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Sample records for automated rna extraction

  1. Automated RNA Extraction and Purification for Multiplexed Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzek, Amy K.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2005-01-01

    Pathogen detection has become an extremely important part of our nation?s defense in this post 9/11 world where the threat of bioterrorist attacks are a grim reality. When a biological attack takes place, response time is critical. The faster the biothreat is assessed, the faster countermeasures can be put in place to protect the health of the general public. Today some of the most widely used methods for detecting pathogens are either time consuming or not reliable [1]. Therefore, a method that can detect multiple pathogens that is inherently reliable, rapid, automated and field portable is needed. To that end, we are developing automated fluidics systems for the recovery, cleanup, and direct labeling of community RNA from suspect environmental samples. The advantage of using RNA for detection is that there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell, whereas there are normally only one or two copies of DNA [2]. Because there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell for highly expressed genes, no amplification of the genetic material may be necessary, and thus rapid and direct detection of only a few cells may be possible [3]. This report outlines the development of both manual and automated methods for the extraction and purification of mRNA. The methods were evaluated using cell lysates from Escherichia coli 25922 (nonpathogenic), Salmonella typhimurium (pathogenic), and Shigella spp (pathogenic). Automated RNA purification was achieved using a custom sequential injection fluidics system consisting of a syringe pump, a multi-port valve and a magnetic capture cell. mRNA was captured using silica coated superparamagnetic beads that were trapped in the tubing by a rare earth magnet. RNA was detected by gel electrophoresis and/or by hybridization of the RNA to microarrays. The versatility of the fluidics systems and the ability to automate these systems allows for quick and easy processing of samples and eliminates the need for an experienced operator.

  2. Automated motif extraction and classification in RNA tertiary structures

    PubMed Central

    Djelloul, Mahassine; Denise, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We used a novel graph-based approach to extract RNA tertiary motifs. We cataloged them all and clustered them using an innovative graph similarity measure. We applied our method to three widely studied structures: Haloarcula marismortui 50S (H.m 50S), Escherichia coli 50S (E. coli 50S), and Thermus thermophilus 16S (T.th 16S) RNAs. We identified 10 known motifs without any prior knowledge of their shapes or positions. We additionally identified four putative new motifs. PMID:18957493

  3. Automated microfluidic DNA/RNA extraction with both disposable and reusable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Johnson, Michael; Hill, Parker; Sonkul, Rahul S.; Kim, Jongwon; Gale, Bruce K.

    2012-01-01

    An automated microfluidic nucleic extraction system was fabricated with a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure that consists of sample wells, microvalves, a micropump and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. Both the microvalves and micropump structures were fabricated in a single layer and are operated pneumatically using a 100 µm PDMS membrane. To fabricate the disposable microfluidic silica cartridge, two-cavity structures were made in a PDMS replica to fit the stacked silica membranes. A handheld controller for the microvalves and pumps was developed to enable system automation. With purified ribonucleic acid (RNA), whole blood and E. coli samples, the automated microfluidic nucleic acid extraction system was validated with a guanidine-based solid phase extraction procedure. An extraction efficiency of ~90% for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ~54% for RNA was obtained in 12 min from whole blood and E. coli samples, respectively. In addition, the same quantity and quality of extracted DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR also presented the appropriate amplification and melting profiles. Automated, programmable fluid control and physical separation of the reusable components and the disposable components significantly decrease the assay time and manufacturing cost and increase the flexibility and compatibility of the system with downstream components.

  4. Automated Device for Asynchronous Extraction of RNA, DNA, or Protein Biomarkers from Surrogate Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Bitting, Anna L; Bordelon, Hali; Baglia, Mark L; Davis, Keersten M; Creecy, Amy E; Short, Philip A; Albert, Laura E; Karhade, Aditya V; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Adams, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarker-based diagnostic methods are inhibited by nontarget molecules in patient samples, necessitating biomarker extraction before detection. We have developed a simple device that purifies RNA, DNA, or protein biomarkers from complex biological samples without robotics or fluid pumping. The device design is based on functionalized magnetic beads, which capture biomarkers and remove background biomolecules by magnetically transferring the beads through processing solutions arrayed within small-diameter tubing. The process was automated by wrapping the tubing around a disc-like cassette and rotating it past a magnet using a programmable motor. This device recovered biomarkers at ~80% of the operator-dependent extraction method published previously. The device was validated by extracting biomarkers from a panel of surrogate patient samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of (1) influenza A RNA in nasal swabs, (2) Escherichia coli DNA in urine, (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum, and (4) Plasmodium falciparum protein and DNA in blood. The device successfully extracted each biomarker type from samples representing low levels of clinically relevant infectivity (i.e., 7.3 copies/µL of influenza A RNA, 405 copies/µL of E. coli DNA, 0.22 copies/µL of TB DNA, 167 copies/µL of malaria parasite DNA, and 2.7 pM of malaria parasite protein).

  5. Automation of DNA and miRNA co-extraction for miRNA-based identification of human body fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kulstein, Galina; Marienfeld, Ralf; Miltner, Erich; Wiegand, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In the last years, microRNA (miRNA) analysis came into focus in the field of forensic genetics. Yet, no standardized and recommendable protocols for co-isolation of miRNA and DNA from forensic relevant samples have been developed so far. Hence, this study evaluated the performance of an automated Maxwell® 16 System-based strategy (Promega) for co-extraction of DNA and miRNA from forensically relevant (blood and saliva) samples compared to (semi-)manual extraction methods. Three procedures were compared on the basis of recovered quantity of DNA and miRNA (as determined by real-time PCR and Bioanalyzer), miRNA profiling (shown by Cq values and extraction efficiency), STR profiles, duration, contamination risk and handling. All in all, the results highlight that the automated co-extraction procedure yielded the highest miRNA and DNA amounts from saliva and blood samples compared to both (semi-)manual protocols. Also, for aged and genuine samples of forensically relevant traces the miRNA and DNA yields were sufficient for subsequent downstream analysis. Furthermore, the strategy allows miRNA extraction only in cases where it is relevant to obtain additional information about the sample type. Besides, this system enables flexible sample throughput and labor-saving sample processing with reduced risk of cross-contamination.

  6. Comparative evaluation of commercially available manual and automated nucleic acid extraction methods for rotavirus RNA detection in stools.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; McDonald, Sharla; Kamili, Shifaq; Kerin, Tara; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Rotaviruses are a major cause of viral gastroenteritis in children. For accurate and sensitive detection of rotavirus RNA from stool samples by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the extraction process must be robust. However, some extraction methods may not remove the strong RT-PCR inhibitors known to be present in stool samples. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of six extraction methods used commonly for extraction of rotavirus RNA from stool, which have never been formally evaluated: the MagNA Pure Compact, KingFisher Flex and NucliSENS easyMAG instruments, the NucliSENS miniMAG semi-automated system, and two manual purification kits, the QIAamp Viral RNA kit and a modified RNaid kit. Using each method, total nucleic acid or RNA was extracted from eight rotavirus-positive stool samples with enzyme immunoassay optical density (EIA OD) values ranging from 0.176 to 3.098. Extracts prepared using the MagNA Pure Compact instrument yielded the most consistent results by qRT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR. When extracts prepared from a dilution series were extracted by the 6 methods and tested, rotavirus RNA was detected in all samples by qRT-PCR but by conventional RT-PCR testing, only the MagNA Pure Compact and KingFisher Flex extracts were positive in all cases. RT-PCR inhibitors were detected in extracts produced with the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit. The findings of this study should prove useful for selection of extraction methods to be incorporated into future rotavirus detection and genotyping protocols.

  7. Comparison of the MagNA pure LC automated system and the RiboPure-Blood RNA manual method for RNA extraction from multiple myeloma bone marrow samples conserved in an RNA stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Effron, G; Gamarra, S; Crooke, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Lahuerta, J; Martínez-López, J

    2007-04-01

    A total of 62 frozen bone marrow specimens conserved in RNA later (Ambion) were processed using two different extraction methods, the MagNA Pure LC system (MAG; Roche) and the manual RiboPure-Blood RNA method (RIBO; Ambion); Beta glucoronidase RNA (GUS) was amplified by LightCycler PCR to evaluate the quality of both extraction procedures. Less than 1000 GUS copies/ml was detected in 26 of 62 specimens (41.94%) processed by MAG and in five of 62 specimens (8.06%) processed by RIBO. Moreover, RNA recovery from the 62 specimens by MAG is, on average, 2.91 cycle threshold-fold higher than RIBO (P = 0.0008). Furthermore, we compared the extraction times and reagent costs of both methods. In conclusion, RNA extraction using MAG is faster to process 32 samples and less expensive than RIBO but it is not sensitive enough to be employed for research purpose in our laboratory.

  8. High-throughput, automated extraction of DNA and RNA from clinical samples using TruTip technology on common liquid handling robots.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Rebecca C; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Brady, Dane; Thakore, Nitu; Belgrader, Philip; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2013-06-11

    TruTip is a simple nucleic acid extraction technology whereby a porous, monolithic binding matrix is inserted into a pipette tip. The geometry of the monolith can be adapted for specific pipette tips ranging in volume from 1.0 to 5.0 ml. The large porosity of the monolith enables viscous or complex samples to readily pass through it with minimal fluidic backpressure. Bi-directional flow maximizes residence time between the monolith and sample, and enables large sample volumes to be processed within a single TruTip. The fundamental steps, irrespective of sample volume or TruTip geometry, include cell lysis, nucleic acid binding to the inner pores of the TruTip monolith, washing away unbound sample components and lysis buffers, and eluting purified and concentrated nucleic acids into an appropriate buffer. The attributes and adaptability of TruTip are demonstrated in three automated clinical sample processing protocols using an Eppendorf epMotion 5070, Hamilton STAR and STARplus liquid handling robots, including RNA isolation from nasopharyngeal aspirate, genomic DNA isolation from whole blood, and fetal DNA extraction and enrichment from large volumes of maternal plasma (respectively).

  9. Automated modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Skiba, Pawel; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview over the current methods for automated modeling of RNA structures, with emphasis on template-based methods. The currently used approaches to RNA modeling are presented with a side view on the protein world, where many similar ideas have been used. Two main programs for automated template-based modeling are presented: ModeRNA assembling structures from fragments and MacroMoleculeBuilder performing a simulation to satisfy spatial restraints. Both approaches have in common that they require an alignment of the target sequence to a known RNA structure that is used as a modeling template. As a way to find promising template structures and to align the target and template sequences, we propose a pipeline combining the ParAlign and Infernal programs on RNA family data from Rfam. We also briefly summarize template-free methods for RNA 3D structure prediction. Typically, RNA structures generated by automated modeling methods require local or global optimization. Thus, we also discuss methods that can be used for local or global refinement of RNA structures.

  10. Automated Extraction of Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne (Technical Monitor); Haimes, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely performed as part of the design process of most fluid handling devices. In order to efficiently and effectively use the results of a CFD simulation, visualization tools are often used. These tools are used in all stages of the CFD simulation including pre-processing, interim-processing, and post-processing, to interpret the results. Each of these stages requires visualization tools that allow one to examine the geometry of the device, as well as the partial or final results of the simulation. An engineer will typically generate a series of contour and vector plots to better understand the physics of how the fluid is interacting with the physical device. Of particular interest are detecting features such as shocks, recirculation zones, and vortices (which will highlight areas of stress and loss). As the demand for CFD analyses continues to increase the need for automated feature extraction capabilities has become vital. In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like; iso-surface, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snapshot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for (co-processing environments). Methods must be developed to abstract the feature of interest and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  11. Automated Extraction of Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne (Technical Monitor); Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely performed as part of the design process of most fluid handling devices. In order to efficiently and effectively use the results of a CFD simulation, visualization tools are often used. These tools are used in all stages of the CFD simulation including pre-processing, interim-processing, and post-processing, to interpret the results. Each of these stages requires visualization tools that allow one to examine the geometry of the device, as well as the partial or final results of the simulation. An engineer will typically generate a series of contour and vector plots to better understand the physics of how the fluid is interacting with the physical device. Of particular interest are detecting features such as shocks, re-circulation zones, and vortices (which will highlight areas of stress and loss). As the demand for CFD analyses continues to increase the need for automated feature extraction capabilities has become vital. In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like; isc-surface, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snapshot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments). Methods must be developed to abstract the feature of interest and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  12. RCrane: semi-automated RNA model building.

    PubMed

    Keating, Kevin S; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2012-08-01

    RNA crystals typically diffract to much lower resolutions than protein crystals. This low-resolution diffraction results in unclear density maps, which cause considerable difficulties during the model-building process. These difficulties are exacerbated by the lack of computational tools for RNA modeling. Here, RCrane, a tool for the partially automated building of RNA into electron-density maps of low or intermediate resolution, is presented. This tool works within Coot, a common program for macromolecular model building. RCrane helps crystallographers to place phosphates and bases into electron density and then automatically predicts and builds the detailed all-atom structure of the traced nucleotides. RCrane then allows the crystallographer to review the newly built structure and select alternative backbone conformations where desired. This tool can also be used to automatically correct the backbone structure of previously built nucleotides. These automated corrections can fix incorrect sugar puckers, steric clashes and other structural problems.

  13. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples.

  14. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  15. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton I; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access.

  16. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  17. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica; Lee, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from experimentally infected birds. Samples can generally be divided into two types; enriched (e.g. virus stocks) and clinical. Clinical type samples, which may be tissues or swab material, are the most difficult to process due to the complex sample composition and possibly low virus titers. In this chapter two well established procedures for the isolation of AI virus RNA from common clinical specimen types and enriched virus stocks for further molecular applications will be presented.

  18. Comparison of automated and manual purification of total RNA for mRNA-based identification of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Kitayama, Tetsushi; Watanabe, Ken; Sakurada, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Silica column-based RNA purification procedures have widespread use in mRNA profiling for body fluid identification in forensic samples. Also, automated RNA purification systems employing magnetic bead technology have recently become available. In this preliminary study, to ascertain which RNA purification technology is more suitable for the identification of body fluids by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), comparative analyses of the yield and quality of total RNA were performed between automated purification using an EZ1 Advanced Instrument and manual purification using an RNeasy Mini Kit. The yield and size distribution of total RNA were compared by gene expression analysis of two different sized fragments of the β-actin gene. In addition, the relative amounts of several target genes were compared between the purification methods, and the integrity of total RNA was determined by chip-based electrophoresis. The results of this study suggest that RNeasy can purify higher-quality RNA as compared with automated purification using EZ1. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR analysis, however, was higher in the EZ1-purified samples, likely due to the relative efficiency of EZ1 in extracting short-length RNA from degraded samples. We also show that the quantification of relative levels of body fluid-specific genes could be influenced by the purification procedure. Our results indicate that although use of high-quality RNA is generally required for reproducible results in gene expression analysis, the forensic relevance of short RNA fragments in highly degraded samples cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, our results suggest that automated purification procedures as well as silica column-based manual purification procedures can be used for mRNA-based body fluid identification in forensic samples.

  19. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Lovely, David

    1999-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snap-shot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: (1) Shocks, (2) Vortex cores, (3) Regions of recirculation, (4) Boundary layers, (5) Wakes. Three papers and an initial specification for the (The Fluid eXtraction tool kit) FX Programmer's guide were included. The papers, submitted to the AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, are entitled : (1) Using Residence Time for the Extraction of Recirculation Regions, (2) Shock Detection from Computational Fluid Dynamics results and (3) On the Velocity Gradient Tensor and Fluid Feature Extraction.

  20. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    2000-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one 'snap-shot' of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  1. Automated Extraction of Secondary Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne M.; Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become standard practice in the design and development of the major components used for air and space propulsion. To aid in the post-processing and analysis phase of CFD many researchers now use automated feature extraction utilities. These tools can be used to detect the existence of such features as shocks, vortex cores and separation and re-attachment lines. The existence of secondary flow is another feature of significant importance to CFD engineers. Although the concept of secondary flow is relatively understood there is no commonly accepted mathematical definition for secondary flow. This paper will present a definition for secondary flow and one approach for automatically detecting and visualizing secondary flow.

  2. An alternate method for DNA and RNA extraction from clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Z; Umi, S H; Mokhtar, S S; Mokhtar, U; Zaiharina, M Z; Aziz, A T A; Hoh, B P

    2013-02-04

    We developed an alternative method to extract DNA and RNA from clotted blood for genomic and molecular investigations. A combination of the TRIzol method and the QIAamp spin column were used to extract RNA from frozen clotted blood. Clotted blood was sonicated and then the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit was used for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA and RNA were adequate for gene expression analysis and copy number variation (CNV) genotyping, respectively. The purity of the extracted RNA and DNA was in the range of 1.8-2.0, determined by absorbance ratios of A(260):A(280). Good DNA and RNA integrity were confirmed using gel electrophoresis and automated electrophoresis. The extracted DNA was suitable for qPCR and microarrays for CNV genotyping, while the extracted RNA was adequate for gene analysis using RT-qPCR.

  3. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1998-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one 'snap-shot' of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: Shocks; Vortex ores; Regions of Recirculation; Boundary Layers; Wakes.

  4. Automated feature extraction and classification from image sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Unisys Corporation have completed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to explore automated feature extraction and classification from image sources. The CRADA helped the USGS define the spectral and spatial resolution characteristics of airborne and satellite imaging sensors necessary to meet base cartographic and land use and land cover feature classification requirements and help develop future automated geographic and cartographic data production capabilities. The USGS is seeking a new commercial partner to continue automated feature extraction and classification research and development.

  5. Replacing β-mercaptoethanol in RNA extractions.

    PubMed

    Mommaerts, Kathleen; Sanchez, Ignacio; Betsou, Fay; Mathieson, William

    2015-06-15

    RNA extractions are potentially compromised in terms of both yield and quality by ribonucleases (RNases). The pungent and toxic reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME), therefore, is commonly added to the biospecimen's lysis buffer to aid in RNase deactivation. Using different tissue types (liver tissue, kidney tissue, and cell pellets), extraction kits (RNeasy Mini Kit, Illustra RNA Spin Mini Kit, and PureLink Mini Kit), RNA quality assays (RNA integrity numbers [RINs] and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction [qRT-PCR]), yield assessments, and in vitro functional RNase assays (RNaseAlert Kit), we demonstrate that β-ME should be replaced by the less toxic dithiothreitol (DTT) alternative.

  6. Automated DNA extraction for large numbers of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikolić, Petra; Rupar, Matevž; Boben, Jana; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The method described here is a rapid, total DNA extraction procedure applicable to a large number of plant samples requiring pathogen detection. The procedure combines a simple and quick homogenization step of crude extracts with DNA extraction based upon the binding of DNA to magnetic beads. DNA is purified in an automated process in which the magnetic beads are transferred through a series of washing buffers. The eluted DNA is suitable for efficient amplification in PCR reactions.

  7. Extraction of high-quality RNA from human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Le Bleu, Heather K; Kamal, Fadia A; Kelly, Meghan; Ketz, John P; Zuscik, Michael J; Elbarbary, Reyad A

    2017-02-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from articular cartilage is challenging due to low cellularity and high proteoglycan content. This problem hinders efficient application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis in studying cartilage homeostasis. Here we developed a method that purifies high-quality RNA directly from cartilage. Our method optimized the collection and homogenization steps so as to minimize RNA degradation, and modified the conventional TRIzol protocol to enhance RNA purity. Cartilage RNA purified using our method has appropriate quality for RNA-seq experiments including an RNA integrity number of ∼8. Our method also proved efficient in extracting high-quality RNA from subchondral bone.

  8. Efficient oil palm total RNA extraction with a total RNA extraction kit.

    PubMed

    Habib, S H; Saud, H M; Kausar, H

    2014-04-03

    Oil palm tissues are rich in polyphenols, polysaccharides and secondary metabolites; these can co-precipitate with RNA, causing problems for downstream applications. We compared two different methods (one conventional and a kit-based method - Easy-Blue(TM) Total RNA Extraction Kit) to isolate total RNA from leaves, roots and shoot apical meristems of tissue culture derived truncated leaf syndrome somaclonal oil palm seedlings. The quality and quantity of total RNA were compared through spectrophotometry and formaldehyde gel electrophoresis. The specificity and applicability of the protocols were evaluated for downstream applications, including cDNA synthesis and RT-PCR analysis. We found that the conventional method gave higher yields of RNA but took longer, and it was contaminated with genomic DNA. This method required extra genomic DNA removal steps that further reduced the RNA yield. The kit-based method, on the other hand, produced good yields as well as well as good quality RNA, within a very short period of time from a small amount of starting material. Moreover, the RNA from the kit-based method was more suitable for synthesizing cDNA and RT-PCR amplification than the conventional method. Therefore, we conclude that the Easy-BlueTM Total RNA Extraction Kit method is suitable and superior for isolation of total RNA from oil palm leaf, root and shoot apical meristem.

  9. Automated extraction of radiation dose information for CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to radiation as a result of medical imaging is currently in the spotlight, receiving attention from Congress as well as the lay press. Although scanner manufacturers are moving toward including effective dose information in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine headers of imaging studies, there is a vast repository of retrospective CT data at every imaging center that stores dose information in an image-based dose sheet. As such, it is difficult for imaging centers to participate in the ACR's Dose Index Registry. The authors have designed an automated extraction system to query their PACS archive and parse CT examinations to extract the dose information stored in each dose sheet. First, an open-source optical character recognition program processes each dose sheet and converts the information to American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text. Each text file is parsed, and radiation dose information is extracted and stored in a database which can be queried using an existing pathology and radiology enterprise search tool. Using this automated extraction pipeline, it is possible to perform dose analysis on the >800,000 CT examinations in the PACS archive and generate dose reports for all of these patients. It is also possible to more effectively educate technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians about exposure to radiation from CT by generating report cards for interpreted and performed studies. The automated extraction pipeline enables compliance with the ACR's reporting guidelines and greater awareness of radiation dose to patients, thus resulting in improved patient care and management.

  10. Automated vasculature extraction from placenta images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoussa, Nizar; Dutra, Brittany; Lampe, Bryce; Getreuer, Pascal; Wittman, Todd; Salafia, Carolyn; Vese, Luminita

    2011-03-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental blood vessels, which supply a fetus with all of its oxygen and nutrition. An essential step in the analysis of the vascular network pattern is the extraction of the blood vessels, which has only been done manually through a costly and time-consuming process. There is no existing method to automatically detect placental blood vessels; in addition, the large variation in the shape, color, and texture of the placenta makes it difficult to apply standard edge-detection algorithms. We describe a method to automatically detect and extract blood vessels from a given image by using image processing techniques and neural networks. We evaluate several local features for every pixel, in addition to a novel modification to an existing road detector. Pixels belonging to blood vessel regions have recognizable responses; hence, we use an artificial neural network to identify the pattern of blood vessels. A set of images where blood vessels are manually highlighted is used to train the network. We then apply the neural network to recognize blood vessels in new images. The network is effective in capturing the most prominent vascular structures of the placenta.

  11. Automated Image Registration Using Morphological Region of Interest Feature Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Netanyahu, Nathan S.

    2005-01-01

    With the recent explosion in the amount of remotely sensed imagery and the corresponding interest in temporal change detection and modeling, image registration has become increasingly important as a necessary first step in the integration of multi-temporal and multi-sensor data for applications such as the analysis of seasonal and annual global climate changes, as well as land use/cover changes. The task of image registration can be divided into two major components: (1) the extraction of control points or features from images; and (2) the search among the extracted features for the matching pairs that represent the same feature in the images to be matched. Manual control feature extraction can be subjective and extremely time consuming, and often results in few usable points. Automated feature extraction is a solution to this problem, where desired target features are invariant, and represent evenly distributed landmarks such as edges, corners and line intersections. In this paper, we develop a novel automated registration approach based on the following steps. First, a mathematical morphology (MM)-based method is used to obtain a scale-orientation morphological profile at each image pixel. Next, a spectral dissimilarity metric such as the spectral information divergence is applied for automated extraction of landmark chips, followed by an initial approximate matching. This initial condition is then refined using a hierarchical robust feature matching (RFM) procedure. Experimental results reveal that the proposed registration technique offers a robust solution in the presence of seasonal changes and other interfering factors. Keywords-Automated image registration, multi-temporal imagery, mathematical morphology, robust feature matching.

  12. Automated Road Extraction from High Resolution Multispectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Doucette, Peter J.; Agouris, Peggy; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Road networks represent a vital component of geospatial data sets in high demand, and thus contribute significantly to extraction labor costs. Multispectral imagery has only recently become widely available at high spatial resolutions, and modeling spectral content has received limited consideration for road extraction algorithms. This paper presents a methodology that exploits spectral content for fully automated road centerline extraction. Preliminary detection of road centerline pixel candidates is performed with Anti-parallel-edge Centerline Extraction (ACE). This is followed by constructing a road vector topology with a fuzzy grouping model that links nodes from a self-organized mapping of the ACE pixels. Following topology construction, a self-supervised road classification (SSRC) feedback loop is implemented to automate the process of training sample selection and refinement for a road class, as well deriving practical spectral definitions for non-road classes. SSRC demonstrates a potential to provide dramatic improvement in road extraction results by exploiting spectral content. Road centerline extraction results are presented for three 1m color-infrared suburban scenes, which show significant improvement following SSRC.

  13. Automated sea floor extraction from underwater video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Lauren; Rahmes, Mark; Stiver, James; McCluskey, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ocean floor mapping using video is a method to simply and cost-effectively record large areas of the seafloor. Obtaining visual and elevation models has noteworthy applications in search and recovery missions. Hazards to navigation are abundant and pose a significant threat to the safety, effectiveness, and speed of naval operations and commercial vessels. This project's objective was to develop a workflow to automatically extract metadata from marine video and create image optical and elevation surface mosaics. Three developments made this possible. First, optical character recognition (OCR) by means of two-dimensional correlation, using a known character set, allowed for the capture of metadata from image files. Second, exploiting the image metadata (i.e., latitude, longitude, heading, camera angle, and depth readings) allowed for the determination of location and orientation of the image frame in mosaic. Image registration improved the accuracy of mosaicking. Finally, overlapping data allowed us to determine height information. A disparity map was created using the parallax from overlapping viewpoints of a given area and the relative height data was utilized to create a three-dimensional, textured elevation map.

  14. Applications of the Automated SMAC Modal Parameter Extraction Package

    SciTech Connect

    MAYES,RANDALL L.; DORRELL,LARRY R.; KLENKE,SCOTT E.

    1999-10-29

    An algorithm known as SMAC (Synthesize Modes And Correlate), based on principles of modal filtering, has been in development for a few years. The new capabilities of the automated version are demonstrated on test data from a complex shell/payload system. Examples of extractions from impact and shaker data are shown. The automated algorithm extracts 30 to 50 modes in the bandwidth from each column of the frequency response function matrix. Examples of the synthesized Mode Indicator Functions (MIFs) compared with the actual MIFs show the accuracy of the technique. A data set for one input and 170 accelerometer outputs can typically be reduced in an hour. Application to a test with some complex modes is also demonstrated.

  15. Automated DNA extraction platforms offer solutions to challenges of assessing microbial biofouling in oil production facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of microbial assemblages in industrial, marine, and medical systems can inform decisions regarding quality control or mitigation. Modern molecular approaches to detect, characterize, and quantify microorganisms provide rapid and thorough measures unbiased by the need for cultivation. The requirement of timely extraction of high quality nucleic acids for molecular analysis is faced with specific challenges when used to study the influence of microorganisms on oil production. Production facilities are often ill equipped for nucleic acid extraction techniques, making the preservation and transportation of samples off-site a priority. As a potential solution, the possibility of extracting nucleic acids on-site using automated platforms was tested. The performance of two such platforms, the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80™ and Promega Maxwell®16 was compared to a widely used manual extraction kit, MOBIO PowerBiofilm™ DNA Isolation Kit, in terms of ease of operation, DNA quality, and microbial community composition. Three pipeline biofilm samples were chosen for these comparisons; two contained crude oil and corrosion products and the third transported seawater. Overall, the two more automated extraction platforms produced higher DNA yields than the manual approach. DNA quality was evaluated for amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and end-point PCR to generate 454 pyrosequencing libraries for 16S rRNA microbial community analysis. Microbial community structure, as assessed by DGGE analysis and pyrosequencing, was comparable among the three extraction methods. Therefore, the use of automated extraction platforms should enhance the feasibility of rapidly evaluating microbial biofouling at remote locations or those with limited resources. PMID:23168231

  16. Improved Automated Seismic Event Extraction Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, L.; Kleiner, A.; Jordan, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    Like many organizations engaged in seismic monitoring, the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization collects and processes seismic data from a large network of sensors. This data is continuously transmitted to a central data center, and bulletins of seismic events are automatically extracted. However, as for many such automated systems at present, the inaccuracy of this extraction necessitates substantial human analyst review effort. A significant opportunity for improvement thus lies in the fact that these systems currently fail to fully utilize the valuable repository of historical data provided by prior analyst reviews. In this work, we present the results of the application of machine learning approaches to several fundamental sub-tasks in seismic event extraction. These methods share as a common theme the use of historical analyst-reviewed bulletins as ground truth from which they extract relevant patterns to accomplish the desired goals. For instance, we demonstrate the effectiveness of classification and ranking methods for the identification of false events -- that is, those which will be invalidated and discarded by analysts -- in automated bulletins. We also show gains in the accuracy of seismic phase identification via the use of classification techniques to automatically assign seismic phase labels to station detections. Furthermore, we examine the potential of historical association data to inform the direct association of new signal detections with their corresponding seismic events. Empirical results are based upon parametric historical seismic detection and event data received from the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization.

  17. An automated approach for global identification of sRNA-encoding regions in RNA-Seq data from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Fleming, Joy; Li, Zihui; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Hongtai; Xue, Yunxin; Chen, Maoshan; Zhang, Zongde; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    Deep-sequencing of bacterial transcriptomes using RNA-Seq technology has made it possible to identify small non-coding RNAs, RNA molecules which regulate gene expression in response to changing environments, on a genome-wide scale in an ever-increasing range of prokaryotes. However, a simple and reliable automated method for identifying sRNA candidates in these large datasets is lacking. Here, after generating a transcriptome from an exponential phase culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, we developed and validated an automated method for the genome-wide identification of sRNA candidate-containing regions within RNA-Seq datasets based on the analysis of the characteristics of reads coverage maps. We identified 192 novel candidate sRNA-encoding regions in intergenic regions and 664 RNA transcripts transcribed from regions antisense (as) to open reading frames (ORF), which bear the characteristics of asRNAs, and validated 28 of these novel sRNA-encoding regions by northern blotting. Our work has not only provided a simple automated method for genome-wide identification of candidate sRNA-encoding regions in RNA-Seq data, but has also uncovered many novel candidate sRNA-encoding regions in M. tuberculosis, reinforcing the view that the control of gene expression in bacteria is more complex than previously anticipated.

  18. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  19. Automated feature extraction for 3-dimensional point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, Lori A.; Leigh, Holly W.; Soderlund, Alexander; Clymer, Bradley; Baer, Jessica; Neuenschwander, Amy L.

    2016-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology offers the capability to rapidly capture high-resolution, 3-dimensional surface data with centimeter-level accuracy for a large variety of applications. Due to the foliage-penetrating properties of LIDAR systems, these geospatial data sets can detect ground surfaces beneath trees, enabling the production of highfidelity bare earth elevation models. Precise characterization of the ground surface allows for identification of terrain and non-terrain points within the point cloud, and facilitates further discernment between natural and man-made objects based solely on structural aspects and relative neighboring parameterizations. A framework is presented here for automated extraction of natural and man-made features that does not rely on coincident ortho-imagery or point RGB attributes. The TEXAS (Terrain EXtraction And Segmentation) algorithm is used first to generate a bare earth surface from a lidar survey, which is then used to classify points as terrain or non-terrain. Further classifications are assigned at the point level by leveraging local spatial information. Similarly classed points are then clustered together into regions to identify individual features. Descriptions of the spatial attributes of each region are generated, resulting in the identification of individual tree locations, forest extents, building footprints, and 3-dimensional building shapes, among others. Results of the fully-automated feature extraction algorithm are then compared to ground truth to assess completeness and accuracy of the methodology.

  20. ACME, a GIS tool for Automated Cirque Metric Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, Matteo; Pellitero, Ramon; Barr, Iestyn D.; Ely, Jeremy C.; Pellicer, Xavier M.; Rea, Brice R.

    2017-02-01

    Regional scale studies of glacial cirque metrics provide key insights on the (palaeo) environment related to the formation of these erosional landforms. The growing availability of high resolution terrain models means that more glacial cirques can be identified and mapped in the future. However, the extraction of their metrics still largely relies on time consuming manual techniques or the combination of, more or less obsolete, GIS tools. In this paper, a newly coded toolbox is provided for the automated, and comparatively quick, extraction of 16 key glacial cirque metrics; including length, width, circularity, planar and 3D area, elevation, slope, aspect, plan closure and hypsometry. The set of tools, named ACME (Automated Cirque Metric Extraction), is coded in Python, runs in one of the most commonly used GIS packages (ArcGIS) and has a user friendly interface. A polygon layer of mapped cirques is required for all metrics, while a Digital Terrain Model and a point layer of cirque threshold midpoints are needed to run some of the tools. Results from ACME are comparable to those from other techniques and can be obtained rapidly, allowing large cirque datasets to be analysed and potentially important regional trends highlighted.

  1. A simple automated instrument for DNA extraction in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Montpetit, Shawn A; Fitch, Ian T; O'Donnell, Patrick T

    2005-05-01

    The Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 is a small, rapid, and reliable automated DNA extraction instrument capable of extracting DNA from up to six samples in as few as 20 min using magnetic bead technology. The San Diego Police Department Crime Laboratory has validated the BioRobot EZ1 for the DNA extraction of evidence and reference samples in forensic casework. The BioRobot EZ1 was evaluated for use on a variety of different evidence sample types including blood, saliva, and semen evidence. The performance of the BioRobot EZ1 with regard to DNA recovery and potential cross-contamination was also assessed. DNA yields obtained with the BioRobot EZ1 were comparable to those from organic extraction. The BioRobot EZ1 was effective at removing PCR inhibitors, which often co-purify with DNA in organic extractions. The incorporation of the BioRobot EZ1 into forensic casework has streamlined the DNA analysis process by reducing the need for labor-intensive phenol-chloroform extractions.

  2. Automated tools for phenotype extraction from medical records.

    PubMed

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Bejan, Cosmin A; Vanderwende, Lucy; Xia, Fei; Evans, Heather L; Wurfel, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research studying critical illness phenotypes relies on the identification of clinical syndromes defined by consensus definitions. Historically, identifying phenotypes has required manual chart review, a time and resource intensive process. The overall research goal of C ritical I llness PH enotype E xt R action (deCIPHER) project is to develop automated approaches based on natural language processing and machine learning that accurately identify phenotypes from EMR. We chose pneumonia as our first critical illness phenotype and conducted preliminary experiments to explore the problem space. In this abstract, we outline the tools we built for processing clinical records, present our preliminary findings for pneumonia extraction, and describe future steps.

  3. Automated labeling of bibliographic data extracted from biomedical online journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype system has been designed to automate the extraction of bibliographic data (e.g., article title, authors, abstract, affiliation and others) from online biomedical journals to populate the National Library of Medicine"s MEDLINE database. This paper describes a key module in this system: the labeling module that employs statistics and fuzzy rule-based algorithms to identify segmented zones in an article"s HTML pages as specific bibliographic data. Results from experiments conducted with 1,149 medical articles from forty-seven journal issues are presented.

  4. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner.

  5. Automated Feature Extraction of Foredune Morphology from Terrestrial Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spore, N.; Brodie, K. L.; Swann, C.

    2014-12-01

    Foredune morphology is often described in storm impact prediction models using the elevation of the dune crest and dune toe and compared with maximum runup elevations to categorize the storm impact and predicted responses. However, these parameters do not account for other foredune features that may make them more or less erodible, such as alongshore variations in morphology, vegetation coverage, or compaction. The goal of this work is to identify other descriptive features that can be extracted from terrestrial lidar data that may affect the rate of dune erosion under wave attack. Daily, mobile-terrestrial lidar surveys were conducted during a 6-day nor'easter (Hs = 4 m in 6 m water depth) along 20km of coastline near Duck, North Carolina which encompassed a variety of foredune forms in close proximity to each other. This abstract will focus on the tools developed for the automated extraction of the morphological features from terrestrial lidar data, while the response of the dune will be presented by Brodie and Spore as an accompanying abstract. Raw point cloud data can be dense and is often under-utilized due to time and personnel constraints required for analysis, since many algorithms are not fully automated. In our approach, the point cloud is first projected into a local coordinate system aligned with the coastline, and then bare earth points are interpolated onto a rectilinear 0.5 m grid creating a high resolution digital elevation model. The surface is analyzed by identifying features along each cross-shore transect. Surface curvature is used to identify the position of the dune toe, and then beach and berm morphology is extracted shoreward of the dune toe, and foredune morphology is extracted landward of the dune toe. Changes in, and magnitudes of, cross-shore slope, curvature, and surface roughness are used to describe the foredune face and each cross-shore transect is then classified using its pre-storm morphology for storm-response analysis.

  6. Automated blood vessel extraction using local features on retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Samo, Kazuki; Tajima, Mikiya; Ogohara, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    An automated blood vessel extraction using high-order local autocorrelation (HLAC) on retinal images is presented. Although many blood vessel extraction methods based on contrast have been proposed, a technique based on the relation of neighbor pixels has not been published. HLAC features are shift-invariant; therefore, we applied HLAC features to retinal images. However, HLAC features are weak to turned image, thus a method was improved by the addition of HLAC features to a polar transformed image. The blood vessels were classified using an artificial neural network (ANN) with HLAC features using 105 mask patterns as input. To improve performance, the second ANN (ANN2) was constructed by using the green component of the color retinal image and the four output values of ANN, Gabor filter, double-ring filter and black-top-hat transformation. The retinal images used in this study were obtained from the "Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction" (DRIVE) database. The ANN using HLAC output apparent white values in the blood vessel regions and could also extract blood vessels with low contrast. The outputs were evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The AUC of ANN2 was 0.960 as a result of our study. The result can be used for the quantitative analysis of the blood vessels.

  7. Extraction of high-quality RNA from rubber tree leaves.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu-Hong; Luo, Ming-Wu; Zhang, Chun-Fa; Zeng, Hui-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A specific technique capable of producing high-quality RNA for rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was established for challenging tissues: leaves of the rubber tree. Total RNA was extracted by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-LiCl combined with TRIzol reagent. The isolated RNA was highly intact. With RNA as template, full-length cDNA was obtained (NCBI, AY461413) by RACE.

  8. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs.

  9. Automated extraction of knowledge for model-based diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Avelino J.; Myler, Harley R.; Towhidnejad, Massood; Mckenzie, Frederic D.; Kladke, Robin R.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of accessing computer aided design (CAD) design databases and extracting a process model automatically is investigated as a possible source for the generation of knowledge bases for model-based reasoning systems. The resulting system, referred to as automated knowledge generation (AKG), uses an object-oriented programming structure and constraint techniques as well as internal database of component descriptions to generate a frame-based structure that describes the model. The procedure has been designed to be general enough to be easily coupled to CAD systems that feature a database capable of providing label and connectivity data from the drawn system. The AKG system is capable of defining knowledge bases in formats required by various model-based reasoning tools.

  10. Extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls from soils by automated focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction.

    PubMed

    Luque-García, J L; de Castro, Luque

    2003-05-23

    The application of a new focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extractor for the extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls from differently aged soils is here presented. The new extractor overcomes the disadvantages of previous devices based on the same principle and enables a fully automated extraction of two samples simultaneously. The variables affecting the extraction step (namely, power of irradiation, irradiation time, extractant volume, extractant composition and number of extraction cycles) have been optimized using experimental design methodology. The optimized method has also been applied to a certified reference material (CRM910-050 "real" contaminated soil) for quality assurance validation. Quantification of the target compounds has been performed by GC with ion-trap MS. The mass spectrometer was operated in the electron-ionization mode, with selected-ion monitoring at m/z 152, 186, 292, 326 and 498. The results obtained have demonstrated that this approach is as efficient as conventional Soxhlet but with a drastic reduction of both extraction time (70 min vs. 24 h for the "real" contaminated soil) and organic solvent disposal, as 75-80% of the extractant is recycled.

  11. Automated Dsm Extraction from Uav Images and Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, S.; Kim, T.

    2015-08-01

    As technology evolves, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) imagery is being used from simple applications such as image acquisition to complicated applications such as 3D spatial information extraction. Spatial information is usually provided in the form of a DSM or point cloud. It is important to generate very dense tie points automatically from stereo images. In this paper, we tried to apply stereo image-based matching technique developed for satellite/aerial images to UAV images, propose processing steps for automated DSM generation and to analyse the possibility of DSM generation. For DSM generation from UAV images, firstly, exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) for each dataset were adjusted. Secondly, optimum matching pairs were determined. Thirdly, stereo image matching was performed with each pair. Developed matching algorithm is based on grey-level correlation on pixels applied along epipolar lines. Finally, the extracted match results were united with one result and the final DSM was made. Generated DSM was compared with a reference DSM from Lidar. Overall accuracy was 1.5 m in NMAD. However, several problems have to be solved in future, including obtaining precise EOPs, handling occlusion and image blurring problems. More effective interpolation technique needs to be developed in the future.

  12. AUTOMATED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION GC/MS FOR ANALYSIS OF SEMIVOLATILES IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line sampl...

  13. Lab-on-a-chip mRNA purification and reverse transcription via a solid-phase gene extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Nestorova, Gergana G; Hasenstein, Karl; Nguyen, Nam; DeCoster, Mark A; Crews, Niel D

    2017-03-14

    Extraction and purification of high quality RNA is a crucial initial step required for a variety of genomic assays. We report a solid phase gene extraction (SPGE) method for automated extraction, purification and reverse transcription of mRNA in a microfluidic device. This is performed using a 130 μm diameter stainless steel needle that is amino-linked to dT(15) oligonucleotides for selective hybridization of mRNA. By inserting this probe into the biological sample for only 30 seconds, mRNA is captured with high selectivity and a yield greater than 10 pg per mm of probe length. The probe is then inserted into a lab-on-a-chip device, where the bound poly-adenylated RNA is thermally released and immediately reverse transcribed for subsequent PCR amplification. The insertion of the probe into the microfluidic device is straightforward: the microchannel is formed with an elastomer (PDMS) that, when punctured, will seal around the probe. The specificity and RNA loading capacity of the probes were evaluated using conventional qPCR. This procedure was successfully used to extract, purify, and transcribe mRNA from rat glioblastoma cell spheroids in less than seven minutes. Analysis of the product confirmed that the SPGE technique selectively captures and inherently purifies high-quality mRNA directly from biological material with no need for additional pre-processing steps. Integrating this elegant sample preparation method into a complete lab-on-a-chip system will substantially enhance the speed and automation of mRNA assays for research and clinical diagnostics.

  14. Evaluation of automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for recovery of Brucella DNA from suspensions and spiked swabs.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Leslie A; Hutchins, Rebecca J; Bost, Liberty A; Bowen, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluated automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for their ability to recover DNA from Brucella species in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) suspension and from spiked swab specimens. Six extraction methods, representing several of the methodologies which are commercially available for DNA extraction, as well as representing various throughput capacities, were evaluated: the MagNA Pure Compact and the MagNA Pure LC instruments, the IT 1-2-3 DNA sample purification kit, the MasterPure Complete DNA and RNA purification kit, the QIAamp DNA blood mini kit, and the UltraClean microbial DNA isolation kit. These six extraction methods were performed upon three pathogenic Brucella species: B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. Viability testing of the DNA extracts indicated that all six extraction methods were efficient at inactivating virulent Brucella spp. Real-time PCR analysis using Brucella genus- and species-specific TaqMan assays revealed that use of the MasterPure kit resulted in superior levels of detection from bacterial suspensions, while the MasterPure kit and MagNA Pure Compact performed equally well for extraction of spiked swab samples. This study demonstrated that DNA extraction methodologies differ in their ability to recover Brucella DNA from PBS bacterial suspensions and from swab specimens and, thus, that the extraction method used for a given type of sample matrix can influence the sensitivity of real-time PCR assays for Brucella.

  15. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Mark J. J.; Berden, Jo H. M.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Smit, Cornelis H.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate (DS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), keratan sulfate, and non-sulfated hyaluronan. Because relative expression of GAGs is dependent on cell-type and niche, isolating GAGs from cell cultures and tissues may provide insight into cell- and tissue-specific GAG structure and functions. In our objective to obtain structural information about the GAGs expressed on a specialized mouse glomerular endothelial cell culture (mGEnC-1) we adapted a recently published GAG isolation protocol, based on cell lysis, proteinase K and DNase I digestion. Analysis of the GAGs contributing to the mGEnC-1 glycocalyx indicated a large HS and a minor CS content on barium acetate gel. However, isolated GAGs appeared resistant to enzymatic digestion by heparinases. We found that these GAG extracts were heavily contaminated with RNA, which co-migrated with HS in barium acetate gel electrophoresis and interfered with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays, resulting in an overestimation of GAG yields. We hypothesized that RNA may be contaminating GAG extracts from other cell cultures and possibly tissue, and therefore investigated potential RNA contaminations in GAG extracts from two additional cell lines, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and retinal pigmental epithelial cells, and mouse kidney, liver, spleen and heart tissue. GAG extracts from all examined cell lines and tissues contained varying amounts of contaminating RNA, which interfered with GAG quantification using DMMB assays and characterization of GAGs by barium acetate gel electrophoresis. We therefore recommend routinely evaluating the RNA content of GAG extracts and propose a robust protocol for GAG isolation that includes an RNA digestion step. PMID:27898729

  16. The Effect of Nucleic Acid Extraction Platforms and Sample Storage on the Integrity of Viral RNA for Use in Whole Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Kuiama; Bell, Andrew; Miles, Rory; Carne, Simon; Wooldridge, David; Manso, Carmen; Hennessy, Nicola; Bailey, Daniel; Pullan, Steven T; Gharbia, Saheer; Vipond, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of viral RNA and the storage of sample material are extremely important factors in the detection and whole genome sequencing (WGS) of viral pathogens. Although PCR-based detection methods focus on small amplicons, viral WGS applications require RNA of high quality and integrity for adequate sequence coverage and depth. This study examined the fitness of one manual and four automated RNA extraction platforms commonly used in diagnostic laboratories for use in metagenomic sequencing, how the practice of storing sample material in Qiagen buffer AVL before extraction affected the integrity of viral RNA and its suitability for use in amplicon-based WGS methods, and how the addition of Triton X-100 to buffer AVL affected the capability of the extraction platforms and the integrity of viral RNA in stored samples. This study found that the EZ1 platform gave the best performance of the automated platforms and gave comparable results to the frequently used manual Qiagen extraction protocol when extracted viral RNA was used in metagenomics sequencing. To maintain high levels of viral RNA integrity suitable for amplicon-based WGS, nucleic acid should be extracted from samples immediately, because even short storage periods in buffer AVL have a severe effect on integrity, and the addition of Triton X-100 had little effect on the quality of viral material for WGS.

  17. An Automated Microwell Platform for Large-Scale Single Cell RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Sims, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments have enabled rapid, inexpensive RNA sequencing of thousands of individual cells from a single specimen, raising the possibility of unbiased and comprehensive expression profiling from complex tissues. Microwell arrays are a particularly attractive microfluidic platform for single cell analysis due to their scalability, cell capture efficiency, and compatibility with imaging. We report an automated microwell array platform for single cell RNA-Seq with significantly improved performance over previous implementations. We demonstrate cell capture efficiencies of >50%, compatibility with commercially available barcoded mRNA capture beads, and parallel expression profiling from thousands of individual cells. We evaluate the level of cross-contamination in our platform by both tracking fluorescent cell lysate in sealed microwells and with a human-mouse mixed species RNA-Seq experiment. Finally, we apply our system to comprehensively assess heterogeneity in gene expression of patient-derived glioma neurospheres and uncover subpopulations similar to those observed in human glioma tissue. PMID:27670648

  18. An Automated Microwell Platform for Large-Scale Single Cell RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Sims, Peter A

    2016-09-27

    Recent developments have enabled rapid, inexpensive RNA sequencing of thousands of individual cells from a single specimen, raising the possibility of unbiased and comprehensive expression profiling from complex tissues. Microwell arrays are a particularly attractive microfluidic platform for single cell analysis due to their scalability, cell capture efficiency, and compatibility with imaging. We report an automated microwell array platform for single cell RNA-Seq with significantly improved performance over previous implementations. We demonstrate cell capture efficiencies of >50%, compatibility with commercially available barcoded mRNA capture beads, and parallel expression profiling from thousands of individual cells. We evaluate the level of cross-contamination in our platform by both tracking fluorescent cell lysate in sealed microwells and with a human-mouse mixed species RNA-Seq experiment. Finally, we apply our system to comprehensively assess heterogeneity in gene expression of patient-derived glioma neurospheres and uncover subpopulations similar to those observed in human glioma tissue.

  19. RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activity and RNA ligation in HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, W; Konarska, M; Gross, H J; Shatkin, A J

    1983-01-01

    HeLa cell extract contains RNA ligase activity that converts linear polyribonucleotides to covalently closed circles. RNA substrates containing 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini are circularized by formation of a normal 3',5' phosphodiester bond. This activity differs from a previously described wheat germ RNA ligase which circularizes molecules with 2',3'-cyclic and 5' phosphate ends by a 2'-phosphomonester, 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage (Konarska et al., Nature 293, 112-116, 1981; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 1474-1478, 1982). The HeLa cell ligase can also utilize molecules with 3'-phosphate ends. However, in this case ligation is preceded by an ATP-dependent conversion of the 3'-terminal phosphate to the 2',3' cyclic form by a novel activity, RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase. Both RNA ligase and RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activities are also present in extract of Xenopus oocyte nuclei, consistent with a role in RNA processing. Images PMID:6828385

  20. Comparison of manual and automated nucleic acid extraction from whole-blood samples.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Kathrin; Adamzik, Michael; Frauenrath, Stefan; Egensperger, Rupert; Schmid, Kurt W; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Siffert, Winfried

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid extraction and purification from whole blood is a routine application in many laboratories. Automation of this procedure promises standardized sample treatment, a low error rate, and avoidance of contamination. The performance of the BioRobot M48 (Qiagen) and the manual QIAmp DNA Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen) was compared for the extraction of DNA from whole blood. The concentration and purity of the extracted DNAs were determined by spectrophotometry. Analytical sensitivity was assessed by common PCR and genotyping techniques. The quantity and quality of the generated DNAs were slightly higher using the manual extraction method. The results of downstream applications were comparable to each other. Amplification of high-molecular-weight PCR fragments, genotyping by restriction digest, and pyrosequencing were successful for all samples. No cross-contamination could be detected. While automated DNA extraction requires significantly less hands-on time, it is slightly more expensive than the manual extraction method.

  1. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    DOEpatents

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  2. Evaluation of four automated protocols for extraction of DNA from FTA cards.

    PubMed

    Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Poulsen, Lena; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead-based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable, and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. Here, we have compared the yield and quality of DNA extracted from FTA cards using four automated extraction protocols on three different instruments. The extraction processes were repeated up to six times with the same pieces of FTA cards. The sample material on the FTA cards was either blood or buccal cells. With the QIAamp DNA Investigator and QIAsymphony DNA Investigator kits, it was possible to extract DNA from the FTA cards in all six rounds of extractions in sufficient amount and quality to obtain complete short tandem repeat (STR) profiles on a QIAcube and a QIAsymphony SP. With the PrepFiler Express kit, almost all the extractable DNA was extracted in the first two rounds of extractions. Furthermore, we demonstrated that it was possible to successfully extract sufficient DNA for STR profiling from previously processed FTA card pieces that had been stored at 4 °C for up to 1 year. This showed that rare or precious FTA card samples may be saved for future analyses even though some DNA was already extracted from the FTA cards.

  3. Spatial resolution requirements for automated cartographic road extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benjamin, S.; Gaydos, L.

    1990-01-01

    Ground resolution requirements for detection and extraction of road locations in a digitized large-scale photographic database were investigated. A color infrared photograph of Sunnyvale, California was scanned, registered to a map grid, and spatially degraded to 1- to 5-metre resolution pixels. Road locations in each data set were extracted using a combination of image processing and CAD programs. These locations were compared to a photointerpretation of road locations to determine a preferred pixel size for the extraction method. Based on road pixel omission error computations, a 3-metre pixel resolution appears to be the best choice for this extraction method. -Authors

  4. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.C.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese`s group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  5. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.C.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese's group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  6. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  7. Applicability of a System for fully automated nucleic acid extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections for routine KRAS mutation testing.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Annika; Schewe, Christiane; Hennig, Guido; Denkert, Carsten; Weichert, Wilko; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred

    2012-06-01

    Due to the approval of various new targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer, molecular pathology laboratories with a diagnostic focus have to meet new challenges: simultaneous handling of a large number of samples, small amounts of input material, and fragmentation of nucleic acids because of formalin fixation. As a consequence, fully automated systems for a fast and standardized extraction of high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are urgently needed. In this study, we tested the performance of a fully automated, high-throughput method for the extraction of nucleic acids from FFPE tissues. We investigated the extraction performance in sections of 5 different tissue types often analyzed in routine pathology laboratories (cervix, colon, liver, lymph node, and lung; n=340). Furthermore, we compared the quality, labor input, and applicability of the method for diagnostic purposes with those of a laboratory-validated manual method in a clinical setting by screening a set of 45 colorectal adenocarcinoma for the KRAS mutation. Automated extraction of both DNA and RNA was successful in 339 of 340 FFPE samples representing 5 different tissue types. In comparison with a conventional manual extraction protocol, the method showed an overall agreement of 97.7% (95% confidence interval, 88.2%-99.9%) for the subsequent mutational analysis of the KRAS gene in colorectal cancer samples. The fully automated system is a promising tool for a simple, robust, and rapid extraction of DNA and RNA from formalin-fixed tissue. It ensures a standardization of sample processing and can be applied to clinical FFPE samples in routine pathology.

  8. De novo automated design of small RNA circuits for engineering synthetic riboregulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Landrain, Thomas E.; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    A grand challenge in synthetic biology is to use our current knowledge of RNA science to perform the automatic engineering of completely synthetic sequences encoding functional RNAs in living cells. We report here a fully automated design methodology and experimental validation of synthetic RNA interaction circuits working in a cellular environment. The computational algorithm, based on a physicochemical model, produces novel RNA sequences by exploring the space of possible sequences compatible with predefined structures. We tested our methodology in Escherichia coli by designing several positive riboregulators with diverse structures and interaction models, suggesting that only the energy of formation and the activation energy (free energy barrier to overcome for initiating the hybridization reaction) are sufficient criteria to engineer RNA interaction and regulation in bacteria. The designed sequences exhibit nonsignificant similarity to any known noncoding RNA sequence. Our riboregulatory devices work independently and in combination with transcription regulation to create complex logic circuits. Our results demonstrate that a computational methodology based on first-principles can be used to engineer interacting RNAs with allosteric behavior in living cells. PMID:22949707

  9. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A. G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-03-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting.

  10. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A.G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-01-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting. PMID:28303910

  11. Automation and Other Extensions of the SMAC Modal Parameter Extraction Package

    SciTech Connect

    KLENKE,SCOTT E.; MAYES,RANDALL L.

    1999-11-01

    As model validation techniques gain more acceptance and increase in power, the demands on the modal parameter extractions increase. The estimation accuracy, the number of modes desired, and the data reduction efficiency are required features. An algorithm known as SMAC (Synthesize Modes And Correlate), based on principles of modal filtering, has been in development for a few years. SMAC has now been extended in two main areas. First, it has now been automated. Second, it has been extended to fit complex modes as well as real modes. These extensions have enhanced the power of modal extraction so that, typically, the analyst needs to manually fit only 10 percent of the modes in the desired bandwidth, whereas the automated routines will fit 90 percent of the modes. SMAC could be successfully automated because it generally does not produce computational roots.

  12. Discovering Indicators of Successful Collaboration Using Tense: Automated Extraction of Patterns in Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kate; Kennedy-Clark, Shannon; Wheeler, Penny; Kelly, Nick

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for locating indicators of success within the data collected from complex learning environments, proposing an application of e-research to access learner processes and measure and track group progress. The technique combines automated extraction of tense and modality via parts-of-speech tagging with a visualisation…

  13. Optimization of RNA Purification and Analysis for Automated, Pre-Symptomatic Disease Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, A; Nasarabadi, S; Milanovich, F

    2005-06-28

    When diagnosing disease, time is often a more formidable enemy than the pathogen itself. Current detection methods rely primarily on post-symptomatic protein production (i.e. antibodies), which does not occur in noticeable levels until several weeks after infection. As such, a major goal among researchers today is to expedite pre-symptomatic disease recognition and treatment. Since most pathogens are known to leave a unique signature on the genetic expression of the host, one potential diagnostic tool is host mRNA. In my experiments, I examined several methods of isolating RNA and reading its genetic sequence. I first used two types of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (using commercial RNA) and examined the resultant complementary DNA through gel electrophoresis. I then proceeded to isolate and purify whole RNA from actual human monocytes and THP-1 cells using several published methods, and examined gene expression on the RNA itself. I compared the two RT-PCR methods and concluded that a double step RT-PCR is superior to the single step method. I also compared the various techniques of RNA isolation by examining the yield and purity of the resultant RNA. Finally, I studied the level of cellular IL-8 and IL-1 gene expression, two genes involved in the human immune response, which can serve as a baseline for future genetic comparison with LPS-exposed cells. Based on the results, I have determined which conditions and procedures are optimal for RNA isolation, RT-PCR, and RNA yield assessment. The overall goal of my research is to develop a flow-through system of RNA analysis, whereby blood samples can be collected and analyzed for disease prior to the onset of symptoms. The Pathomics group hopes to automate this process by removing the human labor factor, thereby decreasing the procedure's cost and increasing its availability to the general population. Eventually, our aim is to have an autonomous diagnostic system based on RNA analysis that would

  14. Towards automated support for extraction of reusable components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abd-El-hafiz, S. K.; Basili, Victor R.; Caldiera, Gianluigi

    1992-01-01

    A cost effective introduction of software reuse techniques requires the reuse of existing software developed in many cases without aiming at reusability. This paper discusses the problems related to the analysis and reengineering of existing software in order to reuse it. We introduce a process model for component extraction and focus on the problem of analyzing and qualifying software components which are candidates for reuse. A prototype tool for supporting the extraction of reusable components is presented. One of the components of this tool aids in understanding programs and is based on the functional model of correctness. It can assist software engineers in the process of finding correct formal specifications for programs. A detailed description of this component and an example to demonstrate a possible operational scenario are given.

  15. Data Mining: The Art of Automated Knowledge Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Sipes, T.

    2012-12-01

    Data mining algorithms are used routinely in a wide variety of fields and they are gaining adoption in sciences. The realities of real world data analysis are that (a) data has flaws, and (b) the models and assumptions that we bring to the data are inevitably flawed, and/or biased and misspecified in some way. Data mining can improve data analysis by detecting anomalies in the data, check for consistency of the user model assumptions, and decipher complex patterns and relationships that would not be possible otherwise. The common form of data collected from in situ spacecraft measurements is multi-variate time series which represents one of the most challenging problems in data mining. We have successfully developed algorithms to deal with such data and have extended the algorithms to handle streaming data. In this talk, we illustrate the utility of our algorithms through several examples including automated detection of reconnection exhausts in the solar wind and flux ropes in the magnetotail. We also show examples from successful applications of our technique to analysis of 3D kinetic simulations. With an eye to the future, we provide an overview of our upcoming plans that include collaborative data mining, expert outsourcing data mining, computer vision for image analysis, among others. Finally, we discuss the integration of data mining algorithms with web-based services such as VxOs and other Heliophysics data centers and the resulting capabilities that it would enable.

  16. Automated extraction and variability analysis of sulcal neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Le Goualher, G; Procyk, E; Collins, D L; Venugopal, R; Barillot, C; Evans, A C

    1999-03-01

    Systematic mapping of the variability in cortical sulcal anatomy is an area of increasing interest which presents numerous methodological challenges. To address these issues, we have implemented sulcal extraction and assisted labeling (SEAL) to automatically extract the two-dimensional (2-D) surface ribbons that represent the median axis of cerebral sulci and to neuroanatomically label these entities. To encode the extracted three-dimensional (3-D) cortical sulcal schematic topography (CSST) we define a relational graph structure composed of two main features: vertices (representing sulci) and arcs (representing the relationships between sulci). Vertices contain a parametric representation of the surface ribbon buried within the sulcus. Points on this surface are expressed in stereotaxic coordinates (i.e., with respect to a standardized brain coordinate system). For each of these vertices, we store length, depth, and orientation as well as anatomical attributes (e.g., hemisphere, lobe, sulcus type, etc.). Each arc stores the 3-D location of the junction between sulci as well as a list of its connecting sulci. Sulcal labeling is performed semiautomatically by selecting a sulcal entity in the CSST and selecting from a menu of candidate sulcus names. In order to help the user in the labeling task, the menu is restricted to the most likely candidates by using priors for the expected sulcal spatial distribution. These priors, i.e., sulcal probabilistic maps, were created from the spatial distribution of 34 sulci traced manually on 36 different subjects. Given these spatial probability maps, the user is provided with the likelihood that the selected entity belongs to a particular sulcus. The cortical structure representation obtained by SEAL is suitable to extract statistical information about both the spatial and the structural composition of the cerebral cortical topography. This methodology allows for the iterative construction of a successively more complete

  17. Multispectral Image Road Extraction Based Upon Automated Map Conflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin

    Road network extraction from remotely sensed imagery enables many important and diverse applications such as vehicle tracking, drone navigation, and intelligent transportation studies. There are, however, a number of challenges to road detection from an image. Road pavement material, width, direction, and topology vary across a scene. Complete or partial occlusions caused by nearby buildings, trees, and the shadows cast by them, make maintaining road connectivity difficult. The problems posed by occlusions are exacerbated with the increasing use of oblique imagery from aerial and satellite platforms. Further, common objects such as rooftops and parking lots are made of materials similar or identical to road pavements. This problem of common materials is a classic case of a single land cover material existing for different land use scenarios. This work addresses these problems in road extraction from geo-referenced imagery by leveraging the OpenStreetMap digital road map to guide image-based road extraction. The crowd-sourced cartography has the advantages of worldwide coverage that is constantly updated. The derived road vectors follow only roads and so can serve to guide image-based road extraction with minimal confusion from occlusions and changes in road material. On the other hand, the vector road map has no information on road widths and misalignments between the vector map and the geo-referenced image are small but nonsystematic. Properly correcting misalignment between two geospatial datasets, also known as map conflation, is an essential step. A generic framework requiring minimal human intervention is described for multispectral image road extraction and automatic road map conflation. The approach relies on the road feature generation of a binary mask and a corresponding curvilinear image. A method for generating the binary road mask from the image by applying a spectral measure is presented. The spectral measure, called anisotropy-tunable distance (ATD

  18. Highly efficient automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Zupanič Pajnič, Irena; Debska, Magdalena; Gornjak Pogorelc, Barbara; Vodopivec Mohorčič, Katja; Balažic, Jože; Zupanc, Tomaž; Štefanič, Borut; Geršak, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    We optimised the automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains using the AutoMate Express system and the PrepFiler BTA kit. 24 Contemporary and 25 old skeletal remains from WWII were analysed. For each skeleton, extraction using only 0.05 g of powder was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations (no demineralisation - ND method). Since only 32% of full profiles were obtained from aged and 58% from contemporary casework skeletons, the extraction protocol was modified to acquire higher quality DNA and genomic DNA was obtained after full demineralisation (FD method). The nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified using the Investigator Quantiplex kit and STR typing was performed using the NGM kit to evaluate the performance of tested extraction methods. In the aged DNA samples, 64% of full profiles were obtained using the FD method. For the contemporary skeletal remains the performance of the ND method was closer to the FD method compared to the old skeletons, giving 58% of full profiles with the ND method and 71% of full profiles using the FD method. The extraction of DNA from only 0.05 g of bone or tooth powder using the AutoMate Express has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA from old and contemporary skeletons, especially with the modified FD method. We believe that the results obtained will contribute to the possibilities of using automated devices for extracting DNA from skeletal remains, which would shorten the procedures for obtaining high-quality DNA from skeletons in forensic laboratories.

  19. Evaluation of three automated nucleic acid extraction systems for identification of respiratory viruses in clinical specimens by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonjung; Han, Mi-Soon; Kim, Juwon; Kwon, Aerin; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    A total of 84 nasopharyngeal swab specimens were collected from 84 patients. Viral nucleic acid was extracted by three automated extraction systems: QIAcube (Qiagen, Germany), EZ1 Advanced XL (Qiagen), and MICROLAB Nimbus IVD (Hamilton, USA). Fourteen RNA viruses and two DNA viruses were detected using the Anyplex II RV16 Detection kit (Seegene, Republic of Korea). The EZ1 Advanced XL system demonstrated the best analytical sensitivity for all the three viral strains. The nucleic acids extracted by EZ1 Advanced XL showed higher positive rates for virus detection than the others. Meanwhile, the MICROLAB Nimbus IVD system was comprised of fully automated steps from nucleic extraction to PCR setup function that could reduce human errors. For the nucleic acids recovered from nasopharyngeal swab specimens, the QIAcube system showed the fewest false negative results and the best concordance rate, and it may be more suitable for detecting various viruses including RNA and DNA virus strains. Each system showed different sensitivity and specificity for detection of certain viral pathogens and demonstrated different characteristics such as turnaround time and sample capacity. Therefore, these factors should be considered when new nucleic acid extraction systems are introduced to the laboratory.

  20. Fully Automated Electro Membrane Extraction Autosampler for LC-MS Systems Allowing Soft Extractions for High-Throughput Applications.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, David; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Jensen, Henrik; Rand, Kasper D; Honoré Hansen, Steen; Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob

    2016-07-05

    The current work describes the implementation of electro membrane extraction (EME) into an autosampler for high-throughput analysis of samples by EME-LC-MS. The extraction probe was built into a luer lock adapter connected to a HTC PAL autosampler syringe. As the autosampler drew sample solution, analytes were extracted into the lumen of the extraction probe and transferred to a LC-MS system for further analysis. Various parameters affecting extraction efficacy were investigated including syringe fill strokes, syringe pull up volume, pull up delay and volume in the sample vial. The system was optimized for soft extraction of analytes and high sample throughput. Further, it was demonstrated that by flushing the EME-syringe with acidic wash buffer and reverting the applied electric potential, carry-over between samples can be reduced to below 1%. Performance of the system was characterized (RSD, <10%; R(2), 0.994) and finally, the EME-autosampler was used to analyze in vitro conversion of methadone into its main metabolite by rat liver microsomes and for demonstrating the potential of known CYP3A4 inhibitors to prevent metabolism of methadone. By making use of the high extraction speed of EME, a complete analytical workflow of purification, separation, and analysis of sample could be achieved within only 5.5 min. With the developed system large sequences of samples could be analyzed in a completely automated manner. This high degree of automation makes the developed EME-autosampler a powerful tool for a wide range of applications where high-throughput extractions are required before sample analysis.

  1. An automated approach for extracting Barrier Island morphology from digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, Phillipe; Houser, Chris; Bishop, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    The response and recovery of a barrier island to extreme storms depends on the elevation of the dune base and crest, both of which can vary considerably alongshore and through time. Quantifying the response to and recovery from storms requires that we can first identify and differentiate the dune(s) from the beach and back-barrier, which in turn depends on accurate identification and delineation of the dune toe, crest and heel. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a multi-scale automated approach for extracting beach, dune (dune toe, dune crest and dune heel), and barrier island morphology. The automated approach introduced here extracts the shoreline and back-barrier shoreline based on elevation thresholds, and extracts the dune toe, dune crest and dune heel based on the average relative relief (RR) across multiple spatial scales of analysis. The multi-scale automated RR approach to extracting dune toe, dune crest, and dune heel based upon relative relief is more objective than traditional approaches because every pixel is analyzed across multiple computational scales and the identification of features is based on the calculated RR values. The RR approach out-performed contemporary approaches and represents a fast objective means to define important beach and dune features for predicting barrier island response to storms. The RR method also does not require that the dune toe, crest, or heel are spatially continuous, which is important because dune morphology is likely naturally variable alongshore.

  2. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA from mature rice kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few RNA extraction protocols or commercial kits work well with the starchy endosperm of cereal grains. Standard RNA extraction protocols are time consuming, use large amounts of expensive chemicals, and leave behind hazardous wastes. However, there are numerous commercial DNA extraction kits that ...

  3. Comparative evaluation of automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for detection of Francisella tularensis DNA from suspensions and spiked swabs by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Leslie A; Walker, Roblena E; Petersen, Jeannine M; Bowen, Michael D

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated commercial automated and manual DNA extraction methods for the isolation of Francisella tularensis DNA suitable for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis from cell suspensions and spiked cotton, foam, and polyester swabs. Two automated methods, the MagNA Pure Compact and the QIAcube, were compared to 4 manual methods, the IT 1-2-3 DNA sample purification kit, the MasterPure Complete DNA and RNA purification kit, the QIAamp DNA blood mini kit, and the UltraClean Microbial DNA isolation kit. The methods were compared using 6 F. tularensis strains representing the 2 subspecies which cause the majority of reported cases of tularemia in humans. Cell viability testing of the DNA extracts showed that all 6 extraction methods efficiently inactivated F. tularensis at concentrations of ≤10⁶ CFU/mL. Real-time PCR analysis using a multitarget 5' nuclease assay for F. tularensis revealed that the PCR sensitivity was equivalent using DNA extracted by the 2 automated methods and the manual MasterPure and QIAamp methods. These 4 methods resulted in significantly better levels of detection from bacterial suspensions and performed equivalently for spiked swab samples than the remaining 2. This study identifies optimal DNA extraction methods for processing swab specimens for the subsequent detection of F. tularensis DNA using real-time PCR assays. Furthermore, the results provide diagnostic laboratories with the option to select from 2 automated DNA extraction methods as suitable alternatives to manual methods for the isolation of DNA from F. tularensis.

  4. Automated extraction and labelling of the arterial tree from whole-body MRA data.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Rahil; Dzyubachyk, Oleh; Staring, Marius; Kullberg, Joel; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a fully automated algorithm for extraction of the 3D arterial tree and labelling the tree segments from whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) sequences. The algorithm developed consists of two core parts (i) 3D volume reconstruction from different stations with simultaneous correction of different types of intensity inhomogeneity, and (ii) Extraction of the arterial tree and subsequent labelling of the pruned extracted tree. Extraction of the arterial tree is performed using the probability map of the "contrast" class, which is obtained as one of the results of the inhomogeneity correction scheme. We demonstrate that such approach is more robust than using the difference between the pre- and post-contrast channels traditionally used for this purpose. Labelling the extracted tree is performed by using a combination of graph-based and atlas-based approaches. Validation of our method with respect to the extracted tree was performed on the arterial tree subdivided into 32 segments, 82.4% of which were completely detected, 11.7% partially detected, and 5.9% were missed on a cohort of 35 subjects. With respect to automated labelling accuracy of the 32 segments, various registration strategies were investigated on a training set consisting of 10 scans. Further analysis on the test set consisting of 25 data sets indicates that 69% of the vessel centerline tree in the head and neck region, 80% in the thorax and abdomen region, and 84% in the legs was accurately labelled to the correct vessel segment. These results indicate clinical potential of our approach in enabling fully automated and accurate analysis of the entire arterial tree. This is the first study that not only automatically extracts the WB-MRA arterial tree, but also labels the vessel tree segments.

  5. Comparisons of Three Automated Systems for Genomic DNA Extraction in a Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Han; Park, Yongjung; Choi, Jong Rak; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The extraction of nucleic acid is initially a limiting step for successful molecular-based diagnostic workup. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of three automated DNA extraction systems for clinical laboratory use. Materials and Methods Venous blood samples from 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed using QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I (Roche), and Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). The concentration of extracted DNAs was measured by NanoDrop ND-1000 (PeqLab). Also, extracted DNAs were confirmed by applying in direct agarose gel electrophoresis and were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for human beta-globin gene. Results The corrected concentrations of extracted DNAs were 25.42 ± 8.82 ng/µL (13.49-52.85 ng/µL) by QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), and 22.65 ± 14.49 ng/µL (19.18-93.39 ng/µL) by MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I, and 22.35 ± 6.47 ng/µL (12.57-35.08 ng/µL) by Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). No statistically significant difference was noticed among the three commercial kits (p > 0.05). Only the mean value of DNA purity through PSS was slightly lower than others. All the extracted DNAs were successfully identified in direct agarose gel electrophoresis. And all the product of beta-globin gene PCR showed a reproducible pattern of bands. Conclusion The effectiveness of the three automated extraction systems is of an equivalent level and good enough to produce reasonable results. Each laboratory could select the automated system according to its clinical and laboratory conditions. PMID:20046522

  6. Rnnotator: an automated de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from stranded RNA-Seq reads

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeffrey; Bruno, Vincent M.; Fang, Zhide; Meng, Xiandong; Blow, Matthew; Zhang, Tao; Sherlock, Gavin; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Zhong

    2010-11-19

    Background: Comprehensive annotation and quantification of transcriptomes are outstanding problems in functional genomics. While high throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has emerged as a powerful tool for addressing these problems, its success is dependent upon the availability and quality of reference genome sequences, thus limiting the organisms to which it can be applied. Results: Here, we describe Rnnotator, an automated software pipeline that generates transcript models by de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data without the need for a reference genome. We have applied the Rnnotator assembly pipeline to two yeast transcriptomes and compared the results to the reference gene catalogs of these organisms. The contigs produced by Rnnotator are highly accurate (95percent) and reconstruct full-length genes for the majority of the existing gene models (54.3percent). Furthermore, our analyses revealed many novel transcribed regions that are absent from well annotated genomes, suggesting Rnnotator serves as a complementary approach to analysis based on a reference genome for comprehensive transcriptomics. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the Rnnotator pipeline is able to reconstruct full-length transcripts in the absence of a complete reference genome.

  7. A fully automated liquid–liquid extraction system utilizing interface detection

    PubMed Central

    Maslana, Eugene; Schmitt, Robert; Pan, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    The development of the Abbott Liquid-Liquid Extraction Station was a result of the need for an automated system to perform aqueous extraction on large sets of newly synthesized organic compounds used for drug discovery. The system utilizes a cylindrical laboratory robot to shuttle sample vials between two loading racks, two identical extraction stations, and a centrifuge. Extraction is performed by detecting the phase interface (by difference in refractive index) of the moving column of fluid drawn from the bottom of each vial containing a biphasic mixture. The integration of interface detection with fluid extraction maximizes sample throughput. Abbott-developed electronics process the detector signals. Sample mixing is performed by high-speed solvent injection. Centrifuging of the samples reduces interface emulsions. Operating software permits the user to program wash protocols with any one of six solvents per wash cycle with as many cycle repeats as necessary. Station capacity is eighty, 15 ml vials. This system has proven successful with a broad spectrum of both ethyl acetate and methylene chloride based chemistries. The development and characterization of this automated extraction system will be presented. PMID:18924693

  8. Automated segmentation and feature extraction of product inspection items

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Casasent, David P.

    1997-03-01

    X-ray film and linescan images of pistachio nuts on conveyor trays for product inspection are considered. The final objective is the categorization of pistachios into good, blemished and infested nuts. A crucial step before classification is the separation of touching products and the extraction of features essential for classification. This paper addresses new detection and segmentation algorithms to isolate touching or overlapping items. These algorithms employ a new filter, a new watershed algorithm, and morphological processing to produce nutmeat-only images. Tests on a large database of x-ray film and real-time x-ray linescan images of around 2900 small, medium and large nuts showed excellent segmentation results. A new technique to detect and segment dark regions in nutmeat images is also presented and tested on approximately 300 x-ray film and approximately 300 real-time linescan x-ray images with 95-97 percent detection and correct segmentation. New algorithms are described that determine nutmeat fill ratio and locate splits in nutmeat. The techniques formulated in this paper are of general use in many different product inspection and computer vision problems.

  9. Extraction of prostatic lumina and automated recognition for prostatic calculus image using PCA-SVM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuocai; Xu, Xiangmin; Ding, Xiaojun; Xiao, Hui; Huang, Yusheng; Liu, Jian; Xing, Xiaofen; Wang, Hua; Liao, D Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Identification of prostatic calculi is an important basis for determining the tissue origin. Computation-assistant diagnosis of prostatic calculi may have promising potential but is currently still less studied. We studied the extraction of prostatic lumina and automated recognition for calculus images. Extraction of lumina from prostate histology images was based on local entropy and Otsu threshold recognition using PCA-SVM and based on the texture features of prostatic calculus. The SVM classifier showed an average time 0.1432 second, an average training accuracy of 100%, an average test accuracy of 93.12%, a sensitivity of 87.74%, and a specificity of 94.82%. We concluded that the algorithm, based on texture features and PCA-SVM, can recognize the concentric structure and visualized features easily. Therefore, this method is effective for the automated recognition of prostatic calculi.

  10. Automated renal histopathology: digital extraction and quantification of renal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Ginley, Brandon; Tomaszewski, John E.

    2016-03-01

    The branch of pathology concerned with excess blood serum proteins being excreted in the urine pays particular attention to the glomerulus, a small intertwined bunch of capillaries located at the beginning of the nephron. Normal glomeruli allow moderate amount of blood proteins to be filtered; proteinuric glomeruli allow large amount of blood proteins to be filtered. Diagnosis of proteinuric diseases requires time intensive manual examination of the structural compartments of the glomerulus from renal biopsies. Pathological examination includes cellularity of individual compartments, Bowman's and luminal space segmentation, cellular morphology, glomerular volume, capillary morphology, and more. Long examination times may lead to increased diagnosis time and/or lead to reduced precision of the diagnostic process. Automatic quantification holds strong potential to reduce renal diagnostic time. We have developed a computational pipeline capable of automatically segmenting relevant features from renal biopsies. Our method first segments glomerular compartments from renal biopsies by isolating regions with high nuclear density. Gabor texture segmentation is used to accurately define glomerular boundaries. Bowman's and luminal spaces are segmented using morphological operators. Nuclei structures are segmented using color deconvolution, morphological processing, and bottleneck detection. Average computation time of feature extraction for a typical biopsy, comprising of ~12 glomeruli, is ˜69 s using an Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4790 CPU, and is ~65X faster than manual processing. Using images from rat renal tissue samples, automatic glomerular structural feature estimation was reproducibly demonstrated for 15 biopsy images, which contained 148 individual glomeruli images. The proposed method holds immense potential to enhance information available while making clinical diagnoses.

  11. An automated approach to prepare tissue-derived spatially barcoded RNA-sequencing libraries

    PubMed Central

    Jemt, Anders; Salmén, Fredrik; Lundmark, Anna; Mollbrink, Annelie; Fernández Navarro, José; Ståhl, Patrik L.; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing the nucleic acid content of individual cells or specific biological samples is becoming increasingly common. This drives the need for robust, scalable and automated library preparation protocols. Furthermore, an increased understanding of tissue heterogeneity has lead to the development of several unique sequencing protocols that aim to retain or infer spatial context. In this study, a protocol for retaining spatial information of transcripts has been adapted to run on a robotic workstation. The method spatial transcriptomics is evaluated in terms of robustness and variability through the preparation of reference RNA, as well as through preparation and sequencing of six replicate sections of a gingival tissue biopsy from a patient with periodontitis. The results are reduced technical variability between replicates and a higher throughput, processing four times more samples with less than a third of the hands on time, compared to the standard protocol. PMID:27849009

  12. An advanced distributed automated extraction of drainage network model on high-resolution DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Y.; Ye, A.; Xu, J.; Ma, F.; Deng, X.; Miao, C.; Gong, W.; Di, Z.

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution and high-accuracy drainage network map is a prerequisite for simulating the water cycle in land surface hydrological models. The objective of this study was to develop a new automated extraction of drainage network model, which can get high-precision continuous drainage network on high-resolution DEM (Digital Elevation Model). The high-resolution DEM need too much computer resources to extract drainage network. The conventional GIS method often can not complete to calculate on high-resolution DEM of big basins, because the number of grids is too large. In order to decrease the computation time, an advanced distributed automated extraction of drainage network model (Adam) was proposed in the study. The Adam model has two features: (1) searching upward from outlet of basin instead of sink filling, (2) dividing sub-basins on low-resolution DEM, and then extracting drainage network on sub-basins of high-resolution DEM. The case study used elevation data of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) at 3 arc-second resolution in Zhujiang River basin, China. The results show Adam model can dramatically reduce the computation time. The extracting drainage network was continuous and more accurate than HydroSHEDS (Hydrological data and maps based on Shuttle Elevation Derivatives at multiple Scales).

  13. Bacterial and fungal DNA extraction from positive blood culture bottles: a manual and an automated protocol.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When adapting a gene amplification-based method in a routine sepsis diagnostics using a blood culture sample as a specimen type, a prerequisite for a successful and sensitive downstream analysis is the efficient DNA extraction step. In recent years, a number of in-house and commercial DNA extraction solutions have become available. Careful evaluation in respect to cell wall disruption of various microbes and subsequent recovery of microbial DNA without putative gene amplification inhibitors should be conducted prior selecting the most feasible DNA extraction solution for the downstream analysis used. Since gene amplification technologies have been developed to be highly sensitive for a broad range of microbial species, it is also important to confirm that the used sample preparation reagents and materials are bioburden-free to avoid any risks for false-positive result reporting or interference of the diagnostic process. Here, one manual and one automated DNA extraction system feasible for blood culture samples are described.

  14. Comparison of QIAGEN automated nucleic acid extraction methods for CMV quantitative PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steve; Seet, Henrietta; Khan, Yasmeen; Wright, Carolyn; Nadarajah, Rohan

    2010-04-01

    We examined the effect of nucleic acid extraction methods on the analytic characteristics of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Human serum samples were extracted with 2 automated instruments (BioRobot EZ1 and QIAsymphony SP, QIAGEN, Valencia, CA) and CMV PCR results compared with those of pp65 antigenemia testing. Both extraction methods yielded results that were comparably linear and precise, whereas the QIAsymphony SP had a slightly lower limit of detection (1.92 log(10) copies/mL vs 2.26 log(10) copies/mL). In both cases, PCR was more sensitive than CMV antigen detection, detecting CMV viremia in 12% (EZ1) and 21% (QIAsymphony) of antigen-negative specimens. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using 2 different extraction techniques to yield results within 0.5 log(10) copies/mL of the mean value, a level that would allow for clinical comparison between different laboratory assays.

  15. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  16. General principles and methods for routine automated microRNA in situ hybridization and double labeling with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Singh, U; Keirstead, N; Wolujczyk, A; Odin, M; Albassam, M; Garrido, R

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression by binding to complementary sequences on target messenger RNA transcripts. Changes in the expression levels of specific miRNAs have been associated with a variety of disease conditions. We developed a reliable and high throughput in situ hybridization (ISH) method and optimized tissue fixation conditions for formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. ISH methods were automated to visualize four miRNAs: miRNA-145 (smooth muscle cells), miRNA-126 (endothelial cells), miRNA-21 (neoplastic cells) and U6 small nuclear RNA (nuclear marker) using locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes and the Discovery Ultra Ventana(™) platform. The FFPE tissue sections were pretreated with protease 3, hybridized with probe concentrations of ≤ 25 nM; signal was detected using an enhanced, polymer-based detection method. The ISH signal was stronger and more uniform for tissue samples fixed for ≥ 48 h. To investigate the specificity of the method, we developed an automated dual ISH for miRNA-145 coupled with immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle actin, which confirmed the specific distribution of miRNA-145 to smooth muscle cells. These methods may be used routinely for exploratory studies of biomarker development, sample screening and understanding the role of miRNA in the pathophysiology of specific diseases.

  17. Improved RNA extraction and one-tube RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of control plant RNA plus several viruses in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Nassuth, A; Pollari, E; Helmeczy, K; Stewart, S; Kofalvi, S A

    2000-10-01

    A procedure was developed for simultaneous detection of plant RNA viruses and of plant RNA, as a control. RT-PCR amplification with primers designed for the detection of the plant mRNAs encoding malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RubiscoL) was used for the development of a plant extraction procedure that consistently yields extracts that can be amplified. The control amplification was used successfully on extracts from cane, leaf and/or bud tissues from grapevine, apple, raspberry, strawberry, peach, apricot, plum and wheat. Multiplex RT-PCR conditions were established for the simultaneous detection in grapevine extracts of either arabis mosaic virus, rupestris stem pitting associated virus and malate dehydrogenase mRNA, or grapevine virus A, grapevine virus B, grapevine leafroll associated virus-3, and RubiscoL mRNA.

  18. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M.; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M.

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription–translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications. PMID:26621913

  19. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M

    2016-01-08

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription-translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications.

  20. Rapid and specific detection of tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by transcription-reverse transcription concerted reaction with an automated system.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Ishizuka, Tetsuya; Ohnaka, Satoru; Hayashi, Toshinori; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Ishiguro, Takahiko; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2004-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains carrying the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) tdh gene, the TDH-related hemolysin (trh) gene, or both genes are considered virulent strains. We previously demonstrated that the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method could be used to quantify the amount of mRNA transcribed from the tdh gene by using an automated detection system. In this study, we devised two TRC-based assays to quantify the mRNAs transcribed from the trh1 and trh2 genes, the two representative trh genes. The TRC-based detection assays for the tdh, trh1, and trh2 transcripts could specifically and quantitatively detect 10(3) to 10(7) copies of the corresponding calibrator RNAs. We examined by the three TRC assays the total RNA preparations extracted from 103 strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying the tdh, trh1, or trh2 gene in various combinations. The tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNAs in the total RNA preparations were specifically quantified, and the time needed for detection ranged from 9 to 19 min, from 14 to 18 min, and from 9 to 12 min, respectively. The results showed that this automated TRC assays could detect the tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNAs specifically, quantitatively, and rapidly. The relative levels of TDH determined by the immunological method and that of tdh mRNA determined by the TRC assays for most tdh-positive strains correlated. Interestingly, the levels of TDH produced from the strains carrying both tdh and trh genes were lower than those carrying only the tdh gene, whereas the levels of mRNA did not significantly differ between the two groups.

  1. [Automated RNA amplification for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens].

    PubMed

    Drouillon, V; Houriez, F; Buze, M; Lagrange, P; Herrmann, J-L

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) directly on clinical respiratory specimens is essential for a correct management of patients suspected of tuberculosis. For this purpose PCR-based kits are available to detect MTB in respiratory specimen but most of them need at least 4 hours to be completed. New methods, based on TRC method (TRC: Transcription Reverse transcription Concerted--TRCRapid M. Tuberculosis--Tosoh Bioscience, Tokyo, Japon) and dedicated monitor have been developed. A new kit (TRC Rapid M. tuberculosis and Real-time monitor TRCRapid-160, Tosoh Corporation, Japan) enabling one step amplification and real-time detection of MTB 16S rRNA by a combination of intercalative dye oxazole yellow-linked DNA probe and isothermal RNA amplification directly on respiratory specimens has been tested in our laboratory. 319 respiratory specimens were tested in this preliminary study and results were compared to smear and culture. Fourteen had a positive culture for MTB. Among theses samples, smear was positive in 11 cases (78.6%) and TRC process was positive in 8 cases (57.1%). Overall sensitivity of TRC compared to smear positive samples is 73%. Theses first results demonstrated that a rapid identification of MTB was possible (less than 2 processing hours for 14 specimens and about 1 hour for 1 specimen) in most cases of smear positive samples using ready to use reagents for real time detection of MTB rRNA in clinical samples. New pretreatment and extraction reagents kits to increase the stability of the sputum RNA and the extraction efficiency are now tested in our laboratory.

  2. High-quality RNA extraction from small cardamom tissues rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nadiya, Fasiludeen; Anjali, Narayanannair; Gangaprasad, Appukuttannair; Sabu, Kalluvettankuzhy Krishnannair

    2015-09-15

    Due to the presence of a diverse array of metabolites, no standard method of RNA isolation is available for plants. We noted that polysaccharide and polyphenol contents of cardamom tissues critically hinder the RNA extraction procedure. Hence, we attempted several methods for obtaining intact mRNA and small RNA from various cardamom tissues. It was found that protocols involving a combination of commercial kits and conventional CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) methods yielded RNA with good purity, higher yield, and good integrity. The total RNA isolated through this approach was found to be amenable for transcriptome and small RNA analysis through next-generation sequencing platforms.

  3. Brain MAPS: an automated, accurate and robust brain extraction technique using a template library

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kelvin K.; Barnes, Josephine; Modat, Marc; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Fox, Nick C.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Whole brain extraction is an important pre-processing step in neuro-image analysis. Manual or semi-automated brain delineations are labour-intensive and thus not desirable in large studies, meaning that automated techniques are preferable. The accuracy and robustness of automated methods are crucial because human expertise may be required to correct any sub-optimal results, which can be very time consuming. We compared the accuracy of four automated brain extraction methods: Brain Extraction Tool (BET), Brain Surface Extractor (BSE), Hybrid Watershed Algorithm (HWA) and a Multi-Atlas Propagation and Segmentation (MAPS) technique we have previously developed for hippocampal segmentation. The four methods were applied to extract whole brains from 682 1.5T and 157 3T T1-weighted MR baseline images from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. Semi-automated brain segmentations with manual editing and checking were used as the gold-standard to compare with the results. The median Jaccard index of MAPS was higher than HWA, BET and BSE in 1.5T and 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests), and the 1st-99th centile range of the Jaccard index of MAPS was smaller than HWA, BET and BSE in 1.5T and 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests). HWA and MAPS were found to be best at including all brain tissues (median false negative rate ≤ 0.010% for 1.5T scans and ≤ 0.019% for 3T scans, both methods). The median Jaccard index of MAPS were similar in both 1.5T and 3T scans, whereas those of BET, BSE and HWA were higher in 1.5T scans than 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests). We found that the diagnostic group had a small effect on the median Jaccard index of all four methods. In conclusion, MAPS had relatively high accuracy and low variability compared to HWA, BET and BSE in MR scans with and without atrophy. PMID:21195780

  4. Splicing of arabidopsis tRNA(Met) precursors in tobacco cell and wheat germ extracts.

    PubMed

    Akama, K; Junker, V; Yukawa, Y; Sugiura, M; Beier, H

    2000-09-01

    Intron-containing tRNA genes are exceptional within nuclear plant genomes. It appears that merely two tRNA gene families coding for tRNA(GpsiA(Tyr)) and elongator tRNA(CmAU(Met)) contain intervening sequences. We have previously investigated the features required by wheat germ splicing endonuclease for efficient and accurate intron excision from Arabidopsis pre-tRNA(Tyr). Here we have studied the expression of an Arabidopsis elongator tRNA(Met) gene in two plant extracts of different origin. This gene was first transcribed either in HeLa or in tobacco cell nuclear extract and splicing of intron-containing tRNA(Met) precursors was then examined in wheat germ S23 extract and in the tobacco system. The results show that conversion of pre-tRNA(Met) to mature tRNA proceeds very efficiently in both plant extracts. In order to elucidate the potential role of specific nucleotides at the 3' and 5' splice sites and of a structured intron for pre-tRNA(Met) splicing in either extract, we have performed a systematic survey by mutational analyses. The results show that cytidine residues at intron-exon boundaries impair pre-tRNA(Met) splicing and that a highly structured intron is indispensable for pre-tRNA(Met) splicing. tRNA precursors with an extended anticodon stem of three to four base pairs are readily accepted as substrates by wheat and tobacco splicing endonuclease, whereas pre-tRNA molecules that can form an extended anticodon stem of only two putative base pairs are not spliced at all. An amber suppressor, generated from the intron-containing elongator tRNA(Met) gene, is efficiently processed and spliced in both plant extracts.

  5. Automated extraction of single H atoms with STM: tip state dependency.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Jarvis, Samuel P; Guérinet, Laurent; Sharp, Peter; Woolley, Richard; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2017-02-17

    The atomistic structure of the tip apex plays a crucial role in performing reliable atomic-scale surface and adsorbate manipulation using scanning probe techniques. We have developed an automated extraction routine for controlled removal of single hydrogen atoms from the H:Si(100) surface. The set of atomic extraction protocols detect a variety of desorption events during scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-induced modification of the hydrogen-passivated surface. The influence of the tip state on the probability for hydrogen removal was examined by comparing the desorption efficiency for various classifications of STM topographs (rows, dimers, atoms, etc). We find that dimer-row-resolving tip apices extract hydrogen atoms most readily and reliably (and with least spurious desorption), while tip states which provide atomic resolution counter-intuitively have a lower probability for single H atom removal.

  6. Automated extraction of single H atoms with STM: tip state dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Morten; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Guérinet, Laurent; Sharp, Peter; Woolley, Richard; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2017-02-01

    The atomistic structure of the tip apex plays a crucial role in performing reliable atomic-scale surface and adsorbate manipulation using scanning probe techniques. We have developed an automated extraction routine for controlled removal of single hydrogen atoms from the H:Si(100) surface. The set of atomic extraction protocols detect a variety of desorption events during scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-induced modification of the hydrogen-passivated surface. The influence of the tip state on the probability for hydrogen removal was examined by comparing the desorption efficiency for various classifications of STM topographs (rows, dimers, atoms, etc). We find that dimer-row-resolving tip apices extract hydrogen atoms most readily and reliably (and with least spurious desorption), while tip states which provide atomic resolution counter-intuitively have a lower probability for single H atom removal.

  7. Factors controlling the manual and automated extraction of image information using imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.

    2004-07-01

    The factors governing the extraction of useful information from polarimetric images depend upon the image acquisition and analytical methodologies being used, and upon systematic and environmental variations present during the acquisition process. The acquisition process generally occurs with foreknowledge of the analysis to be used. Broadly, interactive image analysis and automated image analysis are two different procedures: in each case, there are technical challenges. Imaging polarimetry is more complex than other imaging methodologies, and produces an increased dimensionality. However, there are several potential broad areas of interactive (manual) and automated remote sensing in which imaging polarimetry can provide useful additional information. A review is presented of the factors controlling feature discrimination, of metrics that are used, and of some proposed directions for future research.

  8. Comparative evaluation of different extraction and quantification methods for forensic RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Grabmüller, Melanie; Madea, Burkhard; Courts, Cornelius

    2015-05-01

    Since about 2005, there is increasing interest in forensic RNA analysis whose versatility may very favorably complement traditional DNA profiling in forensic casework. There is, however, no method available specifically dedicated for extraction of RNA from forensically relevant sample material. In this study we compared five commercially available and commonly used RNA extraction kits and methods (mirVana™ miRNA Isolation Kit Ambion; Trizol® Reagent, Invitrogen; NucleoSpin® miRNA Kit Macherey-Nagel; AllPrep DNA/RNA Mini Kit and RNeasy® Mini Kit both Qiagen) to assess their relative effectiveness of yielding RNA of good quality and their compatibility with co-extraction of DNA amenable to STR profiling. We set up samples of small amounts of dried blood, liquid saliva, semen and buccal mucosa that were aged for different time intervals for co-extraction of RNA and DNA. RNA quality was assessed by determination of 'RNA integrity number' (RIN) and quantitative PCR based expression analysis. DNA quality was assessed via monitoring STR typing success rates. By comparison, the different methods exhibited considerable differences between RNA and DNA yields, RNA quality values and expression levels, and STR profiling success, with the AllPrep DNA/RNA Mini Kit and the NucleoSpin® miRNA Kit excelling at DNA co-extraction and RNA results, respectively. Overall, there was no 'best' method to satisfy all demands of comprehensible co-analysis of RNA and DNA and it appears that each method has specific merits and flaws. We recommend to cautiously choose from available methods and align its characteristics with the needs of the experimental setting at hand.

  9. Automated Kinematic Extraction of Wing and Body Motions of Free Flying Diptera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostreski, Nicholas I.

    In the quest to understand the forces generated by micro aerial systems powered by oscillating appendages, it is necessary to study the kinematics that generate those forces. Automated and manual tracking techniques were developed to extract the complex wing and body motions of dipteran insects, ideal micro aerial systems, in free flight. Video sequences were captured by three high speed cameras (7500 fps) oriented orthogonally around a clear flight test chamber. Synchronization and image-based triggering were made possible by an automated triggering circuit. A multi-camera calibration was implemented using image-based tracking techniques. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the insect were generated from the 2-D images by shape from silhouette (SFS) methods. An intensity based segmentation of the wings and body was performed using a mixture of Gaussians. In addition to geometric and cost based filtering, spectral clustering was also used to refine the reconstruction and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to find the body roll axis and wing-span axes. The unobservable roll state of the cylindrically shaped body was successfully estimated by combining observations of the wing kinematics with a wing symmetry assumption. Wing pitch was determined by a ray tracing technique to compute and minimize a point-to-line cost function. Linear estimation with assumed motion models was accomplished by discrete Kalman filtering the measured body states. Generative models were developed for different species of diptera for model based tracking, simulation, and extraction of inertial properties. Manual and automated tracking results were analyzed and insect flight simulation videos were developed to quantify ground truth errors for an assumed model. The results demonstrated the automated tracker to have comparable performance to a human digitizer, though manual techniques displayed superiority during aggressive maneuvers and image blur. Both techniques demonstrated

  10. Automated extraction of natural drainage density patterns for the conterminous United States through high performance computing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanislawski, Larry V.; Falgout, Jeff T.; Buttenfield, Barbara P.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrographic networks form an important data foundation for cartographic base mapping and for hydrologic analysis. Drainage density patterns for these networks can be derived to characterize local landscape, bedrock and climate conditions, and further inform hydrologic and geomorphological analysis by indicating areas where too few headwater channels have been extracted. But natural drainage density patterns are not consistently available in existing hydrographic data for the United States because compilation and capture criteria historically varied, along with climate, during the period of data collection over the various terrain types throughout the country. This paper demonstrates an automated workflow that is being tested in a high-performance computing environment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to map natural drainage density patterns at the 1:24,000-scale (24K) for the conterminous United States. Hydrographic network drainage patterns may be extracted from elevation data to guide corrections for existing hydrographic network data. The paper describes three stages in this workflow including data pre-processing, natural channel extraction, and generation of drainage density patterns from extracted channels. The workflow is concurrently implemented by executing procedures on multiple subbasin watersheds within the U.S. National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). Pre-processing defines parameters that are needed for the extraction process. Extraction proceeds in standard fashion: filling sinks, developing flow direction and weighted flow accumulation rasters. Drainage channels with assigned Strahler stream order are extracted within a subbasin and simplified. Drainage density patterns are then estimated with 100-meter resolution and subsequently smoothed with a low-pass filter. The extraction process is found to be of better quality in higher slope terrains. Concurrent processing through the high performance computing environment is shown to facilitate and refine

  11. Automated extraction of DNA from biological stains on fabric from crime cases. A comparison of a manual and three automated methods.

    PubMed

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin B; Hansen, Thomas N; Hoflund, Anders; Mogensen, Helle S; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-05-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. DNA extraction from fabric for forensic genetic purposes may be challenging due to the occasional presence of PCR inhibitors that may be co-extracted with the DNA. Using 120 forensic trace evidence samples consisting of various types of fabric, we compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads (PrepFiler Express Forensic DNA Extraction Kit on an AutoMate Express, QIAsyphony DNA Investigator kit either with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen or an in-house optimized sample pre-treatment on a QIAsymphony SP) and one manual method (Chelex) with the aim of reducing the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable STR-profiles. A total of 480 samples were processed. The highest DNA recovery was obtained with the PrepFiler Express kit on an AutoMate Express while the lowest DNA recovery was obtained using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen. Extraction using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen resulted in the lowest percentage of PCR inhibition (0%) while extraction using manual Chelex resulted in the highest percentage of PCR inhibition (51%). The largest number of reportable STR-profiles was obtained with DNA from samples extracted with the PrepFiler Express kit (75%) while the lowest number was obtained with DNA from samples extracted using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen (41%).

  12. Automated milk fat extraction for the analyses of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Archer, Jeffrey C; Jenkins, Roy G

    2017-01-15

    We have utilized an automated acid hydrolysis technology, followed by an abbreviated Soxhlet extraction technique to obtain fat from whole milk for the determination of persistent organic pollutants, namely polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls. The process simply involves (1) pouring the liquid milk into the hydrolysis beaker with reagents and standards, (2) drying the obtained fat on a filter paper and (3) obtaining pure fat via the modified Soxhlet extraction using 100mL of hexane per sample. This technique is in contrast to traditional manually intense liquid-liquid extractions and avoids the preparatory step of freeze-drying the samples for pressurized liquid extractions. Along with these extraction improvements, analytical results closely agree between the methods, thus no quality has been compromised. The native spike (n=12) and internal standard (n=24) precision and accuracy results are within EPA Methods 1613 and 1668 limits. While the median (n=6) Toxic Equivalency Quotient (TEQ) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans and the concentration of the marker polychlorinated biphenyls show a percent difference of 1% and 12%, respectively, compared to 315 previously analyzed milk samples at the same laboratory using liquid-liquid extraction. During our feasibility studies, both egg and fish tissue show substantial promise using this technique as well.

  13. Comparison of manual and automated nucleic acid extraction methods from clinical specimens for microbial diagnosis purposes.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Aniela; Geoffroy, Enrique; Miranda, Carolina; Castillo, Claudia; Sanhueza, Francia; García, Patricia

    2016-11-01

    The choice of nucleic acids (NAs) extraction method for molecular diagnosis in microbiology is of major importance because of the low microbial load, different nature of microorganisms, and clinical specimens. The NA yield of different extraction methods has been mostly studied using spiked samples. However, information from real human clinical specimens is scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a manual low-cost extraction method (Qiagen kit or salting-out extraction method) with the automated high-cost MagNAPure Compact method. According to cycle threshold values for different pathogens, MagNAPure is as efficient as Qiagen for NA extraction from noncomplex clinical specimens (nasopharyngeal swab, skin swab, plasma, respiratory specimens). In contrast, according to cycle threshold values for RNAseP, MagNAPure method may not be an appropriate method for NA extraction from blood. We believe that MagNAPure versatility reduced risk of cross-contamination and reduced hands-on time compensates its high cost.

  14. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-03-23

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals.

  15. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction using magnetic beads from viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Li, Rongqun; Chen, Yi; Pan, Ping; Tong, Wenjuan; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Yu, Daojun

    2017-01-01

    Current extraction methods often extract DNA and RNA separately, and few methods are capable of co-extracting DNA and RNA from sputum. We established a nucleic acid co-extraction method from sputum based on magnetic beads and optimized the method by evaluating influencing factors, such as the guanidinium thiocyanate (GTC) and dithiothreitol (DTT) concentrations, magnetic bead amount, incubation temperature, lysis buffer pH and RNA carrier type. The feasibility of the simultaneous nucleic acid co-extraction method was evaluated by amplifying DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen with a multiplex RT-qPCR method. Both DNA and RNA were most efficiently extracted when the GTC and DTT concentrations were 2.0 M and 80 mM, respectively, 20 μl magnetic beads were added, the incubation temperature was 80 °C, the pH was 8 or 9, and RNA carrier A was used. Therefore, we established a simple method to extract nucleic acids from two important respiratory viruses compared with other commercial kits. This magnetic beads-based co-extraction method for sputum followed by a multiplex RT-qPCR can rapidly and precisely detect DNA and RNA viruses from a single clinical specimen and has many advantages, such as decreased time, low cost, and a lack of harmful chemicals. PMID:28332631

  16. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination.

  17. Automated solid-phase extraction of herbicides from water for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for the pre-concentration of chloroacetanilide and triazine herbicides, and two triazine metabolites from 100-ml water samples. Breakthrough experiments for the C18 SPE cartridge show that the two triazine metabolites are not fully retained and that increasing flow-rate decreases their retention. Standard curve r2 values of 0.998-1.000 for each compound were consistently obtained and a quantitation level of 0.05 ??g/l was achieved for each compound tested. More than 10,000 surface and ground water samples have been analyzed by this method.

  18. Comparative evaluation of total RNA extraction methods in Theobroma cacao using shoot apical meristems.

    PubMed

    Silva, D V; Branco, S M J; Holanda, I S A; Royaert, S; Motamayor, J C; Marelli, J P; Corrêa, R X

    2016-03-04

    Theobroma cacao is a species of great economic importance with its beans used for chocolate production. The tree has been a target of various molecular studies. It contains many polyphenols, which complicate the extraction of nucleic acids with the extraction protocols requiring a large amount of plant material. These issues, therefore, necessitate the optimization of the protocols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for extraction of total RNA from shoot apical meristems of T. cacao 'CCN 51' and to assess the influence of storage conditions for the meristems on the extraction. The study also aimed to identify the most efficient protocol for RNA extraction using a small amount of plant material. Four different protocols were evaluated for RNA extraction using one shoot apical meristem per sample. Among these protocols, one that was more efficient was then tested to extract RNA using four different numbers of shoot apical meristems, subjected to three different storage conditions. The best protocol was tested for cDNA amplification using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; the cDNA quality was determined to be satisfactory for molecular analyses. The study revealed that with the best RNA extraction protocol, one shoot apical meristem was sufficient for extraction of high-quality total RNA. The results obtained might enable advances in genetic analyses and molecular studies using reduced amount of plant material.

  19. Automated CO2 extraction from air for clumped isotope analysis in the atmo- and biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Magdalena; Ziegler, Martin; Pons, Thijs; Lourens, Lucas; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The conventional stable isotope ratios 13C/12C and 18O/16O in atmospheric CO2 are a powerful tool for unraveling the global carbon cycle. In recent years, it has been suggested that the abundance of the very rare isotopologue 13C18O16O on m/z 47 might be a promising tracer to complement conventional stable isotope analysis of atmospheric CO2 [Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al. 2007; Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Yeung et al., 2009]. Here we present an automated analytical system that is designed for clumped isotope analysis of atmo- and biospheric CO2. The carbon dioxide gas is quantitatively extracted from about 1.5L of air (ATP). The automated stainless steel extraction and purification line consists of three main components: (i) a drying unit (a magnesium perchlorate unit and a cryogenic water trap), (ii) two CO2 traps cooled with liquid nitrogen [Werner et al., 2001] and (iii) a GC column packed with Porapak Q that can be cooled with liquid nitrogen to -30°C during purification and heated up to 230°C in-between two extraction runs. After CO2 extraction and purification, the CO2 is automatically transferred to the mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometric analysis of the 13C18O16O abundance is carried out in dual inlet mode on a MAT 253 mass spectrometer. Each analysis generally consists of 80 change-over-cycles. Three additional Faraday cups were added to the mass spectrometer for simultaneous analysis of the mass-to-charge ratios 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49. The reproducibility for δ13C, δ18O and Δ47 for repeated CO2 extractions from air is in the range of 0.11o (SD), 0.18o (SD) and 0.02 (SD)o respectively. This automated CO2 extraction and purification system will be used to analyse the clumped isotopic signature in atmospheric CO2 (tall tower, Cabauw, Netherlands) and to study the clumped isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis (leaf chamber experiments) and soil respiration. References Affek, H. P., Xu, X. & Eiler, J. M., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 5033

  20. OMIT: Dynamic, Semi-Automated Ontology Development for the microRNA Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingshan; Dang, Jiangbo; Borchert, Glen M.; Eilbeck, Karen; Zhang, He; Xiong, Min; Jiang, Weijian; Wu, Hao; Blake, Judith A.; Natale, Darren A.; Tan, Ming

    2014-01-01

    As a special class of short non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (a.k.a. miRNAs or miRs) have been reported to perform important roles in various biological processes by regulating respective target genes. However, significant barriers exist during biologists' conventional miR knowledge discovery. Emerging semantic technologies, which are based upon domain ontologies, can render critical assistance to this problem. Our previous research has investigated the construction of a miR ontology, named Ontology for MIcroRNA Target Prediction (OMIT), the very first of its kind that formally encodes miR domain knowledge. Although it is unavoidable to have a manual component contributed by domain experts when building ontologies, many challenges have been identified for a completely manual development process. The most significant issue is that a manual development process is very labor-intensive and thus extremely expensive. Therefore, we propose in this paper an innovative ontology development methodology. Our contributions can be summarized as: (i) We have continued the development and critical improvement of OMIT, solidly based on our previous research outcomes. (ii) We have explored effective and efficient algorithms with which the ontology development can be seamlessly combined with machine intelligence and be accomplished in a semi-automated manner, thus significantly reducing large amounts of human efforts. A set of experiments have been conducted to thoroughly evaluate our proposed methodology. PMID:25025130

  1. A non-phenol-chloroform extraction of double-stranded RNA from plant and fungal tissues.

    PubMed

    Balijja, Alitukiriza; Kvarnheden, Anders; Turchetti, Tullio

    2008-09-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules of viruses are found in nature at a very high frequency. Their detection in plants and fungi has been carried out with difficulty due to the complicated dsRNA extraction techniques used commonly which includes phenol-chloroform extractions. In this study, an extraction method for isolation of dsRNA is described that is free of phenol and chloroform. A lysis buffer, containing beta-mercaptoethanol and polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP-40), was added to homogenised tissues and the subsequent supernatant was filtered through a cellulose CF-11 mini-column. DsRNA molecules were separated based on the differing affinity of nucleic acids for the cellulose CF-11 resin in 20% ethanol buffer. This easy, rapid and cheap technique has been successfully tested on fungi and plants containing different dsRNA virus molecules, indicating the possibility of a wide use of the method.

  2. Simultaneous Extraction from Bacterioplankton of Total RNA and DNA Suitable for Quantitative Structure and Function Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Weinbauer, Markus G.; Fritz, Ingo; Wenderoth, Dirk F.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the simultaneous extraction from bacterioplankton of RNA and DNA suitable for quantitative molecular analysis. By using a combined mechanical and chemical extraction method, the highest RNA and DNA yield was obtained with sodium lauryl sarcosinate-phenol or DivoLab-phenol as the extraction mix. The efficiency of extraction of nucleic acids was comparatively high and varied only moderately in gram-negative bacterial isolates and bacterioplankton (RNA, 52 to 66%; DNA, 43 to 61%); significant amounts of nucleic acids were also obtained for a gram-positive bacterial isolate (RNA, 20 to 30%; DNA, 20 to 25%). Reverse transcription-PCR and PCR amplification products of fragments of 16S rRNA and its genes were obtained from all isolates and communities, indicating that the extracted nucleic acids were intact and pure enough for community structure analyses. By using single-strand conformation polymorphism of fragments of 16S rRNA and its gene, community fingerprints were obtained from pond bacterioplankton. mRNA transcripts encoding fragments of the enzyme nitrite reductase gene (nir gene) could be detected in a pond water sample, indicating that the extraction method is also suitable for studying gene expression. The extraction method presented yields nucleic acids that can be used to perform structural and functional studies of bacterioplankton communities from a single sample. PMID:11872453

  3. Automation of lidar-based hydrologic feature extraction workflows using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlongan, Noel Jerome B.; de la Cruz, Roel M.; Olfindo, Nestor T.; Perez, Anjillyn Mae C.

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of LiDAR technology, higher resolution datasets become available for use in different remote sensing and GIS applications. One significant application of LiDAR datasets in the Philippines is in resource features extraction. Feature extraction using LiDAR datasets require complex and repetitive workflows which can take a lot of time for researchers through manual execution and supervision. The Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys (PHD), a project under the Nationwide Detailed Resources Assessment Using LiDAR (Phil-LiDAR 2) program, created a set of scripts, the PHD Toolkit, to automate its processes and workflows necessary for hydrologic features extraction specifically Streams and Drainages, Irrigation Network, and Inland Wetlands, using LiDAR Datasets. These scripts are created in Python and can be added in the ArcGIS® environment as a toolbox. The toolkit is currently being used as an aid for the researchers in hydrologic feature extraction by simplifying the workflows, eliminating human errors when providing the inputs, and providing quick and easy-to-use tools for repetitive tasks. This paper discusses the actual implementation of different workflows developed by Phil-LiDAR 2 Project 4 in Streams, Irrigation Network and Inland Wetlands extraction.

  4. High-quality RNA extraction from copepods for Next Generation Sequencing: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Asai, Sneha; Ianora, Adrianna; Lauritano, Chiara; Lindeque, Penelope K; Carotenuto, Ylenia

    2015-12-01

    Despite the ecological importance of copepods, few Next Generation Sequencing studies (NGS) have been performed on small crustaceans, and a standard method for RNA extraction is lacking. In this study, we compared three commonly-used methods: TRIzol®, Aurum Total RNA Mini Kit and Qiagen RNeasy Micro Kit, in combination with preservation reagents TRIzol® or RNAlater®, to obtain high-quality and quantity of RNA from copepods for NGS. Total RNA was extracted from the copepods Calanus helgolandicus, Centropages typicus and Temora stylifera and its quantity and quality were evaluated using NanoDrop, agarose gel electrophoresis and Agilent Bioanalyzer. Our results demonstrate that preservation of copepods in RNAlater® and extraction with Qiagen RNeasy Micro Kit were the optimal isolation method for high-quality and quantity of RNA for NGS studies of C. helgolandicus. Intriguingly, C. helgolandicus 28S rRNA is formed by two subunits that separate after heat-denaturation and migrate along with 18S rRNA. This unique property of protostome RNA has never been reported in copepods. Overall, our comparative study on RNA extraction protocols will help increase gene expression studies on copepods using high-throughput applications, such as RNA-Seq and microarrays.

  5. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  6. Strategies for Medical Data Extraction and Presentation Part 3: Automated Context- and User-Specific Data Extraction.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    In current medical practice, data extraction is limited by a number of factors including lack of information system integration, manual workflow, excessive workloads, and lack of standardized databases. The combined limitations result in clinically important data often being overlooked, which can adversely affect clinical outcomes through the introduction of medical error, diminished diagnostic confidence, excessive utilization of medical services, and delays in diagnosis and treatment planning. Current technology development is largely inflexible and static in nature, which adversely affects functionality and usage among the diverse and heterogeneous population of end users. In order to address existing limitations in medical data extraction, alternative technology development strategies need to be considered which incorporate the creation of end user profile groups (to account for occupational differences among end users), customization options (accounting for individual end user needs and preferences), and context specificity of data (taking into account both the task being performed and data subject matter). Creation of the proposed context- and user-specific data extraction and presentation templates offers a number of theoretical benefits including automation and improved workflow, completeness in data search, ability to track and verify data sources, creation of computerized decision support and learning tools, and establishment of data-driven best practice guidelines.

  7. Automated solid-phase extraction approaches for large scale biomonitoring studies.

    PubMed

    Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Ye, Xiaoyun; Needham, Larry L; Calafat, Antonia M

    2009-01-01

    The main value in measuring environmental chemicals in biological specimens (i.e., biomonitoring) is the ability to minimize risk assessment uncertainties. The collection of biomonitoring data for risk assessment requires the analysis of a statistically significant number of samples from subjects with a significant prevalence of detectable internal dose levels. This paper addresses the practical laboratory challenges that arise from these statistical requirements: development of high throughput techniques that can handle, with high accuracy and precision, a large number of samples and can do a trace level analysis of multiple and diverse environmental chemicals (i.e., analytes). We review here examples of high throughput, automated solid-phase extraction methods developed in our laboratory for biomonitoring of analytes with representative hydrophobic properties and for typical biomonitoring matrices. We discuss key aspects of sample preparation, column, and solvent selection for off- and online extractions, and the so-called nuts-and-bolts of online column-switching systems necessary for developing-with minimal sample handling-rugged, automated methods.

  8. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  9. Evidence for an RNA Polymerization Activity in Axolotl and Xenopus Egg Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Pelczar, Hélène; Woisard, Anne; Lemaître, Jean Marc; Chachou, Mohamed; Andéol, Yannick

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported a post-transcriptional RNA amplification observed in vivo following injection of in vitro synthesized transcripts into axolotl oocytes, unfertilized (UFE) or fertilized eggs. To further characterize this phenomenon, low speed extracts (LSE) from axolotl and Xenopus UFE were prepared and tested in an RNA polymerization assay. The major conclusions are: i) the amphibian extracts catalyze the incorporation of radioactive ribonucleotide in RNase but not DNase sensitive products showing that these products correspond to RNA; ii) the phenomenon is resistant to α-amanitin, an inhibitor of RNA polymerases II and III and to cordycepin (3′dAMP), but sensitive to cordycepin 5′-triphosphate, an RNA elongation inhibitor, which supports the existence of an RNA polymerase activity different from polymerases II and III; the detection of radiolabelled RNA comigrating at the same length as the exogenous transcript added to the extracts allowed us to show that iii) the RNA polymerization is not a 3′ end labelling and that iv) the radiolabelled RNA is single rather than double stranded. In vitro cell-free systems derived from amphibian UFE therefore validate our previous in vivo results hypothesizing the existence of an evolutionary conserved enzymatic activity with the properties of an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). PMID:21203452

  10. ChemDataExtractor: A Toolkit for Automated Extraction of Chemical Information from the Scientific Literature.

    PubMed

    Swain, Matthew C; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-24

    The emergence of "big data" initiatives has led to the need for tools that can automatically extract valuable chemical information from large volumes of unstructured data, such as the scientific literature. Since chemical information can be present in figures, tables, and textual paragraphs, successful information extraction often depends on the ability to interpret all of these domains simultaneously. We present a complete toolkit for the automated extraction of chemical entities and their associated properties, measurements, and relationships from scientific documents that can be used to populate structured chemical databases. Our system provides an extensible, chemistry-aware, natural language processing pipeline for tokenization, part-of-speech tagging, named entity recognition, and phrase parsing. Within this scope, we report improved performance for chemical named entity recognition through the use of unsupervised word clustering based on a massive corpus of chemistry articles. For phrase parsing and information extraction, we present the novel use of multiple rule-based grammars that are tailored for interpreting specific document domains such as textual paragraphs, captions, and tables. We also describe document-level processing to resolve data interdependencies and show that this is particularly necessary for the autogeneration of chemical databases since captions and tables commonly contain chemical identifiers and references that are defined elsewhere in the text. The performance of the toolkit to correctly extract various types of data was evaluated, affording an F-score of 93.4%, 86.8%, and 91.5% for extracting chemical identifiers, spectroscopic attributes, and chemical property attributes, respectively; set against the CHEMDNER chemical name extraction challenge, ChemDataExtractor yields a competitive F-score of 87.8%. All tools have been released under the MIT license and are available to download from http://www.chemdataextractor.org .

  11. Automated sample preparation by pressurized liquid extraction-solid-phase extraction for the liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of polyphenols in the brewing process.

    PubMed

    Papagiannopoulos, Menelaos; Mellenthin, Annett

    2002-11-08

    The analysis of polyphenols from solid plant or food samples usually requires laborious sample preparation. The liquid extraction of these compounds from the sample is compromised by apolar matrix interferences, an excess of which has to be eliminated prior to subsequent purification and separation. Applying pressurized liquid extraction to the extraction of polyphenols from hops, the use of different solvents sequentially can partly overcome these problems. Initial extraction with pentane eliminates hydrophobic compounds like hop resins and oils and enables the straightforward automated on-line solid-phase extraction as part of an optimized LC-MS analysis.

  12. Identification of extracellular miRNA in archived serum samples by next-generation sequencing from RNA extracted using multiple methods.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Kumar, Raina; Dimitrov, George; Hoke, Allison; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs act as important regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation or by attenuating protein translation. Since miRNAs are stably expressed in bodily fluids, there is growing interest in profiling these miRNAs, as it is minimally invasive and cost-effective as a diagnostic matrix. A technical hurdle in studying miRNA dynamics is the ability to reliably extract miRNA as small sample volumes and low RNA abundance create challenges for extraction and downstream applications. The purpose of this study was to develop a pipeline for the recovery of miRNA using small volumes of archived serum samples. The RNA was extracted employing several widely utilized RNA isolation kits/methods with and without addition of a carrier. The small RNA library preparation was carried out using Illumina TruSeq small RNA kit and sequencing was carried out using Illumina platform. A fraction of five microliters of total RNA was used for library preparation as quantification is below the detection limit. We were able to profile miRNA levels in serum from all the methods tested. We found out that addition of nucleic acid based carrier molecules had higher numbers of processed reads but it did not enhance the mapping of any miRBase annotated sequences. However, some of the extraction procedures offer certain advantages: RNA extracted by TRIzol seemed to align to the miRBase best; extractions using TRIzol with carrier yielded higher miRNA-to-small RNA ratios. Nuclease free glycogen can be carrier of choice for miRNA sequencing. Our findings illustrate that miRNA extraction and quantification is influenced by the choice of methodologies. Addition of nucleic acid- based carrier molecules during extraction procedure is not a good choice when assaying miRNA using sequencing. The careful selection of an extraction method permits the archived serum samples to become valuable resources for high-throughput applications.

  13. Evaluation of commercial kits for extraction of DNA and RNA from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Devon; Weese, J Scott

    2012-12-01

    Commercial nucleic acid extraction kits are a cost effective, efficient and convenient way to isolate DNA and RNA from bacteria. Despite the increasing importance of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, and the increased use of nucleic acids in its identification, characterization, and investigation of virulence factors, no standardized or recommended methods for nucleic acid isolation exist. Here, we sought to evaluate 4 commercial DNA extraction kits and 3 commercial RNA extraction kits assessing cost, labor intensity, purity, quantity and quality of nucleic acid preparations. The DNA extraction kits produced a range of concentrations (20.9-546 ng/ml) and A(260/280) ratios (1.92-2.11). All kits were suitable for DNA extraction with the exception of the Roche MagNA pure LC DNA isolation kit III which produced DNA of high yield but with substantial shearing, but that did not affect downstream PCR amplifications. For RNA extraction, the Qiagen RNeasy mini kit stood out producing preparations of consistently higher concentrations and higher RNA integrity numbers (RIN). The Roche MagNA pure LC RNA isolation kit produced preparations that could not be properly assigned RINs due to a failure to remove small RNAs which were interpreted as degradation. Good DNA and RNA yield are critical but methods are often overlooked. This study highlights the potential for critical variation between established commercial systems and the need for assessment of any extraction methods that are used.

  14. Automated Detection and Extraction of Coronal Dimmings from SDO/AIA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Alisdair R.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Wills-Davey, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    The sheer volume of data anticipated from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) highlights the necessity for the development of automatic detection methods for various types of solar activity. Initially recognised in the 1970s, it is now well established that coronal dimmings are closely associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and are particularly recognised as an indicator of front-side (halo) CMEs, which can be difficult to detect in white-light coronagraph data. An automated coronal dimming region detection and extraction algorithm removes visual observer bias from determination of physical quantities such as spatial location, area and volume. This allows reproducible, quantifiable results to be mined from very large datasets. The information derived may facilitate more reliable early space weather detection, as well as offering the potential for conducting large-sample studies focused on determining the geoeffectiveness of CMEs, coupled with analysis of their associated coronal dimmings. We present examples of dimming events extracted using our algorithm from existing EUV data, demonstrating the potential for the anticipated application to SDO/AIA data. Metadata returned by our algorithm include: location, area, volume, mass and dynamics of coronal dimmings. As well as running on historic datasets, this algorithm is capable of detecting and extracting coronal dimmings in near real-time. The coronal dimming detection and extraction algorithm described in this poster is part of the SDO/Computer Vision Center effort hosted at SAO (Martens et al., 2009). We acknowledge NASA grant NNH07AB97C.

  15. Hybrid curation of gene–mutation relations combining automated extraction and crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Burger, John D.; Doughty, Emily; Khare, Ritu; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Mishra, Rajashree; Aberdeen, John; Tresner-Kirsch, David; Wellner, Ben; Kann, Maricel G.; Lu, Zhiyong; Hirschman, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Background: This article describes capture of biological information using a hybrid approach that combines natural language processing to extract biological entities and crowdsourcing with annotators recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk to judge correctness of candidate biological relations. These techniques were applied to extract gene– mutation relations from biomedical abstracts with the goal of supporting production scale capture of gene–mutation–disease findings as an open source resource for personalized medicine. Results: The hybrid system could be configured to provide good performance for gene–mutation extraction (precision ∼82%; recall ∼70% against an expert-generated gold standard) at a cost of $0.76 per abstract. This demonstrates that crowd labor platforms such as Amazon Mechanical Turk can be used to recruit quality annotators, even in an application requiring subject matter expertise; aggregated Turker judgments for gene–mutation relations exceeded 90% accuracy. Over half of the precision errors were due to mismatches against the gold standard hidden from annotator view (e.g. incorrect EntrezGene identifier or incorrect mutation position extracted), or incomplete task instructions (e.g. the need to exclude nonhuman mutations). Conclusions: The hybrid curation model provides a readily scalable cost-effective approach to curation, particularly if coupled with expert human review to filter precision errors. We plan to generalize the framework and make it available as open source software. Database URL: http://www.mitre.org/publications/technical-papers/hybrid-curation-of-gene-mutation-relations-combining-automated PMID:25246425

  16. Automated hand thermal image segmentation and feature extraction in the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Snekhalatha, U; Anburajan, M; Sowmiya, V; Venkatraman, B; Menaka, M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was (1) to perform an automated segmentation of hot spot regions of the hand from thermograph using the k-means algorithm and (2) to test the potential of features extracted from the hand thermograph and its measured skin temperature indices in the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. Thermal image analysis based on skin temperature measurement, heat distribution index and thermographic index was analyzed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and controls. The k-means algorithm was used for image segmentation, and features were extracted from the segmented output image using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix method. In metacarpo-phalangeal, proximal inter-phalangeal and distal inter-phalangeal regions, the calculated percentage difference in the mean values of skin temperatures was found to be higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients (5.3%, 4.9% and 4.8% in MCP3, PIP3 and DIP3 joints, respectively) as compared to the normal group. k-Means algorithm applied in the thermal imaging provided better segmentation results in evaluating the disease. In the total population studied, the measured mean average skin temperature of the MCP3 joint was highly correlated with most of the extracted features of the hand. In the total population studied, the statistical feature extracted parameters correlated significantly with skin surface temperature measurements and measured temperature indices. Hence, the developed computer-aided diagnostic tool using MATLAB could be used as a reliable method in diagnosing and analyzing the arthritis in hand thermal images.

  17. An automated system for liquid-liquid extraction in monosegmented flow analysis

    PubMed Central

    Facchin, Ileana; Pasquini, Celio

    1997-01-01

    An automated system to perform liquid-liquid extraction in monosegmented flow analysis is described. The system is controlled by a microcomputer that can track the localization of the aqueous monosegmented sample in the manifold. Optical switches are employed to sense the gas-liquid interface of the air bubbles that define the monosegment. The logical level changes, generated by the switches, are flagged by the computer through a home-made interface that also contains the analogue-to-digital converter for signal acquisition. The sequence of operations, necessary for a single extraction or for concentration of the analyte in the organic phase, is triggered by these logical transitions. The system was evaluated for extraction of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and concentration of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions at pH 9.9 (NH3/NH4Cl buffer) into chloroform containing PAN (1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol) . The results show a mean repeatability of 3% (rsd) for a 2.0 mg l-1 Cd(II) solution and a linear increase of the concentration factor for a 0.5mg l-1 Cd(II) solution observed for up to nine extraction cycles. PMID:18924792

  18. An effective method for extracting total RNA from Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Liao, C M; Li, J; Liu, X H; Zhang, Y S

    2014-01-21

    Dioscorea opposita Thunb., included in the genus Dioscorea of the family Dioscoreaceae, is an important herb with great edible and medicinal value. In this study, the total RNA from leaves of Lichuan Dioscorea opposita Thunb. was isolated by an improved Trizol method. The results showed that the RNA extracted by the improved Trizol method had good integrity, and the RNA could be used for down-stream molecular biology operations including reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

  19. Automated endmember extraction for subpixel classification of multispectral and hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Deepali; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Richa U.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the multispectral sensors acquire data in several broad wavelength bands and are capable of extracting different Land Cover features while hyperspectral sensors contain ample spectral data in narrow bandwidth (10- 20nm). The spectrally rich data enable the extraction of useful quantitative information from earth surface features. Endmembers are the pure spectral components extracted from the remote sensing datasets. Most approaches for Endmember extraction (EME) are manual and have been designed from a spectroscopic viewpoint, thus neglecting the spatial arrangement of the pixels. Therefore, EME techniques which can consider both spectral and spatial aspects are required to find more accurate Endmembers for Subpixel classification. Multispectral (EO-1 ALI and Landsat 8 OLI) and Hyperspectral (EO-1 Hyperion) datasets of Udaipur region, Rajasthan is used in this study. All the above mentioned datasets are preprocessed and converted to surface reflectance using Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercube (FLAASH). Further Automated Endmember extraction and Subpixel classification is carried out using Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA). Endmembers are selected from spectral libraries to be given as input to MESMA. To optimize these spectral libraries three techniques are deployed i.e. Count based Endmember selection (CoB), Endmember Average RMSE (EAR) and Minimum Average Spectral Angle (MASA) for endmember selection. Further identified endmembers are used for classifying multispectral and hyperspectral data using MESMA and SAM. It was observed from the obtained classified results that diverse features, spread over a pixel, which are spectrally same are well classified by MESMA whereas SAM was unable to do so.

  20. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-06

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed.

  1. Investigation of automated feature extraction techniques for applications in cancer detection from multispectral histopathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Neal R.; Levenson, Richard M.; Rimm, David L.

    2003-05-01

    Recent developments in imaging technology mean that it is now possible to obtain high-resolution histological image data at multiple wavelengths. This allows pathologists to image specimens over a full spectrum, thereby revealing (often subtle) distinctions between different types of tissue. With this type of data, the spectral content of the specimens, combined with quantitative spatial feature characterization may make it possible not only to identify the presence of an abnormality, but also to classify it accurately. However, such are the quantities and complexities of these data, that without new automated techniques to assist in the data analysis, the information contained in the data will remain inaccessible to those who need it. We investigate the application of a recently developed system for the automated analysis of multi-/hyper-spectral satellite image data to the problem of cancer detection from multispectral histopathology image data. The system provides a means for a human expert to provide training data simply by highlighting regions in an image using a computer mouse. Application of these feature extraction techniques to examples of both training and out-of-training-sample data demonstrate that these, as yet unoptimized, techniques already show promise in the discrimination between benign and malignant cells from a variety of samples.

  2. Urinary extracellular vesicles for RNA extraction: optimization of a protocol devoid of prokaryote contamination

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch-Weinert, Dorota; Musante, Luca; Kretz, Oliver; Holthofer, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) represent an ideal platform for biomarker discovery. They carry different types of RNA species, and reported profile discrepancies related to the presence/absence of 18s and 28s rRNA remain controversial. Moreover, sufficient urinary RNA yields and respective quality RNA profiles are still to be fully established. Methods UEVs were enriched by hydrostatic filtration dialysis, and RNA content was extracted using 7 different commercially available techniques. RNA quantity was assessed using spectrophotometry and fluorometry, whilst RNA quality was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Results The presence of prokaryotic transcriptome was stressed when cellular RNA, as a control, was spiked into the UEVs samples before RNA extraction. The presence of bacteria in hydrostatic filtration dialysis above 1,000 kDa molecular weight cut-off and in crude urine was confirmed with growth media plates. The efficiency in removing urinary bacteria was evaluated by differential centrifugation, filtration (0.22 µm filters) and chemical pretreatment (water purification tablet). For volumes of urine >200 ml, the chemical treatment provides ease of handling without affecting vesicle integrity, protein and RNA profiles. This protocol was selected to enrich RNA with 7 methods, and its respective quality and quantity were assessed. The results were given as follows: (a) Fluorometry gave more repeatability and reproducibility than spectrophotometry to assess the RNA yields, (b) UEVs were enriched with small RNA, (c) Ribosomal RNA peaks were not observed for any RNA extraction method used and (d) RNA yield was higher for column-based method designed for urinary exosome, whilst the highest relative microRNA presence was obtained using TRIzol method. Conclusion Our results show that the presence of bacteria can lead to misidentification in the electrophoresis peaks. Fluorometry is more reliable than spectrophotometry. RNA isolation method

  3. Prospective evaluation of a new automated nucleic acid extraction system using routine clinical respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Mengelle, C; Mansuy, J-M; Sandres-Sauné, K; Barthe, C; Boineau, J; Izopet, J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the MagNA Pure 96™ nucleic acid extraction system using clinical respiratory specimens for identifying viruses by qualitative real-time PCR assays. Three extraction methods were tested, that is, the MagNA Pure LC™, the COBAS Ampliprep™, and the MagNA Pure 96™ with 10-fold dilutions of an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 sample. Two hundred thirty-nine respiratory specimens, 35 throat swabs, 164 nasopharyngeal specimens, and 40 broncho-alveolar fluids, were extracted with the MagNA Pure 96™ and the COBAS Ampliprep™ instruments. Forty COBAS Ampliprep™ positive samples were also tested. Real-time PCRs were used to identify influenza A and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus. Similar results were obtained on RNA extracted from dilutions of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with the three systems: the MagNA Pure LC™, the COBAS Ampliprep™, and the MagNA Pure 96™. Data from clinical respiratory specimens extracted with the MagNA Pure 96™ and COBAS Ampliprep™ instruments were in 98.5% in agreement (P < 0.0001) for influenza A and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Data for rhinovirus were in 97.3% agreement (P < 0.0001) and in 96.8% agreement for enterovirus. They were in 100% agreement for adenovirus. Data for cytomegalovirus and HSV1-2 were in 95.2% agreement (P < 0.0001). The MagNA Pure 96™ instrument is easy-to-use, reliable, and has a high throughput for extracting total nucleic acid from respiratory specimens. These extracts are suitable for molecular diagnosis with any type of real-time PCR assay.

  4. [The development of kit for hybridization extraction of DNA and RNA of agents of hemotransmissive infections from serum and blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Netesova, E S; Bragin, A G; Glushkov, S A; Prasolova, M A; Dymshits, G M; Kondrushin, E V; Podymova, A S; Sandyreva, G M

    2014-10-01

    To decrease dependence of effectiveness of isolation of nucleic acids of composition and amount of applied sample a kit was developed for hybridization extraction of DNA HBV RNA HCV and RNA HIV from blood serum in two formats--using up to 250 mkl and up to 1 ml of sample. This kit, in complex with kits for detection using polymerase chain reaction technique in real-time, forms a test characterized by high analytical sensitivity i.e. HBV50 copies per ml, HCV37.5 copies per ml, HIV 13 copies per ml. The developed kit for extraction of target nucleic acids permits to get rid of total DNA and inhibited effect of heparin. It can be adapted for application wit factors B and automated stations of sample preparation.

  5. Automated extraction of the cortical sulci based on a supervised learning approach.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhuowen; Zheng, Songfeng; Yuille, Alan L; Reiss, Allan L; Dutton, Rebecca A; Lee, Agatha D; Galaburda, Albert M; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-04-01

    It is important to detect and extract the major cortical sulci from brain images, but manually annotating these sulci is a time-consuming task and requires the labeler to follow complex protocols. This paper proposes a learning-based algorithm for automated extraction of the major cortical sulci from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes and cortical surfaces. Unlike alternative methods for detecting the major cortical sulci, which use a small number of predefined rules based on properties of the cortical surface such as the mean curvature, our approach learns a discriminative model using the probabilistic boosting tree algorithm (PBT). PBT is a supervised learning approach which selects and combines hundreds of features at different scales, such as curvatures, gradients and shape index. Our method can be applied to either MRI volumes or cortical surfaces. It first outputs a probability map which indicates how likely each voxel lies on a major sulcal curve. Next, it applies dynamic programming to extract the best curve based on the probability map and a shape prior. The algorithm has almost no parameters to tune for extracting different major sulci. It is very fast (it runs in under 1 min per sulcus including the time to compute the discriminative models) due to efficient implementation of the features (e.g., using the integral volume to rapidly compute the responses of 3-D Haar filters). Because the algorithm can be applied to MRI volumes directly, there is no need to perform preprocessing such as tissue segmentation or mapping to a canonical space. The learning aspect of our approach makes the system very flexible and general. For illustration, we use volumes of the right hemisphere with several major cortical sulci manually labeled. The algorithm is tested on two groups of data, including some brains from patients with Williams Syndrome, and the results are very encouraging.

  6. Comparison and optimization of methods for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vorreiter, Fränze; Richter, Silke; Peter, Michel; Baumann, Sven; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2016-09-01

    The challenge of performing a time-resolved comprehensive analysis of molecular systems has led to the quest to optimize extraction methods. When the size of a biological sample is limited, there is demand for the simultaneous extraction of molecules representing the four areas of "omics": genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Here we optimized a protocol for the simultaneous extraction of DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites and compared it with two existing protocols. Our optimization comprised the addition of a methanol/chloroform metabolite purification before the separation of DNA/RNA and proteins. Extracted DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites were quantitatively and/or qualitatively analyzed. Of the three methods, only the newly developed protocol yielded all biomolecule classes of adequate quantity and quality.

  7. Validation of the Total Visual Acuity Extraction Algorithm (TOVA) for Automated Extraction of Visual Acuity Data From Free Text, Unstructured Clinical Records

    PubMed Central

    Baughman, Douglas M.; Su, Grace L.; Tsui, Irena; Lee, Cecilia S.; Lee, Aaron Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose With increasing volumes of electronic health record data, algorithm-driven extraction may aid manual extraction. Visual acuity often is extracted manually in vision research. The total visual acuity extraction algorithm (TOVA) is presented and validated for automated extraction of visual acuity from free text, unstructured clinical notes. Methods Consecutive inpatient ophthalmology notes over an 8-year period from the University of Washington healthcare system in Seattle, WA were used for validation of TOVA. The total visual acuity extraction algorithm applied natural language processing to recognize Snellen visual acuity in free text notes and assign laterality. The best corrected measurement was determined for each eye and converted to logMAR. The algorithm was validated against manual extraction of a subset of notes. Results A total of 6266 clinical records were obtained giving 12,452 data points. In a subset of 644 validated notes, comparison of manually extracted data versus TOVA output showed 95% concordance. Interrater reliability testing gave κ statistics of 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–0.99), 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94–0.98), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92–0.98), and 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90–0.98) for acuity numerators, denominators, adjustments, and signs, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.983. Linear regression showed an R2 of 0.966 (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The total visual acuity extraction algorithm is a novel tool for extraction of visual acuity from free text, unstructured clinical notes and provides an open source method of data extraction. Translational Relevance Automated visual acuity extraction through natural language processing can be a valuable tool for data extraction from free text ophthalmology notes. PMID:28299240

  8. Automated data extraction from in situ protein-stable isotope probing studies.

    PubMed

    Slysz, Gordon W; Steinke, Laurey; Ward, David M; Klatt, Christian G; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2014-03-07

    Protein-stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities for short periods of time under natural conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large-scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large-scale extraction and visualization of data from short-term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on phototrophic bacterial mats isolated from Yellowstone National Park. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  9. BLINKER: Automated Extraction of Ocular Indices from EEG Enabling Large-Scale Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kleifges, Kelly; Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Kerick, Scott E; Robbins, Kay A

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a platform for studying the relationships between behavioral measures, such as blink rate and duration, with neural correlates of fatigue and attention, such as theta and alpha band power. Further, the existence of EEG studies covering a variety of subjects and tasks provides opportunities for the community to better characterize variability of these measures across tasks and subjects. We have implemented an automated pipeline (BLINKER) for extracting ocular indices such as blink rate, blink duration, and blink velocity-amplitude ratios from EEG channels, EOG channels, and/or independent components (ICs). To illustrate the use of our approach, we have applied the pipeline to a large corpus of EEG data (comprising more than 2000 datasets acquired at eight different laboratories) in order to characterize variability of certain ocular indicators across subjects. We also investigate dependence of ocular indices on task in a shooter study. We have implemented our algorithms in a freely available MATLAB toolbox called BLINKER. The toolbox, which is easy to use and can be applied to collections of data without user intervention, can automatically discover which channels or ICs capture blinks. The tools extract blinks, calculate common ocular indices, generate a report for each dataset, dump labeled images of the individual blinks, and provide summary statistics across collections. Users can run BLINKER as a script or as a plugin for EEGLAB. The toolbox is available at https://github.com/VisLab/EEG-Blinks. User documentation and examples appear at http://vislab.github.io/EEG-Blinks/.

  10. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  11. BLINKER: Automated Extraction of Ocular Indices from EEG Enabling Large-Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kleifges, Kelly; Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Kerick, Scott E.; Robbins, Kay A.

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a platform for studying the relationships between behavioral measures, such as blink rate and duration, with neural correlates of fatigue and attention, such as theta and alpha band power. Further, the existence of EEG studies covering a variety of subjects and tasks provides opportunities for the community to better characterize variability of these measures across tasks and subjects. We have implemented an automated pipeline (BLINKER) for extracting ocular indices such as blink rate, blink duration, and blink velocity-amplitude ratios from EEG channels, EOG channels, and/or independent components (ICs). To illustrate the use of our approach, we have applied the pipeline to a large corpus of EEG data (comprising more than 2000 datasets acquired at eight different laboratories) in order to characterize variability of certain ocular indicators across subjects. We also investigate dependence of ocular indices on task in a shooter study. We have implemented our algorithms in a freely available MATLAB toolbox called BLINKER. The toolbox, which is easy to use and can be applied to collections of data without user intervention, can automatically discover which channels or ICs capture blinks. The tools extract blinks, calculate common ocular indices, generate a report for each dataset, dump labeled images of the individual blinks, and provide summary statistics across collections. Users can run BLINKER as a script or as a plugin for EEGLAB. The toolbox is available at https://github.com/VisLab/EEG-Blinks. User documentation and examples appear at http://vislab.github.io/EEG-Blinks/. PMID:28217081

  12. Rapid and automated sample preparation for nucleic acid extraction on a microfluidic CD (compact disk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jitae; Kido, Horacio; Zoval, Jim V.; Gagné, Dominic; Peytavi, Régis; Picard, François J.; Bastien, Martine; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G.; Madou, Marc J.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and automated preparation of PCR (polymerase chain reaction)-ready genomic DNA was demonstrated on a multiplexed CD (compact disk) platform by using hard-to-lyse bacterial spores. Cell disruption is carried out while beadcell suspensions are pushed back and forth in center-tapered lysing chambers by angular oscillation of the disk - keystone effect. During this lysis period, the cell suspensions are securely held within the lysing chambers by heatactivated wax valves. Upon application of a remote heat to the disk in motion, the wax valves release lysate solutions into centrifuge chambers where cell debris are separated by an elevated rotation of the disk. Only debris-free DNA extract is then transferred to collection chambers by capillary-assisted siphon and collected for heating that inactivates PCR inhibitors. Lysing capacity was evaluated using a real-time PCR assay to monitor the efficiency of Bacillus globigii spore lysis. PCR analysis showed that 5 minutes' CD lysis run gave spore lysis efficiency similar to that obtained with a popular commercial DNA extraction kit (i.e., IDI-lysis kit from GeneOhm Sciences Inc.) which is highly efficient for microbial cell and spore lysis. This work will contribute to the development of an integrated CD-based assay for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  13. Streamlining DNA Barcoding Protocols: Automated DNA Extraction and a New cox1 Primer in Arachnid Systematics

    PubMed Central

    Vidergar, Nina; Toplak, Nataša; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding is a popular tool in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, but for most animal lineages protocols for obtaining the barcoding sequences—mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (cox1 AKA CO1)—are not standardized. Our aim was to explore an optimal strategy for arachnids, focusing on the species-richest lineage, spiders by (1) improving an automated DNA extraction protocol, (2) testing the performance of commonly used primer combinations, and (3) developing a new cox1 primer suitable for more efficient alignment and phylogenetic analyses. Methodology We used exemplars of 15 species from all major spider clades, processed a range of spider tissues of varying size and quality, optimized genomic DNA extraction using the MagMAX Express magnetic particle processor—an automated high throughput DNA extraction system—and tested cox1 amplification protocols emphasizing the standard barcoding region using ten routinely employed primer pairs. Results The best results were obtained with the commonly used Folmer primers (LCO1490/HCO2198) that capture the standard barcode region, and with the C1-J-2183/C1-N-2776 primer pair that amplifies its extension. However, C1-J-2183 is designed too close to HCO2198 for well-interpreted, continuous sequence data, and in practice the resulting sequences from the two primer pairs rarely overlap. We therefore designed a new forward primer C1-J-2123 60 base pairs upstream of the C1-J-2183 binding site. The success rate of this new primer (93%) matched that of C1-J-2183. Conclusions The use of C1-J-2123 allows full, indel-free overlap of sequences obtained with the standard Folmer primers and with C1-J-2123 primer pair. Our preliminary tests suggest that in addition to spiders, C1-J-2123 will also perform in other arachnids and several other invertebrates. We provide optimal PCR protocols for these primer sets, and recommend using them for systematic efforts beyond DNA barcoding. PMID:25415202

  14. Automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil by focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction prior to gas chromatography--electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, F; Luque-García, J L; Luque de Castro, M D

    2003-04-25

    An approach for the automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitroPAHs) from soil, using a focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extractor, is proposed. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency (namely: irradiation power, irradiation time, number of cycles and extractant volume) were optimised by using experimental design methodology. The reduction of the nitro-PAHs to amino-PAHs and the derivatisation of the reduced analytes with heptafluorobutyric anhydride was mandatory prior to the separation-determination step by gas chromatography--electron-capture detection. The proposed approach has allowed the extraction of these pollutants from spiked and "real" contaminated soils with extraction efficiencies similar to those provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency methods 3540-8091, but with a drastic reduction in both the extraction time and sample handling, and using less organic solvent, as 75-85% of it was recycled.

  15. Development of automated extraction method of biliary tract from abdominal CT volumes based on local intensity structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Hirose, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Nagino, Masato; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated biliary tract extraction method from abdominal CT volumes. The biliary tract is the path by which bile is transported from liver to the duodenum. No extraction method have been reported for the automated extraction of the biliary tract from common contrast CT volumes. Our method consists of three steps including: (1) extraction of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) candidate regions, (2) extraction of intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) candidate regions, and (3) combination of these candidate regions. The IHBD has linear structures and intensities of the IHBD are low in CT volumes. We use a dark linear structure enhancement (DLSE) filter based on a local intensity structure analysis method using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix for the IHBD candidate region extraction. The EHBD region is extracted using a thresholding process and a connected component analysis. In the combination process, we connect the IHBD candidate regions to each EHBD candidate region and select a bile duct region from the connected candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 22 cases of CT volumes. An average Dice coefficient of extraction result was 66.7%.

  16. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  17. High-quality RNA extraction from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryos.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Zupo, Valerio; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Fontana, Angelo; Costantini, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816) is a keystone herbivore in the Mediterranean Sea due to its ability to transform macroalgal-dominated communities into barren areas characterized by increased cover of bare substrates and encrusting coralline algae, reduced biodiversity and altered ecosystem functions. P. lividus is also an excellent animal model for toxicology, physiology and biology investigations having been used for more than a century as a model for embryological studies with synchronously developing embryos which are easy to manipulate and analyze for morphological aberrations. Despite its importance for the scientific community, the complete genome is still not fully annotated. To date, only a few molecular tools are available and a few Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies have been performed. Here we aimed at setting-up an RNA extraction method to obtain high quality and sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS from P. lividus embryos at the pluteus stage. We compared five different RNA extraction protocols from four different pools of plutei (500, 1000, 2500 and 5000 embryos): TRIzol®, and four widely-used Silica Membrane kits, GenElute™ Mammalian Total RNA Miniprep Kit, RNAqueous® Micro Kit, RNeasy® Micro Kit and Aurum™ Total RNA Mini Kit. The quantity of RNA isolated was evaluated using NanoDrop. The quality, considering the purity, was measured as A260/A280 and A260/230 ratios. The integrity was measured by RNA Integrity Number (RIN). Our results demonstrated that the most efficient procedures were GenElute, RNeasy and Aurum, producing a sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS. The Bioanalyzer profiles and RIN values revealed that the most efficient methods guaranteeing for RNA integrity were RNeasy and Aurum combined with an initial preservation in RNAlater. This research represents the first attempt to standardize a method for high-quality RNA extraction from sea urchin embryos at the pluteus stage, providing a new resource for this

  18. High-quality RNA extraction from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Zupo, Valerio; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Fontana, Angelo; Costantini, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816) is a keystone herbivore in the Mediterranean Sea due to its ability to transform macroalgal-dominated communities into barren areas characterized by increased cover of bare substrates and encrusting coralline algae, reduced biodiversity and altered ecosystem functions. P. lividus is also an excellent animal model for toxicology, physiology and biology investigations having been used for more than a century as a model for embryological studies with synchronously developing embryos which are easy to manipulate and analyze for morphological aberrations. Despite its importance for the scientific community, the complete genome is still not fully annotated. To date, only a few molecular tools are available and a few Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies have been performed. Here we aimed at setting-up an RNA extraction method to obtain high quality and sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS from P. lividus embryos at the pluteus stage. We compared five different RNA extraction protocols from four different pools of plutei (500, 1000, 2500 and 5000 embryos): TRIzol®, and four widely-used Silica Membrane kits, GenElute™ Mammalian Total RNA Miniprep Kit, RNAqueous® Micro Kit, RNeasy® Micro Kit and Aurum™ Total RNA Mini Kit. The quantity of RNA isolated was evaluated using NanoDrop. The quality, considering the purity, was measured as A260/A280 and A260/230 ratios. The integrity was measured by RNA Integrity Number (RIN). Our results demonstrated that the most efficient procedures were GenElute, RNeasy and Aurum, producing a sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS. The Bioanalyzer profiles and RIN values revealed that the most efficient methods guaranteeing for RNA integrity were RNeasy and Aurum combined with an initial preservation in RNAlater. This research represents the first attempt to standardize a method for high-quality RNA extraction from sea urchin embryos at the pluteus stage, providing a new resource for this

  19. Californian demonstration and validation of automated agricultural field extraction from multi-temporal Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial distribution of agricultural fields is a fundamental description of rural landscapes and the location and extent of fields is important to establish the area of land utilized for agricultural yield prediction, resource allocation, and for economic planning. To date, field objects have not been extracted from satellite data over large areas because of computational constraints and because consistently processed appropriate resolution data have not been available or affordable. We present a fully automated computational methodology to extract agricultural fields from 30m Web Enabled Landsat data (WELD) time series and results for approximately 250,000 square kilometers (eleven 150 x 150 km WELD tiles) encompassing all the major agricultural areas of California. The extracted fields, including rectangular, circular, and irregularly shaped fields, are evaluated by comparison with manually interpreted Landsat field objects. Validation results are presented in terms of standard confusion matrix accuracy measures and also the degree of field object over-segmentation, under-segmentation, fragmentation and shape distortion. The apparent success of the presented field extraction methodology is due to several factors. First, the use of multi-temporal Landsat data, as opposed to single Landsat acquisitions, that enables crop rotations and inter-annual variability in the state of the vegetation to be accommodated for and provides more opportunities for cloud-free, non-missing and atmospherically uncontaminated surface observations. Second, the adoption of an object based approach, namely the variational region-based geometric active contour method that enables robust segmentation with only a small number of parameters and that requires no training data collection. Third, the use of a watershed algorithm to decompose connected segments belonging to multiple fields into coherent isolated field segments and a geometry based algorithm to detect and associate parts of

  20. The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150 bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

  1. Methylation of tRNA by normal mouse liver and Erhlich ascites cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Sitz, T.O.

    1986-05-01

    When Erhlich ascites tumor and normal mouse liver extracts were incubated with (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)-S-adenosylmethionine and E. coli tRNA, the tumor extracts had a ten-fold higher methyltransferase activity than mouse liver extracts. However, only a two-fold higher methyltransferase activity was observed when methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA was used as a substrate. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of alkaline hydrolysates of methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA (tRNA isolated from mice treated with ethionine) showed 70% of the /sup 3/H-methyl groups in the mononucleotide peak and 30% in alkaline stable di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks demonstrating methylation of both the base and ribose moieties. Perchloric acid digest of material isolated from the di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks confirm that the /sup 3/H-methyl groups are on the ribose moieties. In hydrolysates of E. coli tRNA /sup 3/H-methyl groups appeared in only the mononucleotide peak, i.e. only base methylation. These data, from Erhlich ascites cells, suggest that ribose methyltransferases may have greater RNA substrate specificity than the base methyltransferases and may act processively to produce alkaline stable oligonucleotides.

  2. From clinical sample to complete genome: Comparing methods for the extraction of HIV-1 RNA for high-throughput deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Marion; Gall, Astrid; Vink, Monique; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Binter, Špela; Edwards, Stephanie; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Bakker, Margreet; Ong, Swee Hoe; Gras, Luuk; van Sighem, Ard; Bezemer, Daniela; de Wolf, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Kellam, Paul; Berkhout, Ben; Fraser, Christophe; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2016-08-04

    The BEEHIVE (Bridging the Evolution and Epidemiology of HIV in Europe) project aims to analyse nearly-complete viral genomes from >3000 HIV-1 infected Europeans using high-throughput deep sequencing techniques to investigate the virus genetic contribution to virulence. Following the development of a computational pipeline, including a new de novo assembler for RNA virus genomes, to generate larger contiguous sequences (contigs) from the abundance of short sequence reads that characterise the data, another area that determines genome sequencing success is the quality and quantity of the input RNA. A pilot experiment with 125 patient plasma samples was performed to investigate the optimal method for isolation of HIV-1 viral RNA for long amplicon genome sequencing. Manual isolation with the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini Kit (Qiagen) was superior over robotically extracted RNA using either the QIAcube robotic system, the mSample Preparation Systems RNA kit with automated extraction by the m2000sp system (Abbott Molecular), or the MagNA Pure 96 System in combination with the MagNA Pure 96 Instrument (Roche Diagnostics). We scored amplification of a set of four HIV-1 amplicons of ∼1.9, 3.6, 3.0 and 3.5kb, and subsequent recovery of near-complete viral genomes. Subsequently, 616 BEEHIVE patient samples were analysed to determine factors that influence successful amplification of the genome in four overlapping amplicons using the QIAamp Viral RNA Kit for viral RNA isolation. Both low plasma viral load and high sample age (stored before 1999) negatively influenced the amplification of viral amplicons >3kb. A plasma viral load of >100,000 copies/ml resulted in successful amplification of all four amplicons for 86% of the samples, this value dropped to only 46% for samples with viral loads of <20,000 copies/ml.

  3. A new automated spectral feature extraction method and its application in spectral classification and defective spectra recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Guo, Ping; Luo, A.-Li

    2017-03-01

    Spectral feature extraction is a crucial procedure in automated spectral analysis. This procedure starts from the spectral data and produces informative and non-redundant features, facilitating the subsequent automated processing and analysis with machine-learning and data-mining techniques. In this paper, we present a new automated feature extraction method for astronomical spectra, with application in spectral classification and defective spectra recovery. The basic idea of our approach is to train a deep neural network to extract features of spectra with different levels of abstraction in different layers. The deep neural network is trained with a fast layer-wise learning algorithm in an analytical way without any iterative optimization procedure. We evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme on real-world spectral data. The results demonstrate that our method is superior regarding its comprehensive performance, and the computational cost is significantly lower than that for other methods. The proposed method can be regarded as a new valid alternative general-purpose feature extraction method for various tasks in spectral data analysis.

  4. A comparison of methods for forensic DNA extraction: Chelex-100® and the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit (manual and automated).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kirsty; McCallum, Nicola; Welch, Lindsey

    2012-03-01

    Efficient isolation of DNA from a sample is the basis for successful forensic DNA profiling. There are many DNA extraction methods available and they vary in their ability to efficiently extract the DNA; as well as in processing time, operator intervention, contamination risk and ease of use. In recent years, automated robots have been made available which speed up processing time and decrease the amount of operator input. This project was set up to investigate the efficiency of three DNA extraction methods, two manual (Chelex(®)-100 and the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit) and one automated (QIAcube), using both buccal cells and blood stains as the DNA source. Extracted DNA was quantified using real-time PCR in order to assess the amount of DNA present in each sample. Selected samples were then amplified using AmpFlSTR SGM Plus amplification kit. The results suggested that there was no statistical difference between results gained for the different methods investigated, but the automated QIAcube robot made sample processing much simpler and quicker without introducing DNA contamination.

  5. How Severely Is DNA Quantification Hampered by RNA Co-extraction?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ignacio; Remm, Matthieu; Frasquilho, Sonia; Betsou, Fay; Mathieson, William

    2015-10-01

    The optional RNase digest that is part of many DNA extraction protocols is often omitted, either because RNase is not provided in the kit or because users do not want to risk contaminating their laboratory. Consequently, co-eluting RNA can become a "contaminant" of unknown magnitude in a DNA extraction. We extracted DNA from liver, lung, kidney, and heart tissues and established that 28-52% of the "DNA" as assessed by spectrophotometry is actually RNA (depending on tissue type). Including an RNase digest in the extraction protocol reduced 260:280 purity ratios. Co-eluting RNA drives an overestimation of DNA yield when quantification is carried out using OD 260 nm spectrophotometry, or becomes an unquantified contaminant when spectrofluorometry is used for DNA quantification. This situation is potentially incompatible with the best practice guidelines for biobanks issued by organizations such as the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, which state that biospecimens should be accurately characterized in terms of their identity, purity, concentration, and integrity. Consequently, we conclude that an RNase digest must be included in DNA extractions if pure DNA is required. We also discuss the implications of unquantified RNA contamination in DNA samples in the context of laboratory accreditation schemes.

  6. In vitro RNA editing-like activity in a mitochondrial extract from Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed Central

    Frech, G C; Bakalara, N; Simpson, L; Simpson, A M

    1995-01-01

    A mitochondrial extract from Leishmania tarentolae directs the incorporation of uridylate (U) residues within the pre-edited domain of synthetic cytochrome b (CYb) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 7 mRNA. This has several characteristics of an in vitro RNA editing activity, but no direct evidence for involvement of guide RNAs was obtained. Inhibition by micrococcal nuclease suggests a requirement for some type of endogenous RNA. The limitation of internal U-incorporation to the pre-edited region in the CYb mRNA and the inhibition by deletion or substitution of both mRNA anchor sequences for CYb gRNA-I and -II could be consistent either with a gRNA-mediated process or a secondary structure-mediated process. A low level of incorporation of [alpha-32P]CTP occurs at the same sites as UTP. Internal U-incorporation activity is selectively inhibited by heterologous RNAs, suggesting an involvement of low affinity RNA-binding proteins which can be competed by the added RNA. Images PMID:7828590

  7. Sensitivity testing of trypanosome detection by PCR from whole blood samples using manual and automated DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, J; Thompson, C K; Godfrey, S S; Thompson, R C A

    2014-11-01

    Automated extraction of DNA for testing of laboratory samples is an attractive alternative to labour-intensive manual methods when higher throughput is required. However, it is important to maintain the maximum detection sensitivity possible to reduce the occurrence of type II errors (false negatives; failure to detect the target when it is present), especially in the biomedical field, where PCR is used for diagnosis. We used blood infected with known concentrations of Trypanosoma copemani to test the impact of analysis techniques on trypanosome detection sensitivity by PCR. We compared combinations of a manual and an automated DNA extraction method and two different PCR primer sets to investigate the impact of each on detection levels. Both extraction techniques and specificity of primer sets had a significant impact on detection sensitivity. Samples extracted using the same DNA extraction technique performed substantially differently for each of the separate primer sets. Type I errors (false positives; detection of the target when it is not present), produced by contaminants, were avoided with both extraction methods. This study highlights the importance of testing laboratory techniques with known samples to optimise accuracy of test results.

  8. Development of an RNA extraction protocol for detection of waterborne viruses by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR).

    PubMed

    Jothikumar, N; Sobsey, M D; Cromeans, T L

    2010-10-01

    RNA extraction from environmental samples yields frequently an RNA preparation containing inhibitors of molecular reactions. Commercial RNA extraction kits commonly permit extraction of only 0.1-0.2 ml sample volume. An RNA extraction buffer (RNAX buffer) was formulated for the extraction of viral RNA from 4.0 ml using a silica column based protocol. To evaluate the RNAX buffer based protocol, we used hepatitis A virus (HAV) and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) to monitor the RNA extraction efficiency from environmental samples. For evaluation of viral RNA recovery from water concentrates which were prepared from river and pond water by PEG concentration, serial ten fold dilutions of two waterborne viruses were added to the water concentrates for evaluation by quantitative detection. Quantitative recovery of HAV and CVB3 was determined by reverse transcriptase quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). The extracted RNA was compatible with RT-qPCR and sensitivity of detection of 0.8PFU per reaction was found with RNAX buffer and the developed protocol. This level of sensitivity was obtained using viral RNA extracted from 4.0 ml of an inoculated water sample concentrate. The RNAX buffer developed in this study could be applicable to the detection of other pathogens in water and food.

  9. Rapid and Semi-Automated Extraction of Neuronal Cell Bodies and Nuclei from Electron Microscopy Image Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Paul S.; Morehead, Michael; Doretto, Gianfranco; Chen, Peter; Berg, Stuart; Plaza, Stephen; Spirou, George

    2016-01-01

    Connectomics—the study of how neurons wire together in the brain—is at the forefront of modern neuroscience research. However, many connectomics studies are limited by the time and precision needed to correctly segment large volumes of electron microscopy (EM) image data. We present here a semi-automated segmentation pipeline using freely available software that can significantly decrease segmentation time for extracting both nuclei and cell bodies from EM image volumes. PMID:27259933

  10. Comparison of RNA Extraction Methods for Molecular Analysis of Oral Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Padín-Iruegas, Maria-Elena; Reboiras-López, Maria Dolores; Suarez-Peńaranda, José Manuel; López-López, Rafael; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; García-García, Abel; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2016-01-01

    Objective of work The aim of this study was to compare three methods of RNA extraction for molecular analysis of oral cytology to establish the best technique, considering its concentration and purity for molecular tests of oral lesions such as real-time reverse transcriptase reaction. Material and methods The sample included exfoliative cytology from the oral cavity mucosa of patients with no visible clinical changes, using Orcellex Rovers Brush®. The extraction of total RNA was performed using the following three techniques: 30 samples were extracted by Trizol® technique, 30 by the Direct-zolTM RNA Miniprep system and 30 by the RNeasy mini Kit. The absorbance was measured by spectrophotometer to estimate the purity. The estimated RNA concentration was obtained by multiplying the value of A260 (ng/mL) by 40. Statistical analysis of the obtained data was performed using GraphPad Prism 5.03 software with Student t, analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests, considering p ≤0.05. Results Trizol® group revealed higher average concentration, followed by Direct-zolTM and Rneasy group. It was observed that the RNA Direct-zolTM group had the highest purity, followed by RNeasy and Trizol® groups, allowing for the two ratios. Conclusion Considering all aspects, concentration, purity and time spent in the procedures, the Direct-zolTM group showed the best results. PMID:27789907

  11. High quality RNA extraction from Maqui berry for its application in next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Carolina; Villacreses, Javier; Blanc, Noelle; Espinoza, Loreto; Martinez, Camila; Pastor, Gabriela; Manque, Patricio; Undurraga, Soledad F; Polanco, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Maqui berry (Aristotelia chilensis) is a native Chilean species that produces berries that are exceptionally rich in anthocyanins and natural antioxidants. These natural compounds provide an array of health benefits for humans, making them very desirable in a fruit. At the same time, these substances also interfere with nucleic acid preparations, making RNA extraction from Maqui berry a major challenge. Our group established a method for RNA extraction of Maqui berry with a high quality RNA (good purity, good integrity and higher yield). This procedure is based on the adapted CTAB method using high concentrations of PVP (4 %) and β-mercaptoethanol (4 %) and spermidine in the extraction buffer. These reagents help to remove contaminants such as polysaccharides, proteins, phenols and also prevent the oxidation of phenolic compounds. The high quality of RNA isolated through this method allowed its uses with success in molecular applications for this endemic Chilean fruit, such as differential expression analysis of RNA-Seq data using next generation sequencing (NGS). Furthermore, we consider that our method could potentially be used for other plant species with extremely high levels of antioxidants and anthocyanins.

  12. An Optimized Method for Extracting Bacterial RNA from Mouse Skin Tissue Colonized by Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Robbe-Saule, Marie; Babonneau, Jérémie; Sismeiro, Odile; Marsollier, Laurent; Marion, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial transcriptome analyses during host colonization are essential to decipher the complexity of the relationship between the bacterium and its host. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a promising approach providing valuable information about bacterial adaptation, the host response and, in some cases, mutual tolerance underlying crosstalk, as recently observed in the context of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. Buruli ulcer is caused by M. ulcerans. This neglected disease is the third most common mycobacterial disease worldwide. Without treatment, M. ulcerans provokes massive skin ulcers. A healing process may be observed in 5% of Buruli ulcer patients several months after the initiation of disease. This spontaneous healing process suggests that some hosts can counteract the development of the lesions caused by M. ulcerans. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in this process should open up new treatment possibilities. To this end, we recently developed the first mouse model for studies of the spontaneous healing process. We have shown that the healing process is based on mutual tolerance between the bacterium and its host. In this context, RNA-seq seems to be the most appropriate method for deciphering bacterial adaptation. However, due to the low bacterial load in host tissues, the isolation of mycobacterial RNA from skin tissue for RNA-seq analysis remains challenging. We developed a method for extracting and purifying mycobacterial RNA whilst minimizing the amount of host RNA in the sample. This approach was based on the extraction of bacterial RNA by a differential lysis method. The challenge in the development of this method was the choice of a lysis system favoring the removal of host RNA without damage to the bacterial cells. We made use of the thick, resistant cell wall of M. ulcerans to achieve this end.

  13. An Optimized Method for Extracting Bacterial RNA from Mouse Skin Tissue Colonized by Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Robbe-Saule, Marie; Babonneau, Jérémie; Sismeiro, Odile; Marsollier, Laurent; Marion, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial transcriptome analyses during host colonization are essential to decipher the complexity of the relationship between the bacterium and its host. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a promising approach providing valuable information about bacterial adaptation, the host response and, in some cases, mutual tolerance underlying crosstalk, as recently observed in the context of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. Buruli ulcer is caused by M. ulcerans. This neglected disease is the third most common mycobacterial disease worldwide. Without treatment, M. ulcerans provokes massive skin ulcers. A healing process may be observed in 5% of Buruli ulcer patients several months after the initiation of disease. This spontaneous healing process suggests that some hosts can counteract the development of the lesions caused by M. ulcerans. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in this process should open up new treatment possibilities. To this end, we recently developed the first mouse model for studies of the spontaneous healing process. We have shown that the healing process is based on mutual tolerance between the bacterium and its host. In this context, RNA-seq seems to be the most appropriate method for deciphering bacterial adaptation. However, due to the low bacterial load in host tissues, the isolation of mycobacterial RNA from skin tissue for RNA-seq analysis remains challenging. We developed a method for extracting and purifying mycobacterial RNA whilst minimizing the amount of host RNA in the sample. This approach was based on the extraction of bacterial RNA by a differential lysis method. The challenge in the development of this method was the choice of a lysis system favoring the removal of host RNA without damage to the bacterial cells. We made use of the thick, resistant cell wall of M. ulcerans to achieve this end. PMID:28392785

  14. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  15. Development of a low resource RNA extraction cassette based on surface tension valves

    PubMed Central

    Bordelon, Hali; Adams, Nicholas M.; Klemm, Amy S.; Russ, Patricia K.; Williams, John V.; Talbot, H. Keipp; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostics are highly sensitive and specific, but are easily disrupted by the presence of interferents in biological samples. In a laboratory or hospital setting, the influence of these interferents can be minimized using an RNA or DNA extraction procedure prior to analysis. However, in low resource settings, limited access to specialized instrumentation and trained personnel presents challenges that impede sample preparation. We have developed a self-contained nucleic acid extraction cassette suitable for operation in a low resource setting. This simple design contains processing solutions preloaded within a continuous length of 1.6 mm inner diameter Tygon tubing. Processing solutions are separated by air gaps and held in place during processing by the surface tension forces at the liquid-air interface, viz. surface tension valves. Nucleic acids preferentially adsorbed to silica-coated magnetic particles are separated from sample interferents by using an external magnet to transfer the nucleic acid biomarker through successive solutions to precipitate, wash and elute in the final cassette solution. The efficiency of the extraction cassette was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) following extraction of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) RNA. RNA was recovered from TE buffer or from lysates of RSV infected HEp-2 cells with 55 and 33% efficiency, respectively, of the Qiagen RNeasy kit. Recovery of RSV RNA from RSV infected HEp-2 cells was similar at 30% of the RNeasy kit. An overall limit of detection after extraction was determined to be nearly identical (97.5%) to a laboratory-based commercially available kit. These results indicate that this extraction cassette design has the potential to be an effective sample preparation device suitable for use in a low resource setting. PMID:21604768

  16. A high-throughput RNA extraction for sprouted single-seed malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) rich in polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germinated seed from cereal crops including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is an important tissue to extract RNA and analyze expression levels of genes that control aspects of germination. These tissues are rich in polysaccharides and most methods for RNA extraction are not suitable to handle the exces...

  17. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA for RT-PCR from starchy rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Belefant-Miller, Helen; Ledbetter, Cindy; Bennett, Selester

    2008-03-01

    The extraction of RNA from a starchy plant material, such as many common food grains, is difficult, and especially so from the mature endosperm of rice. Most commercial RNA kits are not suitable for starchy materials. Traditional RNA extraction procedures, in addition to being laborious and time consuming, leave hazardous organic wastes that result in expensive disposal costs. Interestingly, the numerous commercial DNA isolation kits now available often include directions for eliminating co-isolated RNA. This indicated an approach to obtain the generally unwanted RNA by-product by treating the total extraction product to intentionally retain RNA. A method was developed by which a two-step DNase procedure was applied to the product of the Cartagen Food DNA extraction kit that eliminated the DNA but left the co-extracted RNA. This modified procedure was compared with several other commercial and standard methods that are promoted as being able to work under high polysaccharide conditions. Successful extraction was determined by the production and amplification of cDNA by RT-PCR of actin. Extraction was successful from milled rice, as well as from cornmeal and wheat flour. The modification provides an RNA extraction method that is quick, easy, and inexpensive, and also eliminates the production of hazardous wastes.

  18. RNA Chromogenic in situ Hybridization Assay with Clinical Automated Platform is a Sensitive Method in Detecting High-risk Human Papillomavirus in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Pena, Javier E; Sadow, Peter M; Nose, Vania; Hoang, Mai P

    2017-03-13

    Detection of active human papillomavirus (HPV) is clinically important, as its presence has been shown to correlate with favorable clinical outcomes and better response to treatment in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Using a clinical automated platform, we compared the performance of commercially available HPV DNA and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) probes in archival tissues of 57 SCC. Importantly, a clinical automated platform gives 1) consistent and reproducible results for HPV ISH and 2) better standardization across clinical laboratories. Compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results, RNA ISH exhibited 93% concordance versus 81% of DNA ISH. RNA ISH was more sensitive than DNA ISH (100% versus 88%), and more specific (87% versus 74%). When only accounting for 2-3+ positivity, sensitivity was 92% for RNA ISH versus 73% for DNA ISH, highlighting the ease of interpretation. p16 exhibited 96% sensitivity while specificity was only 55%. In 3 cases both RNA and DNA ISH were positive while PCR results were negative, suggesting that ISH methods might be a more sensitive method. Performing on a clinical automated platform, RNA ISH is sensitive in determining high-risk HPV status in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and has the potential of being a standalone clinical test.

  19. RNA sequencing using fluorescent-labeled dideoxynucleotides and automated fluorescence detection.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, G J

    1990-01-01

    Although dideoxy terminated sequencing of RNA, using reverse transcriptase and oligodeoxynucleotide primers, is now a well established method, the accuracy is limited by sequence ambiguities due to unspecific chain termination events. A protocol is described which circumvents these ambiguities by using fluorescence labels tagged to dideoxynucleotides. Only chain terminations caused by dideoxynucleotides were detected while premature terminated cDNA's remain undetectable. In addition, the remaining multiple signals at nucleotide positions can be assigned to sequence heterogeneities within the RNA sequence to be determined. Images PMID:1690393

  20. OPTIMISATION OF TOTAL RNA EXTRACTION FROM BOVINE OOCYTES AND EMBRYOS FOR GENE EXPRESSION STUDIES AND EFFECTS OF CRYOPROTECTANTS ON TOTAL RNA EXTRACTION.

    PubMed

    Pavani, K C; Baron, E E; Faheem, M; Chaveiro, A; Da Silva, F Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is required for understanding bovine oocytes meiotic maturation as well as the potential of embryonic development. In the present study a standardized reagent protocol for total RNA extraction was designed for bovine oocytes and embryos, which is considered specific and less expensive. For such purpose oocytes (n = 795) recovered from about 80 ovaries were divided in three groups: Group 1 modified Trizol (MTP, n = 355); Group 2 Guanidinium thiocyanate protocol (GNTC, n = 140) and Group 3 Commercial Kit protocol (CKP, n = 60). Oocytes belonging to group 1 (n = 100) and 3 (n = 20) were subjected to vitrification using two cryoprotectants 1,2 propandiol (PROH) or Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The 240 remaining oocytes were divided into 3 groups in which 100 were used, in fresh, for in vitro fertilization, and 140 oocytes were vitrified using PROH (n = 70) and DMSO (n = 70) as cryoprotectants, being then fertilized in vitro after thawing. Embryos were used nine days after fertilization. Gene amplification (SDHA, (GAPDH and DNMT1) was performed in oocytes, and gene quantification (DNMT1) in in vitro produced embryos at the stage of blastocyst (n = 10). Efficiency of the extraction was further compared. The purity of all samples to different protocols ranged from 1.10 to 1.25 for GNTC protocol; from 2.05 to 2.63 for the CKP and from 1.50 to 2.11 for the developed MTP, being the last one nearest to the expected purity levels for RNA samples (1.7 to 2.0). On average, for 30 fresh oocytes, from spectrophotometer readings, total RNA concentration was 127.8 ± 9.3 ng μl(-1) for MTP, against 46.4 ± 9.5 ng μl(-1) from CKP and 476 ± 12.9 ng μl(-1) for GNTC protocol. Using the MTP to evaluate RNA in 30 vitrified/thawed oocytes, resulted in a total RNA concentration of 61.3 ± 3.3 ng μl(-1) and 40.0 μ 12.4 ng μ(-1), respectively for DMSO and PROH. Regarding total RNA concentration and purity, in blastocyst stage, more purity was observed in DMSO as compared to

  1. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  2. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes.

  3. A High-Throughput RNA Extraction for Sprouted Single-Seed Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Rich in Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Abdur; Baldwin, Thomas; Gines, Michael; Bregitzer, Phil; Esvelt Klos, Kathy

    2016-12-22

    Germinated seed from cereal crops including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is an important tissue to extract RNA and analyze expression levels of genes that control aspects of germination. These tissues are rich in polysaccharides and most methods for RNA extraction are not suitable to handle the excess polysaccharides. Here, we compare the current methods for RNA extraction applicable to germinated barley tissue. We found that although some of these standard methods produced high-quality RNA, the process of extraction was drastically slow, mostly because the frozen seed tissue powder from liquid N₂ grinding became recalcitrant to buffer mixing. Our suggested modifications to the protocols removed the need for liquid N₂ grinding and significantly increased the output efficiency of RNA extraction. Our modified protocol has applications in other cereal tissues rich in polysaccharides, including oat.

  4. A High-Throughput RNA Extraction for Sprouted Single-Seed Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Rich in Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Abdur; Baldwin, Thomas; Gines, Michael; Bregitzer, Phil; Esvelt Klos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Germinated seed from cereal crops including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is an important tissue to extract RNA and analyze expression levels of genes that control aspects of germination. These tissues are rich in polysaccharides and most methods for RNA extraction are not suitable to handle the excess polysaccharides. Here, we compare the current methods for RNA extraction applicable to germinated barley tissue. We found that although some of these standard methods produced high-quality RNA, the process of extraction was drastically slow, mostly because the frozen seed tissue powder from liquid N2 grinding became recalcitrant to buffer mixing. Our suggested modifications to the protocols removed the need for liquid N2 grinding and significantly increased the output efficiency of RNA extraction. Our modified protocol has applications in other cereal tissues rich in polysaccharides, including oat. PMID:28025509

  5. Method for RNA extraction and cDNA library construction from microbes in crop rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changxun; Xu, Tiecheng; Ye, Changliang; Huang, Likun; Wang, Qingshui; Lin, Wenxiong

    2014-02-01

    Techniques to analyze the transcriptome of the soil rhizosphere are essential to reveal the interactions and communications between plants and microorganisms in the soil ecosystem. In this study, different volumes of Al₂(SO₄)₃ were added to rhizosphere soil samples to precipitate humic substances, which interfere with most procedures of RNA and DNA analyses. After humic substances were precipitated, cells of soil microorganisms were broken by vortexing with glass beads, and then DNA and RNA were recovered using Tris-HCl buffer with LiCl, SDS, and EDTA. The crude extract was precipitated and dissolved in RNAse-free water, and then separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. We determined the optimum volume of Al₂(SO₄)₃ for treating rhizosphere soil of rice, tobacco, sugarcane, Rehmannia glutinosa, and Pseudostellaria heterophylla. The crude nucleic acids extract from rice soil was treated with DNase I and then RNA was purified using a gel filtration column. The purified RNA was reverse-transcribed into single-strand cDNA and then ligated with an adaptor at each end before amplifying ds cDNA. The ds cDNA was sub-cloned for subsequent gene sequence analysis. We conducted qPCR to amplify 16S ribosomal DNA and observed highly efficient amplification. These results show that the extraction method can be optimized to isolate and obtain high-quality nucleic acids from microbes in different rhizosphere soils, suitable for genomic and post-genomic analyses.

  6. A System for Automated Extraction of Metadata from Scanned Documents using Layout Recognition and String Pattern Search Models.

    PubMed

    Misra, Dharitri; Chen, Siyuan; Thoma, George R

    2009-01-01

    One of the most expensive aspects of archiving digital documents is the manual acquisition of context-sensitive metadata useful for the subsequent discovery of, and access to, the archived items. For certain types of textual documents, such as journal articles, pamphlets, official government records, etc., where the metadata is contained within the body of the documents, a cost effective method is to identify and extract the metadata in an automated way, applying machine learning and string pattern search techniques.At the U. S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) we have developed an automated metadata extraction (AME) system that employs layout classification and recognition models with a metadata pattern search model for a text corpus with structured or semi-structured information. A combination of Support Vector Machine and Hidden Markov Model is used to create the layout recognition models from a training set of the corpus, following which a rule-based metadata search model is used to extract the embedded metadata by analyzing the string patterns within and surrounding each field in the recognized layouts.In this paper, we describe the design of our AME system, with focus on the metadata search model. We present the extraction results for a historic collection from the Food and Drug Administration, and outline how the system may be adapted for similar collections. Finally, we discuss some ongoing enhancements to our AME system.

  7. A novel automated device for rapid nucleic acid extraction utilizing a zigzag motion of magnetic silica beads.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Uehara, Masayuki; Honda, Takayuki; Saito, Yasunori

    2016-02-04

    We report a novel automated device for nucleic acid extraction, which consists of a mechanical control system and a disposable cassette. The cassette is composed of a bottle, a capillary tube, and a chamber. After sample injection in the bottle, the sample is lysed, and nucleic acids are adsorbed on the surface of magnetic silica beads. These magnetic beads are transported and are vibrated through the washing reagents in the capillary tube under the control of the mechanical control system, and thus, the nucleic acid is purified without centrifugation. The purified nucleic acid is automatically extracted in 3 min for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The nucleic acid extraction is dependent on the transport speed and the vibration frequency of the magnetic beads, and optimizing these two parameters provided better PCR efficiency than the conventional manual procedure. There was no difference between the detection limits of our novel device and that of the conventional manual procedure. We have already developed the droplet-PCR machine, which can amplify and detect specific nucleic acids rapidly and automatically. Connecting the droplet-PCR machine to our novel automated extraction device enables PCR analysis within 15 min, and this system can be made available as a point-of-care testing in clinics as well as general hospitals.

  8. Extracting microRNA-gene relations from biomedical literature using distant supervision

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical relation extraction approaches are based on supervised machine learning, requiring an annotated corpus. Distant supervision aims at training a classifier by combining a knowledge base with a corpus, reducing the amount of manual effort necessary. This is particularly useful for biomedicine because many databases and ontologies have been made available for many biological processes, while the availability of annotated corpora is still limited. We studied the extraction of microRNA-gene relations from text. MicroRNA regulation is an important biological process due to its close association with human diseases. The proposed method, IBRel, is based on distantly supervised multi-instance learning. We evaluated IBRel on three datasets, and the results were compared with a co-occurrence approach as well as a supervised machine learning algorithm. While supervised learning outperformed on two of those datasets, IBRel obtained an F-score 28.3 percentage points higher on the dataset for which there was no training set developed specifically. To demonstrate the applicability of IBRel, we used it to extract 27 miRNA-gene relations from recently published papers about cystic fibrosis. Our results demonstrate that our method can be successfully used to extract relations from literature about a biological process without an annotated corpus. The source code and data used in this study are available at https://github.com/AndreLamurias/IBRel. PMID:28263989

  9. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  10. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  11. A Modified Protocol for High-Quality RNA Extraction from Oleoresin-Producing Adult Pines.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Júlio César; Füller, Thanise Nogueira; de Costa, Fernanda; Rodrigues-Corrêa, Kelly C S; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-01-01

    RNA extraction resulting in good yields and quality is a fundamental step for the analyses of transcriptomes through high-throughput sequencing technologies, microarray, and also northern blots, RT-PCR, and RTqPCR. Even though many specific protocols designed for plants with high content of secondary metabolites have been developed, these are often expensive, time consuming, and not suitable for a wide range of tissues. Here we present a modification of the method previously described using the commercially available Concert™ Plant RNA Reagent (Invitrogen) buffer for field-grown adult pine trees with high oleoresin content.

  12. Optimizing preservation protocols to extract high-quality RNA from different tissues of echinoderms for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Portela, Rocío; Riesgo, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Transcriptomic information provides fundamental insights into biological processes. Extraction of quality RNA is a challenging step, and preservation and extraction protocols need to be adjusted in many cases. Our objectives were to optimize preservation protocols for isolation of high-quality RNA from diverse echinoderm tissues and to compare the utility of parameters as absorbance ratios and RIN values to assess RNA quality. Three different tissues (gonad, oesophagus and coelomocytes) were selected from the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Solid tissues were flash-frozen and stored at -80 °C until processed. Four preservation treatments were applied to coelomocytes: flash freezing and storage at -80 °C, RNAlater and storage at -20 °C, preservation in TRIzol reagent and storage at -80 °C and direct extraction with TRIzol from fresh cells. Extractions of total RNA were performed with a modified TRIzol protocol for all tissues. Our results showed high values of RNA quantity and quality for all tissues, showing nonsignificant differences among them. However, while flash freezing was effective for solid tissues, it was inadequate for coelomocytes because of the low quality of the RNA extractions. Coelomocytes preserved in RNAlater displayed large variability in RNA integrity and insufficient RNA amount for further isolation of mRNA. TRIzol was the most efficient system for stabilizing RNA which resulted on high RNA quality and quantity. We did not detect correlation between absorbance ratios and RNA integrity. The best strategies for assessing RNA integrity was the visualization of 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA bands in agarose gels and estimation of RIN values with Agilent Bioanalyzer chips.

  13. Mixed-mode isolation of triazine metabolites from soil and aquifer sediments using automated solid-phase extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Reversed-phase isolation and ion-exchange purification were combined in the automated solid-phase extraction of two polar s-triazine metabolites, 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (deethylatrazine) and 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-s-triazine (deisopropylatrazine) from clay-loam and slit-loam soils and sandy aquifer sediments. First, methanol/ water (4/1, v/v) soil extracts were transferred to an automated workstation following evaporation of the methanol phase for the rapid reversed-phase isolation of the metabolites on an octadecylresin (C18). The retention of the triazine metabolites on C18 decreased substantially when trace methanol concentrations (1%) remained. Furthermore, the retention on C18 increased with decreasing aqueous solubility and increasing alkyl-chain length of the metabolites and parent herbicides, indicating a reversed-phase interaction. The analytes were eluted with ethyl acetate, which left much of the soil organic-matter impurities on the resin. Second, the small-volume organic eluate was purified on an anion-exchange resin (0.5 mL/min) to extract the remaining soil pigments that could foul the ion source of the GC/MS system. Recoveries of the analytes were 75%, using deuterated atrazine as a surrogate, and were comparable to recoveries by soxhlet extraction. The detection limit was 0.1 ??g/kg with a coefficient of variation of 15%. The ease and efficiency of this automated method makes it viable, practical technique for studying triazine metabolites in the environment.

  14. mRNA-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from human tissue extracts.

    PubMed

    Hurteau, Gregory J; Spivack, Simon D

    2002-08-15

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has become the method of choice for detection of mRNA transcripts, including those of low abundance obtained from small precious samples of human tissue. A major confounding problem for standard reverse-transcription-priming strategies is the presence of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA) carried over from the original "RNA" extract into the RT and PCR steps. The contaminating gDNA contains a processed pseudogene sequence-which lacks introns but contains a poly(A) tail-for commonly studied internal reference genes beta-actin and GAPDH, and target genes GSTM1, GSTP1, and others. These pseudogene sequences therefore confound standard-design "RNA-specific" PCR primer pairs which rely, for cDNA versus gDNA specificity, on the pair-spanning introns, or one of the individual primer oligos spanning an exon/exon splice site, because these features are lacking in processed pseudogene sequences. The result is false RT-PCR positives for these "housekeeper" genes in total RNA extracts; the gDNA processed pseudogene is mistaken for mRNA gene transcript. A universal RT primer has been designed that targets the poly(A) tail of mRNA and adds a unique tag sequence not otherwise existing in the human genome. Genomic DNA does not incorporate this RT-inserted unique tag. PCR is then performed using a transcript-specific forward primer and a reverse primer that is identical to the unique tag incorporated at RT. Only cDNA made with this RT primer is compatible with this reverse PCR primer, thus eliminating confounding signal from contaminating gDNA. This method performs RNA-specific qualitative and quantitative evaluation of gene expression, while preserving the sensitivity of standard RT-PCR techniques. Applications to low-copy transcripts in human samples are demonstrated.

  15. Semi-automated extraction of landslides in Taiwan based on SPOT imagery and DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisank, Clemens; Hölbling, Daniel; Friedl, Barbara; Chen, Yi-Chin; Chang, Kang-Tsung

    2014-05-01

    The vast availability and improved quality of optical satellite data and digital elevation models (DEMs), as well as the need for complete and up-to-date landslide inventories at various spatial scales have fostered the development of semi-automated landslide recognition systems. Among the tested approaches for designing such systems, object-based image analysis (OBIA) stepped out to be a highly promising methodology. OBIA offers a flexible, spatially enabled framework for effective landslide mapping. Most object-based landslide mapping systems, however, have been tailored to specific, mainly small-scale study areas or even to single landslides only. Even though reported mapping accuracies tend to be higher than for pixel-based approaches, accuracy values are still relatively low and depend on the particular study. There is still room to improve the applicability and objectivity of object-based landslide mapping systems. The presented study aims at developing a knowledge-based landslide mapping system implemented in an OBIA environment, i.e. Trimble eCognition. In comparison to previous knowledge-based approaches, the classification of segmentation-derived multi-scale image objects relies on digital landslide signatures. These signatures hold the common operational knowledge on digital landslide mapping, as reported by 25 Taiwanese landslide experts during personal semi-structured interviews. Specifically, the signatures include information on commonly used data layers, spectral and spatial features, and feature thresholds. The signatures guide the selection and implementation of mapping rules that were finally encoded in Cognition Network Language (CNL). Multi-scale image segmentation is optimized by using the improved Estimation of Scale Parameter (ESP) tool. The approach described above is developed and tested for mapping landslides in a sub-region of the Baichi catchment in Northern Taiwan based on SPOT imagery and a high-resolution DEM. An object

  16. Metal-organic framework mixed-matrix disks: Versatile supports for automated solid-phase extraction prior to chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Font Picó, Maria Francesca; Salehinia, Shima; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Maya, Fernando; Berlier, Gloria; Saraji, Mohammad; Cerdà, Víctor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma

    2017-03-10

    We present for the first time the application of metal-organic framework (MOF) mixed-matrix disks (MMD) for the automated flow-through solid-phase extraction (SPE) of environmental pollutants. Zirconium terephthalate UiO-66 and UiO-66-NH2 MOFs with different size (90, 200 and 300nm) have been incorporated into mechanically stable polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) disks. The performance of the MOF-MMDs for automated SPE of seven substituted phenols prior to HPLC analysis has been evaluated using the sequential injection analysis technique. MOF-MMDs enabled the simultaneous extraction of phenols with the concomitant size exclusion of molecules of larger size. The best extraction performance was obtained using a MOF-MMD containing 90nm UiO-66-NH2 crystals. Using the selected MOF-MMD, detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 0.2μgL(-1) were obtained. Relative standard deviations ranged from 3.9 to 5.3% intra-day, and 4.7-5.7% inter-day. Membrane batch-to-batch reproducibility was from 5.2 to 6.4%. Three different groundwater samples were analyzed with the proposed method using MOF-MMDs, obtaining recoveries ranging from 90 to 98% for all tested analytes.

  17. Modified CTAB and TRIzol protocols improve RNA extraction from chemically complex Embryophyta1

    PubMed Central

    Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid E.; Chanderbali, Andre S.; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Here we present a series of protocols for RNA extraction across a diverse array of plants; we focus on woody, aromatic, aquatic, and other chemically complex taxa. Methods and Results: Ninety-one taxa were subjected to RNA extraction with three methods presented here: (1) TRIzol/TURBO DNA-free kits using the manufacturer’s protocol with the addition of sarkosyl; (2) a combination method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and TRIzol/sarkosyl/TURBO DNA-free; and (3) a combination of CTAB and QIAGEN RNeasy Plant Mini Kit. Bench-ready protocols are given. Conclusions: After an iterative process of working with chemically complex taxa, we conclude that the use of TRIzol supplemented with sarkosyl and the TURBO DNA-free kit is an effective, efficient, and robust method for obtaining RNA from 100 mg of leaf tissue of land plant species (Embryophyta) examined. Our protocols can be used to provide RNA of suitable stability, quantity, and quality for transcriptome sequencing. PMID:25995975

  18. HIV Viral RNA Extraction in Wax Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension (IFAST) Devices

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; LaVanway, Alex J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Anderson, Meghan A.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of viral load is critical for proper management of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive patients. Unfortunately, in the developing world, significant economic and geographical barriers exist, limiting access to this test. The complexity of current viral load assays makes them expensive and their access limited to advanced facilities. We attempted to address these limitations by replacing conventional RNA extraction, one of the essential processes in viral load quantitation, with a simplified technique known as immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). Furthermore, these devices were produced via the embossing of wax, enabling local populations to produce and dispose of their own devices with minimal training or infrastructure, potentially reducing the total assay cost. In addition, IFAST can be used to reduce cold chain dependence during transportation. Viral RNA extracted from raw samples stored at 37°C for 1 week exhibited nearly complete degradation. However, IFAST-purified RNA could be stored at 37°C for 1 week without significant loss. These data suggest that RNA isolated at the point of care (eg, in a rural clinic) via IFAST could be shipped to a central laboratory for quantitative RT-PCR without a cold chain. Using this technology, we have demonstrated accurate and repeatable measurements of viral load on samples with as low as 50 copies per milliliter of sample. PMID:24613822

  19. miRNA assays in the clinical laboratory: workflow, detection technologies and automation aspects.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Andreas; Keller, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Their differential abundance is indicative or even causative for a variety of pathological processes including cancer or cardiovascular disorders. Due to their important biological function, miRNAs represent a promising class of novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose life-threatening diseases, and to monitor disease progression. Further, they may guide treatment selection or dosage of drugs. miRNAs from blood or derived fractions are particularly interesting candidates for routine laboratory applications, as they can be measured in most clinical laboratories already today. This assures a good accessibility of respective tests. Albeit their great potential, miRNA-based diagnostic tests have not made their way yet into the clinical routine, and hence no standardized workflows have been established to measure miRNAs for patients' benefit. In this review we summarize the detection technologies and workflow options that exist to measure miRNAs, and we describe the advantages and disadvantages of each of these options. Moreover, we also provide a perspective on data analysis aspects that are vital for translation of raw data into actionable diagnostic test results.

  20. Efficient recovery of whole blood RNA - a comparison of commercial RNA extraction protocols for high-throughput applications in wildlife species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the emergence of next generation sequencing platforms, unprecedented opportunities have arisen in the study of natural vertebrate populations. In particular, insights into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of adaptation can be revealed through study of the expression profiles of genes. However, as a pre-requisite to expression profiling, care must be taken in RNA preparation as factors like DNA contamination, RNA integrity or transcript abundance can affect downstream applications. Here, we evaluated five commonly used RNA extraction methods using whole blood sampled under varying conditions from 20 wild carnivores. Results Despite the use of minute starting volumes, all methods produced quantifiable RNA extracts (1.4 – 18.4 μg) with varying integrity (RIN 4.6 - 7.7), the latter being significantly affected by the storage and extraction method used. We observed a significant overall effect of the extraction method on DNA contamination. One particular extraction method, the LeukoLOCK™ filter system, yielded high RNA integrity along with low DNA contamination and efficient depletion of hemoglobin transcripts highly abundant in whole blood. In a proof of concept sequencing experiment, we found globin RNA transcripts to occupy up to ¼ of all sequencing reads if libraries were not depleted of hemoglobin prior to sequencing. Conclusion By carefully choosing the appropriate RNA extraction method, whole blood can become a valuable source for high-throughput applications like expression arrays or transcriptome sequencing from natural populations. Additionally, candidate genes showing signs of selection could subsequently be genotyped in large population samples using whole blood as a source for RNA without harming individuals from rare or endangered species. PMID:22738215

  1. A highly efficient method for extracting next-generation sequencing quality RNA from adipose tissue of recalcitrant animal species.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Davinder; Golla, Naresh; Singh, Dheer; Onteru, Suneel Kumar

    2017-04-13

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) based RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and transcriptome profiling offers an opportunity to unveil complex evolutionary processes. Successful RNA-Seq and transcriptome profiling requires a large amount of high-quality RNA. However, NGS-quality RNA isolation is extremely difficult from recalcitrant adipose tissue (AT) with high lipid content and low cell numbers. Further, the amount and biochemical composition of AT lipid varies depending upon the animal species which can pose different degree of resistance to RNA extraction. Currently available approaches may work effectively in one species but can be almost unproductive in another species. Herein, we report a two step protocol for the extraction of NGS quality RNA from AT across a broad range of animal species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Viral RNA testing and automation on the bead-based CBNE detection microsystem.

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul C.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Farrell, Cara M.; Rossito, Paul; McClain, Jaime L.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Cullor, James Sterling; Rahimian, Kamayar

    2008-09-01

    We developed prototype chemistry for nucleic acid hybridization on our bead-based diagnostics platform and we established an automatable bead handling protocol capable of 50 part-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity. We are working towards a platform capable of parallel, rapid (10 minute), raw sample testing for orthogonal (in this case nucleic acid and immunoassays) identification of biological (and other) threats in a single sensor microsystem. In this LDRD we developed the nucleic acid chemistry required for nucleic acid hybridization. Our goal is to place a non-cell associated RNA virus (Bovine Viral Diarrhea, BVD) on the beads for raw sample testing. This key pre-requisite to showing orthogonality (nucleic acid measurements can be performed in parallel with immunoassay measurements). Orthogonal detection dramatically reduces false positives. We chose BVD because our collaborators (UC-Davis) can supply samples from persistently infected animals; and because proof-of-concept field testing can be performed with modification of the current technology platform at the UC Davis research station. Since BVD is a cattle-prone disease this research dovetails with earlier immunoassay work on Botulinum toxin simulant testing in raw milk samples. Demonstration of BVD RNA detection expands the repertoire of biological macromolecules that can be adapted to our bead-based detection. The resources of this late start LDRD were adequate to partially demonstrate the conjugation of the beads to the nucleic acids. It was never expected to be adequate for a full live virus test but to motivate that additional investment. In addition, we were able to reduce the LOD (Limit of Detection) for the botulinum toxin stimulant to 50 ppb from the earlier LOD of 1 ppm. A low LOD combined with orthogonal detection provides both low false negatives and low false positives. The logical follow-on steps to this LDRD research are to perform live virus identification as well as concurrent nucleic acid and

  3. Automated solid-phase extraction coupled online with HPLC-FLD for the quantification of zearalenone in edible oil.

    PubMed

    Drzymala, Sarah S; Weiz, Stefan; Heinze, Julia; Marten, Silvia; Prinz, Carsten; Zimathies, Annett; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Koch, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Established maximum levels for the mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) in edible oil require monitoring by reliable analytical methods. Therefore, an automated SPE-HPLC online system based on dynamic covalent hydrazine chemistry has been developed. The SPE step comprises a reversible hydrazone formation by ZEN and a hydrazine moiety covalently attached to a solid phase. Seven hydrazine materials with different properties regarding the resin backbone, pore size, particle size, specific surface area, and loading have been evaluated. As a result, a hydrazine-functionalized silica gel was chosen. The final automated online method was validated and applied to the analysis of three maize germ oil samples including a provisionally certified reference material. Important performance criteria for the recovery (70-120 %) and precision (RSDr <25 %) as set by the Commission Regulation EC 401/2006 were fulfilled: The mean recovery was 78 % and RSDr did not exceed 8 %. The results of the SPE-HPLC online method were further compared to results obtained by liquid-liquid extraction with stable isotope dilution analysis LC-MS/MS and found to be in good agreement. The developed SPE-HPLC online system with fluorescence detection allows a reliable, accurate, and sensitive quantification (limit of quantification, 30 μg/kg) of ZEN in edible oils while significantly reducing the workload. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an automated SPE-HPLC method based on a covalent SPE approach.

  4. Control of 5S RNA transcription in Xenopus somatic cell chromatin: activation with an oocyte extract.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W F; Bloomer, L S; Gottesfeld, J M

    1983-01-01

    A chromatin fraction enriched for Xenopus 5S RNA genes has been isolated by restriction endonuclease digestion and sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Soluble chromatin sedimenting at 70-80S contains approximately 50% of the oocyte-expressed 5S RNA genes and only 1.5-3% of total chromatin DNA; this represents a 15- to 30-fold purification of the 5S genes. Such chromatin isolated from somatic cells (blood and cultured kidney cells) retains the transcriptionally-inactive state of the oocyte-expressed 5S genes. Soluble chromatin from somatic cells prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion also retains the inactive state of the oocyte-type 5S genes. It is likely that the level of chromatin structure responsible for inactivity of the oocyte genes in somatic cells is the nucleosome or short chains of nucleosomes and not supranucleosomal structures. The oocyte-type genes can be rendered transcriptionally active in somatic cell chromatin either by salt extraction of some chromosomal proteins or by treatment with the ion exchange resin Dowex A50W-X2. Alternatively, activation of these genes can be achieved by incubating somatic cell chromatin or nuclei with an extract prepared from Xenopus oocytes. This effect is not specific for 5S RNA genes as the transcription of other small RNAs (including pre-tRNA) is stimulated by the oocyte extract. The activating factor(s) is resistant to micrococcal nuclease, nondialyzable, heat labile and sensitive to trypsin; thus it is highly likely to be a protein or a group of proteins. Partial purification of the activating factor(s) has been achieved by ion exchange chromatography. Images PMID:6866764

  5. Novel automated extraction method for quantitative analysis of urinary 11-nor-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH).

    PubMed

    Fu, Shanlin; Lewis, John

    2008-05-01

    An automated extraction method for extracting the major urinary metabolite of cannabis, 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) was developed on the four-probe Gilson ASPEC XL4trade mark solid-phase extraction (SPE) system. The method works on liquid-liquid extraction principles but does not require the use of SPE cartridges. The limits of detection and quantitation and the upper limit of linearity (ULOL) of the developed method were found to be 1, 2, and 1,500 ng/mL, respectively. There was no detectable carry over after 10,000 ng/mL analyte. For a batch of 76 samples, the process uses less than 100 mL methanol, 450 mL extracting solvent hexane/ethyl acetate (5:1, v/v) and 1 L rinsing solvent, 30% methanol in water. The automated extraction process takes 5 h to complete. Precision and accuracy of the method are comparable to both manual liquid-liquid extraction and automated SPE methods. The method has proven to be a simple, speedy, and economical alternative to the currently popular automated SPE method for the quantitative analysis of urinary THC-COOH.

  6. A method for DNA and RNA co-extraction for use on forensic samples using the Promega DNA IQ™ system.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Anna; Fleming, Rachel; Harbison, SallyAnn

    2011-01-01

    The use of messenger RNA profiling to identify the origin of biological samples (e.g. blood, semen and saliva) from crime scenes is now at the stage of being implemented into routine forensic casework. We report on the successful modification of the Promega DNA IQ™ system to enable co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample without compromising the potential DNA profile. Using the protocol in our laboratory for extracting DNA using the DNA IQ™ system combined with the Zymo Research Mini RNA Isolation Kit™ II we demonstrate the simultaneous co-extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample for routine DNA and mRNA profiling for the identification of both the individual and the biological stain.

  7. Olive Leaf Extract Elevates Hepatic PPAR α mRNA Expression and Improves Serum Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Leena; Liu, Ya-Nan; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that olive leaf extract might alleviate dyslipidemia resulting from estrogen deficiency. Serum lipid profile and mRNA expression of the related genes in the liver and adipose tissue were analyzed after providing olive leaf extract (200 or 400 mg/kg body weight; n=7 for each group) to ovariectomized rats for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks' administration, the rats in the olive leaf extract-administered groups showed significantly lower levels of serum triglyceride and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-cholesterol compared with the rats in the control group, whereas the administration of olive leaf extract did not significantly change the elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In addition, administration of high dose of olive leaf extract significantly decreased the liver triglyceride and increased serum estradiol levels. mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR α) and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) were not affected by ovariectomy, however, administration of olive leaf extract significantly increased both PPAR α and ACO mRNA expression. Expression of adiponectin mRNA in adipose tissue was significantly decreased in the ovariectomized control group. Rats administered low-dose olive leaf extract showed significantly elevated adiponectin mRNA expression compared with rats in the ovariectomized control group. Even though dose-dependent effects were not observed in most of the measurements, these results suggest that genes involved in lipid metabolism may be regulated by olive leaf extract administration in ovariectomized rats.

  8. Screening for anabolic steroids in urine of forensic cases using fully automated solid phase extraction and LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Andersen, David W; Linnet, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A screening method for 18 frequently measured exogenous anabolic steroids and the testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio in forensic cases has been developed and validated. The method involves a fully automated sample preparation including enzyme treatment, addition of internal standards and solid phase extraction followed by analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) using electrospray ionization with adduct formation for two compounds. Urine samples from 580 forensic cases were analyzed to determine the T/E ratio and occurrence of exogenous anabolic steroids. Extraction recoveries ranged from 77 to 95%, matrix effects from 48 to 78%, overall process efficiencies from 40 to 54% and the lower limit of identification ranged from 2 to 40 ng/mL. In the 580 urine samples analyzed from routine forensic cases, 17 (2.9%) were found positive for one or more anabolic steroids. Only seven different steroids including testosterone were found in the material, suggesting that only a small number of common steroids are likely to occur in a forensic context. The steroids were often in high concentrations (>100 ng/mL), and a combination of steroids and/or other drugs of abuse were seen in the majority of cases. The method presented serves as a fast and automated screening procedure, proving the suitability of LC-MS-MS for analyzing anabolic steroids.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF ARSENIC SPECIATION ON DRINKING WATER TREATMENT MEDIA UTILIZING AUTOMATED SEQUENTIAL CONTINUOUS FLOW EXTRACTION WITH IC-ICP-MS DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three treatment media, used for the removal of arsenic from drinking water, were sequentially extracted using 10mM MgCl2 (pH 8), 10mM NaH2PO4 (pH 7) followed by 10mM (NH4)2C2O4 (pH 3). The media were extracted using an on-line automated continuous extraction system which allowed...

  10. [Efficiency of three commercial kits dedicated to DNA and RNA isolation from various clinical and forensic materials using the Janus automated workstation].

    PubMed

    Małodobra, Małgorzata; Jonkisz, Anna; Kowalczyk, Elzbieta; Lebioda, Arleta; Bartnik, Beata; Swiatek, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Isolation of genetic material is a crucial stage in molecular biology. Increasing needs for DNA analysis cause continuous improving of genetic material isolation methods toward higher accuracy and output. Automatization in molecular biology is widely seen, especially in clinical and forensic medicine. The objective of this research was optimization of methods for automatic nucleic acid isolation using the Janus automated workstation, Perkin Elmer. The efficiency and purity of isolated DNA was satisfactory. Despite numerous attempts at achieving automatic RNA isolation, we did not succeed in obtaining RNA working in other applications, such as RT-PCR or Real-Time PCR.

  11. A sequential co-extraction method for DNA, RNA and protein recovery from soil for future system-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Frossard, Aline; Seeley, Mary; Cowan, Don

    2014-08-01

    A co-extraction protocol that sequentially isolates core biopolymer fractions (DNA, RNA, protein) from edaphic microbial communities is presented. In order to confirm compatibility with downstream analyses, bacterial T-RFLP profiles were generated from the DNA- and RNA-derived fractions of an arid-based soil, with metaproteomics undertaken on the corresponding protein fraction.

  12. Direct Sampling and Analysis from Solid Phase Extraction Cards using an Automated Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; ElNaggar, Mariam S; Stankovich, Joseph J; WitkowskiII, Charles E.; Norris, Jeremy L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Direct liquid extraction based surface sampling, a technique previously demonstrated with continuous flow and autonomous pipette liquid microjunction surface sampling probes, has recently been implemented as the Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) mode on the commercially available Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system. In the present paper, the LESA mode was applied to the analysis of 96-well format custom solid phase extraction (SPE) cards, with each well consisting of either a 1 or 2 mm diameter monolithic hydrophobic stationary phase. These substrate wells were conditioned, loaded with either single or multi-component aqueous mixtures, and read out using the LESA mode of a TriVersa NanoMate or a Nanomate 100 coupled to an ABI/Sciex 4000QTRAPTM hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer and a Thermo LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Extraction conditions, including extraction/nanoESI solvent composition, volume, and dwell times, were optimized in the analysis of targeted compounds. Limit of detection and quantitation as well as analysis reproducibility figures of merit were measured. Calibration data was obtained for propranolol using a deuterated internal standard which demonstrated linearity and reproducibility. A 10x increase in signal and cleanup of micromolar Angiotensin II from a concentrated salt solution was demonstrated. Additionally, a multicomponent herbicide mixture at ppb concentration levels was analyzed using MS3 spectra for compound identification in the presence of isobaric interferences.

  13. Performance verification of the Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit for automated DNA extraction of known reference samples.

    PubMed

    Krnajski, Z; Geering, S; Steadman, S

    2007-12-01

    Advances in automation have been made for a number of processes conducted in the forensic DNA laboratory. However, because most robotic systems are designed for high-throughput laboratories batching large numbers of samples, smaller laboratories are left with a limited number of cost-effective options for employing automation. The Maxwell 16 Instrument and DNA IQ Reference Sample Kit marketed by Promega are designed for rapid, automated purification of DNA extracts from sample sets consisting of sixteen or fewer samples. Because the system is based on DNA capture by paramagnetic particles with maximum binding capacity, it is designed to generate extracts with yield consistency. The studies herein enabled evaluation of STR profile concordance, consistency of yield, and cross-contamination performance for the Maxwell 16 Instrument. Results indicate that the system performs suitably for streamlining the process of extracting known reference samples generally used for forensic DNA analysis and has many advantages in a small or moderate-sized laboratory environment.

  14. Sequential Chomospheric Brightening: An Automated Approach to Extracting Physics from Ephemeral Brightening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-17

    University; 2 Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory; 3 National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM; 4 Astrophysics Research Centre...propose a connection of the small-scale features to solar flares. Our automated routine detects and distinguishes three separate types of brightening...88003-8001; mskirk@nmsu.edu 2 Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 87114 3 National Solar Observatory, Sunspot

  15. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mario; Müller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures.

  16. Semi-automated solid-phase extraction method for studying the biodegradation of ochratoxin A by human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Camel, Valérie; Ouethrani, Minale; Coudray, Cindy; Philippe, Catherine; Rabot, Sylvie

    2012-04-15

    A simple and rapid semi-automated solid-phase (SPE) extraction method has been developed for the analysis of ochratoxin A in aqueous matrices related to biodegradation experiments (namely digestive contents and faecal excreta), with a view of using this method to follow OTA biodegradation by human intestinal microbiota. Influence of extraction parameters that could affect semi-automated SPE efficiency was studied, using C18-silica as the sorbent and water as the simplest matrix, being further applied to the matrices of interest. Conditions finally retained were as follows: 5-mL aqueous samples (pH 3) containing an organic modifier (20% ACN) were applied on 100-mg cartridges. After drying (9 mL of air), the cartridge was rinsed with 5-mL H(2)O/ACN (80:20, v/v), before eluting the compounds with 3 × 1 mL of MeOH/THF (10:90, v/v). Acceptable recoveries and limits of quantification could be obtained considering the complexity of the investigated matrices and the low volumes sampled; this method was also suitable for the analysis of ochratoxin B in faecal extracts. Applicability of the method is illustrated by preliminary results of ochratoxin A biodegradation studies by human intestinal microbiota under simple in vitro conditions. Interestingly, partial degradation of ochratoxin A was observed, with efficiencies ranging from 14% to 47% after 72 h incubation. In addition, three phase I metabolites could be identified using high resolution mass spectrometry, namely ochratoxin α, open ochratoxin A and ochratoxin B.

  17. A high yield DNA extraction method for medically important Candida species: A comparison of manual versus QIAcube-based automated system.

    PubMed

    Das, P; Pandey, P; Harishankar, A; Chandy, M; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of infected individuals with candidemia depends on rapid and precise diagnosis which enables optimising treatment. Three fungal DNA extraction protocols have been compared in this study for medically important Candida species. The quality and quantity of the DNA extracted by physical, chemical and automated protocols was compared using NanoDrop ND-2000 spectrophotometer. It was found that the yield and purity (260/230) ratio of extracted DNA was significantly high in the physical treatment-based protocol as compared to chemical based or automated protocol. Extracted DNA-based real time-polymerase chain reaction showed an analytical sensitivity of 103 cfu/mL. The result of this study suggests physical treatment is the most successful extraction technique compared to other two protocols.

  18. [Influence of temperature on the preferential extraction of RNA polymerase I from hepatic nuclei of the rat].

    PubMed

    Zoncheddu, A; Accomando, R; Pertica, M; Orunesu, M

    1979-11-15

    RNA polymerase I has been extracted from rat liver nuclei by three consecutive washings at 0 degrees C with a medium of relatively low ionic strength (0.15 M KCl) containing Mg++ rather than by incubating the organelles at 37 degrees C in the same medium, as originally proposed by Chesterton and Butterworth. The modified technique, which has the advantage of preventing a temperature-mediated conversion of form IB to IA, gives similar yields of RNA polymerase I and retains the capacity of preferentially extracting the enzyme with respect to the other forms of nuclear RNA polymerase.

  19. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  20. Feature extraction from terahertz pulses for classification of RNA data via support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Fischer, Bernd; Ferguson, Bradley; Mickan, Samuel P.; Abbott, Derek

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates binary and multiple classes of classification via support vector machines (SVMs). A couple of groups of two dimensional features are extracted via frequency orientation components, which result in the effective classification of Terahertz (T-ray) pulses for discrimination of RNA data and various powder samples. For each classification task, a pair of extracted feature vectors from the terahertz signals corresponding to each class is viewed as two coordinates and plotted in the same coordinate system. The current classification method extracts specific features from the Fourier spectrum, without applying an extra feature extractor. This method shows that SVMs can employ conventional feature extraction methods for a T-ray classification task. Moreover, we discuss the challenges faced by this method. A pairwise classification method is applied for the multi-class classification of powder samples. Plots of learning vectors assist in understanding the classification task, which exhibit improved clustering, clear learning margins, and least support vectors. This paper highlights the ability to use a small number of features (2D features) for classification via analyzing the frequency spectrum, which greatly reduces the computation complexity in achieving the preferred classification performance.

  1. Characterization and Application of Superlig 620 Solid Phase Extraction Resin for Automated Process Monitoring of 90Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Devol, Timothy A.; Clements, John P.; Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Egorov, Oleg; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-11-30

    Characterization of SuperLig® 620 solid phase extraction resin was performed in order to develop an automated on-line process monitor for 90Sr. The main focus was on strontium separation from barium, with the goal of developing an automated separation process for 90Sr in high-level wastes. High-level waste contains significant 137Cs activity, of which 137mBa is of great concern as an interference to the quantification of strontium. In addition barium, yttrium and plutonium were studied as potential interferences to strontium uptake and detection. A number of complexants were studied in a series of batch Kd experiments, as SuperLig® 620 was not previously known to elute strontium in typical mineral acids. The optimal separation was found using a 2M nitric acid load solution with a strontium elution step of ~0.49M ammonium citrate and a barium elution step of ~1.8M ammonium citrate. 90Sr quantification of Hanford high-level tank waste was performed on a sequential injection analysis microfluidics system coupled to a flow-cell detector. The results of the on-line procedure are compared to standard radiochemical techniques in this paper.

  2. Automated Control of the Organic and Inorganic Composition of Aloe vera Extracts Using (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Randel, Gabriele; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2016-09-01

    Recent classification of Aloe vera whole-leaf extract by the International Agency for Research and Cancer as a possible carcinogen to humans as well as the continuous adulteration of A. vera's authentic material have generated renewed interest in controlling A. vera. The existing NMR spectroscopic method for the analysis of A. vera, which is based on a routine developed at Spectral Service, was extended. Apart from aloverose, glucose, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, whole-leaf material (WLM), acetic acid, fumaric acid, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate, the quantification of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and fructose is possible with the addition of a Cs-EDTA solution to sample. The proposed methodology was automated, which includes phasing, baseline-correction, deconvolution (based on the Lorentzian function), integration, quantification, and reporting. The NMR method was applied to 41 A. vera preparations in the form of liquid A. vera juice and solid A. vera powder. The advantages of the new NMR methodology over the previous method were discussed. Correlation between the new and standard NMR methodologies was significant for aloverose, glucose, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and WLM (P < 0.0001, R(2) = 0.99). NMR was found to be suitable for the automated simultaneous quantitative determination of 13 parameters in A. vera.

  3. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Junya; Sato, Yukuto; Shinozaki, Natsuko; Ye, Bin; Tsuboi, Akito; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamashita, Riu

    2016-01-01

    The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field), QIAsymphony (a robotics method), and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no "gold standard" for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study.

  4. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Natsuko; Ye, Bin; Tsuboi, Akito; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamashita, Riu

    2016-01-01

    The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field), QIAsymphony (a robotics method), and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no “gold standard” for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study. PMID:27104353

  5. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  6. Sample preparation for avian and porcine influenza virus cDNA amplification simplified: Boiling vs. conventional RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan R; Starick, Elke; Ziller, Mario; Harder, Timm C; Unger, Hermann; Hamilton, Keith; Globig, Anja

    2015-09-01

    RNA extraction and purification is a fundamental step that allows for highly sensitive amplification of specific RNA targets in PCR applications. However, commercial extraction kits that are broadly used because of their robustness and high yield of purified RNA are expensive and labor-intensive. In this study, boiling in distilled water or a commercial lysis buffer of different sample matrices containing avian or porcine influenza viruses was tested as an alternative. Real-time PCR (RTqPCR) for nucleoprotein gene fragment was used as read out. Results were compared with freshly extracted RNA by use of a commercial extraction kit. Different batches of virus containing materials, including diluted virus positive allantoic fluid or cell culture supernatant, and avian faecal, cloacal or oropharyngeal swab samples were used in this study. Simple boiling of samples without any additional purification steps can be used as an alternative RNA preparation method to detect influenza A virus nucleoprotein RNA in oropharyngeal swab samples, allantoic fluid or cell-culture supernatant. The boiling method is not applicable for sample matrices containing faecal material.

  7. [Corrected Title: Solid-Phase Extraction of Polar Compounds from Water] Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey; Schultz, John

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) process has been developed for removing alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and other polar organic compounds from water. This process can be either a subprocess of a water-reclamation process or a means of extracting organic compounds from water samples for gas-chromatographic analysis. This SPE process is an attractive alternative to an Environmental Protection Administration liquid-liquid extraction process that generates some pollution and does not work in a microgravitational environment. In this SPE process, one forces a water sample through a resin bed by use of positive pressure on the upstream side and/or suction on the downstream side, thereby causing organic compounds from the water to be adsorbed onto the resin. If gas-chromatographic analysis is to be done, the resin is dried by use of a suitable gas, then the adsorbed compounds are extracted from the resin by use of a solvent. Unlike the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process works in both microgravity and Earth gravity. In comparison with the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process is more efficient, extracts a wider range of organic compounds, generates less pollution, and costs less.

  8. Automated extraction of information on chemical-P-glycoprotein interactions from the literature.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shuya; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Ose, Atsushi; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2013-10-28

    Knowledge of the interactions between drugs and transporters is important for drug discovery and development as well as for the evaluation of their clinical safety. We recently developed a text-mining system for the automatic extraction of information on chemical-CYP3A4 interactions from the literature. This system is based on natural language processing and can extract chemical names and their interaction patterns according to sentence context. The present study aimed to extend this system to the extraction of information regarding chemical-transporter interactions. For this purpose, the key verb list designed for cytochrome P450 enzymes was replaced with that for known drug transporters. The performance of the system was then tested by examining the accuracy of information on chemical-P-glycoprotein (P-gp) interactions extracted from randomly selected PubMed abstracts. The system achieved 89.8% recall and 84.2% precision for the identification of chemical names and 71.7% recall and 78.6% precision for the extraction of chemical-P-gp interactions.

  9. Automation of static and dynamic non-dispersive liquid phase microextraction. Part 1: Approaches based on extractant drop-, plug-, film- and microflow-formation.

    PubMed

    Alexovič, Michal; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Solich, Petr; Sabo, Ján

    2016-02-04

    Simplicity, effectiveness, swiftness, and environmental friendliness - these are the typical requirements for the state of the art development of green analytical techniques. Liquid phase microextraction (LPME) stands for a family of elegant sample pretreatment and analyte preconcentration techniques preserving these principles in numerous applications. By using only fractions of solvent and sample compared to classical liquid-liquid extraction, the extraction kinetics, the preconcentration factor, and the cost efficiency can be increased. Moreover, significant improvements can be made by automation, which is still a hot topic in analytical chemistry. This review surveys comprehensively and in two parts the developments of automation of non-dispersive LPME methodologies performed in static and dynamic modes. Their advantages and limitations and the reported analytical performances are discussed and put into perspective with the corresponding manual procedures. The automation strategies, techniques, and their operation advantages as well as their potentials are further described and discussed. In this first part, an introduction to LPME and their static and dynamic operation modes as well as their automation methodologies is given. The LPME techniques are classified according to the different approaches of protection of the extraction solvent using either a tip-like (needle/tube/rod) support (drop-based approaches), a wall support (film-based approaches), or microfluidic devices. In the second part, the LPME techniques based on porous supports for the extraction solvent such as membranes and porous media are overviewed. An outlook on future demands and perspectives in this promising area of analytical chemistry is finally given.

  10. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Church, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes. PMID:25202621

  11. Automated Template-based Brain Localization and Extraction for Fetal Brain MRI Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tourbier, Sébastien; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Taimouri, Vahid; Hagmann, Patric; Meuli, Reto; Warfield, Simon K; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-04-10

    Most fetal brain MRI reconstruction algorithms rely only on brain tissue-relevant voxels of low-resolution (LR) images to enhance the quality of inter-slice motion correction and image reconstruction. Consequently the fetal brain needs to be localized and extracted as a first step, which is usually a laborious and time consuming manual or semi-automatic task. We have proposed in this work to use age-matched template images as prior knowledge to automatize brain localization and extraction. This has been achieved through a novel automatic brain localization and extraction method based on robust template-to-slice block matching and deformable slice-to-template registration. Our template-based approach has also enabled the reconstruction of fetal brain images in standard radiological anatomical planes in a common coordinate space. We have integrated this approach into our new reconstruction pipeline that involves intensity normalization, inter-slice motion correction, and super-resolution (SR) reconstruction. To this end we have adopted a novel approach based on projection of every slice of the LR brain masks into the template space using a fusion strategy. This has enabled the refinement of brain masks in the LR images at each motion correction iteration. The overall brain localization and extraction algorithm has shown to produce brain masks that are very close to manually drawn brain masks, showing an average Dice overlap measure of 94.5%. We have also demonstrated that adopting a slice-to-template registration and propagation of the brain mask slice-by-slice leads to a significant improvement in brain extraction performance compared to global rigid brain extraction and consequently in the quality of the final reconstructed images. Ratings performed by two expert observers show that the proposed pipeline can achieve similar reconstruction quality to reference reconstruction based on manual slice-by-slice brain extraction. The proposed brain mask refinement and

  12. Using mobile laser scanning data for automated extraction of road markings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Wang, Cheng; Chapman, Michael; Yang, Bisheng

    2014-01-01

    A mobile laser scanning (MLS) system allows direct collection of accurate 3D point information in unprecedented detail at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs, which serves the fast growing demands of transportation-related road surveying including road surface geometry and road environment. As one type of road feature in traffic management systems, road markings on paved roadways have important functions in providing guidance and information to drivers and pedestrians. This paper presents a stepwise procedure to recognize road markings from MLS point clouds. To improve computational efficiency, we first propose a curb-based method for road surface extraction. This method first partitions the raw MLS data into a set of profiles according to vehicle trajectory data, and then extracts small height jumps caused by curbs in the profiles via slope and elevation-difference thresholds. Next, points belonging to the extracted road surface are interpolated into a geo-referenced intensity image using an extended inverse-distance-weighted (IDW) approach. Finally, we dynamically segment the geo-referenced intensity image into road-marking candidates with multiple thresholds that correspond to different ranges determined by point-density appropriate normality. A morphological closing operation with a linear structuring element is finally used to refine the road-marking candidates by removing noise and improving completeness. This road-marking extraction algorithm is comprehensively discussed in the analysis of parameter sensitivity and overall performance. An experimental study performed on a set of road markings with ground-truth shows that the proposed algorithm provides a promising solution to the road-marking extraction from MLS data.

  13. Progress in automated extraction and purification of in situ 14C from quartz: Results from the Purdue in situ 14C laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Goehring, Brent; Wilson, Jim; Kubley, Thomas; Caffee, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Current extraction methods for in situ 14C from quartz [e.g., Lifton et al., (2001), Pigati et al., (2010), Hippe et al., (2013)] are time-consuming and repetitive, making them an attractive target for automation. We report on the status of in situ 14C extraction and purification systems originally automated at the University of Arizona that have now been reconstructed and upgraded at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). The Purdue in situ 14C laboratory builds on the flow-through extraction system design of Pigati et al. (2010), automating most of the procedure by retrofitting existing valves with external servo-controlled actuators, regulating the pressure of research purity O2 inside the furnace tube via a PID-based pressure controller in concert with an inlet mass flow controller, and installing an automated liquid N2 distribution system, all driven by LabView® software. A separate system for cryogenic CO2 purification, dilution, and splitting is also fully automated, ensuring a highly repeatable process regardless of the operator. We present results from procedural blanks and an intercomparison material (CRONUS-A), as well as results of experiments to increase the amount of material used in extraction, from the standard 5 g to 10 g or above. Results thus far are quite promising with procedural blanks comparable to previous work and significant improvements in reproducibility for CRONUS-A measurements. The latter analyses also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative extraction of in situ 14C from sample masses up to 10 g. Our lab is now analyzing unknowns routinely, but lowering overall blank levels is the focus of ongoing research.

  14. Automated reference region extraction and population-based input function for brain [11C]TMSX PET image analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Eero; Tuisku, Jouni; Luoto, Pauliina; Arponen, Eveliina; Johansson, Jarkko; Oikonen, Vesa; Parkkola, Riitta; Airas, Laura; Rinne, Juha O

    2015-01-01

    [11C]TMSX ([7-N-methyl-11C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a selective adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) radioligand. In the central nervous system (CNS), A2AR are linked to dopamine D2 receptor function in striatum, but they are also important modulators of inflammation. The golden standard for kinetic modeling of brain [11C]TMSX positron emission tomography (PET) is to obtain arterial input function via arterial blood sampling. However, this method is laborious, prone to errors and unpleasant for study subjects. The aim of this work was to evaluate alternative input function acquisition methods for brain [11C]TMSX PET imaging. First, a noninvasive, automated method for the extraction of gray matter reference region using supervised clustering (SCgm) was developed. Second, a method for obtaining a population-based arterial input function (PBIF) was implemented. These methods were created using data from 28 study subjects (7 healthy controls, 12 multiple sclerosis patients, and 9 patients with Parkinson's disease). The results with PBIF correlated well with original plasma input, and the SCgm yielded similar results compared with cerebellum as a reference region. The clustering method for extracting reference region and the population-based approach for acquiring input for dynamic [11C]TMSX brain PET image analyses appear to be feasible and robust methods, that can be applied in patients with CNS pathology. PMID:25370856

  15. Automated reference region extraction and population-based input function for brain [(11)C]TMSX PET image analyses.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Eero; Tuisku, Jouni; Luoto, Pauliina; Arponen, Eveliina; Johansson, Jarkko; Oikonen, Vesa; Parkkola, Riitta; Airas, Laura; Rinne, Juha O

    2015-01-01

    [(11)C]TMSX ([7-N-methyl-(11)C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a selective adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) radioligand. In the central nervous system (CNS), A2AR are linked to dopamine D2 receptor function in striatum, but they are also important modulators of inflammation. The golden standard for kinetic modeling of brain [(11)C]TMSX positron emission tomography (PET) is to obtain arterial input function via arterial blood sampling. However, this method is laborious, prone to errors and unpleasant for study subjects. The aim of this work was to evaluate alternative input function acquisition methods for brain [(11)C]TMSX PET imaging. First, a noninvasive, automated method for the extraction of gray matter reference region using supervised clustering (SCgm) was developed. Second, a method for obtaining a population-based arterial input function (PBIF) was implemented. These methods were created using data from 28 study subjects (7 healthy controls, 12 multiple sclerosis patients, and 9 patients with Parkinson's disease). The results with PBIF correlated well with original plasma input, and the SCgm yielded similar results compared with cerebellum as a reference region. The clustering method for extracting reference region and the population-based approach for acquiring input for dynamic [(11)C]TMSX brain PET image analyses appear to be feasible and robust methods, that can be applied in patients with CNS pathology.

  16. A Simple Method for Automated Solid Phase Extraction of Water Samples for Immunological Analysis of Small Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Heub, Sarah; Tscharner, Noe; Kehl, Florian; Dittrich, Petra S; Follonier, Stéphane; Barbe, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    A new method for solid phase extraction (SPE) of environmental water samples is proposed. The developed prototype is cost-efficient and user friendly, and enables to perform rapid, automated and simple SPE. The pre-concentrated solution is compatible with analysis by immunoassay, with a low organic solvent content. A method is described for the extraction and pre-concentration of natural hormone 17β-estradiol in 100 ml water samples. Reverse phase SPE is performed with octadecyl-silica sorbent and elution is done with 200 µl of methanol 50% v/v. Eluent is diluted by adding di-water to lower the amount of methanol. After preparing manually the SPE column, the overall procedure is performed automatically within 1 hr. At the end of the process, estradiol concentration is measured by using a commercial enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). 100-fold pre-concentration is achieved and the methanol content in only 10% v/v. Full recoveries of the molecule are achieved with 1 ng/L spiked de-ionized and synthetic sea water samples.

  17. Fully automated Liquid Extraction-Based Surface Sampling and Ionization Using a Chip-Based Robotic Nanoelectrospray Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling device utilizing an Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system is reported. Analyses were enabled for discrete spot sampling by using the Advanced User Interface of the current commercial control software. This software interface provided the parameter control necessary for the NanoMate robotic pipettor to both form and withdraw a liquid microjunction for sampling from a surface. The system was tested with three types of analytically important sample surface types, viz., spotted sample arrays on a MALDI plate, dried blood spots on paper, and whole-body thin tissue sections from drug dosed mice. The qualitative and quantitative data were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling techniques. The successful analyses performed here utilized the hardware and software elements already present in the NanoMate system developed to handle and analyze liquid samples. Implementation of an appropriate sample (surface) holder, a solvent reservoir, faster movement of the robotic arm, finer control over solvent flow rate when dispensing and retrieving the solution at the surface, and the ability to select any location on a surface to sample from would improve the analytical performance and utility of the platform.

  18. Automated Identification of Medically Important Bacteria by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Using a Novel Comprehensive Database, 16SpathDB▿

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Yeung, Juilian M. Y.; Tse, Herman; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, interpretation of 16S rRNA gene sequence results is one of the most difficult problems faced by clinical microbiologists and technicians. To overcome the problems we encountered in the existing databases during 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation, we built a comprehensive database, 16SpathDB (http://147.8.74.24/16SpathDB) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of all medically important bacteria listed in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and evaluated its use for automated identification of these bacteria. Among 91 nonduplicated bacterial isolates collected in our clinical microbiology laboratory, 71 (78%) were reported by 16SpathDB as a single bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, 19 (20.9%) were reported as more than one bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, and 1 (1.1%) was reported as no match. For the 71 bacterial isolates reported as a single bacterial species, all results were identical to their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach. For the 19 bacterial isolates reported as more than one bacterial species, all results contained their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach and all of them had their true identities as the “best match in 16SpathDB.” For the isolate (Gordonibacter pamelaeae) reported as no match, the bacterium has never been reported to be associated with human disease and was not included in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology. 16SpathDB is an automated, user-friendly, efficient, accurate, and regularly updated database for 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:21389154

  19. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A.; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  20. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  1. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  2. CAMUR: Knowledge extraction from RNA-seq cancer data through equivalent classification rules

    PubMed Central

    Cestarelli, Valerio; Fiscon, Giulia; Felici, Giovanni; Bertolazzi, Paola; Weitschek, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Nowadays, knowledge extraction methods from Next Generation Sequencing data are highly requested. In this work, we focus on RNA-seq gene expression analysis and specifically on case–control studies with rule-based supervised classification algorithms that build a model able to discriminate cases from controls. State of the art algorithms compute a single classification model that contains few features (genes). On the contrary, our goal is to elicit a higher amount of knowledge by computing many classification models, and therefore to identify most of the genes related to the predicted class. Results: We propose CAMUR, a new method that extracts multiple and equivalent classification models. CAMUR iteratively computes a rule-based classification model, calculates the power set of the genes present in the rules, iteratively eliminates those combinations from the data set, and performs again the classification procedure until a stopping criterion is verified. CAMUR includes an ad-hoc knowledge repository (database) and a querying tool. We analyze three different types of RNA-seq data sets (Breast, Head and Neck, and Stomach Cancer) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and we validate CAMUR and its models also on non-TCGA data. Our experimental results show the efficacy of CAMUR: we obtain several reliable equivalent classification models, from which the most frequent genes, their relationships, and the relation with a particular cancer are deduced. Availability and implementation: dmb.iasi.cnr.it/camur.php Contact: emanuel@iasi.cnr.it Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26519501

  3. Automated object extraction from remote sensor image based on adaptive thresholding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongzhou; Ma, Shuaijun; Li, Jin; Ming, Hui; Luo, Xiaobo

    2009-10-01

    Detection and extraction of the dim moving small objects in the infrared image sequences is an interesting research area. A system for detection of the dim moving small targets in the IR image sequences is presented, and a new algorithm having high performance for extracting moving small targets in infrared image sequences containing cloud clutter is proposed in the paper. This method can get the better detection precision than some other methods, and two independent units can realize the calculative process. The novelty of the algorithm is that it uses adaptive thresholding technique of the moving small targets in both the spatial domain and temporal domain. The results of experiment show that the algorithm we presented has high ratio of detection precision.

  4. Automated extraction of oscillation parameters for Kepler observations of solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D.; Stello, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Arentoft, T.; Quirion, P.-O.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2009-10-01

    The recent launch of the Kepler space telescope brings the opportunity to study oscillations systematically in large numbers of solar-like stars. In the framework of the asteroFLAG project, we have developed an automated pipeline to estimate global oscillation parameters, such as the frequency of maximum power (νmax ) and the large frequency spacing (Δν), for a large number of time series. We present an effective method based on the autocorrelation function to find excess power and use a scaling relation to estimate granulation timescales as initial conditions for background modelling. We derive reliable uncertainties for νmax and Δν through extensive simulations. We have tested the pipeline on about 2000 simulated Kepler stars with magnitudes of V ˜ 7-12 and were able to correctly determine νmax and Δν for about half of the sample. For about 20%, the returned large frequency spacing is accurate enough to determine stellar radii to a 1% precision. We conclude that the methods presented here are a promising approach to process the large amount of data expected from Kepler.

  5. Automating identification of avian vocalizations using time-frequency information extracted from the Gabor transform.

    PubMed

    Connor, Edward F; Li, Shidong; Li, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Based on the Gabor transform, a metric is developed and applied to automatically identify bird species from a sample of 568 digital recordings of songs/calls from 67 species of birds. The Gabor frequency-amplitude spectrum and the Gabor time-amplitude profile are proposed as a means to characterize the frequency and time patterns of a bird song. An approach based on template matching where unknown song clips are compared to a library of known song clips is used. After adding noise to simulate the background environment and using an adaptive high-pass filter to de-noise the recordings, the successful identification rate exceeded 93% even at signal-to-noise ratios as low as 5 dB. Bird species whose songs/calls were dominated by low frequencies were more difficult to identify than species whose songs were dominated by higher frequencies. The results suggest that automated identification may be practical if comprehensive libraries of recordings that encompass the vocal variation within species can be assembled.

  6. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  -0.6   ±   2.3° and  -1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment.

  7. Exploratory normalized difference water indices for semi-automated extraction of Antarctic lake features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, Shridhar D.; Luis, Alvarinho J.

    2016-05-01

    This work presents various normalized difference water indices (NDWI) to delineate lakes from Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica, by using a very high resolution WorldView-2 (WV-2) satellite imagery. Schirmacher oasis region hosts a number of fresh as well as saline water lakes, such as epishelf lakes, ice-free or landlocked lakes, which are completely frozen or semi-frozen and in a ice-free state. Hence, detecting all these types of lakes distinctly on satellite imagery was the major challenge, as the spectral characteristics of various types of lakes were identical to the other land cover targets. Multiband spectral index pixel-based approach is most experimented and recently growing technique because of its unbeatable advantages such as its simplicity and comparatively lesser amount of processing-time. In present study, semiautomatic extraction of lakes in cryospheric region was carried out by designing specific spectral indices. The study utilized number of existing spectral indices to extract lakes but none could deliver satisfactory results and hence we modified NDWI. The potentials of newly added bands in WV-2 satellite imagery was explored by developing spectral indices comprising of Yellow (585 - 625 nm) band, in combination with Blue (450 - 510 nm), Coastal (400 - 450 nm) and Green (510 - 580 nm) bands. For extraction of frozen lakes, use of Yellow (585 - 625 nm) and near-infrared 2 (NIR2) band pair, and Yellow and Green band pair worked well, whereas for ice-free lakes extraction, a combination of Blue and Coastal band yielded appreciable results, when compared with manually digitized data. The results suggest that the modified NDWI approach rendered bias error varying from 1 to 34 m2.

  8. Automated extraction of DNA from blood and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler for forensic genetic STR typing of reference samples.

    PubMed

    Stangegaard, Michael; Frøslev, Tobias G; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2011-04-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler mounted with the Te-MagS magnetic separation device (Tecan, Männedorf, Switzerland). The protocols were validated for accredited forensic genetic work according to ISO 17025 using the Qiagen MagAttract DNA Mini M48 kit (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany) from fresh whole blood and blood from deceased individuals. The workflow was simplified by returning the DNA extracts to the original tubes minimizing the risk of misplacing samples. The tubes that originally contained the samples were washed with MilliQ water before the return of the DNA extracts. The PCR was setup in 96-well microtiter plates. The methods were validated for the kits: AmpFℓSTR Identifiler, SGM Plus and Yfiler (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA), GenePrint FFFL and PowerPlex Y (Promega, Madison, WI). The automated protocols allowed for extraction and addition of PCR master mix of 96 samples within 3.5h. In conclusion, we demonstrated that (1) DNA extraction with magnetic beads and (2) PCR setup for accredited, forensic genetic short tandem repeat typing can be implemented on a simple automated liquid handler leading to the reduction of manual work, and increased quality and throughput.

  9. Automated sample preparation based on the sequential injection principle. Solid-phase extraction on a molecularly imprinted polymer coupled on-line to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, Georgios; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G; Economou, Anastasios

    2004-03-19

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared using caffeine, as a template, was validated as a selective sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE), within an automated on-line sample preparation method. The polymer produced was packed in a polypropylene cartridge, which was incorporated in a flow system prior to the HPLC analytical instrumentation. The principle of sequential injection was utilised for a rapid automated and efficient SPE procedure on the MIP. Samples, buffers, washing and elution solvents were introduced to the extraction cartridge via a peristaltic pump and a multi-position valve, both controlled by appropriate software developed in-house. The method was optimised in terms of flow rates, extraction time and volume. After extraction, the final eluent from the extraction cartridge was directed to the injection loop and was subsequently analysed on HPLC. The overall set-up facilitated unattended operation, operation and improved both mixing fluidics and method development flexibility. This system may be readily built in the laboratory and can be further used as an automated platform for on-line sample preparation.

  10. Determination of 21 drugs in oral fluid using fully automated supported liquid extraction and UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Valen, Anja; Leere Øiestad, Åse Marit; Strand, Dag Helge; Skari, Ragnhild; Berg, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Collection of oral fluid (OF) is easy and non-invasive compared to the collection of urine and blood, and interest in OF for drug screening and diagnostic purposes is increasing. A high-throughput ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of 21 drugs in OF using fully automated 96-well plate supported liquid extraction for sample preparation is presented. The method contains a selection of classic drugs of abuse, including amphetamines, cocaine, cannabis, opioids, and benzodiazepines. The method was fully validated for 200 μL OF/buffer mix using an Intercept OF sampling kit; validation included linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, extraction recovery, matrix effects, stability, and carry-over. Inter-assay precision (RSD) and accuracy (relative error) were <15% and 13 to 5%, respectively, for all compounds at concentrations equal to or higher than the lower limit of quantification. Extraction recoveries were between 58 and 76% (RSD < 8%), except for tetrahydrocannabinol and three 7-amino benzodiazepine metabolites with recoveries between 23 and 33% (RSD between 51 and 52 % and 11 and 25%, respectively). Ion enhancement or ion suppression effects were observed for a few compounds; however, to a large degree they were compensated for by the internal standards used. Deuterium-labelled and (13) C-labelled internal standards were used for 8 and 11 of the compounds, respectively. In a comparison between Intercept and Quantisal OF kits, better recoveries and fewer matrix effects were observed for some compounds using Quantisal. The method is sensitive and robust for its purposes and has been used successfully since February 2015 for analysis of Intercept OF samples from 2600 cases in a 12-month period. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    PubMed

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes.

  12. A device for automated direct sampling and quantitation from solid-phase sorbent extraction cards by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Timothy; Henion, Jack

    2003-04-01

    A new solid-phase extraction (SPE) device in the 96-well format (SPE Card) has been employed for automated off-line sample preparation of low-volume urine samples. On-line automated analyte elution via SPE and direct quantitation by micro ion spray mass spectrometry is reported. This sample preparation device has the format of a microtiter plate and is molded in a plastic frame which houses 96 separate sandwiched 3M Empore sorbents (0.5-mm-thickness, 8-microm particles) covered on both sides by a microfiber support material. Ninety-six discrete SPE zones, each 7 mm in diameter, are imbedded into the sheet in the conventional 9-mm pitch (spacing) of a 96-well microtiter plate. In this study one-quarter of an SPE Card (24 individual zones) was used merely as a convenience. After automated off-line interference elution of applied human urine from 24 samples, a section of SPE Card is mounted vertically on a computer-controlled X, Y, Z positioner in front of a micro ion spray direct sampling tube equipped with a beveled tip. The beveled tip of this needle robotically penetrates each SPE elution zone (sorbent disk) or stationary phase in a serial fashion. The eluted analytes are sequentially transferred directly to a microelectrosprayer to obtain tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. This strategy precludes any HPLC separation and the associated method development. The quantitative determination of Ritalin (methylphenidate) from fortified human urine samples is demonstrated. A trideuterated internal standard of methylphenidate was used to obtain ion current response ratios between the parent drug and the internal standard. Human control urine samples fortified from 6.6 to 3300 ng/mL (normal therapeutic levels have been determined in other studies to be between 50 and 100 ng/mL urine) were analyzed and a linear calibration curve was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.9999, where the precision of the quality control (QC) samples ranged from 9.6% at the 24

  13. A total extract dot blot hybridization procedure for mRNA quantitation in small samples of tissues or cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Grimes, A; McArdle, H J; Mercer, J F

    1988-08-01

    A simple method for the estimation of specific mRNA concentrations in small tissue samples (as little as 1 mg) or cultured cells (lower limit 10(5) cells) is described. Guanidine hydrochloride extracts of whole cells or tissues are applied directly onto nitrocellulose and hybridized with the appropriate nick-translated probe. Loading according to DNA content allows expression of the result as concentration per cell. Hybridizing with a ribosomal RNA probe allows expression of results relative to rRNA and estimation of the RNA/DNA ratio in the sample. We describe the application of this procedure to the measurement of ceruloplasmin mRNA in tissues and cultured hepatocytes.

  14. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  15. Automated identification and geometrical features extraction of individual trees from Mobile Laser Scanning data in Budapest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Zsófia; Székely, Balázs; Folly-Ritvay, Zoltán; Skobrák, Ferenc; Koenig, Kristina; Höfle, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) is an evolving operational measurement technique for urban environment providing large amounts of high resolution information about trees, street features, pole-like objects on the street sides or near to motorways. In this study we investigate a robust segmentation method to extract the individual trees automatically in order to build an object-based tree database system. We focused on the large urban parks in Budapest (Margitsziget and Városliget; KARESZ project) which contained large diversity of different kind of tree species. The MLS data contained high density point cloud data with 1-8 cm mean absolute accuracy 80-100 meter distance from streets. The robust segmentation method contained following steps: The ground points are determined first. As a second step cylinders are fitted in vertical slice 1-1.5 meter relative height above ground, which is used to determine the potential location of each single trees trunk and cylinder-like object. Finally, residual values are calculated as deviation of each point from a vertically expanded fitted cylinder; these residual values are used to separate cylinder-like object from individual trees. After successful parameterization, the model parameters and the corresponding residual values of the fitted object are extracted and imported into the tree database. Additionally, geometric features are calculated for each segmented individual tree like crown base, crown width, crown length, diameter of trunk, volume of the individual trees. In case of incompletely scanned trees, the extraction of geometric features is based on fitted circles. The result of the study is a tree database containing detailed information about urban trees, which can be a valuable dataset for ecologist, city planners, planting and mapping purposes. Furthermore, the established database will be the initial point for classification trees into single species. MLS data used in this project had been measured in the framework of

  16. Linearly Supporting Feature Extraction for Automated Estimation of Stellar Atmospheric Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangru; Lu, Yu; Comte, Georges; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Yongheng; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    We describe a scheme to extract linearly supporting (LSU) features from stellar spectra to automatically estimate the atmospheric parameters {{T}{\\tt{eff} }}, log g, and [Fe/H]. “Linearly supporting” means that the atmospheric parameters can be accurately estimated from the extracted features through a linear model. The successive steps of the process are as follow: first, decompose the spectrum using a wavelet packet (WP) and represent it by the derived decomposition coefficients; second, detect representative spectral features from the decomposition coefficients using the proposed method Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LARS)bs; third, estimate the atmospheric parameters {{T}{\\tt{eff} }}, log g, and [Fe/H] from the detected features using a linear regression method. One prominent characteristic of this scheme is its ability to evaluate quantitatively the contribution of each detected feature to the atmospheric parameter estimate and also to trace back the physical significance of that feature. This work also shows that the usefulness of a component depends on both the wavelength and frequency. The proposed scheme has been evaluated on both real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/SEGUE and synthetic spectra calculated from Kurucz's NEWODF models. On real spectra, we extracted 23 features to estimate {{T}{\\tt{eff} }}, 62 features for log g, and 68 features for [Fe/H]. Test consistencies between our estimates and those provided by the Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline of SDSS show that the mean absolute errors (MAEs) are 0.0062 dex for log {{T}{\\tt{eff} }} (83 K for {{T}{\\tt{eff} }}), 0.2345 dex for log g, and 0.1564 dex for [Fe/H]. For the synthetic spectra, the MAE test accuracies are 0.0022 dex for log {{T}{\\tt{eff} }} (32 K for {{T}{\\tt{eff} }}), 0.0337 dex for log g, and 0.0268 dex for [Fe/H].

  17. Pedestrian detection in thermal images: An automated scale based region extraction with curvelet space validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, A.; Faheema, A. G. J.; Deodhare, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection is a key problem in night vision processing with a dozen of applications that will positively impact the performance of autonomous systems. Despite significant progress, our study shows that performance of state-of-the-art thermal image pedestrian detectors still has much room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to overcome the challenge faced by the thermal image pedestrian detectors, which employ intensity based Region Of Interest (ROI) extraction followed by feature based validation. The most striking disadvantage faced by the first module, ROI extraction, is the failed detection of cloth insulted parts. To overcome this setback, this paper employs an algorithm and a principle of region growing pursuit tuned to the scale of the pedestrian. The statistics subtended by the pedestrian drastically vary with the scale and deviation from normality approach facilitates scale detection. Further, the paper offers an adaptive mathematical threshold to resolve the problem of subtracting the background while extracting cloth insulated parts as well. The inherent false positives of the ROI extraction module are limited by the choice of good features in pedestrian validation step. One such feature is curvelet feature, which has found its use extensively in optical images, but has as yet no reported results in thermal images. This has been used to arrive at a pedestrian detector with a reduced false positive rate. This work is the first venture made to scrutinize the utility of curvelet for characterizing pedestrians in thermal images. Attempt has also been made to improve the speed of curvelet transform computation. The classification task is realized through the use of the well known methodology of Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The proposed method is substantiated with qualified evaluation methodologies that permits us to carry out probing and informative comparisons across state-of-the-art features, including deep learning methods, with six

  18. Automated feature extraction and spatial organization of seafloor pockmarks, Belfast Bay, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, B.D.; Brothers, L.L.; Barnhardt, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor pockmarks occur worldwide and may represent millions of m3 of continental shelf erosion, but few numerical analyses of their morphology and spatial distribution of pockmarks exist. We introduce a quantitative definition of pockmark morphology and, based on this definition, propose a three-step geomorphometric method to identify and extract pockmarks from high-resolution swath bathymetry. We apply this GIS-implemented approach to 25km2 of bathymetry collected in the Belfast Bay, Maine USA pockmark field. Our model extracted 1767 pockmarks and found a linear pockmark depth-to-diameter ratio for pockmarks field-wide. Mean pockmark depth is 7.6m and mean diameter is 84.8m. Pockmark distribution is non-random, and nearly half of the field's pockmarks occur in chains. The most prominent chains are oriented semi-normal to the steepest gradient in Holocene sediment thickness. A descriptive model yields field-wide spatial statistics indicating that pockmarks are distributed in non-random clusters. Results enable quantitative comparison of pockmarks in fields worldwide as well as similar concave features, such as impact craters, dolines, or salt pools. ?? 2010.

  19. Automated DICOM metadata and volumetric anatomical information extraction for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichail, D.; Ploussi, A.; Kordolaimi, S.; Karavasilis, E.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Syrgiamiotis, V.; Efstathopoulos, E.

    2015-09-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry calculations based on simulation techniques have as a prerequisite the modeling of the modality system and the creation of voxelized phantoms. This procedure requires the knowledge of scanning parameters and patients’ information included in a DICOM file as well as image segmentation. However, the extraction of this information is complicated and time-consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a simple graphical user interface (GUI) to (i) automatically extract metadata from every slice image of a DICOM file in a single query and (ii) interactively specify the regions of interest (ROI) without explicit access to the radiology information system. The user-friendly application developed in Matlab environment. The user can select a series of DICOM files and manage their text and graphical data. The metadata are automatically formatted and presented to the user as a Microsoft Excel file. The volumetric maps are formed by interactively specifying the ROIs and by assigning a specific value in every ROI. The result is stored in DICOM format, for data and trend analysis. The developed GUI is easy, fast and and constitutes a very useful tool for individualized dosimetry. One of the future goals is to incorporate a remote access to a PACS server functionality.

  20. Automated bare earth extraction technique for complex topography in light detection and ranging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Bradford, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital surface models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. Few existing algorithms can handle substantial terrain diversity without significant editing or user interaction. This effort presents a newly developed methodology that provides a flexible, adaptable tool capable of integrating multiple LiDAR data attributes for an accurate terrain assessment. The terrain extraction and segmentation (TEXAS) approach uses a third-order spatial derivative for each point in the digital surface model to determine the curvature of the terrain rather than rely solely on the slope. The utilization of the curvature has shown to successfully preserve ground points in areas of steep terrain as they typically exhibit low curvature. Within the framework of TEXAS, the contiguous sets of points with low curvatures are grouped into regions using an edge-based segmentation method. The process does not require any user inputs and is completely data driven. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LiDAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity.

  1. Automated boundary extraction of the spinal canal in MRI based on dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jaehan; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord is the only communication link between the brain and the body. The abnormalities in it can lead to severe pain and sometimes to paralysis. Due to the growing gap between the number of available radiologists and the number of required radiologists, the need for computer-aided diagnosis and characterization is increasing. To ease this gap, we have developed a computer-aided diagnosis and characterization framework in lumbar spine that includes the spinal cord, vertebrae, and intervertebral discs. In this paper, we propose two spinal cord boundary extraction methods that fit into our framework based on dynamic programming in lumbar spine MRI. Our method incorporates the intensity of the image and the gradient of the image into a dynamic programming scheme and works in a fully-automatic fashion. The boundaries generated by our method is compared against reference boundaries in terms of Fréchet distance which is known to be a metric for shape analysis. The experimental results from 65 clinical data show that our method finds the spinal canal boundary correctly achieving a mean Fréchet distance of 13.5 pixels. For almost all data, the extracted boundary falls within the spinal cord. So, it can be used as a landmark when marking background regions and finding regions of interest.

  2. Automated Neuroanatomical Relation Extraction: A Linguistically Motivated Approach with a PVT Connectivity Graph Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gökdeniz, Erinç; Özgür, Arzucan; Canbeyli, Reşit

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the relations among different regions of the brain is vital for a better understanding of how the brain functions. While a large number of studies have investigated the neuroanatomical and neurochemical connections among brain structures, their specific findings are found in publications scattered over a large number of years and different types of publications. Text mining techniques have provided the means to extract specific types of information from a large number of publications with the aim of presenting a larger, if not necessarily an exhaustive picture. By using natural language processing techniques, the present paper aims to identify connectivity relations among brain regions in general and relations relevant to the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) in particular. We introduce a linguistically motivated approach based on patterns defined over the constituency and dependency parse trees of sentences. Besides the presence of a relation between a pair of brain regions, the proposed method also identifies the directionality of the relation, which enables the creation and analysis of a directional brain region connectivity graph. The approach is evaluated over the manually annotated data sets of the WhiteText Project. In addition, as a case study, the method is applied to extract and analyze the connectivity graph of PVT, which is an important brain region that is considered to influence many functions ranging from arousal, motivation, and drug-seeking behavior to attention. The results of the PVT connectivity graph show that PVT may be a new target of research in mood assessment. PMID:27708573

  3. A novel approach for automated shoreline extraction from remote sensing images using low level programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigos, Anastasios; Vaiopoulos, Aristidis; Skianis, George; Tsekouras, George; Drakopoulos, Panos

    2015-04-01

    Tracking coastline changes is a crucial task in the context of coastal management and synoptic remotely sensed data has become an essential tool for this purpose. In this work, and within the framework of BeachTour project, we introduce a new method for shoreline extraction from high resolution satellite images. It was applied on two images taken by the WorldView-2 satellite (7 channels, 2m resolution) during July 2011 and August 2014. The location is the well-known tourist destination of Laganas beach spanning 5 km along the southern part of Zakynthos Island, Greece. The atmospheric correction was performed with the ENVI FLAASH procedure and the final images were validated against hyperspectral field measurements. Using three channels (CH2=blue, CH3=green and CH7=near infrared) the Modified Redness Index image was calculated according to: MRI=(CH7)2/[CH2x(CH3)3]. MRI has the property that its value keeps increasing as the water becomes shallower. This is followed by an abrupt reduction trend at the location of the wet sand up to the point where the dry shore face begins. After that it remains low-valued throughout the beach zone. Images based on this index were used for the shoreline extraction process that included the following steps: a) On the MRI based image, only an area near the shoreline was kept (this process is known as image masking). b) On the masked image the Canny edge detector operator was applied. c) Of all edges discovered on step (b) only the biggest was kept. d) If the line revealed on step (c) was unacceptable, i.e. not defining the shoreline or defining only part of it, then either more than one areas on step (c) were kept or on the MRI image the pixel values were bound in a particular interval [Blow, Bhigh] and only the ones belonging in this interval were kept. Then, steps (a)-(d) were repeated. Using this method, which is still under development, we were able to extract the shoreline position and reveal its changes during the 3-year period

  4. Evaluation of different RNA-extraction kits for sensitive detection of hepatitis A virus in strawberry samples.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Silvia; Dal Vecchio, Anna; Vilariño, María Luz; Romalde, Jesús L

    2011-02-01

    The efficiency of different commercial RNA extraction kits for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) from seeded strawberry samples was assessed by standard RT-PCR and real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The best results with standard RT-PCR were achieved with Aurum™ Total RNA extraction kit (BioRad), obtaining a detection limit of 5-6.25 pfu/mg of tissue. A slightly lower sensitivity was rendered by the RNeasy® Plant mini kit (Qiagen) (10-12.5 pfu/mg tissue), while the Total Quick RNA Cells and Tissues kit version mini (Talent) rendered a detection limit of 50-100 pfu/mg of tissue. The other tested commercial kits showed worse detection limits (>500 pfu/mg). With RT-qPCR and ten fold diluted RNA all the kits showed an increase of sensitivity, detecting the kits from Qiagen, Talent and BioRad down to 0.05 pfu/mg of strawberry homogenate. These findings indicate that the use of Aurum™ Total RNA extraction kit, with standard RT-PCR technique or RT-qPCR, can not only be labor and time saving but also helpful to improve the sensitivity for the HAV detection from fruits and to facilitate the standardization of detection methods among laboratories.

  5. Extraction of high-quality RNA from germinating barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds containing high levels of starch.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative evaluation of gene expression levels can lead to improved understanding of the gene networks underlying traits of economic importance. Extraction of high-quality RNA from germinating barley seeds that contain high levels of starch is of vital importance for analysing the expression of ca...

  6. EFFECTS OF STORAGE, RNA EXTRACTION, GENECHIP TYPE, AND DONOR SEX ON GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF HUMAN WHOLE BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Gene expression profiling of whole blood may be useful for monitoring toxicological exposure and for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. Several methods are available that can be used to transport, store, and extract RNA from whole blood, but it is not clear...

  7. Cistanches Herba aqueous extract affecting serum BGP and TRAP and bone marrow Smad1 mRNA, Smad5 mRNA, TGF-β1 mRNA and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels in osteoporosis disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Dong; Yu, Fang; Tong, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Quan; Liang, Wu

    2013-02-01

    We studied molecular mechanism of Cistanches Herba aqueous extract (CHAE) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, as an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Female rats were either sham-operated or bilaterally OVX; and at 60 days postoperatively. The OVX group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and treatment with normal saline for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomized +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and were treated with Cistanches Herba aqueous extract of 100 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 22nd post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomy +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy, and were treated with the of 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. Serum BGP and TRAP, E2, FSH and LH level, bone marrow Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels were examined. Results showed that serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels were significantly increased, whereas E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels were significantly decreased in OVX rats compared to sham rats. 90 days of CHAE treatment could significantly decrease serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels, and increase E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels in OVX rats. It can be concluded that CHAE play its protective effect against OVX-induced bone degeneration partly by regulating some bone metabolism related genes, e.g. Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1.

  8. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  9. An automated method of on-line extraction coupled with flow injection and capillary electrophoresis for phytochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongli; Ding, Xiuping; Wang, Min; Chen, Xingguo

    2010-11-01

    In this study, an automated system for phytochemical analysis was successfully fabricated for the first time in our laboratory. The system included on-line decocting, filtering, cooling, sample introducing, separation, and detection, which greatly simplified the sample preparation and shortened the analysis time. Samples from the decoction extract were drawn every 5 min through an on-line filter and a condenser pipe to the sample loop from which 20-μL samples were injected into the running buffer and transported into a split-flow interface coupling the flow injection and capillary electrophoresis systems. The separation of glycyrrhetinic acid (GTA) and glycyrrhizic acid (GA) took less than 5 min by using a 10 mM borate buffer (adjusted pH to 8.8) and +10 kV voltage. Calibration curves showed good linearity with correlation coefficients (R) more than 0.9991. The intra-day repeatabilities (n = 5, expressed as relative standard deviation) of the proposed system, obtained using GTA and GA standards, were 1.1% and 0.8% for migration time and 0.7% and 0.9% for peak area, respectively. The mean recoveries of GTA and GA in the off-line extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch root were better than 99.0%. The limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) of the proposed method were 6.2 μg/mL and 6.9 μg/mL for GTA and GA, respectively. The dynamic changes of GTA and GA on the decoction time were obtained during the on-line decoction process of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch root.

  10. Automated and portable solid phase extraction platform for immuno-detection of 17β-estradiol in water.

    PubMed

    Heub, Sarah; Tscharner, Noe; Monnier, Véronique; Kehl, Florian; Dittrich, Petra S; Follonier, Stéphane; Barbe, Laurent

    2015-02-13

    A fully automated and portable system for solid phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for the analysis of the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) in environmental water by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). The system has been validated with de-ionized and artificial sea water as model samples and allowed for pre-concentration of E2 at levels of 1, 10 and 100 ng/L with only 100 ml of sample. Recoveries ranged from 24±3% to 107±6% depending on the concentration and sample matrix. The method successfully allowed us to determine the concentration of two seawater samples. A concentration of 15.1±0.3 ng/L of E2 was measured in a sample obtained from a food production process, and 8.8±0.7 ng/L in a sample from the Adriatic Sea. The system would be suitable for continuous monitoring of water quality as it is user friendly, and as the method is reproducible and totally compatible with the analysis of water sample by simple immunoassays and other detection methods such as biosensors.

  11. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  12. Automated extraction and quantitation of oncogenic HPV genotypes from cervical samples by a real-time PCR-based system.

    PubMed

    Broccolo, Francesco; Cocuzza, Clementina E

    2008-03-01

    Accurate laboratory assays for the diagnosis of persistent oncogenic HPV infection are being recognized increasingly as essential for clinical management of women with cervical precancerous lesions. HPV viral load has been suggested to be a surrogate marker of persistent infection. Four independent real-time quantitative TaqMan PCR assays were developed for: HPV-16, -31, -18 and/or -45 and -33 and/or -52, -58, -67. The assays had a wide dynamic range of detection and a high degree of accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. In order to minimize material and hands-on time, automated nucleic acid extraction was performed using a 96-well plate format integrated into a robotic liquid handler workstation. The performance of the TaqMan assays for HPV identification was assessed by comparing results with those obtained by means of PCR using consensus primers (GP5+/GP6+) and sequencing (296 samples) and INNO-LiPA analysis (31 samples). Good agreement was found generally between results obtained by real-time PCR assays and GP(+)-PCR system (kappa statistic=0.91). In conclusion, this study describes four newly developed real-time PCR assays that provide a reliable and high-throughput method for detection of not only HPV DNA but also HPV activity of the most common oncogenic HPV types in cervical specimens.

  13. Exposing Exposure: Automated Anatomy-specific CT Radiation Exposure Extraction for Quality Assurance and Radiation Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Graham I.; Farkas, Cameron E.; Ikuta, Ichiro; Prevedello, Luciano M.; Andriole, Katherine P.; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate an informatics toolkit that extracts anatomy-specific computed tomography (CT) radiation exposure metrics (volume CT dose index and dose-length product) from existing digital image archives through optical character recognition of CT dose report screen captures (dose screens) combined with Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine attributes. Materials and Methods: This institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant study was performed in a large urban health care delivery network. Data were drawn from a random sample of CT encounters that occurred between 2000 and 2010; images from these encounters were contained within the enterprise image archive, which encompassed images obtained at an adult academic tertiary referral hospital and its affiliated sites, including a cancer center, a community hospital, and outpatient imaging centers, as well as images imported from other facilities. Software was validated by using 150 randomly selected encounters for each major CT scanner manufacturer, with outcome measures of dose screen retrieval rate (proportion of correctly located dose screens) and anatomic assignment precision (proportion of extracted exposure data with correctly assigned anatomic region, such as head, chest, or abdomen and pelvis). The 95% binomial confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for discrete proportions, and CIs were derived from the standard error of the mean for continuous variables. After validation, the informatics toolkit was used to populate an exposure repository from a cohort of 54 549 CT encounters; of which 29 948 had available dose screens. Results: Validation yielded a dose screen retrieval rate of 99% (597 of 605 CT encounters; 95% CI: 98%, 100%) and an anatomic assignment precision of 94% (summed DLP fraction correct 563 in 600 CT encounters; 95% CI: 92%, 96%). Patient safety applications of the resulting data repository include benchmarking between institutions, CT protocol quality

  14. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-12-29

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses.

  15. Hyphenating Centrifugal Partition Chromatography with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance through Automated Solid Phase Extraction.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jonathan; Brunel, Marion; Badoc, Alain; Da Costa, Grégory; Richard, Tristan; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre

    2016-10-18

    Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and all countercurrent separation apparatus provide chemists with efficient ways to work with complex matrixes, especially in the domain of natural products. However, despite the great advances provided by these techniques, more efficient ways of analyzing the output flow would bring further enhancement. This study describe a hyphenated approach made by coupling NMR with CPC through a hybrid-indirect coupling made possible by using a solid phase extraction (SPE) apparatus intended for high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-NMR hyphenation. Some hardware changes were needed to adapt the incompatible flow-rates and a reverse-engineering approach that led to the specific software required to control the apparatus. 1D (1)HNMR and (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were acquired in reasonable time without the need for any solvent-suppression method thanks to the SPE nitrogen drying step. The reduced usage of expensive deuterated solvents from several hundreds of milliliters to the milliliter order is the major improvement of this approach compared to the previously published ones.

  16. Automated quantification of distributed landslide movement using circular tree trunks extracted from terrestrial laser scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Jeremy C.; Olsen, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    This manuscript presents a novel algorithm to automatically detect landslide movement in a forested area using displacements of tree trunks distributed across the landslide surveyed repeatedly using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Common landslide monitoring techniques include: inclinometers, global position system (GPS), and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). While these techniques provide valuable data for monitoring landslides, they can be difficult to apply with adequate spatial or temporal resolution needed to understand complex landslides, specifically in forested environments. Comparison of the center coordinates (determined via least-squares fit of the TLS data) of a cross section of the tree trunk between consecutive surveys enable quantification of landslide movement rates, which can be used to analyze patterns of landslide displacement. The capabilities of this new methodology were tested through a case-study analyzing the Johnson Creek Landslide, a complex, quick moving coastal landslide, which has proven difficult to monitor using other techniques. A parametric analysis of fitting thresholds was also conducted to determine the reliability of tree trunk displacements calculated and the number of features that were extracted. The optimal parameters in selecting trees for movement analysis were found to be less than 1.5 cm for the RMS residuals of the circle fit and less than 1.0 cm for the difference in the calculated tree radii between epochs.

  17. High-throughput pharmacokinetics screen of VLA-4 antagonists by LC/MS/MS coupled with automated solid-phase extraction sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xinchun S; Wang, Junying; Zheng, Song; Pivnichny, James V

    2004-06-29

    Automation of plasma sample preparation for pharmacokinetic studies on VLA-4 antagonists has been achieved by using 96-well format solid-phase extraction operated by Beckman Coulter Biomek 2000 liquid handling system. A Biomek 2000 robot is used to perform fully automated plasma sample preparation tasks that include serial dilution of standard solutions, pipetting plasma samples, addition of standard and internal standard solutions, performing solid-phase extraction (SPE) on Waters OASIS 96-well plates. This automated sample preparation process takes less than 2 h for a typical pharmacokinetic study, including 51 samples, 24 standards, 9 quality controls, and 3-6 dose checks with minimal manual intervention. Extensive validation has been made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of this method. A two-stage vacuum pressure controller has been incorporated in the program to improve SPE efficiency. This automated SPE sample preparation approach combined with liquid chromatography coupled with the high sensitivity and selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS)/MS has been successfully applied on both individual and cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening of a large number of VLA-4 antagonists with a limit of quantitation in the range of 1-5 ng/ml. Consequently, a significant throughput increase has been achieved along with an elimination of tedious labor and its consequential tendency to produce errors.

  18. Validation of the TaqMan Influenza A Detection Kit and a rapid automated total nucleic acid extraction method to detect influenza A virus in nasopharyngeal specimens.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Shelly; De Lima, Cedric; Choi, Kam-Wing; Lombos, Ernesto; Burton, Laura; Mazzulli, Tony; Drews, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validation of the TaqMan Influenza A Detection Kit v2.0 combined with an automated nucleic acid extraction method. The limit of detection of this assay was determined by probit regression (95% confidence interval) to be 2 influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus particles per microlitre. One hundred and eleven specimens previously tested using the Seeplex RV assay and viral culture methods were tested using the TaqMan Influenza A Detection Kit. Compared to the aggregate gold-standard, the sensitivity and specificity of the TaqMan Influenza A Detection Kit were 100% (35/35) and 97% (74/76), respectively. Because of its accuracy, quick turn-around-time and lyophilized bead form, the TaqMan Influenza A Detection Kit, combined with the NucliSense easyMAG automated extraction method, constitutes a reliable protocol for influenza A diagnosis.

  19. Automated extraction and analysis of rock discontinuity characteristics from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, Matteo; Villa, Alberto; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    A reliable characterization of fractured rock masses requires an exhaustive geometrical description of discontinuities, including orientation, spacing, and size. These are required to describe discontinuum rock mass structure, perform Discrete Fracture Network and DEM modelling, or provide input for rock mass classification or equivalent continuum estimate of rock mass properties. Although several advanced methodologies have been developed in the last decades, a complete characterization of discontinuity geometry in practice is still challenging, due to scale-dependent variability of fracture patterns and difficult accessibility to large outcrops. Recent advances in remote survey techniques, such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, allow a fast and accurate acquisition of dense 3D point clouds, which promoted the development of several semi-automatic approaches to extract discontinuity features. Nevertheless, these often need user supervision on algorithm parameters which can be difficult to assess. To overcome this problem, we developed an original Matlab tool, allowing fast, fully automatic extraction and analysis of discontinuity features with no requirements on point cloud accuracy, density and homogeneity. The tool consists of a set of algorithms which: (i) process raw 3D point clouds, (ii) automatically characterize discontinuity sets, (iii) identify individual discontinuity surfaces, and (iv) analyse their spacing and persistence. The tool operates in either a supervised or unsupervised mode, starting from an automatic preliminary exploration data analysis. The identification and geometrical characterization of discontinuity features is divided in steps. First, coplanar surfaces are identified in the whole point cloud using K-Nearest Neighbor and Principal Component Analysis algorithms optimized on point cloud accuracy and specified typical facet size. Then, discontinuity set orientation is calculated using Kernel Density Estimation and

  20. Development of an automated method for Folin-Ciocalteu total phenolic assay in artichoke extracts.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kil Sun; Lee, Eun Jin; Leskovar, Daniel; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2012-12-01

    We developed a system to run the Folin-Ciocalteu (F-C) total phenolic assay, in artichoke extract samples, which is fully automatic, consistent, and fast. The system uses 2 high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pumps, an autosampler, a column heater, a UV/Vis detector, and a data collection system. To test the system, a pump delivered 10-fold diluted F-C reagent solution at a rate of 0.7 mL/min, and 0.4 g/mL sodium carbonate at a rate of 2.1 mL/min. The autosampler injected 10 μL per 1.2 min, which was mixed with the F-C reagent and heated to 65 °C while it passed through the column heater. The heated reactant was mixed with sodium carbonate and color intensity was measured by the detector at 600 nm. The data collection system recorded the color intensity, and peak area of each sample was calculated as the concentration of the total phenolic content, expressed in μg/mL as either chlorogenic acid or gallic acid. This new method had superb repeatability (0.7% CV) and a high correlation with both the manual method (r(2) = 0.93) and the HPLC method (r(2) = 0.78). Ascorbic acid and quercetin showed variable antioxidant activity, but sugars did not. This method can be efficiently applied to research that needs to test many numbers of antioxidant capacity samples with speed and accuracy.

  1. Automated liquid-liquid extraction workstation for library synthesis and its use in the parallel and chromatography-free synthesis of 2-alkyl-3-alkyl-4-(3H)-quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Mercedes; Cifuentes, Marta; Ferritto, Rafael; Haro, Rubén; Toledo, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    An automated liquid-liquid extraction workstation has been developed. This module processes up to 96 samples in an automated and parallel mode avoiding the time-consuming and intensive sample manipulation during the workup process. To validate the workstation, a highly automated and chromatography-free synthesis of differentially substituted quinazolin-4(3H)-ones with two diversity points has been carried out using isatoic anhydride as starting material.

  2. Wheat germ extract decreases glucose uptake and RNA ribose formation but increases fatty acid synthesis in MIA pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Boros, L G; Lapis, K; Szende, B; Tömösközi-Farkas, R; Balogh, A; Boren, J; Marin, S; Cascante, M; Hidvégi, M

    2001-08-01

    The fermented wheat germ extract with standardized benzoquinone composition has potent tumor propagation inhibitory properties. The authors show that this extract induces profound metabolic changes in cultured MIA pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells when the [1,2-13C2]glucose isotope is used as the single tracer with biologic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. MIA cells treated with 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/mL wheat germ extract showed a dose-dependent decrease in cell glucose consumption. uptake of isotope into ribosomal RNA (2.4%, 9.4%, and 28.0%), and release of 13CO2. Conversely, direct glucose oxidation and ribose recycling in the pentose cycle showed a dose-dependent increase of 1.2%, 20.7%, and 93.4%. The newly synthesized fraction of cell palmitate and the 13C enrichment of acetyl units were also significantly increased with all doses of wheat germ extract. The fermented wheat germ extract controls tumor propagation primarily by regulating glucose carbon redistribution between cell proliferation-related and cell differentiation-related macromolecules. Wheat germ extract treatment is likely associated with the phosphorylation and transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes that are involved in glucose carbon redistribution between cell proliferation-related structural and functional macromolecules (RNA, DNA) and the direct oxidative degradation of glucose, which have devastating consequences for the proliferation and survival of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in culture.

  3. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES CONTAINING PESTICIDES, ACIDIC/BASIC/NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILES AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line 10-m...

  4. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid.

    PubMed

    Mornkham, Tanupat; Wangsomnuk, Preeya Puangsomlee; Fu, Yong-Bi; Wangsomnuk, Pinich; Jogloy, Sanun; Patanothai, Aran

    2013-04-29

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011) yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  5. Submicrometric Magnetic Nanoporous Carbons Derived from Metal-Organic Frameworks Enabling Automated Electromagnet-Assisted Online Solid-Phase Extraction.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Bauzà, Maria Del Mar; Portugal, Lindomar A; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor; Estela, José M; Turnes Palomino, Gemma

    2016-07-19

    We present the first application of submicrometric magnetic nanoporous carbons (μMNPCs) as sorbents for automated solid-phase extraction (SPE). Small zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 crystals are obtained at room temperature and directly carbonized under an inert atmosphere to obtain submicrometric nanoporous carbons containing magnetic cobalt nanoparticles. The μMNPCs have a high contact area, high stability, and their preparation is simple and cost-effective. The prepared μMNPCs are exploited as sorbents in a microcolumn format in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system with online spectrophotometric detection, which includes a specially designed three-dimensional (3D)-printed holder containing an automatically actuated electromagnet. The combined action of permanent magnets and an automatically actuated electromagnet enabled the movement of the solid bed of particles inside the microcolumn, preventing their aggregation, increasing the versatility of the system, and increasing the preconcentration efficiency. The method was optimized using a full factorial design and Doehlert Matrix. The developed system was applied to the determination of anionic surfactants, exploiting the retention of the ion-pairs formed with Methylene Blue on the μMNPC. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model analyte, quantification was linear from 50 to 1000 μg L(-1), and the detection limit was equal to 17.5 μg L(-1), the coefficient of variation (n = 8; 100 μg L(-1)) was 2.7%, and the analysis throughput was 13 h(-1). The developed approach was applied to the determination of anionic surfactants in water samples (natural water, groundwater, and wastewater), yielding recoveries of 93% to 110% (95% confidence level).

  6. Semi-automated disk-type solid-phase extraction method for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in aqueous samples and its application to natural water.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Lee, J H; Moon, B S; Baek, K H

    2007-07-20

    A disk-type solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was used for the extraction of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in natural water and tap water. Since this SPE system comprised airtight glass covers with a decompression pump, it enabled continuous extraction with semi-automation. The disk-type SPE method was validated by comparing its recovery rates of spiked internal standards with those of the liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). The recovery ranges of both methods were similar in terms of (13)C-labeled internal standards: 64.3-99.2% for the LLE and 52.4-93.6% for the SPE. For the native spike of 1,3,6,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD), the recoveries in the SPE were in the normal range of 77.9-101.1%. However, in the LLE, the recoveries of 1,3,6,8-TCDD decreased significantly. One of the reasons for the low recovery is that the solubility of this congener is high. The semi-automated SPE method was applied to the analysis of different types of water: river water, snow, sea water, raw water for drinking purposes, and tap water. PCDD/F congeners were found in some sea water and snow samples, while their concentrations in the other samples were below the limits of detection (LODs). This SPE system is appropriate for the routine analysis of water samples below 50L.

  7. A Unique Method for Isolation and Solubilization of Proteins after Extraction of RNA from Tumor Tissue Using Trizol

    PubMed Central

    Likhite, Neah; Warawdekar, Ujjwala M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a systems approach to study tumor tissue. The importance of concurrent extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein is evident when genetic aberrations and the differences in the proteome and transcriptome have to be correlated. The need is magnified, as the tissue available for study is miniscule, is shared amongst investigators, and needs to support the holistic approach. Trizol is a monophasic solution of phenol and guanidine isothiocyanate and can be used to isolate the three biomolecules simultaneously. Trizol solution was used for RNA extraction in an ongoing study about expression of molecular markers in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and breast tumor tissue. After isolation of RNA, the remaining Trizol fraction was stored at −80°C for over 6 months. We have shown the extraction of protein from 17 tumor and adjacent, normal tissue samples and PBMC obtained from four blood samples. The isolation and solubilization of the protein fraction were done according to the product information using isopropanol for precipitation and guanidine hydrochloride and SDS for washing and solubilization, respectively, modifying the time of solubilization. The protein was estimated by the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method and analyzed on polyacrylamide gels. Staining showed a wide repertoire, and Western blotting confirmed extraction of cytokeratins (CK) and DNA repair proteins. Whereas tissue samples in which the RNA was degraded could be assessed by the presence of the protein salvaging the marker analysis, it was seen that nuclear proteins cannot be retrieved and are probably lost with the DNA fraction. PMID:21455480

  8. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Natalie Y N; Roco, Constance A; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer's recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of "representative samples" is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis.

  9. Transparent DNA/RNA Co-extraction Workflow Protocol Suitable for Inhibitor-Rich Environmental Samples That Focuses on Complete DNA Removal for Transcriptomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Natalie Y. N.; Roco, Constance A.; Frostegård, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Adequate comparisons of DNA and cDNA libraries from complex environments require methods for co-extraction of DNA and RNA due to the inherent heterogeneity of such samples, or risk bias caused by variations in lysis and extraction efficiencies. Still, there are few methods and kits allowing simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from the same sample, and the existing ones generally require optimization. The proprietary nature of kit components, however, makes modifications of individual steps in the manufacturer’s recommended procedure difficult. Surprisingly, enzymatic treatments are often performed before purification procedures are complete, which we have identified here as a major problem when seeking efficient genomic DNA removal from RNA extracts. Here, we tested several DNA/RNA co-extraction commercial kits on inhibitor-rich soils, and compared them to a commonly used phenol-chloroform co-extraction method. Since none of the kits/methods co-extracted high-quality nucleic acid material, we optimized the extraction workflow by introducing small but important improvements. In particular, we illustrate the need for extensive purification prior to all enzymatic procedures, with special focus on the DNase digestion step in RNA extraction. These adjustments led to the removal of enzymatic inhibition in RNA extracts and made it possible to reduce genomic DNA to below detectable levels as determined by quantitative PCR. Notably, we confirmed that DNase digestion may not be uniform in replicate extraction reactions, thus the analysis of “representative samples” is insufficient. The modular nature of our workflow protocol allows optimization of individual steps. It also increases focus on additional purification procedures prior to enzymatic processes, in particular DNases, yielding genomic DNA-free RNA extracts suitable for metatranscriptomic analysis. PMID:27803690

  10. Single-Step RNA Extraction from Different Hydrogel-Embedded Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Köster, Natascha; Schmiermund, Alexandra; Grubelnig, Stefan; Leber, Jasmin; Ehlicke, Franziska; Czermak, Peter; Salzig, Denise

    2016-06-01

    For many tissue engineering applications, cells such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) must be embedded in hydrogels. The analysis of embedded hMSCs requires RNA extraction, but common extraction procedures often produce low yields and/or poor quality RNA. We systematically investigated four homogenization methods combined with eight RNA extraction protocols for hMSCs embedded in three common hydrogel types (alginate, agarose, and gelatin). We found for all three hydrogel types that using liquid nitrogen or a rotor-stator produced low RNA yields, whereas using a microhomogenizer or enzymatic/chemical hydrogel digestion achieved better yields regardless of which extraction protocol was subsequently applied. The hot phenol extraction protocol generally achieved the highest A260 values (representing up to 40.8 μg RNA per 10(6) cells), but the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method produced RNA of better quality, with A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios and UV spectra similar to the pure RNA control. The RNA produced by this method was also suitable as a template for endpoint and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), achieving low Ct values of ∼20. The prudent choice of hydrogel homogenization and RNA extraction methods can ensure the preparation of high-quality RNA that generates reliable endpoint and quantitative RT-PCR data. We therefore propose a universal method that is suitable for the extraction of RNA from cells embedded in all three hydrogel types commonly used for tissue engineering.

  11. Automated Metadata Extraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    advanced forensic format, library and tools. Paper presented at the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.9 International Conference on Digital Forensics...search.htm. [49] C. Spieler. UnZip 5.52. Retrieved 5/24/2008, from http://www.WinZip.com. [50] J. E. Towle , C. T. Clotfelter. (2007). TwiddleNet

  12. Full Design Automation of Multi-State RNA Devices to Program Gene Expression Using Energy-Based Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Majer, Eszter; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) can operate as regulatory agents to control protein expression by interaction with the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA. We have developed a physicochemical framework, relying on base pair interaction energies, to design multi-state sRNA devices by solving an optimization problem with an objective function accounting for the stability of the transition and final intermolecular states. Contrary to the analysis of the reaction kinetics of an ensemble of sRNAs, we solve the inverse problem of finding sequences satisfying targeted reactions. We show here that our objective function correlates well with measured riboregulatory activity of a set of mutants. This has enabled the application of the methodology for an extended design of RNA devices with specified behavior, assuming different molecular interaction models based on Watson-Crick interaction. We designed several YES, NOT, AND, and OR logic gates, including the design of combinatorial riboregulators. In sum, our de novo approach provides a new paradigm in synthetic biology to design molecular interaction mechanisms facilitating future high-throughput functional sRNA design. PMID:23935479

  13. Determination of Low Concentrations of Acetochlor in Water by Automated Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Mass-Selective Detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindley, C.E.; Stewart, J.T.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for determining acetochlor in environmental water samples was developed. The method involves automated extraction of the herbicide from a filtered 1 L water sample through a C18 solid-phase extraction column, elution from the column with hexane-isopropyl alcohol (3 + 1), and concentration of the extract with nitrogen gas. The herbicide is quantitated by capillary/column GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring of 3 characteristic ions. The single-operator method detection limit for reagent water samples is 0.0015 ??g/L. Mean recoveries ranged from about 92 to 115% for 3 water matrixes fortified at 0.05 and 0.5 ??g/L. Average single-operator precision, over the course of 1 week, was better than 5%.

  14. Fully automated diagnosis of papilledema through robust extraction of vascular patterns and ocular pathology from fundus photographs

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Khush Naseeb; Hassan, Taimur; Akram, M. Usman; Akhtar, Mahmood; Butt, Wasi Haider

    2017-01-01

    Rapid development in the field of ophthalmology has increased the demand of computer aided diagnosis of various eye diseases. Papilledema is an eye disease in which the optic disc of the eye is swelled due to an increase in intracranial pressure. This increased pressure can cause severe encephalic complications like abscess, tumors, meningitis or encephalitis, which may lead to a patient’s death. Although there have been several papilledema case studies reported from a medical point of view, only a few researchers have presented automated algorithms for this problem. This paper presents a novel computer aided system which aims to automatically detect papilledema from fundus images. Firstly, the fundus images are preprocessed by going through optic disc detection and vessel segmentation. After preprocessing, a total of 26 different features are extracted to capture possible changes in the optic disc due to papilledema. These features are further divided into four categories based upon their color, textural, vascular and disc margin obscuration properties. The best features are then selected and combined to form a feature matrix that is used to distinguish between normal images and images with papilledema using the supervised support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The proposed method is tested on 160 fundus images obtained from two different data sets i.e. structured analysis of retina (STARE), which is a publicly available data set, and our local data set that has been acquired from the Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO). The STARE data set contained 90 and our local data set contained 70 fundus images respectively. These annotations have been performed with the help of two ophthalmologists. We report detection accuracies of 95.6% for STARE, 87.4% for the local data set, and 85.9% for the combined STARE and local data sets. The proposed system is fast and robust in detecting papilledema from fundus images with promising results. This will aid

  15. An improved method for extraction of high-quality total RNA from oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Rayani, Azadeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Seeds of oilseed plants that contain large amounts of oil, polysaccharides, proteins and polyphenols are not amenable to conventional RNA isolation protocols. The presence of these substances affects the quality and quantity of isolated nucleic acids. Here, a rapid and efficient RNA isolation protocol that, in contrast to other methods tested, allows high purify, integrity and yield of total RNA from seeds of sesame, corn, sunflower, flax and rapeseed was developed. The average yields of total RNA from 70 mg oil seeds ranged from 84 to 310 µg with A260/A280 between 1.9 and 2.08. The RNA isolated with this protocol was verified to be suitable for PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, cDNA synthesis and expression analysis.

  16. Validation of a PicoGreen-based DNA quantification integrated in an RNA extraction method for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Sonnaert, Maarten; Roberts, Scott J; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2012-06-01

    DNA measurement and RNA extraction are two frequently used methods for cell characterization. In the conventional protocols, they require similar, but separate samples and in most cases, different pretreatments. The few combined protocols that exist still include time-consuming steps. Hence, to establish an efficient combined RNA extraction and DNA measurement protocol for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures, a PicoGreen-based DNA measurement was integrated in an existing RNA extraction protocol. It was validated by analysis of the influence of different lysis buffers, RLT, RA1, or Trizol, used for RNA extraction on the measured DNA concentration. The DNA cell yield was evaluated both in cell suspensions (2D) and on 3D cell-seeded scaffolds. Results showed that the different RNA lysis buffers caused a concentration-dependent perturbation of the PicoGreen signal. The measured DNA concentrations in 2D and 3D using RLT and RA1 buffer were comparable, also to the positive control. We, therefore, concluded that RNA extraction protocols using RA1 or RLT buffer allow the integration of a DNA quantification step without the buffer influencing the results. Hence, the combined DNA measurement and RNA extraction offer an alternative for DNA measurement techniques that is time and sample saving, for both 2D cell cultures and specific 3D constructs.

  17. Time-resolved characterization of particle associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a newly-developed sequential spot sampler with automated extraction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Lewis, Gregory S.; Spielman, Steven R.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2014-10-01

    A versatile and compact sampling system, the Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) has been developed for pre-concentrated, time-resolved, dry collection of fine and ultrafine particles. Using a temperature-moderated laminar flow water condensation method, ambient particles as small as 6 nm are deposited within a dry, 1-mm diameter spot. Sequential samples are collected on a multiwell plate. Chemical analyses are laboratory-based, but automated. The sample preparation, extraction and chemical analysis steps are all handled through a commercially-available, needle-based autosampler coupled to a liquid chromatography system. This automation is enabled by the small deposition area of the collection. The entire sample is extracted into 50-100 μL volume of solvent, providing quantifiable samples with small collected air volumes. A pair of S3 units was deployed in Stockton (CA) from November 2011 to February 2012. PM2.5 samples were collected every 12 h, and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In parallel, conventional filter samples were collected for 48 h and used to assess the new system's performance. An automated sample preparation and extraction was developed for samples collected using the S3. Collocated data from the two sequential spot samplers were highly correlated for all measured compounds, with a regression slope of 1.1 and r2 = 0.9 for all measured concentrations. S3/filter ratios for the mean concentration of each individual PAH vary between 0.82 and 1.33, with the larger variability observed for the semivolatile components. Ratio for total PAH concentrations was 1.08. Total PAH concentrations showed similar temporal trend as ambient PM2.5 concentrations. Source apportionment analysis estimated a significant contribution of biomass burning to ambient PAH concentrations during winter.

  18. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction.

  19. Time-resolved Characterization of Particle Associated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons using a newly-developed Sequential Spot Sampler with Automated Extraction and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory S.; Spielman, Steven R.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2014-01-01

    A versatile and compact sampling system, the Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) has been developed for pre-concentrated, time-resolved, dry collection of fine and ultrafine particles. Using a temperature-moderated laminar flow water condensation method, ambient particles as small as 6 nm are deposited within a dry, 1-mm diameter spot. Sequential samples are collected on a multiwell plate. Chemical analyses are laboratory-based, but automated. The sample preparation, extraction and chemical analysis steps are all handled through a commercially-available, needle-based autosampler coupled to a liquid chromatography system. This automation is enabled by the small deposition area of the collection. The entire sample is extracted into 50–100μl volume of solvent, providing quantifiable samples with small collected air volumes. A pair of S3 units was deployed in Stockton (CA) from November 2011 to February 2012. PM2.5 samples were collected every 12 hrs, and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In parallel, conventional filter samples were collected for 48 hrs and used to assess the new system’s performance. An automated sample preparation and extraction was developed for samples collected using the S3. Collocated data from the two sequential spot samplers were highly correlated for all measured compounds, with a regression slope of 1.1 and r2=0.9 for all measured concentrations. S3/filter ratios for the mean concentration of each individual PAH vary between 0.82 and 1.33, with the larger variability observed for the semivolatile components. Ratio for total PAH concentrations was 1.08. Total PAH concentrations showed similar temporal trend as ambient PM2.5 concentrations. Source apportionment analysis estimated a significant contribution of biomass burning to ambient PAH concentrations during winter. PMID:25574151

  20. Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro

    2015-06-28

    We have developed a novel type of biofunction-assisted aptasensor that harnesses ligand-dependent 3' processing of a premature amber suppressor tRNA and the subsequent amber suppression of a reporter gene in a wheat germ extract.

  1. Correction: Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro

    2015-08-14

    Correction for 'Biofunction-assisted aptasensors based on ligand-dependent 3' processing of a suppressor tRNA in a wheat germ extract' by Atsushi Ogawa et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 6681-6685.

  2. Automated mini-column solid-phase extraction cleanup for high-throughput analysis of chemical contaminants in foods by low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrated the application of an automated high-throughput mini-cartridge solid-phase extraction (mini-SPE) cleanup for the rapid low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants in QuEChERS extracts of foods. ...

  3. Hydroethanolic Pistacia atlantica hulls extract improved wound healing process; evidence for mast cells infiltration, angiogenesis and RNA stability.

    PubMed

    Farahpour, Mohammad Reza; Mirzakhani, Navideh; Doostmohammadi, Jamal; Ebrahimzadeh, Mahmood

    2015-05-01

    In Iranian traditional therapy folk, the Pistacia is used for treatment of wound inflammation. Here in the present study, the In vivo effect of Pistacia atlantica hulls ointment (PAO) on the wound healing process was assessed. Excision and incision wounds were induced in rats. Three different doses of PAO were administrated. Following 3, 7, 14 and 21 days, the tissue samples were obtained and skin irritation ratio, hydroxyproline content, as well as immune cells, fibroblasts, fibrocytes distribution and collagen density were analyzed. Moreover, the cellular RNA damage examined using epi-fluorescent microscope. Hydroethanolic extract of PAO significantly (P < 0.05) increased wound contraction percentage and up-regulated hydroxyproline content. The animals in medium and high dose PAO-treated groups exhibited remarkably (P < 0.05) higher fibroblast distribution and significantly (P < 0.05) lower immune cells infiltration. PAO up-regulated mast cells distribution on day 7 and elevated neovascularization in a dose dependent manner. Significantly lower RNA damage was revealed in PAO-treated animals. Our data showed that, PAO shortened the inflammation phase by provoking the fibroblast proliferation. Moreover, PAO enhanced mast cells distribution and infiltration, which in turn promoted the neovascularization. Ultimately, promoted angiogenesis increased RNA stability in different cell types. Thus, Hydroethanolic extract of PAO can be considered as an appropriate compound for wound healing medicine.

  4. A filter paper-based microdevice for low-cost, rapid, and automated DNA extraction and amplification from diverse sample types.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wupeng; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Pengfei; Han, Junping; Li, Cai-Xia; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-07

    A plastic microfluidic device that integrates a filter disc as a DNA capture phase was successfully developed for low-cost, rapid and automated DNA extraction and PCR amplification from various raw samples. The microdevice was constructed by sandwiching a piece of Fusion 5 filter, as well as a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane, between two PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) layers. An automated DNA extraction from 1 μL of human whole blood can be finished on the chip in 7 minutes by sequentially aspirating NaOH, HCl, and water through the filter. The filter disc containing extracted DNA was then taken out directly for PCR. On-chip DNA purification from 0.25-1 μL of human whole blood yielded 8.1-21.8 ng of DNA, higher than those obtained using QIAamp® DNA Micro kits. To realize DNA extraction from raw samples, an additional sample loading chamber containing a filter net with an 80 μm mesh size was designed in front of the extraction chamber to accommodate sample materials. Real-world samples, including whole blood, dried blood stains on Whatman® 903 paper, dried blood stains on FTA™ cards, buccal swabs, saliva, and cigarette butts, can all be processed in the system in 8 minutes. In addition, multiplex amplification of 15 STR (short tandem repeat) loci and Sanger-based DNA sequencing of the 520 bp GJB2 gene were accomplished from the filters that contained extracted DNA from blood. To further prove the feasibility of integrating this extraction method with downstream analyses, "in situ" PCR amplifications were successfully performed in the DNA extraction chamber following DNA purification from blood and blood stains without DNA elution. Using a modified protocol to bond the PDMS and PMMA, our plastic PDMS devices withstood the PCR process without any leakage. This study represents a significant step towards the practical application of on-chip DNA extraction methods, as well as the development of fully integrated genetic analytical systems.

  5. RNA extraction from various recalcitrant plant tissues with a cethyltrimethylammonium bromide-containing buffer followed by an acid guanidium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform treatment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuji; Mae, Tadahiko; Makino, Amane

    2008-07-01

    High-quality total RNA was extracted using a cethyltrimethylammonium bromide-containing buffer followed by an acid guanidium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform treatment from recalcitrant plant tissues such as tree leaves (pine, Norway spruce, ginkgo, Japanese cedar, rose), flowers (rose, Lotus japonicus) and storage tissues (seeds of Lotus japonicus and rice, sweet potato tuber, banana fruit). This protocol greatly reduced the time required for RNA extraction.

  6. Towards a “Sample-In, Answer-Out” Point-of-Care Platform for Nucleic Acid Extraction and Amplification: Using an HPV E6/E7 mRNA Model System

    PubMed Central

    Gulliksen, Anja; Keegan, Helen; Martin, Cara; O'Leary, John; Solli, Lars A.; Falang, Inger Marie; Grønn, Petter; Karlgård, Aina; Mielnik, Michal M.; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Tofteberg, Terje R.; Baier, Tobias; Gransee, Rainer; Drese, Klaus; Hansen-Hagge, Thomas; Riegger, Lutz; Koltay, Peter; Zengerle, Roland; Karlsen, Frank; Ausen, Dag; Furuberg, Liv

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a “proof-of-principle” hands-free and self-contained diagnostic platform for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA in clinical specimens. The automated platform performs chip-based sample preconcentration, nucleic acid extraction, amplification, and real-time fluorescent detection with minimal user interfacing. It consists of two modular prototypes, one for sample preparation and one for amplification and detection; however, a common interface is available to facilitate later integration into one single module. Nucleic acid extracts (n = 28) from cervical cytology specimens extracted on the sample preparation chip were tested using the PreTect HPV-Proofer and achieved an overall detection rate for HPV across all dilutions of 50%–85.7%. A subset of 6 clinical samples extracted on the sample preparation chip module was chosen for complete validation on the NASBA chip module. For 4 of the samples, a 100% amplification for HPV 16 or 33 was obtained at the 1 : 10 dilution for microfluidic channels that filled correctly. The modules of a “sample-in, answer-out” diagnostic platform have been demonstrated from clinical sample input through sample preparation, amplification and final detection. PMID:22235204

  7. Evaluation of commercial kits for dual extraction of DNA and RNA from human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Schweighardt, Andrew J; Tate, Courtney M; Scott, Kristina A; Harper, Kathryn A; Robertson, James M

    2015-01-01

    STR typing of DNA evidence can identify the donor with a high power of discrimination but cannot identify the tissue origin of a body-fluid stain. Using RNA to attribute a crime scene stain to a particular tissue may aid in reconstruction efforts. With blood from 10 donors, four DNA and RNA coextraction kits were evaluated by measuring yields and STR and mRNA profiles. T tests indicated some significant differences in kit performance. The Zymo Research ZR-Duet(™) kit performed best based on average DNA (41.4 ng) and mRNA (4.07 ng) yields and was the only kit to provide complete DNA/RNA profiles for all samples. The consistency of this kit was challenged by data from additional blood and saliva donors. Further testing is advised before a superior kit is unequivocally chosen. Stand-alone DNA or RNA purification generally offers higher yield, but coextraction may still allow successful STR profiling and tissue source identification.

  8. Automated solid phase extraction, on-support derivatization and isotope dilution-GC/MS method for the detection of urinary dialkyl phosphates in humans.

    PubMed

    De Alwis, G K Hemakanthi; Needham, Larry L; Barr, Dana B

    2009-01-15

    We developed an analytical method based on solid phase extraction, on-support derivatization and isotope dilution-GC/MS for the detection of dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites, dimethyl thiophosphate, diethyl thiophosphate, dimethyl dithiophosphate, and diethyl dithiophosphate in human urine. The sample preparative procedure is simple and fully automated. In this method, the analytes were extracted from the urinary matrix onto a styrene-divinyl benzene polymer-based solid phase extraction cartridge and derivatized on-column with pentafluorobenzyl bromide. The ester conjugated analytes are eluted from the column with acetonitrile, concentrated and analyzed. Compared to extraction-post extraction derivatization methods for the analysis of DAP metabolites, this on-support derivatization is fast, efficient, and less labor-intensive. Furthermore, it has fewer steps in the sample preparation, uses less solvent and produces less interference. The method is highly sensitive with limits of detection for the analytes ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/mL. The recoveries were high and comparable with those of our previous method. Relative standard deviation, indicative of the repeatability and precision of the method, was 1-17% for the metabolites.

  9. Automated flow-based anion-exchange method for high-throughput isolation and real-time monitoring of RuBisCO in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ruth; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Galmés, Jeroni

    2011-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized, completely enclosed multisyringe-flow system is proposed for high-throughput purification of RuBisCO from Triticum aestivum extracts. The automated method capitalizes on the uptake of the target protein at 4°C onto Q-Sepharose Fast Flow strong anion-exchanger packed in a cylindrical microcolumn (105 × 4 mm) followed by a stepwise ionic-strength gradient elution (0-0.8 mol/L NaCl) to eliminate concomitant extract components and retrieve highly purified RuBisCO. The manifold is furnished downstream with a flow-through diode-array UV/vis spectrophotometer for real-time monitoring of the column effluent at the protein-specific wavelength of 280 nm to detect the elution of RuBisCO. Quantitation of RuBisCO and total soluble proteins in the eluate fractions were undertaken using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and the spectrophotometric Bradford assay, respectively. A comprehensive investigation of the effect of distinct concentration gradients on the isolation of RuBisCO and experimental conditions (namely, type of resin, column dimensions and mobile-phase flow rate) upon column capacity and analyte breakthrough was effected. The assembled set-up was aimed to critically ascertain the efficiency of preliminary batchwise pre-treatments of crude plant extracts (viz., polyethylenglycol (PEG) precipitation, ammonium sulphate precipitation and sucrose gradient centrifugation) in terms of RuBisCO purification and absolute recovery prior to automated anion-exchange column separation. Under the optimum physical and chemical conditions, the flow-through column system is able to admit crude plant extracts and gives rise to RuBisCO purification yields better than 75%, which might be increased up to 96 ± 9% with a prior PEG fractionation followed by sucrose gradient step.

  10. A fully automated method for simultaneous determination of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in dried fruits by pressurized liquid extraction and online solid-phase extraction cleanup coupled to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Russo, Mariateresa; Valdés, Alberto; Ibáñez, Clara; Rastrelli, Luca

    2015-04-01

    According to current demands and future perspectives in food safety, this study reports a fast and fully automated analytical method for the simultaneous analysis of the mycotoxins with high toxicity and wide spread, aflatoxins (AFs) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in dried fruits, a high-risk foodstuff. The method is based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), with aqueous methanol (30%) at 110 °C, of the slurried dried fruit and online solid-phase extraction (online SPE) cleanup of the PLE extracts with a C18 cartridge. The purified sample was directly analysed by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) for sensitive and selective determination of AFs and OTA. The proposed analytical procedure was validated for different dried fruits (vine fruit, fig and apricot), providing method detection and quantification limits much lower than the AFs and OTA maximum levels imposed by EU regulation in dried fruit for direct human consumption. Also, recoveries (83-103%) and repeatability (RSD < 8, n = 3) meet the performance criteria required by EU regulation for the determination of the levels of mycotoxins in foodstuffs. The main advantage of the proposed method is full automation of the whole analytical procedure that reduces the time and cost of the analysis, sample manipulation and solvent consumption, enabling high-throughput analysis and highly accurate and precise results.

  11. Rotaviruses: Extraction and Isolation of RNA, Reassortant Strains, and NSP4 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yakshe, Krystle A; Franklin, Zachary D; Ball, Judith M

    2015-05-01

    Rotavirus (RV) contains 11 double-stranded RNA segments that encode for twelve structural and nonstructural proteins. The separation and isolation of viral RNA is a necessary precursor for many experimental techniques and can be useful for rapid RV RNA typing and sequencing of different rotavirus strains. The segmented genome enables RV to recombine easily. These recombinant viruses are essential for many purposes, including generation of potential vaccine strains. Rotavirus gene 10 expresses the viral enterotoxin, NSP4, which has been the focus of several studies due to the influence of NSP4 on rotavirus replication, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis. This unit will describe the isolation and separation of viral RNAs, the production characterization of recombinant RV in culture, and the expression and isolation of NSP4 in mammalian and insect cells.

  12. Evaluation of automated cell disruptor methods for oomycetous and ascomycetous model organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two automated cell disruptor-based methods for RNA extraction; disruption of thawed cells submerged in TRIzol Reagent (method QP), and direct disruption of frozen cells on dry ice (method CP), were optimized for a model oomycete, Phytophthora capsici, and compared with grinding in a mortar and pestl...

  13. Demonstration and validation of automated agricultural field extraction from multi-temporal Landsat data for the majority of United States harvested cropland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial distribution of agricultural fields is a fundamental description of rural landscapes and the location and extent of fields is important to establish the area of land utilized for agricultural yield prediction, resource allocation, and for economic planning, and may be indicative of the degree of agricultural capital investment, mechanization, and labor intensity. To date, field objects have not been extracted from satellite data over large areas because of computational constraints, the complexity of the extraction task, and because consistently processed appropriate resolution data have not been available or affordable. A recently published automated methodology to extract agricultural crop fields from weekly 30 m Web Enabled Landsat data (WELD) time series was refined and applied to 14 states that cover 70% of harvested U.S. cropland (USDA 2012 Census). The methodology was applied to 2010 combined weekly Landsat 5 and 7 WELD data. The field extraction and quantitative validation results are presented for the following 14 states: Iowa, North Dakota, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, South Dakota, Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Oklahoma and Michigan (sorted by area of harvested cropland). These states include the top 11 U.S states by harvested cropland area. Implications and recommendations for systematic application to global coverage Landsat data are discussed.

  14. Comparison of RNA extraction kits for the purification and detection of an enteric virus surrogate on green onions via RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruoyang; Shieh, Y Carol; Stewart, Diana S

    2017-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) offers a rapid and sensitive molecular method for detection of enteric viruses. Unfortunately, these assays are often hampered by the low virus titre found in foods and PCR inhibition due to matrix carryover during RNA extraction. Four commercial RNA extraction kits (Qiagen's QIAamp Viral RNA Mini and UltraSens Virus kits, MoBio UltraClean Tissue & Cells RNA Isolation kit, and Ambion MagMAX Viral RNA Isolation kit) were evaluated for their ability to extract and purify MS2 bacteriophage RNA, an enteric virus surrogate, from inoculated green onions, a food which has been associated with viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. Inoculated green onion wash concentrates and green onion pieces with and without Qiagen QIAshredder homogenization were assayed in the kit comparison. MS2 detection and PCR inhibition were evaluated using a duplex real-time RT-PCR for MS2 and an exogenous internal amplification control (IAC) assay. Without homogenization, MS2 inoculated at 40pfu/g was detected in at least 4 lots of green onion wash concentrates using the silica-membrane spin-column kits. Inhibition was a factor for the magnetic silica-based MagMAX kit, which resulted in detection of MS2 in 1 of 5. Addition of QIAshredder homogenization prior to extraction did not adversely affect the silica-membrane kit results but improved the MS2 detection by MagMAX to 5 of 5 lots. Use of a 1:10 dilution of primary RNA extracts also improved detection. The QIAamp Viral RNA Mini and MagMAX kits were further compared for detection of MS2 from green onion pieces inoculated at 20 and 5pfu/g. Using homogenization, the MagMAX kit detected 20pfu/g in only 1 of 2 green onion lots, whereas the QIAamp Viral RNA kit detected 2 of 2 lots at 5 pfu/g without homogenization.

  15. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects. PMID:27873931

  16. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-11-17

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  17. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and Power Prep™ clean-up.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Al-Rashdan, Amal; Ibtisam, A

    2012-05-30

    An automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method followed by Power Prep™ clean-up was developed for organochlorinated pesticide (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analysis in environmental marine samples of fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp. OCPs and PCBs were simultaneously determined in a single chromatographic run using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-negative chemical ionization (GC-MS-NCI). About 5 g of each biological marine sample was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulphate and placed in the extraction cell of the PLE system. PLE is controlled by means of a PC using DMS 6000 software. Purification of the extract was accomplished using automated Power Prep™ clean-up with a pre-packed disposable silica column (6 g) supplied by Fluid Management Systems (FMS). All OCPs and PCBs were eluted from the silica column using two types of solvent: 80 mL of hexane and a 50 mL mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (1:1). A wide variety of fish and shellfish were collected from the fish market and analyzed using this method. The total PCB concentrations were 2.53, 0.25, 0.24, 0.24, 0.17 and 1.38 ng g(-1) (w/w) for fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp, respectively, and the corresponding total OCP concentrations were 30.47, 2.86, 0.92, 10.72, 5.13 and 18.39 ng g(-1) (w/w). Lipids were removed using an SX-3 Bio-Beads gel permeation chromatography (GPC) column. Analytical criteria such as recovery, reproducibility and repeatability were evaluated through a range of biological matrices.

  18. Extraction of hydroxyaromatic compounds in river water by liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction with automated movement of the acceptor and the donor phase.

    PubMed

    Melwanki, Mahaveer B; Huang, Shang-Da

    2006-08-01

    Liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction with automated movement of the acceptor and the donor phase technique is described for the extraction of six hydroxyaromatic compounds in river water using a disposable and ready to use hollow fiber. Separation and quantitative analyses were performed using LC with UV detection at 254 nm. Analytes were extracted from the acidified sample solution (donor phase) into the organic solvent impregnated in the pores of the hollow fiber and then back extracted into the alkaline solution (acceptor phase) inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The fiber was held by a conventional 10 microL LC syringe. The acceptor phase was sandwitched between the plunger and a small volume of the organic solvent (microcap). The acceptor solution was repeatedly moved in and out of the hollow fiber using a syringe pump. This movement provides a fresh acceptor phase to come in contact with the organic phase and thus enhancing extraction kinetics thereby leading to the improvement in enrichment of the analytes. The microcap separates the acceptor phase and the donor phase in addition to being partially responsible for mass transfer of the analytes from the donor solution to the acceptor solution. Under stirring, a fresh donor phase will enter through the open end of the fiber that will also contribute to the mass transfer. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency viz type of organic solvent, extraction time, stirring speed, effect of sodium chloride, and concentration of donor and acceptor phases were studied. RSD (3.9-5.6%), correlation coefficient (0.995-0.997), detection limit (2.0-51.2 ng/mL), enrichment factor (339-630), relative recovery (93.2-97.9%), and absolute recovery (33.9-63.0%) have also been investigated. The developed method was applied for the analysis of river water.

  19. Liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction with automated movement of the acceptor and the donor phase for the extraction of phenoxyacetic acids prior to liquid chromatography detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Chiang; Melwanki, Mahaveer B; Huang, Shang-Da

    2006-02-03

    A simple liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction with automated movement of the acceptor and the donor phase (LLLME/AMADP) technique is described for the quantitative determination of five phenoxyacetic acids in water using a disposable and ready to use hollow fiber. The target compounds were extracted from the acidified sample solution (donor phase) into the organic solvent residing in the pores of the hollow fiber and then back extracted into the alkaline solution (acceptor phase) inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The fiber was held by a conventional 10-microl syringe. The acceptor phase was sandwiched between the plunger and a small volume of the organic solvent (microcap). The acceptor solution was repeatedly moved in and out of the hollow fiber assisted by a programmable syringe pump. This repeated movement provides a fresh acceptor phase to come in-contact with the organic phase and thus enhancing extraction kinetics leading to high enrichment of the analytes. The microcap separates the aqueous acceptor phase and the donor phase in addition of being partially responsible for mass transfer of the analytes from donor solution (moving in and out of the hollow fiber from the open end of the fiber) to the acceptor solution. Separation and quantitative analyses were then performed using liquid chromatography (LC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection at 280 nm. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency viz. type of organic solvent used for immobilization in the pores of the hollow fiber, extraction time, stirring speed, effect of sodium chloride, and concentration of donor and acceptor phases were studied. Repeatability (RSD, 3.2-7.4%), correlation coefficient (0.996-0.999), detection limit (0.2-2.8 ng ml(-1)) and enrichment factors (129-240) were also investigated. Relative recovery (87-101%) and absolute recoveries (4.6-13%) have also been calculated. The developed method was applied for the analysis of river water.

  20. Simultaneous analysis of thebaine, 6-MAM and six abused opiates in postmortem fluids and tissues using Zymark automated solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Johnson, R D; Hattrup, R A

    2005-08-05

    Opiates are some of the most widely prescribed drugs in America and are often abused. Demonstrating the presence or absence of opiate compounds in postmortem fluids and/or tissues derived from fatal civil aviation accidents can have serious legal consequences and may help determine the cause of impairment and/or death. However, the consumption of poppy seed products can result in a positive opiate drug test. We have developed a simple method for the simultaneous determination of eight opiate compounds from one extraction. These compounds are hydrocodone, dihydrocodeine, codeine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, and thebaine. The inclusion of thebaine is notable as it is an indicator of poppy seed consumption and may help explain morphine/codeine positives in cases where no opiate use was indicated. This method incorporates a Zymark RapidTracetrade mark automated solid-phase extraction system, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and trimethyl silane (TMS) and oxime-TMS derivatives. The limits of detection ranged from 0.78 to 12.5 ng/mL. The linear dynamic range for most analytes was 6.25-1600 ng/mL. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 70 to 103%. We applied this method to eight separate aviation fatalities where opiate compounds had previously been detected.

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring of haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol in serum by a fully automated sequential solid phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angelo, H R; Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    In Denmark, haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol are among the most frequently requested antipsychotics for therapeutic drug monitoring. With the number of requests made at the authors' laboratory, the only rational analysis is one that can measure all three drugs simultaneously. The authors therefore decided to develop an automated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Two milliliters serum, 2.0 mL 10 mmol/L sodium phosphate buffer (pH 5.5), and 150 microL internal standard (trifluoperazine) solution were pipetted into HPLC vials and extracted on an ASPEC XL equipped with 1 mL (50 mg) Isolute C2 (EC) extraction columns and acetonitrile-methanol-ammonium acetate buffer (60:34:6) as extracting solution. Three hundred fifty microliters was analyzed by HPLC; a 150 x 4.6-mm S5CN Spherisorb column with a mobile phase of 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer-methanol (1:9), a flow rate of 0.6-1.7 mL/min, and ultraviolet detection at 256 and 245 nm were used. Reproducibility was 5-12% and the lower limit of quantitation was 10, 1, and 5 nmol/L (4, 0.4, and 2 ng/mL) for haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol, respectively. The method was found to be sufficiently selective and robust for routine analysis.

  2. Automated detection of feeding strikes by larval fish using continuous high-speed digital video: a novel method to extract quantitative data from fast, sparse kinematic events.

    PubMed

    Shamur, Eyal; Zilka, Miri; Hassner, Tal; China, Victor; Liberzon, Alex; Holzman, Roi

    2016-06-01

    Using videography to extract quantitative data on animal movement and kinematics constitutes a major tool in biomechanics and behavioral ecology. Advanced recording technologies now enable acquisition of long video sequences encompassing sparse and unpredictable events. Although such events may be ecologically important, analysis of sparse data can be extremely time-consuming and potentially biased; data quality is often strongly dependent on the training level of the observer and subject to contamination by observer-dependent biases. These constraints often limit our ability to study animal performance and fitness. Using long videos of foraging fish larvae, we provide a framework for the automated detection of prey acquisition strikes, a behavior that is infrequent yet critical for larval survival. We compared the performance of four video descriptors and their combinations against manually identified feeding events. For our data, the best single descriptor provided a classification accuracy of 77-95% and detection accuracy of 88-98%, depending on fish species and size. Using a combination of descriptors improved the accuracy of classification by ∼2%, but did not improve detection accuracy. Our results indicate that the effort required by an expert to manually label videos can be greatly reduced to examining only the potential feeding detections in order to filter false detections. Thus, using automated descriptors reduces the amount of manual work needed to identify events of interest from weeks to hours, enabling the assembly of an unbiased large dataset of ecologically relevant behaviors.

  3. Automated diagnosis of congestive heart failure using dual tree complex wavelet transform and statistical features extracted from 2s of ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Vidya K; Acharya, U Rajendra; Oh, Shu Lih; Adam, Muhammad; Tan, Jen Hong; Chua, Chua Kuang; Chua, Kok Poo; Tan, Ru San

    2017-04-01

    Identification of alarming features in the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is extremely significant for the prediction of congestive heart failure (CHF). ECG signal analysis carried out using computer-aided techniques can speed up the diagnosis process and aid in the proper management of CHF patients. Therefore, in this work, dual tree complex wavelets transform (DTCWT)-based methodology is proposed for an automated identification of ECG signals exhibiting CHF from normal. In the experiment, we have performed a DTCWT on ECG segments of 2s duration up to six levels to obtain the coefficients. From these DTCWT coefficients, statistical features are extracted and ranked using Bhattacharyya, entropy, minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR), receiver-operating characteristics (ROC), Wilcoxon, t-test and reliefF methods. Ranked features are subjected to k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and decision tree (DT) classifiers for automated differentiation of CHF and normal ECG signals. We have achieved 99.86% accuracy, 99.78% sensitivity and 99.94% specificity in the identification of CHF affected ECG signals using 45 features. The proposed method is able to detect CHF patients accurately using only 2s of ECG signal length and hence providing sufficient time for the clinicians to further investigate on the severity of CHF and treatments.

  4. Development of an Automated Column Solid-Phase Extraction Cleanup of QuEChERS Extracts, Using a Zirconia-Based Sorbent, for Pesticide Residue Analyses by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Morris, Bruce D; Schriner, Richard B

    2015-06-03

    A new, automated, high-throughput, mini-column solid-phase extraction (c-SPE) cleanup method for QuEChERS extracts was developed, using a robotic X-Y-Z instrument autosampler, for analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by LC-MS/MS. Removal of avocado matrix and recoveries of 263 pesticides and metabolites were studied, using various stationary phase mixtures, including zirconia-based sorbents, and elution with acetonitrile. These experiments allowed selection of a sorbent mixture consisting of zirconia, C18, and carbon-coated silica, that effectively retained avocado matrix but also retained 53 pesticides with <70% recoveries. Addition of MeOH to the elution solvent improved pesticide recoveries from zirconia, as did citrate ions in CEN QuEChERS extracts. Finally, formate buffer in acetonitrile/MeOH (1:1) was required to give >70% recoveries of all 263 pesticides. Analysis of avocado extracts by LC-Q-Orbitrap-MS showed that the method developed was removing >90% of di- and triacylglycerols. The method was validated for 269 pesticides (including homologues and metabolites) in avocado and citrus. Spike recoveries were within 70-120% and 20% RSD for 243 of these analytes in avocado and 254 in citrus, when calibrated against solvent-only standards, indicating effective matrix removal and minimal electrospray ionization suppression.

  5. A simple micro-extraction plate assay for automated LC-MS/MS analysis of human serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Geib, Timon; Meier, Florian; Schorr, Pascal; Lammert, Frank; Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-01-01

    This short application note describes a simple and automated assay for determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in very small volumes of human serum. It utilizes commercial 96-well micro-extraction plates with commercial 25(OH)D isotope calibration and quality control kits. Separation was achieved using a pentafluorophenyl liquid chromatography column followed by multiple reaction monitoring-based quantification on an electrospray triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on providing a simple assay that can be rapidly established in non-specialized laboratories within days, without the need for laborious and time consuming sample preparation steps, advanced calibration or data acquisition routines. The analytical figures of merit obtained from this assay compared well to established assays. To demonstrate the applicability, the assay was applied to analysis of serum samples from patients with chronic liver diseases and compared to results from a routine clinical immunoassay.

  6. Extraction of high quality of RNA and construction of a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library from chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt).

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Tao, Nengguo; Hu, Zhiyong; Yue, Hailin; Deng, Xiuxin

    2006-04-01

    Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt) is a rare fruit crop of promising economical importance in fruit and ornamental exploitation in China. Isolation of high quality RNA from chestnut rose is difficult due to its high levels of polyphenols, polysaccharides and other compounds, but a modified CTAB extraction procedure without phenol gave satisfactory results. High concentrations of PVP (2%, w/v), CTAB (2%, w/v) and beta-mercaptoethanol (4%, v/v) were used in the extraction buffer to improve RNA quality. The average yield was about 200 microg RNA g(-1) fresh leaves. The isolated RNA was of sufficient quality for construction of suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) library, which allowed the isolation of several pathogen-induced defense genes.

  7. Facile semi-automated forensic body fluid identification by multiplex solution hybridization of NanoString® barcode probes to specific mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick; White, Robin Lynn; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    A DNA profile from the perpetrator does not reveal, per se, the circumstances by which it was transferred. Body fluid identification by mRNA profiling may allow extraction of contextual 'activity level' information from forensic samples. Here we describe the development of a prototype multiplex digital gene expression (DGE) method for forensic body fluid/tissue identification based upon solution hybridization of color-coded NanoString(®) probes to 23 mRNA targets. The method identifies peripheral blood, semen, saliva, vaginal secretions, menstrual blood and skin. We showed that a simple 5 min room temperature cellular lysis protocol gave equivalent results to standard RNA isolation from the same source material, greatly enhancing the ease-of-use of this method in forensic sample processing. We first describe a model for gene expression in a sample from a single body fluid and then extend that model to mixtures of body fluids. We then describe calculation of maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of body fluid quantities in a sample, and we describe the use of likelihood ratios to test for the presence of each body fluid in a sample. Known single source samples of blood, semen, vaginal secretions, menstrual blood and skin all demonstrated the expected tissue-specific gene expression for at least two of the chosen biomarkers. Saliva samples were more problematic, with their previously identified characteristic genes exhibiting poor specificity. Nonetheless the most specific saliva biomarker, HTN3, was expressed at a higher level in saliva than in any of the other tissues. Crucially, our algorithm produced zero false positives across this study's 89 unique samples. As a preliminary indication of the ability of the method to discern admixtures of body fluids, five mixtures were prepared. The identities of the component fluids were evident from the gene expression profiles of four of the five mixtures. Further optimization of the biomarker 'CodeSet' will be required

  8. Activated charcoal-mediated RNA extraction method for Azadirachta indica and plants highly rich in polyphenolics, polysaccharides and other complex secondary compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High quality RNA is a primary requisite for numerous molecular biological applications but is difficult to isolate from several plants rich in polysaccharides, polyphenolics and other secondary metabolites. These compounds either bind with nucleic acids or often co-precipitate at the final step and many times cannot be removed by conventional methods and kits. Addition of vinyl-pyrollidone polymers in extraction buffer efficiently removes polyphenolics to some extent, but, it failed in case of Azadirachta indica and several other medicinal and aromatic plants. Findings Here we report the use of adsorption property of activated charcoal (0.03%–0.1%) in RNA isolation procedures to remove complex secondary metabolites and polyphenolics to yield good quality RNA from Azadirachta indica. We tested and validated our modified RNA isolation method across 21 different plants including Andrographis paniculata, Aloe vera, Rosa damascena, Pelargonium graveolens, Phyllanthus amarus etc. from 13 other different families, many of which are considered as tough system for isolating RNA. The A260/280 ratio of the extracted RNA ranged between 1.8-2.0 and distinct 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA bands were observed in denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Analysis using Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer revealed intact total RNA yield with very good RNA Integrity Number. Conclusions The RNA isolated by our modified method was found to be of high quality and amenable for sensitive downstream molecular applications like subtractive library construction and RT-PCR. This modified RNA isolation procedure would aid and accelerate the biotechnological studies in complex medicinal and aromatic plants which are extremely rich in secondary metabolic compounds. PMID:23537338

  9. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  10. Screening of drugs in equine plasma using automated on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwok, W H; Leung, David K K; Leung, Gary N W; Wan, Terence S M; Wong, Colton H F; Wong, Jenny K Y

    2010-05-07

    A rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed for the simultaneous screening of 19 drugs of different classes in equine plasma using automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Plasma samples were first protein precipitated using acetonitrile. After centrifugation, the supernatant was directly injected into the on-line SPE system and analysed by a triple quadrupole LC-MS-MS in positive electrospray ionisation (+ESI) mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) scan function. On-line extraction and chromatographic separation of the targeted drugs were performed using respectively a polymeric extraction column (2 cm L x 2.1mm ID, 25 microm particle size) and a reversed-phase C18 LC column (3 cm L x 2.1mm ID, 3 microm particle size) with gradient elution to provide fast analysis time. The overall instrument turnaround time was 9.5 min, inclusive of post-run and equilibration time. Plasma samples fortified with 19 targeted drugs including narcotic analgesics, local anaesthetics, antipsychotics, bronchodilators, mucolytics, corticosteroids, sedative and tranquillisers at sub-parts per billion (ppb) to low parts per trillion (ppt) levels could be consistently detected. No significant matrix interference was observed at the expected retention times of the targeted ion transitions. Over 70% of the drugs studied gave detection limits at or below 100 pg/mL, with some detection limits reaching down to 19 pg/mL. The method had been validated for extraction recovery, precision and sensitivity, and a blockage study had also been carried out. This method is used regularly in the authors' laboratory to screen for the presence of targeted drugs in pre-race plasma samples from racehorses.

  11. MICAS: a fully automated web server for microsatellite extraction and analysis from prokaryote and viral genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Vattipally B; Ranjitkumar, Gundu; Swaminathan, Sugavanam; Priya, Sasidharan; Bose, Buddhaditta; Pavan, Mogili N; Thanu, Geeta; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2003-01-01

    MICAS is a web server for extracting microsatellite information from completely sequenced prokaryote and viral genomes, or user-submitted sequences. This server provides an integrated platform for MICdb (database of prokaryote and viral microsatellites), W-SSRF (simple sequence repeat finding program) and Autoprimer (primer design software). MICAS, through dynamic HTML page generation, helps in the systematic extraction of microsatellite information from selected genomes hosted on MICdb or from user-submitted sequences. Further, it assists in the design of primers with the help of Autoprimer, for sequences containing selected microsatellite tracts.

  12. Ethanolic Extract of Melia Fructus Has Anti-influenza A Virus Activity by Affecting Viral Entry and Viral RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Young-Hee; Choi, Jang-Gi; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2017-01-01

    Meliae Fructus (MF) is the dried ripe fruit of Melia toosendan Siebold et Zuccarini, Meliaceae family. MF is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation and helminthic infection and has anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities. However, potential anti-influenza properties of MF have yet to be investigated. We determined whether an ethanolic extract of MF (EMF) has anti-viral activity via an EMF pre-, co-, and post-treatment assay, using the Influenza A/PR/8/34 and H3N2 virus on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The EMF had anti-influenza virus activity in pre- and co-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner, but not in post-treated cell. EMF inhibited the activity of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of influenza virus. EMF inhibited viral HA, nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 2 (M2), non-structural protein 1 (NS1), polymerase acidic protein (PA), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), and polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) mRNA synthesis at 5 h post infection (hpi), however, the levels of PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA were increased in pre- and co-EMF treated cells compared with control virus-infected and EMF post-treated cells at 18 hpi. The level of M2 protein expression was also decreased upon pre- and co-treatment with EMF. The PA protein was accumulated and localized in not only the nucleus but also the cytoplasm of virus-infected MDCK cells at 18 hpi. Pre-EMF treatment inhibited the expression of pAKT, which is induced by influenza virus infection, at the stage of virus entry. We also found that treatment of EMF up-regulated the antiviral protein Mx1, which may play a partial role in inhibiting influenza virus infection in pre- and co-EMF treated MDCK cells. In summary, these results strongly suggested that an ethanolic extract of Meliae Fructus inhibited influenza A virus infection by affecting viral entry, PA proteins of the RNA polymerase complex, and Mx1 induction and may be a potential and

  13. Comparison of automated nucleic acid extraction methods for the detection of cytomegalovirus DNA in fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA is increasingly being used for specimen types other than plasma or whole blood. However, few studies have investigated the performance of different nucleic acid extraction protocols in such specimens. In this study, CMV extraction using the Cell-free 1000 and Pathogen Complex 400 protocols on the QIAsymphony Sample Processing (SP) system were compared using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), tissue samples, and urine. The QIAsymphonyAssay Set-up (AS) system was used to assemble reactions using artus CMV PCR reagents and amplification was carried out on the Rotor-Gene Q. Samples from 93 patients previously tested for CMV DNA and negative samples spiked with CMV AD-169 were used to evaluate assay performance. The Pathogen Complex 400 protocol yielded the following results: BAL, sensitivity 100% (33/33), specificity 87% (20/23); tissue, sensitivity 100% (25/25), specificity 100% (20/20); urine, sensitivity 100% (21/21), specificity 100% (20/20). Cell-free 1000 extraction gave comparable results for BAL and tissue, however, for urine, the sensitivity was 86% (18/21) and specimen quantitation was inaccurate. Comparative studies of different extraction protocols and DNA detection methods in body fluids and tissues are needed, as assays optimized for blood or plasma will not necessarily perform well on other specimen types. PMID:24765569

  14. SnapShot-Seq: A Method for Extracting Genome-Wide, In Vivo mRNA Dynamics from a Single Total RNA Sample

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Sarah A.; Cloonan, Nicole; Mullen, Thomas E.; Ling, Joseph J.; Miller, Nimrod; Kuersten, Scott; Ma, Yong-Chao; McCarroll, Steven A.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Springer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    mRNA synthesis, processing, and destruction involve a complex series of molecular steps that are incompletely understood. Because the RNA intermediates in each of these steps have finite lifetimes, extensive mechanistic and dynamical information is encoded in total cellular RNA. Here we report the development of SnapShot-Seq, a set of computational methods that allow the determination of in vivo rates of pre-mRNA synthesis, splicing, intron degradation, and mRNA decay from a single RNA-Seq snapshot of total cellular RNA. SnapShot-Seq can detect in vivo changes in the rates of specific steps of splicing, and it provides genome-wide estimates of pre-mRNA synthesis rates comparable to those obtained via labeling of newly synthesized RNA. We used SnapShot-Seq to investigate the origins of the intrinsic bimodality of metazoan gene expression levels, and our results suggest that this bimodality is partly due to spillover of transcriptional activation from highly expressed genes to their poorly expressed neighbors. SnapShot-Seq dramatically expands the information obtainable from a standard RNA-Seq experiment. PMID:24586954

  15. Semi-automated solid phase extraction method for the mass spectrometric quantification of 12 specific metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides, synthetic pyrethroids, and select herbicides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark D; Wade, Erin L; Restrepo, Paula R; Roman-Esteva, William; Bravo, Roberto; Kuklenyik, Peter; Calafat, Antonia M

    2013-06-15

    Organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides and phenoxyacetic acid herbicides represent important classes of pesticides applied in commercial and residential settings. Interest in assessing the extent of human exposure to these pesticides exists because of their widespread use and their potential adverse health effects. An analytical method for measuring 12 biomarkers of several of these pesticides in urine has been developed. The target analytes were extracted from one milliliter of urine by a semi-automated solid phase extraction technique, separated from each other and from other urinary biomolecules by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and detected using tandem mass spectrometry with isotope dilution quantitation. This method can be used to measure all the target analytes in one injection with similar repeatability and detection limits of previous methods which required more than one injection. Each step of the procedure was optimized to produce a robust, reproducible, accurate, precise and efficient method. The required selectivity and sensitivity for trace-level analysis (e.g., limits of detection below 0.5ng/mL) was achieved using a narrow diameter analytical column, higher than unit mass resolution for certain analytes, and stable isotope labeled internal standards. The method was applied to the analysis of 55 samples collected from adult anonymous donors with no known exposure to the target pesticides. This efficient and cost-effective method is adequate to handle the large number of samples required for national biomonitoring surveys.

  16. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  17. An efficient and cost effective method of RNA extraction from mucilage, phenol and secondary metabolite rich bark tissue of tossa jute (C. olitorius L.) actively developing phloem fiber.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, S B; Kumar, M; Chowdhury, I; Singh, R K; Pandey, S P; Sharma, H K; Karmakar, P G

    2016-06-01

    Tossa jute is an important natural fiber crop of Southeast Asian countries including India, Bangladesh, China, Thailand, Myanmar etc. Traditional industrial application of jute fiber is limited to the packaging products like hessians, sacks, etc. and the fiber found unsuitable for textile industries largely due to significantly high lignin content. Therefore, understanding genetic factors underlying lignin biosynthesis in tossa jute holds promise for jute based product diversification. The major limiting factor in undertaking such study is unavailability of efficient protocol for RNA extraction at secondary growth active stage of tossa jute. Here we report a simplified, swift and cost effective protocol for isolating fairly good quality RNA from bark tissue of 65-days-old field grown tossa jute plant with active secondary growth. The purity, concentration and integrity of extracted RNA ascertained. To confirm downstream amenability, isolated RNA samples were reverse transcribed and PCR analysis done by using CCoAMT1 primer. Results established that method of RNA extraction presented here is an improvement over the other methods, particularly for bark tissue of field grown tossa jute at advance developmental stage. Therefore, present study will enhance our ability to understand expression pattern of fiber formation and maturation related genes in mature bark tissue that holds key for much talked genetic manipulation of fiber quality via lignin optimisation in the crop.

  18. Automated on-fiber derivatization with headspace SPME-GC-MS-MS for the determination of primary amines in sewage sludge using pressurized hot water extraction.

    PubMed

    Llop, Anna; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2011-07-01

    An automated, environmentally friendly, simple, selective, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of ten primary aliphatic amines in sewage sludge at μg/kg dry weight (d.w.). The procedure involves a pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) of the analytes from the solid matrix, followed by a fully automated on-fiber derivatization with 2,3,4,5-pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and subsequent gas chromatography ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS-MS) analysis. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were between 0.5 and 45 μg/kg (d.w.) for all compounds except for ethyl-, isopropyl-, and amylamine, whose LODs were 70, 109, and 116 μg/kg (d.w.), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 10 and 350 μg/kg (d.w.). Repeatability and intermediate precision, expressed as RSD(%) (n=3), were lower than 18 and 21%, respectively. The method developed enabled to determine primary aliphatic amines in sludge from various urban and industrial sewage treatment plants as well as from a potable treatment plant. Most of the primary aliphatic amines were found in the sewage sludge samples analyzed corresponding to the maximum concentrations to the samples from the urban plant: for instance, isobutylamine and methylamine were found at 7728 and 12 536 μg/kg (d.w.), respectively. Amylamine was detected only in few samples but always at concentrations lower than its LOQ.

  19. A method for extracting high-quality RNA from diverse plants for next-generation sequencing and gene expression analyses1

    PubMed Central

    Yockteng, Roxana; Almeida, Ana M. R.; Yee, Stephen; Andre, Thiago; Hill, Colin; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: To study gene expression in plants, high-quality RNA must be extracted in quantities sufficient for subsequent cDNA library construction. Field-based collections are often limited in quantity and quality of tissue and are typically preserved in RNAlater. Obtaining sufficient and high-quality yield from variously preserved samples is essential to studies of comparative biology. We present a protocol for the extraction of high-quality RNA from even the most recalcitrant plant tissues. • Methods and Results: Tissues from mosses, cycads, and angiosperm floral organs and leaves were preserved in RNAlater or frozen fresh at −80°C. Extractions were performed and quality was measured for yield and purity. • Conclusions: This protocol results in the extraction of high-quality RNA from a variety of plant tissues representing vascular and nonvascular plants. RNA was used for cDNA synthesis to generate libraries for next-generation sequencing and for expression studies using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). PMID:25202509

  20. Automation of Silica Bead-based Nucleic Acid Extraction on a Centrifugal Lab-on-a-Disc Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinahan, David J.; Mangwanya, Faith; Garvey, Robert; Chung, Danielle WY; Lipinski, Artur; Julius, Lourdes AN; King, Damien; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Mishra, Rohit; Al-Ofi, May; Miyazaki, Celina; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-10-01

    We describe a centrifugal microfluidic ‘Lab-on-a-Disc’ (LoaD) technology for DNA purification towards eventual integration into a Sample-to-Answer platform for detection of the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 from food samples. For this application, we use a novel microfluidic architecture which combines ‘event-triggered’ dissolvable film (DF) valves with a reaction chamber gated by a centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valve (CPSV). This architecture permits comprehensive flow control by simple changes in the speed of the platform innate spindle motor. Even before method optimisation, characterisation by DNA fluorescence reveals an extraction efficiency of 58%, which is close to commercial spin columns.

  1. A novel method for RNA extraction from FFPE samples reveals significant differences in biomarker expression between orthotopic and subcutaneous pancreatic cancer patient-derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mark; Maawy, Ali; Chang, Alexander; Lee, Jacqueline; Gharibi, Armen; Katz, Matthew H; Fleming, Jason; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael; Doebler, Robert; Kelber, Jonathan A

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) can identify and validate new biomarkers of cancer onset, progression and therapy resistance. Substantial archives of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples from patients represent a rich resource for linking molecular signatures to clinical data. However, performing NGS on FFPE samples is limited by poor RNA purification methods. To address this hurdle, we developed an improved methodology for extracting high-quality RNA from FFPE samples. By briefly integrating a newly-designed micro-homogenizing (mH) tool with commercially available FFPE RNA extraction protocols, RNA recovery is increased by approximately 3-fold while maintaining standard A260/A280 ratios and RNA quality index (RQI) values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mH-purified FFPE RNAs are longer and of higher integrity. Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) gene expression signatures vary significantly under in vitro versus in vivo and in vivo subcutaneous versus orthotopic conditions. By using our improved mH-based method, we were able to preserve established expression patterns of KRas-dependency genes within these three unique microenvironments. Finally, expression analysis of novel biomarkers in KRas mutant PDAC samples revealed that PEAK1 decreases and MST1R increases by over 100-fold in orthotopic versus subcutaneous microenvironments. Interestingly, however, only PEAK1 levels remain elevated in orthotopically grown KRas wild-type PDAC cells. These results demonstrate the critical nature of the orthotopic tumor microenvironment when evaluating the clinical relevance of new biomarkers in cells or patient-derived samples. Furthermore, this new mH-based FFPE RNA extraction method has the potential to enhance and expand future FFPE-RNA-NGS cancer biomarker studies. PMID:27602776

  2. Revealing Dimensions of Thinking in Open-Ended Self-Descriptions: An Automated Meaning Extraction Method for Natural Language

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A new method for extracting common themes from written text is introduced and applied to 1,165 open-ended self-descriptive narratives. Drawing on a lexical approach to personality, the most commonly-used adjectives within narratives written by college students were identified using computerized text analytic tools. A factor analysis on the use of these adjectives in the self-descriptions produced a 7-factor solution consisting of psychologically meaningful dimensions. Some dimensions were unipolar (e.g., Negativity factor, wherein most loaded items were negatively valenced adjectives); others were dimensional in that semantically opposite words clustered together (e.g., Sociability factor, wherein terms such as shy, outgoing, reserved, and loud all loaded in the same direction). The factors exhibited modest reliability across different types of writ writing samples and were correlated with self-reports and behaviors consistent with the dimensions. Similar analyses with additional content words (adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and verbs) yielded additional psychological dimensions associated with physical appearance, school, relationships, etc. in which people contextualize their self-concepts. The results suggest that the meaning extraction method is a promising strategy that determines the dimensions along which people think about themselves. PMID:18802499

  3. MDL constrained 3-D grayscale skeletonization algorithm for automated extraction of dendrites and spines from fluorescence confocal images.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaosong; Trachtenberg, Joshua T; Potter, Steve M; Roysam, Badrinath

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a method for improved automatic delineation of dendrites and spines from three-dimensional (3-D) images of neurons acquired by confocal or multi-photon fluorescence microscopy. The core advance presented here is a direct grayscale skeletonization algorithm that is constrained by a structural complexity penalty using the minimum description length (MDL) principle, and additional neuroanatomy-specific constraints. The 3-D skeleton is extracted directly from the grayscale image data, avoiding errors introduced by image binarization. The MDL method achieves a practical tradeoff between the complexity of the skeleton and its coverage of the fluorescence signal. Additional advances include the use of 3-D spline smoothing of dendrites to improve spine detection, and graph-theoretic algorithms to explore and extract the dendritic structure from the grayscale skeleton using an intensity-weighted minimum spanning tree (IW-MST) algorithm. This algorithm was evaluated on 30 datasets organized in 8 groups from multiple laboratories. Spines were detected with false negative rates less than 10% on most datasets (the average is 7.1%), and the average false positive rate was 11.8%. The software is available in open source form.

  4. Automated and quantitative headspace in-tube extraction for the accurate determination of highly volatile compounds from wines and beers.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Julián; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2012-03-23

    An automatic headspace in-tube extraction (ITEX) method for the accurate determination of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, diacetyl and other volatile compounds from wine and beer has been developed and validated. Method accuracy is based on the nearly quantitative transference of volatile compounds from the sample to the ITEX trap. For achieving that goal most methodological aspects and parameters have been carefully examined. The vial and sample sizes and the trapping materials were found to be critical due to the pernicious saturation effects of ethanol. Small 2 mL vials containing very small amounts of sample (20 μL of 1:10 diluted sample) and a trap filled with 22 mg of Bond Elut ENV resins could guarantee a complete trapping of sample vapors. The complete extraction requires 100 × 0.5 mL pumping strokes at 60 °C and takes 24 min. Analytes are further desorbed at 240 °C into the GC injector under a 1:5 split ratio. The proportion of analytes finally transferred to the trap ranged from 85 to 99%. The validation of the method showed satisfactory figures of merit. Determination coefficients were better than 0.995 in all cases and good repeatability was also obtained (better than 7% in all cases). Reproducibility was better than 8.3% except for acetaldehyde (13.1%). Detection limits were below the odor detection thresholds of these target compounds in wine and beer and well below the normal ranges of occurrence. Recoveries were not significantly different to 100%, except in the case of acetaldehyde. In such a case it could be determined that the method is not able to break some of the adducts that this compound forms with sulfites. However, such problem was avoided after incubating the sample with glyoxal. The method can constitute a general and reliable alternative for the analysis of very volatile compounds in other difficult matrixes.

  5. Green tea extract increases cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by modulating the expression of cytochrome P-450 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Dongsun; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Shin, Sunhee; Joo, Seong Soo; Kang, Dae-Hyuck; Moon, Seol-Hee; Jang, Min-Jung; Cho, Yeoung Mi; Kim, Jae Wook; Ji, Hyeong-Jin; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2009-01-01

    The effects of green tea extract (GTE) on the fetal development and external, visceral and skeletal abnormalities induced by cyclophosphamide were investigated in rats. Pregnant rats were daily administered GTE (100mg/kg) by gavage for 7 d, from the 6th to 12th day of gestation, and intraperitoneally administered with cyclophosphamide (11mg/kg) 1h after the final treatment. On the 20th day of gestation, maternal and fetal abnormalities were determined by Cesarian section. Cyclophosphamide was found to reduce fetal and placental weights without increasing resorption or death. In addition, it induced malformations in live fetuses; 94.6%, 41.5% and 100% of the external (skull and limb defects), visceral (cleft palate and ureteric dilatation) and skeletal (acrania, vertebral/costal malformations and delayed ossification) abnormalities. When pre-treated with GTE, cyclophosphamide-induced body weight loss and abnormalities of fetuses were remarkably aggravated. Moreover, repeated treatment with GTE greatly increased mRNA expression and activity of hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2B, which metabolizes cyclophosphamide into teratogenic acrolein and cytotoxic phosphoramide mustard, while reducing CYP3A expression (a detoxifying enzyme). The results suggest that repeated intake of GTE may aggravate cyclophosphamide-induced body weight loss and malformations of fetuses by modulating CYP2B and CYP3A.

  6. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3–V4 and the other targeting the V4–V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results. PMID:28260999

  7. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals.

  8. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-02-28

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3-V4 and the other targeting the V4-V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results.

  9. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  10. The ValleyMorph Tool: An automated extraction tool for transverse topographic symmetry (T-) factor and valley width to valley height (Vf-) ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daxberger, Heidi; Dalumpines, Ron; Scott, Darren M.; Riller, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    In tectonically active regions on Earth, shallow-crustal deformation associated with seismic hazards may pose a threat to human life and property. The study of landform development, such as analysis of the valley width to valley height ratio (Vf-ratio) and the Transverse Topographic Symmetry Factor (T-factor), delineating drainage basin symmetry, can be used as a relative measure of tectonic activity along fault-bound mountain fronts. The fast evolution of digital elevation models (DEM) provides an ideal base for remotely-sensed tectonomorphic studies of large areas using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). However, a manual extraction of the above mentioned morphologic parameters may be tedious and very time consuming. Moreover, basic GIS software suites do not provide the necessary built-in functions. Therefore, we present a newly developed, Python based, ESRI ArcGIS compatible tool and stand-alone script, the ValleyMorph Tool. This tool facilitates an automated extraction of the Vf-ratio and the T-factor data for large regions. Using a digital elevation raster and watershed polygon files as input, the tool provides output in the form of several ArcGIS data tables and shapefiles, ideal for further data manipulation and computation. This coding enables an easy application among the ArcGIS user community and code conversion to earlier ArcGIS versions. The ValleyMorph Tool is easy to use due to a simple graphical user interface. The tool is tested for the southern Central Andes using a total of 3366 watersheds.

  11. Analysis of trace contamination of phthalate esters in ultrapure water using a modified solid-phase extraction procedure and automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsu-Chuan; Den, Walter; Chan, Shu-Fei; Kin, Kuan Tzu

    2008-04-25

    The present study was aimed to develop a procedure modified from the conventional solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for the analysis of trace concentration of phthalate esters in industrial ultrapure water (UPW). The proposed procedure allows UPW sample to be drawn through a sampling tube containing hydrophobic sorbent (Tenax TA) to concentrate the aqueous phthalate esters. The solid trap was then demoisturized by two-stage gas drying before subjecting to thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This process removes the solvent extraction procedure necessary for the conventional SPE method, and permits automation of the analytical procedure for high-volume analyses. Several important parameters, including desorption temperature and duration, packing quantity and demoisturizing procedure, were optimized in this study based on the analytical sensitivity for a standard mixture containing five different phthalate esters. The method detection limits for the five phthalate esters were between 36 ng l(-1) and 95 ng l(-1) and recovery rates between 15% and 101%. Dioctyl phthalate (DOP) was not recovered adequately because the compound was both poorly adsorbed and desorbed on and off Tenax TA sorbents. Furthermore, analyses of material leaching from poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) tubes as well as the actual water samples showed that di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were the common contaminants detected from PVC contaminated UPW and the actual UPW, as well as in tap water. The reduction of DEHP in the production processes of actual UPW was clearly observed, however a DEHP concentration of 0.20 microg l(-1) at the point of use was still being quantified, suggesting that the contamination of phthalate esters could present a barrier to the future cleanliness requirement of UPW. The work demonstrated that the proposed modified SPE procedure provided an effective method for rapid analysis and contamination

  12. High sensitivity measurements of active oxysterols with automated filtration/filter backflush-solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Grimsmo, Anders; Olsen, Petter Angell; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Rise, Frode; Lundanes, Elsa; Greibrokk, Tyge; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2012-09-14

    Oxysterols are important in numerous biological processes, including cell signaling. Here we present an automated filtration/filter backflush-solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (AFFL-SPE-LC-MS/MS) method for determining 24-hydroxysterol and the isomers 25-hydroxycholesterol and 22S-hydroxycholesterol that enables simplified sample preparation, high sensitivity (~25 pg/mL cell lysis sample) and low sample variability. Only one sample transfer step was required for the entire process of cell lysis, derivatization and determination of selected oxysterols. During the procedure, autoxidation of cholesterol, a potential/common problem using standard analytical methods, was found to be negligible. The reversed phase AFFL-SPE-LC-MS/MS method utilizing a 1mm inner diameter column was validated, and used to determine levels of the oxysterol analytes in mouse fibroblast cell lines SSh-LII and NIH-3T3, and human cancer cell lines, BxPC3, HCT-15 and HCT-116. In BxPC3 cells, the AFFL-SPE-LC-MS/MS method was used to detect significant differences in 24S-OHC levels between vimentin+ and vimentin- heterogenous sub-populations. The methodology also allowed monitoring of significant alterations in 24S-OHC levels upon delivery of the Hedgehog (Hh) antagonist MS-0022 in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

  13. Determination of dialkyl phosphate metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides in human urine by automated solid-phase extraction, derivatization, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hemakanthi De Alwis, G K; Needham, Larry L; Barr, Dana B

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are highly toxic but used commonly worldwide, nevertheless. Their urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites are widely used for exposure assessment of OP pesticides in humans. We previously developed an analytical method to measure urinary DAPs utilizing solid-phase extraction (SPE)-derivatization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) with quantification using isotope-dilution technique. We now present a more cost-effective yet highly accurate method that can be easily adaptable to many laboratories for routine OP exposure assessment. This method is simple and fast and involves automated SPE of the metabolites followed by derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and quantification by GC-MS. Dibutyl phosphate (DBP) serves as the internal standard. The detection limits for the six metabolites ranged from 0.1 to 0.15 ng/mL. Depending on the metabolite the relative standard deviation of the analytical procedure was 2-15% for the metabolites. We compared performance of DBP as an internal standard with that of isotope-labeled compounds and found that DBP gives reliable results for the analytical procedure. We also optimized reaction parameters of pentafluorobenzylation.

  14. Comparison of turbulent-flow chromatography with automated solid-phase extraction in 96-well plates and liquid-liquid extraction used as plasma sample preparation techniques for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, D; Pickard, V; Czembor, W; Müller, C

    1999-08-27

    Turbulent flow chromatography (TFC) combined with the high selectivity and sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) is a new technique for the fast direct analysis of drugs from crude plasma. TFC in the 96-well plate format reduces significantly the time required for sample clean-up in the laboratory. For example, for 100 samples the workload for a technician is reduced from about 8 h by a manual liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) assay to about 1 h in the case of TFC. Sample clean-up and analysis are performed on-line on the same column. Similar chromatographic performance and validation results were achieved using HTLC Turbo-C18 columns (Cohesive Technologies) and Oasis HLB extraction columns (Waters). One 96-well plate with 96 plasma samples is analyzed within 5.25 h, corresponding to 3.3 min per sample. Compared to this LLE and analysis of 96 samples takes about 16 h. Two structurally different and highly protein bound compounds, drug A and drug B, were analyzed under identical TFC conditions and the assays were fully validated for the application to toxicokinetics studies (compliant with Good Laboratory Practices-GLP). The limit of quantitation was 1.00 microg/l and the linear working range covered three orders of magnitude for both drugs. In the case of drug A the quality of analysis by TFC was similar to the reference LLE assay and slightly better than automated solid-phase extraction in 96-well plates. The accuracy was -3.1 to 6.7% and the precision was 3.1 to 6.8% in the case of drug A determined for dog plasma by TFC-MS-MS. For drug B the accuracy was -3.7 to 3.5% and the precision was 1.6 to 5.4% for rat plasma, which is even slightly better than what was achieved with the validated protein precipitation assay.

  15. Development and validation of an automated liquid-liquid extraction GC/MS method for the determination of THC, 11-OH-THC, and free THC-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) from blood serum.

    PubMed

    Purschke, Kirsten; Heinl, Sonja; Lerch, Oliver; Erdmann, Freidoon; Veit, Florian

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) from blood serum is a routine task in forensic toxicology laboratories. For examination of consumption habits, the concentration of the phase I metabolite THC-COOH is used. Recommendations for interpretation of analysis values in medical-psychological assessments (regranting of driver's licenses, Germany) include threshold values for the free, unconjugated THC-COOH. Using a fully automated two-step liquid-liquid extraction, THC, 11-OH-THC, and free, unconjugated THC-COOH were extracted from blood serum, silylated with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), and analyzed by GC/MS. The automation was carried out by an x-y-z sample robot equipped with modules for shaking, centrifugation, and solvent evaporation. This method was based on a previously developed manual sample preparation method. Validation guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh) were fulfilled for both methods, at which the focus of this article is the automated one. Limits of detection and quantification for THC were 0.3 and 0.6 μg/L, for 11-OH-THC were 0.1 and 0.8 μg/L, and for THC-COOH were 0.3 and 1.1 μg/L, when extracting only 0.5 mL of blood serum. Therefore, the required limit of quantification for THC of 1 μg/L in driving under the influence of cannabis cases in Germany (and other countries) can be reached and the method can be employed in that context. Real and external control samples were analyzed, and a round robin test was passed successfully. To date, the method is employed in the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen, Germany, in daily routine. Automation helps in avoiding errors during sample preparation and reduces the workload of the laboratory personnel. Due to its flexibility, the analysis system can be employed for other liquid-liquid extractions as

  16. Systematic review automation technologies.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-07-09

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time.

  17. Systematic review automation technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  18. Increased interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in skin biopsies of horses with Culicoides hypersensitivity following challenge with Culicoides nubeculosus extract.

    PubMed

    Kolm, Gabriela; Knapp, Elzbieta; Wagner, Regina; Klein, Dieter

    2006-09-15

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a primary cytokine of the skin that has a pivotal role in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal wound healing and host defense. Pathological increase of cutaneous IL-1beta is associated with edema formation, epidermal hyperproliferation and atopic dermatitis in humans. However, in horses the role of cutaneous IL-1beta in edema formation and allergic skin disease has not been characterised so far. Particularly in Culicoides hypersensitivity (CHS), intradermal injection of Culicoides extract may be associated with enhanced transcription of local IL-1beta. To examine the mRNA expression of IL-1beta and its receptor antagonist IL-1RA in the skin of horses, biopsy specimens of horses affected and non-affected by CHS prior and following intradermal challenge with a commercial C. nubeculosus extract were examined. Our hypothesis was that cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA was significantly upregulated in horses with CHS in response to Culicoides allergen. Biopsies were taken from sites prior to and 4 h following intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract. In order to obtain reliable data, real time PCR was performed and genes of interest were normalized using three different housekeeping genes, beta-actin, GAPDH, beta-2-microglobulin. No significant difference was detected in non-challenged cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA and IL-1RA mRNA levels between CHS affected and non-affected horses. Intradermal injection of C. nubeculosus extract resulted in local upregulation of IL-1beta mRNA both in horses with typical history, characteristic clinical signs for CHS and a positive intradermal skin test (IDT), and non-affected horses with a negative IDT. However, the difference in prior and post challenged site IL-1beta mRNA levels only reached statistical significance in the affected horses (p=0.01 versus 0.7). In contrast, IL-1RA mRNA levels did not demonstrate any modification following intradermal injection with C. nubeculosus in either group. In contrast

  19. A molecular exploration of human DNA/RNA co-extracted from the palmar surface of the hands and fingers.

    PubMed

    Lacerenza, D; Aneli, S; Omedei, M; Gino, S; Pasino, S; Berchialla, P; Robino, C

    2016-05-01

    "Touch DNA" refers to the DNA that is left behind when a person touches or comes into contact with an item. However, the source of touch DNA is still debated and the large variability in DNA yield from casework samples suggests that, besides skin, various body fluids can be transferred through contact. Another important issue concerning touch DNA is the possible occurrence of secondary transfer, but the data published in the literature in relation to the background levels of foreign DNA present on the hand surfaces of the general population are very limited. As the present study aimed at better understanding the nature and characteristics of touch DNA, samples were collected from the palmar surface of the hands and fingers ("PHF" samples) of 30 male and 30 female donors by tape-lifting/swabbing and subjected to DNA/RNA co-extraction. Multiplex mRNA profiling showed that cellular material different from skin could be observed in 15% of the PHF samples. The total amount of DNA recovered from these samples (median 5.1 ng) was significantly higher than that obtained from samples containing skin cells only (median 1.6 ng). The integrity of the DNA isolated from the donors' hands and fingers as well as the prevalence of DNA mixtures were evaluated by STR typing and compared with reference STR profiles from buccal swabs. DNA integrity appeared significantly higher in the male rather than in the female subsample, as the average percentage of the donors' alleles effectively detected in PHF profiles was 75.1% and 60.1%, respectively. The prevalence of mixtures with a foreign DNA contribution ≥20% was 19.2% (30.0% in the female PHF samples and 8.3% in the male PHF samples). The obtained results support the hypothesis that transfer of cellular material different from skin may underlie the occasional recovery of quality STR profiles from handled items. These results also suggest that gender may represent an important factor influencing the propensity of individuals to carry

  20. Protocol: high throughput silica-based purification of RNA from Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96-well format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of systems-based approaches to plant research has resulted in a demand for high throughput (HTP) methods to be developed. RNA extraction from multiple samples in an experiment is a significant bottleneck in performing systems-level genomic studies. Therefore we have established a high throughput method of RNA extraction from Arabidopsis thaliana to facilitate gene expression studies in this widely used plant model. We present optimised manual and automated protocols for the extraction of total RNA from 9-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings in a 96 well plate format using silica membrane-based methodology. Consistent and reproducible yields of high quality RNA are isolated averaging 8.9 μg total RNA per sample (~20 mg plant tissue). The purified RNA is suitable for subsequent qPCR analysis of the expression of over 500 genes in triplicate from each sample. Using the automated procedure, 192 samples (2 × 96 well plates) can easily be fully processed (samples homogenised, RNA purified and quantified) in less than half a day. Additionally we demonstrate that plant samples can be stored in RNAlater at -20°C (but not 4°C) for 10 months prior to extraction with no significant effect on RNA yield or quality. Additionally, disrupted samples can be stored in the lysis buffer at -20°C for at least 6 months prior to completion of the extraction procedure providing a flexible sampling and storage scheme to facilitate complex time series experiments. PMID:22136293

  1. Automated 96-well solid phase extraction and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the analysis of cetirizine (ZYRTEC) in human plasma--with emphasis on method ruggedness.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Junga, Heiko; Tang, Yong; Li, Austin C; Addison, Tom; McCort-Tipton, Melanie; Beato, Brian; Naidong, Weng

    2005-01-05

    A high-throughput bioanalytical method based on automated sample transfer, automated solid phase extraction, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) analysis, has been developed for the determination of cetirizine, a selective H(1)-receptor antagonist. Deuterated cetirizine (cetirizine-d(8)) was synthesized as described and was used as the internal standard. Samples were transferred into 96-well plates using an automated sample handling system. Automated solid phase extraction was carried out using a 96-channel programmable liquid-handling workstation. Solid phase extraction 96-well plate on polymer sorbent (Strata X) was used to extract the analyte. The extracted samples were injected onto a Betasil silica column (50 x 3, 5 microm) using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid-trifluroacetic acid (93:7:1:0.025, v/v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. The chromatographic run time is 2.0 min per injection, with retention time of cetirizine and cetirizine-d(8) both at 1.1 min. The system consisted of a Shimadzu HPLC system and a PE Sciex API 3000 or API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer with (+) ESI. The method has been validated over the concentration range of 1.00-1000 ng/ml cetirizine in human plasma, based on a 0.10-ml sample size. The inter-day precision and accuracy of the quality control (QC) samples demonstrated <3.0% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) and <6.0% relative error (RE). Stability of cetirizine in stock solution, in plasma, and in reconstitution solution was established. The absolute extraction recovery was 85.8%, 84.5%, and 88.0% at 3, 40, and 800 ng/ml, respectively. The recovery for the internal standard was 84.1%. No adverse matrix effects were noticed for this assay. The automation of the sample preparation steps not only increased the analysis throughput, but also increased method ruggedness. The use of a stable isotope-labeled internal standard further improved the method ruggedness

  2. Online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water by automated microscale solid-phase extraction with large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; George, John E; McCarty, Christina L

    2007-12-28

    A fully automated analytical method was developed for the online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water. The method used a large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a fully automated microscale solid-phase extraction technique, which was based on x-y-z robotic techniques. Water samples were extracted by using a 96-well solid-phase extraction plate. For most analytes included in this study, the obtained linear calibrations ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 microg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.996-1.000, the method detection limits were less than 0.1 microg/L, and the relative recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation of less than 15% for fortified reagent water samples. The applications to chlorinated tap water, well water, and river water have been validated. The obtained results were similar to those resulting from fortified reagent water samples for all analytes except metribuzin, bromacil, aldrin, and methoxychlor. Matrix effects were observed for these analytes. In general, this fully automated analytical method was rugged, reliable, and easy to operate, and was capable of providing real-time data to water treatment and distribution systems as well as water reservation and protection systems. In addition, the method could reduce the analytical costs associated with sample collection, transportation, storage, and preparation.

  3. Multiplex digital colour-coded barcode technology on RNA extracted from routine cytological samples of patients with non-small cell lung cancer: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Roberta; Pisapia, Pasquale; Nacchio, Mariantonia; De Luca, Caterina; Pepe, Francesco; Russo, Maria; Bellevicine, Claudio; Troncone, Giancarlo; Malapelle, Umberto

    2017-04-06

    In the advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), molecular testing is often performed on archival cytological smears. The nCounter system (NanoString Technologies) is a new promising multiplex digital colour-coded barcode technology. However, its feasibility to evaluate the RNA expression of clinical relevant biomarkers on routine cytological smears is still uncertain. To this end, RNA was extracted from 12 NSCLC routine stained cytological smears, and nCounter analysis performed by using a 48-gene panel. Overall, 11/12 (92%) of the smears were adequate for the secondary analysis, fulfilling the quality check parameter analysis of nSolver software. This pilot study shows that RNA nCounter analysis is feasible on routine cytological smears preparing the field for the implementation of this technology in the routine setting.

  4. Evaluation of RNA extraction methods and identification of putative reference genes for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction expression studies on olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Nonis, Alberto; Vezzaro, Alice; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2012-07-11

    Genome wide transcriptomic surveys together with targeted molecular studies are uncovering an ever increasing number of differentially expressed genes in relation to agriculturally relevant processes in olive (Olea europaea L). These data need to be supported by quantitative approaches enabling the precise estimation of transcript abundance. qPCR being the most widely adopted technique for mRNA quantification, preliminary work needs to be done to set up robust methods for extraction of fully functional RNA and for the identification of the best reference genes to obtain reliable quantification of transcripts. In this work, we have assessed different methods for their suitability for RNA extraction from olive fruits and leaves and we have evaluated thirteen potential candidate reference genes on 21 RNA samples belonging to fruit developmental/ripening series and to leaves subjected to wounding. By using two different algorithms, GAPDH2 and PP2A1 were identified as the best reference genes for olive fruit development and ripening, and their effectiveness for normalization of expression of two ripening marker genes was demonstrated.

  5. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, E.; Amenc, L.; Pablo, A.L.; Legname, E.; Blanchart, E.; Plassard, C.; Robin, A.; Bernard, L.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. • A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters. • The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult. • The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content. PMID:26150987

  6. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents.

    PubMed

    Tournier, E; Amenc, L; Pablo, A L; Legname, E; Blanchart, E; Plassard, C; Robin, A; Bernard, L

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. •A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters.•The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult.•The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content.

  7. Extraction of total nucleic acid based on silica-coated magnetic particles for RT-qPCR detection of plant RNA virus/viroid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Yi; Yan, Wenlong; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a nucleic acid extraction method based on silica-coated magnetic particles (SMPs) and RT-qPCR assay was developed to detect Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Lily symptomless virus (LSV), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and grape yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd-1). The amplification sequences of RT-qPCR were reversely transcribed in vitro as RNA standard templates. The standard curves covered six or seven orders of magnitude with a detection limit of 100 copies per each assay. Extraction efficiency of the SMPs method was evaluated by recovering spiked ssRNAs from plant samples and compared to two commercial kits (TRIzol and RNeasy Plant mini kit). Results showed that the recovery rate of SMPs method was comparable to the commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from lily leaves, whereas it was two or three times higher than commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from grapevine leaves. SMPs method was also used to extract viral nucleic acid from15 ArMV-positive lily leaf samples and 15 LSV-positive lily leaf samples. SMPs method did not show statistically significant difference from other methods on detecting ArMV, but LSV. The SMPs method has the same level of virus load as the TRIzol, and its mean virus load of was 0.5log10 lower than the RNeasy Plant mini kit. Nucleic acid was extracted from 19 grapevine-leaf samples with SMPs and the two commercial kits and subsequently screened for HSVd and GYSVd-1 by RT-qPCR. Regardless of HSVd or GYSVd-1, SMPs method outperforms other methods on both positive rate and the viroid load. In conclusion, SMPs method was able to efficiently extract the nucleic acid of RNA viruses or viroids, especially grapevine viroids, from lily-leaf or grapevine-leaf samples for RT-qPCR detection.

  8. Highly sensitive routine method for urinary 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene quantitation using liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection and automated off-line solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Damien; Maître, Anne; Marques, Marie

    2011-03-21

    Many workers and also the general population are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was recently classified as carcinogenic for humans (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Biomonitoring of PAHs exposure is usually performed by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) analysis. 1-OHP is a metabolite of pyrene, a non-carcinogenic PAH. In this work, we developed a very simple but highly sensitive analytical method of quantifying one urinary metabolite of BaP, 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OHBaP), to evaluate carcinogenic PAHs exposure. After hydrolysis of 10 mL urine for two hours and concentration by automated off-line solid phase extraction, the sample was injected in a column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detection system. The limit of quantification was 0.2 pmol L(-1) (0.05 ng L(-1)) and the limit of detection was estimated at 0.07 pmol L(-1) (0.02 ng L(-1)). Linearity was established for 3-OHBaP concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 74.5 pmol L(-1) (0.1 to 20 ng L(-1)). Relative within-day standard deviation was less than 3% and relative between-day standard deviation was less than 4%. In non-occupationally exposed subjects, median concentrations for smokers compared with non-smokers were 3.5 times higher for 1-OHP (p<0.001) and 2 times higher for 3-OHBaP (p<0.05). The two urinary biomarkers were correlated in smokers (ρ=0.636; p<0.05; n=10) but not in non-smokers (ρ=0.09; p>0.05; n=21).

  9. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID

  10. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Mee, Blanaid C; Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F

    2011-12-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep(®) (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy(®) and QIAamp(®) (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect(®) (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software(®)). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A(260/280) values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates.

  11. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells, mediated by a long non-coding RNA, HOTAIR, are involved in cell malignant transformation induced by cigarette smoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Bairu; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Shi, Le; Lu, Xiaolin; Liu, Qizhan

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of lung diseases, including cancer, caused by cigarette smoke is increasing, but the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation induced by cigarette smoke remain unclear. This report describes a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and experiments utilizing lncRNAs to integrate inflammation with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The present study shows that, induced by CSE, IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, leads to activation of STAT3, a transcription activator. A ChIP assay determined that the interaction of STAT3 with the promoter regions of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) increased levels of HOTAIR. Blocking of IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody, decreasing STAT3, and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced HOTAIR expression. Moreover, for HBE cells cultured in the presence of HOTAIR siRNA for 24 h, the CSE-induced EMT, formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates HOTAIR in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT and to CSCs induced by CSE. These data define a link between inflammation and EMT, processes involved in the malignant transformation of cells caused by CSE. This link, mediated through lncRNAs, establishes a mechanism for CSE-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • STAT3 directly regulates the levels of LncRNA HOTAIR. • LncRNA HOTAIR mediates the link between inflammation and EMT. • LncRNA HOTAIR is involved in the malignant transformation of cells caused by CSE.

  12. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with semi-automated in-syringe back extraction as a new approach for the sample preparation of ionizable organic compounds prior to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Melwanki, Mahaveer B; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2008-07-11

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by a newly designed semi-automated in-syringe back extraction technique has been developed as an extraction methodology for the extraction of polar organic compounds prior to liquid chromatography (LC) measurement. The method is based on the formation of tiny droplets of the extractant in the sample solution using water-immiscible organic solvent (extractant) dissolved in a water-miscible organic dispersive solvent. Extraction of the analytes from aqueous sample into the dispersed organic droplets took place. The extracting organic phase was separated by centrifuging and the sedimented phase was withdrawn into a syringe. Then in-syringe back extraction was utilized to extract the analytes into an aqueous solution prior to LC analysis. Clenbuterol (CB), a basic organic compound used as a model, was extracted from a basified aqueous sample using 25 microL tetrachloroethylene (TCE, extraction solvent) dissolved in 500 microL acetone (as a dispersive solvent). After separation of the organic extracting phase by centrifuging, CB enriched in TCE phase was back extracted into 10 microL of 1% aqueous formic acid (FA) within the syringe. Back extraction was facilitated by repeatedly moving the plunger back and forth within the barrel of syringe, assisted by a syringe pump. Due to the plunger movement, a thin organic film is formed on the inner layer of the syringe that comes in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. Here, CB, a basic analyte, will be protonated and back extracted into FA. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, viz., choice of extraction and dispersive solvent, salt effect, speed of syringe pump, back extraction time period, effect of concentration of base and acid, were evaluated. Under optimum conditions, precision, linearity (correlation coefficient, r(2)=0.9966 over the concentration range of 10-1000 ng mL(-1) CB), detection limit (4.9 ng mL(-1)), enrichment factor (175), relative

  13. Comparative evaluation of three automated systems for DNA extraction in conjunction with three commercially available real-time PCR assays for quantitation of plasma Cytomegalovirus DNAemia in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Dayana; Clari, María Ángeles; Costa, Elisa; Muñoz-Cobo, Beatriz; Solano, Carlos; José Remigia, María; Navarro, David

    2011-08-01

    Limited data are available on the performance of different automated extraction platforms and commercially available quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) methods for the quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in plasma. We compared the performance characteristics of the Abbott mSample preparation system DNA kit on the m24 SP instrument (Abbott), the High Pure viral nucleic acid kit on the COBAS AmpliPrep system (Roche), and the EZ1 Virus 2.0 kit on the BioRobot EZ1 extraction platform (Qiagen) coupled with the Abbott CMV PCR kit, the LightCycler CMV Quant kit (Roche), and the Q-CMV complete kit (Nanogen), for both plasma specimens from allogeneic stem cell transplant (Allo-SCT) recipients (n = 42) and the OptiQuant CMV DNA panel (AcroMetrix). The EZ1 system displayed the highest extraction efficiency over a wide range of CMV plasma DNA loads, followed by the m24 and the AmpliPrep methods. The Nanogen PCR assay yielded higher mean CMV plasma DNA values than the Abbott and the Roche PCR assays, regardless of the platform used for DNA extraction. Overall, the effects of the extraction method and the QRT-PCR used on CMV plasma DNA load measurements were less pronounced for specimens with high CMV DNA content (>10,000 copies/ml). The performance characteristics of the extraction methods and QRT-PCR assays evaluated herein for clinical samples were extensible at cell-based standards from AcroMetrix. In conclusion, different automated systems are not equally efficient for CMV DNA extraction from plasma specimens, and the plasma CMV DNA loads measured by commercially available QRT-PCRs can differ significantly. The above findings should be taken into consideration for the establishment of cutoff values for the initiation or cessation of preemptive antiviral therapies and for the interpretation of data from clinical studies in the Allo-SCT setting.

  14. Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (nu ITS2 rRNA) Sequence-Structure Phylogenetics: Towards an Automated Reconstruction of the Green Algal Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Mark A.; Keller, Alexander; Koetschan, Christian; Förster, Frank; Merget, Benjamin; Wolf, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background Chloroplast-encoded genes (matK and rbcL) have been formally proposed for use in DNA barcoding efforts targeting embryophytes. Extending such a protocol to chlorophytan green algae, though, is fraught with problems including non homology (matK) and heterogeneity that prevents the creation of a universal PCR toolkit (rbcL). Some have advocated the use of the nuclear-encoded, internal transcribed spacer two (ITS2) as an alternative to the traditional chloroplast markers. However, the ITS2 is broadly perceived to be insufficiently conserved or to be confounded by introgression or biparental inheritance patterns, precluding its broad use in phylogenetic reconstruction or as a DNA barcode. A growing body of evidence has shown that simultaneous analysis of nucleotide data with secondary structure information can overcome at least some of the limitations of ITS2. The goal of this investigation was to assess the feasibility of an automated, sequence-structure approach for analysis of IT2 data from a large sampling of phylum Chlorophyta. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences and secondary structures from 591 chlorophycean, 741 trebouxiophycean and 938 ulvophycean algae, all obtained from the ITS2 Database, were aligned using a sequence structure-specific scoring matrix. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed by Profile Neighbor-Joining coupled with a sequence structure-specific, general time reversible substitution model. Results from analyses of the ITS2 data were robust at multiple nodes and showed considerable congruence with results from published phylogenetic analyses. Conclusions/Significance Our observations on the power of automated, sequence-structure analyses of ITS2 to reconstruct phylum-level phylogenies of the green algae validate this approach to assessing diversity for large sets of chlorophytan taxa. Moreover, our results indicate that objections to the use of ITS2 for DNA barcoding should be weighed against the utility of an automated

  15. An Automated Approach to Agricultural Tile Drain Detection and Extraction Utilizing High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Richard A.

    Subsurface drainage from agricultural fields in the Maumee River watershed is suspected to adversely impact the water quality and contribute to the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie. In early August of 2014, a HAB developed in the western Lake Erie Basin that resulted in over 400,000 people being unable to drink their tap water due to the presence of a toxin from the bloom. HAB development in Lake Erie is aided by excess nutrients from agricultural fields, which are transported through subsurface tile and enter the watershed. Compounding the issue within the Maumee watershed, the trend within the watershed has been to increase the installation of tile drains in both total extent and density. Due to the immense area of drained fields, there is a need to establish an accurate and effective technique to monitor subsurface farmland tile installations and their associated impacts. This thesis aimed at developing an automated method in order to identify subsurface tile locations from high resolution aerial imagery by applying an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach utilizing eCognition. This process was accomplished through a set of algorithms and image filters, which segment and classify image objects by their spectral and geometric characteristics. The algorithms utilized were based on the relative location of image objects and pixels, in order to maximize the robustness and transferability of the final rule-set. These algorithms were coupled with convolution and histogram image filters to generate results for a 10km2 study area located within Clay Township in Ottawa County, Ohio. The eCognition results were compared to previously collected tile locations from an associated project that applied heads-up digitizing of aerial photography to map field tile. The heads-up digitized locations were used as a baseline for the accuracy assessment. The accuracy assessment generated a range of agreement values from 67.20% - 71.20%, and an average

  16. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells, mediated by a long non-coding RNA, HOTAIR, are involved in cell malignant transformation induced by cigarette smoke extract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Bairu; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Shi, Le; Lu, Xiaolin; Liu, Qizhan

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of lung diseases, including cancer, caused by cigarette smoke is increasing, but the molecular mechanisms of gene regulation induced by cigarette smoke remain unclear. This report describes a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and experiments utilizing lncRNAs to integrate inflammation with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The present study shows that, induced by CSE, IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, leads to activation of STAT3, a transcription activator. A ChIP assay determined that the interaction of STAT3 with the promoter regions of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) increased levels of HOTAIR. Blocking of IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody, decreasing STAT3, and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced HOTAIR expression. Moreover, for HBE cells cultured in the presence of HOTAIR siRNA for 24h, the CSE-induced EMT, formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates HOTAIR in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT and to CSCs induced by CSE. These data define a link between inflammation and EMT, processes involved in the malignant transformation of cells caused by CSE. This link, mediated through lncRNAs, establishes a mechanism for CSE-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  17. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  18. Complete automation of solid-phase extraction with subsequent liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the quantification of benzoylecgonine, m-hydroxybenzoylecgonine, p-hydroxybenzoylecgonine, and norbenzoylecgonine in urine--application to a high-throughput urine analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Robandt, Paul P; Reda, Louis J; Klette, Kevin L

    2008-10-01

    A fully automated system utilizing a liquid handler and an online solid-phase extraction (SPE) device coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was designed to process, detect, and quantify benzoylecgonine (BZE), meta-hydroxybenzoylecgonine (m-OH BZE), para-hydroxybenzoylecgonine (p-OH BZE), and norbenzoylecgonine (nor-BZE) metabolites in human urine. The method was linear for BZE, m-OH BZE, and p-OH BZE from 1.2 to 10,000 ng/mL with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 1.2 ng/mL. Nor-BZE was linear from 5 to 10,000 ng/mL with an LOD and LOQ of 1.2 and 5 ng/mL, respectively. The intrarun precision measured as the coefficient of variation of 10 replicates of a 100 ng/mL control was less than 2.6%, and the interrun precision for 5 replicates of the same control across 8 batches was less than 4.8% for all analytes. No assay interference was noted from controls containing cocaine, cocaethylene, and ecgonine methyl ester. Excellent data concordance (R2 > 0.994) was found for direct comparison of the automated SPE-LC-MS-MS procedure and an existing gas chromatography-MS procedure using 94 human urine samples previously determined to be positive for BZE. The automated specimen handling and SPE procedure, when compared to the traditional extraction schema, eliminates the human factors of specimen handling, processing, extraction, and derivatization, thereby reducing labor costs and rework resulting from batch handling issues, and may reduce the number of fume hoods required in the laboratory.

  19. End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT) expands the extractable information from single-cell RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Alan; Yang, Chaoxing; Zilionis, Rapolas; Sergushichev, Alexey; Blodgett, David M.; Redick, Sambra; Bortell, Rita; Luban, Jeremy; Harlan, David M.; Kadener, Sebastian; Greiner, Dale L.; Klein, Allon; Artyomov, Maxim N.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq protocols that focus on transcript termini are well suited for applications in which template quantity is limiting. Here we show that, when applied to end-sequencing data, analytical methods designed for global RNA-seq produce computational artifacts. To remedy this, we created the End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT). As a test, we first compared end-sequencing and bulk RNA-seq using RNA from dendritic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As predicted by the telescripting model for transcriptional bursts, ESAT detected an LPS-stimulated shift to shorter 3′-isoforms that was not evident by conventional computational methods. Then, droplet-based microfluidics was used to generate 1000 cDNA libraries, each from an individual pancreatic islet cell. ESAT identified nine distinct cell types, three distinct β-cell types, and a complex interplay between hormone secretion and vascularization. ESAT, then, offers a much-needed and generally applicable computational pipeline for either bulk or single-cell RNA end-sequencing. PMID:27470110

  20. End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT) expands the extractable information from single-cell RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Derr, Alan; Yang, Chaoxing; Zilionis, Rapolas; Sergushichev, Alexey; Blodgett, David M; Redick, Sambra; Bortell, Rita; Luban, Jeremy; Harlan, David M; Kadener, Sebastian; Greiner, Dale L; Klein, Allon; Artyomov, Maxim N; Garber, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    RNA-seq protocols that focus on transcript termini are well suited for applications in which template quantity is limiting. Here we show that, when applied to end-sequencing data, analytical methods designed for global RNA-seq produce computational artifacts. To remedy this, we created the End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT). As a test, we first compared end-sequencing and bulk RNA-seq using RNA from dendritic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As predicted by the telescripting model for transcriptional bursts, ESAT detected an LPS-stimulated shift to shorter 3'-isoforms that was not evident by conventional computational methods. Then, droplet-based microfluidics was used to generate 1000 cDNA libraries, each from an individual pancreatic islet cell. ESAT identified nine distinct cell types, three distinct β-cell types, and a complex interplay between hormone secretion and vascularization. ESAT, then, offers a much-needed and generally applicable computational pipeline for either bulk or single-cell RNA end-sequencing.

  1. A simple and effective method for high quality co-extraction of genomic DNA and total RNA from low biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the model brown alga.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A; Brown, Murray T; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10-11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg(-1) fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this method

  2. Quantification of asenapine and three metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with automated solid-phase extraction: application to a phase I clinical trial with asenapine in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Theo; Meulman, Erik; Meijering, Henri; Wieling, Jaap; Dogterom, Peter; Lass, Holger

    2012-02-01

    The development and validation of methods for determining concentrations of the antipsychotic drug asenapine (ASE) and three of its metabolites [N-desmethylasenapine (DMA), asenapine-N(+) -glucuronide (ASG) and 11-O-sulfate-asenapine (OSA)] in human plasma using LC-MS/MS with automated solid-phase extraction is described. The three assessment methods in human plasma were found to be acceptable for quantification in the ranges 0.0250-20.0 ng/mL (ASE), 0.0500-20.0 ng/mL (DMA and OSA) and 0.250-50.0 ng/mL (ASG).

  3. Efficient rescue of foot-and-mouth disease virus in cultured cells transfected with RNA extracted from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Punam; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Das, Biswajit; Pande, Veena; Biswal, Jitendra K; Sharma, Gaurav K; Rout, Manoranjan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Dash, Bana B; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an RNA transfection was used to rescue infectious foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus from clinical samples in BHK-21 cell line for diagnosis of FMD. Tissue samples (n=190) were subjected to FMD virus isolation by conventional cell culture and also by RNA transfection. FMD virus was isolated from 62% of the clinical samples by RNA transfection, whereas virus was isolated only from 16% of the clinical samples in conventional cell culture method, suggesting better performance of the RNA transfection. Virus was rescued from 67% and 10% of ELISA negative but multiplex PCR positive samples by RNA transfection and conventional cell culture, respectively. The efficiency of transfection was studied on clinical samples subjected to temperature as high as 37°C and varying pH (pH 4-9). Except up to 1 week of storage at 4°C at pH 7.5, virus isolation was not possible by cell culture. Virus was rescued by transfection from samples stored at 4°C for any of the applied pH up to 4 weeks, and when stored at 37°C virus could be rescued up to 4 weeks at pH 7.5 suggesting the fitness of transfection to isolate virus from clinical samples stored under inappropriate conditions. The sequence data and antigenic relationships with the vaccine strains, between virus rescued by transfection and conventional cell culture, were comparable. The RNA transfection will help to increase the efficiency of virus isolation, diagnosis and molecular epidemiological studies.

  4. Automation in Photogrammetry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-25

    Allam , 1978), and the OM-Bendix AS-lIB-X (Scarano and Bruma, 1976). The UNAMACE and GPM-2 employ analog (electronic) correlation technology. However...Survey (USGS) and the Surveys and Mapping Branch (Canada) have formed integrated systems based on the Gestalt GPM 2 (Brunson and Olson, 1978; Allam , 1978...ten years off, and the full automation of planimetric extraction may be more than 20 years in the future. REFERENCES Allam , M. M., 1978. The Role of

  5. Automated Cooperative Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Pahle, Joseph; Brown, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the Automated Cooperative Trajectories project. An introduction to the phenomena of wake vortices is given, along with a summary of past research into the possibility of extracting energy from the wake by flying close parallel trajectories. Challenges and barriers to adoption of civilian automatic wake surfing technology are identified. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described that will support future research. Finally, a roadmap for future research and technology transition is proposed.

  6. Direct DNA isolation from solid biological sources without pretreatments with proteinase-K and/or homogenization through automated DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Ki, Jang-Seu; Chang, Ki Byum; Roh, Hee June; Lee, Bong Youb; Yoon, Joon Yong; Jang, Gi Young

    2007-03-01

    Genomic DNA from solid biomaterials was directly isolated with an automated DNA extractor, which was based on magnetic bead technology with a bore-mediated grinding (BMG) system. The movement of the bore broke down the solid biomaterials, mixed crude lysates thoroughly with reagents to isolate the DNA, and carried the beads to the next step. The BMG system was suitable for the mechanical homogenization of the solid biomaterials and valid as an automated system for purifying the DNA from the solid biomaterials without the need for pretreatment or disruption procedures prior to the application of the solid biomaterials.

  7. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  8. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  9. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  10. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity.

  11. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  12. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by manual and automated DNA extraction methods using venous blood and dried blood spots for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Nsojo, Anthony; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using venous blood sample has been used for many years in low resource settings for early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in children less than 18 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance characteristics of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay version 1.5 following processing of venous blood and dried blood spot (DBS) samples by Roche manual DNA extraction and automated Roche MagNA Pure LC instrument (MP) for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in order to scale up early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in routine practice. Venous blood samples from children under 18 months born to HIV-infected mothers between January and April 2008 were collected. Venous blood was used to prepare cell pellet and DBS samples. DNA extractions by manual procedure and MP were performed each on cell pellet, venous blood and DBS samples and tested by Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay. Of 325 samples included, 60 (18.5%) were confirmed HIV-infected by manual extraction performed on cell pellets. Sensitivity of the assay following MP processing of venous blood was 95% (95% CI; 86.1-99.0%) and 98.3% (95% CI; 91.1 to 99.9%) for the manual extraction and processing by MP performed on DBS samples. Specificity of the assay with all DNA extraction methods was 99.6% (95% CI; 97.9 to 100%). Performance of the assay with Roche manual extraction and processing by MP on DBS samples compared well with Roche manual extraction performed on cell pellet samples. The choice of DNA extraction method needs to be individualized based on the level of laboratory facility, volume of testing and cost benefit analysis before it is adopted for use.

  13. Characterization of eleutheroside B metabolites derived from an extract of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms by high-resolution liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and automated data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Sun, Qiang; Bai, Yun; Bao, Shunru; Li, Xuzhao; Yan, Guangli; Liu, Shumin

    2012-10-01

    We elucidated the structure and metabolite profile of eleutheroside B, a component derived from the extract of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms, after oral administration of the extract in rats. Samples of rat plasma were collected and analyzed by selective high-resolution liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS) automated data analysis method. A total of 11 metabolites were detected: four were identified, and three of those four are reported for the first time here. The three new plasma metabolites were identified on the basis of mass fragmentation patterns and literature reports. The major in vivo metabolic processes associated with eleutheroside B in A. senticosus include demethylation, acetylation, oxidation and glucuronidation after deglycosylation. A fairly comprehensive metabolic pathway was proposed for eleutheroside B. Our results provide a meaningful basis for drug discovery, design and clinical applications related to A. senticosus in traditional Chinese medicine.

  14. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component.

  15. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network.

  16. Semi-automated fault system extraction and displacement analysis of an excavated oyster reef using high-resolution laser scanned data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Gábor; Székely, Balázs; Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Exner, Ulrike; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present a semi-automated method for reconstructing the brittle deformation field of an excavated Miocene oyster reef, in Stetten, Korneuburg Basin, Lower Austria. Oyster shells up to 80 cm in size were scattered in a shallow estuarine bay forming a continuous and almost isochronous layer as a consequence of a catastrophic event in the Miocene. This shell bed was preserved by burial of several hundred meters of sandy to silty sediments. Later the layers were tilted westward, uplifted and erosion almost exhumed them. An excavation revealed a 27 by 17 meters area of the oyster covered layer. During the tectonic processes the sediment volume suffered brittle deformation. Faults mostly with some centimeter normal component and NW-SE striking affected the oyster covered volume, dissecting many shells and the surrounding matrix as well. Faults and displacements due to them can be traced along the site typically at several meters long, and as fossil oysters are broken and parts are displaced due to the faulting, along some faults it is possible to follow these displacements in 3D. In order to quantify these varying displacements and to map the undulating fault traces high-resolution scanning of the excavated and cleaned surface of the oyster bed has been carried out using a terrestrial laser scanner. The resulting point clouds have been co-georeferenced at mm accuracy and a 1mm resolution 3D point cloud of the surface has been created. As the faults are well-represented in the point cloud, this enables us to measure the dislocations of the dissected shell parts along the fault lines. We used a semi-automatic method to quantify these dislocations. First we manually digitized the fault lines in 2D as an initial model. In the next step we estimated the vertical (i.e. perpendicular to the layer) component of the dislocation along these fault lines comparing the elevations on two sides of the faults with moving averaging windows. To estimate the strike

  17. Biofunction-assisted DNA detection through RNase H-enhanced 3' processing of a premature tRNA probe in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro; Doi, Yasunori; Takamatsu, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel type of biofunction-assisted, signal-turn-on sensor for simply and homogenously detecting DNA. This sensor system is composed of two types of in vitro-transcribed label-free RNAs (a 3' premature amber suppressor tRNA probe and an amber-mutated mRNA encoding a reporter protein), RNase H, and a wheat germ extract (WGE). A target DNA induces the 3' end maturation of the tRNA probe, which is enhanced by RNase H and leads to the expression of a full-length reporter protein through amber suppression in WGE, while there is almost no expression without the target due to the inactivity of the premature probe. Therefore, the target can be readily detected with the activity of the translated reporter. The catalytic reuse of the target with the help of RNase H in addition to various bioprocesses in WGE enables this sensor system to exhibit relatively high selectivity and sensitivity.

  18. Environmental Genome Analysis: Polymerase Chain Reaction Fingerprinting on In Situ Extracted Bacterial mRNA from Contaminated Soils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-31

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Tennessee 404 Andy Holt Tower Knoxville, TN 37996-0140... Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37932 (423) 974-8080 Table of contents Abstract ......................... ............................... 1 Introduction...and M. McClelland. 1994. Stress-inducible gene of Salmonella typhimurium identified by arbitrarily primed PCR of RNA. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 91:639

  19. Office automation.

    PubMed

    Arenson, R L

    1986-03-01

    By now, the term "office automation" should have more meaning for those readers who are not intimately familiar with the subject. Not all of the preceding material pertains to every department or practice, but certainly, word processing and simple telephone management are key items. The size and complexity of the organization will dictate the usefulness of electronic mail and calendar management, and the individual radiologist's personal needs and habits will determine the usefulness of the home computer. Perhaps the most important ingredient for success in the office automation arena relates to the ability to integrate information from various systems in a simple and flexible manner. Unfortunately, this is perhaps the one area that most office automation systems have ignored or handled poorly. In the personal computer world, there has been much emphasis recently on integration of packages such as spreadsheet, database management, word processing, graphics, time management, and communications. This same philosophy of integration has been applied to a few office automation systems, but these are generally vendor-specific and do not allow for a mixture of foreign subsystems. During the next few years, it is likely that a few vendors will emerge as dominant in this integrated office automation field and will stress simplicity and flexibility as major components.

  20. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  1. Quantification of five compounds with heterogeneous physicochemical properties (morphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, cyamemazine, meprobamate and caffeine) in 11 fluids and tissues, using automated solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bévalot, Fabien; Bottinelli, Charline; Cartiser, Nathalie; Fanton, Laurent; Guitton, Jérôme

    2014-06-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocol followed by gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for quantification of caffeine, cyamemazine, meprobamate, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) in 11 biological matrices [blood, urine, bile, vitreous humor, liver, kidney, lung and skeletal muscle, brain, adipose tissue and bone marrow (BM)]. The assay was validated for linearity, within- and between-day precision and accuracy, limits of quantification, selectivity, extraction recovery (ER), sample dilution and autosampler stability on BM. For the other matrices, partial validation was performed (limits of quantification, linearity, within-day precision, accuracy, selectivity and ER). The lower limits of quantification were 12.5 ng/mL(ng/g) for 6-MAM, morphine and cyamemazine, 100 ng/mL(ng/g) for meprobamate and 50 ng/mL(ng/g) for caffeine. Analysis of real-case samples demonstrated the performance of the assay in forensic toxicology to investigate challenging cases in which, for example, blood is not available or in which analysis in alternative matrices could be relevant. The SPE protocol was also assessed as an extraction procedure that could target other relevant analytes of interest. The extraction procedure was applied to 12 molecules of forensic interest with various physicochemical properties (alimemazine, alprazolam, amitriptyline, citalopram, cocaine, diazepam, levomepromazine, nordazepam, tramadol, venlafaxine, pentobarbital and phenobarbital). All drugs were able to be detected at therapeutic concentrations in blood and in the alternate matrices.

  2. Validation of high-throughput measurement system with microwave-assisted extraction, fully automated sample preparation device, and gas chromatography-electron capture detector for determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in whale blubber.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Honda, Katsuhisa; Hamada, Noriaki; Yasunaga, Genta; Fujise, Yoshihiro

    2009-02-01

    Validation of a high-throughput measurement system with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), fully automated sample preparation device (SPD), and gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in minke whale blubber was performed. PCB congeners accounting for > 95% of the total PCBs burden in blubber were efficiently extracted with a small volume (20 mL) of n-hexane using MAE due to simultaneous saponification and extraction. Further, the crude extract obtained by MAE was rapidly purified and automatically substituted to a small volume (1 mL) of toluene using SPD without using concentrators. Furthermore, the concentration of PCBs in the purified and concentrated solution was accurately determined by GC-ECD. Moreover, the result of accuracy test using a certified material (SRM 1588b; Cod liver oil) showed good agreement with the NIST certified concentration values. In addition, the method quantification limit of total-PCB in whale blubbers was 41 ng g(-1). This new measurement system for PCBs takes only four hours. Consequently, it indicated this method is the most suitable for the monitoring and screening of PCBs in the conservation of the marine ecosystem and safe distribution of foods.

  3. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  4. Olive leaf extract suppresses messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances insulin receptor substrate 1 expression in the rats with streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Jung, Ji-Hye; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, HyunSook

    2014-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, is a metabolic disease resulting from defects in both insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Recently, olive leaf has been reported as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antidiabetic agent. This study sought to investigate whether olive leaf extract can improve the insulin resistance and inflammation response in rats with type 2 diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin. After administering olive leaf extract for 8 weeks (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight), rats given the higher dose showed significantly lower blood glucose, serum total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared with those of diabetic control rats (P < .05). Results of oral glucose tolerance tests, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL) 6 in the liver show significantly decreased glucose level in rats given either dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Both olive leaf extract-treated groups showed significantly increased insulin receptor substrate 1 expression (P < .05). Tumor necrosis factor α, IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expressions in epididymis adipose tissue were significantly lower in rats that received higher dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Lymphocyte infiltration was not observed in these rats. The results suggest that olive leaf extract may attenuate insulin resistance by suppressing mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and elevating of insulin receptor substrate 1 expression.

  5. Automated analysis of siRNA screens of cells infected by hepatitis C and dengue viruses based on immunofluorescence microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Petr; Kumar, Anil; Wörz, Ilka; Harder, Nathalie; Erfle, Holger; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We present an image analysis approach as part of a high-throughput microscopy siRNA-based screening system using cell arrays for the identification of cellular genes involved in hepatitis C and dengue virus replication. Our approach comprises: cell nucleus segmentation, quantification of virus replication level in the neighborhood of segmented cell nuclei, localization of regions with transfected cells, cell classification by infection status, and quality assessment of an experiment and single images. In particular, we propose a novel approach for the localization of regions of transfected cells within cell array images, which combines model-based circle fitting and grid fitting. By this scheme we integrate information from single cell array images and knowledge from the complete cell arrays. The approach is fully automatic and has been successfully applied to a large number of cell array images from screening experiments. The experimental results show a good agreement with the expected behaviour of positive as well as negative controls and encourage the application to screens from further high-throughput experiments.

  6. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  7. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  8. Automation in biological crystallization.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  9. Automation in biological crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Stewart, Patrick; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given. PMID:24915074

  10. Automated clean-up, separation and detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulate matter extracts from urban dust and diesel standard reference materials using a 2D-LC/2D-GC system.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Trifa M; Lim, Hwanmi; Bergvall, Christoffer; Westerholm, Roger

    2013-10-01

    A multidimensional, on-line coupled liquid chromatographic/gas chromatographic system was developed for the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system (2D-liquid chromatography (LC)), with three columns having different selectivities, was connected on-line to a two-dimensional gas chromatographic system (2D-gas chromatography (GC)). Samples were cleaned up by combining normal elution and column back-flush of the LC columns to selectively remove matrix constituents and isolate well-defined, PAH enriched fractions. Using this system, the sequential removal of polar, mono/diaromatic, olefinic and alkane compounds from crude extracts was achieved. The LC/GC coupling was performed using a fused silica transfer line into a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) GC injector. Using the PTV in the solvent vent mode, excess solvent was removed and the enriched PAH sample extract was injected into the GC. The 2D-GC setup consisted of two capillary columns with different stationary phase selectivities. Heart-cutting of selected PAH compounds in the first GC column (first dimension) and transfer of these to the second GC column (second dimension) increased the baseline resolutions of closely eluting PAHs. The on-line system was validated using the standard reference materials SRM 1649a (urban dust) and SRM 1975 (diesel particulate extract). The PAH concentrations measured were comparable to the certified values and the fully automated LC/GC system performed the clean-up, separation and detection of PAHs in 16 extracts in less than 24 h. The multidimensional, on-line 2D-LC/2D-GC system eliminated manual handling of the sample extracts and minimised the risk of sample loss and contamination, while increasing accuracy and precision.

  11. LC-HR-MS/MS standard urine screening approach: Pros and cons of automated on-line extraction by turbulent flow chromatography versus dilute-and-shoot and comparison with established urine precipitation.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Andreas G; Michely, Julian A; Weber, Armin A; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive urine screening for drugs and metabolites by LC-HR-MS/MS using Orbitrap technology has been described with precipitation as simple workup. In order to fasten, automate, and/or simplify the workup, on-line extraction by turbulent flow chromatography and a dilute-and-shoot approach were developed and compared. After chromatographic separation within 10min, the Q-Exactive mass spectrometer was run in full scan mode with positive/negative switching and subsequent data dependent acquisition mode. The workup approaches were validated concerning selectivity, recovery, matrix effects, process efficiency, and limits of identification and detection for typical drug representatives and metabolites. The total workup time for on-line extraction was 6min, for the dilution approach 3min. For comparison, the established urine precipitation and evaporation lasted 10min. The validation results were acceptable. The limits for on-line extraction were comparable with those described for precipitation, but lower than for dilution. Thanks to the high sensitivity of the LC-HR-MS/MS system, all three workup approaches were sufficient for comprehensive urine screening and allowed fast, reliable, and reproducible detection of cardiovascular drugs, drugs of abuse, and other CNS acting drugs after common doses.

  12. Automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction-retention time locked-isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Devosa, Christophe; Vliegen, Maarten; Willaert, Bart; David, Frank; Moens, Luc; Sandra, Pat

    2005-06-24

    An automated method for the simultaneous determination of six important organotin compounds namely monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPhT), diphenyltin (DPhT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) in water and sediment samples is described. The method is based on derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate followed by automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction (SPME) combined with GC-MS under retention time locked (RTL) conditions. Home-synthesized deuterated organotin analogues were used as internal standards. Two high abundant fragment ions corresponding to the main tin isotopes Sn118 and Sn120 were chosen; one for quantification and one as qualifier ion. The method was validated and excellent figures of merit were obtained. Limits of quantification (LOQs) are from 1.3 to 15 ng l(-1) (ppt) for water samples and from 1.0 to 6.3 microg kg(-1) (ppb) for sediment samples. Accuracy for sediment samples was tested on spiked real-life sediment samples and on a reference PACS-2 marine harbor sediment. The developed method was used in a case-study at the harbor of Antwerp where sediment samples in different areas were taken and subsequently screened for TBT contamination. Concentrations ranged from 15 microg kg(-1) in the port of Antwerp up to 43 mg kg(-1) near a ship repair unit.

  13. Picogram per liter level determination of estrogens in natural waters and waterworks by a fully automated on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Lopez de Alda, Maria J; Barceló, Damià

    2004-12-01

    The present work describes a novel, fully automated method, based on on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS-MS), which allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most environmentally relevant estrogens (estradiol, estrone, estriol, estradiol-17-glucuronide, estradiol-17-acetate, estrone-3-sulfate, ethynyl estradiol, diethylstilbestrol) in natural and treated waters at levels well below those of concern (limits of quantification between 0.02 and 1.02 ng/L). The method is highly precise, with relative standard deviations varying between 1.43 and 3.89%, and accurate (recovery percentages >74 %). This method was used to track the presence and fate of the target compounds in a waterworks and to evaluate the removal efficiency of the treatment processes applied. Only estrone and estrone-3-sulfate were detected in the river water used as source (at 0.68 and 0.33 ng/L, respectively). After progressive removal through the various treatment steps, none of them were detected in the finished drinking water. In addition to selectivity, sensitivity, repeatability, and automation (up to 15 samples plus 6 calibration solutions and 1 blank can be analyzed unattended), this technique offers fairly high throughput (analysis time per sample is 60 min), low time and solvent consumption, and ease of use.

  14. Effect of Green Tea Extract on Systemic Metabolic Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Determined via RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Young; Kim, Ye Jin; Ryu, Ri; Cho, Su-Jung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Green tea (GT) has various health effects, including anti-obesity properties. However, the multiple molecular mechanisms of the effects have not been fully determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the anti-obesity effects of GT via the analysis of its metabolic and transcriptional responses based on RNA-seq profiles. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal, high-fat (60% energy as fat), or high-fat + 0.25% (w/w) GT diet for 12 weeks. The GT extract ameliorated obesity, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. GT supplementation resulted in body weight gain reduction than mice fed high-fat through enhanced energy expenditure, and reduced adiposity. The transcriptome profiles of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) suggested that GT augments transcriptional responses to the degradation of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, which suggests enhanced energy homeostasis. Our findings provide some significant insights into the effects of GT for the prevention of obesity and its comorbidities. We demonstrated that the GT extract contributed to the regulation of systemic metabolic homeostasis via transcriptional responses to not only lipid and glucose metabolism, but also amino acid metabolism via BCAA degradation in the adipose tissue of DIO mice. PMID:27754422

  15. Comparison of direct boiling method with commercial kits for extracting fecal microbiome DNA by Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Deng, Guan-Hua; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Low cost and high throughput capacity are major advantages of using next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to determine metagenomic 16S rRNA tag sequences. These methods have significantly changed our view of microorganisms in the fields of human health and environmental science. However, DNA extraction using commercial kits has shortcomings of high cost and time constraint. In the present study, we evaluated the determination of fecal microbiomes using a direct boiling method compared with 5 different commercial extraction methods, e.g., Qiagen and MO BIO kits. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) using UniFrac distances and clustering showed that direct boiling of a wide range of feces concentrations gave a similar pattern of bacterial communities as those obtained from most of the commercial kits, with the exception of the MO BIO method. Fecal concentration by boiling method affected the estimation of α-diversity indices, otherwise results were generally comparable between boiling and commercial methods. The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined through direct boiling showed highly consistent frequencies with those determined through most of the commercial methods. Even those for the MO BIO kit were also obtained by the direct boiling method with high confidence. The present study suggested that direct boiling could be used to determine the fecal microbiome and using this method would significantly reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of the sample preparation for studying gut microbiome diversity.

  16. Automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in human urine specimens: application to a high-throughput urine analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Robandt, P V; Klette, K L; Sibum, M

    2009-10-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS-MS) method for the analysis of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in human urine specimens was developed. The method was linear (R(2) = 0.9986) to 1000 ng/mL with no carryover evidenced at 2000 ng/mL. Limits of quantification and detection were found to be 2 ng/mL. Interrun precision was evaluated at the 15 ng/mL level over nine batches spanning 15 days (n = 45). The coefficient of variation (%CV) was found to be 5.5% over the course of the validation. Intrarun precision of a 15 ng/mL control (n = 5) ranged from 0.58% CV to 7.4% CV for the same set of analytical batches. Interference was tested using (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, (-)-Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and cannabinol. One hundred and nineteen specimens previously found to contain THC-COOH by a previously validated gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure were compared to the SPE-LC-MS-MS method. Excellent agreement was found (R(2) = 0.9925) for the parallel comparison study. The automated SPE procedure eliminates the human factors of specimen handling, extraction, and derivatization, thereby reducing labor costs and rework resulting from human error or technique issues. Additionally, method runtime is greatly reduced (e.g., during parallel studies the SPE-LC-MS-MS instrument was often finished with analysis by the time the technician finished the offline SPE and derivatization procedure prior to the GC-MS analysis).

  17. Fully automated analysis of four tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines in mainstream cigarette smoke using two-dimensional online solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ruoshi; Yi, Xiaoli; Yang, Zhendong; Liu, Xingyu; Zhou, Jun; Liang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A fully automated method for the detection of four tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) in mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS) has been developed. The new developed method is based on two-dimensional online solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/LC-MS/MS). The two dimensional SPE was performed in the method utilizing two cartridges with different extraction mechanisms to cleanup disturbances of different polarity to minimize sample matrix effects on each analyte. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a UPLC C18 reversed phase analytical column. Under the optimum online SPE/LC-MS/MS conditions, N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), N'-nitrosoanatabine (NAT), N'-nitrosoanabasine (NAB), and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) were baseline separated with good peak shapes. This method appears to be the most sensitive method yet reported for determination of TSNAs in mainstream cigarette smoke. The limits of quantification for NNN, NNK, NAT and NAB reached the levels of 6.0, 1.0, 3.0 and 0.6 pg/cig, respectively, which were well below the lowest levels of TSNAs in MSS of current commercial cigarettes. The accuracy of the measurement of four TSNAs was from 92.8 to 107.3%. The relative standard deviations of intra-and inter-day analysis were less than 5.4% and 7.5%, respectively. The main advantages of the method developed are fairly high sensitivity, selectivity and accuracy of results, minimum sample pre-treatment, full automation, and high throughput. As a part of the validation procedure, the developed method was applied to evaluate TSNAs yields for 27 top-selling commercial cigarettes in China.

  18. TOGA: an automated parsing technology for analyzing expression of nearly all genes.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, J G; Foye, P E; Erlander, M G; Hilbush, B S; Bodzin, L J; Durham, J T; Hasel, K W

    2000-02-29

    We have developed an automated, high-throughput, systematic cDNA display method called TOGA, an acronym for total gene expression analysis. TOGA utilizes 8-nt sequences, comprised of a 4-nt restriction endonuclease cleavage site and adjacent 4-nt parsing sequences, and their distances from the 3' ends of mRNA molecules to give each mRNA species in an organism a single identity. The parsing sequences are used as parts of primer-binding sites in 256 PCR-based assays performed robotically on tissue extracts to determine simultaneously the presence and relative concentration of nearly every mRNA in the extracts, regardless of whether the mRNA has been discovered previously. Visualization of the electrophoretically separated fluorescent assay products from different extracts displayed via a Netscape browser-based graphical user interface allows the status of each mRNA to be compared among samples and its identity to be matched with sequences of known mRNAs compiled in databases.

  19. TOGA: An automated parsing technology for analyzing expression of nearly all genes

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, J. Gregor; Foye, Pamela E.; Erlander, Mark G.; Hilbush, Brian S.; Bodzin, Leon J.; Durham, Jayson T.; Hasel, Karl W.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed an automated, high-throughput, systematic cDNA display method called TOGA, an acronym for total gene expression analysis. TOGA utilizes 8-nt sequences, comprised of a 4-nt restriction endonuclease cleavage site and adjacent 4-nt parsing sequences, and their distances from the 3′ ends of mRNA molecules to give each mRNA species in an organism a single identity. The parsing sequences are used as parts of primer-binding sites in 256 PCR-based assays performed robotically on tissue extracts to determine simultaneously the presence and relative concentration of nearly every mRNA in the extracts, regardless of whether the mRNA has been discovered previously. Visualization of the electrophoretically separated fluorescent assay products from different extracts displayed via a Netscape browser-based graphical user interface allows the status of each mRNA to be compared among samples and its identity to be matched with sequences of known mRNAs compiled in databases. PMID:10681428

  20. Effect of polysaccharides extract of rhizoma atractylodis macrocephalae on thymus, spleen and cardiac indexes, caspase-3 activity ratio, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2/Omi protein and mRNA expression levels in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Sun, Yong Le; Wang, Ai Hong; Xu, Chong En; Zhang, Meng Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of polysaccharides extract of rhizoma atractylodis macrocephalae on heart function in aged rats. Polysaccharides extract of rhizoma atractylodis macrocephalae was administered to aged rats. Results showed that thymus, spleen and cardiac indexs were significantly increased, whereas caspase-3 activity ratio, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2/Omi protein expression, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2/Omi mRNA expression levels were markedly reduced. It can be concluded that polysaccharides extract of rhizoma atractylodis macrocephalae may enhance immunity and improve heart function in aged rats.

  1. Application of Brown Planthopper Salivary Gland Extract to Rice Plants Induces Systemic Host mRNA Patterns Associated with Nutrient Remobilization

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Adelina; Smith, Charles Michael

    2015-01-01

    Insect saliva plays an important role in modulation of plant-insect interactions. Although this area of research has generated much attention in recent years, mechanisms of how saliva affects plant responses remain poorly understood. To address this void, the present study investigated the impact of the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens, Stål; hereafter BPH) salivary gland extract (SGE) on rice (Oryza sativa) systemic responses at the mRNA level. Differentially expressed rice mRNAs were generated through suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and classified into six functional groups. Those with the most representatives were from the primary metabolism (28%), signaling-defense (22%) and transcription-translation-regulation group (16%). To validate SSH library results, six genes were further analyzed by One-Step Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase-PCR. Five of these genes exhibited up-regulation levels of more than 150% of those in the control group in at least one post-application time point. Results of this study allow assignment of at least two putative roles of BPH saliva: First, application of SGE induces immediate systemic responses at the mRNA level, suggesting that altering of the rice transcriptome at sites distant to hoppers feeding locations may play an important role in BPH-rice interactions. Second, 58% of SGE-responsive up-regulated genes have a secondary function associated with senescence, a process characterized by remobilization of nutrients. This suggests that BPH salivary secretions may reprogram the rice transcriptome for nutritional enhancement. When these findings are translated onto ‘whole plant’ scale, they indicate that BPH saliva may play the ‘wise investment’ role of ‘minimum input today, maximum output tomorrow’. PMID:26641488

  2. A novel dual-valve sequential injection manifold (DV-SIA) for automated liquid-liquid extraction. Application for the determination of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Skrlíková, Jana; Andruch, Vasil; Sklenárová, Hana; Chocholous, Petr; Solich, Petr; Balogh, Ioseph S

    2010-05-07

    A novel dual-valve sequential injection system (DV-SIA) for online liquid-liquid extraction which resolves the main problems of LLE utilization in SIA has been designed. The main idea behind this new design was to construct an SIA system by connecting two independent units, one for aqueous-organic mixture flow and the second specifically for organic phase flow. As a result, the DV-SIA manifold consists of an Extraction unit and a Detection unit. Processing a mixture of aqueous-organic phase in the Extraction unit and a separated organic phase in the Detection unit solves the problems associated with the change of phases having different affinities to the walls of the Teflon tubing used in the SI-system. The developed manifold is a simple, user-friendly and universal system built entirely from commercially available components. The system can be used for a variety of samples and organic solvents and is simple enough to be easily handled by operators less familiar with flow systems. The efficiency of the DV-SIA system is demonstrated by the extraction of picric acid in the form of an ion associate with 2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenylamino)-vinyl]-1,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium reagent, with subsequent spectrophotometric detection. The suggested DV-SIA concept can be expected to stimulate new experiments in analytical laboratories and can be applied to the elaboration of procedures for the determination of other compounds extractable by organic solvents. It could thus form a basis for the design of simple, single-purpose commercial instruments used in LLE procedures.

  3. Automated extraction of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and N-demethyl-LSD from blood, serum, plasma, and urine samples using the Zymark RapidTrace with LC/MS/MS confirmation.

    PubMed

    de Kanel, J; Vickery, W E; Waldner, B; Monahan, R M; Diamond, F X

    1998-05-01

    A forensic procedure for the quantitative confirmation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and the qualitative confirmation of its metabolite, N-demethyl-LSD, in blood, serum, plasma, and urine samples is presented. The Zymark RapidTrace was used to perform fully automated solid-phase extractions of all specimen types. After extract evaporation, confirmations were performed using liquid chromatography (LC) followed by positive electrospray ionization (ESI+) mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) without derivatization. Quantitation of LSD was accomplished using LSD-d3 as an internal standard. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for LSD was 0.05 ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) for both LSD and N-demethyl-LSD was 0.025 ng/mL. The recovery of LSD was greater than 95% at levels of 0.1 ng/mL and 2.0 ng/mL. For LSD at 1.0 ng/mL, the within-run and between-run (different day) relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.2% and 4.4%, respectively.

  4. Validation of an assay for the determination of cotinine and 3-hydroxycotinine in human saliva using automated solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bentley, M C; Abrar, M; Kelk, M; Cook, J; Phillips, K

    1999-02-19

    The validation of a high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of low level cotinine and 3-hydroxycotinine in human saliva is reported. Analytes and deuterated internal standards were extracted from saliva samples using automated solid-phase extraction, the columns containing a hyper cross-linked styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer sorbent, and analysed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS-MS). Lower limits of quantitation of 0.05 and 0.10 ng/ml for cotinine and 3-hydroxycotinine, respectively, were achieved. Intra- and inter-batch precision and accuracy values fell within +/-17% for all quality control samples, with the exception of quality control samples prepared at 0.30 ng/ml for 3-hydroxycotinine (inter-day precision 21.1%). Results from the analysis of saliva samples using this assay were consistent with subjects' self-reported environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures, enhancing the applicability of cotinine as a biomarker for the assessment of low level ETS exposure.

  5. Automated and sensitive determination of four anabolic androgenic steroids in urine by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a novel approach for clinical monitoring and doping control.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Shao, Jing; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for automated and sensitive analysis of testosterone, androstenedione, methyltestosterone and methenolone in urine samples by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The optimization and validation of the method were discussed in detail. The Turboflow C18-P SPE column showed the best extraction efficiency for all the analytes. Nanogram per liter (ng/L) level of AAS could be determined directly and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 ng/mL, which were much lower than normally concerned concentrations for these typical anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) (0.1 ng/mL). The linearity range was from the LOQ to 100 ng/mL for each compound, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.9990 to 0.9999. The intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.1% to 14.5% (n=5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of urine samples collected from 24 male athletes and 15 patients of prostate cancer. The proposed method provides an alternative practical way to rapidly determine AAS in urine samples, especially for clinical monitoring and doping control.

  6. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  7. Multiresidue trace analysis of pharmaceuticals, their human metabolites and transformation products by fully automated on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García-Galán, María Jesús; Petrovic, Mira; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià

    2016-09-01

    A novel, fully automated analytical methodology based on dual column liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-LC-MS(2)) has been developed and validated for the analysis of 12 pharmaceuticals and 20 metabolites and transformation products in different types of water (influent and effluent wastewaters and surface water). Two LC columns were used - one for pre-concentration of the sample and the second for separation and analysis - so that water samples were injected directly in the chromatographic system. Besides the many advantages of the methodology, such as minimization of the sample volume required and its manipulation, both compounds ionized in positive and negative mode could be analyzed simultaneously without compromising the sensitivity. A comparative study of different mobile phases, gradients and LC pre-concentration columns was carried out to obtain the best analytical performance. Limits of detection (MLODs) achieved were in the low ngL(-1) range for all the compounds. The method was successfully applied to study the presence of the target analytes in different wastewater and surface water samples collected near the city of Girona (Catalonia, Spain). Data on the environmental presence and fate of pharmaceutical metabolites and TPs is still scarce, highlighting the relevance of the developed methodology.

  8. Analysis of Cocaine, Its Metabolites, Pyrolysis Products, and Ethanol Adducts in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues Using Zymark Automated Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    NA, et al. Solid- phase extraction and GC/MS quantitation of cocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene from meconium , whole...blood, and plasma. J Anal Toxicol 1993;17(6):353-8. 21. Browne SP, Tebbett IR, Moore CM, Dusick A, Co- vert R, Yee GT. Analysis of meconium for...humor. J Anal Toxicol 2000;24(1):59-65. 29. Oyler J, Darwin WD, Preston KL, Suess P, Cone EJ. Cocaine disposition in meconium from newborns of

  9. An Automated Method for Extracting Spatially Varying Time-Dependent Quantities from an ALEGRA Simulation Using VisIt Visualization Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Visualization software such as VisIt presents an alternative method to examine data through the use of EXODUS databases.3 In addition, VisIt...extracting transient quantities that vary spatially from an EXODUS database using a VisIt macro written in the Python programming language. 2...Graphics; Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque, NM, September 1991. Revised April 1994. 3 Schoof, L. A.; Yarberry, V. R. EXODUS II: A Finite

  10. Automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of 6-acetylmorphine in human urine specimens: application for a high-throughput urine analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Robandt, P V; Bui, H M; Scancella, J M; Klette, K L

    2010-10-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS-MS) method using the Spark Holland Symbiosis Pharma SPE-LC coupled to a Waters Quattro Micro MS-MS was developed for the analysis of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in human urine specimens. The method was linear (R² = 0.9983) to 100 ng/mL, with no carryover at 200 ng/mL. Limits of quantification and detection were found to be 2 ng/mL. Interrun precision calculated as percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and evaluated by analyzing five specimens at 10 ng/mL over nine batches (n = 45) was 3.6%. Intrarun precision evaluated from 0 to 100 ng/mL ranged from 1.0 to 4.4%CV. Other opioids (codeine, morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and norcodeine) did not interfere in the detection, quantification, or chromatography of 6-AM or the deuterated internal standard. The quantified values for 41 authentic human urine specimens previously found to contain 6-AM by a validated gas chromatography (GC)-MS method were compared to those obtained by the SPE-LC-MS-MS method. The SPE-LC-MS-MS procedure eliminates the human factors of specimen handling, extraction, and derivatization, thereby reducing labor costs and rework resulting from human error or technique issues. The time required for extraction and analysis was reduced by approximately 50% when compared to a validated 6-AM procedure using manual SPE and GC-MS analysis.

  11. A semi-automated system for quantifying the oxidative potential of ambient particles in aqueous extracts using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay: results from the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Guo, H.; King, L. E.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    A variety of methods are used to measure the capability of particulate matter (PM) to catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo, also defined as the aerosol oxidative potential. A widely used measure of aerosol oxidative potential is the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay, which monitors the depletion of DTT (a surrogate for cellular antioxidants) as catalyzed by the redox-active species in PM. However, a major constraint in the routine use of the DTT assay for integrating it with the large-scale health studies is its labor-intensive and time-consuming protocol. To specifically address this concern, we have developed a semi-automated system for quantifying the oxidative potential of aerosol liquid extracts using the DTT assay. The system, capable of unattended analysis at one sample per hour, has a high analytical precision (Coefficient of Variation of 12% for standards, 4% for ambient samples), and reasonably low limit of detection (0.31 nmol min-1). Comparison of the automated approach with the manual method conducted on ambient samples yielded good agreement (slope = 1.08 ± 0.12, r2 = 0.92, N = 9). The system was utilized for the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) to generate an extensive data set on DTT activity of ambient particles collected from contrasting environments (urban, road-side, and rural) in the southeastern US. We find that water-soluble PM2.5 DTT activity on a per air volume basis was spatially uniform and often well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r = 0.49 to 0.88), suggesting regional sources contributing to the PM oxidative potential in southeast US. However, the greater heterogeneity in the intrinsic DTT activity (per PM mass basis) across seasons indicates variability in the DTT activity associated with aerosols from sources that vary with season. Although developed for the DTT assay, the instrument can also be used to determine oxidative potential with other acellular assays.

  12. Quantitative analysis of simvastatin and its beta-hydroxy acid in human plasma using automated liquid-liquid extraction based on 96-well plate format and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyan; Yang, Amy; Rogers, John Douglas; Zhao, Jamie J

    2004-01-27

    An assay based on automated liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of simvastatin (SV) and its beta-hydroxy acid (SVA) in human plasma. A Packard MultiProbe II workstation was used to convert human plasma samples collected following administration of simvastatin and quality control (QC) samples from individual tubes into 96-well plate format. The workstation was also used to prepare calibration standards and spike internal standards. A Tomtec Quadra 96-channel liquid handling workstation was used to perform LLE based on 96-well plates including adding solvents, separating organic from aqueous layer and reconstitution. SV and SVA were separated through a Kromasil C18 column (50 mm x 2 mm i.d., 5 microm) and detected by tandem mass spectrometry with a TurboIonspray interface. Stable isotope-labeled SV and SVA, 13CD(3)-SV and 13 CD(3)-SVA, were used as the internal standards for SV and SVA, respectively. The automated procedures reduced the overall analytical time (96 samples) to 1/3 of that of manual LLE. Most importantly, an analyst spent only a fraction of time on the 96-well LLE. A limit of quantitation of 50 pg/ml was achieved for both SV and SVA. The interconversion between SV and SVA during the 96-well LLE was found to be negligible. The assay showed very good reproducibility, with intra- and inter-assay precision (%R.S.D.) of less than 7.5%, and accuracy of 98.7-102.3% of nominal values for both analytes. By using this method, sample throughput should be enhanced at least three-fold compared to that of the manual procedure.

  13. Participation of microRNA 124-CREB pathway: a parallel memory enhancing mechanism of standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08).

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Charles, Prisila Dulcy; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    Bacosides, the effective component of standardised leaf extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) has been reported to have memory enhancing effect. Our previous reports suggested that BESEB CDRI-08 (BME) improves memory in postnatal rats by enhancing serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] metabolism, its transportation and subsequently activates 5-HT(3A) receptor during hippocampus-dependent learning. In this study, we examine whether the up-regulated 5-HT(3A) receptor activity by BME modulate microRNA 124-CREB pathway to enhance synaptic plasticity. Wistar rat pups received single dose of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/BME (80 mg/kg)/mCPBG (10 mg/kg)/BME + mCPBG during the postnatal days (PND) 15-29. On PND 30, individuals were trained at brightness discrimination task and 24 h later, they were tested on the task. The BME treated group exhibited significantly lower percentage of errors during retention than acquisition. In addition, pre-miR-124 expression in hippocampus was significantly down-regulated in the BME and mCPBG + BME treated groups combined with a significant increase in the plasticity related genes, cAMP response element-binding protein, its phosphorylation and postsynaptic density protein 95. Our results suggest that this may be one of the mechanisms of bacosides present in BME for the memory enhancement.

  14. Rapid and automated analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products by online solid phase extraction coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Pagano, Imma; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2016-01-08

    This study reports a fast and automated analytical procedure for the analysis of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk and dairy products. The method is based on the simultaneous protein precipitation and AFM1 extraction, by salt-induced liquid-liquid extraction (SI-LLE), followed by an online solid-phase extraction (online SPE) coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis to the automatic pre-concentration, clean up and sensitive and selective determination of AFM1. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and accuracy of the analytical method were studied in detail. In the optimal conditions, acetonitrile and NaCl were used as extraction/denaturant solvent and salting-out agent in SI-LLE, respectively. After centrifugation, the organic phase (acetonitrile) was diluted with water (1:9 v/v) and purified (1mL) by online C18 cartridge coupled with an UHPLC column. Finally, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode was applied to the detection of AFM1. Validation studies were carried out on different dairy products (whole and skimmed cow milk, yogurt, goat milk, and powder infant formula), providing method quantification limits about 25 times lower than AFM1 maximum levels permitted by EU regulation 1881/2006 in milk and dairy products for direct human consumption. Recoveries (86-102%) and repeatability (RSD<3, n=6) meet the performance criteria required by EU regulation N. 401/2006 for the determination of the levels of mycotoxins in foodstuffs. Moreover, no matrix effects were observed in the different milk and dairy products studied. The proposed method improves the performance of AFM1 analysis in milk samples as AFM1 determination is performed with a degree of accuracy higher than the conventional methods. Other advantages are the reduction of sample preparation procedure, time and cost of the analysis, enabling high sample throughput that meet the current concerns of food safety and the public

  15. An automated method for measurement of methoxetamine in human plasma by use of turbulent flow on-line extraction coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Abe, Emuri; Ricard, Florian; Darrouzain, François; Alvarez, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    Methoxetamine is a new ketamine derivative designer drug which has recently become available via the Internet marketed as "legal ketamine". It is a new dissociative recreational drug, acting as an NMDA receptor antagonist and dopamine reuptake inhibitor. The objective of this study was to develop on-line automated sample preparation using a TurboFlow device coupled with liquid chromatography with ion-trap mass spectrometric detection for measurement of methoxetamine in human plasma. Samples (100 μL) were vortex mixed with internal standard solution (ketamine-d4 in acetonitrile). After centrifugation, 20 μL of the supernatant was injected on to a 50 mm × 0.5-mm C18XL Turboflow column. The retained analytes were then back-flushed on to a 50 mm × 3-mm (3 μm) Hypersil Gold analytical column for chromatographic separation, then eluted with a formate buffer-acetonitrile gradient. Methoxetamine and the IS were ionized by electrospray in positive mode. Parent [M + H](+) ions were m/z 248.1 for methoxetamine and m/z 242.0 for the IS. The most intense product ions from methoxetamine (m/z 203.0) and the IS (m/z 224.0) were used for quantification. The assay was accurate (96.8-108.8% range) and precise (intra and inter-day coefficients of variation <8.8%) over the range of 2.0 (lower limit of quantification) to 1000.0 ng mL(-1) (upper limit of quantification). No matrix effect was observed. This method has been successfully applied to determination of plasma concentrations of methoxetamine in the first French hospitalization case report after acute intoxication; the plasma concentration was 136 ng mL(-1).

  16. Automated Desalting Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Maegan K.; Liu, De-Ling; Kanik, Isik; Beegle, Luther

    2010-01-01

    Because salt and metals can mask the signature of a variety of organic molecules (like amino acids) in any given sample, an automated system to purify complex field samples has been created for the analytical techniques of electrospray ionization/ mass spectroscopy (ESI/MS), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and biological assays where unique identification requires at least some processing of complex samples. This development allows for automated sample preparation in the laboratory and analysis of complex samples in the field with multiple types of analytical instruments. Rather than using tedious, exacting protocols for desalting samples by hand, this innovation, called the Automated Sample Processing System (ASPS), takes analytes that have been extracted through high-temperature solvent extraction and introduces them into the desalting column. After 20 minutes, the eluent is produced. This clear liquid can then be directly analyzed by the techniques listed above. The current apparatus including the computer and power supplies is sturdy, has an approximate mass of 10 kg, and a volume of about 20 20 20 cm, and is undergoing further miniaturization. This system currently targets amino acids. For these molecules, a slurry of 1 g cation exchange resin in deionized water is packed into a column of the apparatus. Initial generation of the resin is done by flowing sequentially 2.3 bed volumes of 2N NaOH and 2N HCl (1 mL each) to rinse the resin, followed by .5 mL of deionized water. This makes the pH of the resin near neutral, and eliminates cross sample contamination. Afterward, 2.3 mL of extracted sample is then loaded into the column onto the top of the resin bed. Because the column is packed tightly, the sample can be applied without disturbing the resin bed. This is a vital step needed to ensure that the analytes adhere to the resin. After the sample is drained, oxalic acid (1 mL, pH 1.6-1.8, adjusted with NH4OH) is pumped into the column. Oxalic acid works as a

  17. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin production genes from patient samples using an automated extraction platform and multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chiefari, Amy K; Perry, Michael J; Kelly-Cirino, Cassandra; Egan, Christina T

    2015-12-01

    To minimize specimen volume, handling and testing time, we have developed two TaqMan(®) multiplex real-time PCR (rtPCR) assays to detect staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E and Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin production genes directly from clinical patient stool specimens utilizing a novel lysis extraction process in parallel with the Roche MagNA Pure Compact. These assays are specific, sensitive and reliable for the detection of the staphylococcal enterotoxin encoding genes and the tst1 gene from known toxin producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Specificity was determined by testing a total of 47 microorganism strains, including 8 previously characterized staphylococcal enterotoxin producing strains against each rtPCR target. Sensitivity for these assays range from 1 to 25 cfu per rtPCR reaction for cultured isolates and 8-20 cfu per rtPCR for the clinical stool matrix.

  18. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2012-01-01

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (1H–15N 2D HMQC) and proton–proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1H–1H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino resonances for a majority

  19. Automated 3-D extraction and evaluation of the inner and outer cortical surfaces using a Laplacian map and partial volume effect classification.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Sic; Singh, Vivek; Lee, Jun Ki; Lerch, Jason; Ad-Dab'bagh, Yasser; MacDonald, David; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun I; Evans, Alan C

    2005-08-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the inner and outer cortical surfaces of the human cerebrum is a critical objective for a wide variety of neuroimaging analysis purposes, including visualization, morphometry, and brain mapping. The Anatomic Segmentation using Proximity (ASP) algorithm, previously developed by our group, provides a topology-preserving cortical surface deformation method that has been extensively used for the aforementioned purposes. However, constraints in the algorithm to ensure topology preservation occasionally produce incorrect thickness measurements due to a restriction in the range of allowable distances between the gray and white matter surfaces. This problem is particularly prominent in pediatric brain images with tightly folded gyri. This paper presents a novel method for improving the conventional ASP algorithm by making use of partial volume information through probabilistic classification in order to allow for topology preservation across a less restricted range of cortical thickness values. The new algorithm also corrects the classification of the insular cortex by masking out subcortical tissues. For 70 pediatric brains, validation experiments for the modified algorithm, Constrained Laplacian ASP (CLASP), were performed by three methods: (i) volume matching between surface-masked gray matter (GM) and conventional tissue-classified GM, (ii) surface matching between simulated and CLASP-extracted surfaces, and (iii) repeatability of the surface reconstruction among 16 MRI scans of the same subject. In the volume-based evaluation, the volume enclosed by the CLASP WM and GM surfaces matched the classified GM volume 13% more accurately than using conventional ASP. In the surface-based evaluation, using synthesized thick cortex, the average difference between simulated and extracted surfaces was 4.6 +/- 1.4 mm for conventional ASP and 0.5 +/- 0.4 mm for CLASP. In a repeatability study, CLASP produced a 30% lower RMS error for the GM surface and a 8

  20. Algorithms Could Automate Cancer Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baky, A. A.; Winkler, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Five new algorithms are a complete statistical procedure for quantifying cell abnormalities from digitized images. Procedure could be basis for automated detection and diagnosis of cancer. Objective of procedure is to assign each cell an atypia status index (ASI), which quantifies level of abnormality. It is possible that ASI values will be accurate and economical enough to allow diagnoses to be made quickly and accurately by computer processing of laboratory specimens extracted from patients.

  1. Validation of a sensitive and automated 96-well solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of desloratadine and 3-hydroxydesloratadine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyu; Clement, Robert P; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Reyderman, Larisa; Beaudry, Francis; Grandmaison, Charles; Di Donato, Lorella; Masse, Robert; Rudewicz, Patrick J

    2003-07-25

    To support clinical development, a liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of desloratadine (descarboethoxyloratadine) and 3-OH desloratadine (3-hydroxydescarboethoxyloratadine) concentrations in human plasma. The method consisted of automated 96-well solid-phase extraction for sample preparation and liquid chromatography/turbo ionspray tandem mass spectrometry for analysis. [2H(4)]Desloratadine and [2H(4)]3-OH desloratadine were used as internal standards (I.S.). A quadratic regression (weighted 1/concentration(2)) gave the best fit for calibration curves over the concentration range of 25-10000 pg/ml for both desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine. There was no interference from endogenous components in the blank plasma tested. The accuracy (%bias) at the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was -12.8 and +3.4% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. The precision (%CV) for samples at the LLOQ was 15.1 and 10.9% for desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine, respectively. For quality control samples at 75, 1000 and 7500 pg/ml, the between run %CV was extracts (up to 185 h at 5 degrees C). This LC-MS-MS method for the determination of desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine in human plasma met regulatory requirements for selectivity, sensitivity, goodness of fit, precision, accuracy and stability.

  2. A multiplex real-time PCR-platform integrated into automated extraction method for the rapid detection and measurement of oncogenic HPV type-specific viral DNA load from cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Broccolo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The persistent infection with most frequent high-risk (HR)-HPV types (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58) is considered to be the true precursor of neoplastic progression. HR-HPV detection and genotyping is the most effective and accurate approach in screening of the early cervical lesions and cervical cancer, although also the HR-HPV DNA load is considered an ancillary marker for persistent HPV infection. Here, it is described an in-house multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based typing system for the rapid detection and quantitation of the most common HR-HPV genotypes from cervical cytology screening tests. First, a separate qPCR assay to quantify a single-copy gene is recommended prior to screening (prescreening assay) to verify the adequate cellularity of the sample and the quality of DNA extracted and to normalize the HPV copy number per genomic DNA equivalent in the sample. Subsequently, to minimize the number of reactions, two multiplex qPCR assays (first line screening) are performed to detect and quantify HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58 (HPV-18 and -45 are measured together by single-fluorophore). In addition, a multiplex qPCR assay specific for HPV-18 and HPV-45 is also available to type precisely the samples found to be positive for one of the two strains. Finally, two nucleic acid extraction methods are proposed by using a 96-well plate format: one manual method (supported by centrifuge or by vacuum) and one automated method integrated into a robotic liquid handler workstation to minimize material and hands-on time. In conclusion, this system provides a reliable high-throughput method for the rapid detection and quantitation of HR-HPV DNA load in cervical samples.

  3. Effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza root extract on brain acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities, their mRNA levels and memory evaluation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Piasecka, Anna; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Bogacz, Anna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Kachlicki, Piotr; Buchwald, Waldemar; Klejewski, Andrzej; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2017-05-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (Lamiaceae), one of the most important and popular plants of traditional medicine of Asia, is used for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and in central nervous system disturbances. The main aim of this study was to assess the influence of subchronic (28-fold) administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza root extract (SE, 200mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioural activity and memory of rats and to evaluate the activities of cholinesterases (AChE and BuChE) and gene expression levels of AChE and BuChE as well as of beta-secretase (BACE1) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex in vivo. Huperzine A (HU, 0.5mg/kg b.w., p.o.) served as a positive control substance, whereas scopolamine (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) injection was used as a well-known model of memory impairment. The results showed that subchronic administration of SE led to an improvement of long-term memory of rats. Strong inhibition of AChE and BuChE mRNA transcription in the frontal cortex of rats treated with SE or HU was observed. The BACE1 transcript level was significantly decreased. AChE activity was statistically significantly inhibited in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus by SE (47% and 55%, respectively). Similar effects were observed in the case of HU. In summary, activity of SE provides evidence that the plant can be a source of drugs used in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  4. A fully automated system with on-line micro solid-phase extraction combined with capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for high throughput analysis of microcystins and nodularin-R in tap water and lake water.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yuanhong; Shi, Xianzhe; Dou, Abo; Zou, Cunjie; He, Hongbing; Yang, Qin; Zhao, Sumin; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2011-04-01

    Microcystins and nodularins are cyclic peptide hepatotoxins and tumour promoters from cyanobacteria. The present study describes the development, validation and practical application of a fully automated analytical method based on on-line micro solid-phase extraction-capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of seven microcystins and nodularin-R in tap water and lake water. Aliquots of just 100 μL of water samples are sufficient for the detection and quantification of all eight toxins. Selected reaction monitoring was used to obtain the highest sensitivity. Good linear calibrations were obtained for microcystins (50-2000ng/L) and nodularin-R (25-1000 ng/L) in spiked tap water and lake water samples. Excellent interday and intraday repeatability were achieved for eight toxins with relative standard deviation less than 15.7% in three different concentrations. Acceptable recoveries were achieved in the three concentrations with both tap water matrix and lake water matrix and no significant matrix effect was found in tap water and lake water except for microcystin-RR. The limits of detection (signal to noise ratio=3) of toxins were lower than 56.6 ng/L which is far below the 1 μg/L defined by the World Health Organization provisional guideline for microcystin-LR. Finally, this method was successfully applied to lake water samples from Tai lake and proved to be useful for water quality monitoring.

  5. On-line coupling of automated solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. Quantitation of oxidizable drugs of abuse and their metabolites in plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Krämer, E; Kovar, K A

    1999-08-20

    The concentration effect of automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) in combination with HPLC and very sensitive electrochemical detection was employed for the determination of N-ethyl-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-amphetamine (HMEA, the main metabolite of the ecstasy analogue MDE), delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in plasma and urine in comparison to a previously published psilocin assay. For the SPE either CBA (functional group: carboxypropyl)- or CH (functional group: cyclohexyl)-sorbent was used. The following separation was carried out on a reversed-phase column (LiChroCart, Superspher 60 RP select B from Merck). Depending on the hydrodynamic voltammogram of the analyzed substance the oxidation potential varied from 920 mV up to 1.2 V. In spite of using high potentials, precision and accuracy were always within the accepted statistical requirements. The limits of quantitation were between 5 ng/ml (THC, THC-COOH in plasma) and 20 ng/ml (HMEA in plasma). Advantages of on-line SPE in comparison with off-line methods were less manual effort, evidently smaller volumes (< or = 400 microliters) of plasma or urine and almost always higher recovery rates (> 93%). The assays have been successfully proven with real biological samples and found suitable for use in routine analysis.

  6. Automated liquid-liquid extraction based on 96-well plate format in conjunction with ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantitation of methoxsalen in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manish; Contractor, Pritesh; Upadhyay, Vivek; Gupta, Ajay; Guttikar, Swati; Singhal, Puran; Goswami, Sailendra; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive, specific and high throughput bioanalytical method using automated sample processing via 96-well plate liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of methoxsalen in human plasma. Plasma samples with ketoconazole as internal standard (IS) were prepared by employing 0.2 mL human plasma in ethyl acetate:dichloromethane (80:20, v/v). The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using isocratic mobile phase, consisting of 10 mM ammonium formate and acetonitrile (60:40, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The linear dynamic range was established over the concentration range 1.1-213.1 ng/mL for methoxsalen. The method was rugged and rapid with a total run time of 1.5 min. It was successfully applied to a pivotal bioequivalence study in 12 healthy human subjects after oral administration of 10 mg extended release methoxsalen formulation under fasting condition.

  7. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  8. Automated Confocal Microscope Bias Correction

    NASA Astrophysi