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Sample records for automated serum chemistry

  1. Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus

    PubMed Central

    Stoskopf, Michael K.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Esler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A portable analytical chemistry analyzer was used to make field assessments of wild harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in association with telemetry studies of winter survival in Prince William Sound, Alaska. We compared serum chemistry results obtained on-site with results from a traditional laboratory. Particular attention was paid to serum glucose and potassium concentrations as potential indicators of high-risk surgical candidates based on evaluation of the field data. The median differential for glucose values (N = 82) between methods was 0.6 mmol/L (quartiles 0.3 and 0.9 mmol/L) with the median value higher when assayed on site. Analysis of potassium on site returned a median of 2.7 mmol/L (N = 88; quartiles 2.4 and 3.0 mmol/L). Serum potassium values were too low for quantitation by the traditional laboratory. Changes in several serum chemistry values following a three-day storm during the study support the value of on site evaluation of serum potassium to identify presurgical patients with increased anesthetic risk. PMID:20445783

  2. Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus.

    PubMed

    Stoskopf, Michael K; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Esler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A portable analytical chemistry analyzer was used to make field assessments of wild harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in association with telemetry studies of winter survival in Prince William Sound, Alaska. We compared serum chemistry results obtained on-site with results from a traditional laboratory. Particular attention was paid to serum glucose and potassium concentrations as potential indicators of high-risk surgical candidates based on evaluation of the field data. The median differential for glucose values (N = 82) between methods was 0.6 mmol/L (quartiles 0.3 and 0.9 mmol/L) with the median value higher when assayed on site. Analysis of potassium on site returned a median of 2.7 mmol/L (N = 88; quartiles 2.4 and 3.0 mmol/L). Serum potassium values were too low for quantitation by the traditional laboratory. Changes in several serum chemistry values following a three-day storm during the study support the value of on site evaluation of serum potassium to identify presurgical patients with increased anesthetic risk.

  3. The EPOS Automated Selective Chemistry Analyzer evaluated.

    PubMed

    Moses, G C; Lightle, G O; Tuckerman, J F; Henderson, A R

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of the EPOS (Eppendorf Patient Oriented System) Automated Selective Chemistry Analyzer, using the following tests for serum analytes: alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and glucose. Results from the EPOS correlated well with those from comparison instruments (r greater than or equal to 0.990). Precision and linearity limits were excellent for all tests; linearity of the optical and pipetting systems was satisfactory. Reagent carryover was negligible. Sample-to-sample carryover was less than 1% for all tests, but only lactate dehydrogenase was less than the manufacturer's specified 0.5%. Volumes aspirated and dispensed by the sample and reagent II pipetting systems differed significantly from preset values, especially at lower settings; the reagent I system was satisfactory at all volumes tested. Minimal daily maintenance and an external data-reduction system make the EPOS a practical alternative to other bench-top chemistry analyzers.

  4. An automated method for serum magnesium estimation

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, D. N.; Evans, D. I. K.

    1964-01-01

    An automated method for magnesium determination in serum is described using conventional AutoAnalyser equipment. The method gives results comparable with those obtained by the flame photometer. The method may prove particularly useful with subnormal serum magnesium levels. PMID:14227433

  5. Evaluation of an automated, homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for serum thyroxine measurement in dog and cat serum.

    PubMed

    Horney, Barbara S.; MacKenzie, Allan L.; Burton, Shelley A.; Olexson, Dennis W.; Mitton, Katherine L.; Coty, William A.; Rinne, Sherrie G.

    1999-01-01

    A homogenous enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for measurement of serum thyroxine (T4) concentration was evaluated for use with canine and feline serum. The EIA method was linear from 0 to 150 nmol T4/L for human serum, 0 to 94 nmol T4/L for feline serum and 10 to 60 nmol T4/L for canine serum. Intra- and interassay precision studies yielded coefficients of variation serum samples. The EIA showed no interference from hemolysis at hemoglobin concentrations automation of T4 testing in a veterinary hospital or laboratory, and can be integrated with the routine clinical chemistry panel.

  6. Inventory management and reagent supply for automated chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kuzniar, E

    1999-08-01

    Developments in automated chemistry have kept pace with developments in HTS such that hundreds of thousands of new compounds can be rapidly synthesized in the belief that the greater the number and diversity of compounds that can be screened, the more successful HTS will be. The increasing use of automation for Multiple Parallel Synthesis (MPS) and the move to automated combinatorial library production is placing an overwhelming burden on the management of reagents. Although automation has improved the efficiency of the processes involved in compound synthesis, the bottleneck has shifted to ordering, collating and preparing reagents for automated chemistry resulting in loss of time, materials and momentum. Major efficiencies have already been made in the area of compound management for high throughput screening. Most of these efficiencies have been achieved with sophisticated library management systems using advanced engineering and data handling for the storage, tracking and retrieval of millions of compounds. The Automation Partnership has already provided many of the top pharmaceutical companies with modular automated storage, preparation and retrieval systems to manage compound libraries for high throughput screening. This article describes how these systems may be implemented to solve the specific problems of inventory management and reagent supply for automated chemistry.

  7. Automated Combinatorial Chemistry in the Organic Chemistry Majors Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Christopher J.; Hanne, Larry F.

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment has been developed in which students each synthesize a combinatorial library of 48 hydrazones with the aid of a liquid-handling robot. Each product is then subjected to a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay to assess its antibacterial activity. Students gain experience working with automation and at the…

  8. Automated Combinatorial Chemistry in the Organic Chemistry Majors Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Christopher J.; Hanne, Larry F.

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment has been developed in which students each synthesize a combinatorial library of 48 hydrazones with the aid of a liquid-handling robot. Each product is then subjected to a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay to assess its antibacterial activity. Students gain experience working with automation and at the…

  9. Effects of two types of medical contrast media on routine chemistry results by three automated chemistry analyzers.

    PubMed

    Park, Yu Jin; Rim, John Hoon; Yim, Jisook; Lee, Sang-Guk; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    The use of iodinated contrast media has grown in popularity in the past two decades, but relatively little attention has been paid to the possible interferential effects of contrast media on laboratory test results. Herein, we investigate medical contrast media interference with routine chemistry results obtained by three automated chemistry analyzers. Ten levels of pooled serum were used in the study. Two types of medical contrast media [Iopamiro (iopamidol) and Omnipaque (iohexol)] were evaluated. To evaluate the dose-dependent effects of the contrast media, iopamidol and iohexol were spiked separately into aliquots of serum for final concentrations of 1.8%, 3.6%, 5.5%, 7.3%, and 9.1%. The 28 analytes included in the routine chemistry panel were measured by using Hitachi 7600, AU5800, and Cobas c702 analyzers. We calculated the delta percentage difference (DPD) between the samples and the control, and examined dose-dependent trends. When the mean DPD values were compared with the reference cut-off criteria, the only uniformly interferential effect observed for all analyzers was in total protein with iopamidol. Two additional analytes that showed trends toward interferential effects only in few analyzers and exceeded the limits of the allowable error were the serum iron and the total CO2. The other combinations of analyzer and contrast showed no consistent dose-dependent propensity for change in any analyte level. Our study suggests that many of the analytes included in routine chemistry results, except total protein and serum iron, are not significantly affected by iopamidol and iohexol. These results suggest that it would be beneficial to apply a flexible medical evaluation process for patients requiring both laboratory tests and imaging studies, minimizing the need for strict regulations for sequential tests. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum 5'nucleotidase activity in rats: a method for automated analysis and criteria for interpretation.

    PubMed

    Carakostas, Michael C.; Power, Richard J.; Banerjee, Asit K.

    1990-01-01

    A manual kit for determining serum 5'nucleotidase (5'NT, EC 3.1.3.5) activity was adapted for use with rat samples on a large discrete clinical chemistry analyzer. The precision of the method was good (within-run C.V. = 2.14%; between-run C.V. = 5.5%). A comparison of the new automated method with a manual and semi-automated method gave regression statistics of y = 1.18X -3.66 (Sy. x = 4.54), and y = 0.733X + 1.97 (Sy. x = 1.69), respectively. Temperature conversion factors provided by the kit manufacturer for human samples were determined to be inaccurate for converting results from rat samples. Analysis of components contributing to normal variation in rat serum 5'NT activity showed age and sex to be major factors. Increased serum 5'NT activity was observed in female rats when compared to male rats beginning at about 5 to 6 weeks of age. An analysis of variance of serum 5'NT, alkaline phosphatase, and GGT activities observed over a 9-week period in normal rats suggests several advantages for 5'NT as a predictor of biliary lesions in rats.

  11. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  12. Hematology and serum chemistry values in the beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Cornell, L H; Duffield, D S; Joseph, B E; Stark, B

    1988-04-01

    Normal values and ranges for 31 clinical hematology and serum chemistry tests are reported for the beluga or white whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The values were collected over a 6-yr period from eight belugas maintained for display at Sea World (San Diego, California, USA) facilities and represent long-term evaluations for each animal in a controlled environment. They represent the first report for a number of serum chemistry values for the beluga. Normal values such as these provide an important data base from which to detect diagnostically important changes in health status for belugas in a zoological setting. They also establish a baseline from which to evaluate differences in normal values in free-ranging belugas and from which to diagnose disease problems in wild populations.

  13. Evaluation of an automated urine chemistry reagent-strip analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lott, J A; Johnson, W R; Luke, K E

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the Miles Inc., Clinitek Atlas Automated Urine Chemistry Analyzer for 11 tests: bilirubin, color, glucose, ketones, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, occult blood, pH, protein, specific gravity, and urobilinogen. The instrument uses a roll of reagent strips affixed to a clear plastic support; urine specimens are automatically pipetted onto these strips. The instrument measures the pads' color using reflectance colorimetry. Specific gravity is measured using a fiberoptic refractive index method. Four hospitals participated in the evaluation, and tests were performed only on fresh urine samples. We found the instrument easy to use; it has walk-away capability with up to 40-specimen loading capacity plus spaces for STATs, calibrators and controls. We found good comparability with chemical tests and other nonreagent strip procedures, as well as good agreement with the Miles Inc. Clinitek 200+ urine chemistry analyzer and visual reading of the Miles Inc. Multistix Reagent Strips. The Clinitek Atlas is rugged and reliable, and is suitable for a high-volume urinalysis laboratory.

  14. Comparison of two dry chemistry analyzers and a wet chemistry analyzer using canine serum.

    PubMed

    Lanevschi, Anne; Kramer, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Canine serum was used to compare seven chemistry analytes on two tabletop clinical dry chemistry analyzers, Boehringer's Reflotron and Kodak's Ektachem. Results were compared to those obtained on a wet chemistry reference analyzer, Roche Diagnostic's Cobas Mira. Analytes measured were urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), cholesterol and bilirubin. Nine to 12 canine sera with values in the low, normal, and high range were evaluated. The correlations were acceptable for all comparisons with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98 for all analytes. Regression analysis resulted in significant differences for both tabletop analyzers when compared to the reference analyzer for cholesterol and bilirubin, and for glucose and AST on the Kodak Ektachem. Differences appeared to result from proportional systematic error occurring at high analyte concentrations.

  15. Hematological and serum chemistry norms for sandhill and whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Hendricks, M.M.; Dressler, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    The normal values used as a diagnostic tool and for comparison of cranes were established in the early 1970's. In that early study, no effort was made to look at factors such as age, sex, or subspecies. In addition, during the early study disease problems (primarily disseminated visceral coccidiosis) and nutritional problems were undiagnosed and uncontrolled. For 2 years during the annual health examinations of cranes at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent), we collected blood from healthy cranes for analysis. We found significant differences between the values reported from the 1970's and the values seen in this study for 8 blood parameters for Florida sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pratensis), 6 blood parameters for greater sandhill cranes (G. c. tabida), and 6 blood parameters for whooping cranes (Grus americana). In addition, there were significant differences for some hematology and serum chemistry values based on the age of the cranes.

  16. Automated method for the estimation of serum protein-bound iodine following alkaline incineration

    PubMed Central

    Welshman, S. G.; Bell, J. F.; McKee, G.

    1966-01-01

    A method is described for the estimation of serum protein-bound iodine using alkaline incineration and an automated technique for the estimation of iodine in the ash. Pretreatment of the serum with an anion exchange resin avoids the need for precipitation and washing of the protein. The method is accurate, reproducible, and simple to perform. PMID:5919368

  17. Automated Water Chemistry Control at University of Virginia Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krone, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the technologically advanced aquatic and fitness center at the University of Virginia. Discusses the imprecise water chemistry control at the former facility and its intensive monitoring requirements. Details the new chemistry control standards initiated in the new center, which ensure constant chlorine and pH levels. (RJM)

  18. Automated Water Chemistry Control at University of Virginia Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krone, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the technologically advanced aquatic and fitness center at the University of Virginia. Discusses the imprecise water chemistry control at the former facility and its intensive monitoring requirements. Details the new chemistry control standards initiated in the new center, which ensure constant chlorine and pH levels. (RJM)

  19. Radioanalytical Chemistry for Automated Nuclear Waste Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jay W. Grate; Timothy A. DeVol

    2006-07-20

    The objectives of our research were to develop the first automated radiochemical process analyzer including sample pretreatment methodoology, and to initiate work on new detection approaches, especially using modified diode detectors.

  20. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation).

    PubMed

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  1. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation)

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  2. Bodily fluid analysis of non-serum samples using point-of-care testing with iSTAT and Piccolo analyzers versus a fixed hospital chemistry analytical platform.

    PubMed

    Londeree, William; Davis, Konrad; Helman, Donald; Abadie, Jude

    2014-09-01

    Forward deployed military medical units can provide sophisticated medical care with limited resources. Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) may facilitate care and expedite diagnosis. This study assessed the accuracy of results for POCT for non-serum samples (pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluid) using iSTAT and Piccolo hand-held devices compared with results obtained using a hospital chemistry analyzer. Pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluids obtained during routine care were simultaneously analyzed on a Vitros 5600 automated clinical chemistry hospital analyzer, iSTAT, and Piccolo POCT devices. POCT results were highly correlated with the Vitros 5600 for pleural fluid LDH, glucose, and triglycerides (TG); for peritoneal fluid bilirubin, TG, glucose, albumin, and protein; and glucose for cerebrospinal fluid. POCT results for non-serum samples from pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluid correlate with standard hospital chemistry analysis. The results of this study demonstrate potential for possible new diagnostic roles for POCT in resource-limited environments.

  3. Automated Simultaneous Determination of Serum Total Protein and Globulin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    biuret reaction while the serum globulin is determined by the reaction of globulins with copper in the presence of sulfuric and acetic acids to form...colored metalloprotein complexes. A major advantage of the proposed combined procedure is that the latter reaction is not influenced by the tryptophan

  4. Direct determination of selenium in serum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using automated ultrasonic slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Kang; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Wei, Bai-Luh; Hu, Chao-Chin; Yu, Jya-Jyun; Chung, Chien; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    1998-01-01

    Selenium concentration in body fluids is a good index to establish human selenium status. This work discusses the determination of selenium in serum by ETAAS using longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction and combining the use of automated slurry sampling. The standard reference materials bovine serum (NIST, SRM 1598) and second-generation biological freeze-dried human serum are analyzed to verify the accuracy and precision of this technique. The direct method proposed in this study is used for the determination of selenium in human serum collected from healthy people of 19-25 years. The average accuracy values of certified reference serum samples and the recovery values of spiked samples indicate this method to be an efficient and rapid technique for determining selenium in biological samples.

  5. An automated pressure data acquisition system for evaluation of pressure sensitive paint chemistries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sealey, Bradley S.; Mitchell, Michael; Burkett, Cecil G.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated pressure data acquisition system for testing of pressure sensitive phosphorescent paints was designed, assembled, and tested. The purpose of the calibration system is the evaluation and selection of pressure sensitive paint chemistries that could be used to obtain global aerodynamic pressure distribution measurements. The test apparatus and setup used for pressure sensitive paint characterizations is described. The pressure calibrations, thermal sensitivity effects, and photodegradation properties are discussed.

  6. Continuous-flow automation of the Lactobacillus casei serum folate assay.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, G B

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the continuous-flow automation of the serum folate assay using Lactobacillus casei. The total incubation period is approximately four hours. The growth response of the organism to folate is estimated by measuring the rate of reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC). A simple continuous culture apparatus is used to grow the inoculum. Supplementation of the assay medium is necessary to obtain parallel results. A statistical assessment shows a favourable comparison with the whole-serum tube assay using a chloramphenicol resistant strain of L. casei. The method is less sensitive to inhibitory substances than the tube assay. PMID:415069

  7. Hematology and serum chemistry of the young Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi).

    PubMed

    Banish, L D; Gilmartin, W G

    1988-04-01

    Between January 1984 and May 1987, blood samples were collected from 12 young (3- to 6-mo-old) Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi) that were captured in the wild and held in captivity. All samples evaluated were from clinically normal animals. Average hematologic and serum chemistry values were not remarkable for a young diving mammal. The blood and serum analyses performed established reference ranges, which can be used as indicators of health status for this endangered species.

  8. Automating multistep flow synthesis: approach and challenges in integrating chemistry, machines and logic

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Chinmay A

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of automation in the multistep flow synthesis is essential for transforming laboratory-scale chemistry into a reliable industrial process. In this review, we briefly introduce the role of automation based on its application in synthesis viz. auto sampling and inline monitoring, optimization and process control. Subsequently, we have critically reviewed a few multistep flow synthesis and suggested a possible control strategy to be implemented so that it helps to reliably transfer the laboratory-scale synthesis strategy to a pilot scale at its optimum conditions. Due to the vast literature in multistep synthesis, we have classified the literature and have identified the case studies based on few criteria viz. type of reaction, heating methods, processes involving in-line separation units, telescopic synthesis, processes involving in-line quenching and process with the smallest time scale of operation. This classification will cover the broader range in the multistep synthesis literature. PMID:28684977

  9. Hematology and serum chemistry of free-ranging jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Widmer, Cynthia E; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Ferreira, Fernando; Azevedo, Fernando C C

    2012-10-01

    We collected and analyzed blood samples from 12 free-ranging jaguars (Panthera onca). Clinical examinations, hematology, and serum chemistry indicate the jaguars were in good overall health. Results may help as values for free-ranging jaguars under the same handling conditions.

  10. Efficacy of transsphenoidal surgery on endocrinological status and serum chemistry parameters in dogs with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yasushi; Teshima, Takahiro; Taoda, Takahiro; Ishino, Hirokazu; Nezu, Yoshinori; Harada, Yasuji; Yogo, Takuya; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira; Tagawa, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative changes in endocrinological status and serum chemistry during the 4 years after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in 25 dogs with Cushing's disease were investigated in a prospective study. In all 25 dogs, Cushing's disease was diagnosed from resected pituitary tissues as a corticotroph adenoma in the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Prior to TSS, all 25 dogs showed hypercortisolemia. After TSS, the ACTH stimulation test showed continued low serum cortisol concentrations in 21 dogs (84%). In addition, the serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations decreased sequentially, while the serum T4 concentrations tended to increase due to the postoperative hormone substitution therapy utilized to avoid secondary hypothyroidism. In regard to serum chemistry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total cholesterol are commonly increased in canine Cushing's disease. In this study, ALP, ALT and total cholesterol were increased in 23 cases (92%), 19 cases (76%) and 20 cases (80%), respectively. However, postoperatively, these concentrations gradually decreased. The postoperative serum concentrations of ALP at 1 year, that of ALT at six months to 2 years and that of total cholesterol over the course of the 4 years decreased significantly compared with the concentrations before TSS. These results show that TSS is an effective treatment for canine Cushing's disease and for long-term improvement of hypercortisolemia. Moreover, TSS is effective in improvement of hypercortisolism, such as increased concentrations of serum ALP, ALT and total cholesterol.

  11. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of free-ranging brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) in Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are reported for 105 brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific. Hematocrit, estimated total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Hematologic and serum chemistry values varied with age and sex. Values were compared with those of red-footed boobies and other tropical and temperate marine pelecaniforms.

  12. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of free-ranging brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) in Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.

    1999-01-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are reported for 105 brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific. Hematocrit, estimated total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Hematologic and serum chemistry values varied with age and sex. Values were compared with those of red-footed boobies and other tropical and temperate marine pelecaniforms.

  13. Rapid determination of serum myoglobin with a routine chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A J; Boymans, D A; Dijkstra, D; Gorgels, J P; Lerk, R

    1993-04-01

    A turbidimetric immunoassay system (Turbitime system, Behringwerke AG) allows rapid determination of myoglobin in serum. We adapted the reagents for this myoglobin assay (Turbiquant myoglobin) for use with a Hitachi 717 analyzer. No high-dose hook effect was observed up to 15,000 micrograms/L. Interassay CVs were 4.6% (mean = 72.0 micrograms/L; n = 9) and 2.5% (mean = 365.6 micrograms/L; n = 11). The calibration curve was stable for at least 1 month. Hemolysis did not interfere, and turbidity from lipemia interfered only when absorbance exceeded 2.0 A. Results of this method (y) correlated well with those by the Turbitime method (y = 1.256x - 44.1 micrograms/L; n = 91; r = 0.991) and by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (Byk-Sangtec; y = 0.739x - 42.2 micrograms/L; n = 94; r = 0.991). The upper limit (95th percentile) of the reference interval for myoglobin was estimated at 57.9 micrograms/L. The positive predictive value for results of myoglobin at admission was 89% with this upper reference limit and 99% with 100 micrograms/L, whereas the negative predictive value was about 60% for both limits.

  14. Evaluation of automated assays for immunoglobulin G, M, and A measurements in dog and cat serum.

    PubMed

    Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Caldin, Marco; Tecles, Fernando; Ceron, Jose J

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of immunoglobulins (Igs) in companion animals can be useful to detect deficiencies of the humoral immune system, that can be associated with opportunistic or chronic infections, or other immune-mediated disorders including B-cell neoplasms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate commercially available automated immunoturbidimetric assays designed for human IgG, M, and A measurements in canine and feline serum using species-specific calibrators. Canine and feline serum samples with different IgG, M, and A concentrations were used for the analytical validation of the assays. Intra- and inter-assay precision, linearity under dilution, spiking recovery, and limit of detection were determined. In addition, effects of lipemia, hemolysis, and bilirubinemia were evaluated. Finally, Ig concentrations were determined in small groups of diseased dogs and cats, and compared with healthy groups. Spiking recovery and linearity under dilution tests showed that the assays measured Igs in canine and feline serum samples precisely and accurately. Intra- and inter-assay imprecisions were lower than 15% in all cases. Significantly higher IgG, IgM, and IgA levels were observed in dogs with leishmaniasis, while dogs with pyometra showed a statistically significant increase in IgM and IgA concentrations in comparison with healthy dogs. Significantly higher IgG and IgM levels were observed in FIV-infected cats compared with healthy ones. The automated human Ig assays showed adequate precision and accuracy with serum samples from dogs and cats. Also, they were able to discriminate different concentrations of Igs in healthy and diseased animals. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  15. The Effects of Fasting and General Anesthesia on Serum Chemistries in KCG Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hozumi; Igarashi, Takashi; Lefor, Alan T; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Investigators are obligated to optimize the perioperative care of experimental animals, but little is known about the effects of anesthesia and surgery on serum chemistries in KCG pigs. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of fasting and surgery under general anesthesia on 27 serum chemistries in KCG miniature pigs to improve management. Crossbred KCG minipigs were used at a mean of 12.3 mo of age (range, 8.6 to 14.9) and 33.4 kg of body weight (range, 24.0 to 40.2). Serum chemistries were evaluated at the start and end of a 24 h fasting period in fasted animals (n = 6). No significant differences were observed between the starting and postfasting studies. Partial hemilaminectomy of the lumbar spine was carried out in 2 groups of animals. Those given sevoflurane anesthesia (n = 7) had significant decreases in serum albumin, potassium, inorganic phosphorus, γ-glutamyltransferase peptidase, cholinesterase, and glucose postoperatively compared with preoperative values. Animals given isoflurane (n = 7) anesthesia had significantly decreased total protein, albumin, triglyceride, phospholipids, sodium, potassium, calcium, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phoshatase and glucose after surgery compared with levels before surgery. In a separate experiment (n = 7), serum glucose and insulin also decreased during the postoperative period after isoflurane anesthesia. These results demonstrate that select serum electrolytes, glucose, and insulin of KCG miniature pigs are altered after general anesthesia. Investigators must be aware of the effects of anesthetic agents on experimental animals to provide optimal care and for interpretation of experimental data. PMID:19245748

  16. Hematology and serum chemistry of the island spotted skunk on Santa Cruz Island.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Kevin R; Garcelon, D K; Scott, Cheryl A; Wilcox, Jeffery T; Timm, Steven F; Van Vuren, Dirk H

    2003-04-01

    We determined serum biochemistry and hematologic values for island spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis amphiala) on Santa Cruz Island (California, USA). Samples were collected from island spotted skunks chemically restrained with ketamine hydrochloride and acepromazine in August 1999 (dry season) and from skunks manually restrained in August 2000 (dry season) and January 2001 (wet season). One parameter, glucose, significantly differed with season, with higher levels during the wet season. Serum chemistry and hematologic profiles suggest that method of restraint (manual or chemical), as well as other methodologic details, may influence blood characteristics in the island spotted skunk.

  17. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of seven species of free-ranging tropical pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    I established reference values for weight, hematology, and serum chemistry for seven species of free-ranging Hawaiian tropical pelagic seabirds comprising three orders (Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, Charadriiformes) and six families (Procellariidae, Phaethontidae, Diomedeidae, Sulidae, Fregatidae, and Laridae). Species examined included 84 Hawaiian darkrumped petrels (Pterodoma phaeopygia), 90 wedge-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus pacificus), 151 Laysan albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis), 69 red-footed boobies (Sula sula), 154 red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda), 90 great frigatebirds (Fregata minor), and 72 sooty terns (Sterna fuscata). Hematocrit, total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Among and within species, hematology and chemistry values varied with age, sex, season, and island of collection. Despite this variation, order-wide trends were observed.

  18. Age-related changes in haematology and serum chemistry of Weiser-Maples guineapigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, M; Yamaguchi, M; Nakamura, M; Sakurada, K; Suwa, T; Sasa, H

    2005-07-01

    Age-related changes in haematology and serum chemistry values were examined in male and female Weiser-Maples guineapigs (Cavia porcellus). Haematological changes that significantly (P<0.01) correlated with ageing were increased white blood cell and neutrophil counts in both sexes, decreased lymphocyte counts in both sexes, decreased reticulocyte and platelet counts in males, and decreased basophil counts in females. For serum chemistry, increases in total protein, triglycerides, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were seen in both sexes, along with increases in total cholesterol in males and sodium in females. Decreased alkaline phosphatase in both sexes and decreased chloride in males were significantly (P<0.01) associated with age. These age-related changes are compared with the published literature.

  19. Weights, hematology, and serum chemistry of seven species of free-ranging tropical pelagic seabirds.

    PubMed

    Work, T M

    1996-10-01

    I established reference values for weight, hematology, and serum chemistry for seven species of free-ranging Hawaiian tropical pelagic seabirds comprising three orders (Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, Charadriiformes) and six families (Procellariidae, Phaethontidae, Diomedeidae, Sulidae, Fregatidae, and Laridae). Species examined included 84 Hawaiian darkrumped petrels (Pterodoma phaeopygia), 90 wedge-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus pacificus), 151 Laysan albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis), 69 red-footed boobies (Sula sula), 154 red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda), 90 great frigatebirds (Fregata minor), and 72 sooty terns (Sterna fuscata). Hematocrit, total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Among and within species, hematology and chemistry values varied with age, sex, season, and island of collection. Despite this variation, order-wide trends were observed.

  20. Blood serum chemistry of wild Alaskan Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) with avian keratin disorder

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured serum chemistries in wild Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) from Alaska to test for potential differences associated with beak deformities characteristic of avian keratin disorder. Lower uric acid in affected birds was the only difference detected between groups, although sample sizes were small. This difference could be associated with fasting or malnutrition in birds with beak deformities, but it is challenging to interpret its biologic significance without reference values. Black-capped Chickadees had high levels of aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase relative to reference values for companion birds. However, all serum chemistry parameters from our study were within the range of values reported from other apparently healthy wild-caught birds.

  1. Hematology and serum chemistry reference ranges of free-ranging moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Rostal, Melinda K; Evans, Alina L; Solberg, Erling J; Arnemo, Jon M

    2012-07-01

    Baseline reference ranges of serum chemistry and hematology data can be important indicators for the status of both individuals or populations of wild animals that are affected by emerging pathogens, toxicants, or other causes of disease. Frequently, reference ranges for these values are not available for wildlife species or subspecies. We present hematologic and serum chemistry reference ranges for moose (Alces alces) adults, yearlings, and calves in Norway sampled from 1992-2000. Additionally, we demonstrated that both induction time and chase time were correlated with initial rectal temperature, although they were not significantly correlated with cortisol, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose, or creatine kinase. Overall, the reference ranges given here are similar to those given for American moose, with a few differences that can be attributed to environment, testing methodology, or subspecies or species status. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of reference ranges for moose in Norway.

  2. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of seven species of free-ranging tropical pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.

    1996-01-01

    I established reference values for weight, hematology, and serum chemistry for seven species of free-ranging Hawaiian tropical pelagic seabirds comprising three orders (Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, Charadriiformes) and six families (Procellariidae, Phaethontidae, Diomedeidae, Sulidae, Fregatidae, and Laridae). Species examined included 84 Hawaiian darkrumped petrels (Pterodoma phaeopygia), 90 wedge-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus pacificus), 151 Laysan albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis), 69 red-footed boobies (Sula sula), 154 red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda), 90 great frigatebirds (Fregata minor), and 72 sooty terns (Sterna fuscata). Hematocrit, total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Among and within species, hematology and chemistry values varied with age, sex, season, and island of collection. Despite this variation, order-wide trends were observed.

  3. Changes to serum sample tube and processing methodology does not cause Intra-Individual [corrected] variation in automated whole serum N-glycan profiling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ventham, Nicholas T; Gardner, Richard A; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Shubhakar, Archana; Kalla, Rahul; Nimmo, Elaine R; Fernandes, Daryl L; Satsangi, Jack; Spencer, Daniel I R

    2015-01-01

    Serum N-glycans have been identified as putative biomarkers for numerous diseases. The impact of different serum sample tubes and processing methods on N-glycan analysis has received relatively little attention. This study aimed to determine the effect of different sample tubes and processing methods on the whole serum N-glycan profile in both health and disease. A secondary objective was to describe a robot automated N-glycan release, labeling and cleanup process for use in a biomarker discovery system. 25 patients with active and quiescent inflammatory bowel disease and controls had three different serum sample tubes taken at the same draw. Two different processing methods were used for three types of tube (with and without gel-separation medium). Samples were randomised and processed in a blinded fashion. Whole serum N-glycan release, 2-aminobenzamide labeling and cleanup was automated using a Hamilton Microlab STARlet Liquid Handling robot. Samples were analysed using a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/ethylene bridged hybrid(BEH) column on an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography instrument. Data were analysed quantitatively by pairwise correlation and hierarchical clustering using the area under each chromatogram peak. Qualitatively, a blinded assessor attempted to match chromatograms to each individual. There was small intra-individual variation in serum N-glycan profiles from samples collected using different sample processing methods. Intra-individual correlation coefficients were between 0.99 and 1. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principal coordinate analyses accurately matched samples from the same individual. Qualitative analysis demonstrated good chromatogram overlay and a blinded assessor was able to accurately match individuals based on chromatogram profile, regardless of disease status. The three different serum sample tubes processed using the described methods cause minimal inter-individual variation in serum whole N

  4. Effect of repeated freezing and thawing on 18 clinical chemistry analytes in rat serum.

    PubMed

    Kale, Vijay P; Patel, Sweta G; Gunjal, Prashant S; Wakchaure, Santosh U; Sundar, Rajesh S; Ranvir, Ramchandra K; Jain, Mukul R

    2012-07-01

    In a preclinical research laboratory, using serum samples that have been frozen and thawed repeatedly is sometimes unavoidable when needing to confirm previous results or perform additional analysis. Here we determined the effects of multiple cycles of refrigeration or freezing and thawing of rat serum at 3 temperature conditions for different storage times on clinical chemistry analytes. Serum samples obtained from adult Wistar rats were stored at 2 to 8 °C and -10 to -20 °C for as long as 72 h and at -70 °C for as long as 30 d. At different time points (24, 48, and 72 h for samples stored at 2 to 8 °C or -10 to -20 °C and 1, 7, and 30 d for samples stored at -70 °C), the samples were brought to room temperature, analyzed, and then stored again at the designated temperature. The results obtained after each storage cycle were compared with those obtained from the initial analysis of fresh samples. Of the 18 serum analytes evaluated, 14 were stable without significant changes, even after 3 freeze-thaw cycles at the tested temperature ranges. Results from this study will help researchers working with rat serum to interpret the biochemical data obtained from serum samples that have been frozen and thawed repeatedly.

  5. Spatio-temporal variation in serum chemistry of the lobster, Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards.

    PubMed

    Dove, A D M; Sokolowski, M S; Bartlett, S L; Bowser, P R

    2005-11-01

    Monthly variations in serum chemistry of the American lobster, Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards, were investigated at one location in Long Island Sound (LIS). Comparisons between three locations within and outside LIS were also made for a single time point. Most serum analytes displayed significant fluctuation over the study period and between locations. Temporal patterns could be classified as: low in cool months/high in warm months, i.e. Na, Cl, Na:K ratio, Ca, albumin:globulin ratio, percentage Fe saturation; high in cool months/low in warm months, i.e. pH, K, urea, total protein, albumin, globulin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lipaemia; June spike, i.e. glucose, cholesterol, creatine kinase, iron, transferrin iron-binding capacity; other less obvious fluctuations, i.e. Mg, PO4; and no apparent fluctuation, i.e. HCO3, alkaline phosphatase. The proportion of samples correctly classified into month of collection by a subset of 13 analytes using discriminant analysis improved as the months progressed from May (0.75) to October (>0.95). Discriminant analysis also resolved 96.5% of samples by location. The significant depression of serum calcium at the eastern LIS site correlates with excretory calcinosis, a calcium storage disease described from lobsters at this site, but contrasts with a seasonal elevation in serum calcium recorded in the temporal component of the study. Serum proteins, the electrolytes Ca and K and the enzymes ALT and AST proved to have the strongest spatio-temporal patterns of variation. Serum chemistry is a useful research tool for lobster populations, but the dearth of information on the homology of analyte functions in this species with those in vertebrate species makes interpretation of the results challenging. Late summer/autumn water conditions appear to cause stress for lobsters in LIS.

  6. A contribution for the definition of serum chemistry values in captive adults Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Silva, F M O; Vergara-Parente, J E; Gomes, J K N; Teixeira, M N; Lima, R P

    2007-04-01

    Serum chemistry analyses represents a fundamental tool for the diagnosis and understanding of diseases in marine mammals. Although several studies are being conducted within the field of clinical pathology, haematological and serum chemistry data for Antillean manatees are deficient. The purpose of this study was to determine serum chemistry values for captive Antillean manatees within the CMA/Ibama facility in Brazil. Serum samples were obtained from five captive adult Antillean manatees fed with seagrass and analysed for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, globulin, phosphate, chloride, calcium and uric acid. Blood chemistry parameters were determined using a semi-automatic analyzer. Maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviations were calculated for each serum chemistry parameter. Differences on the values of males and females were verified using an unpaired Student's t-test. All the parameters analysed were similar between sexes, with exception of AP, which was higher in females (191.43 +/- 31.86 U/l). Alanine aminotransferase and uric acid values for Trichechus manatus manatus are reported for the first time in this paper. This study is the first to report serum chemistry parameter values for long-term captive male and female Antillean manatees. Therefore, the lower values of albumin, phosphate, chloride, cholesterol and triglycerides obtained here highlight the importance of clinical pathology during health monitoring of captive marine mammals.

  7. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Michael M; Ham, Jason E; Wells, J R

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with alpha-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72 h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with alpha-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100 ppb (parts per 10(9)) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100 ppb (over 339 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65 ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3 ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300 ml/min (over 548 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02 ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03 ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/alpha-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  8. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  9. Managing expectations: assessment of chemistry databases generated by automated extraction of chemical structures from patents.

    PubMed

    Senger, Stefan; Bartek, Luca; Papadatos, George; Gaulton, Anna

    2015-12-01

    First public disclosure of new chemical entities often takes place in patents, which makes them an important source of information. However, with an ever increasing number of patent applications, manual processing and curation on such a large scale becomes even more challenging. An alternative approach better suited for this large corpus of documents is the automated extraction of chemical structures. A number of patent chemistry databases generated by using the latter approach are now available but little is known that can help to manage expectations when using them. This study aims to address this by comparing two such freely available sources, SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP (IBM Strategic Intellectual Property Insight Platform), with manually curated commercial databases. When looking at the percentage of chemical structures successfully extracted from a set of patents, using SciFinder as our reference, 59 and 51 % were also found in our comparison in SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP, respectively. When performing this comparison with compounds as starting point, i.e. establishing if for a list of compounds the databases provide the links between chemical structures and patents they appear in, we obtained similar results. SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP found 62 and 59 %, respectively, of the compound-patent pairs obtained from Reaxys. In our comparison of automatically generated vs. manually curated patent chemistry databases, the former successfully provided approximately 60 % of links between chemical structure and patents. It needs to be stressed that only a very limited number of patents and compound-patent pairs were used for our comparison. Nevertheless, our results will hopefully help to manage expectations of users of patent chemistry databases of this type and provide a useful framework for more studies like ours as well as guide future developments of the workflows used for the automated extraction of chemical structures from patents. The challenges we have encountered

  10. Measurement of serum IgG in foals by radial immunodiffusion and automated turbidimetric immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Davis, Deborah G; Schaefer, Deanna M W; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Wellman, Maxey L; Willet, V Ellen; Fletcher, Jana M

    2005-01-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia as a result of failure of transfer of passive immunity (FTPI) is an important risk factor for infectious disease in neonatal foals. The current gold standard for determining serum immunoglobulin concentrations is radial immunodiffusion (RID). The purpose of this study was to compare immunoglobulin concentrations measured by RID with those determined by an automated turbidimetric immunoassay (TIA), which has a much shorter turnaround time. Immunoglobulin concentrations were measured by both RID and TIA in serum collected from 84 neonatal foals. Sixty-seven foals had results within the linear range for both assays. Sensitivity and specificity of TIA for diagnosis of FTPI with IgG < or = 800 mg/dL were 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.88) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.76-0.93) and with IgG < or = 400 mg/dL were 0.63 (95% CI 0.35-0.86) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.87-0.95), respectively. A significant linear relationship was found between IgG concentrations determined by TIA and RID (TIA = 0.9511RID + 8.4354; R2 = .59, P < .0001). The coefficients of variation for between-run and within-run precision for the TIA were 2.5 and 3%, respectively. Storage of samples from 10 foals at -20 degrees C for 10-12 months resulted in a reduction in TIA-measured serum IgG concentration of -17.6% (SD = 3.7%), indicating that long-term storage of samples at -20 degrees C should be avoided. The results of this study indicate that measurement of serum IgG by TIA can be used to evaluate foals for FTPI.

  11. Systematical assessment of serum indices does not impair efficiency of clinical chemistry testing: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Avanzini, Paola; Campioli, Daniele; Da Rin, Giorgio; Dipalo, Mariella; Aloe, Rosalia; Giavarina, Davide; Salvagno, Gian Luca

    2013-09-01

    Despite manufacturers' claim that systematical assessment of serum indices does not impact on testing efficiency, there is widespread perception that this practice may increase the turnaround time (TAT). A multicenter investigation was planned to verify TAT and performance of serum indices on five different clinical chemistry analyzers. Twenty study samples prepared from pooled sera of outpatients, emergency department, intensive care unit and dialyzed patients were divided in aliquots and shipped to 5 different laboratories. According to local instrumentation (Beckman Coulter AU5800, Roche Cobas 6000, Siemens Dimension Vista 1500, Abbott Architect c 16000 and Ortho Vitros 5.1/FS) and reagents, 13 clinical chemistry parameters were assayed on all study samples, with or without contextual assessment of serum indices. The TAT with assessment of serum indices modestly or even negligibly increased, and varied from -0.2 to +5.0% (i.e., from -3 to +85 s). When using the lowest thresholds for sample acceptability, the agreement of hemolysis index (HI) among different instruments was comprised between 0.62 and 1.00 (all p<0.01), but was higher than 0.80 in only 4/10 cases. The agreement of icteric and lipaemic indices could not be estimated due to the low number of samples exceeding acceptability criteria. The results of this study confirm that systematical measurement of serum indices does not impair instrument efficiency. The comparison of HI also suggests that major harmonization may be advisable for this measure among different manufacturers and instrumentations. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bayer Immuno 1 PSA Assay: an automated, ultrasensitive method to quantitate total PSA in serum.

    PubMed

    Morris, D L; Dillon, P W; Very, D L; Ng, P; Kish, L; Goldblatt, J L; Bruzek, D J; Chan, D W; Ahmed, M S; Witek, D; Fritsche, H A; Smith, C; Schwartz, D; Schwartz, M K; Noteboom, J L; Vessella, R L; Yeung, K K; Allard, W J

    1998-01-01

    The Bayer Immuno 1 PSA Assay measures total PSA in human serum and demonstrates excellent performance with an interassay CV < or = 3.4% and a biological detection limit of 0.03 microgram/L. No significant interference from common hormonal and chemotherapeutic drugs, kallikrein, prostatic acid phosphatase, and trypsin, or elevated levels of total bilirubin, hemoglobin, triglycerides, and IgG was observed. The 95th percentile values for healthy individuals increased with age from 3.0 micrograms/L for males 50-59 years and 3.3 micrograms/L for males 60-69 years, to 4.6 micrograms/L for males > or = 70 years. Clinical studies with retrospective samples demonstrated correspondence between serial measurements of PSA and clinical outcome for 98% of 159 prostate cancer patients. Clinical sensitivity for patients with clinical evidence of disease, untreated at the time of specimen draw, increased with increasing stage from 77.5-100%. Specificity of 60-70% for BPH and other benign urogenital diseases was consistent with previous findings. Bayer Immuno 1 PSA Assay values for 2131 specimens from healthy subjects and patients with prostate cancer, BPH, and other malignant and nonmalignant diseases correlated well with the Abbott IMx PSA Assay over the range 0.0-6,238 micrograms/L (Y = 1.10 x + 0.02). The Bayer Immuno 1 PSA Assay provides automated ultrasensitive, precise, and equimolar measurement of total PSA in human serum.

  13. Residual bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantitation in vaccines using automated Capillary Western technology.

    PubMed

    Loughney, John W; Lancaster, Catherine; Ha, Sha; Rustandi, Richard R

    2014-09-15

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a major component of fetal bovine serum (FBS), which is commonly used as a culture medium during vaccine production. Because BSA can cause allergic reactions in humans the World Health Organization (WHO) has set a guidance of 50 ng or less residual BSA per vaccine dose. Vaccine manufacturers are expected to develop sensitive assays to detect residual BSA. Generally, sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are used in the industry to detect these low levels of BSA. We report the development of a new improved method for residual BSA detection using the SimpleWestern technology to analyze residual BSA in an attenuated virus vaccine. The method is based on automated Capillary Western and has linearity of two logs, >80% spike recovery (accuracy), intermediate precision of CV <15%, and LOQ of 5.2 ng/ml. The final method was applied to analyze BSA in four lots of bulk vaccine products and was used to monitor BSA clearance during vaccine process purification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hematologic and serum chemistry reference intervals for free-ranging lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Maas, Miriam; Keet, Dewald F; Nielen, Mirjam

    2013-08-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are used by veterinarians and wildlife researchers to assess health status and to identify abnormally high or low levels of a particular blood parameter in a target species. For free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) information about these values is scarce. In this study 7 hematologic and 11 serum biochemistry values were evaluated from 485 lions from the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Significant differences between sexes and sub-adult (≤ 36 months) and adult (>36 months) lions were found for most of the blood parameters and separate reference intervals were made for those values. The obtained reference intervals include the means of the various blood parameter values measured in captive lions, except for alkaline phosphatase in the subadult group. These reference intervals can be utilized for free-ranging lions, and may likely also be used as reference intervals for captive lions.

  15. Functionalized Polymers-Emerging Versatile Tools for Solution-Phase Chemistry and Automated Parallel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, Andreas; Monenschein, Holger; Wittenberg, Rüdiger

    2001-02-16

    As part of the dramatic changes associated with the need for preparing compound libraries in pharmaceutical and agrochemical research laboratories, industry searches for new technologies that allow for the automation of synthetic processes. Since the pioneering work by Merrifield polymeric supports have been identified to play a key role in this field however, polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis which utilizes immobilized reagents and catalysts has only recently begun to flourish. Polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis has various advantages over conventional solution-phase chemistry, such as the ease of separation of the supported species from a reaction mixture by filtration and washing, the opportunity to use an excess of the reagent to force the reaction to completion without causing workup problems, and the adaptability to continuous-flow processes. Various strategies for employing functionalized polymers stoichiometrically have been developed. Apart from reagents that are covalently or ionically attached to the polymeric backbone and which are released into solution in the presence of a suitable substrate, scavenger reagents play an increasingly important role in purifying reaction mixtures. Employing functionalized polymers in solution-phase synthesis has been shown to be extremely useful in automated parallel synthesis and multistep sequences. So far, compound libraries containing as many as 88 members have been generated by using several polymer-bound reagents one after another. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that complex natural products like the alkaloids (+/-)-oxomaritidine and (+/-)-epimaritidine can be prepared by a sequence of five and six consecutive polymer-assisted steps, respectively, and the potent analgesic compound (+/-)-epibatidine in twelve linear steps ten of which are based on functionalized polymers. These developments reveal the great future prospects of polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis.

  16. Serum chemistry reference values in adult Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) including sex-related differences.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, N; Halle, I; Flachowsky, G; Sauerwein, H

    2009-06-01

    Serum chemistry reference values may provide useful information about the physical condition of individuals, making them a useful tool in differentiating normal and healthy animals from abnormal or diseased states. For Japanese quail that are used for producing eggs and meat for human consumption and also as laboratory animals, we aimed to extend the available array of reference values and to compare 16-wk-old adult male versus female birds. In the present study, clinical chemistry data (albumin, total protein, glucose, uric acid, cholesterol, bilirubin, cholinesterase, creatinine, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase) in blood serum from up to 125 male and 151 female Japanese quail were established. Statistical comparisons were made between male and female birds. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glucose, cholinesterase, and bilirubin values were higher (P < 0.01) in males, whereas females had higher (P < 0.05) concentrations of albumin, total protein, gamma-glutamyltransferase, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. No significant sex-based differences were observed for creatinine and uric acid. The reference values provided are relevant in particular for the use of quail as laboratory animals when responses to specific treatments have to be monitored and appraised.

  17. Seasonal hematology and serum chemistry of wild beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie A; Goertz, Caroline E C; Burek, Kathy A; Quakenbush, Lori T; Cornick, Leslie A; Romano, Tracy A; Spoon, Tracey; Miller, Woutrina; Beckett, Laurel A; Hobbs, Roderick C

    2012-01-01

    We collected blood from 18 beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), live-captured in Bristol Bay, Alaska, USA, in May and September 2008, to establish baseline hematologic and serum chemistry values and to determine whether there were significant differences in hematologic values by sex, season, size/age, or time during the capture period. Whole blood was collected within an average of 19 min (range=11-30 min) after the net was set for capture, and for eight animals, blood collection was repeated in a later season after between 80-100 min; all blood was processed within 12 hr. Mean hematocrit, chloride, creatinine, total protein, albumin, and alkaline phosphatase were significantly lower in May than they were in September, whereas mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, monocytes, phosphorous, magnesium, blood urea nitrogen, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, and creatinine kinase were significantly higher. Mean total protein, white blood cell count, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were significantly higher early in the capture period than they were later. No significant differences in blood analyte values were noted between males and females. Using overall body length as a proxy for age, larger (older) belugas had lower white blood cell, lymphocyte, and eosinophil counts as well as lower sodium, potassium, and calcium levels but higher creatinine levels than smaller belugas. These data provide values for hematology and serum chemistry for comparisons with other wild belugas.

  18. Serum chemistry alterations, including creatine kinase isoenzymes, in furazolidone toxicosis of ducklings: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Webb, D M; DeNicola, D B; Van Vleet, J F

    1991-01-01

    Furazolidone induces a cardiotoxicosis when fed in toxic concentrations to newly hatched ducklings. This preliminary experiment was designed to determine if creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymic activities or other serum analytes would be useful as indicators of these cardiac alterations. Sera from 12 ducklings (six fed a control ration and six fed the control ration with 700 mg furazolidone added per kg of feed [700 ppm] for 28 days) were analyzed for CK isoenzymic activities, electrolytes, nitrogenous metabolites, hepatic enzymic activities, bilirubin, and glucose. Statistically significant differences between control and treated groups were detected for creatine kinase MB (CK-MB, cardiac muscle origin) isoenzymic activity and bilirubin, potassium, calcium, and total carbon dioxide concentrations. Differences other than CK-MB isoenzymic activity were generally explained by factors related to the toxicosis or sample handling. These findings suggest that CK-MB isoenzymic activity may be useful to detect and monitor the progress of cardiac injury in furazolidone toxicosis, thereby increasing the usefulness of this model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our findings, analyzed on the Kodak Ektachem 700 Dry Chemistry Analyzer, are compared with serum chemistry values reported in the literature.

  19. Automated multiple flow-injection analysis in clinical chemistry: determination of total protein with Biuret reagent.

    PubMed

    Shideler, C E; Stewart, K K; Crump, J; Wills, M R; Savory, J; Renoe, B W

    1980-09-01

    We have examined the feasibility of the automated multiple flow-injection technique for application to clinical chemistry by adapting to this system the biuret method for the determination of total protein. Samples were discretely and rapidly introduced into a continuously flowing, nonsegmented reagent stream by means of an automatic sampler and high-pressure injection valve. Pumps operating at 1380-2070 kPa (200-300 psi) were utilized to introduce the biuret reagent and saline diluent into the system separately at flow rates of 72 and 47 microL/s, respectively. Use of 20-microL sample and a 3.0-s reaction-delay coil was adequately sensitive for analysis for total protein by this method. Samples were analyzed at a rate of 150/h with no detectable between-sample carryover. Within-run precision studies yielded relative standard deviations of 2.5% and less. Total protein values obtained by this method correlated well with those obtained by centrifugal analyzer and bubble-segmented continuous-flow biuret methods.

  20. On-demand droplet loading for automated organic chemistry on digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav J; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Chen, Supin; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-21

    Organic chemistry applications on digital microfluidic devices often involve reagents that are volatile or sensitive and must be introduced to the chip immediately before use. We present a new technique for automated, on-demand loading of ~1 μL droplets from large (~1 mL), sealed, off-chip reservoirs to a digital microfluidic chip in order to address this challenge. Unlike aqueous liquids which generally are non-wetting to the hydrophobic surface and must be actively drawn into the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) chip by electrode activation, organic liquids tend to be wetting and can spontaneously flood the chip, and hence require a retracting force for controlled liquid delivery. Using a combination of compressed inert gas and gravity to exert driving and retracting forces on the liquid, the simple loading technique enables precise loading of droplets of both wetting and non-wetting liquids in a reliable manner. A key feature from a practical point of view is that all of the wetted parts are inexpensive and potentially disposable, thus avoiding cross-contamination in chemical and biochemical applications. We provide a theoretical treatment of the underlying physics, discuss the effect of geometry and liquid properties on its performance, and show repeatable reagent loading using the technique. Its versatility is demonstrated with the loading of several aqueous and non-aqueous liquids on an EWOD digital microfluidic device.

  1. Chemistry Testing on Plasma Versus Serum Samples in Dialysis Patients: Clinical and Quality Improvement Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Roger Neill; Johnson, Curtis; Pearce, Jim; Hui-Ng, Patricia; Lacson, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Plasma samples collected in tubes containing separator gels have replaced serum samples for most chemistry tests in many hospital and commercial laboratories. Use of plasma samples for blood tests in the dialysis population eliminates delays in sample processing while waiting for clotting to complete, laboratory technical issues associated with fibrin formation, repeat sample collection, and patient care issues caused by delay of results because of incompletely clotted specimens. Additionally, a larger volume of plasma is produced than serum for the same amount of blood collected. Plasma samples are also acceptable for most chemical tests involved in the care of patients with ESRD. This information becomes very important when United States regulatory requirements for ESRD inadvertently limit the type of sample that can be used for government reporting, quality assessment, and value–based payment initiatives. In this narrative, we summarize the renal community experience and how the subsequent resolution of the acceptability of phosphorus levels measured from serum and plasma samples may have significant implications in the country’s continued development of a value–based Medicare ESRD Quality Incentive Program. PMID:27185523

  2. Serum chemistry comparisons between captive and free-ranging giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Debra A; Barbiers, Robyn B; Ellersieck, Mark R; Ball, Ray L; Koutsos, Elizabeth A; Griffin, Mark E; Grobler, Douw; Citino, Scott B; Bush, Mitchell

    2011-03-01

    Serum chemistry analyses were compared between captive and free-ranging giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) in an attempt to better understand some of the medical issues seen with captive giraffes. Illnesses, including peracute mortality, energy malnutrition, pancreatic disease, urolithiasis, hoof disease, and severe intestinal parasitism, may be related to zoo nutrition and management issues. Serum samples were collected from 20 captive giraffes at 10 United States institutions. Thirteen of the captive animal samples were collected from animals trained for blood collection; seven were banked samples obtained from a previous serum collection. These samples were compared with serum samples collected from 24 free-ranging giraffes in South Africa. Differences between captive and free-ranging giraffes, males and females, and adults and subadults were analyzed by using a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial and Fisher's least significant difference for mean separation; when necessary variables were ranked and analyzed via analysis of variance. Potassium and bilirubin concentrations and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities were different between captive and free-ranging giraffes, but all fell within normal bovid reference ranges. The average glucose concentration was significantly elevated in free-ranging giraffes (161 mg/dl) compared with captive giraffes (113 mg/dl). All giraffes in this study had glucose concentrations higher than bovine (42-75 mg/ dl) and caprine (48-76 mg/dl) reference ranges. Differences were also seen in lipase, chloride, and magnesium though these findings are likely not clinically significant. There were no differences detected between sexes. Adults had higher concentrations of potassium, total protein, globulins, and chloride and higher gamma glutamyltransferase activities, whereas subadults had higher concentrations of phosphorus. Within the captive group, nonimmobilized animals had higher concentrations of total protein and globulins. Captive giraffe diets

  3. Validation of an automated immune turbidimetric assay for serum gelsolin and its possible clinical utility in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Horváth-Szalai, Zoltán; Kustán, Péter; Szirmay, Balázs; Lakatos, Ágnes; Christensen, Per H; Huber, Tamás; Bugyi, Beáta; Mühl, Diána; Ludány, Andrea; Miseta, Attila; Kovács, Gábor L; Kőszegi, Tamás

    2017-09-05

    Studies showing the potential predictive value of the actin-binding protein gelsolin, in critically ill patients are scarce. Moreover, even up to now a rapid automated measurement of gelsolin has still remained a challenge. Therefore, we developed and validated an automated serum gelsolin immune turbidimetric assay for possible clinical use. Validation of serum gelsolin assay was performed on a Cobas 8000/c502 analyzer (Roche) according to the second edition of Eurachem guidelines. Furthermore, we also studied the diagnostic value of serum gelsolin in sepsis when investigating sera of septic (n = 25), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS; n = 8) and control patients (n = 14). We compared our previously published Western blot data with those of the new turbidimetric assay. The sample volume was 7 μL and the assay time was 10 minutes. The detection limit was 0.72 mg/L, intra- and inter-assay imprecision remained in most cases less than 5% expressed as CV. Recovery was found to be 84.56%-93.52% and linearity study gave an appropriate correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis (r(2)  = .998). Septic patients exhibited lower (P = .015) first-day serum gelsolin levels than SIRS patients, which confirmed our previous Western blot results. The determined cut-off point for serum gelsolin was 14.05 mg/L (sensitivity: 75%; specificity: 60%) when investigating its diagnostic value in sepsis. Based on the results, our immune turbidimetric measurement offers a rapid and accurate quantitation of gelsolin in human serum samples. Serum gelsolin seems a promising additional diagnostic marker of sepsis which has to be further investigated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A roadmap to defining the clinical reportable ranges of chemistry analytes: Increasing automation efficiency and decreasing manual dilutions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sheng-Ying; Baird, Geoffrey S; Greene, Dina N

    2015-12-07

    Proper utilization of resources is an important operational objective for clinical laboratories. To reduce unnecessary manual interventions on automated instruments, we conducted a workflow analysis that optimized dilution parameters and reporting of abnormally high chemistry results for the Beckman AU series of chemistry analyzers while maintaining clinically acceptable reportable ranges. Workflow analysis for the Beckman AU680/5812 and DxC800 chemistry analyzers was performed using historical data. Clinical reportable ranges for 53 chemistry analytes were evaluated. Optimized dilution parameters and upper limit of reportable ranges for the AU680/5812 instruments were derived and validated to meet these reportable ranges. The number of specimens that required manual dilutions before and after optimization was determined for both the AU680/5812 and DxC800, with the DxC800 serving as the reference instrument. Retrospective data analysis revealed that 7700 specimens required manual dilutions on the DxC over a 2-y period. Using our optimized AU-specific dilution and reporting parameters, the data-driven simulation analysis showed a 61% reduction in manual dilutions. For the specimens that required manual dilutions on the AU680/5812, we developed standardized dilution procedures to further streamline workflow. We provide a data-driven, practical outline for clinical laboratories to efficiently optimize their use of automated chemistry analyzers. The outcomes can be used to assist laboratories wishing to improve their existing procedures or to facilitate transitioning into a new line of instrumentation, regardless of the instrument model or manufacturer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of an automated system for detection of canine serum antibodies against Ehrlichia canis glycoprotein 36.

    PubMed

    Moroff, Scott; Sokolchik, Irene; Woodring, Todd; Woodruff, Colby; Atkinson, Brett; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the most common cause of monocytotropic ehrlichiosis in dogs around the world. The purpose of the present study was to validate a new automated fluorescence system (Accuplex4™ BioCD system; Antech Diagnostics, Lake Success, New York) to detect antibodies against the E. canis immunodominant glycoprotein 36 (gp36). Sera and blood samples (ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid) were collected from mixed sex beagles ( n = 8) on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 28, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70, 77, 84, and 98 after intravenous inoculation with culture-derived E. canis. Sera were assayed using the Accuplex4 BioCD system (Accuplex4), an E. canis indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), and a commercially available kit. A complete blood cell count and a proprietary E. canis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on each blood sample. On the day thrombocytopenia was first detected for each dog, E. canis DNA was amplified from blood of all dogs. At those times, E. canis antibodies were detected in 7 of 8 dogs by the Accuplex4, 1 of 8 dogs by the commercial kit, and 4 of 8 dogs by IFAT. Ehrlichia canis DNA was amplified from blood before seroconversion in any antibody assay for 6 dogs. Antibodies against gp36 were detected by Accuplex4 within 3 days of PCR-positive test results and were detected up to 25 days sooner than the commercial kit. After starting doxycycline treatment, E. canis DNA was no longer amplified by PCR assay, but serum antibodies remained detectable by all assays.

  6. Effect of Sweet Orange Fruit Waste Diets and Acidifier on Haematology and Serum Chemistry of Weanling Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Daudu, Oluremi Martha; Sani, Rahamatu Usman; Adedibu, Iyetunde Ifeyori; Ademu, Lawrence Anebi; Bawa, Gideon Shaibu; Olugbemi, Taiye Sunday

    2014-01-01

    A total of thirty-five mixed breed (35) rabbits of average weight of 700 g aged 5-6 weeks were allocated to seven treatments in a completely randomised design to investigate the effect of sweet orange fruit waste (SOFW) and acidomix acidifier on haematology and serum chemistry. The diets were 0% SOFW, 10% SOFW with 0.5% acidomix, 10% SOFW with 0.7 acidomix, 15% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, 15% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier, 20% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, and 20% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier. Blood samples were analyzed for haemoglobin (hb) concentration, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), differential WBC count (lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte, and neutrophil), alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), total protein, albumin, and globulin. There was no interaction between SOFW and acidifier for the haematological and most of the serum chemistry parameters but significant difference was observed in ALT; however the values were within the normal range. SOFW had no significant effect on all haematological and serum chemistry parameters. Acidomix had significant effect (P < 0.05) on haemoglobin concentration; rabbits fed 0.5% acidomix diets had higher values which were within the normal range. It is therefore concluded that SOFW with acidifier up to 20% had no detrimental effect on serum chemistry and haematology. PMID:26464931

  7. The effect of the zeolite clinoptilolite on serum chemistry and hematopoiesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, I; Flegar-Mestric, Z; Zadro, R; Breljak, D; Stanovic Janda, S; Stojkovic, R; Marusic, M; Radacic, M; Boranic, M

    2001-07-01

    Zeolites are natural or synthetic crystalline alumosilicates with ion exchanging properties. Supplied in fodder, they promote biomass production and animal health. Our aim was to assess the effects of the natural zeolite, clinoptilolite, on hematopoiesis, serum electrolytes and essential biochemical indicators of kidney and liver function in mice. Two preparations differing in particle size were tested: a powderized form obtained by countercurrent mechanical treatment of the clinoptilolite (MTCp) and normally ground clinoptilolite (NGCp). Young adult mice were supplied with food containing 12.5, 25 or 50% clinoptilolite powder. Control animals received the same food ration without the clinoptilolite. After 10, 20, 30 and 40 days, six animals from each group were exsanguinated to obtain blood for hematological and serum for biochemical measurements as well as to collect femoral bone marrow for determination of hematopoietic activity. Clinoptilolite ingestion was well tolerated, as judged by comparable body masses of treated and control animals. A 20% increase of the potassium level was detected in mice receiving the zeolite-rich diet, without other changes in serum chemistry. Erythrocyte, hemoglobin and platelet levels in peripheral blood were not materially affected. NGCp caused leukocytosis, with concomitant decline of the GM-CFU content in the bone marrow, which was attributed to intestinal irritation by rough zeolite particles. The mechanically treated clinoptilolite preparation caused similar, albeit less pronounced, changes. In a limited experiment, mice having transplanted mammary carcinoma in the terminal stage showed increased potassium and decreased sodium and chloride levels, severe anemia and leukocytosis, decreased bone marrow cellularity and diminished content of hematopoietic progenitor cells in the marrow. The clinoptilolite preparations ameliorated the sodium and chloride decline, whereas the effects on hematopoiesis were erratic.

  8. Comparison of select hematology and serum chemistry analtyes between wild-caught and aquarium-housed lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens).

    PubMed

    DiVincenti, Louis; Priest, Heather; Walker, Kyle J; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Dittman, Dawn

    2013-12-01

    Hematology and serum chemistry analytes were compared between wild-caught and aquarium-housed lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to potentially improve understanding of medical issues in lake sturgeon. Blood samples were taken from 30 lake sturgeon exhibited in 11 institutions in the United States and from 23 experimentally stocked lake sturgeon caught in gill nets in the lower Genesee River in Rochester, New York, USA. For hematology, only segmented neutrophil count was significantly different, with wild-caught fish having a higher number of circulating neutrophils. For clinical chemistry analytes, chloride, uric acid, calcium, phosphate, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, triglycerides, and creatine kinase were significantly different between the two cohorts. These differences are likely not clinically significant and are attributable to handling stress, variability in environmental parameters, or differences in nutritional status. This is the first report of hematology and serum chemistry values in aquarium-housed lake sturgeon and provides useful reference intervals for clinicians.

  9. Comparison of select hematology and serum chemistry analtyes between wild-caught and aquarium-housed lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiVincenti, Louis; Priest, Heather; Walker, Kyle J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Dittman, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Hematology and serum chemistry analytes were compared between wild-caught and aquarium-housed lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to potentially improve understanding of medical issues in lake sturgeon. Blood samples were taken from 30 lake sturgeon exhibited in 11 institutions in the United States and from 23 experimentally stocked lake sturgeon caught in gill nets in the lower Genesee River in Rochester, New York, USA. For hematology, only segmented neutrophil count was significantly different, with wild-caught fish having a higher number of circulating neutrophils. For clinical chemistry analytes, chloride, uric acid, calcium, phosphate, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, triglycerides, and creatine kinase were significantly different between the two cohorts. These differences are likely not clinically significant and are attributable to handling stress, variability in environmental parameters, or differences in nutritional status. This is the first report of hematology and serum chemistry values in aquarium-housed lake sturgeon and provides useful reference intervals for clinicians.

  10. Hematology and serum chemistries of nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower peninsula of MI, USA.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Stickle, J E; Giesy, J P

    2000-11-01

    Hematology constituents and serum biochemistries were determined in blood collected from 55 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from nest sites within the lower peninsula of Michigan in 1992. Hematological values were comparable to published ranges for birds for all but eosinophils, which were greater than normal. Serum chemistry values were similar to those of other birds for all but six parameters, uric acid, cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, globulin, and urea nitrogen, which were greater and glucose which was less. Samples of blood collected from wild bald eagles can be used for hematologic parameters and serum chemistry. It is important for other studies of endangered species to obtain baseline data from healthy, wild animals in their natural environment, and for comparison of animals living in environments of greater exposure to those living in areas of lesser exposure to xenobiotics. We caution that arrangements for rapid analysis be done in advance of sample collection.

  11. Validation of an automated assay for the measurement of cupric reducing antioxidant capacity in serum of dogs.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Camila Peres; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Cerón, José Joaquin

    2016-07-02

    The objective of the present study was to optimize and validate an automated method to assess the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in serum of dogs using the cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) methodology (TACc) with bathocuproinedisulfonic acid disodium salt as chelating agent, evaluating also possible variations due to the use of two different automated analyzers. The method is based on the reduction of Cu(2+) into Cu(1+) by the action of the non-enzymatic antioxidants that are present in the sample. Imprecision was low in both apparatus utilized, and the results were linear across serial Trolox and canine serum samples dilutions. Lipids did not interfere with the assay; however, hemolysis increased the TACc concentrations. When TACc concentrations were determined in ten healthy (control) dogs and in twelve dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), dogs with IBD had lower TACc concentrations when compared with the healthy dogs. The method validated in this paper is precise, simple, and fast and can be easily adapted to automated analyzers.

  12. Effects of lead shot ingestion on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, hemoglobin concentration, and serum chemistry in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.

    1981-01-01

    Lead shot ingestion by bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is considered to be widespread and has been implicated in the death of eagles in nature. It was recently demonstrated under experimental conditions that ingestion of as few as 10 lead shot resulted in death within 12 to 20 days. In the present study hematological responses to lead toxicity including red blood cell ALAD activity, hemoglobin concentration and 23 different blood serum chemistries were examined in five captive bald eagles that were unsuitable for rehabilitation and release. Eagles were dosed by force-feeding with 10 lead shot; they were redosed if regurgitation occurred. Red blood cell ALAD activity was inhibited by nearly 80% within 24 hours when mean blood lead concentration had increased to 0.8 parts per million (ppm). By the end of 1 week there was a significant decrease (20-25%) in hematocrit and hemoglobin, and the mean blood lead concentration was over 3 ppm. Within as little as 1-2 weeks after dosing, significant elevations in serum creatinine and serum alanine aminotransferase occurred, as well as a significant decrease in the ratio of serum aspartic aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase. The mean blood lead concentration was over 5 ppm by the end of 2 weeks. These changes in serum chemistry may be indicative of kidney and liver alterations.

  13. High-Throughput Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Testing with Automated Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Serum from bar-coded tubes, and then internal standard, are pipetted to 96-well plates with an 8-channel automated liquid handler (ALH). The first precipitation reagent (methanol:ZnSO4) is added and mixed with the 8-channel ALH. A second protein precipitating agent, 1 % formic acid in acetonitrile, is added and mixed with a 96-channel ALH. After a 4-min delay for larger precipitates to settle to the bottom of the plate, the upper 36 % of the precipitate/supernatant mix is transferred with the 96-channel ALH to a Sigma Hybrid SPE(®) plate and vacuumed through for removal of phospholipids and precipitated proteins. The filtrate is collected in a second 96-well plate (collection plate) which is foil-sealed, placed in the autosampler (ALS), and injected into a multiplexed LC-MS/MS system running AB Sciex Cliquid(®) and MPX(®) software. Two Shimadzu LC stacks, with multiplex timing controlled by MPX(®) software, inject alternately to one AB Sciex API-5000 MS/MS using positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and a 1.87 min water/acetonitrile LC gradient with a 2.1 × 20 mm, 2.7 μm, C18 fused core particle column (Sigma Ascentis Express). LC-MS/MS through put is ~44 samples/h/LC-MS/MS system with dual-LC channel multiplexing. Plate maps are transferred electronically from the ALH and reformatted into LC-MS/MS sample table format using the Data Innovations LLC (DI) Instrument Manager middleware application. Before collection plates are loaded into the ALS, the plate bar code is manually scanned to download the sample table from the DI middleware to the LC-MS/MS. After acquisition-LC-MS/MS data is analyzed with AB Sciex Multiquant(®) software using customized queries, and then results are transferred electronically via a DI interface to the LIS. 2500 samples/day can be extracted by two analysts using four ALHs in 4-6 h. LC-MS/MS analysis of those samples on three dual-channel LC multiplexed LC-MS/MS systems requires 19-21 h and data analysis can be

  14. Renal evaluation of Aotus azarai infulatus by ultrasonography and serum chemistry profile.

    PubMed

    Lins, Fernanda Luiza de Miranda Lins e; Monteiro, Frederico Ozanan Barros; Takeshita, Rafaela Sayuri Cicalise; da Silva, Gilmara Abreu; Faturi, Cristian; Palha, Maria das Dores Correia; Monteiro, Maria Vivina Barros; Coutinho, Leandro Nassar; Kugelmeier, Tatiana; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to characterize anatomical and biochemical properties of owl monkey kidneys in order to provide normal reference values. Sixty-nine Aotus azarai infulatus (45 males and 24 females) were divided into four different age groups (AG1: 3 months-1 year; AG2: 2-3 years; AG3: 4-6 years; and AG4: over 7 years old). The monkeys were evaluated with a serum chemistry profile, focusing on serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and with ultrasound. Mean body mass differed among the age groups. This significance was attributed to AG1 body mass being significantly lower than in AG2 and that in both AG2 and AG3 being significantly lower than in the two older age groups (AG3 and AG4). SCr and BUN concentrations differed significantly between the sexes and SCr level correlated positively with age. In contrast, renal measurements did not differ between males and females. Left and right renal volumes did not differ significantly within age groups, or among AG2, AG3, and AG4. Renal volumes in AG1, however, while not differing from those in AG2, did differ significantly from those in AG3 and AG4. In conclusion, this study provides ultrasonographic reference values for the morphology the kidneys in A. a. infulatus. Evidence is also provided that SCr and BUN levels in owl monkeys are influenced by the sex and age of the individual, factors that should be considered when interpreting test results. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  16. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  17. Positive reinforcement training affects hematologic and serum chemistry values in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Susan P; Hau, Jann; Perlman, Jaine E; Martino, Michele; Schapiro, Steven J

    2006-03-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques have received considerable attention for their stress reduction potential in the behavioral management of captive nonhuman primates. However, few published empirical studies have provided physiological data to support this position. To address this issue, PRT techniques were used to train chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) to voluntarily present a leg for an intramuscular (IM) injection of anesthetic. Hematology and serum chemistry profiles were collected from healthy chimpanzees (n=128) of both sexes and various ages during their routine annual physical examinations over a 7-year period. Specific variables potentially indicative of acute stress (i.e., total white blood cell (WBC) counts, absolute segmented neutrophils (SEG), glucose (GLU) levels, and hematocrit (HCT) levels) were analyzed to determine whether the method used to administer the anesthetic (voluntary present for injection vs. involuntary injection) affected the physiological parameters. Subjects that voluntarily presented for an anesthetic injection had significantly lower mean total WBC counts, SEG, and GLU levels than subjects that were involuntarily anesthetized by more traditional means. Within-subjects analyses revealed the same pattern of results. This is one of the first data sets to objectively demonstrate that PRT for voluntary presentation of IM injections of anesthetic can significantly affect some of the physiological measures correlated with stress responses to chemical restraint in captive chimpanzees.

  18. Surface chemistry and serum type both determine the nanoparticle-protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The protein corona that forms around nanoparticles in vivo is a critical factor that affects their physiological response. The potential to manipulate nanoparticle characteristics such that either proteins advantageous for delivery are recruited and/or detrimental proteins are avoided offers exciting possibilities for improving drug delivery. In this work, we used nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to characterize the corona of five lipid formulations after incubation in mouse and human plasma with the hope of providing data that may contribute to a better understanding of the role played by both the nanoparticle properties and the physiological environment in recruiting specific proteins to the corona. Notably, we showed that minor changes in the lipid composition might critically affect the protein corona composition demonstrating that the surface chemistry and arrangement of lipid functional groups are key players that regulate the liposome-protein interactions. Notably, we provided evidence that the protein corona that forms around liposomes is strongly affected by the physiological environment, i.e., the serum type. These results are likely to suggest that the translation of novel pharmaceutical formulations from animal models to the clinic must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. PMID:25731725

  19. Macrophage Serum-Based Adhesion to Plasma-Processed Surface Chemistry is Distinct from That Exhibited by Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godek, Marisha L.; Malkov, Galiya Sh.; Fisher, Ellen R.; Grainger, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Plasma-polymerized films deposited from AlAm, HxAm, NVP, NVFA, AA and FC were compared to TCPS and PS surfaces in supporting cellular attachment, viability, and proliferation in serum-based culture in vitro for extended periods of time (>7 d). Surface patterns were created using multi-step depositions with physical masks. Cell adhesion in the presence of serum was compared for (monocyte-) macrophage and fibroblast cell lines. Cellular response was tracked over time, reporting adhesive behavior, proliferative rates, and morphological changes as a function of surface chemistry. Micropatterned surfaces containing different surface chemistries and functional groups (e.g. –NH2, –COOH, –CF3) produced differential cell adhesive patterns for NIH 3T3 fibroblasts compared to J774A.1, RAW 264.7 or IC-21 (monocyte-) macrophage cell types. Significantly, macrophage adhesion is substantial on surfaces where fibroblasts do not adhere under identical culture conditions. PMID:17417668

  20. Hematological and serum chemistry profiles of free-ranging southern two-toed sloths in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Vogel, I; Vié, J C; de Thoisy, B; Moreau, B

    1999-07-01

    Free-ranging southern two-toed sloths (Choloepus didactylus) were translocated during the flooding of a forest at a hydroelectric dam site in French Guiana. Over an 11 mo period blood samples were collected from 90 sloths (38 males, 52 females) in order to determine hematological and serum chemistry reference values. Mean values and range of values were calculated for 13 hematological and 21 serum chemistry parameters. Variations associated with sex, age and reproductive status were identified. Males had a significantly lower red blood cell count than females. Immature animals had more monocytes while adults had more neutrophils and higher mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Aspartate aminotransferase and triglyceride values were higher in young than in adult sloths but uric acid was lower. Lactating females showed lower red blood cells count and iron levels than non-lactating females. These profiles will help to provide reliable baseline data for medical evaluation of sloths.

  1. Automated analysis of mouse serum peptidome using restricted access media and nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Brennan, Jim; Throckmorton, Dan J; Branda, Steven S; Chirica, Gabriela S

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate use of restricted access media with reversed phase functionality (RAM-RP) for analysis of low molecular weight proteins and peptides in mouse serum (75 μl) using a custom designed modular automated processing system (MAPS). RAM-RP fractionation with simultaneous removal of high molecular weight and high abundance proteins is integrated with a follow-on buffer exchange module (BE) to ensure compatibility with subsequent processing steps (trypsin digestion and intact peptide separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis). The high sample capacity afforded by chromatographic methods generates enough sample to achieve comprehensive serum peptidome identification (357 proteins) through tandem mass spectrometric analysis of both intact and digested peptides. Sample losses during transfer between modules are minimized through precise fluidic control; no clogging occurred over several months of serum processing in our low back pressure system. Computer controlled operation of both modules and thorough optimization yield excellent run-to-run reproducibility and protein/peptide overlap in analytical repeats. The robustness of our results demonstrate that the RAM-RP-BE workflow executed on our MAPS platform shows tremendous potential for high throughput peptidome processing, particularly with regard to direct analysis of small-volume serum samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Automated quantum mechanical total line shape fitting model for quantitative NMR-based profiling of human serum metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mihaleva, Velitchka V; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; van Duynhoven, John; Niemitz, Mathias; Vervoort, Jacques; Jacobs, Doris M

    2014-05-01

    An automated quantum mechanical total line shape (QMTLS) fitting model was implemented for quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based profiling of 42 metabolites in ultrafiltrated human serum samples. Each metabolite was described by a set of chemical shifts, J-couplings, and line widths. These parameters were optimized for each metabolite in each sample by iteratively minimizing the difference between the calculated and the experimental spectrum. In total, 92.0 to 98.1 % of the signal intensities in the experimental spectrum could be explained by the calculated spectrum. The model was validated by comparison to signal integration of metabolites with isolated signals and by means of standard additions. Metabolites present at average concentration higher than 50 μM were quantified with average absolute relative error less than 10 % when using different initial parameters for the fitting procedure. Furthermore, the biological applicability of the QMTLS model was demonstrated on 287 samples from an intervention study in 37 human volunteers undergoing an exercise challenge. Our automated QMTLS model was able to cope with the large dynamic range of metabolite concentrations in serum and proved to be suitable for high-throughput analysis.

  3. Development and validation of an automated liquid-liquid extraction GC/MS method for the determination of THC, 11-OH-THC, and free THC-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) from blood serum.

    PubMed

    Purschke, Kirsten; Heinl, Sonja; Lerch, Oliver; Erdmann, Freidoon; Veit, Florian

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) from blood serum is a routine task in forensic toxicology laboratories. For examination of consumption habits, the concentration of the phase I metabolite THC-COOH is used. Recommendations for interpretation of analysis values in medical-psychological assessments (regranting of driver's licenses, Germany) include threshold values for the free, unconjugated THC-COOH. Using a fully automated two-step liquid-liquid extraction, THC, 11-OH-THC, and free, unconjugated THC-COOH were extracted from blood serum, silylated with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), and analyzed by GC/MS. The automation was carried out by an x-y-z sample robot equipped with modules for shaking, centrifugation, and solvent evaporation. This method was based on a previously developed manual sample preparation method. Validation guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh) were fulfilled for both methods, at which the focus of this article is the automated one. Limits of detection and quantification for THC were 0.3 and 0.6 μg/L, for 11-OH-THC were 0.1 and 0.8 μg/L, and for THC-COOH were 0.3 and 1.1 μg/L, when extracting only 0.5 mL of blood serum. Therefore, the required limit of quantification for THC of 1 μg/L in driving under the influence of cannabis cases in Germany (and other countries) can be reached and the method can be employed in that context. Real and external control samples were analyzed, and a round robin test was passed successfully. To date, the method is employed in the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen, Germany, in daily routine. Automation helps in avoiding errors during sample preparation and reduces the workload of the laboratory personnel. Due to its flexibility, the analysis system can be employed for other liquid-liquid extractions as

  4. Evaluation of an in-practice wet-chemistry analyzer using canine and feline serum samples.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katherine L; Burt, Kay; Papasouliotis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    A wet-chemistry biochemical analyzer was assessed for in-practice veterinary use. Its small size may mean a cost-effective method for low-throughput in-house biochemical analyses for first-opinion practice. The objectives of our study were to determine imprecision, total observed error, and acceptability of the analyzer for measurement of common canine and feline serum analytes, and to compare clinical sample results to those from a commercial reference analyzer. Imprecision was determined by within- and between-run repeatability for canine and feline pooled samples, and manufacturer-supplied quality control material (QCM). Total observed error (TEobs) was determined for pooled samples and QCM. Performance was assessed for canine and feline pooled samples by sigma metric determination. Agreement and errors between the in-practice and reference analyzers were determined for canine and feline clinical samples by Bland-Altman and Deming regression analyses. Within- and between-run precision was high for most analytes, and TEobs(%) was mostly lower than total allowable error. Performance based on sigma metrics was good (σ > 4) for many analytes and marginal (σ > 3) for most of the remainder. Correlation between the analyzers was very high for most canine analytes and high for most feline analytes. Between-analyzer bias was generally attributed to high constant error. The in-practice analyzer showed good overall performance, with only calcium and phosphate analyses identified as significantly problematic. Agreement for most analytes was insufficient for transposition of reference intervals, and we recommend that in-practice-specific reference intervals be established in the laboratory.

  5. Combinatorial chemistry, automation and molecular diversity: new trends in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Van Hijfte, L; Marciniak, G; Froloff, N

    1999-04-02

    Combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a set of novel strategies for the synthesis of large sets of compounds (combinatorial libraries) for biological evaluation. Within a few years combinatorial chemistry has undergone a series of changes in trends, which are closely related to two important factors in libraries: numbers and quality. While the number of compounds in a library may be easily expressed, it is a lot more difficult to indicate the degree of quality of a library. This degree of quality can be split into two aspects: purity and diversity. The changing trends in combinatorial chemistry with respect to the strategies, the technologies, the libraries themselves (numbers and purity aspects) and the molecular diversity are outlined in this paper.

  6. Robust algorithms for automated chemical shift calibration of 1D 1H NMR spectra of blood serum.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Jake T M; Athersuch, Toby J; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Keun, Hector C

    2008-09-15

    In biofluid NMR spectroscopy, the frequency of each resonance is typically calibrated by addition of a reference compound such as 3-(trimethylsilyl)-propionic acid- d 4 (TSP) to the sample. However biofluids such as serum cannot be referenced to TSP, due to shifts resonance caused by binding to macromolecules in solution. In order to overcome this limitation we have developed algorithms, based on analysis of derivative spectra, to locate and calibrate (1)H NMR spectra to the alpha-glucose anomeric doublet. We successfully used these algorithms to calibrate 77 serum (1)H NMR spectra and demonstrate the greater reproducibility of the calculated chemical-shift corrections ( r = 0.97) than those generated by manual alignment ( r = 0.8-0.88). Hence we show that these algorithms provide robust and reproducible methods of calibrating (1)H NMR of serum, plasma, or any biofluid in which glucose is abundant. Precise automated calibration of complex biofluid NMR spectra is an important tool in large-scale metabonomic or metabolomic studies, where hundreds or even thousands of spectra may be analyzed in high-resolution by pattern recognition analysis.

  7. Evaluation of Serum Lipid, Thyroid, and Hepatic Clinical Chemistries in Association With Serum Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in Cynomolgus Monkeys After Oral Dosing With Potassium PFOS

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bruce C.; Andres, Kara L.; Ehresman, David J.; Falvo, Ria; Provencher, Anne; Olsen, Geary W.; Butenhoff, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An oral dose study with perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was undertaken to identify potential associations between serum PFOS and changes in serum clinical chemistry parameters in purpose-bred young adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). In this study, control group (n = 6/sex) was sham-dosed with vehicle (0.5% Tween 20 and 5% ethanol in water), low-dose group (n = 6/sex) received 1 single K+PFOS dose (9 mg/kg), and high-dose group (n = 4–6/sex) received 3 separate K+ PFOS doses (11–17.2 mg/kg). Monkeys were given routine checkups and observed carefully for health problems on a daily basis. Scheduled blood samples were drawn from all monkeys prior to, during, and after K+PFOS administration for up to 1 year and they were analyzed for PFOS concentrations and clinical chemistry markers for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. No mortality occurred during the study. All the monkeys were healthy, gained weight, and were released back to the colony at the end of the study. The highest serum PFOS achieved was approximately 165 μg/ml. When compared with time-matched controls, administration of K+PFOS to monkeys did not result in any toxicologically meaningful or clinically relevant changes in serum clinical measurements for coagulation, lipids, hepatic, renal, electrolytes, and thyroid-related hormones. A slight reduction in serum cholesterol (primarily the high-density lipoprotein fraction), although not toxicologically significant, was observed. The corresponding lower-bound fifth percentile benchmark concentrations (BMCL1sd) were 74 and 76 μg/ml for male and female monkeys, respectively. Compared to the 2013–2014 geometric mean serum PFOS level of 4.99 ng/ml (0.00499 μg/ml) in US general population reported by CDC NHANES, this represents 4 orders of magnitude for margin of exposure. PMID:28115654

  8. TCA Cycle Turnover And Serum Glucose Sources By Automated Bayesian Analysis Of NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Burgess, Shawn; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2004-04-01

    Changes in sources of serum glucose are indicative of a variety of pathological metabolic states. It is possible to measure the sources of serum glucose by the administration of deuterated water to a subject followed by analysis of the 2H enrichment levels in glucose extracted from plasma from a single blood draw by 2H NMR. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior probability densities may then be used to evaluate the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and the Kreb's cycle to serum glucose. Experiments with simulated NMR spectra show that in spectra with a S/N of 20 to 1, the resulting metabolic information may be evaluated with an accuracy of about 4 percent.

  9. Detecting endotoxin activity in bovine serum using an automated testing system

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; SHIMAMORI, Toshio; SATO, Ayano; TSUKANO, Kenji; TSUCHIYA, Masakazu; LAKRITZ, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of the commercially available portable test system (PTSTM) to detect endotoxin activity in bovine serum, with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) and chromogenic (KC) assays. Prior to testing, serum samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTSTM was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assays. The results using PTSTM correlated with those using KT (r2=0.963, P<0.001) or KC assays (r2=0.982, P<0.001). Based on these findings, the PTSTM could be applied as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in bovine serum. PMID:25787927

  10. Serum lipase determination in the dog: a comparison of a titrimetric method with an automated kinetic method.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gail L.; McGraw, Pamela; Tvedten, Harold W.

    1992-01-01

    An enzymatic, kinetic method for determining serum lipase activity was evaluated and compared to a standard manual method for use in dogs. The kinetic method was a commercial kit adapted for use on a tandem access clinical chemistry analyzer and utilized a series of coupled enzymatic reactions based on the hydrolysis of 1,2-diglyceride by lipase. The manual method was the Cherry-Crandall technique based on the titration of base against the acid formed by hydrolysis of an olive oil substrate by lipase. The correlation between the two methods was very good (r = 0.94). The reference range for 56 clinically healthy dogs assayed by the kinetic method was 90 to 527 U/L. Diseases associated with a greater than twofold elevation in serum lipase activity as determined by the kinetic method included pancreatitis, gastritis with liver disease, and oliguric renal failure with metabolic acidosis. In some cases, pancreatitis was seen with other clinical problems, such as gastroenteritis, diabetic ketoacidosis, duodenal mass, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and septic peritonitis. Diseases associated with serum lipase activity within the reference range or elevated less than twofold included gastritis, gastric ulcer, cholestasis, phenobarbital-induced hepatopathy, colitis, copper hepatopathy, abdominal hematoma, apocrine gland adenocarcinoma, and thrombocytopenia with pneumonia.

  11. Hematology and serum chemistry values for free-ranging Florida panther neonates with a comparison to adult panther values.

    PubMed

    Foster, Garry W; Cunningham, Mark W

    2009-07-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values were determined for 25 free-ranging Florida panther (Puma concolor couguar) neonates from southern Florida sampled from January 2001 to April 2007. The kittens were < or = 25 days old, belonging to 12 litters, from 11 different dams. Forty-one blood samples also were collected from 32 free-ranging adult panthers (3-10 yr-old) from southern Florida from November 2000 to February 2007. Male kittens had higher hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (HCT), and red blood cell (RBC) counts than did female kittens. Neonates had higher mean serum values of total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus, triglycerides, and magnesium than adult panthers but lower mean values of urea nitrogen, creatinine, total protein, albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, sodium, chloride, creatine kinase, amylase, and total globulin. Neonates also had higher mean values of mean cell volume, mean cell hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentration, platelets, and the number of lymphocytes and monocytes but lower Hb, HCT, white blood cell count, RBC count, and neutrophils than adult panthers. No other significant differences in serum chemistry or hematology were noted between neonates and adults.

  12. Ivermectin treatment of bovine psoroptic mange: effects on serum chemistry, hematology, organ weights, and leather quality.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, S; Visser, M; Meyer, M; Lindner, T

    2016-04-01

    Psoroptic mange is a skin disease which may result in serious health and welfare problems and important economic losses. Apart from the effect on weight gain, little information is available concerning other responses of the organism consequent to the successful therapy of bovine psoroptic mange. Accordingly, serum chemistry, hematology, organ weights, and leather quality of young bulls with experimentally induced clinical Psoroptes ovis mange and treated with either ivermectin long-acting injection (IVM LAI; IVOMEC(®) GOLD, Merial) or saline (n = 16 each) were examined 8 weeks after treatment when all IVM LAI-treated bulls were free of live P. ovis mites while the saline-treated bulls maintained clinical mange. IVM LAI-treated bulls had higher (p < 0.05) alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, cholesterol, glucose, and albumin levels and lower (p < 0.01) total protein and β- and γ-globulin levels than the saline-treated bulls. Complete blood counts revealed higher leukocyte counts associated with higher eosinophil counts and higher platelet counts in the saline-treated compared to the IVM LAI-treated bulls (p < 0.01). Correlating with body weight, the warm carcass weight of the saline-treated bulls was lower than that of the IVM LAI-treated bulls (p < 0.05). Absolute and relative (organ weight divided by body weight) weights of the spleen, thymus, omental fat, and perirenal fat were higher (p < 0.01) for the IVM LAI-treated bulls than for the saline-treated bulls, while the IVM LAI-treated bulls had lower (p < 0.05) absolute and relative weights of the liver, adrenal glands, and selected lymph nodes than the saline-treated bulls. The leathers produced from the IVM LAI-treated bulls showed significantly (p < 0.001) less severe gouging or etching than leathers from the saline-treated bulls, and significantly (p < 0.05) more leather from the IVM LAI-treated bulls was of usable quality than the size of leather from the saline

  13. Micro-bead injection spectroscopy for label-free automated determination of immunoglobulin G in human serum.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inês I; Magalhães, Luís M; Barreiros, Luisa; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C; Segundo, Marcela A

    2017-09-09

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) represents the major fraction of antibodies in healthy adult human serum, and deviations from physiological levels are a generic marker of disease corresponding to different pathologies. Therefore, screening methods for IgG evaluation are a valuable aid to diagnostics. The present work proposes a rapid, automatic, and miniaturized method based on UV-vis micro-bead injection spectroscopy (μ-BIS) for the real-time determination of human serum IgG with label-free detection. Relying on attachment of IgG in rec-protein G immobilized in Sepharose 4B, a bioaffinity column is automatically assembled, where IgG is selectively retained and determined by on-column optical density measurement. A "dilution-and-shoot" approach (50 to 200 times) was implemented without further sample treatment because interferences were flushed out of the column upon sample loading, with minimization of carryover and cross-contamination by automatically discarding the sorbent (0.2 mg) after each determination. No interference from human serum albumin at 60 mg mL(-1) in undiluted sample was found. The method allowed IgG determination in the range 100-300 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 5.0-60 mg mL(-1) in undiluted samples), with a detection limit of 33 μg mL(-1) (1.7 mg mL(-1) for samples, dilution factor of 50). RSD values were < 9.4 and < 11.7%, for intra and inter-assay precision, respectively, while recovery values for human serum spiked with IgG at high pathological levels were 97.8-101.4%. Comparison to commercial ELISA kit showed no significant difference for tested samples (n = 8). Moreover, time-to-result decreased from several hours to < 5 min and analysis cost decreased 10 times, showing the potential of the proposed approach as a point-of-care method. Graphical abstract Micro-Bead Injection Spectroscopy method for real time, automated and label-free determination of total serum human Immunoglobulin G (IgG). The method was designed for Lab

  14. Automated electrorotation shows electrokinetic separation of pancreatic cancer cells is robust to acquired chemotherapy resistance, serum starvation, and EMT.

    PubMed

    Lannin, Timothy; Su, Wey-Wey; Gruber, Conor; Cardle, Ian; Huang, Chao; Thege, Fredrik; Kirby, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We used automated electrorotation to measure the cytoplasmic permittivity, cytoplasmic conductivity, and specific membrane capacitance of pancreatic cancer cells under environmental perturbation to evaluate the effects of serum starvation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and evolution of chemotherapy resistance which may be associated with the development and dissemination of cancer. First, we compared gemcitabine-resistant BxPC3 subclones with gemcitabine-naive parental cells. Second, we serum-starved BxPC3 and PANC-1 cells and compared them to untreated counterparts. Third, we induced the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in PANC-1 cells and compared them to untreated PANC-1 cells. We also measured the electrorotation spectra of white blood cells isolated from a healthy donor. The properties from fit electrorotation spectra were used to compute dielectrophoresis (DEP) spectra and crossover frequencies. For all three experiments, the median crossover frequency for both treated and untreated pancreatic cancer cells remained significantly lower than the median crossover frequency for white blood cells. The robustness of the crossover frequency to these treatments indicates that DEP is a promising technique for enhancing capture of circulating cancer cells.

  15. Effects of seasonal and physiological variations on the serum chemistry, vitamins and thyroid hormone concentrations in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yokus, B; Cakir, D U; Kanay, Z; Gulten, T; Uysal, E

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of the reproductive status and seasonal variations on the serum chemistry and vitamin status and their relationships with the thyroid hormones in Sakiz-Awassi crossbreed sheep. The sheep (n = 34) were divided into two groups. The first group (n = 22) was mated; the second group (n = 12) was not mated. Their serum samples were collected four times a year at the each season and under reproductive status. The periods are 1, early pregnancy (October); 2, late pregnancy (January); 3, lactation (April); and 4, dry season (July). The results of this study indicated that (1) total protein (TP), globulin, cholesterol, creatinine, uric acid and T4/T3 vary with reproductive status but not seasonal variations; (2) alanine aminotransferase, T4, fT4 concentrations in serum vary only with reproductive status; (3) the urea, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, amylase, albumin, triglyceride, VLDL, Vit A-E, T3 and fT3 concentration could vary with both reproductive status and seasonal variations; (4) the glucose, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, folate concentrations were altered neither season of the year nor the reproductive status; (5) a single reference interval for folate, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glucose, TP, globulin, cholesterol, creatinine, uric acid and T4/T3 can be used for both mated and non-mated sheep because of no differences were found due to the reproductive status. Taking the results together suggests that reproductive status and seasonal variations have to be taken into consideration for a correct interpretation of the serum chemistry values of sheep. Nutritional supplements are required for sheep during certain periods to avoid a decline of their performance, which would then represent consequent economic, loses.

  16. Lithium induced toxicity in rats: blood serum chemistry, antioxidative enzymes in red blood cells and histopathological studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Elnakady, Yasser; Farooq, Muhammad; Wadaan, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Lithium is commonly used in treating mental disorders and bipolar diseases. As physicians frequently keep the patients on long-term lithium therapy, awareness of the numerous side effects and pathogenesis of this lightest alkali metal is needed for such treatments. The present study was designed to evaluate the toxic effect of small doses of lithium chloride in male Wistar rats. The oral administration of lithium chloride (15, 30 mg/kg body wt) for 7 weeks through their drinking water elicited a significant alteration in their body weight and blood serum chemistry. The serum enzyme levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), high density lipoprotein (HDLP), and creatinine kinase (CK) were diminished, whereas the level of serum urea and glucose were elevated in the lithium treated animals, depicting the disturbed general physiological status. Furthermore, a marked inhibition in the levels of serum alanine and aspartate transaminases (ALT and AST) reflected a stimulating transamination reaction in hepatic and renal tissues. Lithium exposure also reduced the glutathione (GSH) level and stimulated the lipid peroxidation (LPO) level in the rat blood cells, indicating oxidative stress in the red blood cells due to lithium exposures. The histopathological observations of the liver and kidney tissues revealed many deformities and histological alterations due to lithium treatment. The results of present study suggest that small doses of lithium induce toxicity in rat blood as well as in liver and kidney tissues. However, the precise mechanism of lithium toxicity is still incompletely understood.

  17. Determination of 74 new psychoactive substances in serum using automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sabrina; Kieliba, Tobias; Beike, Justus; Thevis, Mario; Mercer-Chalmers-Bender, Katja

    2017-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the development and validation of a fully automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method capable of detecting 90 central-stimulating new psychoactive substances (NPS) and 5 conventional amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethyl-amphetamine (MDEA), methamphetamine) in serum. The aim was to apply the validated method to forensic samples. The preparation of 150μL of serum was performed by an Instrument Top Sample Preparation (ITSP)-SPE with mixed mode cation exchanger cartridges. The extracts were directly injected into an LC-MS/MS system, using a biphenyl column and gradient elution with 2mM ammonium formate/0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid as mobile phases. The chromatographic run time amounts to 9.3min (including re-equilibration). The total cycle time is 11min, due to the interlacing between sample preparation and analysis. The method was fully validated using 69 NPS and five conventional amphetamine-type stimulants, according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh). The guidelines were fully achieved for 62 analytes (with a limit of detection (LOD) between 0.2 and 4μg/L), whilst full validation was not feasible for the remaining 12 analytes. For the fully validated analytes, the method achieved linearity in the 5μg/L (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ) to 250μg/L range (coefficients of determination>0.99). Recoveries for 69 of these compounds were greater than 50%, with relative standard deviations≤15%. The validated method was then tested for its capability in detecting a further 21 NPS, thus totalling 95 tested substances. An LOD between 0.4 and 1.6μg/L was obtained for these 21 additional qualitatively-measured substances. The method was subsequently successfully applied to 28 specimens from

  18. Serum chemistry reference values in free-ranging north Atlantic male walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) from the Svalbard archipelago.

    PubMed

    Tryland, Morten; Lydersen, Christian; Kovacs, Kit M; Thoresen, Stein Istre

    2009-12-01

    Information regarding health and disease is limited for walruses, a keystone species in arctic marine ecosystems. Serum chemistry analysis is a useful clinical tool for the health assessment of walruses, but only a few captive Pacific walruses have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine serum chemistry reference values for free-ranging male Atlantic walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) on Svalbard and to assess potential differences in animals with low and high tissue levels of organic pollutants. Blood samples were collected from 17 wild, adult, male Atlantic walruses chemically immobilized with etorphine at eastern Svalbard (Norway). Serum was obtained for routine biochemical analysis as well as nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA) and cortisol tests. Serum protein concentration was also measured by agarose gel electrophoresis. Reference values (ranges) included alanine aminotransferase (12-51 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase (54-137 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (42-243 U/L), creatine kinase (32-506 U/L), lactate dehydrogenase (480-1322 U/L), amylase (0-23 U/L), lipase (68-298 U/L), total protein (68-91 g/L), albumin (25.3-34.8 g/L), creatinine (84-137 mumol/L), urea (8.2-19.9 mmol/L), bilirubin (0-4 mumol/L), cholesterol (4.4-7.3 mmol/L), NEFA (0.1-0.4 mmol/L), triglycerides (0.6-2.2 mmol/L), calcium (2.0-2.7 mmol/L), phosphorus (1.7-2.8 mmol/L), sodium (147-162 mmol/L), potassium (4.7-7.4 mmol/L), chloride (102-115 mmol/L), and cortisol (<28-214 nmol/L). Walruses exposed to high levels of organic pollutants (n=6) had significantly lower (P=.022) phosphorus concentration than those with low levels of pollutants (n=6). The clinical chemistry reference values determined in this study can serve as baseline data for future health-related studies of walruses in a changing Arctic and may also be helpful for health evaluations of walruses in captivity. Impacts of the exposure of marine mammals to organic pollutants should be further investigated.

  19. Automated 3-D Printed Arrays to Evaluate Genotoxic Chemistry: E-Cigarettes and Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Kadimisetty, Karteek; Malla, Spundana; Rusling, James F

    2017-05-26

    A novel, automated, low cost, three-dimensional (3-D) printed microfluidic array was developed to detect DNA damage from metabolites of chemicals in environmental samples. The electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection platform incorporates layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled films of microsomal enzymes, DNA and an ECL-emitting ruthenium metallopolymer in ∼10 nm deep microwells. Liquid samples are introduced into the array, metabolized by the human enzymes, products react with DNA if possible, and DNA damage is detected by ECL with a camera. Measurements of relative DNA damage by the array assess the genotoxic potential of the samples. The array analyzes three samples simultaneously in 5 min. Measurement of cigarette and e-cigarette smoke extracts and polluted water samples was used to establish proof of concept. Potentially genotoxic reactions from e-cigarette vapor similar to smoke from conventional cigarettes were demonstrated. Untreated wastewater showed a high genotoxic potential compared to negligible values for treated wastewater from a pollution control treatment plant. Reactivity of chemicals known to produce high rates of metabolite-related DNA damage were measured, and array results for environmental samples were expressed in terms of equivalent responses from these standards to assess severity of possible DNA damage. Genotoxic assessment of wastewater samples during processing also highlighted future on-site monitoring applications.

  20. molSimplify: A toolkit for automating discovery in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Efthymios I; Gani, Terry Z H; Kulik, Heather J

    2016-08-15

    We present an automated, open source toolkit for the first-principles screening and discovery of new inorganic molecules and intermolecular complexes. Challenges remain in the automatic generation of candidate inorganic molecule structures due to the high variability in coordination and bonding, which we overcome through a divide-and-conquer tactic that flexibly combines force-field preoptimization of organic fragments with alignment to first-principles-trained metal-ligand distances. Exploration of chemical space is enabled through random generation of ligands and intermolecular complexes from large chemical databases. We validate the generated structures with the root mean squared (RMS) gradients evaluated from density functional theory (DFT), which are around 0.02 Ha/au across a large 150 molecule test set. Comparison of molSimplify results to full optimization with the universal force field reveals that RMS DFT gradients are improved by 40%. Seamless generation of input files, preparation and execution of electronic structure calculations, and post-processing for each generated structure aids interpretation of underlying chemical and energetic trends. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Histopathology and serum clinical chemistry evaluation of broilers with femoral head separation disorder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Femoral head disarticulation (FHD) and necrosis is a sporadic leg problem of unknown etiology in broiler breeders. To determine the underlying physiology of FHD, the blood chemistry and the histopathology of the femoral heads of the affected chickens were compared with their age matched controls. Ch...

  2. Hematology, serum chemistry, and body mass of free-ranging and captive Canada lynx in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Moen, Ron; Rasmussen, James M; Burdett, Christopher L; Pelican, Katharine M

    2010-01-01

    Baseline blood chemistry data could be particularly valuable if reference values from free-ranging populations of rare or endangered species are not available. The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in the conterminous United States, even though the species is managed as a furbearer in Alaska and in most provinces of Canada. Body mass, blood chemistry, and hematologic data for free-ranging lynx were collected from 2003 to 2007 and for captive lynx from 1984 to 2007. Up to 2 yr of age, captive lynx were consistently heavier than free-ranging lynx. Body mass of adult free-ranging lynx was similar to body mass of captive adult lynx. Some differences in blood chemistry between free-ranging and captive lynx were statistically significant, but most measured values were within reference ranges for domestic cats. Free-ranging lynx had higher concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and blood urea nitrogen than did captive lynx, and these were outside the reference value ranges for domestic cats. Alkaline phosphatase and phosphorus were higher in juveniles (<12 mo when captured) as compared to adults. Free-ranging lynx maintained body mass between serial captures. Hematologic values, blood chemistry values, and body mass of free-ranging Canada lynx provide support for the hypothesis that Canada lynx in Minnesota, at the southern edge of their range, are in normal physical condition.

  3. Automation of a spectrophotometric method for measuring L -carnitine in human blood serum

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Amparo; Padros, Anna; Arambarri, Marta; Martin, Silvia

    1998-01-01

    A spectrometric method for the determination of L-carnitine has been developed based on the reaction of the 5, 5 ′ dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) and adapted to a Technicon RA-2000 automatic analyser Química Farmacéutica Bayer, S.A.). The detection limit of the method is 13.2 μmol/l, with a measurement interval ranging from 30 to 320 μmoll1. Imprecision and accuracy are good even at levels close to the detection limit (coeffcient of variation of 5.4% for within-run imprecision for a concentration of 35 μmol/l). A good correlation was observed between the method studied and the radiometric method. The method evaluated has suffcient analytical sensitivity to diagnose carnitine deficiencies. The short time period required for sample processing (30 samples in 40min), the simple methodology and apparatus, the ease of personnel training and the low cost of the reagents make this method a good alternative to the classical radiometric method for evaluating serum L-carnitine in clinical laboratories without radioactive installations. PMID:18924818

  4. Automation of a spectrophotometric method for measuring L -carnitine in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Galan, A; Padros, A; Arambarri, M; Martin, S

    1998-01-01

    A spectrometric method for the determination of L-carnitine has been developed based on the reaction of the 5,5' dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) and adapted to a Technicon RA-2000 automatic analyser Química Farmacéutica Bayer, S.A.). The detection limit of the method is 13.2 mumol/l, with a measurement interval ranging from 30 to 320 mumoll1. Imprecision and accuracy are good even at levels close to the detection limit (coeffcient of variation of 5.4% for within-run imprecision for a concentration of 35 mumol/l). A good correlation was observed between the method studied and the radiometric method. The method evaluated has suffcient analytical sensitivity to diagnose carnitine deficiencies. The short time period required for sample processing (30 samples in 40min), the simple methodology and apparatus, the ease of personnel training and the low cost of the reagents make this method a good alternative to the classical radiometric method for evaluating serum L-carnitine in clinical laboratories without radioactive installations.

  5. Hematologic, serum chemistry and serologic values of Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J; Smith, T C; Evermann, J F; Heimer, W E

    1983-04-01

    In June 1979, 73 Dall's sheep were captured near Tok, Alaska to determine selected hematologic and serum metabolite parameters and to determine the presence of antibodies to selected pathogens. Hematology and serum metabolite values were compared with values for domestic sheep and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). Antibodies were detected against Brucella sp. (4%), Campylobacter feti (30%), contagious ecthyma virus (23%) and bovine parainfluenza type 3 virus (1%). Antibodies were not detected against Anaplasma sp., Leptospira sp., bovine virus diarrhea virus, bluetongue virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, ovine progressive pneumonia, and Toxoplasma sp.

  6. Serum perfluorooctane sulfonate and hepatic and lipid clinical chemistry tests in fluorochemical production employees.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G W; Burris, J M; Mandel, J H; Zobel, L R

    1999-09-01

    The 3M Company manufactures fluorochemicals, which have as a precursor perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluoride (C8F17SO2F). These compounds may be expected to transform metabolically, to an undetermined degree, to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-) as an end-stage metabolite. Subchronic studies in rats and primates indicate a potential for cumulative toxicity with PFOS with the primary effect related to metabolic wasting with hypolipidemia as a consistent finding. Biennial medical surveillance has been offered to the company's fluorochemical production workers located in Decatur, Alabama, and Antwerp, Belgium. In 1995, the mean serum PFOS level, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, for 178 male employees was 2.19 parts per million (ppm; range, 0.00 to 12.83 ppm), and in 1997, for 149 male employees, it was 1.75 ppm (0.10 to 9.93 ppm). Our analyses suggest that among these production employees, there were no substantial changes in serum hepatic enzymes, cholesterol, or lipoproteins associated with PFOS levels less than 6 ppm. It was not possible to derive inferences from the few employees who had serum PFOS levels > or = 6 ppm. These results may be due to the lower levels of serum PFOS measured among these production employees, compared to those suspected to cause effects in laboratory animals.

  7. Baseline Serum Clinical Chemistry Values in African Green Monkeys Before and After Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    male AGMs (N=49), with a weight of 4-7 kg, via 2.0-ml blood samples collected twice a week for three weeks. Seven randomly chosen background AGMs were...chemistry parameters were established in male AGMs (N=49), with a weight range of 4-7 kg, via 2.0-ml blood samples collected from the saphenous vein...challenged with a 1.0-mg/kg iv injection of HD. A 1.5-ml blood sample was obtained preexposure and analyzed; subsequent 1.5-m1 blood draws were

  8. Effects of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins on performance, serum chemistry, and intestinal histology of New Zealand White fryer rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, M A; Girgis, G N; Brash, M; Smith, T K

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of feeding diets containing grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins to fryer rabbits. The efficacy of a glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) was also examined. Thirty 5-wk-old male New Zealand White rabbits were fed a control diet, a contaminated diet, or a contaminated diet + 0.2% GMA for 21 d. Experimental diets contained deoxynivalenol (DON; vomitoxin) at a concentration of 0.25, 4.3, and 4.9 μg/g, respectively. Feed intake was measured daily and water intake was measured every 3 d. At the end of the feeding period, blood was collected for evaluation of serum chemistry and hematology. Visceral organs were excised, weighed, and processed for histopathological examination. Body weight gain and water intake were greater in rabbits fed the contaminated diet (P = 0.075 and 0.020, respectively) and those fed the contaminated + GMA diet (P = 0.026 and 0.002, respectively) compared with controls. Rabbits fed the contaminated + GMA diet had significantly increased serum urea concentrations (P = 0.023) and decreased serum alkaline phosphatase activity (P = 0.020) compared with controls. Increase in BW gain of rabbits fed the contaminated diets was caused by increased water consumption. There was no effect (P > 0.05) of diet on relative organ weights, but decreased infiltrations with eosinophilic granulocytes were observed in different regions of the intestine in rabbits fed the contaminated or the contaminated + GMA diet. It was concluded that rabbits could be adversely affected by feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins but appear to be less sensitive than other mammalian species. Supplementation with GMA did not reduce many of the effects of feed-borne mycotoxins.

  9. Evaluation of changes in serum chemistry in association with feed withdrawal or high dose oral gavage with dextran sodium sulfate- (DSS-) induced gut leakage in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kuttappan, V A; Vicuña, E A; Faulkner, O B; Huff, G R; Freeman, K A; Latorre, J D; Menconi, A; Tellez, G I; Hargis, B M; Bielke, L R

    2016-11-01

    Dextran sodium sulfate ( DSS: ) has been shown to be effective at inducing enteric inflammation in broiler chickens, resulting in increased leakage of orally administered fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran to circulation. In a previous study, 2 doses of DSS (0.45 g/dose) administered as oral gavage resulted in increased mucosal permeability. The main objective of the present study was to compare serum turbidity in control and DSS treated birds plus with feed restriction ( FR: ), and evaluate the associated serum chemistry. Three independent experiments were conducted with different combinations of treatment groups. In Experiment 1, control full-fed ( CON: ) and DSS full-fed ( FFD: ) with n = 15 birds/group were evaluated, Experiment 2 had groups (n = 15/group) CON, FFD, feed restriction ( FRS: for 34 h), and DSS with feed restriction ( FRD: ), and Experiment 3 (n = 15/group) had CON, FFD, and FRS (29 h FRS). All DSS treated birds received one or 2 doses of DSS by oral gavage (0.45 g/dose/bird). Results showed that, compared to CON group, there was an increase (P < 0.05) in serum turbidity in FFD birds, even though the difference between FRS and FRD was not apparent (P > 0.05). Administration of DSS did not result in increase of serum enzymes such as alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase ( LDH: ), nonetheless, the FFD showed lower (P < 0.05) LDH level compared to CON in Experiment 2. Among the various serum chemistry parameters evaluated triglycerides had the highest positive correlation (r(2) = 0.85; P < 0.05) with serum turbidity. DSS administration resulted in decreased serum protein levels, especially albumin. These results suggest that oral gavage with DSS in broiler chicks could result in changes to serum chemistry parameters which could be developed as potential marker/s for gut leakage.

  10. Evaluation of an automated assay based on monoclonal anti-human serum amyloid A (SAA) antibodies for measurement of canine, feline, and equine SAA.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Jacobsen, S; Ichiyanagi, T; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M

    2012-12-01

    Major acute phase proteins (APPs) have proven diagnostically useful in dogs, cats and horses with routine use facilitated by commercially available automated heterologous assays. An automated assay applicable across all three species would highly facilitate further dissemination of routine use, and the aim of this study was to validate an automated latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay based on monoclonal anti-human serum amyloid A (SAA) antibodies for measurement of canine, feline and equine SAA. Serum samples from 60 dogs, 40 cats and 40 horses were included. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision, linearity and detection limit (DL) were determined to assess analytical performance. To assess clinical performance, equine and feline SAA measurements were compared with parallel measurements using a previously validated automated SAA assay in a method comparison setting, and by assessing overlap performance of canine SAA in healthy dogs and diseased dogs with and without systemic inflammation. Intra- and inter-assay CVs ranged between 1.9-4.6% and between 3.0-14.5%, respectively. Acceptable linearity within a clinically relevant range of SAA concentrations was observed for all three species. The DL was 1.06 mg/L. Method comparison revealed acceptable agreement of the two assays measuring feline and equine SAA, and the overlap performance of canine SAA was acceptable. The tested assay measured SAA in canine, feline and equine serum with analytical and overlap performance acceptable for clinical purposes so improving practical aspects of clinical APP application. The monoclonal nature of the antibodies suggests strong, long-term inter-batch performance stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hematology and serum clinical chemistry reference intervals for free-ranging Scandinavian gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Thoresen, Stein I; Arnemo, Jon M; Liberg, Olof

    2009-06-01

    Scandinavian free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus) are endangered, such that laboratory data to assess their health status is increasingly important. Although wolves have been studied for decades, most biological information comes from captive animals. The objective of the present study was to establish reference intervals for 30 clinical chemical and 8 hematologic analytes in Scandinavian free-ranging wolves. All wolves were tracked and chemically immobilized from a helicopter before examination and blood sampling in the winter of 7 consecutive years (1998-2004). Seventy-nine blood samples were collected from 57 gray wolves, including 24 juveniles (24 samples), 17 adult females (25 samples), and 16 adult males (30 samples). Whole blood and serum samples were stored at refrigeration temperature for 1-3 days before hematologic analyses and for 1-5 days before serum biochemical analyses. Reference intervals were calculated as 95% confidence intervals except for juveniles where the minimum and maximum values were used. Significant differences were observed between adult and juvenile wolves for RBC parameters, alkaline phosphatase and amylase activities, and total protein, albumin, gamma-globulins, cholesterol, creatinine, calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphate, and sodium concentrations. Compared with published reference values for captive wolves, reference intervals for free-ranging wolves reflected exercise activity associated with capture (higher creatine kinase activity, higher glucose concentration), and differences in nutritional status (higher urea concentration).

  12. Serum chemistry and antibodies against pathogens in antarctic fur seals, Weddell seals, crabeater seals, and Ross seals.

    PubMed

    Tryland, Morten; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Nielsen, Ole; Nordøy, Erling S; Kovacs, Kit M; Krafft, Bjørn A; Thoresen, Stein I; Åsbakk, Kjetil; Osterrieder, Klaus; Roth, Swaantje J; Lydersen, Christian; Godfroid, Jacques; Blix, Arnoldus S

    2012-07-01

    Information on health parameters, such as antibody prevalences and serum chemistry that can reveal exposure to pathogens, disease, and abnormal physiologic conditions, is scarce for Antarctic seal species. Serum samples from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella, n=88) from Bouvetøya (2000-2001 and 2001-2002), and from Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, n=20), Ross seals (Ommatophoca rossii, n=20), and crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophagus, n=9) from the pack-ice off Queen Maud Land, Antarctica (2001) were analyzed for enzyme activity, and concentrations of protein, metabolites, minerals, and cortisol. Adult Antarctic fur seal males had elevated levels of total protein (range 64-99 g/l) compared to adult females and pups (range 52-79 g/l). Antarctic fur seals had higher enzyme activities of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and amylase, compared to Weddell, Ross, and crabeater seals. Antibodies against Brucella spp. were detected in Weddell seals (37%), Ross seals (5%), and crabeater seals (11%), but not in Antarctic fur seals. Antibodies against phocine herpesvirus 1 were detected in all species examined (Antarctic fur seals, 58%; Weddell seals, 100%; Ross seals, 15%; and crabeater seals, 44%). No antibodies against Trichinella spp., Toxoplasma, or phocine distemper virus (PDV) were detected (Antarctic fur seals were not tested for PDV antibodies). Antarctic seals are challenged by reduced sea ice and increasing temperatures due to climate change, and increased anthropogenic activity can introduce new pathogens to these vulnerable ecosystems and represent a threat for these animals. Our data provide a baseline for future monitoring of health parameters of these Antarctic seal species, for tracking the impact of environmental, climatic, and anthropogenic changes in Antarctica over time.

  13. Hematology and serum chemistry comparisons between free-ranging and rehabilitated harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsi) pups.

    PubMed

    Lander, Michelle E; Harvey, James T; Gulland, Frances M

    2003-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the hematology and serum chemistry values between free-ranging and stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsi) pups and to ascertain how blood values of stranded pups changed during the rehabilitation process. Coincident with these comparisons, reference values were obtained for free-ranging pups. Stranded harbor seal pups (n = 28) recovered from areas between Pebble Beach and Moss Landing, California (USA) were admitted to The Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, from March to May 1995, 1996, and 1998. Blood samples were collected from harbor seal pups before and after rehabilitation. As a control group, wild harbor seal pups were captured at Pebble Beach and Elkhorn Slough (n = 42) during the 1995, 1996, and 1998 pupping seasons. Mean eosinophil and calcium values of wild pups were significantly greater than those of newly admitted pups, whereas mean bands, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and chloride values were significantly lower (P < or = 0.05). Mean neutrophil, band, lymphocyte, eosinophil, basophil, calcium, phosphorus, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, total protein, and globulin values of rehabilitated pups increased significantly after 2-3 mo in captivity, whereas, mean red blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit, cholesterol, and total bilirubin values decreased significantly (P < or = 0.05).

  14. Yohimbine hydrochloride reversal of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride immobilization of Bengal tigers and effects on hematology and serum chemistries.

    PubMed

    Seal, U S; Armstrong, D L; Simmons, L G

    1987-04-01

    Six bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) were immobilized five times at 2-wk intervals with ketamine hydrochloride (ketamine) and xylazine hydrochloride (xylazine) mixtures at different dose levels. Hematology and serum chemistry analyses on blood samples collected at each immobilization remained normal during the study. There were acute changes in hematocrit, chloride, potassium, glucose, and bilirubin as a function of xylazine dose level. The effect of yohimbine hydrochloride (yohimbine) on the depth and duration of immobilization was evaluated in a crossover design with every animal serving as its own control at each dose. Administration of yohimbine resulted in recovery of the animals within 4-8 min in contrast to greater than 60 min with no yohimbine treatment. There were no adverse effects noted with the yohimbine treatment and the tigers did not exhibit a relapse over the next 24 hr. Yohimbine at a dose of 5-15 mg per adult tiger provided effective reversal of 50-150 mg of xylazine per tiger.

  15. LC–MS/MS Quantitation of Esophagus Disease Blood Serum Glycoproteins by Enrichment with Hydrazide Chemistry and Lectin Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glycosylation have been shown to have a profound correlation with development/malignancy in many cancer types. Currently, two major enrichment techniques have been widely applied in glycoproteomics, namely, lectin affinity chromatography (LAC)-based and hydrazide chemistry (HC)-based enrichments. Here we report the LC–MS/MS quantitative analyses of human blood serum glycoproteins and glycopeptides associated with esophageal diseases by LAC- and HC-based enrichment. The separate and complementary qualitative and quantitative data analyses of protein glycosylation were performed using both enrichment techniques. Chemometric and statistical evaluations, PCA plots, or ANOVA test, respectively, were employed to determine and confirm candidate cancer-associated glycoprotein/glycopeptide biomarkers. Out of 139, 59 common glycoproteins (42% overlap) were observed in both enrichment techniques. This overlap is very similar to previously published studies. The quantitation and evaluation of significantly changed glycoproteins/glycopeptides are complementary between LAC and HC enrichments. LC–ESI–MS/MS analyses indicated that 7 glycoproteins enriched by LAC and 11 glycoproteins enriched by HC showed significantly different abundances between disease-free and disease cohorts. Multiple reaction monitoring quantitation resulted in 13 glycopeptides by LAC enrichment and 10 glycosylation sites by HC enrichment to be statistically different among disease cohorts. PMID:25134008

  16. A clinical evaluation of the Cobas Fara clinical chemistry analyzer for some routine serum enzymes and glucose.

    PubMed

    Moses, G C; Lightle, G O; Tuckerman, J F; Henderson, A R

    1987-11-01

    The authors evaluated the Cobas FARA centrifugal analyzer with respect to pipetting precision and accuracy, instrument temperature, spectrophotometric response, and analytic performance for the assay of five serum enzymes and glucose. Spectrophotometric response, temperature response, pipetting precision, and accuracy were satisfactory. However, sufficient time must be allowed for cuvet contents to reach a stable temperature before measurements are made. Total day-to-day imprecision (within plus between run) was less than 5% (coefficient of variation) for aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST; Enzyme Commission classification number [EC] EC 2.6.1.1; and ALT; EC 2.6.1.2); alkaline phosphatase (AP; EC 3.1.3.1); gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT; EC 2.3.1.2); lactate dehydrogenase (LD; EC 1.1.1.17); creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.1); and glucose assays. Results compare well with those obtained with other current clinical chemistry analyzers; correlation coefficients were greater than 0.993. Sample-to-sample carryover was negligible, and method linearity was satisfactory for all tests.

  17. LC-MS/MS quantitation of esophagus disease blood serum glycoproteins by enrichment with hydrazide chemistry and lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Zhu, Rui; Hammoud, Zane T; Mechref, Yehia

    2014-11-07

    Changes in glycosylation have been shown to have a profound correlation with development/malignancy in many cancer types. Currently, two major enrichment techniques have been widely applied in glycoproteomics, namely, lectin affinity chromatography (LAC)-based and hydrazide chemistry (HC)-based enrichments. Here we report the LC-MS/MS quantitative analyses of human blood serum glycoproteins and glycopeptides associated with esophageal diseases by LAC- and HC-based enrichment. The separate and complementary qualitative and quantitative data analyses of protein glycosylation were performed using both enrichment techniques. Chemometric and statistical evaluations, PCA plots, or ANOVA test, respectively, were employed to determine and confirm candidate cancer-associated glycoprotein/glycopeptide biomarkers. Out of 139, 59 common glycoproteins (42% overlap) were observed in both enrichment techniques. This overlap is very similar to previously published studies. The quantitation and evaluation of significantly changed glycoproteins/glycopeptides are complementary between LAC and HC enrichments. LC-ESI-MS/MS analyses indicated that 7 glycoproteins enriched by LAC and 11 glycoproteins enriched by HC showed significantly different abundances between disease-free and disease cohorts. Multiple reaction monitoring quantitation resulted in 13 glycopeptides by LAC enrichment and 10 glycosylation sites by HC enrichment to be statistically different among disease cohorts.

  18. Comparison of paired serum and lithium heparin plasma samples for the measurement of serum amyloid A in horses using an automated turbidimetric immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Howard, Judith; Graubner, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether equine serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations could be reliably measured in plasma with a turbidimetric immunoassay previously validated for equine SAA concentrations in serum. Paired serum and lithium-heparin samples obtained from 40 horses were evaluated. No difference was found in SAA concentrations between serum and plasma using a paired t test (P=0.48). The correlation between paired samples was 0.97 (Spearman's rank P<0.0001; 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.99). Passing-Bablok regression analyses revealed no differences between paired samples. Bland-Altman plots revealed a positive bias in plasma compared to serum but the difference was not considered clinically significant. The results indicate that lithium-heparin plasma samples are suitable for measurement of equine SAA using this method. Use of either serum or plasma allows for greater flexibility when it comes to sample collection although care should be taken when comparing data between measurements from different sample types.

  19. A simple micro-extraction plate assay for automated LC-MS/MS analysis of human serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Geib, Timon; Meier, Florian; Schorr, Pascal; Lammert, Frank; Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-01-01

    This short application note describes a simple and automated assay for determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in very small volumes of human serum. It utilizes commercial 96-well micro-extraction plates with commercial 25(OH)D isotope calibration and quality control kits. Separation was achieved using a pentafluorophenyl liquid chromatography column followed by multiple reaction monitoring-based quantification on an electrospray triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on providing a simple assay that can be rapidly established in non-specialized laboratories within days, without the need for laborious and time consuming sample preparation steps, advanced calibration or data acquisition routines. The analytical figures of merit obtained from this assay compared well to established assays. To demonstrate the applicability, the assay was applied to analysis of serum samples from patients with chronic liver diseases and compared to results from a routine clinical immunoassay.

  20. Automated online pretreatment and cleanup recycle coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of deca-bromodiphenyl ether in human serum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuexia; Li, Hai-Fang; He, Xiangwei; Hashi, Yuki; Lin, Jin-Ming; Wang, Zhihua

    2012-10-01

    Automated online SPE-HPLC-MS was established for the determination of deca-bromodiphenyl ether in human serum. The online SPE with large volume injection was utilized to enhance the sensitivity. Online SPE with dilution line greatly decreased matrices effect, which enabled serum samples to be injected directly into pre-column. Washing line was designed for the system to solve the serious residual phenomenon and reduce the risk of sample wastage and contamination. Under the optimized conditions, the linear of the method was in the range 0.1-10 ng/mL with the LOD of 0.026 ng/mL. The recoveries of serum samples spiked with deca-bromodiphenyl ether at 0.5 ng/mL was in the range from 83.30 to 102.7% with RSD in interday less than 8.67%. The satisfactory results demonstrated that the method of online sample pretreatment and cleanup recycle were reliable for human serum analysis.

  1. A novel dietary supplement containing multiple phytochemicals and vitamins elevates hepatorenal and cardiac antioxidant enzymes in the absence of significant serum chemistry and genomic changes

    PubMed Central

    Bulku, Elida; Zinkovsky, Daniel; Patel, Payal; Javia, Vishal; Lahoti, Tejas; Khodos, Inna; Stohs, Sidney J

    2010-01-01

    A novel dietary supplement composed of three well-known phytochemicals, namely, Salvia officinalis (sage) extract, Camellia sinensis (oolong tea) extract, and Paullinia cupana (guarana) extract, and two prominent vitamins (thiamine and niacin) was designed to provide nutritional support by enhancing metabolism and maintaining healthy weight and energy. The present study evaluated the safety of this dietary supplement (STG; S, sage; T, tea; G, guarana) and assessed changes in target organ antioxidant enzymes (liver, kidneys and heart), serum chemistry profiles and organ histopathology in Fisher 344 rats. Adult male and female Fisher 344 rats were fed control (no STG) or STG containing (1X and 7X, 1X = daily human dose) diets and sacrificed after 2 and 4 months. Serum chemistry analysis and histopathological examination of three vital target organs disclosed no adverse influence on protein, lipid and carbohydrate profiles, genomic integrity of the liver and/or the tissue architecture. However, analysis of the most important antioxidant components in the liver, kidney and heart homogenates revealed a dramatic increase in total glutathione concentrations, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. Concomitantly, oxidative stress levels (malondialdehyde accumulation) in these three organs were less than control. Organ specific serum markers (ALT/AST for the liver; CPK/AST/LDH for the heart; BUN/creatinine for kidneys) and the genomic integrity disclosed no STG-induced alteration. Some of the serum components (lipid and protein) showed insignificant changes. Overall, STG-exposed rats were more active, and the results suggest that STG exposure produces normal serum chemistry coupled with elevated antioxidant capacity in rats fed up to seven times the normal human dose and does not adversely influence any of the vital target organs. Additionally, this study reiterates the potential benefits of exposure to a pharmacologically relevant combination of

  2. A novel dietary supplement containing multiple phytochemicals and vitamins elevates hepatorenal and cardiac antioxidant enzymes in the absence of significant serum chemistry and genomic changes.

    PubMed

    Bulku, Elida; Zinkovsky, Daniel; Patel, Payal; Javia, Vishal; Lahoti, Tejas; Khodos, Inna; Stohs, Sidney J; Ray, Sidhartha D

    2010-01-01

    A novel dietary supplement composed of three well-known phytochemicals, namely, Salvia officinalis (sage) extract, Camellia sinensis (oolong tea) extract, and Paullinia cupana (guarana) extract, and two prominent vitamins (thiamine and niacin) was designed to provide nutritional support by enhancing metabolism and maintaining healthy weight and energy. The present study evaluated the safety of this dietary supplement (STG; S=sage; T=tea; G=guarana) and assessed changes in target organ antioxidant enzymes (liver, kidneys and heart), serum chemistry profiles and organ histopathology in Fisher 344 rats. Adult male and female Fisher 344 rats were fed control (no STG) or STG containing (1X and 7X, 1X=daily human dose) diets and sacrificed after 2 and 4 months. Serum chemistry analysis and histopathological examination of three vital target organs disclosed no adverse influence on protein, lipid and carbohydrate profiles, genomic integrity of the liver and/or the tissue architecture. However, analysis of the most important antioxidant components in the liver, kidney and heart homogenates revealed a dramatic increase in total glutathione concentrations, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. Concomitantly, oxidative stress levels (malondialdehyde accumulation) in these three organs were less than control. Organ specific serum markers (ALT/AST for the liver; CPK/AST for the heart; BUN/creatinine for kidneys) and the genomic integrity disclosed no STG-induced alteration. Some of the serum components (lipid and protein) showed insignificant changes. Overall, STG-exposed rats were more active, and the results suggest that STG exposure produces normal serum chemistry coupled with elevated antioxidant capacity in rats fed up to seven times the normal human dose and does not adversely influence any of the vital target organs. Additionally, this study reiterates the potential benefits of exposure to a pharmacologically relevant combination of

  3. Combinatorial and automated synthesis of phosphodiester galactosyl cluster on solid support by click chemistry assisted by microwaves.

    PubMed

    Pourceau, Gwladys; Meyer, Albert; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Morvan, François

    2008-08-01

    Small libraries of di-, tri-, and tetragalactosyl clusters were efficiently synthesized using combinatorial methodology, on solid support, by click chemistry assisted by microwaves, starting from different poly alkyne DNA-based scaffolds and two galactosyl azide derivatives. The scaffold was synthesized by standard DNA solid-supported phosphoramidite chemistry using a novel alkyne phosphoramidite and an alkyne solid support. The proportion of each glycocluster in a library was modulated using different molar ratios of both galactose azides.

  4. A Demonstration of Automated DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latourelle, Sandra; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Details a simulation that employs a paper-and-pencil model to demonstrate the principles behind automated DNA sequencing. Discusses the advantages of automated sequencing as well as the chemistry of automated DNA sequencing. (DDR)

  5. Effects of Escherichia coli challenge and transport stress on hematology and serum chemistry values of three genetic lines of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Rath, N C; Anthony, N B; Nestor, K E

    2008-11-01

    Three lines of turkeys were compared for response to an Escherichia coli challenge followed by transport stress (transport). The turkey lines were a slow-growing line selected for increased egg production (egg line), a fast-growing line selected for increased 16-wk BW (F line), and a commercial line (Comm line). Birds were challenged at 14 wk of age with an air sac injection of 5,000 to 10,000 cfu of E. coli. At 8 d postchallenge, birds were subjected to a transport stress procedure that included 12 h of holding time in a transport vehicle. The following morning all birds (n = 10 to 19 birds/line) were bled. Whole blood was analyzed using the Cell-Dyn 3500 blood analysis system (Abbott Diagnostics), and serum chemistry was measured using the Express Plus analyzer (Ciba-Corning Diagnostics Corp.). Transport significantly decreased the levels of hematocrit, hemoglobin, mean cell volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphorus, iron, albumin, and alkaline phosphatase (AP) and increased the levels of uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase. Line differences were variable, but the levels of both iron and AP were least in the fastest-growing Comm line birds and greatest in the slowest-growing egg-line birds with intermediate values in the F line. Iron and AP were also the only parameters influenced by sex, with males having greater levels of both compared with females. The creatine kinase levels were more than 6-fold greater in transported Comm line birds, and iron levels of transported Comm males were 3-fold less than controls. Previously, the growth rate of these lines was positively correlated with increased heterophil to lymphocyte ratios and susceptibility to colibacillosis. The differences seen in the Comm line for these commonly measured blood parameters suggest that they may be useful for profiling flocks to determine their response to transport stress and feed

  6. What Are They Thinking? Automated Analysis of Student Writing about Acid-Base Chemistry in Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna B.; Moscarella, Rosa A.; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students' writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an…

  7. What Are They Thinking? Automated Analysis of Student Writing about Acid-Base Chemistry in Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna B.; Moscarella, Rosa A.; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students' writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an…

  8. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Michael M; Ham, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    Nitrate radical (NO(3)(●)) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO(3)(●) at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50-500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500-2000 ml min(-1)) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO(3)(●) supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N(2)O(5) and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO(3)(●) loss through the system, consistency of the NO(3)(●) concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h).

  9. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2012-08-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50-500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500-2000 ml min-1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h).

  10. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    PubMed Central

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50–500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500–2000 ml min−1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h). PMID:22938328

  11. Evaluation of Novel Wet Chemistry Separation and Purification Methods to Facilitate Automation of Astatine-­211 Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2016-07-19

    At solutions did not appear to change the percent capture, but may have an effect on the % extracted; There was some indication that the PEG-­Merrifield resins could be saturated (perhaps with Bi) resulting in lower capture percentages, but more studies need to be done to confirm that; A target dissolution chamber, designed and built at PNNL, works well with syringe pumps so it can be used in an automated system; Preliminary semi-­automated 211At isolation studies have been conducted with full scale target dissolution and 211At isolation using a PEG column on the Hamilton automated system gave low overall recoveries, but HNO3 was used (rather than HCl) for loading the 211At and flow rates were not optimized; Results obtained using PEG columns are high enough to warrant further development on a fully automated system; Results obtained also indicate that additional studies are warranted to evaluate other types of columns for 211At separation from bismuth, which allow use of HNO3/HCl mixtures for loading and NaOH for eluting 211At. Such a column could greatly simplify the overall isolation process and make it easier to automate.

  12. Normal organ weights, serum chemistry, hematology, and cecal and nasopharyngeal bacterial cultures in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Evans, Kristin D; Hewett, Terry A; Clayton, Cindy J; Krubitzer, Leah A; Griffey, Stephen M

    2010-07-01

    Gray short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica) currently are used in genetic, developmental, oncology, and neurologic research. Little is known about their natural flora or potential for pathogenic infectious disease. The present study aims to improve existing comparative normal blood and organ weight values available to researchers and to describe flora of clinically normal M. domestica to obtain an understanding of potential pathogenic flora in clinically abnormal animals. For evaluation of serum hematology and serum chemistry, clinically normal animals were assigned to 1 of 6 groups stratified by age (younger than 1 y, 1 to 2 y, and 2 to 3 y) and sex. Hemoglobin and phosphorus levels were higher in male than female opossums, whereas monocyte and eosinophil counts were greater in females than males. Hemoglobin concentration decreased with increasing age. The youngest group had significantly higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase and lower serum protein levels compared with older age groups. Liver and kidney weights of adult animals (1 to 3 y) were greater in female than male opossums. The predominant nasopharyngeal flora in 20 clinically normal animals from the 2- to 3-y-old group were Streptococcus viridans, Escherichia coli, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp.; predominant cecal organisms were Escherichia coli and Citrobacter spp. The availability of reference hematologic values and flora for Monodelphis domestica will aid researchers in comparisons and analysis of experimental data and in diagnosis and evaluation of potential pathogens in clinically ill animals.

  13. Baseline hematologic, endocrine, and clinical chemistry values in ducks and roosters.

    PubMed

    Spano, J S; Pedersoli, W M; Kemppainen, R J; Krista, L M; Young, D W

    1987-01-01

    Venous blood samples were collected at 3-day intervals for a total of six samples from each of five adult male pekin ducks and five adult Ross roosters. Twenty biochemical, six hematologic, and three endocrine determinations were performed on each blood or serum sample collected. The data obtained provide reference values for future studies of avian species and illustrate the utility of an automated clinical chemistry analyzer in assessing multiple serum biochemistry values in small sample volumes obtained from birds.

  14. Automated on-line column-switching HPLC-MS/MS method for measuring environmental phenols and parabens in serum.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Tao, Lily J; Needham, Larry L; Calafat, Antonia M

    2008-08-15

    We developed a method using on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to measure the serum concentrations of seven environmental phenols and five parabens: bisphenol A; ortho-phenylphenol; 2,4-dichlorophenol; 2,5-dichlorophenol; 2,4,5-trichlorophenol; benzophenone-3; triclosan; and methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl-, and benzyl-parabens. The phenols and parabens present in serum were retained and concentrated on a C18 reversed-phase size-exclusion SPE column, back-eluted from the SPE column while the eluate was diluted through a mixing Tee (analyte peak focusing), separated using a pair of monolithic HPLC columns, and detected by isotope dilution-MS/MS. Sample preparation did not require protein precipitation, only dilution of the serum with 0.1M formic acid. This method, which combines an on-line SPE with analyte peak focusing feature and the selective atmospheric pressure photoionization MS detection, resulted in limits of detection ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 ng/mL for most of the analytes. The high throughput and adequate sensitivity with yet a relative low serum volume used (100 microL) confirm that analytically it is possible to measure simultaneously these phenols and parabens with the precision and accuracy at sub-parts-per-billion levels required for biomonitoring. However, important additional factors, including validated sample collecting, handling, and storing protocols, as well as toxicokinetic data, are required if these measures are used for exposure assessment.

  15. Detection of kappa and lambda light chain monoclonal proteins in human serum: automated immunoassay versus immunofixation electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-02-01

    Recently, turbidimetric immunoassays for detecting and quantifying kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) have become available and are promoted as being more sensitive than immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in detecting FLC monoclonal proteins. In this study, we assessed the ability of these turbidimetric assays to detect serum monoclonal proteins involving both free and heavy-chain-bound kappa and lambda light chains compared to standard immunofixation electrophoresis. Sera demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration (other than a definite M spike) by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), which may represent early monoclonal proteins, were also examined. When compared to IFE, percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for the kappa-FLC and lambda-FLC were 94.6, 72.9, and 99.5% and 98.5, 91.4, and 99.7%, respectively, in detecting monoclonal proteins involving free and heavy-chain-bound light chains. The majority of sera (73.7%) demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration on SPE demonstrated abnormal IFE patterns suggestive of multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, but gave normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios using the turbidimetric immunoassays. In conclusion, the kappa and lambda FLC assays are significantly less sensitive (72.9 to 91.4%) than IFE, but specific in detecting serum monoclonal proteins. Moreover, the kappa/lambda ratio has little value in routine screening since the majority of sera with abnormal IFE patterns had normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios.

  16. Quantification of serum apolipoproteins A-I and B-100 in clinical samples using an automated SISCAPA-MALDI-TOF-MS workflow.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Nouta, Jan; Razavi, Morteza; Yip, Richard; Bladergroen, Marco R; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Smit, Nico P M; Drews, Oliver; Paape, Rainer; Suckau, Detlev; Deelder, André M; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Pearson, Terry W; Anderson, N Leigh; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2015-06-15

    A fully automated workflow was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the cardiovascular disease risk markers apolipoproteins A-I (apoA-I) and B-100 (apoB-100) in clinical sera. By coupling of stable-isotope standards and capture by anti-peptide antibodies (SISCAPA) for enrichment of proteotypic peptides from serum digests to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS detection, the standardized platform enabled rapid, liquid chromatography-free quantification at a relatively high throughput of 96 samples in 12h. The average imprecision in normo- and triglyceridemic serum pools was 3.8% for apoA-I and 4.2% for apoB-100 (4 replicates over 5 days). If stored properly, the MALDI target containing enriched apoA-1 and apoB-100 peptides could be re-analyzed without any effect on bias or imprecision for at least 7 days after initial analysis. Validation of the workflow revealed excellent linearity for daily calibration with external, serum-based calibrators (R(2) of 0.984 for apoA-I and 0.976 for apoB-100 as average over five days), and absence of matrix effects or interference from triglycerides, protein content, hemolysates, or bilirubins. Quantification of apoA-I in 93 normo- and hypertriglyceridemic clinical sera showed good agreement with immunoturbidimetric analysis (slope = 1.01, R(2) = 0.95, mean bias = 4.0%). Measurement of apoB-100 in the same clinical sera using both methods, however, revealed several outliers in SISCAPA-MALDI-TOF-MS measurements, possibly as a result of the lower MALDI-TOF-MS signal intensity (slope = 1.09, R(2) = 0.91, mean bias = 2.0%). The combination of analytical performance, rapid cycle time and automation potential validate the SISCAPA-MALDI-TOF-MS platform as a valuable approach for standardized and high-throughput quantification of apoA-I and apoB-100 in large sample cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Glycoproteins in Human Serum by Means of Glycospecific Magnetic Bead Separation and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF Analysis with Automated Glycopeptide Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sparbier, Katrin; Asperger, Arndt; Resemann, Anja; Kessler, Irina; Koch, Sonja; Wenzel, Thomas; Stein, Günter; Vorwerg, Lars; Suckau, Detlev; Kostrzewa, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive proteomic analyses require efficient and selective pre-fractionation to facilitate analysis of post-translationally modified peptides and proteins, and automated analysis workflows enabling the detection, identification, and structural characterization of the corresponding peptide modifications. Human serum contains a high number of glycoproteins, comprising several orders of magnitude in concentration. Thereby, isolation and subsequent identification of low-abundant glycoproteins from serum is a challenging task. selective capturing of glycopeptides and -proteins was attained by means of magnetic particles specifically functionalized with lectins or boronic acids that bind to various structural motifs. Human serum was incubated with differentially functionalized magnetic micro-particles (lectins or boronic acids), and isolated proteins were digested with trypsin. Subsequently, the resulting complex mixture of peptides and glycopeptides was subjected to LC-MALDI analysis and database searching. In parallel, a second magnetic bead capturing was performed on the peptide level to separate and analyze by LC-MALDI intact glycopeptides, both peptide sequence and glycan structure. Detection of glycopeptides was achieved by means of a software algorithm that allows extraction and characterization of potential glycopeptide candidates from large LC-MALDI-MS/MS data sets, based on N-glycopeptide-specific fragmentation patterns and characteristic fragment mass peaks, respectively. By means of fast and simple glycospecific capturing applied in conjunction with extensive LC-MALDI-MS/MS analysis and novel data analysis tools, a high number of low-abundant proteins were identified, comprising known or predicted glycosylation sites. According to the specific binding preferences of the different types of beads, complementary results were obtained from the experiments using either magnetic ConA-, LCA-, WGA-, and boronic acid beads, respectively. PMID:17916798

  18. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  19. Distribution of serum paraoxon hydrolyzing activity in a large Spanish population using a routine automized method in clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Carrera, V; Llopis, I; Sastre, J; Sogorb, M A; Vilanova, E

    2003-01-01

    This work was performed to adapt the manual laboratory method of measuring serum paraoxonase activity using a routine automatized method in the clinical laboratory and to study the distribution of paraoxonase activity in a large population from Alcoy, a region of Spain. The serum samples for the study were obtained from extractions of blood from 2891 individuals, distributed by sex and age groups, in a routine check in a primary care facility of Alcoy. Paraoxonase activity was assayed by measuring the release of p-nitrophenol according to a previously published method adapted to an automatized analyzer. The mean paraoxonase activity recorder was 70.2 +/- 16.5 IU/L. Paraoxonase activity in children (both males and females) was significantly lower (p < 0.0005) than in older individuals. Paraoxonase activity detected in males and females older than 56 was slightly lower than that detected in younger individuals, although in this case the difference was not statistically significant. The paraoxonase activity shows higher mean values in females than in males (p < 0.0005). Human paraoxonase activity shows a unimodal distribution pattern in the studied population, which is in contrast with other studies showing bimodal distribution.

  20. Comparison of automated chemiluminescence immunoassays with capture enzyme immunoassays for the detection of measles and mumps IgM antibodies in serum.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Becky; Patel, Mauli; Hurday, Samantha; Copping, Ruth; Webster, Daniel; Irish, Dianne; Haque, Tanzina

    2014-02-01

    Outbreaks of measles and mumps occur regularly in the UK. Rapid diagnosis of acute infection is important for both infection control and epidemiological purposes. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of an automated platform (DiaSorin Liaison(®), Saluggia, Italy) with a manual capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Microimmune, Hounslow, UK) for the detection of measles and mumps IgM antibodies in serum from symptomatic individuals. Ninety sera tested previously for measles (n=50) and mumps (n=40) IgM using the manual EIA were tested retrospectively using the DiaSorin Liaison(®) and the results compared. Sensitivity, specificity, inter-assay variability and intra-assay variability of the Liaison(®) assays were calculated. Sensitivity and specificity of the Liaison(®) assay for measles IgM were 92% and 100% respectively, with inter-assay variation of 14.1% and intra-assay variation of 12.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the mumps IgM Liaison(®) assay were 88% and 95% respectively, with an inter-assay and intra-assay variation of 13.9% and 5.3% respectively. Both the measles and mumps IgM Liaison(®) assays gave fewer equivocal results than the EIA. Neither Liaison(®) IgM assay showed any cross-reactivity with sera positive against other viruses, however the measles IgM EIA cross-reacted with parvovirus IgM. The automated Liaison(®) assays are more specific, cheaper and less labour-intensive compared to the manual EIA. The Liaison(®) assays benefit from reduced number of equivocal results compared to the EIA for both measles and mumps IgM. This allows clinical decisions to be made accurately and in a timely manner.

  1. Canine serum amyloid A (SAA) measured by automated latex agglutination turbidimetry is useful for routine sensitive and specific detection of systemic inflammation in a general clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michelle B; Langhorn, Rebecca; Goddard, Amelia; Andreasen, Eva B; Moldal, Elena; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Kirpenteijn, Jolle; Jakobsen, Sabrina; Persson, Frida; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2013-05-02

    Canine serum amyloid A (SAA) is a useful diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation. A latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay (LAT) was validated for automated measurements. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical applicability of SAA measured by the LAT. SAA was measured in 7 groups of dogs with and without systemic inflammation (n=247). Overlap performance was investigated. Diagnostic performance was compared to body temperature and leukocyte markers. Clinical decision limits for SAA were estimated. In dogs with neurological, neoplastic or gastrointestinal disorders (n=143), it was investigated whether a higher proportion of SAA positive dogs could be detected in cases of complications with risk of systemic inflammation. Significantly higher concentrations of SAA were measured in dogs with (range [48.75; 5,032 mg/l]), compared to dogs without systemic inflammation [0; 56.4 mg/l]. SAA was a more sensitive and specific marker of systemic inflammation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) 1.00), compared to body temperature (0.6) and segmented neutrophils (best performing leukocyte marker, 0.84). A clinical decision limit of 56.4 mg/l was established giving close to perfect discrimination between dogs with and without systemic inflammation. Higher proportions of SAA-positive dogs were observed in dogs with neurological, neoplastic and gastrointestinal disorders with complications known to increase risk of systemic inflammation, compared to uncomplicated cases. The automated LAT makes SAA applicable as a relevant diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation in dogs for routine random-access real-time use in a general clinical setting.

  2. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  3. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  4. What are they thinking? Automated analysis of student writing about acid-base chemistry in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Haudek, Kevin C; Prevost, Luanna B; Moscarella, Rosa A; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students' writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an introductory biology course. Students were asked to predict acid-base behavior of biological functional groups and to explain their answers. Student explanations were rated by two independent raters. Responses were also analyzed using SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys and a custom library of science-related terms and lexical categories relevant to the assessment item. These analyses revealed conceptual connections made by students, student difficulties explaining these topics, and the heterogeneity of student ideas. We validated the lexical analysis by correlating student interviews with the lexical analysis. We used discriminant analysis to create classification functions that identified seven key lexical categories that predict expert scoring (interrater reliability with experts = 0.899). This study suggests that computerized lexical analysis may be useful for automatically categorizing large numbers of student open-ended responses. Lexical analysis provides instructors unique insights into student thinking and a whole-class perspective that are difficult to obtain from multiple-choice questions or reading individual responses.

  5. What Are They Thinking? Automated Analysis of Student Writing about Acid–Base Chemistry in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna B.; Moscarella, Rosa A.; Merrill, John; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Students’ writing can provide better insight into their thinking than can multiple-choice questions. However, resource constraints often prevent faculty from using writing assessments in large undergraduate science courses. We investigated the use of computer software to analyze student writing and to uncover student ideas about chemistry in an introductory biology course. Students were asked to predict acid–base behavior of biological functional groups and to explain their answers. Student explanations were rated by two independent raters. Responses were also analyzed using SPSS Text Analysis for Surveys and a custom library of science-related terms and lexical categories relevant to the assessment item. These analyses revealed conceptual connections made by students, student difficulties explaining these topics, and the heterogeneity of student ideas. We validated the lexical analysis by correlating student interviews with the lexical analysis. We used discriminant analysis to create classification functions that identified seven key lexical categories that predict expert scoring (interrater reliability with experts = 0.899). This study suggests that computerized lexical analysis may be useful for automatically categorizing large numbers of student open-ended responses. Lexical analysis provides instructors unique insights into student thinking and a whole-class perspective that are difficult to obtain from multiple-choice questions or reading individual responses. PMID:22949425

  6. Vaporization chemistry and thermodynamics of the lead-indium-sulfur system by computer-automated Knudsen and torsion effusion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Reza; Gates, Alfred S.; Edwards, Jimmie G.

    1980-12-01

    Vaporization of PbIn2S4(s) was studied by computer-automated simultaneous Knudsen and dynamic torsion effusion. Vapor pressures and the apparent molecular weight of the effusing vapor were displayed in real time. The vaporization reaction was PbIn2S4(s)=In2S3(s)+PbS(g). The vapor pressure was measured 108 times in the temperature range 948-1086 K. For the vaporization reaction, third-law analyses gave ΔH°(298 K)=253.0±0.1 kJ/mol. The enthalpy of PbIn2S4(s) with respect to its constituents PbS(s) and In2S3(s) was -23±4 kJ/mol. The apparent molecular weight showed stoichiometry changes in indium sulfide during the experiment. Residual indium sulfide, remaining after loss of all PbS, vaporized with some nonstoichiometry by In2S3(s)= In2S(g)+S2(g). The vapor pressure of the residual indium sulfide was measured 57 times in the temperature range 1035-1121 K;third-law analyses yielded ΔH°(298 K)=613.4±0.4 kJ/mol for the dissociative vaporization reaction. The compound Pb2In6S11(s), found at lower temperatures, had negligible stability at the temperatures of this investigation. The unit cell of PbIn2S4(s) was orthorhombic with a=2.275 nm, b=1.356 nm, and c=1.953 nm.

  7. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little attention has thus far been paid to probes containing these dyes internally attached, a fact which is mainly due to the quite challenging synthesis of such oligonucleotide probes. Herein, by using 2'-O-propargyl uridine phosphoramidite and a series of xanthenes and cyanine azide derivatives, we have for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation of novel oligonucleotide probes containing internally positioned xanthene and cyanine dye pairs and thus represents a significant step forward for the preparation of advanced fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the novel xanthene and cyanine labeled probes display unusual and very promising photophysical properties resulting from energy-transfer interactions between the fluorophores controlled by nucleic acid assembly. Potential benefits of using these novel fluorescent probes within, for example, molecular diagnostics and fluorescence microscopy include: Considerable Stokes shifts (40-110 nm), quenched fluorescence of single-stranded probes accompanied by up to 7.7-fold light-up effect of emission upon target DNA/RNA binding, remarkable sensitivity to single-nucleotide mismatches, generally high fluorescence brightness values (FB up to 26), and hence low limit of target detection values (LOD down to <5 nM). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Method-specific serum cortisol responses to the adrenocorticotrophin test: comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and five automated immunoassays.

    PubMed

    El-Farhan, Nadia; Pickett, Alan; Ducroq, David; Bailey, Catherine; Mitchem, Kelly; Morgan, Nicola; Armston, Annie; Jones, Laila; Evans, Carol; Rees, D Aled

    2013-05-01

    The serum cortisol response to the adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) test is known to vary significantly by assay, but lower reference limits (LRL) for this response have not been established by the reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method or modern immunoassays. We aimed to compare the normal cortisol response to ACTH stimulation using GC-MS with five widely used immunoassays. An ACTH test (250 μg iv ACTH1-24 ) was undertaken in 165 healthy volunteers (age, 20-66 years; 105 women, 24 of whom were taking an oestrogen-containing oral contraceptive pill [OCP]). Serum cortisol was measured using GC-MS, Advia Centaur (Siemens), Architect (Abbott), Modular Analytics E170 (Roche), Immulite 2000 (Siemens) and Access (Beckman) automated immunoassays. The estimated LRL for the 30 min cortisol response to ACTH was derived from the 2·5th percentile of log-transformed concentrations. The GC-MS-measured cortisol response was normally distributed in males but not females, with no significant gender difference in baseline or post-ACTH cortisol concentration. Immunoassays were positively biased relative to GC-MS, except in samples from women on the OCP, who showed a consistent negative bias. The LRL for cortisol was method-specific [GC-MS: 420 nm; Architect: 430 nm; Centaur: 446 nm; Access 459 nm; Immulite (2000) 474 nm] and, for the E170, also gender-specific (female: 524 nm; male 574 nm). A separate LRL is necessary for women on the OCP. Normal cortisol responses to the ACTH test are influenced significantly by assay and oestrogen treatment. We recommend the use of separate reference limits in premenopausal women on the OCP and warn users that cortisol measurements in this subgroup are subject to assay interference. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Where clinical chemistry meets medicinal chemistry. Systematic analysis of physico-chemical properties predicts stability of common used drugs in gel separator serum tubes.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Christian; Huber, Andreas R; Bernasconi, Luca

    2016-11-01

    As LC-MS/MS techniques are becoming more accessible even outside of highly specialized clinical laboratories, pre-analytical issues such as drug stability during specimen storage should be critically evaluated before implementing therapeutic drug monitoring. Our study investigated the influence of physico-chemical properties of different drugs in regard to their interaction with gel separators used in commercial available collection tubes. Drug spiked blood samples were analyzed after storage in different commercial gel- and non-gel based serum tubes. LC-ESI-MS/MS based methods were used to determine drug concentration in serum samples. Lipophilic compounds, defined by logP>3 and a compatibility factor>20 are prone to be efficiently and rapidly absorbed by lipophilic gel barriers inducing a significant in-vitro decrease of drug concentration over a short storage time. Our data show a relevant drop of concentration of posaconazole, sertraline and citalopram when stored in gel based tubes. Molecular descriptors such as logP, polar surface area and protein binding seem to be good predictive markers to identify gel interacting drugs. For ease of handling and minimization of blood drawing times, we assume that tubes containing separator gel can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of high hydrophilic drugs. In contrast lipophilic compounds showing logP higher than 3 and/or CF>20 should be critically considered and validated by extensive stability studies. logP, partition coefficient; PSA, polar surface area; TDM, therapeutic drug monitoring; ACN, acetonitrile; MeOH, methanol; IVD, in-vitro diagnostic; CF, compatibility factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fitness and nutritional assessment of greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) using hematologic and serum chemistry parameters through a cycle of seasonal habitats in northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2009-03-01

    Bird health can significantly affect spring reproductive fitness. A better understanding of how female sage grouse health varies with seasonal nutrition changes provides insight for determining if specific nutritional habitats are limiting bird productivity. In 2004, greater sage grouse adult and yearling hens were captured, and blood samples collected, during breeding (MARCH: March 15 to April 11; n = 22), early brood rearing (MAY: May 20 to June 22; n = 21), and on summer range (JULY: July 7 to August 17; n = 19) in two distinct but similar northern Nevada population management units (Tuscarora [TU] and Lone Willow [LW]). In TU, yearlings weighed less (P < 0.043) than adults at all sampling periods. No age-related differences were observed for LW birds. Serum blood chemistry values were influenced by site, bird age, and season. Adults had more plasma protein and albumin than yearlings during MARCH (P < 0.005) followed by a decrease by MAY (P < or = 0.0001). Lone Willow females had higher albumin levels (P = 0.0005). Higher serum phosphorus levels were detected for LW females during MARCH (P < 0.0001), and no site differences were detected for MAY or JULY. Tuscarora yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than adults during MARCH (P < 0.0001); LW yearlings had lower levels than adults during MAY (P = 0.030). Both TU yearlings (MARCH P < 0.0001) and adults (MARCH P < 0.0001; MAY P = 0.040) had lower values than LW counterparts. Tuscarora adults and LW yearlings and adults showed decreases between MARCH and MAY (P < 0.0001). The combination of lower yearling weight, plasma protein, and serum calcium and phosphorus in the TU birds indicates a lower nesting and re-nesting potential. Leading to the conclusion that TU yearlings contributed less to the population production than LW yearlings for that particular year.

  11. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood, ranges of serum chemistries and clinical hematology values of healthy chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Stone, G A; Johnson, B K; Druilhet, R; Garza, P B; Gibbs, C J

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents clinical chemistry, hematology and immunophenotyping data from 102 chimpanzees over a 2-year period. The groupings were: 3 years or less, 4-7 years, and 8 + years. These data are intended to augment formerly published information on these parameters and to serve as a concise reference guide for primate veterinarians and researchers for whom these data may be useful. This study has larger samplings than previously published data and more panel constituents by immunophenotyping.

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring of haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol in serum by a fully automated sequential solid phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angelo, H R; Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    In Denmark, haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol are among the most frequently requested antipsychotics for therapeutic drug monitoring. With the number of requests made at the authors' laboratory, the only rational analysis is one that can measure all three drugs simultaneously. The authors therefore decided to develop an automated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Two milliliters serum, 2.0 mL 10 mmol/L sodium phosphate buffer (pH 5.5), and 150 microL internal standard (trifluoperazine) solution were pipetted into HPLC vials and extracted on an ASPEC XL equipped with 1 mL (50 mg) Isolute C2 (EC) extraction columns and acetonitrile-methanol-ammonium acetate buffer (60:34:6) as extracting solution. Three hundred fifty microliters was analyzed by HPLC; a 150 x 4.6-mm S5CN Spherisorb column with a mobile phase of 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer-methanol (1:9), a flow rate of 0.6-1.7 mL/min, and ultraviolet detection at 256 and 245 nm were used. Reproducibility was 5-12% and the lower limit of quantitation was 10, 1, and 5 nmol/L (4, 0.4, and 2 ng/mL) for haloperidol, perphenazine, and zuclopenthixol, respectively. The method was found to be sufficiently selective and robust for routine analysis.

  13. Serum chemistry and antibody status to some avian pathogens of free-living and captive condors (Vultur gryphus) of central Chile.

    PubMed

    Toro, H; Pavez, E F; Gough, R E; Montes, G; Kaleta, E F

    1997-01-01

    This study provides information on serology and serum chemistry of the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Twenty condors living under natural conditions were captured, blood sampled, measured, and released. In addition, 12 captive condors maintained at the Metropolitan Zoo of Santiago, Chile, were included as a comparison with free-living birds. All sera were negative to antibodies against reference strains of avian paramyxoviruses of serotypes 1 to 9, avian influenza and avian pox virus. Free-living condors had total protein, albumin, globulin and Mg values significantly (P< 0.05) lower than those of captive birds. The haematological values obtained in free-living condors are of particular interest since they may correspond to the optimum values of the species.

  14. Evaluation of a reduced centrifugation time and higher centrifugal force on various general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Møller, Mette F; Søndergaard, Tove R; Kristensen, Helle T; Münster, Anna-Marie B

    2017-09-01

    Background Centrifugation of blood samples is an essential preanalytical step in the clinical biochemistry laboratory. Centrifugation settings are often altered to optimize sample flow and turnaround time. Few studies have addressed the effect of altering centrifugation settings on analytical quality, and almost all studies have been done using collection tubes with gel separator. Methods In this study, we compared a centrifugation time of 5 min at 3000 ×  g to a standard protocol of 10 min at 2200 ×  g. Nine selected general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes and interference indices were studied in lithium heparin plasma tubes and serum tubes without gel separator. Results were evaluated using mean bias, difference plots and coefficient of variation, compared with maximum allowable bias and coefficient of variation used in laboratory routine quality control. Results For all analytes except lactate dehydrogenase, the results were within the predefined acceptance criteria, indicating that the analytical quality was not compromised. Lactate dehydrogenase showed higher values after centrifugation for 5 min at 3000 ×  g, mean bias was 6.3 ± 2.2% and the coefficient of variation was 5%. Conclusions We found that a centrifugation protocol of 5 min at 3000 ×  g can be used for the general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes studied, with the possible exception of lactate dehydrogenase, which requires further assessment.

  15. Effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins with and without a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent on reproductive performance and serum chemistry of pregnant gilts.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Llano, G; Smith, T K

    2006-09-01

    Contamination of animal feedstuffs with Fusarium mycotoxins can cause reduced feed intake and hyperaminoacidemia resulting from reduced hepatic protein synthesis. The current study investigated the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on reproductive performance, serum chemistry, ADFI, and ADG of gilts, and tested the ability of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) to reduce or eliminate the effects of the contaminated feeds. Thirty-six Yorkshire gilts were fed 3 diets (n = 12 gilts/diet) from 91 +/- 3 d of gestation until farrowing. Diets included 1) control, 2) contaminated grains, and 3) contaminated grains + 0.2% GMA. Diets contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins did not affect ADFI (P = 0.24), but ADG (P = 0.029) and G:F (P = 0.047) were reduced. Serum concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate, haptoglobin, protein, albumin, globulin, urea, glucose, cholesterol, Ca, Na, Mg, P, K, and Cl, and hepatic enzyme activities were not affected by diet. The frequency of stillborn piglets was greater (P = 0.03) for gilts fed contaminated grains compared with that of gilts fed contaminated grains + GMA. The feeding of contaminated grains + GMA also increased (P = 0.026) the percentage of pigs born alive compared with gilts fed the contaminated diets. In conclusion, feeding gilts diets that are naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins can increase the incidence of stillborn piglets and this effect can be reduced by dietary supplementation with GMA.

  16. Serum calcitriol concentrations measured with a new direct automated assay in a large population of adult healthy subjects and in various clinical situations.

    PubMed

    Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Cavalier, Etienne; Delanaye, Pierre; Massart, Catherine; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Cormier, Catherine; Borderie, Didier; Benachi, Alexandra; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-12-07

    The measurement of calcitriol [1,25(OH2)D], is important for the differential diagnosis of several disorders of calcium/phosphorus metabolism but is time-consuming and tricky. We measured serum calcitriol with a new automated direct assay on the Liaison XL platform in 888 healthy French Caucasian subjects aged 18-89 years, 32 patients with a surgically-proven PHPT, 32 pregnant women at the end of the first and at the end of the third trimester, and 24 dialysis patients before and after one year of supplementation with vitamin D3 or placebo. The mean calcitriol concentration (±SD) in the healthy population was 52.9±14.5 ng/L with a 95% CI interval of 29-83.6 ng/L. In PHPT patients, calcitriol concentration was 81.6±29.0 ng/L, 15 of them (46.9%) having a concentration >83.6 ng/L. In pregnant women, calcitriol was 80.4±26.4 ng/L at the end of the first trimester, and 113.1±33.0 ng/L at the end of the third trimester, 12 (37.5%) and 26 (81.3%) of them having a calcitriol concentration >83.6 ng/L at the first and third trimesters respectively. In 14 dialysis patients, calcitriol was 9.5±7.7 ng/L and rose to 19.3 ng/L after one year of supplementation with 50,000 IU vitamin D3/month. In 10 other dialysis patients, calcitriol was 9.9±2.9 ng/L and remained stable (12.4±3.7 ng/L) after one year of placebo. In conclusion, this new automated calcitriol assay, in addition to presenting excellent analytical performances, gives the expected variations in patients compared to "normal" values obtained in an extensive reference population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effects of Varying Concentrations of Dietary Protein and Fat on Blood Gas, Hematologic Serum Chemistry, and Body Temperature Before and After Exercise in Labrador Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Ober, John; Gillette, Robert L.; Angle, Thomas Craig; Haney, Pamela; Fletcher, Daniel J.; Wakshlag, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal dietary protocols for the athletic canine are often defined by requirements for endurance athletes that do not always translate into optimal dietary interventions for all canine athletes. Prior research studying detection dogs suggests that dietary fat sources can influence olfaction; however, as fat is added to the diet the protein calories can be diminished potentially resulting in decreased red blood cell counts or albumin status. Optimal macronutrient profile for detection dogs may be different considering the unique work they engage in. To study a calorically low protein: high fat (18:57% ME), high protein: high fat (27:57% ME), and high protein: low fat (27:32% ME) approach to feeding, 17 dogs were provided various diets in a 3 × 3 cross over design. Dogs were exercised on a treadmill and blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 10- and 20-min post-exercise to assess complete blood count, serum chemistry, blood gases, and cortisol; as well as rectal and core body temperature. Exercise induced a decrease in serum phosphorus, potassium, and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cortisol typical of moderate exercise bouts. A complete and balanced high protein: high-fat diet (27:57% ME) induced decreases in serum cortisol and alkaline phosphatase. Corn oil top dressed low protein: high-fat diet (18:57% ME) induced a slightly better thermal recovery than a complete and balanced high protein: high fat diet and a high protein: low fat (27%:32% ME) diet suggesting some mild advantages when using the low protein: high fat diet that warrant further investigation regarding optimal protein and fat calories and thermal recovery. PMID:27532039

  18. The Effects of Varying Concentrations of Dietary Protein and Fat on Blood Gas, Hematologic Serum Chemistry, and Body Temperature Before and After Exercise in Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Ober, John; Gillette, Robert L; Angle, Thomas Craig; Haney, Pamela; Fletcher, Daniel J; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Optimal dietary protocols for the athletic canine are often defined by requirements for endurance athletes that do not always translate into optimal dietary interventions for all canine athletes. Prior research studying detection dogs suggests that dietary fat sources can influence olfaction; however, as fat is added to the diet the protein calories can be diminished potentially resulting in decreased red blood cell counts or albumin status. Optimal macronutrient profile for detection dogs may be different considering the unique work they engage in. To study a calorically low protein: high fat (18:57% ME), high protein: high fat (27:57% ME), and high protein: low fat (27:32% ME) approach to feeding, 17 dogs were provided various diets in a 3 × 3 cross over design. Dogs were exercised on a treadmill and blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 10- and 20-min post-exercise to assess complete blood count, serum chemistry, blood gases, and cortisol; as well as rectal and core body temperature. Exercise induced a decrease in serum phosphorus, potassium, and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cortisol typical of moderate exercise bouts. A complete and balanced high protein: high-fat diet (27:57% ME) induced decreases in serum cortisol and alkaline phosphatase. Corn oil top dressed low protein: high-fat diet (18:57% ME) induced a slightly better thermal recovery than a complete and balanced high protein: high fat diet and a high protein: low fat (27%:32% ME) diet suggesting some mild advantages when using the low protein: high fat diet that warrant further investigation regarding optimal protein and fat calories and thermal recovery.

  19. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange.

    PubMed

    Serieys, Laurel E K; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Poppenga, Robert H; Clifford, Deana L; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P D

    2013-12-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats ( Lynx rufus ) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002-2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations.

  20. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Poppenga, Robert H.; Clifford, Deana L.; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002–2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations.

  1. An automated method for the measurement of a range of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in human plasma or serum using turbulent flow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Couchman, L; Birch, M; Ireland, R; Corrigan, A; Wickramasinghe, S; Josephs, D; Spicer, J; Flanagan, R J

    2012-06-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used to treat a number of cancers, including chronic myeloid leukaemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be indicated to (1) monitor adherence, (2) guide dosage, and (3) minimise the risk of drug-drug interactions and dose-related toxicity. On-line, automated sample preparation provided by TurboFlow technology (ThermoFisher Scientific) in conjunction with the sensitivity and selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection may be applied to the analysis of single drugs and metabolites. We report the use of TurboFlow LC-MS/MS for the analysis of nine TKIs and metabolites (imatinib, N-desmethylimatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib) in human plasma or serum for TDM purposes. An Aria Transcend TLX-II system coupled with a TSQ Vantage was used. Samples (50 μL) were vortex mixed with internal standard solution (150 μL imatinib-D(8), gefitinib-D(8), sunitinib-D(10), and nilotinib-(13)C (2) (15) N(2) in acetonitrile) and, after centrifugation 100 μL supernatant were injected directly onto a 50 × 0.5-mm Cyclone TurboFlow column. Analytes were focussed onto a 50 × 2.1-mm (3 μm) Hypersil GOLD analytical column and eluted with an acetonitrile/water gradient. Analytes were monitored in selected reaction monitoring mode (positive APCI). Total analysis time was 7 min without multiplexing. Calibration was linear (R(2) > 0.99) for all analytes. Inter- and intra-assay precision (in percent relative standard deviation, RSD) was <11 % and accuracy 89-117 % for all analytes. No matrix effects were observed. This method is suitable for high-throughput TDM in patients undergoing chronic therapy with TKIs and has been utilised in the analysis of clinical samples.

  2. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  3. Redox chemistry of the molecular interactions between tea catechins and human serum proteins under simulated hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Hazal; Luna, Carolina; Estévez, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Carbonylation is an irreversible modification in oxidized proteins that has been directly related to a number of health disorders including Type 2 diabetes. Dietary antioxidants have been proposed to counteract the oxidative stress occurring under hyperglycemic conditions. An understanding of the nature and consequences of the molecular interactions between phytochemicals and human plasma proteins is of utmost scientific interest. Three tea catechins namely epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) were tested for (i) their affinity to bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and human hemoglobin (HH) and (ii) their ability to inhibit tryptophan (Trp) depletion and for the formation of specific protein carbonyls and pentosidine in the aforementioned proteins. Both proteins (20 mg mL(-1)) were allowed to react with postprandial plasmatic concentrations of the catechins (EC: 0.7 μM, EGC: 1.8 μM, and EGCG: 0.7 μM) under simulated hyperglycemic conditions (12 mM glucose/0.2 mM Fe(3+)/37 °C/10 days). The three catechins were able to inhibit Trp oxidation and protein carbonylation in both plasma proteins. Some anti-glycation properties were linked to their binding affinities. The molecular interactions reported in the present study may explain the alleged beneficial effects of tea catechins against the redox impairment linked to hyperglycemic conditions.

  4. Hematology, serum chemistry, and serology of Galápagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Vargas, F Hernan; Merkel, Jane; Gottdenker, Nicole; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2006-07-01

    The Galápagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) is an endangered species endemic to the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. In 2003 and 2004, 195 penguins from 13 colonies on the islands of Isabela and Fernandina in the Galápagos archipelago were examined. Genetic sexing of 157 penguins revealed 62 females and 95 males. Hematology consisted of packed cell volume (n = 134), white blood cell differentials (n = 83), and hemoparasite blood smear evaluation (n = 114). Microfilariae were detected in 22% (25/114) of the blood smears. Female penguins had significantly higher eosinophil counts than males. Serum chemistry on 83 penguins revealed no significant differences between males and females. Birds were seronegative to avian paramyxovirus type 1-3, avian influenza virus, infectious bursal disease virus, Marek's disease virus (herpes), reovirus, avian encephalomyelitis virus, and avian adenovirus type 1 and 2 (n = 75), as well as to West Nile virus (n = 87), and Venezuelan, western and eastern equine encephalitis viruses (n = 26). Seventy-five of 84 (89%) penguins had antibodies to Chlamydophila psittaci but chlamydial DNA was not detected via polymerase chain reaction in samples from 30 birds.

  5. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes.

  6. The effects of programmed administration of human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) on bone histomorphometry and serum chemistry in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobnig, H.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    PTH treatment can result in dramatic increases in cancellous bone volume in normal and osteopenic rats. However, this potentially beneficial response is only observed after pulsatile treatment; continuous infusion of PTH leads to hypercalcemia and bone abnormalities. The purpose of these studies was to determine the optimal duration of the PTH pulses. A preliminary study revealed that human PTH-(1-34) (hPTH) is cleared from circulation within 6 h after sc administration of an anabolic dose of the hormone (80 microg/kg). To establish the effects of gradually extending the duration of exposure to hPTH without increasing the daily dose, we programmed implanted Alzet osmotic pumps to deliver the 80 microg/kg x day dose of the hormone during pulses of 1, 2, and 6 h/day, or 40 microg/kg x day continuously. Discontinuous infusion was accomplished by alternate spacing of external tubing with hPTH solution and sesame oil. After 6 days of treatment, we evaluated serum chemistry and bone histomorphometry. As negative and positive controls, groups of rats received pumps that delivered vehicle only and 80 microg/kg x day hPTH by daily sc injection, respectively. Dynamic and static bone histomorphometry revealed that the daily sc injection and 1 h/day infusion dramatically increased osteoblast number and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis, whereas longer infusion resulted in systemic side-effects, including up to a 10% loss in body weight, hypercalcemia, and histological changes in the proximal tibia resembling abnormalities observed in patients with chronic primary hyperparathyroidism, including peritrabecular marrow fibrosis and focal bone resorption. Infusion for as little as 2 h/day resulted in minor weight loss and changes in bone histology that were intermediate between sc and continuous administration. The results demonstrate that the therapeutic interval for hPTH exposure is brief, but that programmed administration of implanted hormone is a feasible

  7. The effects of programmed administration of human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) on bone histomorphometry and serum chemistry in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobnig, H.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    PTH treatment can result in dramatic increases in cancellous bone volume in normal and osteopenic rats. However, this potentially beneficial response is only observed after pulsatile treatment; continuous infusion of PTH leads to hypercalcemia and bone abnormalities. The purpose of these studies was to determine the optimal duration of the PTH pulses. A preliminary study revealed that human PTH-(1-34) (hPTH) is cleared from circulation within 6 h after sc administration of an anabolic dose of the hormone (80 microg/kg). To establish the effects of gradually extending the duration of exposure to hPTH without increasing the daily dose, we programmed implanted Alzet osmotic pumps to deliver the 80 microg/kg x day dose of the hormone during pulses of 1, 2, and 6 h/day, or 40 microg/kg x day continuously. Discontinuous infusion was accomplished by alternate spacing of external tubing with hPTH solution and sesame oil. After 6 days of treatment, we evaluated serum chemistry and bone histomorphometry. As negative and positive controls, groups of rats received pumps that delivered vehicle only and 80 microg/kg x day hPTH by daily sc injection, respectively. Dynamic and static bone histomorphometry revealed that the daily sc injection and 1 h/day infusion dramatically increased osteoblast number and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis, whereas longer infusion resulted in systemic side-effects, including up to a 10% loss in body weight, hypercalcemia, and histological changes in the proximal tibia resembling abnormalities observed in patients with chronic primary hyperparathyroidism, including peritrabecular marrow fibrosis and focal bone resorption. Infusion for as little as 2 h/day resulted in minor weight loss and changes in bone histology that were intermediate between sc and continuous administration. The results demonstrate that the therapeutic interval for hPTH exposure is brief, but that programmed administration of implanted hormone is a feasible

  8. Automation and quality in analytical laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Valcarcel, M.; Rios, A.

    1994-05-01

    After a brief introduction to the generic aspects of automation in analytical laboratories, the different approaches to quality in analytical chemistry are presented and discussed to establish the following different facets emerging from the combination of quality and automation: automated analytical control of quality of products and systems; quality control of automated chemical analysis; and improvement of capital (accuracy and representativeness), basic (sensitivity, precision, and selectivity), and complementary (rapidity, cost, and personnel factors) analytical features. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of this marriage of convenience in present and future analytical chemistry. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  9. A comprehensive library-based, automated screening procedure for 46 synthetic cannabinoids in serum employing liquid chromatography-quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry with high-temperature electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Laura M; Kneisel, Stefan; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    Considering the vast variety of synthetic cannabinoids and herbal mixtures - commonly known as 'Spice' or 'K2' - on the market and the resulting increase of severe intoxications related to their consumption, there is a need in clinical and forensic toxicology for comprehensive up-to-date screening methods. The focus of this project aimed at developing and implementing an automated screening procedure for the detection of synthetic cannabinoids in serum using a liquid chromatography-ion trap-MS (LC-MS(n)) system and a spectra library-based approach, currently including 46 synthetic cannabinoids and 8 isotope labelled analogues. In the process of method development, a high-temperature ESI source (IonBooster(TM), Bruker Daltonik) and its effects on the ionization efficiency of the investigated synthetic cannabinoids were evaluated and compared to a conventional ESI source. Despite their structural diversity, all investigated synthetic cannabinoids benefitted from high-temperature ionization by showing remarkably higher MS intensities compared to conventional ESI. The employed search algorithm matches retention time, MS and MS(2)/MS(3) spectra. With the utilization of the ionBooster source, limits for the automated detection comparable to cut-off values of routine MRM methods were achieved for the majority of analytes. Even compounds not identified when using a conventional ESI source were detected using the ionBooster-source. LODs in serum range from 0.1 ng/ml to 0.5 ng/ml. The use of parent compounds as analytical targets offers the possibility of instantly adding new emerging compounds to the library and immediately applying the updated method to serum samples, allowing the rapid adaptation of the screening method to ongoing forensic or clinical requirements. The presented approach can also be applied to other specimens, such as oral fluid or hair, and herbal mixtures and was successfully applied to authentic serum samples. Quantitative MRM results of samples with

  10. Effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses, and the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Raymond, S L; Smith, T K; Swamy, H V L N

    2003-09-01

    The feeding of Fusarium mycotoxin-contaminated grains adversely affects the performance of swine and poultry. Very little information is available, however, on adverse effects associated with feeding these mycotoxin-contaminated grains on the performance of horses. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses. A polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GM polymer) was also tested for efficacy in preventing Fusarium mycotoxicoses. Nine mature, nonexercising, light, mixed-breed mares were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments for 21 d. The horses were randomly reassigned and the experiment was subsequently replicated in time following a 14-d washout interval. Feed consumed each day was a combination of up to 2.8 kg of concentrates and 5 kg of mixed timothy/alfalfa hay. The concentrates fed included the following: 1) control, 2) blend of contaminated grains (36% contaminated wheat and 53% contaminated corn), and 3) blend of contaminated grains + 0.2% GM polymer. Diets containing contaminated grains averaged 15.0 ppm of deoxynivalenol, 0.8 ppm of 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 9.7 ppm of fusaric acid, and 2.0 ppm of zearalenone. Feed intake by all horses fed contaminated grains was reduced (P < 0.001) compared with controls throughout the experiment. Supplementation of 0.2% GM polymer to the contaminated diet increased (P = 0.004) feed intake of horses compared with those fed the unsupplemented contaminated diet. Serum activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase were higher (P = 0.047 and 0.027) in horses fed the diet containing contaminated grain compared with those fed the control diet on d 7 and 14, but not on d 21 (P = 0.273). Supplementation of GM polymer to the contaminated diet decreased (P < 0.05) serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activities of horses compared with those

  11. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste.

  12. Assessment of the trueness and inter-laboratory precision of routine uric acid assays using 4 frozen pooled serum samples measured by the Japan Society of Clinical Chemistry's HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaping; Liu, Ou; Xu, Guobing

    2014-03-01

    Reference procedures are required for evaluating the accuracy of routine analytical systems for uric acid (UA). External quality assessment (EQA) for UA has only been conducted with quality controls in China, and the results have not been published. This study was designed to investigate both the trueness and inter-laboratory precision of UA measurements among routine analytical systems using a candidate reference method. We performed the HPLC method recommended by the Japan Society of Clinical Chemistry (JSCC). Next, we evaluated its analytical performance and validated its trueness. The performance of 4 routine analytical systems (5 instruments per system, n=20) for UA was assessed by using 4 frozen pooled serum samples measured by the HPLC method according to biologically relevant quality goals. Within-run, between-run, inter-day, and total CV of the method were less than 0.3%, 0.4%, 1.8%, and 2.6%, respectively. The UA measurements were consistent with the target values of standard reference material (SRM) 909b, the sixth ring trial for Reference Laboratories (RELA-2008) specimen, and national primary reference materials. The 4 frozen pooled serum samples were homogeneous, stable, and commutable. All routine systems achieved the desirable performance goal (total error <11.9%). We successfully reproduced the JSCC's HPLC method, which was simple, specific, precise, and accurate. We recommend this method as a reference method for UA measurement in human serum. Four routine analytical systems for UA measurement had acceptable traceability, and their UA results showed good concordance.

  13. An automated enzymatic method for measurement of D-arabinitol, a metabolite of pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Switchenko, A C; Miyada, C G; Goodman, T C; Walsh, T J; Wong, B; Becker, M J; Ullman, E F

    1994-01-01

    An automated enzymatic method was developed for the measurement of D-arabinitol in human serum. The assay is based on a novel, highly specific D-arabinitol dehydrogenase from Candida tropicalis. This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of D-arabinitol to D-ribulose and the concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. The NADH produced is used in a second reaction to reduce p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) to INT-formazan, which is measured spectrophotometrically. The entire reaction sequence can be performed automatically on a COBAS MIRA-S clinical chemistry analyzer (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Montclair, N.J.). Replicate analyses of human sera supplemented with D-arabinitol over a concentration range of 0 to 40 microM demonstrated that the pentitol could be measured with an accuracy of +/- 7% and a precision (standard deviation) of +/- 0.4 microM. Serum D-arabinitol measurements correlated with those determined by gas chromatography (r = 0.94). The enzymatic method is unaffected by L-arabinitol, D-mannitol, or other polyols commonly found in human serum. Any of 17 therapeutic drugs potentially present in serum did not significantly influence assay performance. Data illustrating the application of the assay in patients for possible diagnosis of invasive candidiasis and the monitoring of therapeutic intervention are presented. The automated assay described here was developed to facilitate the investigation of D-arabinitol as a serum marker for invasive Candida infections.

  14. A clinical chemistry analyzer evaluated by NCCLS guidelines for use in a military field laboratory unit.

    PubMed

    Sullinger, J; Garrett, P E

    1989-11-01

    In a previous comparison study of "dry chemistry" desktop analyzers, the ChemPro 1000 (Arden Medical Systems) was one of several instruments found suitable for field use. We have now evaluated the linearity, accuracy, and precision of the ChemPro 1000, according to NCCLS Document EP 10-P. We also compared results with those by the SMAC (Technicon) and the Nova 9 (Nova Biomedical) for electrolytes, serum urea nitrogen, and ionized calcium in field and laboratory environments. The precision (CV) of the ChemPro was within acceptable ranges for dry chemistry desktop analyzers for all analytes tested. This instrument is a suitable and reasonable alternative to manual chemistry or to large, automated instrumentation in a field environment.

  15. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software.

  16. An automated method for the simultaneous measurement of azole antifungal drugs in human plasma or serum using turbulent flow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Couchman, L; Buckner, S L; Morgan, P E; Ceesay, M M; Pagliuca, A; Flanagan, R J

    2012-08-01

    Azole antifungal drugs are important in the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be indicated to (1) monitor adherence, (2) guide dosage and (3) minimise the risk of drug-drug interactions and dose-related toxicity. TurboFlow(TM) technology offers online, automated sample preparation. An Aria Transcend(TM) TLX-II coupled with a TSQ Vantage(TM) MS was used. Centrifuged samples (25 μL) were mixed with internal standard solution (975 μL) and 30 μL injected directly onto a C18-P-XL TurboFlow column. Analytes were focussed onto a Phenomenex Gemini Phenyl analytical column and eluted using a methanol/water gradient (flow-rate, 0.8 mL/min). Analytes were monitored in selected reaction monitoring mode (two transitions per analyte, positive mode APCI). Calibration ranges were as follows: itraconazole, hydroxyitraconazole, and posaconazole 0.05-5.0 mg/L; voriconazole and fluconazole 0.1-10 mg/L. Total analysis time was 12 min. TurboFlow column recovery was >77% for all analytes. Calibration was linear (R (2) > 0.99) for all analytes. Inter- and intra-assay imprecision (% RSD) was <8% and accuracy (nominal internal quality control values) 90-105% for all analytes. The limit of detection was 0.01 mg/L for all analytes. No matrix effects were observed. This method is simple, robust and suitable for measuring these compounds at concentrations attained during therapy.

  17. A comparison between the Farr radioimmunoassay and a new automated fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against double stranded DNA in serum

    PubMed Central

    Derksen, R; Bast, E; Strooisma, T; Jacobs, J

    2002-01-01

    Methods: A cross sectional study comprising 440 samples from 440 patients, sent to the laboratory over a three month period for anti-dsDNA testing. Chart review was performed, blinded for test results, to count for each patient the number of American College of Rheumatology criteria for the classification of SLE that were fulfilled. At least four criteria were met by 248 (56%) patients (SLE), one to three criteria by 77 (18%) (lupus-like disease, LLD), and no criterion by 115 (26%) (non-SLE/non-LLD). Results from serum samples from the non-SLE/non-LLD and SLE groups were used to calculate receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: For the Farr assay, specificities of 95% and 99% corresponded to sensitivities of 72% and 56% respectively. For the ELIA dsDNA test these levels of specificity corresponded to sensitivities of 44% and 17% respectively. Conclusions: The Farr radioimmunoassay is superior to the ELIA dsDNA test for identifying patients with SLE. PMID:12429543

  18. Automated method for the determination of a new matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor in ovine plasma and serum by coupling of restricted access material for on-line sample clean-up to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chiap, P; Piette, M; Evrard, B; Frankenne, F; Christiaens, B; Piel, G; Cataldo, D; Foidart, J-M; Delattre, L; Crommen, J; Hubert, Ph

    2005-03-05

    A fully automated liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of Ro 28-2653, a new synthetic inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in ovine serum and plasma. The method was based on the coupling of a pre-column packed with restricted access material, namely LiChrospher RP-8 ADS (alkyl diol silica), for sample clean-up to an analytical column containing octyl silica stationary phase. One hundred microl of biological sample, to which 2-propanol was automatically added, were injected onto the ADS pre-column, which was then washed with a washing liquid consisting of a mixture of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) and acetonitrile (90:10; v/v) for 10 min. By rotation of the switching valve, the analyte was then eluted in the back-flush mode with the LC mobile phase composed of a mixture of acetonitrile and 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) (57:43; v/v). The UV detection was performed at 395 nm. The main parameters likely to influence the sample preparation technique were investigated. The method was then validated over a concentration range from 17.5 to 1950 ng/ml, the first concentration level corresponding to the lower limit of quantitation. At this concentration level, the mean bias and the R.S.D. value for intermediate precision were -2.4% and 4.2%, respectively.

  19. Automated extraction of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and N-demethyl-LSD from blood, serum, plasma, and urine samples using the Zymark RapidTrace with LC/MS/MS confirmation.

    PubMed

    de Kanel, J; Vickery, W E; Waldner, B; Monahan, R M; Diamond, F X

    1998-05-01

    A forensic procedure for the quantitative confirmation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and the qualitative confirmation of its metabolite, N-demethyl-LSD, in blood, serum, plasma, and urine samples is presented. The Zymark RapidTrace was used to perform fully automated solid-phase extractions of all specimen types. After extract evaporation, confirmations were performed using liquid chromatography (LC) followed by positive electrospray ionization (ESI+) mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) without derivatization. Quantitation of LSD was accomplished using LSD-d3 as an internal standard. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for LSD was 0.05 ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) for both LSD and N-demethyl-LSD was 0.025 ng/mL. The recovery of LSD was greater than 95% at levels of 0.1 ng/mL and 2.0 ng/mL. For LSD at 1.0 ng/mL, the within-run and between-run (different day) relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.2% and 4.4%, respectively.

  20. Distinguishing disease effects from environmental effects in a mountain ungulate: seasonal variation in body weight, hematology, and serum chemistry among Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) affected by sarcoptic mange.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Jesús M; Serrano, Emmanuel; Soriguer, Ramón C; González, Francisco J; Sarasa, Mathieu; Granados, José E; Cano-Manuel, Francisco J; Cuenca, Rafaela; Fandos, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Our study focuses on the Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) from the Sierra Nevada Natural Space (southern Spain), where sarcoptic mange is an endemic disease and animals are affected by a highly seasonal environment. Our aim was to distinguish between disease and environmental influences on seasonal variation in body weight, hematology, and serum biochemistry in Iberian ibex. We sampled 136 chemically immobilized male ibexes. The single effect of mange influenced hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, leukocytes, band neutrophils, monocytes, cholesterol, urea, creatine, and aspartate aminotransferase. Both mange and the period of the year also affected values of mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, neutrophils, glucose, and serum proteins. Scabietic animals showed a marked reduction in body weight (21.4 kg on average), which was more pronounced in winter. These results reveal that 1) infested animals are anemic, 2) secondary infections likely occur, and 3) sarcoptic mange is catabolic.

  1. Serum sickness

    MedlinePlus

    Drug allergy - serum sickness; Allergic reaction - serum sickness; Allergy - serum sickness ... penicillin, cefaclor, and sulfa) can cause a similar reaction. Injected proteins such as antithymocyte globulin (used to ...

  2. Serum biochemistry reference intervals of live wild dugongs (Dugong dugon) from urban coastal Australia.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Janet M; Wong, Arthur; Long, Trevor; Woolford, Lucy

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the baseline clinical pathology of the dugong (Dugong dugon), a vulnerable marine mammal found in tropical coastal marine systems. The purpose of the study was to collect and determine reference intervals (RI) for select serum biochemical variables for dugongs, and to analyze differences between males and females and different age groups. Reference intervals were established from 103 apparently healthy, wild-caught dugongs for 31 analytes using a Beckman Coulter AU400 Automated Chemistry Analyzer and an Olympus AU680 Chemistry-Immuno Analyzer. Significant differences (P < .05) in some of the variables were found related to size class, sex, and pregnancy status. Adult dugongs had higher serum sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, glucose, and l-lactate concentrations and higher anion gap, compared to sub-adults. Male dugongs had higher triglyceride and l-lactate concentrations than females. Pregnant females displayed higher l-lactate levels compared to nonpregnant animals. Statistical differences in variables within the population contributed to better understanding of the physiologic differences between cohorts. Some serum biochemistry changes observed in this study here also potentially include some effects of pursuit on dugongs (eg, higher l-lactate); however, as all dugongs were subject to similar capture and handling, serum biochemistry RI should be considered as normal for captured dugongs. The serum biochemical RI documented here are considered representative of a population of healthy captured dugongs. They provide a baseline for health surveillance of this and other dugong populations. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  4. Assessment of tolerant sunfish populations (Lepomis sp.) inhabiting selenium-laden coal ash effluents. 3. Serum chemistry and fish health indicators.

    PubMed

    Lohner, T W; Reash, R J; Willet, V E; Fletcher, J

    2001-11-01

    Sunfish were collected from fly ash discharge-receiving streams to assess the possible effects of exposure to elevated selenium. Concentrations of selenium, copper, and arsenic were statistically higher in fish tissue (liver) samples from effluent-exposed fish than in reference fish. Several biomarkers were indicative of metal exposure and effect. Plasma protein levels and cholesterol levels were significantly lower in exposed fish, indicating nutritional stress. Ion levels (i.e., K) increased with exposure to ash pond metals, indicating possible gill damage. Fish from the receiving streams also had increased serum glucose and osmolality indicating possible acute stress due to sampling. Fish health assessments revealed a lower incidence of fin erosion, kidney discoloration, urolithiasis or nephrocalcinosis, liver discoloration, and parasites in exposed fish and a higher incidence of skin, eye, and gill aberrations. Condition factors of exposed fish were correlated with biomarker response and were the same as or lower than those of reference fish, but not related to selenium levels. Although several serum biochemical indicators differed between the ash pond-receiving stream and reference sites, pollutant exposure was apparently not sufficient to cause functional damage to critical organ systems.

  5. The course of toxicity in the pregnant mouse after exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin: clinical effects, serum chemistries, hematology, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, N; Rogers, E H; Zehr, R D; Gage, M I; Travlos, G S; Malarkey, D E; Brix, A; Schmid, J E; Hill, D

    2014-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxin produced by a variety of fresh-water cyanobacterial species worldwide and induces significant adverse effects in both livestock and humans. This study investigated the course of CYN-induced toxicity in pregnant mice exposed daily during either the period of major organogenesis (gestation days [GD] 8-12) or fetal growth (GD13-17). Endpoints include clinical signs of toxicity, serum analyses to evaluate hepatic and renal function, histopathology of liver and kidney, and hematology. Study animals were administered 50 μg/kg CYN once daily by ip route and euthanized 24 h after 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 consecutive doses, or 6 or 13 d after the dosing period. The course of the CYN-induced effects was determined at all euthanasia times for the endpoints just outlined. Results indicated that CYN is a toxin, producing lethality in dams during the early part of gestation, significant weight loss, and bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, tail tip, and peri-orbital tissues. Effects also included alterations in serum markers for liver function, histopathological changes in liver and kidney tissues, electrolyte abnormalities, leukocytosis, and posttreatment thrombocytopenia and reticulocytosis. The onset of symptoms was rapid, producing reductions in weight gain in GD8-12 animals, bleeding in the vaginal area in GD13-17 animals, and significant increases in sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in both groups after a single dose. Although the GD8-12 dams displayed a 50% lethality, in GD13-17 animals only a single death occurred. Alterations seen in hepatic and renal function or histopathology do not appear to be of sufficient severity to produce death. Evidence indicates that bleeding may play a critical role in the onset of symptoms and eventually, in the observed lethality.

  6. Eighth international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Eighth International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry was held on June 25--29, in Princeton, New Jersey. Topics covered in the meeting include: Technetium Chemistry; Perfusion Agents; Radionuclide Production; Synthetic Precursors; Analysis/Automation; Antibodies; Receptors; Metabolism, DOPA FDG; Receptors, D2 D1; Metabolism; and Metabolism, Cancer. Individual papers in each of these areas are abstracted separately. (MHB)

  7. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  8. AutoLab: a robotics solution for flexible laboratory automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nizam; Sowmya, Arcot

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a proposal to develop a flexible automation system for sample preparation and analysis in a chemistry laboratory without human assistance. The key to such automation is a robot arm, centrally placed with respect to a series of work stations containing balances, mixers, dispensers, centrifuges and analytical instruments. Object handling at each station and sample movement from one station to another is performed by the robot arm according to user-programmed procedures. The research emphasizes the analysis and modular decomposition of chemistry procedures, modeling the procedures in a computer system and integrating this model with robot arm and other instrumentation hardware involved in a complete automation of a chemistry laboratory.

  9. Reference intervals for serum cystatin C and serum creatinine in adults.

    PubMed

    Erlandsen, E J; Randers, E; Kristensen, J H

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for cerum cystatin C and serum creatinine in adults. Blood samples were collected from 270 healthy blood donors (135 men and 135 women between 20 and 65 years old with 15 men and 15 women in each five-year-interval). Serum cystatin C was analyzed using an automated particle-enhanced immunoassay (DAKO Cystatin C PET kit) on the Cobas Mira S analyzer. Serum creatinine was analyzed using the Vitros Creatinine Slide, an enzymatic method on the Vitros 950 chemistry analyzer. The calculated reference intervals for serum cystatin C were 0.62-1.15 mg/l in women (median 0.84 mg/l, range 0.56-1.29 mg/l) and 0.51-1.25 mg/l in men (median 0.87 mg/l, range 0.42-1.39 mg/l). The Mann-Whithey U-test revealed no gender-related difference for cystatin C (p = 0.48). A common reference interval in women and men was calculated to be 0.54-1.21 mg/l (median 0.85 mg/l, range 0.42-1.39 mg/l). The non-parametric reference interval for serum creatinine was 57-95 mumol/l in women (median 72 mumol/l, range 44-105 mumol/l) and 69-111 mumol/l in men (median 89 mumol/l, range 58-123 mumol/l).

  10. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  11. Ochratoxin A and dietary protein. 2. Effects on hematology and various clinical chemistry measurements.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C A; Gibson, R M; Kubena, L F; Huff, W E; Harvey, R B

    1989-12-01

    The health status of broilers fed diets with varying protein contents in the presence of ochratoxin A (OA) were evaluated using clinical-chemistry techniques for blood analysis. A completely randomized, 3 x 4 factorial design was utilized: 14, 18, 22, and 26% of dietary protein and 0, 2, and 4 mg/kg of OA. The broilers were raised to 3 wk of age, at which time blood was collected and various hematological parameters were evaluated. The serum was analyzed for various enzyme activities and for concentrations of metabolites and minerals using an automated, clinical-chemistry analyzer and an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. Adding OA to the diets of broilers decreased the hemoglobin concentration, corpuscular volume, and the activity of serum alkaline and phosphatase but increased the activity of gamma-glutamyl transferase. Adding protein to the diet increased the activity of the serum aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and alkaline phosphatase. Adding OA to the diet of broilers decreased the concentrations of serum total protein, as well as the concentrations of albumen and cholesterol and increased the concentrations of serum creatinine and uric acid. The concentrations of serum total protein, albumin, urea nitrogen, and triglyceride were increased by adding protein to the diet. The concentrations of calcium, potassium, and inorganic phosphorus in the serum decreased when OA was added to the diet; but the concentrations of calcium and potassium content in the serum increased along with dietary protein. A regression analysis suggested that dietary protein was synergistic toward OA with regard to the blood levels of cholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase, and glucose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Increasing Efficiency and Quality by Consolidation of Clinical Chemistry and Immunochemistry Systems with MODULAR ANALYTICS SWA

    PubMed Central

    Mocarelli, Paolo; Horowitz, Gary L.; Gerthoux, Pier Mario; Cecere, Rossana; Imdahl, Roland; Ruinemans-Koerts, Janneke; Luthe, Hilmar; Calatayud, Silvia Pesudo; Salve, Marie Luisa; Kunst, Albert; McGovern, Margaret; Ng, Katherine; Stockmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area (in USA Integrated MODULAR ANALYTICS, MODULAR ANALYTICS is a trademark of a member of the Roche Group) represents a further approach to automation in the laboratory medicine. This instrument combines previously introduced modular systems for the clinical chemistry and immunochemistry laboratory and allows customised combinations for various laboratory workloads. Functionality, practicability, and workflow behaviour of MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area were evaluated in an international multicenter study at six laboratories. Across all experiments, 236000 results from 32400 samples were generated using 93 methods. Simulated routine testing which included provocation incidents and anomalous situations demonstrated good performance and full functionality. Heterogeneous immunoassays, performed on the E-module with the electrochemiluminescence technology, showed reproducibility at the same level of the general chemistry tests, which was well within the clinical demands. Sample carryover cannot occur due to intelligent sample processing. Workflow experiments for the various module combinations, with menus of about 50 assays, yielded mean sample processing times of <38 minutes for combined clinical chemistry and immunochemistry requests; <50 minutes including automatically repeated samples. MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area offered simplified workflow by combining various laboratory segments. It increased efficiency while maintaining or even improving quality of laboratory processes. PMID:18401449

  13. Post-death cloning of endangered Jeju black cattle (Korean native cattle): fertility and serum chemistry in a cloned bull and cow and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Song, Dong Hwan; Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Kim, Young Hoon; Mun, Seong Ho; Oh, Chang Eon; Ko, Moon Suck; Lee, Dong Sun; Riu, Key Zung; Park, Se Pill

    2013-12-17

    To preserve Jeju black cattle (JBC; endangered native Korean cattle), a pair of cattle, namely a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a previous study. In the present study, we examined the in vitro fertilization and reproductive potentials of these post-death cloned animals. Sperm motility, in vitro fertilization and developmental capacity were examined in a post-death cloned bull (Heuk Oll Dolee) and an extinct nuclear donor bull (BK94-13). We assessed reproductive ability in another post-death cloned cow (Heuk Woo Sunee) using cloned sperm for artificial insemination (AI). There were no differences in sperm motility or developmental potential of in vitro fertilized embryos between the post-death cloned bull and its extinct nuclear donor bull; however, the embryo development ratio was slightly higher in the cloned sperm group than in the nuclear donor sperm group. After one attempt at AI, the post-death cloned JBC cow became pregnant, and gestation proceeded normally until day 287. From this post-death cloned sire and dam, a JBC male calf (Heuk Woo Dolee) was delivered naturally (weight, 25 kg). The genetic paternity/maternity of the cloned JBC bull and cow with regard to their offspring was confirmed using International Society for Animal Genetics standard microsatellite markers. Presently, Heuk Woo Dolee is 5 months of age and growing normally. In addition, there were no significant differences in blood chemistry among the post-death cloned JBC bull, the cow, their offspring and cattle bred by AI. This is the first report showing that a pair of cattle, namely, a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, had normal fertility. Therefore, SCNT can be used effectively to increase the population of endangered JBC.

  14. Post-Death Cloning of Endangered Jeju Black Cattle (Korean Native Cattle): Fertility and Serum Chemistry in a Cloned Bull and Cow and Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Eun Young; SONG, Dong Hwan; PARK, Min Jee; PARK, Hyo Young; LEE, Seung Eun; CHOI, Hyun Yong; MOON, Jeremiah Jiman; KIM, Young Hoon; MUN, Seong Ho; OH, Chang Eon; KO, Moon Suck; LEE, Dong Sun; RIU, Key Zung; PARK, Se Pill

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To preserve Jeju black cattle (JBC; endangered native Korean cattle), a pair of cattle, namely a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a previous study. In the present study, we examined the in vitro fertilization and reproductive potentials of these post-death cloned animals. Sperm motility, in vitro fertilization and developmental capacity were examined in a post-death cloned bull (Heuk Oll Dolee) and an extinct nuclear donor bull (BK94-13). We assessed reproductive ability in another post-death cloned cow (Heuk Woo Sunee) using cloned sperm for artificial insemination (AI). There were no differences in sperm motility or developmental potential of in vitro fertilized embryos between the post-death cloned bull and its extinct nuclear donor bull; however, the embryo development ratio was slightly higher in the cloned sperm group than in the nuclear donor sperm group. After one attempt at AI, the post-death cloned JBC cow became pregnant, and gestation proceeded normally until day 287. From this post-death cloned sire and dam, a JBC male calf (Heuk Woo Dolee) was delivered naturally (weight, 25 kg). The genetic paternity/maternity of the cloned JBC bull and cow with regard to their offspring was confirmed using International Society for Animal Genetics standard microsatellite markers. Presently, Heuk Woo Dolee is 5 months of age and growing normally. In addition, there were no significant differences in blood chemistry among the post-death cloned JBC bull, the cow, their offspring and cattle bred by AI. This is the first report showing that a pair of cattle, namely, a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, had normal fertility. Therefore, SCNT can be used effectively to increase the population of endangered JBC. PMID:23955237

  15. Protective effect of Devosia sp. ANSB714 on growth performance, serum chemistry, immunity function and residues in kidneys of mice exposed to deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Li, Xiaoying; Ji, Cheng; Rong, Xiaoping; Liu, Shujing; Zhang, Jianyun; Ma, Qiugang

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and the ameliorating efficacy of Devosia sp. ANSB714 for the negative effects of DON on mice. In the experiment, 80 mice were randomly divided into 4 treatments: non-toxin control, toxin, non-toxin control + ANSB714 and toxin + ANSB714. During 28 days, the mice in treatment with 4.70 mg/kg DON only had significantly lower average daily gain as compared those with non-toxin control treatment (P < 0.05). Serum blood urea nitrogen, tumour necrosis factor-α and the residues of DON in kidneys in mice received the toxin diet were obviously higher than those with non-toxin control (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between ANSB714 treatments and non-ANSB714 treatments on above parameters of mice. Adding ANSB714 to toxic diets could normalize deviant physiological effects of DON on mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Office automation.

    PubMed

    Arenson, R L

    1986-03-01

    By now, the term "office automation" should have more meaning for those readers who are not intimately familiar with the subject. Not all of the preceding material pertains to every department or practice, but certainly, word processing and simple telephone management are key items. The size and complexity of the organization will dictate the usefulness of electronic mail and calendar management, and the individual radiologist's personal needs and habits will determine the usefulness of the home computer. Perhaps the most important ingredient for success in the office automation arena relates to the ability to integrate information from various systems in a simple and flexible manner. Unfortunately, this is perhaps the one area that most office automation systems have ignored or handled poorly. In the personal computer world, there has been much emphasis recently on integration of packages such as spreadsheet, database management, word processing, graphics, time management, and communications. This same philosophy of integration has been applied to a few office automation systems, but these are generally vendor-specific and do not allow for a mixture of foreign subsystems. During the next few years, it is likely that a few vendors will emerge as dominant in this integrated office automation field and will stress simplicity and flexibility as major components.

  17. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  18. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: CII. Automated Anodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.; Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents details of anodic stripping analysis (ASV) in college chemistry laboratory experiments. Provides block diagrams of the analyzer system, circuitry and power supplies of the automated stripping analyzer, and instructions for implementing microcomputer control of the ASV. (CS)

  19. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: CII. Automated Anodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.; Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents details of anodic stripping analysis (ASV) in college chemistry laboratory experiments. Provides block diagrams of the analyzer system, circuitry and power supplies of the automated stripping analyzer, and instructions for implementing microcomputer control of the ASV. (CS)

  20. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  6. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  8. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  9. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  12. Bias in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Theodorsson, Elvar; Magnusson, Bertil; Leito, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical chemistry uses automated measurement techniques and medical knowledge in the interest of patients and healthy subjects. Automation has reduced repeatability and day-to-day variation considerably. Bias has been reduced to a lesser extent by reference measurement systems. It is vital to minimize clinically important bias, in particular bias within conglomerates of laboratories that measure samples from the same patients. Small and variable bias components will over time show random error properties and conventional random-error based methods for calculating measurement uncertainty can then be applied. The present overview of bias presents the general principles of error and uncertainty concepts, terminology and analysis, and suggests methods to minimize bias and measurement uncertainty in the interest of healthcare.

  13. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  14. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  15. QDB: Validated Plasma Chemistries Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Sara; Hamilton, James; Hill, Christian; Tennyson, Jonathan; UCL Team

    2016-09-01

    One of most challenging recurring problems when modelling plasmas is the lack of data. This lack of complete and validated datasets hinders research on plasma processes and curbs development of industrial Applications. We will describe the QDB project which aims to fill this missing link by provide a platform for exchange and validation of chemistry datasets. The database will collate published data on both electron scattering and heavy particle reactions and also facilitates and encourages peer-to-peer data sharing by its users. This data platform is rigorously supported by the validation methodical validation of the datasetsan automated chemistry generator employed; this methodology identifies missing reactions in chemistries which although important are currently unreported in the literature and employs mathematical methods to analyze the importance of these chemistries. Gaps in the datasets are filled using in house theoretical methods.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, CEM Corporation, developed a fast, automated analytical process using less toxic reagents and less energy to distinguish protein from the food adulterant, melamine.

  17. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  19. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  20. Analysis of immunoglobulin, complements and CRP levels in serum of captive northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Pang, Wei; Deng, De-Yao; Lv, Long-Bao; Feng, Yue; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2014-05-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (NPM,Macaca leonina) has become a widely used animal model in biomedical research. In this study, we measured serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgM, IgA, complement C3, C4 and CRP levels in 3-11 year old captive northern pig-tailed macaques using HITACHI 7600-20 automated chemistry analyzer in order to determine the influences of age and gender on these items. The results showed that serum IgA, IgM, C3 and C4 levels were not correlated with age (P>0.05), while serum IgG levels increased progressively with age (r=0.202;P=0.045). Serum IgG, IgA, IgM and C3 levels were higher in females than in males (P<0.05). Moreover, serum C3 concentration was both positively and strongly correlated with that of C4 (r=0.700; P<0.0001). This study provides basic serum immunoglobulin and complement data of captive northern pig-tailed macaques, which may prove useful for future breeding efforts and biomedical research.

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  3. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  4. Robotic automation of the environmental chemical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.M.; Erkkila, T.H.

    1994-04-01

    To date, automation of the environmental chemical laboratory has been a slow and tedious affair. In many, of our domestic analytical laboratories, automation consists of no more than analytical instrumentation coupled to an autosampling device. When we look into the future environmental needs of our nation, and indeed the world, it is apparent that we will not be able to keep up with the drastically increasing sample load without automated analyses. Stricter regulatory requirements on the horizon will potentially mandate staggering changes in sampling and characterization requirements. The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) Program was initiated in 1990 by the US government`s Department of Energy (DOE) to address these issues. By application of a new robotics paradigm, based on an integrated production chemistry foundation applied to analytical chemistry, the CAA will use standardized modular instruments called Standard Laboratory Modules (SLM) to provide flexible and standardized automation systems. By promoting the commercialization of this technology, CAA will provide the integrated robotics systems necessary to meet the coming remediation demands. This multilaboratory program is within the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) of the Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  5. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  6. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  8. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  10. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  11. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  12. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  13. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  15. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  16. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  17. Stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, William H.

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  18. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  19. Laboratory automation in clinical bacteriology: what system to choose?

    PubMed

    Croxatto, A; Prod'hom, G; Faverjon, F; Rochais, Y; Greub, G

    2016-03-01

    Automation was introduced many years ago in several diagnostic disciplines such as chemistry, haematology and molecular biology. The first laboratory automation system for clinical bacteriology was released in 2006, and it rapidly proved its value by increasing productivity, allowing a continuous increase in sample volumes despite limited budgets and personnel shortages. Today, two major manufacturers, BD Kiestra and Copan, are commercializing partial or complete laboratory automation systems for bacteriology. The laboratory automation systems are rapidly evolving to provide improved hardware and software solutions to optimize laboratory efficiency. However, the complex parameters of the laboratory and automation systems must be considered to determine the best system for each given laboratory. We address several topics on laboratory automation that may help clinical bacteriologists to understand the particularities and operative modalities of the different systems. We present (a) a comparison of the engineering and technical features of the various elements composing the two different automated systems currently available, (b) the system workflows of partial and complete laboratory automation, which define the basis for laboratory reorganization required to optimize system efficiency, (c) the concept of digital imaging and telebacteriology, (d) the connectivity of laboratory automation to the laboratory information system, (e) the general advantages and disadvantages as well as the expected impacts provided by laboratory automation and (f) the laboratory data required to conduct a workflow assessment to determine the best configuration of an automated system for the laboratory activities and specificities.

  20. Fully mechanized latex immunoassay for serum lipoprotein(a).

    PubMed

    Abe, A; Yoshimura, Y; Sekine, T; Maeda, S; Yamashita, S; Noma, A

    1994-03-01

    We have developed a fully automated system to quantify lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) in human serum, based on the latex-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay by application of the Immuno Chemistry Analyzer 501X. This assay was carried out with undiluted serum and was able to detect at Lp(a) levels higher than 4.0 mg/l. When judged to be out of range of the calibration (> 600 mg/l), the sample was automatically re-tested after automatic 10-fold dilution. Within-run C.V.s ranged from 1.9 to 2.1% and between-run C.V.s from 2.7 to 3.9%. Results by the present method were in good agreement with those by the in-house ELISA (r = 0.978) and the commercial ELISA (r = 0.990). The distribution of Lp(a) levels in sera from 508 healthy donors was highly skewed; the mean and median were 158 mg/l and 105 mg/l, respectively.

  1. Serum ferritin.

    PubMed

    Worwood, M

    1979-01-01

    (1) Brief introduction to iron metabolism and the biochemistry of ferritin. (2) Early studies of circulating ferritin. (3) Methods for measuring serum ferritin concentrations -- immunoradiometric, radioimmuno- and enzyme-linked immuno assays based on liver or spleen ferritin -- an evaluation of these techniques. (4) Serum ferritin concentrations in normal subjects -- definition of normality -- relationship between storage iron and serum ferritin concentrations -- changes during development from birth to old age -- iron deficiency -- variability of serum ferritin concentration -- evaluation of use of ferritin assay for assessment of storage iron levels. (5) Serum ferritin concentrations in disease -- hemochromatosis -- secondary iron overload -- liver damage -- infection and chronic disease -- cancer. (6) Assay of serum ferritin with antibodies to ferritins other than liver or spleen -- ferritinemia and cancer. (7) Properties of serum ferritin -- molecular weight -- iron content -- isoelectric focusing patterns -- carbohydrate content -- immunological properties. (8) Physiology of circulating ferritin -- release of ferritin from tissues -- origin of circulating ferritin -- clearance from the plasma -- iron and protein turnover. (9) Summary -- factors influencing serum ferritin concentrations and clinical use of ferritin estimations.

  2. Quantification of NS1 dengue biomarker in serum via optomagnetic nanocluster detection

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Paula; Watterson, Daniel; Parmvi, Mattias; Burger, Robert; Boisen, Anja; Young, Paul; Cooper, Matthew A.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Ranzoni, Andrea; Donolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a tropical vector-borne disease without cure or vaccine that progressively spreads into regions with temperate climates. Diagnostic tools amenable to resource-limited settings would be highly valuable for epidemiologic control and containment during outbreaks. Here, we present a novel low-cost automated biosensing platform for detection of dengue fever biomarker NS1 and demonstrate it on NS1 spiked in human serum. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are coated with high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against NS1 via bio-orthogonal Cu-free ‘click’ chemistry on an anti-fouling surface molecular architecture. The presence of the target antigen NS1 triggers MNP agglutination and the formation of nanoclusters with rapid kinetics enhanced by external magnetic actuation. The amount and size of the nanoclusters correlate with the target concentration and can be quantified using an optomagnetic readout method. The resulting automated dengue fever assay takes just 8 minutes, requires 6 μL of serum sample and shows a limit of detection of 25 ng/mL with an upper detection range of 20000 ng/mL. The technology holds a great potential to be applied to NS1 detection in patient samples. As the assay is implemented on a low-cost microfluidic disc the platform is suited for further expansion to multiplexed detection of a wide panel of biomarkers. PMID:26536916

  3. Quantification of NS1 dengue biomarker in serum via optomagnetic nanocluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Paula; Watterson, Daniel; Parmvi, Mattias; Burger, Robert; Boisen, Anja; Young, Paul; Cooper, Matthew A.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Ranzoni, Andrea; Donolato, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Dengue is a tropical vector-borne disease without cure or vaccine that progressively spreads into regions with temperate climates. Diagnostic tools amenable to resource-limited settings would be highly valuable for epidemiologic control and containment during outbreaks. Here, we present a novel low-cost automated biosensing platform for detection of dengue fever biomarker NS1 and demonstrate it on NS1 spiked in human serum. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are coated with high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against NS1 via bio-orthogonal Cu-free ‘click’ chemistry on an anti-fouling surface molecular architecture. The presence of the target antigen NS1 triggers MNP agglutination and the formation of nanoclusters with rapid kinetics enhanced by external magnetic actuation. The amount and size of the nanoclusters correlate with the target concentration and can be quantified using an optomagnetic readout method. The resulting automated dengue fever assay takes just 8 minutes, requires 6 μL of serum sample and shows a limit of detection of 25 ng/mL with an upper detection range of 20000 ng/mL. The technology holds a great potential to be applied to NS1 detection in patient samples. As the assay is implemented on a low-cost microfluidic disc the platform is suited for further expansion to multiplexed detection of a wide panel of biomarkers.

  4. Quantification of NS1 dengue biomarker in serum via optomagnetic nanocluster detection.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Paula; Watterson, Daniel; Parmvi, Mattias; Burger, Robert; Boisen, Anja; Young, Paul; Cooper, Matthew A; Hansen, Mikkel F; Ranzoni, Andrea; Donolato, Marco

    2015-11-05

    Dengue is a tropical vector-borne disease without cure or vaccine that progressively spreads into regions with temperate climates. Diagnostic tools amenable to resource-limited settings would be highly valuable for epidemiologic control and containment during outbreaks. Here, we present a novel low-cost automated biosensing platform for detection of dengue fever biomarker NS1 and demonstrate it on NS1 spiked in human serum. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are coated with high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against NS1 via bio-orthogonal Cu-free 'click' chemistry on an anti-fouling surface molecular architecture. The presence of the target antigen NS1 triggers MNP agglutination and the formation of nanoclusters with rapid kinetics enhanced by external magnetic actuation. The amount and size of the nanoclusters correlate with the target concentration and can be quantified using an optomagnetic readout method. The resulting automated dengue fever assay takes just 8 minutes, requires 6 μL of serum sample and shows a limit of detection of 25 ng/mL with an upper detection range of 20000 ng/mL. The technology holds a great potential to be applied to NS1 detection in patient samples. As the assay is implemented on a low-cost microfluidic disc the platform is suited for further expansion to multiplexed detection of a wide panel of biomarkers.

  5. Data interpretation in the Automated Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.; Elling, J.W.; Mniszewski, S.

    1995-12-01

    The Contaminant Analysis Automation project envisions the analytical chemistry laboratory of the future being assembled from automation submodules that can be integrated into complete analysis system through a plug-and-play strategy. In this automated system the reduction of instrumental data to knowledge required by the laboratory customer must also be accomplished in an automated way. This paper presents the concept of an automated Data Interpretation Module (DIM) within the context of the plug-and-play automation strategy. The DIM is an expert system driven software module. The DIM functions as a standard laboratory module controlled by the system task sequence controller. The DIM consists of knowledge base(s) that accomplish the data assessment, quality control, and data analysis tasks. The expert system knowledge base(s) encapsulate the training and experience of the analytical chemist. Analysis of instrumental data by the DIM requires the use of pattern recognition techniques. Laboratory data from the analysis of PCBs will be used to illustrate the DIM.

  6. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  7. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  8. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  9. Automated Sample Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-25

    fET-AY4 732 AUTOMATED SAMPLE DEOXYGENATION FOR IMPROVED LUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS U) EMORY UNIV RTLANTA GA DEPT OF CHEMISTRY M E ROLLIE ET AL 25 NOV... Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) | ,Rollie, M.E.; Patonay, Gabor; and Warner, Isiah M. A .3a. TYPE OF REPORT...GROUP ISU*GRO P ,,,uminescence Spectroscopy; Fluorescence Analysis,* Room *f Temperature Phosphorescence; Deoxygenation ; Quenching ISTRACT (Continue on

  10. A two-year automated dripwater chemistry study in a remote cave in the tropical south Pacific: Using [Cl-] as a conservative tracer for seasalt contribution of major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, Darrel M.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Stoll, Heather M.; Lagerström, Maria; Carvajal, Carlos P.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2016-07-01

    Stalagmite Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are commonly interpreted as proxies for past hydrologic conditions and are often used to supplement carbon and oxygen stable isotope records. While the processes that control these element ratios, including water-rock interaction, dripwater residence time, and upstream precipitation of calcite, are well understood in continental caves, there have been few investigations of dripwater Element/Ca (X/Ca) evolution in coastal marine caves where seasalt can have a strong influence on the incoming Mg/Ca ratio. We instrumented a marine cave on the remote South Pacific island of Niue to record daily cave microclimate, as well as weekly-integrated drip rates, dripwater oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, and dripwater chemistry over a period of twenty-two months. Using chloride as a conservative tracer for sea-spray, we calculate that seasalt input accounts for a large portion of dripwater Na, SO4, and Mg (89%, 93%, and 85% respectively) and a smaller portion of the Ca and Sr (19% and 17%). During the second year of this study a gradual decrease (by ∼18%) in dripwater chlorinity was observed, suggesting that an epikarst-hosted seasalt aerosol inventory was being diluted over time. Minor element to calcium ratios for B, K, Cl, SO4, Mg, Na, Sr, and Fe all strongly covary over the observation period, suggesting that although sea-spray plays a significant role in modulating incoming drip chemistry, prior calcite precipitation (PCP) dominates chemical evolution within the epikarst. During a prolonged drought episode, evaporative enrichments in dripwater δD and δ18O (+4‰ and 0.5‰, respectively) were observed to coincide with increased cation and anion concentrations, strong Ca removal via PCP, and increases in Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios (28% and 34%, respectively), suggesting that concomitant enrichment in speleothem δ18O and X/Ca ratios may be interpreted as multi-proxy evidence for dry climate conditions. We use modern dripwater chemistry and

  11. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  15. Colorful Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, P. Teal; Carsten Conner, L. D.; Guthrie, Mareca; Pompea, Stephen; Tsurusaki, Blakely K.; Tzou, Carrie

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a chemistry/art activity that originated in an National Science Foundation--funded two-week STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) academy for grade 4-6 girls. The authors recommend using this investigation in conjunction with other activities focusing on chemical change as a step toward fulfilling the…

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  17. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  18. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  5. Chemistry's year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2011 to be the International Year of Chemistry. Under this banner, chemists should seize the opportunity to highlight the rich history and successes of our subject to a much broader audience - and explain how it can help to solve the global challenges we face today and in the future.

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  8. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  11. Microscale Chemistry and Green Chemistry: Complementary Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mono M.; Szafran, Zvi; Pike, R. M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the complementary nature of microscale chemistry and green chemistry. Green chemistry emphasizes the concepts of atom economy, source reduction, pathway modification, solvent substitution, and pollution prevention as means of improving the environmental impact of industrial chemistry. Microscale chemistry serves as a tool for incorporating green chemistry ideas across the curriculum in educational institutions. Examples are drawn from microscale laboratory experiments to illustrate the pedagogic connection between the two areas.

  12. Chemistry behind Vegetarianism.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo

    2011-02-09

    This review summarizes the effect of a habitual vegetarian diet on clinical complications in relation to chemistry and biochemistry. Omnivores have a significantly higher cluster of cardiovascular risk factors compared with vegetarians, including increased body mass index, waist to hip ratio, blood pressure, plasma total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol and LDL-C levels, serum lipoprotein(a) concentration, plasma factor VII activity, ratios of TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C and TAG/HDL-C, and serum ferritin levels. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians, especially vegans, have lower serum vitamin B₁₂ concentration and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels in the tissue membrane phospholipids, which are associated with increased collagen and ADP stimulated ex vivo whole blood platelet aggregation, plasma 11-dehydrothromboxane B₂, and homocysteine levels and decreased plasma HDL-C. This may be associated with an increased thrombotic and atherosclerotic risk. It is suggested that vegetarians, especially vegans, should increase their dietary n-3 PUFA and vitamin B₁₂ intakes.

  13. Autonomy and Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  14. Recent trends in laboratory automation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, M L; Stinger, T

    2001-05-01

    The impact of robotics and automation on the pharmaceutical industry over the last two decades has been significant. In the last ten years, the emphasis of laboratory automation has shifted from the support of manufactured products and quality control of laboratory applications, to research and development. This shift has been the direct result of an increased emphasis on the identification, development and eventual marketing of innovative new products. In this article, we will briefly identify and discuss some of the current trends in laboratory automation in the pharmaceutical industry as they apply to research and development, including screening, sample management, combinatorial chemistry, ADME/Tox and pharmacokinetics.

  15. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  16. Organic chemistry. Nanomole-scale high-throughput chemistry for the synthesis of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Buitrago Santanilla, Alexander; Regalado, Erik L; Pereira, Tony; Shevlin, Michael; Bateman, Kevin; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Schneeweis, Jonathan; Berritt, Simon; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Nantermet, Philippe; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Welch, Christopher J; Vachal, Petr; Davies, Ian W; Cernak, Tim; Dreher, Spencer D

    2015-01-02

    At the forefront of new synthetic endeavors, such as drug discovery or natural product synthesis, large quantities of material are rarely available and timelines are tight. A miniaturized automation platform enabling high-throughput experimentation for synthetic route scouting to identify conditions for preparative reaction scale-up would be a transformative advance. Because automated, miniaturized chemistry is difficult to carry out in the presence of solids or volatile organic solvents, most of the synthetic "toolkit" cannot be readily miniaturized. Using palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions as a test case, we developed automation-friendly reactions to run in dimethyl sulfoxide at room temperature. This advance enabled us to couple the robotics used in biotechnology with emerging mass spectrometry-based high-throughput analysis techniques. More than 1500 chemistry experiments were carried out in less than a day, using as little as 0.02 milligrams of material per reaction.

  17. Polynitrogen Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    4N3, while As(C6H5)4N3 presents a borderline case.23 Theoretical Calculations High-level theoretical studies of nitrogen, oxygen, selenium and...Dixon, D. A.; Christe, K. O., "Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorganic Chemistry, p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012...34Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorg. Chem., p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012). 26. K. S. Thanthiriwatte, M. Vasiliu

  18. Hematology and serum biochemistry of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa).

    PubMed

    Muliya, Sanath Krishna; Bhat, Mudraje Narayana

    2016-08-01

    To study the hematology and serum biochemistry parameters of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa) and to evaluate the differences in the same between captive and wild populations. Animals were categorized into four groups, viz., wild Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), wild Indian rat snakes (n=10), captive Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), and captive Indian rat snake (n=10). The snakes were restrained with restraint tubes, and 2 ml of blood was collected from either heart or ventral coccygeal vein. Hematological examinations were performed manually and serum biochemistry assays were performed on semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer. The values of total erythrocyte count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin were slightly low in captive spectacled cobras and captive rat snakes compared to wild ones, whereas total leukocyte count was found to be slightly high in wild spectacled cobras compared to captive ones. All the recorded values of biochemical and electrolyte analytes were found to be well within expected range for snakes except for total protein and chloride levels in both the species which was slightly above the expected range. The hematology and serum biochemistry intervals of the two most common Indian snakes are presented here. The data will be useful in routine health evaluations and aiding in better medical management of the species studied. Since this study is the first to report complete hematologic and blood biochemical ranges for the study species, observations made here can also be used as referral intervals for future use.

  19. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  20. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  1. Automation of industrial bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, W; DaPra, E; Schneider, K

    2000-01-01

    The dramatic development of new electronic devices within the last 25 years has had a substantial influence on the control and automation of industrial bioprocesses. Within this short period of time the method of controlling industrial bioprocesses has changed completely. In this paper, the authors will use a practical approach focusing on the industrial applications of automation systems. From the early attempts to use computers for the automation of biotechnological processes up to the modern process automation systems some milestones are highlighted. Special attention is given to the influence of Standards and Guidelines on the development of automation systems.

  2. Shoe-String Automation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.L.

    2001-07-30

    Faced with a downsizing organization, serious budget reductions and retirement of key metrology personnel, maintaining capabilities to provide necessary services to our customers was becoming increasingly difficult. It appeared that the only solution was to automate some of our more personnel-intensive processes; however, it was crucial that the most personnel-intensive candidate process be automated, at the lowest price possible and with the lowest risk of failure. This discussion relates factors in the selection of the Standard Leak Calibration System for automation, the methods of automation used to provide the lowest-cost solution and the benefits realized as a result of the automation.

  3. A microbiological survey of automated biochemical machines.

    PubMed Central

    Newsom, S W; Matthews, J

    1980-01-01

    The potential microbial hazards to laboratory personnel from operating three pieces of automated laboratory equipment have been tested using challenges of bacteria in serum or water. Aerosols did not seem to be a hazard, and the recommended disinfection procedures seemed quite adequate, although 2% aqueous activated glutaraldehyde is to be preferred to hypochlorite. The use of plastic gloves for protecting hands when changing rinse cups and pH electrodes is recommended. PMID:7400361

  4. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  5. Interstellar chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  6. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  7. Mass spectrometry in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, C; Martinez, J; Aubagnac, J L

    2000-01-01

    In the fast expanding field of combinatorial chemistry, profiling libraries has always been a matter of concern--as illustrated by the buoyant literature over the past seven years. Spectroscopic methods, including especially mass spectrometry and to a lesser extent IR and NMR, have been applied at different levels of combinatorial library synthesis: in the rehearsal phase to optimize the chemistry prior to library generation, to confirm library composition, and to characterize after screening each structure that exhibits positive response. Most of the efforts have been concentrated on library composition assessment. The difficulties of such analyses have evolved from the infancy of the combinatorial concept, where large mixtures were prepared, to the recent parallel syntheses of collections of discrete compounds. Whereas the complexity of the analyses has diminished, an increased degree of automation was simultaneously required to achieve efficient library component identification and quantification. In this respect, mass spectrometry has been found to be the method of choice, providing rapid, sensitive, and informative analyses, especially when coupled to chromatographic separation. Fully automated workstations able to cope with several hundreds of compounds per day have been designed. After a brief introduction to describe the combinatorial approach, library characterization will be discussed in detail, considering first the solution-based methodologies and secondly the support-bound material analyses.

  8. ASPECTS: an automation-assisted SPE method development system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chou, Judy; King, Kristopher W; Yang, Liyu

    2013-07-01

    A typical conventional SPE method development (MD) process usually involves deciding the chemistry of the sorbent and eluent based on information about the analyte; experimentally preparing and trying out various combinations of adsorption chemistry and elution conditions; quantitatively evaluating the various conditions; and comparing quantitative results from all combination of conditions to select the best condition for method qualification. The second and fourth steps have mostly been performed manually until now. We developed an automation-assisted system that expedites the conventional SPE MD process by automating 99% of the second step, and expedites the fourth step by automatically processing the results data and presenting it to the analyst in a user-friendly format. The automation-assisted SPE MD system greatly saves the manual labor in SPE MD work, prevents analyst errors from causing misinterpretation of quantitative results, and shortens data analysis and interpretation time.

  9. Serum PTH reference values established by an automated third-generation assay in vitamin D-replete subjects with normal renal function: consequences of diagnosing primary hyperparathyroidism and the classification of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Massart, Catherine; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Cormier, Catherine; Cavalier, Etienne; Delanaye, Pierre; Chanson, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    To determine parathyroid hormone (PTH) reference values in French healthy adults, taking into account serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), renal function, age, gender, and BMI. We studied 898 healthy subjects (432 women) aged 18-89 years with a normal BMI and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 81 patients with surgically proven primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), and 264 dialysis patients. 25OHD and third-generation PTH assays were implemented on the LIAISON XL platform. Median PTH and 25OHD values in the 898 healthy subjects were 18.8  ng/l and 23.6  ng/ml respectively. PTH was lower in subjects with 25OHD ≥30  ng/ml than in those with lower values. Among the 183 subjects with 25OHD ≥30  ng/ml, those aged ≥60 years (n=31) had higher PTH values than younger subjects, independent of 25OHD, BMI, and eGFR (P<0.001). Given the small number of subjects aged ≥60 years, we adopted the 95% CI of PTH values for the entire group of 183 vitamin D-replete subjects (9.4-28.9  ng/l) as our reference values. With 28.9  ng/l as the upper limit of normal (ULN) rather than the manufacturer's ULN of 38.4  ng/l, the percentage of PHPT patients with 'high' PTH values rose to 90.1% from 66.6% (P<0.001), and 18.6% of the dialysis patients were classified differently in view of the KDIGO target range (two to nine times the ULN). When only subjects with 25OHD ≥30  ng/ml were included in the reference population, the PTH ULN fell by 22.4%, diagnostic sensitivity for PHPT improved, and the classification of dialysis patients was modified. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. Management Planning for Workplace Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDole, Thomas L.

    Several factors must be considered when implementing office automation. Included among these are whether or not to automate at all, the effects of automation on employees, requirements imposed by automation on the physical environment, effects of automation on the total organization, and effects on clientele. The reasons behind the success or…

  11. Application of a sensitive and specific reagent for the determination of serum iron to the Bayer DAX48.

    PubMed

    Artiss, J D; Yang, W C; Harake, B; Capellari, E; Kretch, C; Eisenbrey, A B; Zak, B

    1997-09-01

    We describe a modification of a previously described serum iron procedure applied to the Bayer DAX48 (Bayer Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY) automated chemistry analyzer. The iron-ligand used in this assay, 2-(5-nitro-2-pyridylazo)-5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamine) phenol (nitro-PAPS), has a molar absorptivity of 94,000 L mol(-1) cm(-1), which is three to four times more sensitive than the more commonly used ligands. The increased sensitivity of the iron-ligand complex facilitates modification of a Ferene S method that requires a smaller sample volume while it maintains the precision of the assay. Because the reagent does not contain ascorbate, the "onboard" stability has been increased to more than 4 weeks. The reagent seems to be quite insensitive to icterus and hemolysis. Furthermore, the interference of turbidity caused by triglycerides, abnormal proteins, or fibrinogen, present in samples from patients undergoing anticoagulant therapy, seems to have been eliminated.

  12. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    PubMed

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  13. Complacency and Automation Bias in the Use of Imperfect Automation.

    PubMed

    Wickens, Christopher D; Clegg, Benjamin A; Vieane, Alex Z; Sebok, Angelia L

    2015-08-01

    We examine the effects of two different kinds of decision-aiding automation errors on human-automation interaction (HAI), occurring at the first failure following repeated exposure to correctly functioning automation. The two errors are incorrect advice, triggering the automation bias, and missing advice, reflecting complacency. Contrasts between analogous automation errors in alerting systems, rather than decision aiding, have revealed that alerting false alarms are more problematic to HAI than alerting misses are. Prior research in decision aiding, although contrasting the two aiding errors (incorrect vs. missing), has confounded error expectancy. Participants performed an environmental process control simulation with and without decision aiding. For those with the aid, automation dependence was created through several trials of perfect aiding performance, and an unexpected automation error was then imposed in which automation was either gone (one group) or wrong (a second group). A control group received no automation support. The correct aid supported faster and more accurate diagnosis and lower workload. The aid failure degraded all three variables, but "automation wrong" had a much greater effect on accuracy, reflecting the automation bias, than did "automation gone," reflecting the impact of complacency. Some complacency was manifested for automation gone, by a longer latency and more modest reduction in accuracy. Automation wrong, creating the automation bias, appears to be a more problematic form of automation error than automation gone, reflecting complacency. Decision-aiding automation should indicate its lower degree of confidence in uncertain environments to avoid the automation bias. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  15. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  16. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  17. IFCC international conventional reference procedure for the measurement of free thyroxine in serum: International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) Working Group for Standardization of Thyroid Function Tests (WG-STFT)(1).

    PubMed

    Van Houcke, Sofie K; Van Uytfanghe, Katleen; Shimizu, Eri; Tani, Wataru; Umemoto, Masao; Thienpont, Linda M

    2011-08-01

    The IFCC Working Group for Standardization of Thyroid Function Tests proposes a candidate international conventional reference procedure (RMP) for measurement of the amount-of-substance concentration of free thyroxine in plasma/serum at physiological pH 7.40 and temperature (37.0°C). The unit for reporting measurement results is, by convention, pmol/L. The RMP is based on equilibrium dialysis isotope dilution-liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (ED-ID-LC/tandem MS). The rationale for proposing a conventional RMP is that, because of the physical separation step, it is unknown whether the measurement truly reflects the concentration of free thyroxine (FT4) in serum. Therefore, the ED part of the RMP has to strictly adhere to the following conditions: use of a dialysis buffer with a biochemical composition resembling the ionic environment of serum/plasma as closely as possible; buffering of the sample to a pH of 7.40 (at 37.0°C) before dialysis, however, without additional dilution; dialysis in a device with a dialysand/dialysate compartment of identical volume and separated by a membrane of regenerated cellulose and adequate cut-off; thermostatic control of the temperature during dialysis at 37.0°C±0.50°C. The convention does not apply to the ID-LC/tandem MS part, provided it is eligible to be nominated for review by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine. Here, we describe the ED procedure, inclusive its validation and transferability, in greater detail. We recommend a protocol for successful calibration, measurement and monitoring of the accuracy/trueness and precision of the candidate conventional RMP. For details on our ID-LC/tandem MS procedures, we refer to the Supplement.

  18. Environmental chemistry. Seventh edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents a basic understanding of environmental chemistry and its applications. In addition to providing updated materials in this field, the book emphasizes the major concepts essential to the practice of environmental chemistry. Topics of discussion include the following: toxicological chemistry; toxicological chemistry of chemical substances; chemical analysis of water and wastewater; chemical analysis of wastes and solids; air and gas analysis; chemical analysis of biological materials and xenobiotics; fundamentals of chemistry; and fundamentals of organic chemistry.

  19. Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental processes that control the chemical composition and cycles of the global troposphere and how these processes and properties affect the physical behavior of the atmosphere are examined. The long-term information needs for tropospheric chemistry are: to be able to predict tropospheric responses to perturbations, both natural and anthropogenic, of these cycles, and to provide the information required for the maintenance and effective future management of the atmospheric component of our global life support system. The processes controlling global tropospheric biogeochemical cycles include: the input of trace species into the troposphere, their long-range transport and distribution as affected by the mean wind and vertical venting, their chemical transformations, including gas to particle conversion, leading to the appearance of aerosols or aqueous phase reactions inside cloud droplets, and their removal from the troposphere via wet (precipitation) and dry deposition.

  20. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  1. Stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Demore, W. B.; Ferguson, E. E.; Lesclaux, R.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Sander, S. P.; Sze, N. D.; Zellner, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent improvements in the data base for the currently identified reactions describing the chemistry of the major families of trace gas species, HO(x), NO(x), ClO(x), and hydrocarbons are assessed. The important coupling reactions between the families are introduced progressively. Chemical aspects such as heterogeneous reactions and reactions of sodium species, the importance of which are not yet completely established, are discussed. Recent attempts to reconcile some of the more unexpected kinetic behavior which has emerged from the extensive experimental studies of key reactions with current reaction rate theory are also examined. The uncertainties in the current kinetic and photochemical data base is given. The prospects for improvement of data for known reactions of atmospheric importance as well as for the identification of gaps in the chemical description of the atmosphere.

  2. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  3. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  4. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  5. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  6. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  7. More Benefits of Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that measured the benefits of an automated catalog and automated circulation system from the library user's point of view in terms of the value of time saved. Topics discussed include patterns of use, access time, availability of information, search behaviors, and the effectiveness of the measures used. (seven references)…

  8. Work and Programmable Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  9. The Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naclerio, Nick

    1979-01-01

    Clerical personnel may be able to climb career ladders as a result of office automation and expanded job opportunities in the word processing area. Suggests opportunities in an automated office system and lists books and periodicals on word processing for counselors and teachers. (MF)

  10. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherron, Gene T.

    1982-01-01

    The steps taken toward office automation by the University of Maryland are described. Office automation is defined and some types of word processing systems are described. Policies developed in the writing of a campus plan are listed, followed by a section on procedures adopted to implement the plan. (Author/MLW)

  11. WANTED: Fully Automated Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of indexing focuses on the possibilities of fully automated indexing. Topics discussed include controlled indexing languages such as subject heading lists and thesauri, free indexing languages, natural indexing languages, computer-aided indexing, expert systems, and the need for greater creativity to further advance automated indexing.…

  12. The contaminant analysis automation project: The implementation of a new automation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Erkkila, T.H.; Hollen, R.M.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) Project is implementing a new automation strategy. The basis of this new strategy is a fully modular architecture, which provides a {open_quotes}plug-and-play{close_quotes} environment for the laboratory chemist to rapidly put together a functioning system for automating sample preparation, sample analysis, and data interpretation. The basic building block of this architecture is the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The CAA Project is currently implementing this new automation strategy in an environmental chemistry application. Two Environmental Protection Agency methods, EPA SW846 3540 and 3550, followed by method EPA 8080 as chromatography (GC) analysis, followed by computer assisted data interpretation are the objective of this implementation. Several SLMs perform automated sample preparation of soil samples, a commercially available GC analyzes the samples, and a suite of software modules assist the analyst in interpreting the data and making the determinations. In this paper, we present the progress of the project and some results generated by our system thus far.

  13. A blood chemistry profile for lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1999-01-01

    A blood chemistry profile for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush was developed by establishing baseline ranges for several clinical chemistry tests (glucose, total protein, amylase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, calcium, and magnesium). Measurements were made accurately and rapidly with a Kodak Ektachem DT60 Analyzer and the Ektachem DTSC Module. Blood serum was collected from both laboratory-reared lake trout (1978 and 1986 year-classes) and feral spawning trout from Lake Michigan and then analyzed in the laboratory. No clinically significant differences were found between samples analyzed fresh and those frozen for 1 or 6 weeks. The ranges in chemistry variables for feral lake trout were generally wider than those for laboratory-reared lake trout, and significant differences existed between male and female feral lake trout for several tests. Blood chemistry profiles also varied seasonally on fish sampled repeatedly.

  14. Applications of monolithic solid-phase extraction in chromatography-based clinical chemistry assays.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2013-04-01

    Complex matrices, for example urine, serum, plasma, and whole blood, which are common in clinical chemistry testing, contain many non-analyte compounds that can interfere with either detection or in-source ionization in chromatography-based assays. To overcome this problem, analytes are extracted by protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), and liquid-liquid extraction. With correct chemistry and well controlled material SPE may furnish clean specimens with consistent performance. Traditionally, SPE has been performed with particle-based adsorbents, but monolithic SPE is attracting increasing interest of clinical laboratories. Monoliths, solid pieces of stationary phase, have bimodal structures consisting of macropores, which enable passage of solvent, and mesopores, in which analytes are separated. This structure results in low back-pressure with separation capabilities similar to those of particle-based adsorbents. Monoliths also enable increased sample throughput, reduced solvent use, varied support formats, and/or automation. However, many of these monoliths are not commercially available. In this review, application of monoliths to purification of samples from humans before chromatography-based assays will be critically reviewed.

  15. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  16. Automation in Immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-01-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  17. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  18. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  19. High-throughput spectrophotometric assay of reactive oxygen species in serum.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ikue; Morishita, Yukari; Imai, Kazue; Nakamura, Masakazu; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2007-07-10

    The derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (D-ROM) test has been developed to determine the amount of oxygen-centered free radicals in a blood sample as a marker of oxidative stress. This study aims to improve the D-ROM test and develop an automated assay system by use of a clinical chemistry analyzer. Five microliters of serum was added to 1 well of a 96-well microtiter plate for a total 240microl of reaction solution containing alkylamine and metals. This was followed by automatic mixing, incubation and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a color development at 505nm using a spectrophotometer with catalytic capability for transition metals. This assay system was used to measure serum levels of ROS in cigarette smokers and never-smokers, by way of example. The levels of serum ROS determined by this system correlate with the amounts of free radicals and peroxides, which reacted with various molecules in the body and formed stable metabolites. This test can use frozen sera as well as fresh ones. The inter- and intra-deviation of this system was within 5% and showed consistent linearity in the range between 4 and 500mg/l of hydrogen peroxides. Serum ROS levels among smokers increased with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (36.5% increment per pack per day; P<0.0001). This assay system will be a simple, inexpensive, and reliable tool for assessing oxidative stress in human populations. Our preliminary results on cigarette smoking imply that this assay system has potential for application in various epidemiological and clinical settings.

  20. Nonanalytic Laboratory Automation: A Quarter Century of Progress.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Charles D

    2017-06-01

    Clinical laboratory automation has blossomed since the 1989 AACC meeting, at which Dr. Masahide Sasaki first showed a western audience what his laboratory had implemented. Many diagnostics and other vendors are now offering a variety of automated options for laboratories of all sizes. Replacing manual processing and handling procedures with automation was embraced by the laboratory community because of the obvious benefits of labor savings and improvement in turnaround time and quality. Automation was also embraced by the diagnostics vendors who saw automation as a means of incorporating the analyzers purchased by their customers into larger systems in which the benefits of automation were integrated to the analyzers.This report reviews the options that are available to laboratory customers. These options include so called task-targeted automation-modules that range from single function devices that automate single tasks (e.g., decapping or aliquoting) to multifunction workstations that incorporate several of the functions of a laboratory sample processing department. The options also include total laboratory automation systems that use conveyors to link sample processing functions to analyzers and often include postanalytical features such as refrigerated storage and sample retrieval.Most importantly, this report reviews a recommended process for evaluating the need for new automation and for identifying the specific requirements of a laboratory and developing solutions that can meet those requirements. The report also discusses some of the practical considerations facing a laboratory in a new implementation and reviews the concept of machine vision to replace human inspections. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  1. Systematic review automation technologies.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-07-09

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time.

  2. Systematic review automation technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  3. Effects of storage temperature and time on clinical biochemical parameters from rat serum.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2009-03-01

    Serum is often frozen and banked for analysis at a later date. This study assessed the stability of 17 analytes in rat serum during refrigeration at 4 degrees C and extended storage at -20 degrees C (frost-free and nonfrost-free freezers) and -70 degrees C. Samples were analyzed by using an automated dry-slide chemistry analyzer at time 0 and then stored as aliquots for analysis at time points including day 7, 30, 90, and 360. After 7 d of refrigeration, only creatine kinase activity had varied by more than 10% of the starting value. Freezing at -70 degrees C was clearly superior to -20 degrees C where changes were observed in CO(2) as early as day 30 and alanine aminotransferase as early as day 90. Samples stored in frost-free and nonfrost-free -20 degrees C freezers did not differ significantly through day 90. Factors such as storage time and temperature should be considered when designing any retrospective study.

  4. Techniques for analysis and purification in high-throughput chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hughes, I; Hunter, D

    2001-06-01

    The success of combinatorial chemistry, and the increased emphasis on single well-characterised compounds of high purity, has had a significant impact on analytical and purification technologies. The requirement for ever-increasing throughput has led to the automation and parallelisation of these techniques. Advances have also been made in developing faster methods to augment throughput further.

  5. Current status and future prospects for enabling chemistry technology in the drug discovery process.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Stevan W; Hutchins, Charles W; Talaty, Nari N

    2016-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in the implementation of enabling chemistry technologies into the drug discovery process. Areas covered include parallel synthesis chemistry, high-throughput experimentation, automated synthesis and purification methods, flow chemistry methodology including photochemistry, electrochemistry, and the handling of "dangerous" reagents. Also featured are advances in the "computer-assisted drug design" area and the expanding application of novel mass spectrometry-based techniques to a wide range of drug discovery activities.

  6. Current status and future prospects for enabling chemistry technology in the drug discovery process

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Stevan W.; Hutchins, Charles W.; Talaty, Nari N.

    2016-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in the implementation of enabling chemistry technologies into the drug discovery process. Areas covered include parallel synthesis chemistry, high-throughput experimentation, automated synthesis and purification methods, flow chemistry methodology including photochemistry, electrochemistry, and the handling of “dangerous” reagents. Also featured are advances in the “computer-assisted drug design” area and the expanding application of novel mass spectrometry-based techniques to a wide range of drug discovery activities. PMID:27781094

  7. Automation synthesis modules review.

    PubMed

    Boschi, S; Lodi, F; Malizia, C; Cicoria, G; Marengo, M

    2013-06-01

    The introduction of (68)Ga labelled tracers has changed the diagnostic approach to neuroendocrine tumours and the availability of a reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator has been at the bases of the development of (68)Ga radiopharmacy. The huge increase in clinical demand, the impact of regulatory issues and a careful radioprotection of the operators have boosted for extensive automation of the production process. The development of automated systems for (68)Ga radiochemistry, different engineering and software strategies and post-processing of the eluate were discussed along with impact of automation with regulations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Managing laboratory automation

    PubMed Central

    Saboe, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of managing automated systems through their life cycles within the quality-control (QC) laboratory environment. The focus is on the process of directing and managing the evolving automation of a laboratory; system examples are given. The author shows how both task and data systems have evolved, and how they interrelate. A BIG picture, or continuum view, is presented and some of the reasons for success or failure of the various examples cited are explored. Finally, some comments on future automation need are discussed. PMID:18925018

  9. Guidelines for sampling, measuring and reporting ionized magnesium in undiluted serum, plasma or blood: International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC): IFCC Scientific Division, Committee on Point of Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Rayana, Mohammed C Ben; Burnett, Robert W; Covington, Arthur K; D'Orazio, Paul; Fogh-Andersen, Niels; Jacobs, Ellis; Külpmann, Wolf R; Kuwa, Katsuhiko; Larsson, Lasse; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Maas, Anton H J; Mager, Gerhard; Naskalski, Jerzy H J; Okorodudu, Anthony O; Ritter, Christoph; St John, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    All analyzers with ion-selective electrodes for ionized magnesium (iMg) should yield comparable and unbiased results. The prerequisite to achieve this goal is to reach consensus on sampling, measurement and reporting. The recommended guidelines for sampling, measurement and reporting iMg in plasma ("plasma" refers to circulating plasma and the forms in which it is sampled: the plasma phase of anticoagulated whole blood, plasma separated from blood cells, or serum) or blood, referring to the substance concentration of iMg in the calibrants, will provide results for iMg that are approximately 3% greater than its true concentration, and 4% less than its true molality. Binding of magnesium to proteins and ligands in plasma and blood is pH-dependent. Therefore, pH should be simultaneously measured to allow adjustment of iMg concentration to pH 7.4. The substance concentration of iMg may be physiologically and consequently clinically more relevant than the substance concentration of total magnesium.

  10. Chemistry of bifunctional photoprobes. 3 -- Correlation between the efficiency of CH insertion by photolabile chelating agents and lifetimes of singlet nitrenes by flash photolysis: First example of photochemical attachment of {sup 99m}Tc-complex with human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangi, R.S.; Lusiak, P.; Kuntz, R.R.; Volkert, W.A.; Rogowski, J.; Platz, M.S.

    1998-11-27

    Systematic functionalization of perfluoroaryl azides with chelating agents capable of complexing transition metals produces a new class of bifunctional photolabile chelating agents (BFPCAs). The strategy is shield the azide functionality from the electronic and steric influence of the electron-rich metal Pd through ester and amide bridges raised CH insertion efficiency to unprecedented levels (>92%) in a model solvent (cyclohexane). In contrast, perfluoroaryl azides attached to chelating agents via hydrazones show no significant CH insertion in cyclohexane upon photolysis. Measurements of the lifetimes of the singlet nitrenes derived from these agents by flash photolysis techniques correlate well with the efficiency of CH insertion by demonstrating longer lifetimes (10--50 times) for singlet nitrenes derived from azidotetrafluorinated esters and amides compared with the related hydrazones, which failed to yield significant CH insertion. A representative BFPCA 12 is chelated to diagnostic radionuclide {sup 99m}Tc and covalently attached to human serum albumin via photochemical activation extending the favorable bimolecular insertion characteristics of BFPCA to tracer level concentrations in buffer conditions. Flash photolysis experiments correlate singlet nitrene lifetimes with the efficiency of intermolecular insertion reactions. This work provides new photo-cross-linking technology, useful in radiodiagnostics and radiotherapy in nuclear medicine.

  11. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  12. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  13. Xenon International Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-05

    The Xenon International Automated Control software monitors, displays status, and allows for manual operator control as well as fully automatic control of multiple commercial and PNNL designed hardware components to generate and transmit atmospheric radioxenon concentration measurements every six hours.

  14. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  15. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Colin K.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a practical approach to planning for office automation termed the "Focused Process Approach" (the "what" phase, "how" phase, "doing" phase) which is a synthesis of the problem-solving and participatory planning approaches. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  16. Automated decision stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischendorf, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the combination of software robots and expert systems to automate everyday business tasks. Tasks which require people to repetitively interact with multiple systems screens as well as multiple systems.

  17. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  18. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  19. Automated Status Notification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Automated Status Notification System (ASNS) was born out of need. To prevent "hacker attacks," Lewis' telephone system needed to monitor communications activities 24 hr a day, 7 days a week. With decreasing staff resources, this continuous monitoring had to be automated. By utilizing existing communications hardware, a UNIX workstation, and NAWK (a pattern scanning and processing language), we implemented a continuous monitoring system.

  20. Automated Microfluidics for Genomics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Abstract--The Genomation Laboratory at the University of Washington is developing an automated fluid handling system called " Acapella " to prepare...Photonic Systems, Inc. (Redmond, WA), an automated submicroliter fluid sample preparation system called ACAPELLA is being developed. Reactions such...technology include minimal residual disease quantification and sample preparation for DNA. Preliminary work on the ACAPELLA is presented in [4][5]. This

  1. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  2. Automating Index Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    Automating Index Preparation* Pehong Chent Michael A. Harrison Computer Science Division University of CaliforniaI Berkeley, CA 94720 March 23, 1987...Abstract Index preparation is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper we indicate * how the indexing process can be automated in a way which...identified and analyzed. Specifically, we describe a framework for placing index commands in the document and a general purpose index processor which

  3. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  4. Repeated automated plasmapheresis in goats (Capra hircus): a clinically safe and long-term refinement to current antibody recovery techniques.

    PubMed

    Klages, Curtis

    2006-11-01

    Automated plasmapheresis is an optimal method of plasma collection because the donor is a part of a closed loop where whole blood is withdrawn and separated and packed cells are returned in a serial fashion until the desired amount of plasma is obtained. The typical approach to collection of antibody-rich plasma involves withdrawal of whole blood from vaccinated animals, yielding approximately 1000 ml plasma from each animal, which is euthanized after this process. In the present study, 32 goats (Capra hircus) were vaccinated and conditioned for restraint in a modified Panepinto sling. Each animal was monitored clinically, including complete and differential blood counts and serum chemistries 24 h before and 24 to 48 h after each procedure. A jugular vein was surgically prepped, a 16-gauge needle catheter was placed, and the animal was attached to an automated plasmapheresis machine. After plasma removal, return of the resuspended packed blood cells, and infusion of 500 ml 0.9% NaCl, the animal was disconnected from the machine, the catheter removed, and the animal returned to the barn. There were no clinically significant changes in either the complete blood counts or the clinical chemistries during the course of this study. These 32 animals produced 240,000 ml of immunoglobulin-rich plasma over the course of this project and more than 949,000 ml of plasma to date. This study identifies a refinement in current antibody-recovery techniques and potentially reduces the number of animals necessary to produce bioreagents on a long-term and continual basis.

  5. Metrology automation reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Elizabeth E.

    1996-09-01

    At Motorola's MOS-12 facility automated measurements on 200- mm diameter wafers proceed in a hands-off 'load-and-go' mode requiring only wafer loading, measurement recipe loading, and a 'run' command for processing. Upon completion of all sample measurements, the data is uploaded to the factory's data collection software system via a SECS II interface, eliminating the requirement of manual data entry. The scope of in-line measurement automation has been extended to the entire metrology scheme from job file generation to measurement and data collection. Data analysis and comparison to part specification limits is also carried out automatically. Successful integration of automated metrology into the factory measurement system requires that automated functions, such as autofocus and pattern recognition algorithms, display a high degree of reliability. In the 24- hour factory reliability data can be collected automatically on every part measured. This reliability data is then uploaded to the factory data collection software system at the same time as the measurement data. Analysis of the metrology reliability data permits improvements to be made as needed, and provides an accurate accounting of automation reliability. This reliability data has so far been collected for the CD-SEM (critical dimension scanning electron microscope) metrology tool, and examples are presented. This analysis method can be applied to such automated in-line measurements as CD, overlay, particle and film thickness measurements.

  6. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  7. Elements of EAF automation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Dragna, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    Our article presents elements of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) automation. So, we present and analyze detailed two automation schemes: the scheme of electrical EAF automation system; the scheme of thermic EAF automation system. The application results of these scheme of automation consists in: the sensitive reduction of specific consummation of electrical energy of Electric Arc Furnace, increasing the productivity of Electric Arc Furnace, increase the quality of the developed steel, increasing the durability of the building elements of Electric Arc Furnace.

  8. Automated recycling of chemistry for virtual screening and library design.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Mikko J; Kogej, Thierry; Raubacher, Florian

    2012-07-23

    An early stage drug discovery project needs to identify a number of chemically diverse and attractive compounds. These hit compounds are typically found through high-throughput screening campaigns. The diversity of the chemical libraries used in screening is therefore important. In this study, we describe a virtual high-throughput screening system called Virtual Library. The system automatically "recycles" validated synthetic protocols and available starting materials to generate a large number of virtual compound libraries, and allows for fast searches in the generated libraries using a 2D fingerprint based screening method. Virtual Library links the returned virtual hit compounds back to experimental protocols to quickly assess the synthetic accessibility of the hits. The system can be used as an idea generator for library design to enrich the screening collection and to explore the structure-activity landscape around a specific active compound.

  9. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolysis Hyperimmunization Immunoelectrophoresis - blood Immunofixation blood test Liver disease Malignancy Malnutrition Nephrotic syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis Serum globulin electrophoresis Serum iron test Systemic lupus erythematosus ...

  10. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  11. Automated Wildfire Detection Through Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jerry; Borne, Kirk; Thomas, Brian; Huang, Zhenping; Chi, Yuechen

    2005-01-01

    Wildfires have a profound impact upon the biosphere and our society in general. They cause loss of life, destruction of personal property and natural resources and alter the chemistry of the atmosphere. In response to the concern over the consequences of wildland fire and to support the fire management community, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) located in Camp Springs, Maryland gradually developed an operational system to routinely monitor wildland fire by satellite observations. The Hazard Mapping System, as it is known today, allows a team of trained fire analysts to examine and integrate, on a daily basis, remote sensing data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensors and generate a 24 hour fire product for the conterminous United States. Although assisted by automated fire detection algorithms, N O M has not been able to eliminate the human element from their fire detection procedures. As a consequence, the manually intensive effort has prevented NOAA from transitioning to a global fire product as urged particularly by climate modelers. NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland is helping N O M more fully automate the Hazard Mapping System by training neural networks to mimic the decision-making process of the frre analyst team as well as the automated algorithms.

  12. A modular approach for automated sample preparation and chemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Michael L.; Turner, Terry D.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Pacetti, Randolph

    1994-01-01

    Changes in international relations, especially within the past several years, have dramatically affected the programmatic thrusts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE now is addressing the environmental cleanup required as a result of 50 years of nuclear arms research and production. One major obstacle in the remediation of these areas is the chemical determination of potentially contaminated material using currently acceptable practices. Process bottlenecks and exposure to hazardous conditions pose problems for the DOE. One proposed solution is the application of modular automated chemistry using Standard Laboratory Modules (SLM) to perform Standard Analysis Methods (SAM). The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) Program has developed standards and prototype equipment that will accelerate the development of modular chemistry technology and is transferring this technology to private industry.

  13. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  14. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  15. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  16. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  17. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  18. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This chemistry Report from the USSR contains articles mainly on Adsorption, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Catalysis, Chemical Industry, Coal ... Gasification , Electrochemistry, Fertilizers, Food Technology, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds and Organometallic Compounds.

  19. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  20. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  1. Measurement of hematological, clinical chemistry, and infection parameters from hirudinized blood collected in universal blood sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Menssen, H D; Brandt, N; Leben, R; Müller, F; Thiel, E; Melber, K

    2001-08-01

    Hirudin, the anticoagulatory polypeptide of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, strongly inhibits thrombus formation by specifically interacting with thrombin. For diagnostic purposes, hirudin should be superior to other anticlotting compounds because it only minimally alters the mineral, protein, and cellular blood constituents. To test this hypothesis, hirudinized and routinely processed venous blood from 80 healthy volunteers and patients was subjected to a variety of automated blood tests. A strong correlation was found between the results of automated complete blood counts obtained from K(2)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) anticoagulated and hirudinized blood (1000 antithrombin units [ATU] hirudin/ml). In addition, clinical chemistry and serological infection parameters (asparlat amintransferase [ASAT], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], sodium, and so on, and antibodies against hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]1/2, respectively) correlated well when measured in serum as compared with hirudinized plasma. Contrary to single clotting factors, global coagulation parameters (activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT], prothrombin time [PT]) could not be measured in hirudinized blood. Recombinant hirudin neither interfered with immunophenotyping of mononuclear cells using FACScan analysis, nor did it alter the detection of Wilms' tumor gene expression by RT-PCR technology even at high doses (5000 ATU hirudin). Thus, a hirudin-containing blood sampling tube can be designed as a universal blood sampling tube (UBT) for testing the majority of diagnostic blood parameters.

  2. Advancing haemostasis automation--successful implementation of robotic centrifugation and sample processing in a tertiary service hospital.

    PubMed

    Sédille-Mostafaie, Nazanin; Engler, Hanna; Lutz, Susanne; Korte, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Laboratories today face increasing pressure to automate operations due to increasing workloads and the need to reduce expenditure. Few studies to date have focussed on the laboratory automation of preanalytical coagulation specimen processing. In the present study, we examined whether a clinical chemistry automation protocol meets the preanalytical requirements for the analyses of coagulation. During the implementation of laboratory automation, we began to operate a pre- and postanalytical automation system. The preanalytical unit processes blood specimens for chemistry, immunology and coagulation by automated specimen processing. As the production of platelet-poor plasma is highly dependent on optimal centrifugation, we examined specimen handling under different centrifugation conditions in order to produce optimal platelet deficient plasma specimens. To this end, manually processed models centrifuged at 1500 g for 5 and 20 min were compared to an automated centrifugation model at 3000 g for 7 min. For analytical assays that are performed frequently enough to be targets for full automation, Passing-Bablok regression analysis showed close agreement between different centrifugation methods, with a correlation coefficient between 0.98 and 0.99 and a bias between -5% and +6%. For seldom performed assays that do not mandate full automation, the Passing-Bablok regression analysis showed acceptable to poor agreement between different centrifugation methods. A full automation solution is suitable and can be recommended for frequent haemostasis testing.

  3. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  4. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... older adolescents and adults. Read more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY Eliminating Wild-Type DNA in Liquid Biopsies Researchers ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  5. Chemistry as General Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    Science courses are common in most general education requirements. This paper addresses the role of chemistry classes in meeting these requirements. Chemistry professors have for many years questioned the appropriateness of the standard introductory chemistry course as general education, resulting in the growing popularity of specialized non-majors courses. I suggest that current non-major chemistry courses cover too much consumer chemistry and ignore some of the big contributions of chemistry to human knowledge. Majors chemistry courses, while they prepare students for majoring in science, do not address these issues either. Consequently, chemistry courses are often an ineffective and unpopular way to meet general education science requirements. Part of the reason for this dilemma is the lack of chemists who address the contributions of chemistry to human knowledge in general. I propose that faculty at liberal arts colleges engage in this important task and that non-majors chemistry textbooks incorporate questions and issues that relate chemistry to a broader view of human knowledge. If these things happen, perhaps chemistry courses will become more effective as general education.

  6. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  7. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  8. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  9. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  10. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  11. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  12. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  13. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  14. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  15. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  16. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  17. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  18. Serum selenium assay following serum ferritin assay

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.; Morris, J.S.; Hann, H.L.; Pulsipher, B.; Stahlhut, M.W.

    1986-08-01

    Stored serum samples can be an important research resource into the etiology of cancer. These sera cannot be replaced and should therefore be used to best advantage. In previous epidemiologic studies, only single serum constituents have been assayed in individual serum samples. For example, serum ferritin has been examined in samples stored for as long as 10 years at -20C for a possible relation with general mortality (1) and cancer death (2). Ferritin is the tissue iron-storage protein and is therefore subject to denaturation. Serum selenium has also been examined in relation to cancer risk in a prospective manner by using stored frozen serum samples (3, 4). The interactions of a variety of serum factors in relation to cancer risk would be a desirable research goal, except that the amounts of serum typically available in frozen serum banks are less than 1 ml. It was the purpose of this investigation to determine if a radioimmunoassay for ferritin affected a subsequent neutron activation assay for selenium on the same 0.1 ml serum sample.

  19. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  20. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  1. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  2. Fully automated protein purification

    PubMed Central

    Camper, DeMarco V.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining highly purified proteins is essential to begin investigating their functional and structural properties. The steps that are typically involved in purifying proteins can include an initial capture, intermediate purification, and a final polishing step. Completing these steps can take several days and require frequent attention to ensure success. Our goal was to design automated protocols that will allow the purification of proteins with minimal operator intervention. Separate methods have been produced and tested that automate the sample loading, column washing, sample elution and peak collection steps for ion-exchange, metal affinity, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. These individual methods are designed to be coupled and run sequentially in any order to achieve a flexible and fully automated protein purification protocol. PMID:19595984

  3. Hematology and serum biochemistry of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa)

    PubMed Central

    Muliya, Sanath Krishna; Bhat, Mudraje Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the hematology and serum biochemistry parameters of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa) and to evaluate the differences in the same between captive and wild populations. Materials and Methods: Animals were categorized into four groups, viz., wild Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), wild Indian rat snakes (n=10), captive Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), and captive Indian rat snake (n=10). The snakes were restrained with restraint tubes, and 2 ml of blood was collected from either heart or ventral coccygeal vein. Hematological examinations were performed manually and serum biochemistry assays were performed on semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: The values of total erythrocyte count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin were slightly low in captive spectacled cobras and captive rat snakes compared to wild ones, whereas total leukocyte count was found to be slightly high in wild spectacled cobras compared to captive ones. All the recorded values of biochemical and electrolyte analytes were found to be well within expected range for snakes except for total protein and chloride levels in both the species which was slightly above the expected range. Conclusion: The hematology and serum biochemistry intervals of the two most common Indian snakes are presented here. The data will be useful in routine health evaluations and aiding in better medical management of the species studied. Since this study is the first to report complete hematologic and blood biochemical ranges for the study species, observations made here can also be used as referral intervals for future use. PMID:27651683

  4. Automated rapid particle investigation using scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Jerod Laurence

    The chemical composition of fly ash particles has been known to vary significantly depending on a number of factors. Current bulk methods of investigation including X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction are thought to be inadequate in determining the performance of fly ash in concrete. It is the goal of this research to develop a method of Automated Rapid Particle Investigation that will not look at fly ash as a bulk material but as individual particles. By examining each particle individually scientists and engineers will have the ability to study the variation in chemical composition by comparing the chemistry present in each particle. The method of investigation developed by this research provides a practical technique that will allow the automated chemical analysis of hundreds, or even thousands, of fly ash particles in a matter of minutes upon completion of sample preparation and automated scanning electron microscope (ASEM) scanning. This research does not examine the significance of the chemical compounds discovered; rather, only the investigation methodology is discussed. Further research will be done to examine the importance of the chemistry discovered with this automated rapid particle investigation technique.

  5. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  6. Automation in optics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollicove, Harvey M.; Moore, Duncan T.

    1991-01-01

    The optics industry has not followed the lead of the machining and electronics industries in applying advances in computer aided engineering (CAE), computer assisted manufacturing (CAM), automation or quality management techniques. Automation based on computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) and flexible machining systems (FMS) has been widely implemented in these industries. Optics continues to rely on standalone equipment that preserves the highly skilled, labor intensive optical fabrication systems developed in the 1940's. This paper describes development initiatives at the Center for Optics Manufacturing that will create computer integrated manufacturing technology and support processes for the optical industry.

  7. Automated software development workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering software development was automated using an expert system (rule-based) approach. The use of this technology offers benefits not available from current software development and maintenance methodologies. A workstation was built with a library or program data base with methods for browsing the designs stored; a system for graphical specification of designs including a capability for hierarchical refinement and definition in a graphical design system; and an automated code generation capability in FORTRAN. The workstation was then used in a demonstration with examples from an attitude control subsystem design for the space station. Documentation and recommendations are presented.

  8. Automating the CMS DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  9. Automated Library System Specifications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    AD-A78 95 AUTOMATED LIBRARY SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS(U) ARMY LIBRARY /i MANAGEMENT OFFICE ALEXANDRIA VA ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR INFORMATION... MANAGEMENT M B BONNETT JUN 86 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 9/2 NLEElIIhllEEEEE IllEEEEEllllEI .1lm lliml * ~I fI.L25 MI, [OCM RL,;OCLUTO fl. ’N k~ AUTOMATED LIBRARY...SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS .,I Prepared by Mary B. Bonnett ARMY LIBRARY MANAGEMENT OFFICE OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Lij

  10. Automated HMC assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    An automated gold wire bonder was characterized for bonding 1-mil gold wires to gallium-arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) which are used in microwave radar transmitter-receiver (T/R) modules. Acceptable gold wire bond test results were obtained for the fragile, 5-mil-thick GaAs MMICs with gold-metallized bond pads; and average wire bond pull strengths, shear strengths, and failure modes were determined. An automated aluminum wire bonder was modified to be used as a gold wire bonder so that a wedge bond capability was available for GaAs MMICs in addition to the gold ball bond capability.

  11. Automated knowledge generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.

    1988-01-01

    The general objectives of the NASA/UCF Automated Knowledge Generation Project were the development of an intelligent software system that could access CAD design data bases, interpret them, and generate a diagnostic knowledge base in the form of a system model. The initial area of concentration is in the diagnosis of the process control system using the Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) diagnostic system. A secondary objective was the study of general problems of automated knowledge generation. A prototype was developed, based on object-oriented language (Flavors).

  12. Principles of Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Ruth A.

    2007-07-01

    Roy M. Harrison, Editor RSC Publishing; ISBN 0854043713; × + 363 pp.; 2006; $69.95 Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes chemistry of the air, water, and soil. Although it may be confused with green chemistry, which deals with potential pollution reduction, environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical principles that occur in nature. Therefore, it is the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, water, and soil environments, and the effect of human activity on them. Environmental chemistry not only explores each of these environments, but also closely examines the interfaces and boundaries where the environments intersect.

  13. Altering user' acceptance of automation through prior automation exposure.

    PubMed

    Bekier, Marek; Molesworth, Brett R C

    2016-08-22

    Air navigation service providers worldwide see increased use of automation as one solution to overcome the capacity constraints imbedded in the present air traffic management (ATM) system. However, increased use of automation within any system is dependent on user acceptance. The present research sought to determine if the point at which an individual is no longer willing to accept or cooperate with automation can be manipulated. Forty participants underwent training on a computer-based air traffic control programme, followed by two ATM exercises (order counterbalanced), one with and one without the aid of automation. Results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation ('tipping point') decreased; suggesting it is indeed possible to alter automation acceptance. Practitioner Summary: This paper investigates whether the point at which a user of automation rejects automation (i.e. 'tipping point') is constant or can be manipulated. The results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation decreased; suggesting it is possible to alter automation acceptance.

  14. Fog, cloud, and dew chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, M.R.

    1989-02-28

    The spatial and temporal variations of fog/cloud chemistry were determined in the San Joaquin Valley, in the Los Angeles Basin, and in the Santa Barbara Channel area using automated fog- and cloudwater collectors that were designed and constructed for the project. A significant correlation was observed between the average nighttime cloud- and fogwater loadings of H/sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup /minus// and the maximum levels of O/sub 3//sup /minus//. Higher aldehydes, a series of dicarbonyls, and a variety of sulfonic acid salts formed by reaction of S(IV) and aldehydes were quantitatively determined in the droplet phase.

  15. Human Factors In Aircraft Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Report presents survey of state of art in human factors in automation of aircraft operation. Presents examination of aircraft automation and effects on flight crews in relation to human error and aircraft accidents.

  16. Cuby: An integrative framework for computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Řezáč, Jan

    2016-05-15

    Cuby is a computational chemistry framework written in the Ruby programming language. It provides unified access to a wide range of computational methods by interfacing external software and it implements various protocols that operate on their results. Using structured input files, elementary calculations can be combined into complex workflows. For users, Cuby provides a unified and userfriendly way to automate their work, seamlessly integrating calculations carried out in different computational chemistry programs. For example, the QM/MM module allows combining methods across the interfaced programs and the builtin molecular dynamics engine makes it possible to run a simulation on the resulting potential. For programmers, it provides high-level, object-oriented environment that allows rapid development and testing of new methods and computational protocols. The Cuby framework is available for download at http://cuby4.molecular.cz. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Impact of L-phenylalanine supplementation on the performance of three-week-old broilers fed diets containing ochratoxin A. 2. Effects on hematology and clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C A; Gibson, R M; Kubena, L F; Huff, W E; Harvey, R B

    1990-03-01

    Phenylalanine was evaluated for its ability to protect broiler chickens from the toxic effects of ochratoxin A (OA). A completely randomized 2-by-3 factorial design was utilized consisting of 0, .8, and 2.4% supplemental L-phenylalanine (Phe) and of 0 and 4 mg of OA per kg of diet. The basal diet contained 14% protein. Broilers were raised in battery brooders to 3 wk of age, when blood was collected and various hematological parameters were determined. The health status of the broilers was evaluated by assaying serum for various enzyme activities and metabolites using an automated, clinical chemistry analyzer. Adding OA to the broiler diets resulted in an increased concentration of serum hemoglobin as well as increased activity for cholinesterase and gamma glutamyl transferase but in decreased activity for aspartate amino transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline-phosphatase activity as well as decreased concentrations of total triglyceride and of inorganic phosphorus. Supplemental Phe decreased the concentrations of hemoglobin and serum glucose. The regression slopes for Phe at 4 mg of OA per kg of diet were significant for uric acid, creatinine, total protein, albumin, and cholesterol suggesting that supplemental Phe improved the health status of the broilers fed diets containing OA with respect to these parameters.

  18. Automated Management Of Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy

    1995-01-01

    Report presents main technical issues involved in computer-integrated documentation. Problems associated with automation of management and maintenance of documents analyzed from perspectives of artificial intelligence and human factors. Technologies that may prove useful in computer-integrated documentation reviewed: these include conventional approaches to indexing and retrieval of information, use of hypertext, and knowledge-based artificial-intelligence systems.

  19. Guide to Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toohill, Barbara G.

    Directed toward librarians and library administrators who wish to procure automated systems or services for their libraries, this guide offers practical suggestions, advice, and methods for determining requirements, estimating costs and benefits, writing specifications procuring systems, negotiating contracts, and installing systems. The advice…

  20. Automated Management Of Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy

    1995-01-01

    Report presents main technical issues involved in computer-integrated documentation. Problems associated with automation of management and maintenance of documents analyzed from perspectives of artificial intelligence and human factors. Technologies that may prove useful in computer-integrated documentation reviewed: these include conventional approaches to indexing and retrieval of information, use of hypertext, and knowledge-based artificial-intelligence systems.

  1. Microcontroller for automation application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The description of a microcontroller currently being developed for automation application was given. It is basically an 8-bit microcomputer with a 40K byte random access memory/read only memory, and can control a maximum of 12 devices through standard 15-line interface ports.

  2. Building Automation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  3. Automated Estimating System (AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, D.A.

    1989-09-01

    This document describes Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System, a personal computer-based software package designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Engineering Division. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System is capable of running in a multiuser environment across a token ring network. The token ring network makes possible services and applications that will more fully integrate all aspects of information processing, provides a central area for large data bases to reside, and allows access to the data base by multiple users. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System also has been enhanced to include an Assembly pricing data base that may be used to retrieve cost data into an estimate. A WBS Title File program has also been included in Version 3.1. The WBS Title File program allows for the creation of a WBS title file that has been integrated with the Automated Estimating System to provide WBS titles in update mode and in reports. This provides for consistency in WBS titles and provides the capability to display WBS titles on reports generated at a higher WBS level.

  4. Automated Essay Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikli, Semire

    2006-01-01

    The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES) has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali,…

  5. Automated Microbial Genome Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam

    2009-05-29

    Miriam Land of the DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk on the current state and future challenges of moving toward automated microbial genome annotation at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  6. Building Automation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  7. Automated Tendering and Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeZorzi, James M.

    1980-01-01

    The Middlesex County Board of Education in Hyde Park (Ontario) has developed an automated tendering/purchasing system for ordering standard items that has reduced by 80 percent the time required for tendering, evaluating, awarding, and ordering items. (Author/MLF)

  8. Automated conflict resolution issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  9. ATC automation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    Information on the design of human-centered tools for terminal area air traffic control (ATC) is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on payoffs and products, guidelines, ATC as a team process, automation tools for ATF, and the traffic management advisor.

  10. Automated Administrative Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrie, M. D.; Jarrett, J. R.; Reising, S. A.; Hodge, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Improved productivity and more effective response to information requirements for internal management, NASA Centers, and Headquarters resulted from using automated techniques. Modules developed to provide information on manpower, RTOPS, full time equivalency, and physical space reduced duplication, increased communication, and saved time. There is potential for greater savings by sharing and integrating with those who have the same requirements.

  11. Automating Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, James

    1996-01-01

    Presents a four-phase plan for small libraries strategizing for automation: inventory and weeding, data conversion, implementation, and enhancements. Other topics include selecting a system, MARC records, compatibility, ease of use, industry standards, searching capabilities, support services, system security, screen displays, circulation modules,…

  12. Automated Lumber Processing

    Treesearch

    Powsiri Klinkhachorn; J. Moody; Philip A. Araman

    1995-01-01

    For the past few decades, researchers have devoted time and effort to apply automation and modern computer technologies towards improving the productivity of traditional industries. To be competitive, one must streamline operations and minimize production costs, while maintaining an acceptable margin of profit. This paper describes the effort of one such endeavor...

  13. Personnel Department Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David

    In 1989, the Austin Independent School District's Office of Research and Evaluation was directed to monitor the automation of personnel information and processes in the district's Department of Personnel. Earlier, a study committee appointed by the Superintendent during the 1988-89 school year identified issues related to Personnel Department…

  14. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  15. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  16. Validating Automated Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Jared; Van Moere, Alistair; Cheng, Jian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that supports the valid use of scores from fully automatic tests of spoken language ability to indicate a person's effectiveness in spoken communication. The paper reviews the constructs, scoring, and the concurrent validity evidence of "facility-in-L2" tests, a family of automated spoken language tests in Spanish,…

  17. Automated EEG acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Hillman, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Automated self-contained portable device can be used by technicians with minimal training. Data acquired from patient at remote site are transmitted to centralized interpretation center using conventional telephone equipment. There, diagnostic information is analyzed, and results are relayed back to remote site.

  18. Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, Larry D.; Lee, Patricia L.; Cook, James R.; Wilhite, Elmer L.

    2008-01-15

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducts performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. These performance assessments, which result in limits on the amounts of radiological substances that can be placed in the waste disposal facilities, consider numerous potential exposure pathways that could occur in the future. One set of exposure scenarios, known as inadvertent intruder analysis, considers the impact on hypothetical individuals who are assumed to inadvertently intrude onto the waste disposal site. Inadvertent intruder analysis considers three distinct scenarios for exposure referred to as the agriculture scenario, the resident scenario, and the post-drilling scenario. Each of these scenarios has specific exposure pathways that contribute to the overall dose for the scenario. For the inadvertent intruder analysis, the calculation of dose for the exposure pathways is a relatively straightforward algebraic calculation that utilizes dose conversion factors. Prior to 2004, these calculations were performed using an Excel spreadsheet. However, design checks of the spreadsheet calculations revealed that errors could be introduced inadvertently when copying spreadsheet formulas cell by cell and finding these errors was tedious and time consuming. This weakness led to the specification of functional requirements to create a software application that would automate the calculations for inadvertent intruder analysis using a controlled source of input parameters. This software application, named the Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application, has undergone rigorous testing of the internal calculations and meets software QA requirements. The Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application was intended to replace the previous spreadsheet analyses with an automated application that was verified to produce the same calculations and

  19. Automating spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Fred T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses the architecture of software utilized in spectroscopic measurements. As optical coatings become more sophisticated, there is mounting need to automate data acquisition (DAQ) from spectrophotometers. Such need is exacerbated when 100% inspection is required, ancillary devices are utilized, cost reduction is crucial, or security is vital. While instrument manufacturers normally provide point-and-click DAQ software, an application programming interface (API) may be missing. In such cases automation is impossible or expensive. An API is typically provided in libraries (*.dll, *.ocx) which may be embedded in user-developed applications. Users can thereby implement DAQ automation in several Windows languages. Another possibility, developed by FTG as an alternative to instrument manufacturers' software, is the ActiveX application (*.exe). ActiveX, a component of many Windows applications, provides means for programming and interoperability. This architecture permits a point-and-click program to act as automation client and server. Excel, for example, can control and be controlled by DAQ applications. Most importantly, ActiveX permits ancillary devices such as barcode readers and XY-stages to be easily and economically integrated into scanning procedures. Since an ActiveX application has its own user-interface, it can be independently tested. The ActiveX application then runs (visibly or invisibly) under DAQ software control. Automation capabilities are accessed via a built-in spectro-BASIC language with industry-standard (VBA-compatible) syntax. Supplementing ActiveX, spectro-BASIC also includes auxiliary serial port commands for interfacing programmable logic controllers (PLC). A typical application is automatic filter handling.

  20. Automation--down to the nuts and bolts.

    PubMed

    Fix, R J; Rowe, J M; McConnell, B C

    2000-01-01

    Laboratories that once viewed automation as an expensive luxury are now looking to automation as a solution to increase sample throughput, to help ensure data integrity and to improve laboratory safety. The question is no longer, 'Should we automate?', but 'How should we approach automation?' A laboratory may choose from three approaches when deciding to automate: (1) contract with a third party vendor to produce a turnkey system, (2) develop and fabricate the system in-house or (3) some combination of approaches (1) and (2). The best approach for a given laboratory depends upon its available resources. The first lesson to be learned in automation is that no matter how straightforward an idea appears in the beginning, the solution will not be realized until many complex problems have been resolved. Issues dealing with sample vessel manipulation, liquid handling and system control must be addressed before a final design can be developed. This requires expertise in engineering, electronics, programming and chemistry. Therefore, the team concept of automation should be employed to help ensure success. This presentation discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the three approaches to automation. The development of an automated sample handling and control system for the STAR System focused microwave will be used to illustrate the complexities encountered in a seemingly simple project, and to highlight the importance of the team concept to automation no matter which approach is taken. The STAR System focused microwave from CEM Corporation is an open vessel digestion system with six microwave cells. This system is used to prepare samples for trace metal determination. The automated sample handling was developed around a XYZ motorized gantry system. Grippers were specially designed to perform several different functions and to provide feedback to the control software. Software was written in Visual Basic 5.0 to control the movement of the samples and the operation and

  1. Automation — down to the nuts and bolts

    PubMed Central

    Fix Sr, Robert J.; Rowe, Jannell M.; McConnell, Bain C.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratories that once viewed automation as an expensive luxury are now looking to automation as a solution to increase sample throughput, to help ensure data integrity and to improve laboratory safety. The question is no longer, ‘Should we automate?’, but ‘How should we approach automation?’ A laboratory may choose from three approaches when deciding to automate: (1) contract with a third party vendor to produce a turnkey system, (2) develop and fabricate the system in-house or (3) some combination of approaches (1) and (2). The best approach for a given laboratory depends upon its available resources. The first lesson to be learned in automation is that no matter how straightforward an idea appears in the beginning, the solution will not be realized until many complex problems have been resolved. Issues dealing with sample vessel manipulation, liquid handling and system control must be addressed before a final design can be developed. This requires expertise in engineering, electronics, programming and chemistry. Therefore, the team concept of automation should be employed to help ensure success. This presentation discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the three approaches to automation. The development of an automated sample handling and control system for the STAR™ System focused microwave will be used to illustrate the complexities encountered in a seemingly simple project, and to highlight the importance of the team concept to automation no matter which approach is taken. The STAR™ System focused microwave from CEM Corporation is an open vessel digestion system with six microwave cells. This system is used to prepare samples for trace metal determination. The automated sample handling was developed around a XYZ motorized gantry system. Grippers were specially designed to perform several different functions and to provide feedback to the control software. Software was written in Visual Basic 5.0 to control the movement of the samples and the

  2. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for ...

  3. Green Chemistry Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolopajlo, Larry

    2017-02-01

    This chapter attempts to show how the practice of chemistry teaching and learning is enriched by the incorporation of green chemistry (GC) into lectures and labs. To support this viewpoint, evidence from a wide range of published papers serve as a cogent argument that GC attracts and engages both science and nonscience students, enhances chemistry content knowledge, and improves the image of the field, while preparing the world for a sustainable future. Published pedagogy associated with green and sustainable chemistry is critically reviewed and discussed.

  4. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  5. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  6. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Industry, Coal Gasification , Electrochemistry, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds, Organophosphorus Compounds, Petroleum Processing Technology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Polymers and Polymerization and, Radiation Chemistry.

  7. Automated optical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Automation and polymer science represent fundamental new technologies which can be directed toward realizing the goal of establishing a domestic, world-class, commercial optics business. Use of innovative optical designs using precision polymer optics will enable the US to play a vital role in the next generation of commercial optical products. The increased cost savings inherent in the utilization of optical-grade polymers outweighs almost every advantage of using glass for high volume situations. Optical designers must gain experience with combined refractive/diffractive designs and broaden their knowledge base regarding polymer technology beyond a cursory intellectual exercise. Implementation of a fully automated assembly system, combined with utilization of polymer optics, constitutes the type of integrated manufacturing process which will enable the US to successfully compete with the low-cost labor employed in the Far East, as well as to produce an equivalent product.

  8. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  9. The automated command transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Satoh, S.

    A technique for automated command transmission (ACT) to GEO-stationed satellites is presented. The system is intended for easing the command center workload. The ACT system determines the relation of the commands to on-board units, connects the telemetry with on-board units, defines the control path on the spacecraft, identifies the correspondence of back-up units to primary units, and ascertains sunlight or eclipse conditions. The system also has the address of satellite and command decoders, the ID and content for the mission command sequence, group and inhibit codes, a listing of all available commands, and restricts the data to a command sequence. Telemetry supplies data for automated problem correction. All other missions operations are terminated during system recovery data processing after a crash. The ACT system is intended for use with the GMS spacecraft.

  10. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  11. Automated Pollution Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Patterned after the Cassini Resource Exchange (CRE), Sholtz and Associates established the Automated Credit Exchange (ACE), an Internet-based concept that automates the auctioning of "pollution credits" in Southern California. An early challenge of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Cassini mission was allocating the spacecraft's resources. To support the decision-making process, the CRE was developed. The system removes the need for the science instrument manager to know the individual instruments' requirements for the spacecraft resources. Instead, by utilizing principles of exchange, the CRE induces the instrument teams to reveal their requirements. In doing so, they arrive at an efficient allocation of spacecraft resources by trading among themselves. A Southern California RECLAIM air pollution credit trading market has been set up using same bartering methods utilized in the Cassini mission in order to help companies keep pollution and costs down.

  12. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  13. Terminal automation system maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Coffelt, D.; Hewitt, J.

    1997-01-01

    Nothing has improved petroleum product loading in recent years more than terminal automation systems. The presence of terminal automation systems (TAS) at loading racks has increased operational efficiency and safety and enhanced their accounting and management capabilities. However, like all finite systems, they occasionally malfunction or fail. Proper servicing and maintenance can minimize this. And in the unlikely event a TAS breakdown does occur, prompt and effective troubleshooting can reduce its impact on terminal productivity. To accommodate around-the-clock loading at racks, increasingly unattended by terminal personnel, TAS maintenance, servicing and troubleshooting has become increasingly demanding. It has also become increasingly important. After 15 years of trial and error at petroleum and petrochemical storage and transfer terminals, a number of successful troubleshooting programs have been developed. These include 24-hour {open_quotes}help hotlines,{close_quotes} internal (terminal company) and external (supplier) support staff, and {open_quotes}layered{close_quotes} support. These programs are described.

  14. Automated campaign system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondran, Gary; Chao, Hui; Lin, Xiaofan; Beyer, Dirk; Joshi, Parag; Atkins, Brian; Obrador, Pere

    2006-02-01

    To run a targeted campaign involves coordination and management across numerous organizations and complex process flows. Everything from market analytics on customer databases, acquiring content and images, composing the materials, meeting the sponsoring enterprise brand standards, driving through production and fulfillment, and evaluating results; all processes are currently performed by experienced highly trained staff. Presented is a developed solution that not only brings together technologies that automate each process, but also automates the entire flow so that a novice user could easily run a successful campaign from their desktop. This paper presents the technologies, structure, and process flows used to bring this system together. Highlighted will be how the complexity of running a targeted campaign is hidden from the user through technologies, all while providing the benefits of a professionally managed campaign.

  15. Automated chemiluminescence immunoassay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Omar S.; Mattingly, G. P.; Genger, K.; Mackowiak, J.; Butler, J.; Pepe, C.; Zurek, T. F.; Abunimeh, N.

    1993-06-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) detection offers potential for high sensitivity immunoassays (CLIAs). Several approaches were attempted to automate CL measurements. Those include the use of photographic film, clear microtitration plates, and magnetic separation. We describe a photon counting detection apparatus that performs (CLIA) measurements. The CL detector moves toward a disposable reaction vessel to create a light-tight seal and then triggers and integrates a CL signal. The capture uses antibody coated polystyrene microparticles. A porous matrix, which is a part of a disposable reaction tray, entraps the microparticle-captured reaction product. The CL signal emanated off the immune complex immobilized by the porous matrix is detected. The detection system is a part of a fully automated immunoassay analyzer. Methods of achieving high sensitivities are discussed.

  16. Automated Chromosome Breakage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    An automated karyotyping machine was built at JPL in 1972. It does computerized karyotyping, but it has some hardware limitations. The image processing hardware that was available at a reasonable price in 1972 was marginal, at best, for this job. In the meantime, NASA has developed an interest in longer term spaceflights and an interest in using chromosome breakage studies as a dosimeter for radiation or perhaps other damage that might occur to the tissues. This uses circulating lymphocytes as a physiological dosimeter looking for chromosome breakage on long-term spaceflights. For that reason, we have reactivated the automated karyotyping work at JPL. An update on that work, and a description of where it appears to be headed is presented.

  17. Automated Chromosome Breakage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    An automated karyotyping machine was built at JPL in 1972. It does computerized karyotyping, but it has some hardware limitations. The image processing hardware that was available at a reasonable price in 1972 was marginal, at best, for this job. In the meantime, NASA has developed an interest in longer term spaceflights and an interest in using chromosome breakage studies as a dosimeter for radiation or perhaps other damage that might occur to the tissues. This uses circulating lymphocytes as a physiological dosimeter looking for chromosome breakage on long-term spaceflights. For that reason, we have reactivated the automated karyotyping work at JPL. An update on that work, and a description of where it appears to be headed is presented.

  18. The automation of science.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Rowland, Jem; Oliver, Stephen G; Young, Michael; Aubrey, Wayne; Byrne, Emma; Liakata, Maria; Markham, Magdalena; Pir, Pinar; Soldatova, Larisa N; Sparkes, Andrew; Whelan, Kenneth E; Clare, Amanda

    2009-04-03

    The basis of science is the hypothetico-deductive method and the recording of experiments in sufficient detail to enable reproducibility. We report the development of Robot Scientist "Adam," which advances the automation of both. Adam has autonomously generated functional genomics hypotheses about the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and experimentally tested these hypotheses by using laboratory automation. We have confirmed Adam's conclusions through manual experiments. To describe Adam's research, we have developed an ontology and logical language. The resulting formalization involves over 10,000 different research units in a nested treelike structure, 10 levels deep, that relates the 6.6 million biomass measurements to their logical description. This formalization describes how a machine contributed to scientific knowledge.

  19. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  20. Serum sickness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y

    1986-01-01

    Numerous agents are known to cause serum sickness reactions. Although generally a benign disorder, serum sickness must be distinguished from various rheumatic and infectious disorders. The causative agent must be identified in order to avoid subsequent reactions. With the introduction of new drugs and biotechnically produced hormones and antibodies, new causes of serum sickness reactions are likely.

  1. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Sewy, D.; Pickering, C.; Sauers, R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the phase 2 of the power subsystem automation study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using computer software to manage an aspect of the electrical power subsystem on a space station. The state of the art in expert systems software was investigated in this study. This effort resulted in the demonstration of prototype expert system software for managing one aspect of a simulated space station power subsystem.

  2. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  3. Automated RTOP Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology electronic information system network from 1983 to 1985 is illustrated. The RTOP automated system takes advantage of existing hardware, software, and expertise, and provides: (1) computerized cover sheet and resources forms; (2) electronic signature and transmission; (3) a data-based information system; (4) graphics; (5) intercenter communications; (6) management information; and (7) text editing. The system is coordinated with Headquarters efforts in codes R,E, and T.

  4. Automated RSO Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2016-09-01

    A methodology for assessing the attitude stability of a Resident Space Object (RSO) using visual magnitude data is presented and then scaled to run in an automated fashion across the entire satellite catalog. Results obtained by applying the methodology to the Commercial Space Operations Center (COMSpOC) catalog are presented and summarized, identifying objects that have changed stability. We also examine the timeline for detecting the transition from stable to unstable attitude

  5. Automated Nitrocellulose Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    is acceptable. (4) As would be expected from the theory of osmosis , a high saline content in the dialysis recipient stream (countersolution) is of...Block 39, II different from Report; IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. KEY WOROS (Continue on rereri Analysis Automated analysis Dialysis Glyceryl...Technicon AutoAnalyzer, involves aspiration of a stirred nitrocellulose suspension, dialysis against 9 percent saline, and hydrolysis with 5N sodium

  6. Cavendish Balance Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report for a project carried out to modify a manual commercial Cavendish Balance for automated use in cryostat. The scope of this project was to modify an off-the-shelf manually operated Cavendish Balance to allow for automated operation for periods of hours or days in cryostat. The purpose of this modification was to allow the balance to be used in the study of effects of superconducting materials on the local gravitational field strength to determine if the strength of gravitational fields can be reduced. A Cavendish Balance was chosen because it is a fairly simple piece of equipment for measuring gravity, one the least accurately known and least understood physical constants. The principle activities that occurred under this purchase order were: (1) All the components necessary to hold and automate the Cavendish Balance in a cryostat were designed. Engineering drawings were made of custom parts to be fabricated, other off-the-shelf parts were procured; (2) Software was written in LabView to control the automation process via a stepper motor controller and stepper motor, and to collect data from the balance during testing; (3)Software was written to take the data collected from the Cavendish Balance and reduce it to give a value for the gravitational constant; (4) The components of the system were assembled and fitted to a cryostat. Also the LabView hardware including the control computer, stepper motor driver, data collection boards, and necessary cabling were assembled; and (5) The system was operated for a number of periods, data collected, and reduced to give an average value for the gravitational constant.

  7. Automated Cooperative Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Pahle, Joseph; Brown, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the Automated Cooperative Trajectories project. An introduction to the phenomena of wake vortices is given, along with a summary of past research into the possibility of extracting energy from the wake by flying close parallel trajectories. Challenges and barriers to adoption of civilian automatic wake surfing technology are identified. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described that will support future research. Finally, a roadmap for future research and technology transition is proposed.

  8. Sigma metrics used to assess analytical quality of clinical chemistry assays: importance of the allowable total error (TEa) target.

    PubMed

    Hens, Koen; Berth, Mario; Armbruster, Dave; Westgard, Sten

    2014-07-01

    Six Sigma metrics were used to assess the analytical quality of automated clinical chemistry and immunoassay tests in a large Belgian clinical laboratory and to explore the importance of the source used for estimation of the allowable total error. Clinical laboratories are continually challenged to maintain analytical quality. However, it is difficult to measure assay quality objectively and quantitatively. The Sigma metric is a single number that estimates quality based on the traditional parameters used in the clinical laboratory: allowable total error (TEa), precision and bias. In this study, Sigma metrics were calculated for 41 clinical chemistry assays for serum and urine on five ARCHITECT c16000 chemistry analyzers. Controls at two analyte concentrations were tested and Sigma metrics were calculated using three different TEa targets (Ricos biological variability, CLIA, and RiliBÄK). Sigma metrics varied with analyte concentration, the TEa target, and between/among analyzers. Sigma values identified those assays that are analytically robust and require minimal quality control rules and those that exhibit more variability and require more complex rules. The analyzer to analyzer variability was assessed on the basis of Sigma metrics. Six Sigma is a more efficient way to control quality, but the lack of TEa targets for many analytes and the sometimes inconsistent TEa targets from different sources are important variables for the interpretation and the application of Sigma metrics in a routine clinical laboratory. Sigma metrics are a valuable means of comparing the analytical quality of two or more analyzers to ensure the comparability of patient test results.

  9. Automation in biological crystallization.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  10. Automation in biological crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Stewart, Patrick; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given. PMID:24915074

  11. Autonomy, Automation, and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Philip R.

    1987-02-01

    Aerospace industry interest in autonomy and automation, given fresh impetus by the national goal of establishing a Space Station, is becoming a major item of research and technology development. The promise of new technology arising from research in Artificial Intelligence (AI) has focused much attention on its potential in autonomy and automation. These technologies can improve performance in autonomous control functions that involve planning, scheduling, and fault diagnosis of complex systems. There are, however, many aspects of system and subsystem design in an autonomous system that impact AI applications, but do not directly involve AI technology. Development of a system control architecture, establishment of an operating system within the design, providing command and sensory data collection features appropriate to automated operation, and the use of design analysis tools to support system engineering are specific examples of major design issues. Aspects such as these must also receive attention and technology development support if we are to implement complex autonomous systems within the realistic limitations of mass, power, cost, and available flight-qualified technology that are all-important to a flight project.

  12. Automating existing stations

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.E.

    1986-09-01

    The task was to automate 20 major compressor stations along ANR Pipeline Co.'s Southeastern and Southwestern pipelines in as many months. Meeting this schedule required standardized hardware and software design. Working with Bristol Babcock Co., ANR came up with an off-the-shelf station automation package suitable for a variety of compressor stations. The project involved 148 engines with 488,880-hp in the 20 stations. ANR Pipeline developed software for these engines and compressors, including horsepower prediction and efficiency. The system places processors ''intelligence'' at each station and engine to monitor and control operations. The station processor receives commands from the company's gas dispatch center at Detroit and informs dispatchers of alarms, conditions, and decision it makes. The automation system is controlled by the Detroit center through a central communications network. Operating orders from the center are sent to the station processor, which obeys orders using the most efficient means of operation at the station's disposal. In a malfunction, a control and communications backup system takes over. Commands and information are directly transmitted between the center and the individual compressor stations. Stations receive their orders based on throughput, with suction and discharge pressure overrides. Additionally, a discharge temperature override protects pipeline coatings.

  13. Automation of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Chang, Bo-Jui; Hsu, Long

    2000-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a newly developed instrument, which makes possible the manipulation of micro-optical particles under a microscope. In this paper, we present the automation of an optical tweezers which consists of a modified optical tweezers, equipped with two motorized actuators to deflect a 1 W argon laser beam, and a computer control system including a joystick. The trapping of a single bead and a group of lactoacidofilus was shown, separately. With the aid of the joystick and two auxiliary cursers superimposed on the real-time image of a trapped bead, we demonstrated the simple and convenient operation of the automated optical tweezers. By steering the joystick and then pressing a button on it, we assign a new location for the trapped bead to move to. The increment of the motion 0.04 (mu) m for a 20X objective, is negligible. With a fast computer for image processing, the manipulation of the trapped bead is smooth and accurate. The automation of the optical tweezers is also programmable. This technique may be applied to accelerate the DNA hybridization in a gene chip. The combination of the modified optical tweezers with the computer control system provides a tool for precise manipulation of micro particles in many scientific fields.

  14. Identification of serum analytes and metabolites associated with aerobic capacity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies aimed at identifying serum markers of cellular metabolism (biomarkers) that are associated at baseline with aerobic capacity (V02 max) in young, healthy individuals have yet to be reported. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to use the standard chemistry screen and untargeted mass ...

  15. NAA For Human Serum Analysis: Comparison With Conventional Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Laura C.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Jose A. G.; Azevedo, Maria R.

    2010-08-04

    Instrumental and Comparator methods of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) were applied to determine elements of clinical relevancy in serum samples of adult population (Sao Paulo city, Brazil). A comparison with the conventional analyses, Colorimetric for calcium, Titrymetric for chlorine and Ion Specific Electrode for sodium and potassium determination were also performed permitting a discussion about the performance of NAA methods for clinical chemistry research.

  16. [Use of formulas for calculating serum osmolality].

    PubMed

    Forzy, G; Quelquejay, J; Dhondt, J-L

    2003-01-01

    Osmolality can be measured or calculated. More than ten formulas have been proposed for calculating serum osmolality from chemical concentrations. The aim of this work was to compare results obtained whith some of these formulas, those calculated in the laboratory using a multiple regression model and measurements with an osmometer. Scattered results for natremia and chloremia, depending on the automate, led us to define formulas adapted for each measurement system in order to reduce the risk of error in the evaluation of the " osmolar gap ".

  17. AUTOMATED INADVERTENT INTRUDER APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L; Patricia Lee, P; Jim Cook, J; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2007-05-29

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducts performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. These performance assessments, which result in limits on the amounts of radiological substances that can be placed in the waste disposal facilities, consider numerous potential exposure pathways that could occur in the future. One set of exposure scenarios, known as inadvertent intruder analysis, considers the impact on hypothetical individuals who are assumed to inadvertently intrude onto the waste disposal site. Inadvertent intruder analysis considers three distinct scenarios for exposure referred to as the agriculture scenario, the resident scenario, and the post-drilling scenario. Each of these scenarios has specific exposure pathways that contribute to the overall dose for the scenario. For the inadvertent intruder analysis, the calculation of dose for the exposure pathways is a relatively straightforward algebraic calculation that utilizes dose conversion factors. Prior to 2004, these calculations were performed using an Excel spreadsheet. However, design checks of the spreadsheet calculations revealed that errors could be introduced inadvertently when copying spreadsheet formulas cell by cell and finding these errors was tedious and time consuming. This weakness led to the specification of functional requirements to create a software application that would automate the calculations for inadvertent intruder analysis using a controlled source of input parameters. This software application, named the Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application, has undergone rigorous testing of the internal calculations and meets software QA requirements. The Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application was intended to replace the previous spreadsheet analyses with an automated application that was verified to produce the same calculations and

  18. Expanding opportunities for mining bioactive chemistry from patents.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Bioactive structures published in medicinal chemistry patents typically exceed those in papers by at least twofold and may precede them by several years. The Big-Bang of open automated extraction since 2012 has contributed to over 15 million patent-derived compounds in PubChem. While mapping between chemical structures, assay results and protein targets from patent documents is challenging, these relationships can be harvested using open tools and are beginning to be curated into databases.

  19. Expanding opportunities for mining bioactive chemistry from patents

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive structures published in medicinal chemistry patents typically exceed those in papers by at least twofold and may precede them by several years. The Big-Bang of open automated extraction since 2012 has contributed to over 15 million patent-derived compounds in PubChem. While mapping between chemical structures, assay results and protein targets from patent documents is challenging, these relationships can be harvested using open tools and are beginning to be curated into databases. PMID:26194581

  20. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  1. Chemistry from Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jan; Donaldson, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Describes the "Chemistry from Issues" project at Chelsea College. Provides the background information, rationale, and overall structure of a proposed course about the importance of chemistry to common culture. Outlines one module about the British steel industry that has been taught at King's College. (TW)

  2. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  3. Pre-Tech Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Junior Coll., Jacksonville.

    This course guide is designed to aid chemistry instructors in teaching the skills and knowledge needed by those students planning to take junior college chemistry and is composed of 11 terminal performance objectives, with intermediate performance objectives and sample criterion measures. Suggestions for related laboratory activities are also…

  4. Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  5. Cooking with Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosser, Arthur E.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests chemistry of cooking and analysis of culinary recipes as subject matter for introducing chemistry to an audience, especially to individuals with neutral or negative attitudes toward science. Includes sample recipes and experiments and a table listing scientific topics with related cooking examples. (JN)

  6. Career Options in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a credit/no credit course which focuses on career options in chemistry. The course (consisting of 15 one-hour seminar-type sessions) includes guest speakers for several sessions and an emphasis (in introductory sessions) on graduate school in chemistry, the chemical industry, resumes, and interviews. Also briefly describes an internship…

  7. Brushing Up on Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantow, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed for use during National Chemistry Week 2002 with the theme "Chemistry Keeps Us Clean". Allows students to discover more about a cleaning product they use everyday. Students make their own toothpaste and compare its properties with those of commercial toothpaste. (MM)

  8. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  9. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  10. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  11. Stratospheric chemistry and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Garcia, Maria M.

    1990-01-01

    A Chemical Tracer Model (CTM) that can use wind field data generated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) is developed to implement chemistry in the three dimensional GCM of the middle atmosphere. Initially, chemical tracers with simple first order losses such as N2O are used. Successive models are to incorporate more complex ozone chemistry.

  12. Bioorganic and bioinorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E; Creus, Marc; Gademann, Karl; Giese, Bernd; Ward, Thomas R; Woggon, Wolf D; Chougnet, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    The interdisciplinary projects in bioinorganic and bioorganic chemistry of the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel led to the preparation of new systems that mimic biologically important processes and to the discovery of compounds from natural sources which are very promising with respect to medical applications. The advances in these areas are reported here.

  13. Chemistry of Moth Repellents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    An effective way to teach chemistry is to examine the substances used in daily life from a pedagogical viewpoint, from the overlap of science, technology, and society (STS). A study aims to engage students in the topic of moth repellents and to encourage them to investigate the chemistry in this familiar product using a set of questions.

  14. Movies in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  15. Chemistry and Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, D. W.

    1970-01-01

    In the second article of a series, the author discusses some of the interactions between chemistry and philosophy. Evaluates chemistry's role within the scientific enterprise. Traces the rise and fall of the logical atom and argues for a new way of looking at science as an educational instrument. (RR)

  16. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  17. Organic Chemistry Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradt, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Student-led workshops are helping undergraduate students learn from each other as they tackle organic chemistry. Each week, small groups brainstorm tough problems in sessions guided by upper-class students who have taken and passed the course. Debating and discussing chemistry problems with peers engages students with the material and boosts…

  18. Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  19. Opportunities in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Because of the changes occurring in the chemical sciences, a new survey of chemistry and its intellectual and economic impact was clearly needed. This report presents a current assessment of the status of chemistry and of the future opportunities in the field. This analysis contains: (1) an introductory chapter (establishing the need for the…

  20. Mathematics and Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, R.; Stumbles, A.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between mathematics and chemistry has been changing rapidly in recent years. Some chemistry teachers have experienced difficulties in their teaching with the introduction of modern mathematics in the schools. Some suggestions for reinforcing the concepts and language of modern mathematics are put forth. (Author/MA)

  1. Movies in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  2. Chemistry of Moth Repellents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    An effective way to teach chemistry is to examine the substances used in daily life from a pedagogical viewpoint, from the overlap of science, technology, and society (STS). A study aims to engage students in the topic of moth repellents and to encourage them to investigate the chemistry in this familiar product using a set of questions.

  3. Brushing Up on Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantow, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed for use during National Chemistry Week 2002 with the theme "Chemistry Keeps Us Clean". Allows students to discover more about a cleaning product they use everyday. Students make their own toothpaste and compare its properties with those of commercial toothpaste. (MM)

  4. Chemistry and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigston, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between chemisty and biology in the science curriculum. Points out the differences in perception of the disciplines, which the physical scientists favoring reductionism. Suggests that biology departments offer a special course for chemistry students, just as the chemistry departments have done for biology students.…

  5. Automated Proactive Fault Isolation: A Key to Automated Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.

    2007-07-31

    In this paper, we present a generic model for automated continuous commissioing and then delve in detail into one of the processes, proactive testing for fault isolation, which is key to automating commissioning. The automated commissioining process uses passive observation-based fault detction and diagnostic techniques, followed by automated proactive testing for fault isolation, automated fault evaluation, and automated reconfiguration of controls together to continuously keep equipment controlled and running as intended. Only when hard failures occur or a physical replacement is required does the process require human intervention, and then sufficient information is provided by the automated commissioning system to target manual maintenance where it is needed. We then focus on fault isolation by presenting detailed logic that can be used to automatically isolate faults in valves, a common component in HVAC systems, as an example of how automated proactive fault isolation can be accomplished. We conclude the paper with a discussion of how this approach to isolating faults can be applied to other common HVAC components and their automated commmissioning and a summary of key conclusions of the paper.

  6. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  7. Serum Zinc, Iron, and Copper Concentrations during Typhoid Fever in Man: Effect of Chloramphenicol Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-12

    Received Nov. 12I~aepe Dec. 16,1974. Study 1. Nineteen healthy men, inmates of the MS CLINICAL CHEMISTRY , Vol. 21.14o. 4, 1975 - Best Available Copy Maryland...thenap and mserum rm concentrfations. nificant depressions of serum iron and zinc conoen- aM CLINICAL CHEMISTRY , Vol. 21.4o. 4. 10754 *IE EWZX 1~001...evidenc, was in the absence between 30-40% of the zinc bound in serum (16), we CLINICAL CHEMISTRY . Vol. 21. No. 4,1975 531 saw no significant changes in

  8. Automation in organizations: Eternal conflict

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieterly, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Some ideas on and insights into the problems associated with automation in organizations are presented with emphasis on the concept of automation, its relationship to the individual, and its impact on system performance. An analogy is drawn, based on an American folk hero, to emphasize the extent of the problems encountered when dealing with automation within an organization. A model is proposed to focus attention on a set of appropriate dimensions. The function allocation process becomes a prominent aspect of the model. The current state of automation research is mentioned in relation to the ideas introduced. Proposed directions for an improved understanding of automation's effect on the individual's efficiency are discussed. The importance of understanding the individual's perception of the system in terms of the degree of automation is highlighted.

  9. The first 110 years of laboratory automation: technologies, applications, and the creative scientist.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kevin

    2012-12-01

    Prior to the widespread availability of electronic components after the Second World War, laboratory automation was constructed by end users and designed for specific tasks, mostly filtration, percolation, and washing operations. The earliest mention of automation in the chemical literature of the United States was in 1875, announcing a device to wash filtrates unattended. In the years that followed, a small number of commercial automated devices were sold, including large grinders for the preparation of coal samples. Around 1900, power stations began adopting automated carbon dioxide analysis. The development of electrical equipment for conductivity measurements enabled the first commercial, automated gas detection instruments for laboratory and field use around the time of the First World War. The growth of industrial production in the 1920s led to a desire for automated testing equipment, and the growing rubber industry was among the more successful early adapters. Photoelectric cells were first used in the early 1930s to create automatic titrators, and by the 1950s, automatic titration encompassed coulometric, potentiometric, and photometric devices. Combinations of chart recorders, photocells, and timers created other types of automated equipment such as stills and fraction collectors. The first true stand-alone automation for the laboratory included clinical chemistry analyzers, introduced during the 1950s.

  10. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry: Modification of Participant Selection Criteria and... (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...) National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

  11. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  12. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  13. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  14. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  15. EVOLVING FROM GREEN CHEMISTRY TO SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The twelve principles of green chemistry provide a foundation and pathway which allows researchers to incorporate greenness into existing reactions or when developing new technologies. Research from our laboratory has adopted many of these principles and utlizes them as a major c...

  16. EVOLVING FROM GREEN CHEMISTRY TO SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The twelve principles of green chemistry provide a foundation and pathway which allows researchers to incorporate greenness into existing reactions or when developing new technologies. Research from our laboratory has adopted many of these principles and utlizes them as a major c...

  17. Environmental chemistry. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    This book is organized around several major sections: aquatic Chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, the geosphere and hazardous wastes, toxicological chemistry, and resources and energy. Specific topics discussed in the book include a general introduction to environment chemistry, basic principles of aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, the essential role of microorganisms in aquatic chemical phenomena, atmospheric chemistry, a discussion of major threats to the global atmosphere (particularly greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting chemicals), the geosphere and hazardous substances, soil chemistry, and the nature and sources of hazardous wastes. The environmental chemistry of hazardous wastes, their treatment, minimization, and recycling, and the effects of these hazardous substances in also presented.

  18. DNA functionalization by dynamic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kanlidere, Zeynep; Jochim, Oleg; Cal, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is an attractive method to efficiently generate libraries of molecules from simpler building blocks by reversible reactions under thermodynamic control. Here we focus on the chemical modification of DNA oligonucleotides with acyclic diol linkers and demonstrate their potential for the deoxyribonucleic acid functionalization and generation of libraries of reversibly interconverting building blocks. The syntheses of phosphoramidite building blocks derived from D-threoninol are presented in two variants with protected amino or thiol groups. The threoninol building blocks were successfully incorporated via automated solid-phase synthesis into 13mer oligonucleotides. The amino group containing phosphoramidite was used together with complementary single-strand DNA templates that influenced the Watson–Crick base-pairing equilibrium in the mixture with a set of aldehyde modified nucleobases. A significant fraction of all possible base-pair mismatches was obtained, whereas, the highest selectivity (over 80%) was found for the guanine aldehyde templated by the complementary cytosine containing DNA. The elevated occurrence of mismatches can be explained by increased backbone plasticity derived from the linear threoninol building block as a cyclic deoxyribose analogue. PMID:27829920

  19. World-wide distribution automation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    A worldwide power distribution automation system is outlined. Distribution automation is defined and the status of utility automation is discussed. Other topics discussed include a distribution management system, substation feeder, and customer functions, potential benefits, automation costs, planning and engineering considerations, automation trends, databases, system operation, computer modeling of system, and distribution management systems.

  20. Automating CPM-GOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Bonnie; Vera, Alonso; Matessa, Michael; Freed, Michael; Remington, Roger

    2002-01-01

    CPM-GOMS is a modeling method that combines the task decomposition of a GOMS analysis with a model of human resource usage at the level of cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. CPM-GOMS models have made accurate predictions about skilled user behavior in routine tasks, but developing such models is tedious and error-prone. We describe a process for automatically generating CPM-GOMS models from a hierarchical task decomposition expressed in a cognitive modeling tool called Apex. Resource scheduling in Apex automates the difficult task of interleaving the cognitive, perceptual, and motor resources underlying common task operators (e.g. mouse move-and-click). Apex's UI automatically generates PERT charts, which allow modelers to visualize a model's complex parallel behavior. Because interleaving and visualization is now automated, it is feasible to construct arbitrarily long sequences of behavior. To demonstrate the process, we present a model of automated teller interactions in Apex and discuss implications for user modeling. available to model human users, the Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection (GOMS) method [6, 21] has been the most widely used, providing accurate, often zero-parameter, predictions of the routine performance of skilled users in a wide range of procedural tasks [6, 13, 15, 27, 28]. GOMS is meant to model routine behavior. The user is assumed to have methods that apply sequences of operators and to achieve a goal. Selection rules are applied when there is more than one method to achieve a goal. Many routine tasks lend themselves well to such decomposition. Decomposition produces a representation of the task as a set of nested goal states that include an initial state and a final state. The iterative decomposition into goals and nested subgoals can terminate in primitives of any desired granularity, the choice of level of detail dependent on the predictions required. Although GOMS has proven useful in HCI, tools to support the