/cross-metathesis promoted by a Mo monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex and a macrocyclic ring-closing metathesis that affords a trisubstituted alkene and is catalyzed by a Mo bis(aryloxide) species. Furthermore, Z-selective cross-metathesis reactions, facilitated by Mo and Ru complexes, have been employed in the stereoselective synthesis of the acyclic dienyl moiety of the target molecule. PMID:25377347

  10. Catalyst-controlled stereoselective olefin metathesis as a principal strategy in multistep synthesis design: a concise route to (+)-neopeltolide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Molybdenum-, tungsten-, and ruthenium-based complexes that control the stereochemical outcome of olefin metathesis reactions have been recently introduced. However, the complementary nature of these systems through their combined use in multistep complex molecule synthesis has not been illustrated. A concise diastereo- and enantioselective route that furnishes the anti-proliferative natural product neopeltolide is now disclosed. Catalytic transformations are employed to address every stereochemical issue. Among the featured processes are an enantioselective ring-opening/cross-metathesis promoted by a Mo monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex and a macrocyclic ring-closing metathesis that affords a trisubstituted alkene and is catalyzed by a Mo bis(aryloxide) species. Furthermore, Z-selective cross-metathesis reactions, facilitated by Mo and Ru complexes, have been employed in the stereoselective synthesis of the acyclic dienyl moiety of the target molecule.

  11. Controlling growth and field emission properties of silicon nanotube arrays by multistep template replication and chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Cheng; Yu, Yuxiang; Liao, Wei; Zhao, Xinsheng; Xu, Dongsheng; Chen, Xihong; Yu, Dapeng

    2005-09-01

    A multistep template replication route was employed to fabricate highly ordered silicon nanotube (SiNT) arrays, in which annular nanochannel membranes were produced first, and then silicon was deposited into the annular nanochannels by pyrolytic decomposition of silane. Electron microscopy revealed that these SiNTs are highly crystalline and the wall thicknesses can be controlled by the spaces of the annular nanochannel. Field emission characterization showed that the turn-on field and threshold field for the SiNT arrays are about 5.1V/μm and 7.3V/μm, respectively. These results represent one of the lowest fields ever reported for Si field emission materials at technologically useful current densities.

  12. Multistep continuous-flow synthesis in medicinal chemistry: discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of CCR8 ligands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Trine P; Mirsharghi, Sahar; Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Ritzén, Andreas; Ulven, Trond

    2013-07-01

    A three-step continuous-flow synthesis system and its application to the assembly of a new series of chemokine receptor ligands directly from commercial building blocks is reported. No scavenger columns or solvent switches are necessary to recover the desired test compounds, which were obtained in overall yields of 49-94%. The system is modular and flexible, and the individual steps of the sequence can be interchanged with similar outcome, extending the scope of the chemistry. Biological evaluation confirmed activity on the chemokine CCR8 receptor and provided initial structure-activity-relationship (SAR) information for this new ligand series, with the most potent member displaying full agonist activity with single-digit nanomolar potency. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first published example of efficient use of multistep flow synthesis combined with biological testing and SAR studies in medicinal chemistry.

  13. Strong textured SmCo5 nanoflakes with ultrahigh coercivity prepared by multistep (three steps) surfactant-assisted ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wen-Liang; Zhao, Xin; Xiong, Jie-Fu; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Tong-Yun; Hu, Feng-Xia; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2015-08-01

    The high coercivity of 26.2 kOe for SmCo5 nanoflakes are obtained by multistep (three steps) surfactant-assisted ball milling. The magnetic properties, phase structure and morphology are studied by VSM, XRD and SEM, respectively. The results demonstrate that the three step ball-milling can keep more complete crystallinity (relatively less defects) during the process of milling compared with one step high energy ball-milling, which enhances the texture degree and coercivity. In addition, the mechanism of coercivity are also studied by the temperature dependence of demagnetization curves for aligned SmCo5 nanoflakes/resin composite, the result indicates that the magnetization reversal could be controlled by co-existed mechanisms of pinning and nucleation.

  14. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  15. Microfluidic large-scale integration: the evolution of design rules for biological automation.

    PubMed

    Melin, Jessica; Quake, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidic large-scale integration (mLSI) refers to the development of microfluidic chips with thousands of integrated micromechanical valves and control components. This technology is utilized in many areas of biology and chemistry and is a candidate to replace today's conventional automation paradigm, which consists of fluid-handling robots. We review the basic development of mLSI and then discuss design principles of mLSI to assess the capabilities and limitations of the current state of the art and to facilitate the application of mLSI to areas of biology. Many design and practical issues, including economies of scale, parallelization strategies, multiplexing, and multistep biochemical processing, are discussed. Several microfluidic components used as building blocks to create effective, complex, and highly integrated microfluidic networks are also highlighted.

  16. Automation in organizations: Eternal conflict

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieterly, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Some ideas on and insights into the problems associated with automation in organizations are presented with emphasis on the concept of automation, its relationship to the individual, and its impact on system performance. An analogy is drawn, based on an American folk hero, to emphasize the extent of the problems encountered when dealing with automation within an organization. A model is proposed to focus attention on a set of appropriate dimensions. The function allocation process becomes a prominent aspect of the model. The current state of automation research is mentioned in relation to the ideas introduced. Proposed directions for an improved understanding of automation's effect on the individual's efficiency are discussed. The importance of understanding the individual's perception of the system in terms of the degree of automation is highlighted.

  17. PaR-PaR Laboratory Automation Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Linshiz, G; Stawski, N; Poust, S; Bi, CH; Keasling, JD; Hilson, NJ

    2013-05-01

    Labor-intensive multistep biological tasks, such as the construction and cloning of DNA molecules, are prime candidates for laboratory automation. Flexible and biology-friendly operation of robotic equipment is key to its successful integration in biological laboratories, and the efforts required to operate a robot must be much smaller than the alternative manual lab work. To achieve these goals, a simple high-level biology-friendly robot programming language is needed. We have developed and experimentally validated such a language: Programming a Robot (PaR-PaR). The syntax and compiler for the language are based on computer science principles and a deep understanding of biological workflows. PaR-PaR allows researchers to use liquid-handling robots effectively, enabling experiments that would not have been considered previously. After minimal training, a biologist can independently write complicated protocols for a robot within an hour. Adoption of PaR-PaR as a standard cross-platform language would enable hand-written or software-generated robotic protocols to be shared across laboratories.

  18. PaR-PaR laboratory automation platform.

    PubMed

    Linshiz, Gregory; Stawski, Nina; Poust, Sean; Bi, Changhao; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J

    2013-05-17

    Labor-intensive multistep biological tasks, such as the construction and cloning of DNA molecules, are prime candidates for laboratory automation. Flexible and biology-friendly operation of robotic equipment is key to its successful integration in biological laboratories, and the efforts required to operate a robot must be much smaller than the alternative manual lab work. To achieve these goals, a simple high-level biology-friendly robot programming language is needed. We have developed and experimentally validated such a language: Programming a Robot (PaR-PaR). The syntax and compiler for the language are based on computer science principles and a deep understanding of biological workflows. PaR-PaR allows researchers to use liquid-handling robots effectively, enabling experiments that would not have been considered previously. After minimal training, a biologist can independently write complicated protocols for a robot within an hour. Adoption of PaR-PaR as a standard cross-platform language would enable hand-written or software-generated robotic protocols to be shared across laboratories.

  19. High-throughput quantitative imaging of cell spreading dynamics by multi-step microscopy projection photolithography based on a cell-friendly photoresist.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Cheol; Doh, Junsang

    2012-12-01

    A new method for the high-throughput study of cell spreading dynamics is devised by multi-step microscopy projection photolithography based on a cell-friendly photoresist. By releasing a large number of rounded cells in single cell arrays and monitoring their spreading dynamics by interference reflection microscopy, a large number of cell spreading data can be acquired by a single experiment.

  20. Continuous Video Modeling to Assist with Completion of Multi-Step Home Living Tasks by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Foster, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated a relatively new video-based procedure, continuous video modeling (CVM), to teach multi-step cleaning tasks to high school students with moderate intellectual disability. CVM in contrast to video modeling and video prompting allows repetition of the video model (looping) as many times as needed while the user completes…

  1. Coping Strategies Applied to Comprehend Multistep Arithmetic Word Problems by Students with Above-Average Numeracy Skills and Below-Average Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nortvedt, Guri A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how 13-year-old students with above-average numeracy skills and below-average reading skills cope with comprehending word problems. Compared to other students who are proficient in numeracy and are skilled readers, these students are more disadvantaged when solving single-step and multistep arithmetic word problems. The…

  2. [Automated anesthesia record system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Liu, Jin

    2005-12-01

    Based on Client/Server architecture, a software of automated anesthesia record system running under Windows operation system and networks has been developed and programmed with Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0, Visual Basic 6.0 and SQL Server. The system can deal with patient's information throughout the anesthesia. It can collect and integrate the data from several kinds of medical equipment such as monitor, infusion pump and anesthesia machine automatically and real-time. After that, the system presents the anesthesia sheets automatically. The record system makes the anesthesia record more accurate and integral and can raise the anesthesiologist's working efficiency.

  3. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  4. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  5. Automated Propellant Blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl W. (Inventor); Harrington, Douglas W. (Inventor); Dutton, Maureen L. (Inventor); Tipton, Billy Charles, Jr. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Salazar, Frank (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An automated propellant blending apparatus and method that uses closely metered addition of countersolvent to a binder solution with propellant particles dispersed therein to precisely control binder precipitation and particle aggregation is discussed. A profile of binder precipitation versus countersolvent-solvent ratio is established empirically and used in a computer algorithm to establish countersolvent addition parameters near the cloud point for controlling the transition of properties of the binder during agglomeration and finishing of the propellant composition particles. The system is remotely operated by computer for safety, reliability and improved product properties, and also increases product output.

  6. Automated Propellant Blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl W. (Inventor); Harrington, Douglas W. (Inventor); Dutton, Maureen L. (Inventor); Tipton, Billy Charles, Jr. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Salazar, Frank (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An automated propellant blending apparatus and method uses closely metered addition of countersolvent to a binder solution with propellant particles dispersed therein to precisely control binder precipitation and particle aggregation. A profile of binder precipitation versus countersolvent-solvent ratio is established empirically and used in a computer algorithm to establish countersolvent addition parameters near the cloud point for controlling the transition of properties of the binder during agglomeration and finishing of the propellant composition particles. The system is remotely operated by computer for safety, reliability and improved product properties, and also increases product output.

  7. The Automated Medical Office

    PubMed Central

    Petreman, Mel

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a clinic shows that practical thinking linked to advanced technology can greatly improve office efficiency. PMID:21233899

  8. Automated Hazard Analysis

    2003-06-26

    The Automated Hazard Analysis (AHA) application is a software tool used to conduct job hazard screening and analysis of tasks to be performed in Savannah River Site facilities. The AHA application provides a systematic approach to the assessment of safety and environmental hazards associated with specific tasks, and the identification of controls regulations, and other requirements needed to perform those tasks safely. AHA is to be integrated into existing Savannah River site work control andmore » job hazard analysis processes. Utilization of AHA will improve the consistency and completeness of hazard screening and analysis, and increase the effectiveness of the work planning process.« less

  9. The automated medical office.

    PubMed

    Petreman, M

    1990-08-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a clinic shows that practical thinking linked to advanced technology can greatly improve office efficiency.

  10. A versatile valving toolkit for automating fluidic operations in paper microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Toley, Bhushan J.; Wang, Jessica A.; Gupta, Mayuri; Buser, Joshua R.; Lafleur, Lisa K.; Lutz, Barry R.; Fu, Elain; Yager, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Failure to utilize valving and automation techniques has restricted the complexity of fluidic operations that can be performed in paper microfluidic devices. We developed a toolkit of paper microfluidic valves and methods for automatic valve actuation using movable paper strips and fluid-triggered expanding elements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first functional demonstration of this valving strategy in paper microfluidics. After introduction of fluids on devices, valves can actuate automatically a) after a certain period of time, or b) after the passage of a certain volume of fluid. Timing of valve actuation can be tuned with greater than 8.5% accuracy by changing lengths of timing wicks, and we present timed on-valves, off-valves, and diversion (channel-switching) valves. The actuators require ~30 μl fluid to actuate and the time required to switch from one state to another ranges from ~5 s for short to ~50s for longer wicks. For volume-metered actuation, the size of a metering pad can be adjusted to tune actuation volume, and we present two methods – both methods can achieve greater than 9% accuracy. Finally, we demonstrate the use of these valves in a device that conducts a multi-step assay for the detection of the malaria protein PfHRP2. Although slightly more complex than devices that do not have moving parts, this valving and automation toolkit considerably expands the capabilities of paper microfluidic devices. Components of this toolkit can be used to conduct arbitrarily complex, multi-step fluidic operations on paper-based devices, as demonstrated in the malaria assay device. PMID:25606810

  11. A versatile valving toolkit for automating fluidic operations in paper microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Toley, Bhushan J; Wang, Jessica A; Gupta, Mayuri; Buser, Joshua R; Lafleur, Lisa K; Lutz, Barry R; Fu, Elain; Yager, Paul

    2015-03-21

    Failure to utilize valving and automation techniques has restricted the complexity of fluidic operations that can be performed in paper microfluidic devices. We developed a toolkit of paper microfluidic valves and methods for automatic valve actuation using movable paper strips and fluid-triggered expanding elements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first functional demonstration of this valving strategy in paper microfluidics. After introduction of fluids on devices, valves can actuate automatically after a) a certain period of time, or b) the passage of a certain volume of fluid. Timing of valve actuation can be tuned with greater than 8.5% accuracy by changing lengths of timing wicks, and we present timed on-valves, off-valves, and diversion (channel-switching) valves. The actuators require ~30 μl fluid to actuate and the time required to switch from one state to another ranges from ~5 s for short to ~50 s for longer wicks. For volume-metered actuation, the size of a metering pad can be adjusted to tune actuation volume, and we present two methods - both methods can achieve greater than 9% accuracy. Finally, we demonstrate the use of these valves in a device that conducts a multi-step assay for the detection of the malaria protein PfHRP2. Although slightly more complex than devices that do not have moving parts, this valving and automation toolkit considerably expands the capabilities of paper microfluidic devices. Components of this toolkit can be used to conduct arbitrarily complex, multi-step fluidic operations on paper-based devices, as demonstrated in the malaria assay device.

  12. World-wide distribution automation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    A worldwide power distribution automation system is outlined. Distribution automation is defined and the status of utility automation is discussed. Other topics discussed include a distribution management system, substation feeder, and customer functions, potential benefits, automation costs, planning and engineering considerations, automation trends, databases, system operation, computer modeling of system, and distribution management systems.

  13. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  14. Automated DNA diagnostics using an ELISA-based oligonucleotide ligation assay.

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, D A; Kaiser, R; Lappin, S; Stewart, J; Hood, L; Landegren, U

    1990-01-01

    DNA diagnostics, the detection of specific DNA sequences, will play an increasingly important role in medicine as the molecular basis of human disease is defined. Here, we demonstrate an automated, nonisotopic strategy for DNA diagnostics using amplification of target DNA segments by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the discrimination of allelic sequence variants by a colorimetric oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). We have applied the automated PCR/OLA procedure to diagnosis of common genetic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and cystic fibrosis (delta F508 mutation), and to genetic linkage mapping of gene segments in the human T-cell receptor beta-chain locus. The automated PCR/OLA strategy provides a rapid system for diagnosis of genetic, malignant, and infectious diseases as well as a powerful approach to genetic linkage mapping of chromosomes and forensic DNA typing. Images PMID:2247466

  15. Automated System Marketplace 1995: The Changing Face of Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Jeff; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses trends in the automated system marketplace with specific attention to online vendors and their customers: academic, public, school, and special libraries. Presents vendor profiles; tables and charts on computer systems and sales; and sidebars that include a vendor source list and the differing views on procuring an automated library…

  16. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  17. Space station advanced automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Donald

    1990-01-01

    In the development of a safe, productive and maintainable space station, Automation and Robotics (A and R) has been identified as an enabling technology which will allow efficient operation at a reasonable cost. The Space Station Freedom's (SSF) systems are very complex, and interdependent. The usage of Advanced Automation (AA) will help restructure, and integrate system status so that station and ground personnel can operate more efficiently. To use AA technology for the augmentation of system management functions requires a development model which consists of well defined phases of: evaluation, development, integration, and maintenance. The evaluation phase will consider system management functions against traditional solutions, implementation techniques and requirements; the end result of this phase should be a well developed concept along with a feasibility analysis. In the development phase the AA system will be developed in accordance with a traditional Life Cycle Model (LCM) modified for Knowledge Based System (KBS) applications. A way by which both knowledge bases and reasoning techniques can be reused to control costs is explained. During the integration phase the KBS software must be integrated with conventional software, and verified and validated. The Verification and Validation (V and V) techniques applicable to these KBS are based on the ideas of consistency, minimal competency, and graph theory. The maintenance phase will be aided by having well designed and documented KBS software.

  18. Automated office blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G; Godwin, Marshall

    2012-05-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) is gradually disappearing from clinical practice with the mercury sphygmomanometer now considered to be an environmental hazard. Manual BP is also subject to measurement error on the part of the physician/nurse and patient-related anxiety which can result in poor quality BP measurements and office-induced (white coat) hypertension. Automated office (AO) BP with devices such as the BpTRU (BpTRU Medical Devices, Coquitlam, BC) has already replaced conventional manual BP in many primary care practices in Canada and has also attracted interest in other countries where research studies using AOBP have been undertaken. The basic principles of AOBP include multiple readings taken with a fully automated recorder with the patient resting alone in a quiet room. When these principles are followed, office-induced hypertension is eliminated and AOBP exhibits a much stronger correlation with the awake ambulatory BP as compared with routine manual BP measurements. Unlike routine manual BP, AOBP correlates as well with left ventricular mass as does the awake ambulatory BP. AOBP also simplifies the definition of hypertension in that the cut point for a normal AOBP (< 135/85 mm Hg) is the same as for the awake ambulatory BP and home BP. This article summarizes the currently available evidence supporting the use of AOBP in routine clinical practice and proposes an algorithm in which AOBP replaces manual BP for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. PMID:22265230

  19. Computer automated design and computer automated manufacture.

    PubMed

    Brncick, M

    2000-08-01

    The introduction of computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing into the field of prosthetics and orthotics did not arrive without concern. Many prosthetists feared that the computer would provide other allied health practitioners who had little or no experience in prosthetics the ability to fit and manage amputees. Technicians in the field felt their jobs may be jeopardized by automated fabrication techniques. This has not turned out to be the case. Prosthetists who use CAD-CAM techniques are finding they have more time for patient care and clinical assessment. CAD-CAM is another tool for them to provide better care for the patients/clients they serve. One of the factors that deterred the acceptance of CAD-CAM techniques in its early stages was that of cost. It took a significant investment in software and hardware for the prosthetists to begin to use the new systems. This new technique was not reimbursed by insurance coverage. Practitioners did not have enough information about this new technique to make a sound decision on their investment of time and money. Ironically, it is the need to hold health care costs down that may prove to be the catalyst for the increased use of CAD-CAM in the field. Providing orthoses and prostheses to patients who require them is a very labor intensive process. Practitioners are looking for better, faster, and more economical ways in which to provide their services under the pressure of managed care. CAD-CAM may be the answer. The author foresees shape sensing departments in hospitals where patients would be sent to be digitized, similar to someone going for radiograph or ultrasound. Afterwards, an orthosis or prosthesis could be provided from a central fabrication facility at a remote site, most likely on the same day. Not long ago, highly skilled practitioners with extensive technical ability would custom make almost every orthosis. One now practices in an atmosphere where off-the-shelf orthoses are the standard. This

  20. A Demonstration of Automated DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latourelle, Sandra; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Details a simulation that employs a paper-and-pencil model to demonstrate the principles behind automated DNA sequencing. Discusses the advantages of automated sequencing as well as the chemistry of automated DNA sequencing. (DDR)

  1. Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Charles R.

    Major resources exist that can be used to develop or upgrade programs in community colleges and technical institutes that educate robotics/automated systems technicians. The first category of resources is Economic, Social, and Education Issues. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) report, "Automation and the Workplace," presents analyses of…

  2. Automated Test-Form Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Diao, Qi

    2011-01-01

    In automated test assembly (ATA), the methodology of mixed-integer programming is used to select test items from an item bank to meet the specifications for a desired test form and optimize its measurement accuracy. The same methodology can be used to automate the formatting of the set of selected items into the actual test form. Three different…

  3. Opening up Library Automation Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the history of library automation, the author has seen a steady advancement toward more open systems. In the early days of library automation, when proprietary systems dominated, the need for standards was paramount since other means of inter-operability and data exchange weren't possible. Today's focus on Application Programming…

  4. Automated Power-Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, Barry; Riedesel, Joel; Myers, Chris; Miller, William; Jones, Ellen F.; Freeman, Kenneth; Walsh, Richard; Walls, Bryan K.; Weeks, David J.; Bechtel, Robert T.

    1992-01-01

    Autonomous power-distribution system includes power-control equipment and automation equipment. System automatically schedules connection of power to loads and reconfigures itself when it detects fault. Potential terrestrial applications include optimization of consumption of power in homes, power supplies for autonomous land vehicles and vessels, and power supplies for automated industrial processes.

  5. Automating a clinical management system.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B; Braun, D

    1990-06-01

    Automating the clinical documentation of a home health care agency will prove crucial as the industry continues to grow and becomes increasingly complex. Kimberly Quality Care, a large, multi-office home care company, made a major commitment to the automation of its clinical management documents.

  6. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  7. Progress Toward Automated Cost Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses efforts to develop standard system of automated cost estimation (ACE) and computer-aided design (CAD). Advantage of system is time saved and accuracy enhanced by automating extraction of quantities from design drawings, consultation of price lists, and application of cost and markup formulas.

  8. Automated Circulation. SPEC Kit 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Of the 64 libraries responding to a 1978 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey, 37 indicated that they used automated circulation systems; half of these were commercial systems, and most were batch-process or combination batch process and online. Nearly all libraries without automated systems cited lack of funding as the reason for not…

  9. Automated design of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Mccomb, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in structural analysis of aerospace vehicles is characterized, automated design technology is discussed, and an indication is given of the future direction of research in analysis and automated design. Representative computer programs for analysis typical of those in routine use in vehicle design activities are described, and results are shown for some selected analysis problems. Recent and planned advances in analysis capability are indicated. Techniques used to automate the more routine aspects of structural design are discussed, and some recently developed automated design computer programs are described. Finally, discussion is presented of early accomplishments in interdisciplinary automated design systems, and some indication of the future thrust of research in this field is given.

  10. Automated Desalting Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Maegan K.; Liu, De-Ling; Kanik, Isik; Beegle, Luther

    2010-01-01

    Because salt and metals can mask the signature of a variety of organic molecules (like amino acids) in any given sample, an automated system to purify complex field samples has been created for the analytical techniques of electrospray ionization/ mass spectroscopy (ESI/MS), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and biological assays where unique identification requires at least some processing of complex samples. This development allows for automated sample preparation in the laboratory and analysis of complex samples in the field with multiple types of analytical instruments. Rather than using tedious, exacting protocols for desalting samples by hand, this innovation, called the Automated Sample Processing System (ASPS), takes analytes that have been extracted through high-temperature solvent extraction and introduces them into the desalting column. After 20 minutes, the eluent is produced. This clear liquid can then be directly analyzed by the techniques listed above. The current apparatus including the computer and power supplies is sturdy, has an approximate mass of 10 kg, and a volume of about 20 20 20 cm, and is undergoing further miniaturization. This system currently targets amino acids. For these molecules, a slurry of 1 g cation exchange resin in deionized water is packed into a column of the apparatus. Initial generation of the resin is done by flowing sequentially 2.3 bed volumes of 2N NaOH and 2N HCl (1 mL each) to rinse the resin, followed by .5 mL of deionized water. This makes the pH of the resin near neutral, and eliminates cross sample contamination. Afterward, 2.3 mL of extracted sample is then loaded into the column onto the top of the resin bed. Because the column is packed tightly, the sample can be applied without disturbing the resin bed. This is a vital step needed to ensure that the analytes adhere to the resin. After the sample is drained, oxalic acid (1 mL, pH 1.6-1.8, adjusted with NH4OH) is pumped into the column. Oxalic acid works as a

  11. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  12. An automated field phenotyping pipeline for application in grapevine research.

    PubMed

    Kicherer, Anna; Herzog, Katja; Pflanz, Michael; Wieland, Markus; Rüger, Philipp; Kecke, Steffen; Kuhlmann, Heiner; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Due to its perennial nature and size, the acquisition of phenotypic data in grapevine research is almost exclusively restricted to the field and done by visual estimation. This kind of evaluation procedure is limited by time, cost and the subjectivity of records. As a consequence, objectivity, automation and more precision of phenotypic data evaluation are needed to increase the number of samples, manage grapevine repositories, enable genetic research of new phenotypic traits and, therefore, increase the efficiency in plant research. In the present study, an automated field phenotyping pipeline was setup and applied in a plot of genetic resources. The application of the PHENObot allows image acquisition from at least 250 individual grapevines per hour directly in the field without user interaction. Data management is handled by a database (IMAGEdata). The automatic image analysis tool BIVcolor (Berries in Vineyards-color) permitted the collection of precise phenotypic data of two important fruit traits, berry size and color, within a large set of plants. The application of the PHENObot represents an automated tool for high-throughput sampling of image data in the field. The automated analysis of these images facilitates the generation of objective and precise phenotypic data on a larger scale. PMID:25730485

  13. An Automated Field Phenotyping Pipeline for Application in Grapevine Research

    PubMed Central

    Kicherer, Anna; Herzog, Katja; Pflanz, Michael; Wieland, Markus; Rüger, Philipp; Kecke, Steffen; Kuhlmann, Heiner; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Due to its perennial nature and size, the acquisition of phenotypic data in grapevine research is almost exclusively restricted to the field and done by visual estimation. This kind of evaluation procedure is limited by time, cost and the subjectivity of records. As a consequence, objectivity, automation and more precision of phenotypic data evaluation are needed to increase the number of samples, manage grapevine repositories, enable genetic research of new phenotypic traits and, therefore, increase the efficiency in plant research. In the present study, an automated field phenotyping pipeline was setup and applied in a plot of genetic resources. The application of the PHENObot allows image acquisition from at least 250 individual grapevines per hour directly in the field without user interaction. Data management is handled by a database (IMAGEdata). The automatic image analysis tool BIVcolor (Berries in Vineyards-color) permitted the collection of precise phenotypic data of two important fruit traits, berry size and color, within a large set of plants. The application of the PHENObot represents an automated tool for high-throughput sampling of image data in the field. The automated analysis of these images facilitates the generation of objective and precise phenotypic data on a larger scale. PMID:25730485

  14. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the multistep process that breaks down the amino acid tyrosine, a building block of most proteins. If ... Resources MedlinePlus (4 links) Encyclopedia: Aminoaciduria Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Liver Diseases Health Topic: ...

  15. Automated Analysis Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Information from NASA Tech Briefs of work done at Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory assisted DiaSys Corporation in manufacturing their first product, the R/S 2000. Since then, the R/S 2000 and R/S 2003 have followed. Recently, DiaSys released their fourth workstation, the FE-2, which automates the process of making and manipulating wet-mount preparation of fecal concentrates. The time needed to read the sample is decreased, permitting technologists to rapidly spot parasites, ova and cysts, sometimes carried in the lower intestinal tract of humans and animals. Employing the FE-2 is non-invasive, can be performed on an out-patient basis, and quickly provides confirmatory results.

  16. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  17. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafermore » surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.« less

  18. Health care automation companies.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks. PMID:10153839

  19. Automated Standard Hazard Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebler, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The current system used to generate standard hazard reports is considered cumbersome and iterative. This study defines a structure for this system's process in a clear, algorithmic way so that standard hazard reports and basic hazard analysis may be completed using a centralized, web-based computer application. To accomplish this task, a test server is used to host a prototype of the tool during development. The prototype is configured to easily integrate into NASA's current server systems with minimal alteration. Additionally, the tool is easily updated and provides NASA with a system that may grow to accommodate future requirements and possibly, different applications. Results of this project's success are outlined in positive, subjective reviews complete by payload providers and NASA Safety and Mission Assurance personnel. Ideally, this prototype will increase interest in the concept of standard hazard automation and lead to the full-scale production of a user-ready application.

  20. Expedition automated flow fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikun, V. A.; Salyuk, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an apparatus and operation of automated flow-through dual-channel fluorometer for studying the fluorescence of dissolved organic matter, and the fluorescence of phytoplankton cells with open and closed reaction centers in sea areas with oligotrophic and eutrophic water type. The step-by step excitation by two semiconductor lasers or two light-emitting diodes is realized in the current device. The excitation wavelengths are 405nm and 532nm in the default configuration. Excitation radiation of each light source can be changed with different durations, intensities and repetition rate. Registration of the fluorescence signal carried out by two photo-multipliers with different optical filters of 580-600 nm and 680-700 nm band pass diapasons. The configuration of excitation sources and spectral diapasons of registered radiation can be changed due to decided tasks.

  1. Automated external defibrillators (AEDs).

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    Automated external defibrillators, or AEDs, will automatically analyze a patient's ECG and, if needed, deliver a defibrillating shock to the heart. We sometimes refer to these devices as AED-only devices or stand-alone AEDs. The basic function of AEDs is similar to that of defibrillator/monitors, but AEDs lack their advanced capabilities and generally don't allow manual defibrillation. A device that functions strictly as an AED is intended to be used by basic users only. Such devices are often referred to as public access defibrillators. In this Evaluation, we present our findings for a newly evaluated model, the Zoll AED Plus. We also summarize our findings for the previously evaluated model that is still on the market and describe other AEDs that are also available but that we haven't evaluated. We rate the models collectively for first-responder use and public access defibrillation (PAD) applications.

  2. Health care automation companies.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks.

  3. [From automation to robotics].

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    The introduction of automation into the laboratory of biology seems to be unavoidable. But at which cost, if it is necessary to purchase a new machine for every new application? Fortunately the same image processing techniques, belonging to a theoretic framework called Mathematical Morphology, may be used in visual inspection tasks, both in car industry and in the biology lab. Since the market for industrial robotics applications is much higher than the market of biomedical applications, the price of image processing devices drops, and becomes sometimes less than the price of a complete microscope equipment. The power of the image processing methods of Mathematical Morphology will be illustrated by various examples, as automatic silver grain counting in autoradiography, determination of HLA genotype, electrophoretic gels analysis, automatic screening of cervical smears... Thus several heterogeneous applications may share the same image processing device, provided there is a separate and devoted work station for each of them.

  4. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  5. Automating Frame Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Franklin, Lyndsey; Tratz, Stephen C.; Danielson, Gary R.; Mileson, Nicholas D.; Riensche, Roderick M.; McGrath, Liam

    2008-04-01

    Frame Analysis has come to play an increasingly stronger role in the study of social movements in Sociology and Political Science. While significant steps have been made in providing a theory of frames and framing, a systematic characterization of the frame concept is still largely lacking and there are no rec-ognized criteria and methods that can be used to identify and marshal frame evi-dence reliably and in a time and cost effective manner. Consequently, current Frame Analysis work is still too reliant on manual annotation and subjective inter-pretation. The goal of this paper is to present an approach to the representation, acquisition and analysis of frame evidence which leverages Content Analysis, In-formation Extraction and Semantic Search methods to provide a systematic treat-ment of a Frame Analysis and automate frame annotation.

  6. Automated calorimeter testing system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; James, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Automated Calorimeter Testing System (ACTS) is a portable measurement device that provides an independent measurement of all critical parameters of a calorimeter system. The ACTS was developed to improve productivity and performance of Mound-produced calorimeters. With ACTS, an individual with minimal understanding of calorimetry operation can perform a consistent set of diagnostic measurements on the system. The operator can identify components whose performance has deteriorated by a simple visual comparison of the current data plots with previous measurements made when the system was performing properly. Thus, downtime and out of control'' situations can be reduced. Should a system malfunction occur, a flowchart of troubleshooting procedures has been developed to facilitate quick identification of the malfunctioning component. If diagnosis is beyond the capability of the operator, the ACTS provides a consistent set of test data for review by a knowledgeable expert. The first field test was conducted at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site in early 1990. 6 figs.

  7. Automated attendance accounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated accounting system useful for applying data to a computer from any or all of a multiplicity of data terminals is disclosed. The system essentially includes a preselected number of data terminals which are each adapted to convert data words of decimal form to another form, i.e., binary, usable with the computer. Each data terminal may take the form of a keyboard unit having a number of depressable buttons or switches corresponding to selected data digits and/or function digits. A bank of data buffers, one of which is associated with each data terminal, is provided as a temporary storage. Data from the terminals is applied to the data buffers on a digit by digit basis for transfer via a multiplexer to the computer.

  8. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafer surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.

  9. Automating the multiprocessing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.

    1989-01-01

    An approach to automate the programming and operation of tree-structured networks of multiprocessor systems is discussed. A conceptual, knowledge-based operating environment is presented, and requirements for two major technology elements are identified as follows: (1) An intelligent information translator is proposed for implementating information transfer between dissimilar hardware and software, thereby enabling independent and modular development of future systems and promoting a language-independence of codes and information; (2) A resident system activity manager, which recognizes the systems capabilities and monitors the status of all systems within the environment, is proposed for integrating dissimilar systems into effective parallel processing resources to optimally meet user needs. Finally, key computational capabilities which must be provided before the environment can be realized are identified.

  10. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  11. Automated imatinib immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Beumer, Jan H.; Kozo, Daniel; Harney, Rebecca L.; Baldasano, Caitlin N.; Jarrah, Justin; Christner, Susan M.; Parise, Robert; Baburina, Irina; Courtney, Jodi B.; Salamone, Salvatore J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Imatinib pharmacokinetic variability and the relationship of trough concentrations with clinical outcomes have been extensively reported. Though physical methods to quantitate imatinib exist, they are not widely available for routine use. An automated homogenous immunoassay for imatinib has been developed, facilitating routine imatinib testing. Methods Imatinib-selective monoclonal antibodies, without substantial cross-reactivity to the N-desmethyl metabolite or N-desmethyl conjugates, were produced. The antibodies were conjugated to 200 nm particles to develop immunoassay reagents on the Beckman Coulter AU480™ analyzer. These reagents were analytically validated using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute protocols. Method comparison to LC-MS/MS was conducted using 77 plasma samples collected from subjects receiving imatinib. Results The assay requires 4 µL of sample without pre-treatment. The non-linear calibration curve ranges from 0 to 3,000 ng/mL. With automated sample dilution, concentrations of up to 9,000 ng/mL can be quantitated. The AU480 produces the first result in 10 minutes, and up to 400 tests per hour. Repeatability ranged from 2.0 to 6.0% coefficient of variation (CV), and within-laboratory reproducibility ranged from 2.9 to 7.4% CV. Standard curve stability was two weeks and on-board reagent stability was 6 weeks. For clinical samples with imatinib concentrations from 438 – 2,691 ng/mL, method comparison with LC-MS/MS gave a slope of 0.995 with a y-intercept of 24.3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.978. Conclusion The immunoassay is suitable for quantitating imatinib in human plasma, demonstrating good correlation with a physical method. Testing for optimal imatinib exposure can now be performed on routine clinical analyzers. PMID:25551407

  12. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  13. An open source multistep model to predict mutagenicity from statistical analysis and relevant structural alerts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutagenicity is the capability of a substance to cause genetic mutations. This property is of high public concern because it has a close relationship with carcinogenicity and potentially with reproductive toxicity. Experimentally, mutagenicity can be assessed by the Ames test on Salmonella with an estimated experimental reproducibility of 85%; this intrinsic limitation of the in vitro test, along with the need for faster and cheaper alternatives, opens the road to other types of assessment methods, such as in silico structure-activity prediction models. A widely used method checks for the presence of known structural alerts for mutagenicity. However the presence of such alerts alone is not a definitive method to prove the mutagenicity of a compound towards Salmonella, since other parts of the molecule can influence and potentially change the classification. Hence statistically based methods will be proposed, with the final objective to obtain a cascade of modeling steps with custom-made properties, such as the reduction of false negatives. Results A cascade model has been developed and validated on a large public set of molecular structures and their associated Salmonella mutagenicity outcome. The first step consists in the derivation of a statistical model and mutagenicity prediction, followed by further checks for specific structural alerts in the "safe" subset of the prediction outcome space. In terms of accuracy (i.e., overall correct predictions of both negative and positives), the obtained model approached the 85% reproducibility of the experimental mutagenicity Ames test. Conclusions The model and the documentation for regulatory purposes are freely available on the CAESAR website. The input is simply a file of molecular structures and the output is the classification result. PMID:20678181

  14. Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Automated remote fluid servicing will be necessary for future space missions, as future satellites will be designed for on-orbit consumable replenishment. In order to develop an on-orbit remote servicing capability, a standard interface between a tanker and the receiving satellite is needed. The objective of the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) program is to design, fabricate, and functionally demonstrate compliance with all design requirements for an automated fluid interface system. A description and documentation of the Fairchild AFIS design is provided.

  15. Multi-step reaction mechanism for F atom interactions with organosilicate glass and SiO x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankelevich, Yuri A.; Voronina, Ekaterina N.; Rakhimova, Tatyana V.; Palov, Alexander P.; Lopaev, Dmitry V.; Zyryanov, Sergey M.; Baklanov, Mikhail R.

    2016-09-01

    An ab initio approach with the density functional theory (DFT) method was used to study F atom interactions with organosilicate glass (OSG)-based low-k dielectric films. Because of the complexity and significant modifications of the OSG surface structure during the interaction with radicals and etching, a variety of reactions between the surface groups and thermal F atoms can happen. For OSG film etching and damage, we propose a multi-step mechanism based on DFT static and dynamic simulations, which is consistent with the previously reported experimental observations. The important part of the proposed mechanism is the formation of pentavalent Si atoms on the OSG surface due to a quasi-chemisorption of the incident F atoms. The revealed mechanism of F atom incorporation into the OSG matrix explains the experimentally observed phenomena of fast fluorination without significant modification of the chemical structure. We demonstrate that the pentavalent Si states induce the weakening of adjacent Si-O bonds and their breaking under F atom flux. The calculated results allow us to propose a set of elementary chemical reactions of successive removal of CH3 and CH2 groups and fluorinated SiO x matrix etching.

  16. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SLOW-RISE, MULTISTEP X1.6 FLARE AND THE ASSOCIATED ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-20

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  17. Automatic Generation of Wide Dynamic Range Image without Pseudo-Edge Using Integration of Multi-Steps Exposure Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migiyama, Go; Sugimura, Atsuhiko; Osa, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi

    Recently, digital cameras are offering technical advantages rapidly. However, the shot image is different from the sight image generated when that scenery is seen with the naked eye. There are blown-out highlights and crushed blacks in the image that photographed the scenery of wide dynamic range. The problems are hardly generated in the sight image. These are contributory cause of difference between the shot image and the sight image. Blown-out highlights and crushed blacks are caused by the difference of dynamic range between the image sensor installed in a digital camera such as CCD and CMOS and the human visual system. Dynamic range of the shot image is narrower than dynamic range of the sight image. In order to solve the problem, we propose an automatic method to decide an effective exposure range in superposition of edges. We integrate multi-step exposure images using the method. In addition, we try to erase pseudo-edges using the process to blend exposure values. Afterwards, we get a pseudo wide dynamic range image automatically.

  18. Segmenting the Femoral Head and Acetabulum in the Hip Joint Automatically Using a Multi-Step Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Cheng, Yuanzhi; Fu, Yili; Zhou, Shengjun; Tamura, Shinichi

    We describe a multi-step approach for automatic segmentation of the femoral head and the acetabulum in the hip joint from three dimensional (3D) CT images. Our segmentation method consists of the following steps: 1) construction of the valley-emphasized image by subtracting valleys from the original images; 2) initial segmentation of the bone regions by using conventional techniques including the initial threshold and binary morphological operations from the valley-emphasized image; 3) further segmentation of the bone regions by using the iterative adaptive classification with the initial segmentation result; 4) detection of the rough bone boundaries based on the segmented bone regions; 5) 3D reconstruction of the bone surface using the rough bone boundaries obtained in step 4) by a network of triangles; 6) correction of all vertices of the 3D bone surface based on the normal direction of vertices; 7) adjustment of the bone surface based on the corrected vertices. We evaluated our approach on 35 CT patient data sets. Our experimental results show that our segmentation algorithm is more accurate and robust against noise than other conventional approaches for automatic segmentation of the femoral head and the acetabulum. Average root-mean-square (RMS) distance from manual reference segmentations created by experienced users was approximately 0.68mm (in-plane resolution of the CT data).

  19. Multistep process of FUS aggregation in the cell cytoplasm involves RNA-dependent and RNA-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shelkovnikova, Tatyana A.; Robinson, Hannah K.; Southcombe, Joshua A.; Ninkina, Natalia; Buchman, Vladimir L.

    2014-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is an RNA-binding protein involved in pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation of mislocalized FUS into non-amyloid inclusions is believed to be pivotal in the development of cell dysfunction, but the mechanism of their formation is unclear. Using transient expression of a panel of deletion and chimeric FUS variants in various cultured cells, we demonstrated that FUS accumulating in the cytoplasm nucleates a novel type of RNA granules, FUS granules (FGs), that are structurally similar but not identical to physiological RNA transport granules. Formation of FGs requires FUS N-terminal prion-like domain and the ability to bind specific RNAs. Clustering of FGs coupled with further recruitment of RNA and proteins produce larger structures, FUS aggregates (FAs), that resemble but are clearly distinct from stress granules. In conditions of attenuated transcription, FAs lose RNA and dissociate into RNA-free FUS complexes that become precursors of large aggresome-like structures. We propose a model of multistep FUS aggregation involving RNA-dependent and RNA-independent stages. This model can be extrapolated to formation of pathological inclusions in human FUSopathies. PMID:24842888

  20. Altered expression of CKs 14/20 is an early event in a rat model of multistep bladder carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, Rui M; Oliveira, Paula A; Vasconcelos-Nóbrega, Carmen; Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Colaço, Aura A; de la Cruz, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Cytokeratins (CKs) 14 and 20 are promising markers for diagnosing urothelial lesions and for studying their prognosis and histogenesis. This work aimed to study the immunohistochemical staining patterns of CK14/20 during multistep carcinogenesis leading to papillary bladder cancer in a rat model. Thirty female Fischer 344 rats were divided into three groups: group 1 (control); group 2, which received N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) for 20 weeks plus 1 week without treatment; and group 3, which received BBN for 20 weeks plus 8 weeks without treatment. Bladder lesions were classified histologically. CK14 and CK20 immunostaining was assessed according to its distribution and intensity. In control animals, 0-25% of basal cells and umbrella cells stained positive for CK14 and CK20 respectively. On groups 2 and 3, nodular hyperplastic lesions showed normal CK20 and moderately increased CK14 staining (26-50% of cells). Dysplasia, squamous metaplasia, papilloma, papillary tumours of low malignant potential and low- and high-grade papillary carcinomas showed increased CK14 and CK20 immunostaining in all epithelial layers. Altered CK14 and CK20 expression is an early event in urothelial carcinogenesis and is present in a wide spectrum of urothelial superficial neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions. PMID:26515584

  1. Altered expression of CKs 14/20 is an early event in a rat model of multistep bladder carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, Rui M; Oliveira, Paula A; Vasconcelos-Nóbrega, Carmen; Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Colaço, Aura A; de la Cruz, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Cytokeratins (CKs) 14 and 20 are promising markers for diagnosing urothelial lesions and for studying their prognosis and histogenesis. This work aimed to study the immunohistochemical staining patterns of CK14/20 during multistep carcinogenesis leading to papillary bladder cancer in a rat model. Thirty female Fischer 344 rats were divided into three groups: group 1 (control); group 2, which received N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) for 20 weeks plus 1 week without treatment; and group 3, which received BBN for 20 weeks plus 8 weeks without treatment. Bladder lesions were classified histologically. CK14 and CK20 immunostaining was assessed according to its distribution and intensity. In control animals, 0-25% of basal cells and umbrella cells stained positive for CK14 and CK20 respectively. On groups 2 and 3, nodular hyperplastic lesions showed normal CK20 and moderately increased CK14 staining (26-50% of cells). Dysplasia, squamous metaplasia, papilloma, papillary tumours of low malignant potential and low- and high-grade papillary carcinomas showed increased CK14 and CK20 immunostaining in all epithelial layers. Altered CK14 and CK20 expression is an early event in urothelial carcinogenesis and is present in a wide spectrum of urothelial superficial neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions.

  2. Multi-step approach for comparing the local air pollution contributions of conventional and innovative MSW thermo-chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, M; Rada, E C

    2012-10-01

    In the sector of municipal solid waste management the debate on the performances of conventional and novel thermo-chemical technologies is still relevant. When a plant must be constructed, decision makers often select a technology prior to analyzing the local environmental impact of the available options, as this type of study is generally developed when the design of the plant has been carried out. Additionally, in the literature there is a lack of comparative analyses of the contributions to local air pollution from different technologies. The present study offers a multi-step approach, based on pollutant emission factors and atmospheric dilution coefficients, for a local comparative analysis. With this approach it is possible to check if some assumptions related to the advantages of the novel thermochemical technologies, in terms of local direct impact on air quality, can be applied to municipal solid waste treatment. The selected processes concern combustion, gasification and pyrolysis, alone or in combination. The pollutants considered are both carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic. A case study is presented concerning the location of a plant in an alpine region and its contribution to the local air pollution. Results show that differences among technologies are less than expected. Performances of each technology are discussed in details. PMID:22795304

  3. Application of an Aided System to Multi-Step Deep Drawing Process in the Brass Pieces Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javier Ramírez, Francisco; Domingo, Rosario

    2009-11-01

    In general, pieces manufacturing procedure, through deep drawing, requires operations that must be carried out in several phases that extend the time and the cost of the process. Material determination, by considering shape, dimensions, mechanical characteristics, etc., can provoke an overdose at estimating proportions with the consequent increase of the manufacturing costs. Furthermore, the processes improvement with its simultaneous reduction of costs, provides to a company a higher profit in competitive markets. Thus, this paper introduces an aided system that allows the technological design of multi-step deep drawing processes, by the optimization of both initial material and process associated costs, and moreover, their application to brass pieces, in particular in CuZn30 alloy (UNS C26000). The aided system considers process technological constraints and pursues a reduction of manufacturing times, by means of the optimization process and fitting. The results show that this system provides, in each stage of the process, a homogenous distribution of the drawing coefficient, thickness reduction, required force and height of the piece, as well as a saving in times.

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow Raise, Multi-Step X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-12-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations we studied a slow rise, multi-step X1.6 flare that began on November 7, 2014 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region. This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, IRIS spacecraft along with the ground based data from the New Solar Telescope (NST) present evidence that i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ--sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; ii) this event represented an example of an in-situ formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; iii) the global PEA system spanned the entire AR and was due to global scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radii, indicating on the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  5. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow-rise, Multistep X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  6. Multi-step reaction mechanism for F atom interactions with organosilicate glass and SiO x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankelevich, Yuri A.; Voronina, Ekaterina N.; Rakhimova, Tatyana V.; Palov, Alexander P.; Lopaev, Dmitry V.; Zyryanov, Sergey M.; Baklanov, Mikhail R.

    2016-09-01

    An ab initio approach with the density functional theory (DFT) method was used to study F atom interactions with organosilicate glass (OSG)-based low-k dielectric films. Because of the complexity and significant modifications of the OSG surface structure during the interaction with radicals and etching, a variety of reactions between the surface groups and thermal F atoms can happen. For OSG film etching and damage, we propose a multi-step mechanism based on DFT static and dynamic simulations, which is consistent with the previously reported experimental observations. The important part of the proposed mechanism is the formation of pentavalent Si atoms on the OSG surface due to a quasi-chemisorption of the incident F atoms. The revealed mechanism of F atom incorporation into the OSG matrix explains the experimentally observed phenomena of fast fluorination without significant modification of the chemical structure. We demonstrate that the pentavalent Si states induce the weakening of adjacent Si–O bonds and their breaking under F atom flux. The calculated results allow us to propose a set of elementary chemical reactions of successive removal of CH3 and CH2 groups and fluorinated SiO x matrix etching.

  7. A multi-step reaction model for ignition of fully-dense Al-CuO nanocomposite powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, D.; Ermoline, A.; Dreizin, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    A multi-step reaction model is developed to describe heterogeneous processes occurring upon heating of an Al-CuO nanocomposite material prepared by arrested reactive milling. The reaction model couples a previously derived Cabrera-Mott oxidation mechanism describing initial, low temperature processes and an aluminium oxidation model including formation of different alumina polymorphs at increased film thicknesses and higher temperatures. The reaction model is tuned using traces measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Ignition is studied for thin powder layers and individual particles using respectively the heated filament (heating rates of 103-104 K s-1) and laser ignition (heating rate ∼106 K s-1) experiments. The developed heterogeneous reaction model predicts a sharp temperature increase, which can be associated with ignition when the laser power approaches the experimental ignition threshold. In experiments, particles ignited by the laser beam are observed to explode, indicating a substantial gas release accompanying ignition. For the heated filament experiments, the model predicts exothermic reactions at the temperatures, at which ignition is observed experimentally; however, strong thermal contact between the metal filament and powder prevents the model from predicting the thermal runaway. It is suggested that oxygen gas release from decomposing CuO, as observed from particles exploding upon ignition in the laser beam, disrupts the thermal contact of the powder and filament; this phenomenon must be included in the filament ignition model to enable prediction of the temperature runaway.

  8. Automated Engineering Design (AED); An approach to automated documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    The automated engineering design (AED) is reviewed, consisting of a high level systems programming language, a series of modular precoded subroutines, and a set of powerful software machine tools that effectively automate the production and design of new languages. AED is used primarily for development of problem and user-oriented languages. Software production phases are diagramed, and factors which inhibit effective documentation are evaluated.

  9. Multi-step ion beam etching of sub-30 nm magnetic tunnel junctions for reducing leakage and MgO barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sung-woo; Kim, Daehong; Kwon, Jihun; Kim, Bongho; Choi, Seonjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2012-04-01

    We have demonstrated the fabrication of sub 30 nm magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The multi-step ion beam etching (IBE) process performed for 18 min between 45 deg. and 30 deg. , at 500 V combined ion supply voltage, resulted in a 55 nm tall MTJ with 28 nm diameter. We used a negative tone electron beam resist as the hard mask, which maintained its lateral dimension during the IBE, allowing almost vertical pillar side profiles. The measurement results showed a tunnel magneto-resistance ratio of 13% at 1 k{Omega} junction resistance. With further optimization in IBE energy and multi-step etching process, it will be possible to fabricate perpendicularly oriented MTJs for future sub 30 nm non-volatile magnetic memory applications.

  10. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  11. Fuzzy Control/Space Station automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fuzzy control/space station automation are presented. Topics covered include: Space Station Freedom (SSF); SSF evolution; factors pointing to automation & robotics (A&R); astronaut office inputs concerning A&R; flight system automation and ground operations applications; transition definition program; and advanced automation software tools.

  12. 46 CFR 15.715 - Automated vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automated vessels. 15.715 Section 15.715 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.715 Automated vessels. (a) Coast Guard acceptance of automated systems... automated system in establishing initial manning levels; however, until the system is proven reliable,...

  13. 46 CFR 15.715 - Automated vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automated vessels. 15.715 Section 15.715 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.715 Automated vessels. (a) Coast Guard acceptance of automated systems... automated system in establishing initial manning levels; however, until the system is proven reliable,...

  14. 46 CFR 15.715 - Automated vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automated vessels. 15.715 Section 15.715 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.715 Automated vessels. (a) Coast Guard acceptance of automated systems... automated system in establishing initial manning levels; however, until the system is proven reliable,...

  15. 46 CFR 15.715 - Automated vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Automated vessels. 15.715 Section 15.715 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.715 Automated vessels. (a) Coast Guard acceptance of automated systems... automated system in establishing initial manning levels; however, until the system is proven reliable,...

  16. 46 CFR 15.715 - Automated vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Automated vessels. 15.715 Section 15.715 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.715 Automated vessels. (a) Coast Guard acceptance of automated systems... automated system in establishing initial manning levels; however, until the system is proven reliable,...

  17. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  18. Human factors in cockpit automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    The rapid advance in microprocessor technology has made it possible to automate many functions that were previously performed manually. Several research areas have been identified which are basic to the question of the implementation of automation in the cockpit. One of the identified areas deserving further research is warning and alerting systems. Modern transport aircraft have had one after another warning and alerting systems added, and computer-based cockpit systems make it possible to add even more. Three major areas of concern are: input methods (including voice, keyboard, touch panel, etc.), output methods and displays (from traditional instruments to CRTs, to exotic displays including the human voice), and training for automation. Training for operating highly automatic systems requires considerably more attention than it has been given in the past. Training methods have not kept pace with the advent of flight-deck automation.

  19. Automating the Purple Crow Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Shannon; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Purple Crow LiDAR (PCL) was built to measure short and long term coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere. The initial component of my MSc. project is to automate two key elements of the PCL: the rotating liquid mercury mirror and the Zaber alignment mirror. In addition to the automation of the Zaber alignment mirror, it is also necessary to describe the mirror's movement and positioning errors. Its properties will then be added into the alignment software. Once the alignment software has been completed, we will compare the new alignment method with the previous manual procedure. This is the first among several projects that will culminate in a fully-automated lidar. Eventually, we will be able to work remotely, thereby increasing the amount of data we collect. This paper will describe the motivation for automation, the methods we propose, preliminary results for the Zaber alignment error analysis, and future work.

  20. Real Automation in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Mayero, Micaela; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We provide a package of strategies for automation of non-linear arithmetic in PVS. In particular, we describe a simplication procedure for the field of real numbers and a strategy for cancellation of common terms.

  1. An automation simulation testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Sztipanovits, Janos; Biegl, Csaba; Karsai, Gabor; Springfield, James F.; Mutammara, Atheel

    1988-01-01

    The work being done in porting ROBOSIM (a graphical simulation system developed jointly by NASA-MSFC and Vanderbilt University) to the HP350SRX graphics workstation is described. New additional ROBOSIM features, like collision detection and new kinematics simulation methods are also discussed. Based on the experiences of the work on ROBOSIM, a new graphics structural modeling environment is suggested which is intended to be a part of a new knowledge-based multiple aspect modeling testbed. The knowledge-based modeling methodologies and tools already available are described. Three case studies in the area of Space Station automation are also reported. First a geometrical structural model of the station is presented. This model was developed using the ROBOSIM package. Next the possible application areas of an integrated modeling environment in the testing of different Space Station operations are discussed. One of these possible application areas is the modeling of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), which is one of the most complex subsystems of the station. Using the multiple aspect modeling methodology, a fault propagation model of this system is being built and is described.

  2. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  3. Automated Gas Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  4. Automated call tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, C.

    1993-03-01

    User Services groups are on the front line with user support. We are the first to hear about problems. The speed, accuracy, and intelligence with which we respond determines the user`s perception of our effectiveness and our commitment to quality and service. To keep pace with the complex changes at our sites, we must have tools to help build a knowledge base of solutions, a history base of our users, and a record of every problem encountered. Recently, I completed a survey of twenty sites similar to the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC). This informal survey reveals that 27% of the sites use a paper system to log calls, 60% employ homegrown automated call tracking systems, and 13% use a vendor-supplied system. Fifty-four percent of those using homegrown systems are exploring the merits of switching to a vendor-supplied system. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidelines for evaluating a call tracking system. In addition, insights are provided to assist User Services groups in selecting a system that fits their needs.

  5. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

  6. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of AZ31B Alloy and AZ31B-SiCp Deformed Through a Multi-step Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Ying, T.; Zhang, M. F.; Wu, K.

    2016-08-01

    The 15 vol.% micron SiC particle (SiCp)-reinforced AZ31B magnesium matrix composite (AZ31B-SiCp) prepared with semisolid stirring-assisted ultrasonic vibration was subjected to a multi-step process. The influence of the multi-step processing route on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the AZ31B-SiCp was investigated. For comparison, the monolithic AZ31B alloy was also processed under the same conditions. The results showed that the grain sizes of the AZ31B alloy and the AZ31B-SiCp were gradually decreased with increasing the processing step. Compared with the AZ31B-SiCp, the grain size of the AZ31B alloy was much larger, and the grain size distribution was inhomogeneous at the same processing condition. The particles of the AZ31B-SiCp were dispersed uniformly through the multi-step processing. Moreover, the tensile properties of the materials were gradually improved with increasing the processing step. In particular, the strength of AZ31B-SiCp and the ductility of AZ31B alloy improved significantly based on the room-temperature tensile test results.

  7. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of AZ31B Alloy and AZ31B-SiCp Deformed Through a Multi-step Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Ying, T.; Zhang, M. F.; Wu, K.

    2016-10-01

    The 15 vol.% micron SiC particle (SiCp)-reinforced AZ31B magnesium matrix composite (AZ31B-SiCp) prepared with semisolid stirring-assisted ultrasonic vibration was subjected to a multi-step process. The influence of the multi-step processing route on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the AZ31B-SiCp was investigated. For comparison, the monolithic AZ31B alloy was also processed under the same conditions. The results showed that the grain sizes of the AZ31B alloy and the AZ31B-SiCp were gradually decreased with increasing the processing step. Compared with the AZ31B-SiCp, the grain size of the AZ31B alloy was much larger, and the grain size distribution was inhomogeneous at the same processing condition. The particles of the AZ31B-SiCp were dispersed uniformly through the multi-step processing. Moreover, the tensile properties of the materials were gradually improved with increasing the processing step. In particular, the strength of AZ31B-SiCp and the ductility of AZ31B alloy improved significantly based on the room-temperature tensile test results.

  8. Influence of multi-step heat treatments in creep age forming of 7075 aluminum alloy: Optimization for springback, strength and exfoliation corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi Jeshvaghani, R.; Zohdi, H.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Bozorg, M.; Hadavi, S.M.M.

    2012-11-15

    Multi-step heat treatments comprise of high temperature forming (150 Degree-Sign C/24 h plus 190 Degree-Sign C for several minutes) and subsequent low temperature forming (120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h) is developed in creep age forming of 7075 aluminum alloy to decrease springback and exfoliation corrosion susceptibility without reduction in tensile properties. The results show that the multi-step heat treatment gives the low springback and the best combination of exfoliation corrosion resistance and tensile strength. The lower springback is attributed to the dislocation recovery and more stress relaxation at higher temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that corrosion resistance is improved due to the enlargement in the size and the inter-particle distance of the grain boundaries precipitates. Furthermore, the achievement of the high strength is related to the uniform distribution of ultrafine {eta} Prime precipitates within grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep age forming developed for manufacturing of aircraft wing panels by aluminum alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A good combination of properties with minimal springback is required in this component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This requirement can be improved through the appropriate heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-step cycles developed in creep age forming of AA7075 for improving of springback and properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results indicate simultaneous enhancing the properties and shape accuracy (lower springback).

  9. Technology modernization assessment flexible automation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.W.; Boyd, D.R.; Hansen, N.H.; Hansen, M.A.; Yount, J.A.

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of this report are: to present technology assessment guidelines to be considered in conjunction with defense regulations before an automation project is developed to give examples showing how assessment guidelines may be applied to a current project to present several potential areas where automation might be applied successfully in the depot system. Depots perform primarily repair and remanufacturing operations, with limited small batch manufacturing runs. While certain activities (such as Management Information Systems and warehousing) are directly applicable to either environment, the majority of applications will require combining existing and emerging technologies in different ways, with the special needs of depot remanufacturing environment. Industry generally enjoys the ability to make revisions to its product lines seasonally, followed by batch runs of thousands or more. Depot batch runs are in the tens, at best the hundreds, of parts with a potential for large variation in product mix; reconfiguration may be required on a week-to-week basis. This need for a higher degree of flexibility suggests a higher level of operator interaction, and, in turn, control systems that go beyond the state of the art for less flexible automation and industry in general. This report investigates the benefits and barriers to automation and concludes that, while significant benefits do exist for automation, depots must be prepared to carefully investigate the technical feasibility of each opportunity and the life-cycle costs associated with implementation. Implementation is suggested in two ways: (1) develop an implementation plan for automation technologies based on results of small demonstration automation projects; (2) use phased implementation for both these and later stage automation projects to allow major technical and administrative risk issues to be addressed. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (JF)

  10. Automated Power-Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Cindy; Anderson, Paul M.; Martin, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Automated power-distribution system monitors and controls electrical power to modules in network. Handles both 208-V, 20-kHz single-phase alternating current and 120- to 150-V direct current. Power distributed to load modules from power-distribution control units (PDCU's) via subsystem distributors. Ring busses carry power to PDCU's from power source. Needs minimal attention. Detects faults and also protects against them. Potential applications include autonomous land vehicles and automated industrial process systems.

  11. Evolution paths for advanced automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healey, Kathleen J.

    1990-01-01

    As Space Station Freedom (SSF) evolves, increased automation and autonomy will be required to meet Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) objectives. As a precursor to the use of advanced automation within the SSFP, especially if it is to be used on SSF (e.g., to automate the operation of the flight systems), the underlying technologies will need to be elevated to a high level of readiness to ensure safe and effective operations. Ground facilities supporting the development of these flight systems -- from research and development laboratories through formal hardware and software development environments -- will be responsible for achieving these levels of technology readiness. These facilities will need to evolve support the general evolution of the SSFP. This evolution will include support for increasing the use of advanced automation. The SSF Advanced Development Program has funded a study to define evolution paths for advanced automaton within the SSFP's ground-based facilities which will enable, promote, and accelerate the appropriate use of advanced automation on-board SSF. The current capability of the test beds and facilities, such as the Software Support Environment, with regard to advanced automation, has been assessed and their desired evolutionary capabilities have been defined. Plans and guidelines for achieving this necessary capability have been constructed. The approach taken has combined indepth interviews of test beds personnel at all SSF Work Package centers with awareness of relevant state-of-the-art technology and technology insertion methodologies. Key recommendations from the study include advocating a NASA-wide task force for advanced automation, and the creation of software prototype transition environments to facilitate the incorporation of advanced automation in the SSFP.

  12. Generative Representations for Automated Design of Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homby, Gregory S.; Lipson, Hod; Pollack, Jordan B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated design of complex, modular robots involves an evolutionary process in which generative representations of designs are used. The term generative representations as used here signifies, loosely, representations that consist of or include algorithms, computer programs, and the like, wherein encoded designs can reuse elements of their encoding and thereby evolve toward greater complexity. Automated design of robots through synthetic evolutionary processes has already been demonstrated, but it is not clear whether genetically inspired search algorithms can yield designs that are sufficiently complex for practical engineering. The ultimate success of such algorithms as tools for automation of design depends on the scaling properties of representations of designs. A nongenerative representation (one in which each element of the encoded design is used at most once in translating to the design) scales linearly with the number of elements. Search algorithms that use nongenerative representations quickly become intractable (search times vary approximately exponentially with numbers of design elements), and thus are not amenable to scaling to complex designs. Generative representations are compact representations and were devised as means to circumvent the above-mentioned fundamental restriction on scalability. In the present method, a robot is defined by a compact programmatic form (its generative representation) and the evolutionary variation takes place on this form. The evolutionary process is an iterative one, wherein each cycle consists of the following steps: 1. Generative representations are generated in an evolutionary subprocess. 2. Each generative representation is a program that, when compiled, produces an assembly procedure. 3. In a computational simulation, a constructor executes an assembly procedure to generate a robot. 4. A physical-simulation program tests the performance of a simulated constructed robot, evaluating the performance

  13. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... human genome, behavioral genetics, pharmacogenetics, drug resistance, biofilms, computer modeling. » more Chapter 5: 21st-Century Genetics Covers systems biology, GFP, genetic testing, privacy concerns, DNA forensics, ...

  14. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  15. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Genetic Counseling Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetic Counseling Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... informed decisions about testing and treatment. Reasons for Genetic Counseling There are many reasons that people go ...

  16. Automated ship image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  17. A Multistep Maturity Model for the Implementation of Electronic and Computable Diagnostic Clinical Prediction Rules (eCPRs)

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Derek; McDonnell, Ronan; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) has been advocated as one way of implementing actionable evidence-based rules in clinical practice. The current highly manual nature of deriving CPRs makes them difficult to use and maintain. Addressing the known limitations of CPRs requires implementing more flexible and dynamic models of CPR development. We describe the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide a platform for the derivation and dissemination of CPRs derived through analysis and continual learning from electronic patient data. Model Components: We propose a multistep maturity model for constructing electronic and computable CPRs (eCPRs). The model has six levels – from the lowest level of CPR maturity (literaturebased CPRs) to a fully electronic and computable service-oriented model of CPRs that are sensitive to specific demographic patient populations. We describe examples of implementations of the core model components – focusing on CPR representation, interoperability, electronic dissemination, CPR learning, and user interface requirements. Conclusion: The traditional focus on derivation and narrow validation of CPRs has severely limited their wider acceptance. The evolution and maturity model described here outlines a progression toward eCPRs consistent with the vision of a learning health system (LHS) – using central repositories of CPR knowledge, accessible open standards, and generalizable models to avoid repetition of previous work. This is useful for developing more ambitious strategies to address limitations of the traditional CPR development life cycle. The model described here is a starting point for promoting discussion about what a more dynamic CPR development process should look like. PMID:26290890

  18. Rapid determination and chemical change tracking of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Su-Qin; Gu, Dong-Chen; He, Helen; Xu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Xi-Chang

    2016-02-01

    BPO is often added to wheat flour as flour improver, but its excessive use and edibility are receiving increasing concern. A multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting was employed to identify BPO in wheat flour and unveil its changes during storage. BPO contained in wheat flour (< 3.0 mg/kg) was difficult to be identified by infrared spectra with correlation coefficients between wheat flour and wheat flour samples contained BPO all close to 0.98. By applying second derivative spectroscopy, obvious differences among wheat flour and wheat flour contained BPO before and after storage in the range of 1500-1400 cm- 1 were disclosed. The peak of 1450 cm- 1 which belonged to BPO was blue shifted to 1453 cm- 1 (1455) which belonged to benzoic acid after one week of storage, indicating that BPO changed into benzoic acid after storage. Moreover, when using two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR) to track changes of BPO in wheat flour (0.05 mg/g) within one week, intensities of auto-peaks at 1781 cm- 1 and 669 cm- 1 which belonged to BPO and benzoic acid, respectively, were changing inversely, indicating that BPO was decomposed into benzoic acid. Moreover, another autopeak at 1767 cm- 1 which does not belong to benzoic acid was also rising simultaneously. By heating perturbation treatment of BPO in wheat flour based on 2DCOS-IR and spectral subtraction analysis, it was found that BPO in wheat flour not only decomposed into benzoic acid and benzoate, but also produced other deleterious substances, e.g., benzene. This study offers a promising method with minimum pretreatment and time-saving to identify BPO in wheat flour and its chemical products during storage in a holistic manner.

  19. Rapid determination and chemical change tracking of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Su-Qin; Gu, Dong-Chen; He, Helen; Xu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Xi-Chang

    2016-02-01

    BPO is often added to wheat flour as flour improver, but its excessive use and edibility are receiving increasing concern. A multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting was employed to identify BPO in wheat flour and unveil its changes during storage. BPO contained in wheat flour (<3.0 mg/kg) was difficult to be identified by infrared spectra with correlation coefficients between wheat flour and wheat flour samples contained BPO all close to 0.98. By applying second derivative spectroscopy, obvious differences among wheat flour and wheat flour contained BPO before and after storage in the range of 1500-1400 cm(-1) were disclosed. The peak of 1450 cm(-1) which belonged to BPO was blue shifted to 1453 cm(-1) (1455) which belonged to benzoic acid after one week of storage, indicating that BPO changed into benzoic acid after storage. Moreover, when using two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR) to track changes of BPO in wheat flour (0.05 mg/g) within one week, intensities of auto-peaks at 1781 cm(-1) and 669 cm(-1) which belonged to BPO and benzoic acid, respectively, were changing inversely, indicating that BPO was decomposed into benzoic acid. Moreover, another autopeak at 1767 cm(-1) which does not belong to benzoic acid was also rising simultaneously. By heating perturbation treatment of BPO in wheat flour based on 2DCOS-IR and spectral subtraction analysis, it was found that BPO in wheat flour not only decomposed into benzoic acid and benzoate, but also produced other deleterious substances, e.g., benzene. This study offers a promising method with minimum pretreatment and time-saving to identify BPO in wheat flour and its chemical products during storage in a holistic manner.

  20. Preparation of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5) PET Tracer [18F]FPEB for Human Use: An Automated Radiosynthesis and a Novel One-Pot Synthesis of its Radiolabeling Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Keunpoong; Labaree, David; Li, Songye; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    The radiotracer 3-[18F]fluoro-5-(2-pyridinylethynyl)benzonitrile, or [18F]FPEB, is a promising PET imaging agent for the metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptor (mGluR5). In an effort to develop a routine production method of this radiotracer for use in clinical research we adapted its radiosynthesis to an automated chemistry module. In the meanwhile, we also developed a simplified “one-pot” method for the preparation of the nitrobenzonitrile radiolabeling precursor for [18F]FPEB and its reference standard to replace the existing multi-step synthetic approach. PMID:25305528

  1. Automated detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on fundus images: false positive reduction based on vessel likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Ishida, Kyoko; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of glaucoma is important to slow down or cease progression of the disease and for preventing total blindness. We have previously proposed an automated scheme for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD), which is one of the early signs of glaucoma observed on retinal fundus images. In this study, a new multi-step detection scheme was included to improve detection of subtle and narrow NFLDs. In addition, new features were added to distinguish between NFLDs and blood vessels, which are frequent sites of false positives (FPs). The result was evaluated with a new test dataset consisted of 261 cases, including 130 cases with NFLDs. Using the proposed method, the initial detection rate was improved from 82% to 98%. At the sensitivity of 80%, the number of FPs per image was reduced from 4.25 to 1.36. The result indicates the potential usefulness of the proposed method for early detection of glaucoma.

  2. Baculovirus expression system and method for high throughput expression of genetic material

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robin; Davies, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides novel recombinant baculovirus expression systems for expressing foreign genetic material in a host cell. Such expression systems are readily adapted to an automated method for expression foreign genetic material in a high throughput manner. In other aspects, the present invention features a novel automated method for determining the function of foreign genetic material by transfecting the same into a host by way of the recombinant baculovirus expression systems according to the present invention.

  3. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fast automated counting procedures in addition problem solving: When are they used and why are they mistaken for retrieval?

    PubMed

    Uittenhove, Kim; Thevenot, Catherine; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to a widespread assumption, a recent study suggested that adults do not solve very small additions by directly retrieving their answer from memory, but rely instead on highly automated and fast counting procedures (Barrouillet & Thevenot, 2013). The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that these automated compiled procedures are restricted to small quantities that do not exceed the size of the focus of attention (i.e., 4 elements). For this purpose, we analyzed the response times of ninety adult participants when solving the 81 additions with operands from 1 to 9. Even when focusing on small problems (i.e. with sums ⩽10) reported by participants as being solved by direct retrieval, chronometric analyses revealed a strong size effect. Response times increased linearly with the magnitude of the operands testifying for the involvement of a sequential multistep procedure. However, this size effect was restricted to the problems involving operands from 1 to 4, whereas the pattern of response times for other small problems was compatible with a retrieval hypothesis. These findings suggest that very fast responses routinely interpreted as reflecting direct retrieval of the answer from memory actually subsume compiled automated procedures that are faster than retrieval and deliver their answer while the subject remains unaware of their process, mistaking them for direct retrieval from long-term memory.

  5. Genetic control of Drosophila nerve cord development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skeath, James B.; Thor, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila ventral nerve cord has been a central model system for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms that control CNS development. Studies show that the generation of neural diversity is a multistep process initiated by the patterning and segmentation of the neuroectoderm. These events act together with the process of lateral inhibition to generate precursor cells (neuroblasts) with specific identities, distinguished by the expression of unique combinations of regulatory genes. The expression of these genes in a given neuroblast restricts the fate of its progeny, by activating specific combinations of downstream genes. These genes in turn specify the identity of any given postmitotic cell, which is evident by its cellular morphology and choice of neurotransmitter.

  6. Automation: Decision Aid or Decision Maker?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skitka, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    This study clarified that automation bias is something unique to automated decision making contexts, and is not the result of a general tendency toward complacency. By comparing performance on exactly the same events on the same tasks with and without an automated decision aid, we were able to determine that at least the omission error part of automation bias is due to the unique context created by having an automated decision aid, and is not a phenomena that would occur even if people were not in an automated context. However, this study also revealed that having an automated decision aid did lead to modestly improved performance across all non-error events. Participants in the non- automated condition responded with 83.68% accuracy, whereas participants in the automated condition responded with 88.67% accuracy, across all events. Automated decision aids clearly led to better overall performance when they were accurate. People performed almost exactly at the level of reliability as the automation (which across events was 88% reliable). However, also clear, is that the presence of less than 100% accurate automated decision aids creates a context in which new kinds of errors in decision making can occur. Participants in the non-automated condition responded with 97% accuracy on the six "error" events, whereas participants in the automated condition had only a 65% accuracy rate when confronted with those same six events. In short, the presence of an AMA can lead to vigilance decrements that can lead to errors in decision making.

  7. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  8. Space power subsystem automation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The technology issues involved in power subsystem automation and the reasonable objectives to be sought in such a program were discussed. The complexities, uncertainties, and alternatives of power subsystem automation, along with the advantages from both an economic and a technological perspective were considered. Whereas most spacecraft power subsystems now use certain automated functions, the idea of complete autonomy for long periods of time is almost inconceivable. Thus, it seems prudent that the technology program for power subsystem automation be based upon a growth scenario which should provide a structured framework of deliberate steps to enable the evolution of space power subsystems from the current practice of limited autonomy to a greater use of automation with each step being justified on a cost/benefit basis. Each accomplishment should move toward the objectives of decreased requirement for ground control, increased system reliability through onboard management, and ultimately lower energy cost through longer life systems that require fewer resources to operate and maintain. This approach seems well-suited to the evolution of more sophisticated algorithms and eventually perhaps even the use of some sort of artificial intelligence. Multi-hundred kilowatt systems of the future will probably require an advanced level of autonomy if they are to be affordable and manageable.

  9. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput. PMID:26520383

  10. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput.

  11. Evaluation of a statewide program in genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J A; Petroski, G

    1998-07-01

    We used the Genetics Office Automation System (GOAS), a database management system designed to facilitate collection and analysis of medical genetic data, to evaluate the Missouri Genetics Disease Program (MGDP). From 1985 through 1995, patient data were collected at four tertiary care genetic centers. The number of genetic visits per 100,000 people more than doubled from 1985 through 1995. The results of subpopulation analyses indicate that the MGDP has facilitated improvements in: (1) services for newborns and infants, (2) rural outreach programs, and (3) evaluation of the incidence and impact of genetic disorders. PMID:9677054

  12. Design automation for integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, S. B.; de Geus, A. J.; Rohrer, R. A.

    1983-04-01

    Consideration is given to the development status of the use of computers in automated integrated circuit design methods, which promise the minimization of both design time and design error incidence. Integrated circuit design encompasses two major tasks: error specification, in which the goal is a logic diagram that accurately represents the desired electronic function, and physical specification, in which the goal is an exact description of the physical locations of all circuit elements and their interconnections on the chip. Design automation not only saves money by reducing design and fabrication time, but also helps the community of systems and logic designers to work more innovatively. Attention is given to established design automation methodologies, programmable logic arrays, and design shortcuts.

  13. Automated power management and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolce, James L.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive automation design is being developed for Space Station Freedom's electric power system. A joint effort between NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Exploration Technology and NASA's Office of Space Station Freedom, it strives to increase station productivity by applying expert systems and conventional algorithms to automate power system operation. The initial station operation will use ground-based dispatches to perform the necessary command and control tasks. These tasks constitute planning and decision-making activities that strive to eliminate unplanned outages. We perceive an opportunity to help these dispatchers make fast and consistent on-line decisions by automating three key tasks: failure detection and diagnosis, resource scheduling, and security analysis. Expert systems will be used for the diagnostics and for the security analysis; conventional algorithms will be used for the resource scheduling.

  14. Automated mapping of hammond's landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallant, A.L.; Brown, D.D.; Hoffer, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We automated a method for mapping Hammond's landforms over large landscapes using digital elevation data. We compared our results against Hammond's published landform maps, derived using manual interpretation procedures. We found general agreement in landform patterns mapped by the manual and the automated approaches, and very close agreement in characterization of local topographic relief. The two approaches produced different interpretations of intermediate landforms, which relied upon quantification of the proportion of landscape having gently sloping terrain. This type of computation is more efficiently and consistently applied by computer than human. Today's ready access to digital data and computerized geospatial technology provides a good foundation for mapping terrain features, but the mapping criteria guiding manual techniques in the past may not be appropriate for automated approaches. We suggest that future efforts center on the advantages offered by digital advancements in refining an approach to better characterize complex landforms. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  15. Automated gaseous criteria pollutant audits

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    The Quality Assurance Section (QAS) of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) began performing automated gaseous audits of its ambient air monitoring sites in July 1996. The concept of automated audits evolved from the constant streamlining of the through-the-probe audit process. Continual audit van development and the desire to utilize advanced technology to save time and improve the accuracy of the overall audit process also contributed to the concept. The automated audit process is a computer program which controls an audit van`s ambient gas calibration system, isolated relay and analog to digital cards, and a monitoring station`s data logging system. The program instructs the audit van`s gas calibration system to deliver specified audit concentrations to a monitoring station`s instruments through their collection probe inlet. The monitoring station`s responses to the audit concentrations are obtained by the program polling the station`s datalogger through its RS-232 port. The program calculates relevant audit statistics and stores all data collected during an audit in a relational database. Planning for the development of an automated gaseous audit system began in earnest in 1993, when the CARB purchased computerized ambient air calibration systems which could be remotely controlled by computer through their serial ports. After receiving all the required components of the automated audit system, they were individually tested to confirm their correct operation. Subsequently, a prototype program was developed to perform through-the-probe automated ozone audits. Numerous simulated ozone audits documented the program`s ability to control audit equipment and extract data from a monitoring station`s data logging system. The program was later modified to incorporate the capability to perform audits for carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, methane, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases and genetic mouse models in cancer research: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep and also a multifactorial process that involves agents like genetic and environmental factors. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are major proteolytic enzymes which are involved in cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Genetic variations in genes encoding the MMPs were shown in human studies to influence cancer risk and phenotypic features of a tumor. The complex role of MMPs seems to be important in the mechanism of carcinogenesis, but it is not well recognized. Rodent studies concentrated particularly on the better understanding of the biological functions of the MMPs and their impact on the pathological process, also through the modification of Mmp genes. This review presents current knowledge and the existing evidence on the importance of selected MMPs in genetic mouse models of cancer and human genetic association studies. Further, this work can be useful for scientists studying the role of the genetic impact of MMPs in carcinogenesis. PMID:25352026

  17. BOA: Framework for automated builds

    SciTech Connect

    N. Ratnikova et al.

    2003-09-30

    Managing large-scale software products is a complex software engineering task. The automation of the software development, release and distribution process is most beneficial in the large collaborations, where the big number of developers, multiple platforms and distributed environment are typical factors. This paper describes Build and Output Analyzer framework and its components that have been developed in CMS to facilitate software maintenance and improve software quality. The system allows to generate, control and analyze various types of automated software builds and tests, such as regular rebuilds of the development code, software integration for releases and installation of the existing versions.

  18. Advanced automation for space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, R.A., Jr.; Healy, T.J.; Long, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A NASA/ASEE summer study conducted at the University of Santa Clara in 1980 examined the feasibility of using advanced artificial intelligence and automation technologies in future NASA space missions. Four candidate applications missions were considered: an intelligent earth-sensing information system; an autonomous space exploration system; an automated space manufacturing facility; and a self-replicating, growing lunar factory. The study assessed the various artificial intelligence and machine technologies which must be developed if such sophisticated missions are to become feasible by the century's end. 18 references.

  19. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  20. Automated selection of synthetic biology parts for genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Fusun; Bhatia, Swapnil; Adler, Aaron; Densmore, Douglas; Beal, Jacob

    2012-08-17

    Raising the level of abstraction for synthetic biology design requires solving several challenging problems, including mapping abstract designs to DNA sequences. In this paper we present the first formalism and algorithms to address this problem. The key steps of this transformation are feature matching, signal matching, and part matching. Feature matching ensures that the mapping satisfies the regulatory relationships in the abstract design. Signal matching ensures that the expression levels of functional units are compatible. Finally, part matching finds a DNA part sequence that can implement the design. Our software tool MatchMaker implements these three steps. PMID:23651287

  1. Automated Tools for Subject Matter Expert Evaluation of Automated Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David M.; Bejar, Isaac I.; Sax, Anne

    2004-01-01

    As automated scoring of complex constructed-response examinations reaches operational status, the process of evaluating the quality of resultant scores, particularly in contrast to scores of expert human graders, becomes as complex as the data itself. Using a vignette from the Architectural Registration Examination (ARE), this article explores the…

  2. Automation U.S.A.: Overcoming Barriers to Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Herb

    1985-01-01

    Although labor unions and inadequate technology play minor roles, the principal barrier to factory automation is "fear of change." Related problems include long-term benefits, nontechnical executives, and uncertainty of factory cost accounting. Industry support for university programs is helping to educate engineers to design, implement, and…

  3. Occlusion of the pig superior sagittal sinus, bridging and cortical veins: multistep evolution of sinus-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fries, G; Wallenfang, T; Hennen, J; Velthaus, M; Heimann, A; Schild, H; Perneczky, A; Kempski, O

    1992-07-01

    content did not differ among the three groups. Angiography demonstrated collateral flow via cortical and bridging veins in animals with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus alone. Additional fibrin glue obstructed these collateral vessels. The data suggest a multistep process of pathophysiological alterations in patients with sinus-vein thrombosis and may explain why these patients present with a wide variety of symptoms: minor neurological deficits or headache might indicate thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and/or its bridging veins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  4. ASteCA: Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.; Piatti, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    We present the Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis package (ASteCA), a suit of tools designed to fully automate the standard tests applied on stellar clusters to determine their basic parameters. The set of functions included in the code make use of positional and photometric data to obtain precise and objective values for a given cluster's center coordinates, radius, luminosity function and integrated color magnitude, as well as characterizing through a statistical estimator its probability of being a true physical cluster rather than a random overdensity of field stars. ASteCA incorporates a Bayesian field star decontamination algorithm capable of assigning membership probabilities using photometric data alone. An isochrone fitting process based on the generation of synthetic clusters from theoretical isochrones and selection of the best fit through a genetic algorithm is also present, which allows ASteCA to provide accurate estimates for a cluster's metallicity, age, extinction and distance values along with its uncertainties. To validate the code we applied it on a large set of over 400 synthetic MASSCLEAN clusters with varying degrees of field star contamination as well as a smaller set of 20 observed Milky Way open clusters (Berkeley 7, Bochum 11, Czernik 26, Czernik 30, Haffner 11, Haffner 19, NGC 133, NGC 2236, NGC 2264, NGC 2324, NGC 2421, NGC 2627, NGC 6231, NGC 6383, NGC 6705, Ruprecht 1, Tombaugh 1, Trumpler 1, Trumpler 5 and Trumpler 14) studied in the literature. The results show that ASteCA is able to recover cluster parameters with an acceptable precision even for those clusters affected by substantial field star contamination. ASteCA is written in Python and is made available as an open source code which can be downloaded ready to be used from its official site.

  5. Modular workcells: modern methods for laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Felder, R A

    1998-12-01

    Laboratory automation is beginning to become an indispensable survival tool for laboratories facing difficult market competition. However, estimates suggest that only 8% of laboratories will be able to afford total laboratory automation systems. Therefore, automation vendors have developed alternative hardware configurations called 'modular automation', to fit the smaller laboratory. Modular automation consists of consolidated analyzers, integrated analyzers, modular workcells, and pre- and post-analytical automation. These terms will be defined in this paper. Using a modular automation model, the automated core laboratory will become a site where laboratory data is evaluated by trained professionals to provide diagnostic information to practising physicians. Modem software information management and process control tools will complement modular hardware. Proper standardization that will allow vendor-independent modular configurations will assure success of this revolutionary new technology.

  6. What Is an Automated External Defibrillator?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is an Automated External Defibrillator? An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a lightweight, portable device ... AED? Non-medical personnel such as police, fire service personnel, flight attendants, security guards and other lay ...

  7. Understanding human management of automation errors

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sara E.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.

    2013-01-01

    Automation has the potential to aid humans with a diverse set of tasks and support overall system performance. Automated systems are not always reliable, and when automation errs, humans must engage in error management, which is the process of detecting, understanding, and correcting errors. However, this process of error management in the context of human-automation interaction is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the variables that contribute to error management. We examined relevant research in human-automation interaction and human error to identify critical automation, person, task, and emergent variables. We propose a framework for management of automation errors to incorporate and build upon previous models. Further, our analysis highlights variables that may be addressed through design and training to positively influence error management. Additional efforts to understand the error management process will contribute to automation designed and implemented to support safe and effective system performance. PMID:25383042

  8. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  9. Automated RNA Extraction and Purification for Multiplexed Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzek, Amy K.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2005-01-01

    Pathogen detection has become an extremely important part of our nation?s defense in this post 9/11 world where the threat of bioterrorist attacks are a grim reality. When a biological attack takes place, response time is critical. The faster the biothreat is assessed, the faster countermeasures can be put in place to protect the health of the general public. Today some of the most widely used methods for detecting pathogens are either time consuming or not reliable [1]. Therefore, a method that can detect multiple pathogens that is inherently reliable, rapid, automated and field portable is needed. To that end, we are developing automated fluidics systems for the recovery, cleanup, and direct labeling of community RNA from suspect environmental samples. The advantage of using RNA for detection is that there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell, whereas there are normally only one or two copies of DNA [2]. Because there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell for highly expressed genes, no amplification of the genetic material may be necessary, and thus rapid and direct detection of only a few cells may be possible [3]. This report outlines the development of both manual and automated methods for the extraction and purification of mRNA. The methods were evaluated using cell lysates from Escherichia coli 25922 (nonpathogenic), Salmonella typhimurium (pathogenic), and Shigella spp (pathogenic). Automated RNA purification was achieved using a custom sequential injection fluidics system consisting of a syringe pump, a multi-port valve and a magnetic capture cell. mRNA was captured using silica coated superparamagnetic beads that were trapped in the tubing by a rare earth magnet. RNA was detected by gel electrophoresis and/or by hybridization of the RNA to microarrays. The versatility of the fluidics systems and the ability to automate these systems allows for quick and easy processing of samples and eliminates the need for an experienced operator.

  10. Ask the experts: automation: part I.

    PubMed

    Allinson, John L; Blick, Kenneth E; Cohen, Lucinda; Higton, David; Li, Ming

    2013-08-01

    Bioanalysis invited a selection of leading researchers to express their views on automation in the bioanalytical laboratory. The topics discussed include the challenges that the modern bioanalyst faces when integrating automation into existing drug-development processes, the impact of automation and how they envision the modern bioanalytical laboratory changing in the near future. Their enlightening responses provide a valuable insight into the impact of automation and the future of the constantly evolving bioanalytical laboratory.

  11. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  12. Automated Cataloging. SPEC Kit 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Results of a 1978 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey indicated that 68 (89%) of responding libraries utilized an automated cataloging system. Of those 68, 53 participated in the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC), five in BALLOTS, and the rest in other networks or local systems. At the beginning of this collection, a concise summary…

  13. Automated species identification: why not?

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J; O'Neill, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    Where possible, automation has been a common response of humankind to many activities that have to be repeated numerous times. The routine identification of specimens of previously described species has many of the characteristics of other activities that have been automated, and poses a major constraint on studies in many areas of both pure and applied biology. In this paper, we consider some of the reasons why automated species identification has not become widely employed, and whether it is a realistic option, addressing the notions that it is too difficult, too threatening, too different or too costly. Although recognizing that there are some very real technical obstacles yet to be overcome, we argue that progress in the development of automated species identification is extremely encouraging that such an approach has the potential to make a valuable contribution to reducing the burden of routine identifications. Vision and enterprise are perhaps more limiting at present than practical constraints on what might possibly be achieved. PMID:15253351

  14. Fully automated solid weighing workstation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephen K-F; Lu, YiFeng; Heineman, William; Palmer, Janice; Courtney, Carter

    2005-08-01

    A fully automated, solid-to-solid weighing workstation (patent pending) is described in this article. The core of this automated process is the use of an electrostatically charged pipette tip to attract solid particles on its outside surface. The particles were then dislodged into a 1.2-mL destination vial in a microbalance by spinning the pipette tip. Textures of solid that could be weighed included powder, crystalline, liquid, and semi-solid substances. The workstation can pick up submilligram quantities of sample (=0.3mg) from source vials containing as little as 1mg. The destination vials containing the samples were stored in a 96-well rack to enable subsequent automated liquid handling. Using bovine serum albumin as test solid, the coefficient of variation of the protein concentration for 48 samples is less than 6%. The workstation was used successfully to weigh out 48 different synthetic compounds. Time required for automated weighing was similar to manual weighing. The use of this workstation reduced 90% hands-on time and thus exposure to potentially toxic compounds. In addition, it minimized sample waste and reduced artifacts due to the poor solubility of compound in solvents. Moreover, it enabled compounds synthesized in milligram quantities to be weighed out and tested in biological assays.

  15. Automated Filtering of Internet Postings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis B.; Holland, Maurita P.

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of the use of dynamic data resources, such as Internet LISTSERVs or Usenet newsgroups, focuses on an experiment using an automated filtering system with Usenet newsgroups. Highlights include user satisfaction, based on retrieval size, data sources, and user interface and the need for some human mediation. (Contains two references.) (LRW)

  16. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  17. Teacherbot: Interventions in Automated Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayne, Sian

    2015-01-01

    Promises of "teacher-light" tuition and of enhanced "efficiency" via the automation of teaching have been with us since the early days of digital education, sometimes embraced by academics and institutions, and sometimes resisted as a set of moves which are damaging to teacher professionalism and to the humanistic values of…

  18. Automating the conflict resolution process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to initiate a discussion of how the conflict resolution process at the Network Control Center can be made more efficient. Described here are how resource conflicts are currently resolved as well as the impacts of automating conflict resolution in the ATDRSS era. A variety of conflict resolution strategies are presented.

  19. Automating a High School Restroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritner-Heir, Robbin

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how one high school transformed its restrooms into cleaner and more vandal-resistant environments by automating them. Solutions discussed include installing perforated stainless steel panel ceilings, using epoxy-based paint for walls, selecting china commode fixtures instead of stainless steel, installing electronic faucets and sensors,…

  20. Automation; The New Industrial Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnstein, George E.

    Automation is a word that describes the workings of computers and the innovations of automatic transfer machines in the factory. As the hallmark of the new industrial revolution, computers displace workers and create a need for new skills and retraining programs. With improved communication between industry and the educational community to…

  1. Safety in the Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Pat R.; Greathouse, Lillian R.

    1990-01-01

    Office automation has introduced new hazards to the workplace: electrical hazards related to computer wiring, musculoskeletal problems resulting from use of computer terminals and design of work stations, and environmental concerns related to ventilation, noise levels, and office machine chemicals. (SK)

  2. Library Automation: Guidelines to Costing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Geoffrey

    As with all new programs, the costs associated with library automation must be carefully considered before implementation. This document suggests guidelines to be followed and areas to be considered in the costing of library procedures. An existing system model has been suggested as a standard (Appendix A) and a classification of library tasks…

  3. Delaware: Library Automation and Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Describes automation and networking activities among Delaware libraries, including integrated library systems for public libraries, the Delaware Technical and Community College telecommunications network, Delaware Public Library Internet access planning, digital resources, a computer/technology training center, and the Delaware Center for…

  4. Automation of Space Inventory Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong; Wagner, Raymond; Barton, Richard; Gifford, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the utilization of automated space-based inventory management through handheld RFID readers and BioNet Middleware. The contents include: 1) Space-Based INventory Management; 2) Real-Time RFID Location and Tracking; 3) Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) RFID; and 4) BioNet Middleware.

  5. Automation on the Laboratory Bench.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legrand, M.; Foucard, A.

    1978-01-01

    A kit is described for use in automation of routine chemical research procedures. The kit uses sensors to evaluate the state of the system, actuators which modify the adjustable parameters, and an organ of decision which uses the information from the sensors. (BB)

  6. Fatal sepsis caused by an unusual Klebsiella species that was misidentified by an automated identification system.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Akeda, Yukihiro; Yoshii, Tadashi; Miyaguchi, Shinichi; Inohara, Hidenori; Horii, Toshihiro; Oishi, Kazunori; Iida, Tetsuya; Tomono, Kazunori

    2013-05-01

    This is a description of fatal sepsis caused by infection with Klebsiella variicola, which is an isolate genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient's condition was incorrectly diagnosed as common sepsis caused by K. pneumoniae, which was identified using an automated identification system, but next-generation sequencing and the non-fermentation of adonitol finally identified the cause of sepsis as K. variicola.

  7. Illinois: Library Automation and Connectivity Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Bridget L.; Bloomberg, Kathleen L.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of library automation in Illinois focuses on ILLINET, the Illinois Library and Information Network. Topics include automated resource sharing; ILLINET's online catalog; regional library system automation; community networking and public library technology development; telecommunications initiatives; electronic access to state government…

  8. You're a What? Automation Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, John

    2010-01-01

    Many people think of automation as laborsaving technology, but it sure keeps Jim Duffell busy. Defined simply, automation is a technique for making a device run or a process occur with minimal direct human intervention. But the functions and technologies involved in automated manufacturing are complex. Nearly all functions, from orders coming in…

  9. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  10. Flight-deck automation: Promises and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, E. L.; Curry, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The state of the art in human factors in flight-deck automation is presented. A number of critical problem areas are identified and broad design guidelines are offered. Automation-related aircraft accidents and incidents are discussed as examples of human factors problems in automated flight.

  11. Automated System Marketplace 1987: Maturity and Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Robert A.; Bridge, Frank R.

    1988-01-01

    This annual review of the library automation marketplace presents profiles of 15 major library automation firms and looks at emerging trends. Seventeen charts and tables provide data on market shares, number and size of installations, hardware availability, operating systems, and interfaces. A directory of 49 automation sources is included. (MES)

  12. Archives and Automation: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Rob

    This paper focuses on archives and automation, and reviews recent literature on various topics concerning archives and automation. Topics include: resistance to technology and the need to educate about automation; the change in archival theory due to the information age; problems with technology use; the history of organizing archival records…

  13. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources ... prevalent. Using various laboratory techniques, the scientists isolate DNA from these samples and examine it for unique ...

  14. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  15. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  16. Genetic principles.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  17. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  18. Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic tests for several reasons. These include Finding genetic diseases in unborn babies Finding out if people carry a gene for a disease and might pass it on to their children Screening embryos for disease Testing for genetic diseases in adults before they cause ...

  19. Procedures for microencapsulation of enzymes, cells and genetically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, T M; Prakash, S

    2001-03-01

    Methods to microencapsulate enzyme, cells, and genetically engineered cells have been described in this article. More specific examples of enzyme encapsulation include the microencapsulation of xanthine oxidase for Lesch-Nyhan disease; phenylalanine ammonia lyase for pheny, ketonuria and microencapsulation of multienzyme systems with cofactor recycling for multistep enzyme conversions. Methods for cell encapsulation include the details for encapsulating hepatocytes for liver failure and for gene therapy. This also includes the details of a novel two-step method for encapsulation of high concentrations of smaller cells. Another new approach is the detailed method of the encapsulation of genetically engineered Escherichia coli DH5 cells for lowering urea, ammonia, and other metabolites in kidney or, liver failure and other diseases.

  20. Bistable responses in bacterial genetic networks: Designs and dynamical consequences

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Ray, J. Christian J.; Narula, Jatin; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    A key property of living cells is their ability to react to stimuli with specific biochemical responses. These responses can be understood through the dynamics of underlying biochemical and genetic networks. Evolutionary design principles have been well studied in networks that display graded responses, with a continuous relationship between input signal and system output. Alternatively, biochemical networks can exhibit bistable responses so that over a range of signals the network possesses two stable steady states. In this review, we discuss several conceptual examples illustrating network designs that can result in a bistable response of the biochemical network. Next, we examine manifestations of these designs in bacterial master-regulatory genetic circuits. In particular, we discuss mechanisms and dynamic consequences of bistability in three circuits: two-component systems, sigma-factor networks, and a multistep phosphorelay. Analyzing these examples allows us to expand our knowledge of evolutionary design principles for networks with bistable responses. PMID:21385588

  1. Specimen coordinate automated measuring machine/fiducial automated measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Hedglen, Robert E.; Jacket, Howard S.; Schwartz, Allan I.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen coordinate Automated Measuring Machine (SCAMM) and the Fiducial Automated Measuring Machine (FAMM) is a computer controlled metrology system capable of measuring length, width, and thickness, and of locating fiducial marks. SCAMM and FAMM have many similarities in their designs, and they can be converted from one to the other without taking them out of the hot cell. Both have means for: supporting a plurality of samples and a standard; controlling the movement of the samples in the +/- X and Y directions; determining the coordinates of the sample; compensating for temperature effects; and verifying the accuracy of the measurements and repeating as necessary. SCAMM and FAMM are designed to be used in hot cells.

  2. Automation: how much is too much?

    PubMed

    Hancock, P A

    2014-01-01

    The headlong rush to automate continues apace. The dominant question still remains whether we can automate, not whether we should automate. However, it is this latter question that is featured and considered explicitly here. The suggestion offered is that unlimited automation of all technical functions will eventually prove anathema to the fundamental quality of human life. Examples of tasks, pursuits and past-times that should potentially be excused from the automation imperative are discussed. This deliberation leads us back to the question of balance in the cooperation, coordination and potential conflict between humans and the machines they create.

  3. Kinetic Analysis for the Multistep Profiles of Organic Reactions: Significance of the Conformational Entropy on the Rate Constants of the Claisen Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Yosuke; Nagahata, Yutaka; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Maeda, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The significance of kinetic analysis as a tool for understanding the reactivity and selectivity of organic reactions has recently been recognized. However, conventional simulation approaches that solve rate equations numerically are not amenable to multistep reaction profiles consisting of fast and slow elementary steps. Herein, we present an efficient and robust approach for evaluating the overall rate constants of multistep reactions via the recursive contraction of the rate equations to give the overall rate constants for the products and byproducts. This new method was applied to the Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether, as well as a substituted allyl vinyl ether. Notably, the profiles of these reactions contained 23 and 84 local minima, and 66 and 278 transition states, respectively. The overall rate constant for the Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether was consistent with the experimental value. The selectivity of the Claisen rearrangement reaction has also been assessed using a substituted allyl vinyl ether. The results of this study showed that the conformational entropy in these flexible chain molecules had a substantial impact on the overall rate constants. This new method could therefore be used to estimate the overall rate constants of various other organic reactions involving flexible molecules.

  4. Regional-scale grassland classification using moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer datasets based on multistep unsupervised classification and indices suitability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuemei; Yang, Taibao; Ji, Qin; He, Yi; Ghebrezgabher, Mihretab G.

    2014-01-01

    This study used the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), in conjunction with other ancillary indices, a digital elevation model (DEM), and the multistep unsupervised classification method to classify grassland in Gansu Province and the Qilian Mountains in China. The results showed that the overall accuracy of vegetation type reached 88.79% and that of grassland coverage level reached 87.23%. The ancillary indices suitability analysis revealed that meadow was distributed mainly in zones where the normalized difference moisture index (NDMI) varied between -0.64 and -0.4, whereas for steppe, it varied between -0.55 and -0.32. Grassland with a different coverage level was mainly distributed in zones where the normalized difference soil index (NDSI) varied between -0.20 and 0.25. To demonstrate the usability of these two indices, the maximum values of NDVI, NDMI, and NDSI and the DEM were used in the decision tree classification method for grassland. The results achieved relatively high kappa coefficients of 77.09% for vegetation type and 65.29% for grassland coverage level. Based on these results, it can be concluded that it is rational to apply the multistep unsupervised classification method and the selected indices for regional-scale grassland identification when a priori information is scarce, expensive, or unsuitable.

  5. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  6. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  7. Automating occupational protection records systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, M.; Martin, J.B.

    1991-10-01

    Occupational protection records have traditionally been generated by field and laboratory personnel, assembled into files in the safety office, and eventually stored in a warehouse or other facility. Until recently, these records have been primarily paper copies, often handwritten. Sometimes, the paper is microfilmed for storage. However, electronic records are beginning to replace these traditional methods. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for making the transition to automated record keeping and retrieval using modern computer equipment. This paper describes the types of records most readily converted to electronic record keeping and a methodology for implementing an automated record system. The process of conversion is based on a requirements analysis to assess program needs and a high level of user involvement during the development. The importance of indexing the hard copy records for easy retrieval is also discussed. The concept of linkage between related records and its importance relative to reporting, research, and litigation will be addressed. 2 figs.

  8. Automated illustration of patients instructions.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duy; Nakamura, Carlos; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A picture can be a powerful communication tool. However, creating pictures to illustrate patient instructions can be a costly and time-consuming task. Building on our prior research in this area, we developed a computer application that automatically converts text to pictures using natural language processing and computer graphics techniques. After iterative testing, the automated illustration system was evaluated using 49 previously unseen cardiology discharge instructions. The completeness of the system-generated illustrations was assessed by three raters using a three-level scale. The average inter-rater agreement for text correctly represented in the pictograph was about 66 percent. Since illustration in this context is intended to enhance rather than replace text, these results support the feasibility of conducting automated illustration.

  9. Automation design and crew coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in technology have greatly impacted the appearance of the modern aircraft cockpit. Where once one would see rows upon rows. The introduction of automation has greatly altered the demands on the pilots and the dynamics of aircrew task performance. While engineers and designers continue to implement the latest technological innovations in the cockpit - claiming higher reliability and decreased workload - a large percentage of aircraft accidents are still attributed to human error. Rather than being the main instigators of accidents, operators tend to be the inheritors of system defects created by poor design, incorrect installation, faulty maintenance and bad management decisions. This paper looks at some of the variables that need to be considered if we are to eliminate at least one of these inheritances - poor design. Specifically, this paper describes the first part of a comprehensive study aimed at identifying the effects of automation on crew coordination.

  10. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  11. Genetic and molecular alterations associated with oral squamous cell cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Somoza-Martín, José M; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Reboiras-López, María D; Gándara Rey, José M; García-García, Abel

    2009-12-01

    The development of oral squamous cell cancer (OSCC) is a multistep process involving the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations modulated by genetic pre-disposition and environmental influences such as tobacco and alcohol use, chronic inflammation, and viral infections. All of these factors can lead to a wide range of genetic and molecular alterations that can be detected using a range of molecular studies. The alterations mostly affect two large groups of genes: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which can be either inactivated or overexpressed through mutations, loss of heterozygosity, deletions, or epigenetic modifications such as methylation. Other molecules that are closely associated with tumor pathogenesis and prognosis also exist and warrant further study. Important advances in molecular biology are helping to shed light on oral cancer and thus aiding in the early diagnosis and development of new personalized treatment approaches. The purpose of the review is to explore the genetic and molecular alterations associated with OSCC.

  12. Algorithms Could Automate Cancer Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baky, A. A.; Winkler, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Five new algorithms are a complete statistical procedure for quantifying cell abnormalities from digitized images. Procedure could be basis for automated detection and diagnosis of cancer. Objective of procedure is to assign each cell an atypia status index (ASI), which quantifies level of abnormality. It is possible that ASI values will be accurate and economical enough to allow diagnoses to be made quickly and accurately by computer processing of laboratory specimens extracted from patients.

  13. Home automation in the workplace.

    PubMed

    McCormack, J E; Tello, S F

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units and home automation devices contribute to the independence and potential of individuals with disabilities, both at work and at home. Devices currently exist that can assist people with physical, cognitive, and sensory disabilities to control lighting, appliances, temperature, security, and telephone communications. This article highlights several possible applications for these technologies and discusses emerging technologies that will increase the benefits these devices offer people with disabilities.

  14. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  15. Convection automated logic oven control

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, M.A.; Eke, K.I.

    1998-03-01

    For the past few years, there has been a greater push to bring more automation to the cooling process. There have been attempts at automated cooking using a wide range of sensors and procedures, but with limited success. The authors have the answer to the automated cooking process; this patented technology is called Convection AutoLogic (CAL). The beauty of the technology is that it requires no extra hardware for the existing oven system. They use the existing temperature probe, whether it is an RTD, thermocouple, or thermistor. This means that the manufacturer does not have to be burdened with extra costs associated with automated cooking in comparison to standard ovens. The only change to the oven is the program in the central processing unit (CPU) on the board. As for its operation, when the user places the food into the oven, he or she is required to select a category (e.g., beef, poultry, or casseroles) and then simply press the start button. The CAL program then begins its cooking program. It first looks at the ambient oven temperature to see if it is a cold, warm, or hot start. CAL stores this data and then begins to look at the food`s thermal footprint. After CAL has properly detected this thermal footprint, it can calculate the time and temperature at which the food needs to be cooked. CAL then sets up these factors for the cooking stage of the program and, when the food has finished cooking, the oven is turned off automatically. The total time for this entire process is the same as the standard cooking time the user would normally set. The CAL program can also compensate for varying line voltages and detect when the oven door is opened. With all of these varying factors being monitored, CAL can produce a perfectly cooked item with minimal user input.

  16. Automated Platform Management System Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    The Platform Management System was established to coordinate the operation of platform systems and instruments. The management functions are split between ground and space components. Since platforms are to be out of contact with the ground more than the manned base, the on-board functions are required to be more autonomous than those of the manned base. Under this concept, automated replanning and rescheduling, including on-board real-time schedule maintenance and schedule repair, are required to effectively and efficiently meet Space Station Freedom mission goals. In a FY88 study, we developed several promising alternatives for automated platform planning and scheduling. We recommended both a specific alternative and a phased approach to automated platform resource scheduling. Our recommended alternative was based upon use of exactly the same scheduling engine in both ground and space components of the platform management system. Our phased approach recommendation was based upon evolutionary development of the platform. In the past year, we developed platform scheduler requirements and implemented a rapid prototype of a baseline platform scheduler. Presently we are rehosting this platform scheduler rapid prototype and integrating the scheduler prototype into two Goddard Space Flight Center testbeds, as the ground scheduler in the Scheduling Concepts, Architectures, and Networks Testbed and as the on-board scheduler in the Platform Management System Testbed. Using these testbeds, we will investigate rescheduling issues, evaluate operational performance and enhance the platform scheduler prototype to demonstrate our evolutionary approach to automated platform scheduling. The work described in this paper was performed prior to Space Station Freedom rephasing, transfer of platform responsibility to Code E, and other recently discussed changes. We neither speculate on these changes nor attempt to predict the impact of the final decisions. As a consequence some of our

  17. Small Business Innovations (Automated Information)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bruce G. Jackson & Associates Document Director is an automated tool that combines word processing and database management technologies to offer the flexibility and convenience of text processing with the linking capability of database management. Originally developed for NASA, it provides a means to collect and manage information associated with requirements development. The software system was used by NASA in the design of the Assured Crew Return Vehicle, as well as by other government and commercial organizations including the Southwest Research Institute.

  18. Fully automated urban traffic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrotin, B. M.; Hansen, G. R.; Peng, T. K. C.; Rennels, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The replacement of the driver with an automatic system which could perform the functions of guiding and routing a vehicle with a human's capability of responding to changing traffic demands was discussed. The problem was divided into four technological areas; guidance, routing, computing, and communications. It was determined that the latter three areas being developed independent of any need for fully automated urban traffic. A guidance system that would meet system requirements was not being developed but was technically feasible.

  19. Home automation in the workplace.

    PubMed

    McCormack, J E; Tello, S F

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units and home automation devices contribute to the independence and potential of individuals with disabilities, both at work and at home. Devices currently exist that can assist people with physical, cognitive, and sensory disabilities to control lighting, appliances, temperature, security, and telephone communications. This article highlights several possible applications for these technologies and discusses emerging technologies that will increase the benefits these devices offer people with disabilities. PMID:24440955

  20. Fully automated analysis of multi-resolution four-channel micro-array genotyping data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspour, Mohsen; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Podder, Mohua; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2006-03-01

    We present a fully-automated and robust microarray image analysis system for handling multi-resolution images (down to 3-micron with sizes up to 80 MBs per channel). The system is developed to provide rapid and accurate data extraction for our recently developed microarray analysis and quality control tool (SNP Chart). Currently available commercial microarray image analysis applications are inefficient, due to the considerable user interaction typically required. Four-channel DNA microarray technology is a robust and accurate tool for determining genotypes of multiple genetic markers in individuals. It plays an important role in the state of the art trend where traditional medical treatments are to be replaced by personalized genetic medicine, i.e. individualized therapy based on the patient's genetic heritage. However, fast, robust, and precise image processing tools are required for the prospective practical use of microarray-based genetic testing for predicting disease susceptibilities and drug effects in clinical practice, which require a turn-around timeline compatible with clinical decision-making. In this paper we have developed a fully-automated image analysis platform for the rapid investigation of hundreds of genetic variations across multiple genes. Validation tests indicate very high accuracy levels for genotyping results. Our method achieves a significant reduction in analysis time, from several hours to just a few minutes, and is completely automated requiring no manual interaction or guidance.

  1. ALFA: an automated line fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2016-03-01

    I present the automated line fitting algorithm, ALFA, a new code which can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. In contrast to traditional emission line fitting methods which require the identification of spectral features suspected to be emission lines, ALFA instead uses a list of lines which are expected to be present to construct a synthetic spectrum. The parameters used to construct the synthetic spectrum are optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. I show that the results are in excellent agreement with those measured manually for a number of spectra. Where discrepancies exist, the manually measured fluxes are found to be less accurate than those returned by ALFA. Together with the code NEAT, ALFA provides a powerful way to rapidly extract physical information from observations, an increasingly vital function in the era of highly multiplexed spectroscopy. The two codes can deliver a reliable and comprehensive analysis of very large data sets in a few hours with little or no user interaction.

  2. Automated genotyping of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Henry, Olivier; Borgen, Elin; Laddach, Nadja; Roeser, Tina; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Fermér, Christian; Hauch, Sigfried; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Lagae, Liesbet

    2010-09-01

    Cancer remains a prominent health concern in modern societies. Continuous innovations and introduction of new technologies are essential to level or reduce current healthcare spending. A diagnostic platform to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood may be most promising in this respect. CTCs have been proposed as a minimally invasive, prognostic and predictive marker to reflect the biological characteristics of tumors and are implemented in an increasing number of clinical studies. Still, their detection remains a challenge as they may occur at concentrations below one single cell per ml of blood. To facilitate their detection, here we describe microfluidic modules to isolate and genotype CTCs directly from clinical blood samples. In a first cell isolation and detection module, the CTCs are immunomagnetically enriched, separated and counted. In a second module and after cell lysis, the mRNA is reversely transcripted to cDNA, followed by a multiplex ligation probe amplification of 20 specific genetic markers and two control fragments. Following the multiplex ligation probe amplification reaction, the amplified fragments are electrochemically detected in a third and final module. Besides the design of the modules, their functionality is described using control samples. Further testing using clinical samples and integration of all modules in a single, fully automated smart miniaturized system will enable minimal invasive testing for frequent detection and characterization of CTCs.

  3. From Crater to Graph: Manual and Automated Crater Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Werner, S. C.; Brumby, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Asphaug, E.; Neukum, G.; Team, H.; Team, I.

    2005-12-01

    Impact craters are some of the most abundant, and most interesting features on Mars. They hold a wealth of information about Martian geology, providing clues to the relative age, local composition and erosional history of the surface. A great deal of effort has been expended to count and understand the nature of planetary crater populations (Hartman and Neukum, 2001). Highly trained experts have developed personal methods for conducting manual crater surveys. In addition, several efforts are underway to automate this process in order to keep up with the rapid increase in planetary surface image data. These efforts make use of a variety of methods, including the direct application of traditional image processing algorithms such as the Hough transform, and recent developments in genetic programming, an artificial intelligence-based technique, in which manual crater surveys are used as examples to `grow' or `evolve' crater counting algorithms. (Plesko, C. S. et al., LPSC 2005, Kim, J. R. et al., LPSC 2001, Michael, G. G. P&SS 2003, Earl, J. et al, LPSC 2005) In this study we examine automated crater counting techniques, and compare them with traditional manual techniques on MOC imagery, and demonstrate capabilities for the analysis of multi-spectral and HRSC Digital Terrain Model data as well. Techniques are compared and discussed to define and develop a robust automated crater detection strategy.

  4. Trust in automation: designing for appropriate reliance.

    PubMed

    Lee, John D; See, Katrina A

    2004-01-01

    Automation is often problematic because people fail to rely upon it appropriately. Because people respond to technology socially, trust influences reliance on automation. In particular, trust guides reliance when complexity and unanticipated situations make a complete understanding of the automation impractical. This review considers trust from the organizational, sociological, interpersonal, psychological, and neurological perspectives. It considers how the context, automation characteristics, and cognitive processes affect the appropriateness of trust. The context in which the automation is used influences automation performance and provides a goal-oriented perspective to assess automation characteristics along a dimension of attributional abstraction. These characteristics can influence trust through analytic, analogical, and affective processes. The challenges of extrapolating the concept of trust in people to trust in automation are discussed. A conceptual model integrates research regarding trust in automation and describes the dynamics of trust, the role of context, and the influence of display characteristics. Actual or potential applications of this research include improved designs of systems that require people to manage imperfect automation.

  5. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A process sequence which can be used in conjunction with automated equipment for the mass production of solar cell modules for terrestrial use was developed. The process sequence was then critically analyzed from a technical and economic standpoint to determine the technological readiness of certain process steps for implementation. The steps receiving analysis were: back contact metallization, automated cell array layup/interconnect, and module edge sealing. For automated layup/interconnect, both hard automation and programmable automation (using an industrial robot) were studied. The programmable automation system was then selected for actual hardware development.

  6. The contaminant analysis automation robot implementation for the automated laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, J.R.; Igou, R.E.; Urenda, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) project defines the automated laboratory as a series of standard laboratory modules (SLM) serviced by a robotic standard support module (SSM). These SLMs are designed to allow plug-and-play integration into automated systems that perform standard analysis methods (SAM). While the SLMs are autonomous in the execution of their particular chemical processing task, the SAM concept relies on a high-level task sequence controller (TSC) to coordinate the robotic delivery of materials requisite for SLM operations, initiate an SLM operation with the chemical method dependent operating parameters, and coordinate the robotic removal of materials from the SLM when its commands and events has been established to allow ready them for transport operations as well as performing the Supervisor and Subsystems (GENISAS) software governs events from the SLMs and robot. The Intelligent System Operating Environment (ISOE) enables the inter-process communications used by GENISAS. CAA selected the Hewlett-Packard Optimized Robot for Chemical Analysis (ORCA) and its associated Windows based Methods Development Software (MDS) as the robot SSM. The MDS software is used to teach the robot each SLM position and required material port motions. To allow the TSC to command these SLM motions, a hardware and software implementation was required that allowed message passing between different operating systems. This implementation involved the use of a Virtual Memory Extended (VME) rack with a Force CPU-30 computer running VxWorks; a real-time multitasking operating system, and a Radiuses PC compatible VME computer running MDS. A GENISAS server on The Force computer accepts a transport command from the TSC, a GENISAS supervisor, over Ethernet and notifies software on the RadiSys PC of the pending command through VMEbus shared memory. The command is then delivered to the MDS robot control software using a Windows Dynamic Data Exchange conversation.

  7. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  8. The genetic basis of addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David

    2012-06-01

    Addictions are common, chronic, and relapsing diseases that develop through a multistep process. The impact of addictions on morbidity and mortality is high worldwide. Twin studies have shown that the heritability of addictions ranges from 0.39 (hallucinogens) to 0.72 (cocaine). Twin studies indicate that genes influence each stage from initiation to addiction, although the genetic determinants may differ. Addictions are by definition the result of gene × environment interaction. These disorders, which are in part volitional, in part inborn, and in part determined by environmental experience, pose the full range of medical, genetic, policy, and moral challenges. Gene discovery is being facilitated by a variety of powerful approaches, but is in its infancy. It is not surprising that the genes discovered so far act in a variety of ways: via altered metabolism of drug (the alcohol and nicotine metabolic gene variants), via altered function of a drug receptor (the nicotinic receptor, which may alter affinity for nicotine but as discussed may also alter circuitry of reward), and via general mechanisms of addiction (genes such as monoamine oxidase A and the serotonin transporter that modulate stress response, emotion, and behavioral control). Addiction medicine today benefits from genetic studies that buttress the case for a neurobiologic origin of addictive behavior, and some general information on familially transmitted propensity that can be used to guide prevention. A few well-validated, specific predictors such as OPRM1, ADH1B, ALDH2, CHRNA5, and CYP26 have been identified and can provide some specific guidance, for example, to understand alcohol-related flushing and upper GI cancer risk (ADH1B and AKLDH2), variation in nicotine metabolism (CYP26), and, potentially, naltrexone treatment response (OPRM1). However, the genetic predictors available are few in number and account for only a small portion of the genetic variance in liability, and have not been integrated

  9. Paleopopulation genetics.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Paleopopulation genetics is a new field that focuses on the population genetics of extinct groups and ancestral populations (i.e., populations ancestral to extant groups). With recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, we now have unprecedented ability to directly assay genetic variation from fossils. This allows us to address issues, such as past population structure, changes in population size, and evolutionary relationships between taxa, at a much greater resolution than can traditional population genetics studies. In this review, we discuss recent developments in this emerging field as well as prospects for the future. PMID:22994357

  10. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile. PMID:26409535

  11. Computer automated movement detection for the analysis of behavior.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Roseanna B; Krishnan, Harish R; Bergeson, Susan E; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2007-05-15

    Currently, measuring ethanol behaviors in flies depends on expensive image analysis software or time intensive experimental observation. We have designed an automated system for the collection and analysis of locomotor behavior data, using the IEEE 1394 acquisition program dvgrab, the image toolkit ImageMagick and the programming language Perl. In the proposed method, flies are placed in a clear container and a computer-controlled camera takes pictures at regular intervals. Digital subtraction removes the background and non-moving flies, leaving white pixels where movement has occurred. These pixels are tallied, giving a value that corresponds to the number of animals that have moved between images. Perl scripts automate these processes, allowing compatibility with high-throughput genetic screens. Four experiments demonstrate the utility of this method, the first showing heat-induced locomotor changes, the second showing tolerance to ethanol in a climbing assay, the third showing tolerance to ethanol by scoring the recovery of individual flies, and the fourth showing a mouse's preference for a novel object. Our lab will use this method to conduct a genetic screen for ethanol-induced hyperactivity and sedation, however, it could also be used to analyze locomotor behavior of any organism. PMID:17335906

  12. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  13. Computer automated movement detection for the analysis of behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Roseanna B.; Krishnan, Harish R.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2007-01-01

    Currently, measuring ethanol behaviors in flies depends on expensive image analysis software or time intensive experimenter observation. We have designed an automated system for the collection and analysis of locomotor behavior data, using the IEEE 1394 acquisition program dvgrab, the image toolkit ImageMagick and the programming language Perl. In the proposed method, flies are placed in a clear container and a computer-controlled camera takes pictures at regular intervals. Digital subtraction removes the background and non-moving flies, leaving white pixels where movement has occurred. These pixels are tallied, giving a value that corresponds to the number of animals that have moved between images. Perl scripts automate these processes, allowing compatibility with high-throughput genetic screens. Four experiments demonstrate the utility of this method, the first showing heat-induced locomotor changes, the second showing tolerance to ethanol in a climbing assay, the third showing tolerance to ethanol by scoring the recovery of individual flies, and the fourth showing a mouse’s preference for a novel object. Our lab will use this method to conduct a genetic screen for ethanol induced hyperactivity and sedation, however, it could also be used to analyze locomotor behavior of any organism. PMID:17335906

  14. Expert Robots For Automated Packaging And Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutzky, G. D.; Hall, E. L.; Shell, R. L.

    1989-02-01

    A variety of problems in automated packaging and processing seem ready for expert robotic solutions. Such problems as automated palletizing, bin-picking, automated stoilw and retrieval, automated kitting of parts for assembly, and automated warehousing are currently being considered. The use of expert robots which consist of specialized computer programs, manipulators and integrated sensors has been demonstrated with robot Chedkers, peg games, etc. Actual solutions for automated palletizing, pit-carb basket loading, etc. have also been developed for industrial applications at our Center. The generic concepts arising from this research will be described, unsolved problems discussed, and some important tools demonstrated. The significance of this work lies in its broad application to a host of generic industrial problems which can improve quality, reduce waste, are eliminate human injuries.

  15. Automated systems for identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Stager, C E; Davis, J R

    1992-01-01

    Automated instruments for the identification of microorganisms were introduced into clinical microbiology laboratories in the 1970s. During the past two decades, the capabilities and performance characteristics of automated identification systems have steadily progressed and improved. This article explores the development of the various automated identification systems available in the United States and reviews their performance for identification of microorganisms. Observations regarding deficiencies and suggested improvements for these systems are provided. PMID:1498768

  16. Powder handling for automated fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, J.R.; Eschenbaum, R.C.; Goldmann, L.H.

    1989-04-09

    Installation of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line has been completed. It is located in the Fuel Cycle Plant (FCP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington. The SAF line was designed to fabricate advanced reactor fuel pellets and assemble fuel pins by automated, remote operation. This paper describes powder handling equipment and techniques utilized for automated powder processing and powder conditioning systems in this line. 9 figs.

  17. Temperature automation for a propellant mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Wilson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis and installation of an automatic temperature controller on a propellant mixer is presented. Ultimately, the entire mixing process will come under automation, but since precise adherence to the temperature profile is very difficult to sustain manually, this was the first component to be automated. Automation is not only important for producing a uniform product, but it is necessary for envisioned space-based propellant production.

  18. New luster for space robots and automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, E.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the potential role of robotics and automation in space transportation systems. Automation development requirements are defined for projects in space exploration, global services, space utilization, and space transport. In each category the potential automation of ground operations, on-board spacecraft operations, and in-space handling is noted. The major developments of space robot technology are noted for the 1967-1978 period. Economic aspects of ground-operation, ground command, and mission operations are noted.

  19. Functionalized Polymers-Emerging Versatile Tools for Solution-Phase Chemistry and Automated Parallel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, Andreas; Monenschein, Holger; Wittenberg, Rüdiger

    2001-02-16

    As part of the dramatic changes associated with the need for preparing compound libraries in pharmaceutical and agrochemical research laboratories, industry searches for new technologies that allow for the automation of synthetic processes. Since the pioneering work by Merrifield polymeric supports have been identified to play a key role in this field however, polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis which utilizes immobilized reagents and catalysts has only recently begun to flourish. Polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis has various advantages over conventional solution-phase chemistry, such as the ease of separation of the supported species from a reaction mixture by filtration and washing, the opportunity to use an excess of the reagent to force the reaction to completion without causing workup problems, and the adaptability to continuous-flow processes. Various strategies for employing functionalized polymers stoichiometrically have been developed. Apart from reagents that are covalently or ionically attached to the polymeric backbone and which are released into solution in the presence of a suitable substrate, scavenger reagents play an increasingly important role in purifying reaction mixtures. Employing functionalized polymers in solution-phase synthesis has been shown to be extremely useful in automated parallel synthesis and multistep sequences. So far, compound libraries containing as many as 88 members have been generated by using several polymer-bound reagents one after another. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that complex natural products like the alkaloids (+/-)-oxomaritidine and (+/-)-epimaritidine can be prepared by a sequence of five and six consecutive polymer-assisted steps, respectively, and the potent analgesic compound (+/-)-epibatidine in twelve linear steps ten of which are based on functionalized polymers. These developments reveal the great future prospects of polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis.

  20. Human-centered aircraft automation: A concept and guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Aircraft automation is examined and its effects on flight crews. Generic guidelines are proposed for the design and use of automation in transport aircraft, in the hope of stimulating increased and more effective dialogue among designers of automated cockpits, purchasers of automated aircraft, and the pilots who must fly those aircraft in line operations. The goal is to explore the means whereby automation may be a maximally effective tool or resource for pilots without compromising human authority and with an increase in system safety. After definition of the domain of the aircraft pilot and brief discussion of the history of aircraft automation, a concept of human centered automation is presented and discussed. Automated devices are categorized as a control automation, information automation, and management automation. The environment and context of aircraft automation are then considered, followed by thoughts on the likely future of automation of that category.