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Sample records for automated single-cell image

  1. Automated micropipette aspiration of single cells.

    PubMed

    Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Yu

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a system for mechanically characterizing single cells using automated micropipette aspiration. Using vision-based control and position control, the system controls a micromanipulator, a motorized translation stage, and a custom-built pressure system to position a micropipette (4 μm opening) to approach a cell, form a seal, and aspirate the cell into the micropipette for quantifying the cell's elastic and viscoelastic parameters as well as viscosity. Image processing algorithms were developed to provide controllers with real-time visual feedback and to accurately measure cell deformation behavior on line. Experiments on both solid-like and liquid-like cells demonstrated that the system is capable of efficiently performing single-cell micropipette aspiration and has low operator skill requirements.

  2. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Tennessen, Kristin; Pati, Amrita

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  3. Automated single cell sorting and deposition in submicroliter drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salánki, Rita; Gerecsei, Tamás; Orgovan, Norbert; Sándor, Noémi; Péter, Beatrix; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-08-01

    Automated manipulation and sorting of single cells are challenging, when intact cells are needed for further investigations, e.g., RNA or DNA sequencing. We applied a computer controlled micropipette on a microscope admitting 80 PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) tubes to be filled with single cells in a cycle. Due to the Laplace pressure, fluid starts to flow out from the micropipette only above a critical pressure preventing the precise control of drop volume in the submicroliter range. We found an anomalous pressure additive to the Laplace pressure that we attribute to the evaporation of the drop. We have overcome the problem of the critical dropping pressure with sequentially operated fast fluidic valves timed with a millisecond precision. Minimum drop volume was 0.4-0.7 μl with a sorting speed of 15-20 s per cell. After picking NE-4C neuroectodermal mouse stem cells and human primary monocytes from a standard plastic Petri dish we could gently deposit single cells inside tiny drops. 94 ± 3% and 54 ± 7% of the deposited drops contained single cells for NE-4C and monocytes, respectively. 7.5 ± 4% of the drops contained multiple cells in case of monocytes. Remaining drops were empty. Number of cells deposited in a drop could be documented by imaging the Petri dish before and after sorting. We tuned the adhesion force of cells to make the manipulation successful without the application of microstructures for trapping cells on the surface. We propose that our straightforward and flexible setup opens an avenue for single cell isolation, critically needed for the rapidly growing field of single cell biology.

  4. When Phase Contrast Fails: ChainTracer and NucTracer, Two ImageJ Methods for Semi-Automated Single Cell Analysis Using Membrane or DNA Staining.

    PubMed

    Syvertsson, Simon; Vischer, Norbert O E; Gao, Yongqiang; Hamoen, Leendert W

    2016-01-01

    Within bacterial populations, genetically identical cells often behave differently. Single-cell measurement methods are required to observe this heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and fluorescence light microscopy are the primary methods to do this. However, flow cytometry requires reasonably strong fluorescence signals and is impractical when bacteria grow in cell chains. Therefore fluorescence light microscopy is often used to measure population heterogeneity in bacteria. Automatic microscopy image analysis programs typically use phase contrast images to identify cells. However, many bacteria divide by forming a cross-wall that is not detectable by phase contrast. We have developed 'ChainTracer', a method based on the ImageJ plugin ObjectJ. It can automatically identify individual cells stained by fluorescent membrane dyes, and measure fluorescence intensity, chain length, cell length, and cell diameter. As a complementary analysis method we developed 'NucTracer', which uses DAPI stained nucleoids as a proxy for single cells. The latter method is especially useful when dealing with crowded images. The methods were tested with Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis cells expressing a GFP-reporter. In conclusion, ChainTracer and NucTracer are useful single cell measurement methods when bacterial cells are difficult to distinguish with phase contrast.

  5. When Phase Contrast Fails: ChainTracer and NucTracer, Two ImageJ Methods for Semi-Automated Single Cell Analysis Using Membrane or DNA Staining

    PubMed Central

    Syvertsson, Simon; Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Gao, Yongqiang; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2016-01-01

    Within bacterial populations, genetically identical cells often behave differently. Single-cell measurement methods are required to observe this heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and fluorescence light microscopy are the primary methods to do this. However, flow cytometry requires reasonably strong fluorescence signals and is impractical when bacteria grow in cell chains. Therefore fluorescence light microscopy is often used to measure population heterogeneity in bacteria. Automatic microscopy image analysis programs typically use phase contrast images to identify cells. However, many bacteria divide by forming a cross-wall that is not detectable by phase contrast. We have developed ‘ChainTracer’, a method based on the ImageJ plugin ObjectJ. It can automatically identify individual cells stained by fluorescent membrane dyes, and measure fluorescence intensity, chain length, cell length, and cell diameter. As a complementary analysis method we developed 'NucTracer', which uses DAPI stained nucleoids as a proxy for single cells. The latter method is especially useful when dealing with crowded images. The methods were tested with Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis cells expressing a GFP-reporter. In conclusion, ChainTracer and NucTracer are useful single cell measurement methods when bacterial cells are difficult to distinguish with phase contrast. PMID:27008090

  6. Automated single cell isolation from suspension with computer vision

    PubMed Central

    Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Gerecsei, Tamás; Fürjes, Péter; Orgovan, Norbert; Sándor, Noémi; Holczer, Eszter; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2016-01-01

    Current robots can manipulate only surface-attached cells seriously limiting the fields of their application for single cell handling. We developed a computer vision-based robot applying a motorized microscope and micropipette to recognize and gently isolate intact individual cells for subsequent analysis, e.g., DNA/RNA sequencing in 1–2 nanoliters from a thin (~100 μm) layer of cell suspension. It can retrieve rare cells, needs minimal sample preparation, and can be applied for virtually any tissue cell type. Combination of 1 μm positioning precision, adaptive cell targeting and below 1 nl liquid handling precision resulted in an unprecedented accuracy and efficiency in robotic single cell isolation. Single cells were injected either into the wells of a miniature plate with a sorting speed of 3 cells/min or into standard PCR tubes with 2 cells/min. We could isolate labeled cells also from dense cultures containing ~1,000 times more unlabeled cells by the successive application of the sorting process. We compared the efficiency of our method to that of single cell entrapment in microwells and subsequent sorting with the automated micropipette: the recovery rate of single cells was greatly improved. PMID:26856740

  7. Automated single cell isolation from suspension with computer vision.

    PubMed

    Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Gerecsei, Tamás; Fürjes, Péter; Orgovan, Norbert; Sándor, Noémi; Holczer, Eszter; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2016-02-09

    Current robots can manipulate only surface-attached cells seriously limiting the fields of their application for single cell handling. We developed a computer vision-based robot applying a motorized microscope and micropipette to recognize and gently isolate intact individual cells for subsequent analysis, e.g., DNA/RNA sequencing in 1-2 nanoliters from a thin (~100 μm) layer of cell suspension. It can retrieve rare cells, needs minimal sample preparation, and can be applied for virtually any tissue cell type. Combination of 1 μm positioning precision, adaptive cell targeting and below 1 nl liquid handling precision resulted in an unprecedented accuracy and efficiency in robotic single cell isolation. Single cells were injected either into the wells of a miniature plate with a sorting speed of 3 cells/min or into standard PCR tubes with 2 cells/min. We could isolate labeled cells also from dense cultures containing ~1,000 times more unlabeled cells by the successive application of the sorting process. We compared the efficiency of our method to that of single cell entrapment in microwells and subsequent sorting with the automated micropipette: the recovery rate of single cells was greatly improved.

  8. Single-cell printer: automated, on demand, and label free.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andre; Schöndube, Jonas; Niekrawitz, Sonja; Streule, Wolfgang; Riegger, Lutz; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Within the past years, single-cell analysis has developed into a key topic in cell biology to study cellular functions that are not accessible by investigation of larger cell populations. Engineering approaches aiming to access single cells to extract information about their physiology, phenotype, and genotype at the single-cell level are going manifold ways, meanwhile allowing separation, sorting, culturing, and analysis of individual cells. Based on our earlier research toward inkjet-like printing of single cells, this article presents further characterization results obtained with a fully automated prototype instrument for printing of single living cells in a noncontact inkjet-like manner. The presented technology is based on a transparent microfluidic drop-on-demand dispenser chip coupled with a camera-assisted automatic detection system. Cells inside the chip are detected and classified with this detection system before they are expelled from the nozzle confined in microdroplets, thus enabling a "one cell per droplet" printing mode. To demonstrate the prototype instrument's suitability for biological and biomedical applications, basic experiments such as printing of single-bead and cell arrays as well as deposition and culture of single cells in microwell plates are presented. Printing efficiencies greater than 80% and viability rates about 90% were achieved.

  9. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  10. An Automated Microwell Platform for Large-Scale Single Cell RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Sims, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments have enabled rapid, inexpensive RNA sequencing of thousands of individual cells from a single specimen, raising the possibility of unbiased and comprehensive expression profiling from complex tissues. Microwell arrays are a particularly attractive microfluidic platform for single cell analysis due to their scalability, cell capture efficiency, and compatibility with imaging. We report an automated microwell array platform for single cell RNA-Seq with significantly improved performance over previous implementations. We demonstrate cell capture efficiencies of >50%, compatibility with commercially available barcoded mRNA capture beads, and parallel expression profiling from thousands of individual cells. We evaluate the level of cross-contamination in our platform by both tracking fluorescent cell lysate in sealed microwells and with a human-mouse mixed species RNA-Seq experiment. Finally, we apply our system to comprehensively assess heterogeneity in gene expression of patient-derived glioma neurospheres and uncover subpopulations similar to those observed in human glioma tissue. PMID:27670648

  11. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  12. Single-Cell Genetic Analysis Using Automated Microfluidics to Resolve Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S.; Gonzales, Michael L.; Sun, Gang; Unger, Marc A.; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism occurs throughout normal development and contributes to numerous disease etiologies, including tumorigenesis and neurological disorders. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity is inherent to many cancers, creating challenges for effective treatments. Unfortunately, analysis of bulk DNA masks subclonal phylogenetic architectures created by the acquisition and distribution of somatic mutations amongst cells. As a result, single-cell genetic analysis is becoming recognized as vital for accurately characterizing cancers. Despite this, methods for single-cell genetics are lacking. Here we present an automated microfluidic workflow enabling efficient cell capture, lysis, and whole genome amplification (WGA). We find that ~90% of the genome is accessible in single cells with improved uniformity relative to current single-cell WGA methods. Allelic dropout (ADO) rates were limited to 13.75% and variant false discovery rates (SNV FDR) were 4.11x10-6, on average. Application to ER-/PR-/HER2+ breast cancer cells and matched normal controls identified novel mutations that arose in a subpopulation of cells and effectively resolved the segregation of known cancer-related mutations with single-cell resolution. Finally, we demonstrate effective cell classification using mutation profiles with 10X average exome coverage depth per cell. Our data demonstrate an efficient automated microfluidic platform for single-cell WGA that enables the resolution of somatic mutation patterns in single cells. PMID:26302375

  13. Electrical impedance tomographic imaging of a single cell electroporation.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2014-06-01

    A living cell placed in a high strength electric field, can undergo a process known as electroporation. It is believed that during electroporation nano-scale defects (pores) occur in the membrane of the cell, causing dramatic changes to the permeability of its membrane. Electroporation is an important technique in biotechnology and medicine and numerous methods are being developed to improve the understanding and use of the technology. We propose to extend the toolbox available for studying electroporation by generating impedance distribution images of the cell as it undergoes electroporation using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). To investigate the feasibility of this concept, we develop a mathematical model of the process of electroporation in a single cell and of EIT of the process and show simulation results of a computer-based finite element model (FEM). Our work is an attempt to develop a new imaging tool for visualizing electroporation in a single cell, offering a different temporal and spatial resolution compared to the state of the art, which includes bulk measurements of electrical properties during single cell electroporation, patch clamp and voltage clamp measurement in single cells and optical imaging with colorimetric dyes during single cell electroporation. This paper is a preliminary theoretic feasibility study.

  14. Single cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope

    PubMed Central

    Park, H.; Weissleder, R.; Yacoby, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Lee, H.; Walsworth, R. L.; Connolly, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope to detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and two orders of magnitude larger field of view (~1 mm2) than previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantify cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells. PMID:26098019

  15. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David R; Lee, Kyungheon; Park, Hongkun; Weissleder, Ralph; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D; Lee, Hakho; Walsworth, Ronald L; Connolly, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  16. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments. PMID:27074762

  17. Automated Chemotactic Sorting and Single-cell Cultivation of Microbes using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Libing; Chen, Dong-Wei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device for automated sorting and cultivation of chemotactic microbes from pure cultures or mixtures. The device consists of two parts: in the first part, a concentration gradient of the chemoeffector was built across the channel for inducing chemotaxis of motile cells; in the second part, chemotactic cells from the sample were separated, and mixed with culture media to form nanoliter droplets for encapsulation, cultivation, enumeration, and recovery of single cells. Chemotactic responses were assessed by imaging and statistical analysis of droplets based on Poisson distribution. An automated procedure was developed for rapid enumeration of droplets with cell growth, following with scale-up cultivation on agar plates. The performance of the device was evaluated by the chemotaxis assays of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RP437 and E. coli RP1616. Moreover, enrichment and isolation of non-labelled Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 from its 1:10 mixture with E. coli RP437 was demonstrated. The enrichment factor reached 36.7 for CNB-1, based on its distinctive chemotaxis toward 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. We believe that this device can be widely used in chemotaxis studies without necessarily relying on fluorescent labelling, and isolation of functional microbial species from various environments.

  18. Analysis of Intracellular Glucose at Single Cells Using Electrochemiluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Huang, Peiyuan; Qin, Yu; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Here, luminol electrochemiluminescence was first applied to analyze intracellular molecules, such as glucose, at single cells. The individual cells were retained in cell-sized microwells on a gold coated indium tin oxide (ITO) slide, which were treated with luminol, triton X-100, and glucose oxidase simultaneously. The broken cellular membrane in the presence of triton X-100 released intracellular glucose into the microwell and reacted with glucose oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide, which induced luminol luminescence under positive potential. To achieve fast analysis, the luminescences from 64 individual cells on one ITO slide were imaged in 60 s using a charge-coupled device (CCD). More luminescence was observed at all the microwells after the introduction of triton X-100 and glucose oxidase suggested that intracellular glucose was detected at single cells. The starvation of cells to decrease intracellular glucose produced less luminescence, which confirmed that our luminescence intensity was correlated with the concentration of intracellular glucose. Large deviations in glucose concentration at observed single cells revealed high cellular heterogeneity in intracellular glucose for the first time. This developed electrochemiluminescence assay will be potentially applied for fast analysis of more intracellular molecules in single cells to elucidate cellular heterogeneity. PMID:27094779

  19. CellStress - open source image analysis program for single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedh, Maria; Beck, Caroline; Sott, Kristin; Goksör, Mattias

    2010-08-01

    This work describes our image-analysis software, CellStress, which has been developed in Matlab and is issued under a GPL license. CellStress was developed in order to analyze migration of fluorescent proteins inside single cells during changing environmental conditions. CellStress can also be used to score information regarding protein aggregation in single cells over time, which is especially useful when monitoring cell signaling pathways involved in e.g. Alzheimer's or Huntington's disease. Parallel single-cell analysis of large numbers of cells is an important part of the research conducted in systems biology and quantitative biology in order to mathematically describe cellular processes. To quantify properties for single cells, large amounts of data acquired during extended time periods are needed. Manual analyses of such data involve huge efforts and could also include a bias, which complicates the use and comparison of data for further simulations or modeling. Therefore, it is necessary to have an automated and unbiased image analysis procedure, which is the aim of CellStress. CellStress utilizes cell contours detected by CellStat (developed at Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre), which identifies cell boundaries using bright field images, and thus reduces the fluorescent labeling needed.

  20. Image-Based Single Cell Profiling: High-Throughput Processing of Mother Machine Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Christian Carsten; Grünberger, Alexander; Helfrich, Stefan; Probst, Christopher; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Background Microfluidic lab-on-chip technology combined with live-cell imaging has enabled the observation of single cells in their spatio-temporal context. The mother machine (MM) cultivation system is particularly attractive for the long-term investigation of rod-shaped bacteria since it facilitates continuous cultivation and observation of individual cells over many generations in a highly parallelized manner. To date, the lack of fully automated image analysis software limits the practical applicability of the MM as a phenotypic screening tool. Results We present an image analysis pipeline for the automated processing of MM time lapse image stacks. The pipeline supports all analysis steps, i.e., image registration, orientation correction, channel/cell detection, cell tracking, and result visualization. Tailored algorithms account for the specialized MM layout to enable a robust automated analysis. Image data generated in a two-day growth study (≈ 90 GB) is analyzed in ≈ 30 min with negligible differences in growth rate between automated and manual evaluation quality. The proposed methods are implemented in the software molyso (MOther machine AnaLYsis SOftware) that provides a new profiling tool to analyze unbiasedly hitherto inaccessible large-scale MM image stacks. Conclusion Presented is the software molyso, a ready-to-use open source software (BSD-licensed) for the unsupervised analysis of MM time-lapse image stacks. molyso source code and user manual are available at https://github.com/modsim/molyso. PMID:27661996

  1. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility. PMID:24739819

  2. A stochastic transcriptional switch model for single cell imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Kirsty L.; Momiji, Hiroshi; Featherstone, Karen; Davis, Julian R.E.; White, Michael R.H.; Rand, David A.; Finkenstädt, Bärbel

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is made up of inherently stochastic processes within single cells and can be modeled through stochastic reaction networks (SRNs). In particular, SRNs capture the features of intrinsic variability arising from intracellular biochemical processes. We extend current models for gene expression to allow the transcriptional process within an SRN to follow a random step or switch function which may be estimated using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This stochastic switch model provides a generic framework to capture many different dynamic features observed in single cell gene expression. Inference for such SRNs is challenging due to the intractability of the transition densities. We derive a model-specific birth–death approximation and study its use for inference in comparison with the linear noise approximation where both approximations are considered within the unifying framework of state-space models. The methodology is applied to synthetic as well as experimental single cell imaging data measuring expression of the human prolactin gene in pituitary cells. PMID:25819987

  3. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level. PMID:27114911

  4. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  5. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-01

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  6. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-01

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies. PMID:27510097

  7. An automated approach for single-cell tracking in epifluorescence microscopy applied to E. coli growth analysis on microfluidics biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Kirov, Boris; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Lefevre, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    With the accumulation of knowledge for the intimate molecular mechanisms governing the processes inside the living cells in the later years, the ability to characterize the performance of elementary genetic circuits and parts at the single-cell level is becoming of crucial importance. Biological science is arriving to the point where it can develop hypothesis for the action of each molecule participating in the biochemical reactions and need proper techniques to test those hypothesis. Microfluidics is emerging as the technology that combined with high-magnification microscopy will allow for the long-term single-cell level observation of bacterial physiology. In this study we design, build and characterize the gene dynamics of genetic circuits as one of the basic parts governing programmed cell behavior. We use E. coli as model organism and grow it in microfluidics chips, which we observe with epifluorescence microscopy. One of the most invaluable segments of this technology is the consequent image processing, since it allows for the automated analysis of vast amount of single-cell observation and the fast and easy derivation of conclusions based on that data. Specifically, we are interested in promoter activity as function of time. We expect it to be oscillatory and for that we use GFP (green fluorescent protein) as a reporter in our genetic circuits. In this paper, an automated framework for single-cell tracking in phase-contrast microscopy is developed, combining 2D segmentation of cell time frames and graph-based reconstruction of their spatiotemporal evolution with fast tracking of the associated fluorescence signal. The results obtained on the investigated biological database are presented and discussed.

  8. Quantum dot imaging platform for single-cell molecular profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-03-01

    Study of normal cell physiology and disease pathogenesis heavily relies on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. To achieve this goal, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of microenvironment is required. Here we report the development of a multicolour multicycle in situ imaging technology capable of creating detailed quantitative molecular profiles for individual cells at the resolution of optical imaging. A library of stoichiometric fluorescent probes is prepared by linking target-specific antibodies to a universal quantum dot-based platform via protein A in a quick and simple procedure. Surprisingly, despite the potential for multivalent binding between protein A and antibody and the intermediate affinity of this non-covalent bond, fully assembled probes do not aggregate or exchange antibodies, facilitating highly multiplexed parallel staining. This single-cell molecular profiling technology is expected to open new opportunities in systems biology, gene expression studies, signalling pathway analysis and molecular diagnostics.

  9. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  10. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  11. Making colourful sense of Raman images of single cells.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Lorna; Hollywood, Katherine A; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-03-21

    In order to understand biological systems it is important to gain pertinent information on the spatial localisation of chemicals within cells. With the relatively recent advent of high-resolution chemical imaging this is being realised and one rapidly developing area of research is the Raman mapping of single cells, an approach whose success has vast potential for numerous areas of biomedical research. However, there is a danger of undermining the potential routine use of Raman mapping due to a lack of consistency and transparency in the way false-shaded Raman images are constructed. In this study we demonstrate, through the use of simulated data and real Raman maps of single human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells, how changes in the application of colour shading can dramatically alter the final Raman images. In order to avoid ambiguity and potential subjectivity in image interpretation we suggest that data distribution plots are used to aid shading approaches and that extreme care is taken to use the most appropriate false-shading for the biomedical question under investigation.

  12. Preparation of single cells for imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berman, Elena S F; Fortson, Susan L; Kulp, Kristen S

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing the molecular contents of individual cells is critical for understanding fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of biological systems has been steadily gaining popularity for its ability to create precise chemical images of biological samples, thereby revealing new biological insights and improving understanding of disease. In order to acquire mass spectral images from single cells that contain relevant molecular information, samples must be prepared such that cell-culture components, especially salts, are eliminated from the cell surface and that the cell contents are accessible to the mass spectrometer. We have demonstrated a cellular preparation technique for IMS that preserves the basic morphology of cultured cells, allows mass spectrometric chemical profiling of cytosol, and removes the majority of the interfering species derived from the cellular growth medium. Using this protocol, we achieve high-quality, reproducible IMS images from three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation method allows rapid and routine IMS analysis of cultured cells, making possible a wide variety of experiments to further scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells. PMID:20680596

  13. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging.

    PubMed

    Goyet, Elise; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Perroy, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferase, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With this, we achieved an unprecedented performance in the field of protein-protein interaction imaging in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, duration of signal stability, signal sensitivity and dynamic range. As proof-of-principle, an Nluc-containing BRET-based sensor of ERK activity enabled the detection of subtle, transient and localized variations in ERK activity in neuronal dendritic spines, induced by the activation of endogenous synaptic NMDA receptors. This development will improve our comprehension of both the spatio-temporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions and the activation patterns of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27302735

  14. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goyet, Elise; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Perroy, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferase, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With this, we achieved an unprecedented performance in the field of protein-protein interaction imaging in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, duration of signal stability, signal sensitivity and dynamic range. As proof-of-principle, an Nluc-containing BRET-based sensor of ERK activity enabled the detection of subtle, transient and localized variations in ERK activity in neuronal dendritic spines, induced by the activation of endogenous synaptic NMDA receptors. This development will improve our comprehension of both the spatio-temporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions and the activation patterns of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27302735

  15. Electrochemiluminescence imaging for parallel single-cell analysis of active membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junyu; Ma, Guangzhong; Chen, Yun; Fang, Danjun; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-08-18

    Luminol electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging was developed for the parallel measurement of active membrane cholesterol at single living cells, thus establishing a novel electrochemical detection technique for single cells with high analysis throughput and low detection limit. In our strategy, the luminescence generated from luminol and hydrogen peroxide upon the potential was recorded in one image so that hydrogen peroxide at the surface of multiple cells could be simultaneously analyzed. Compared with the classic microelectrode array for the parallel single-cell analysis, the plat electrode only was needed in our ECL imaging, avoiding the complexity of electrode fabrication. The optimized ECL imaging system showed that hydrogen peroxide as low as 10 μM was visible and the efflux of hydrogen peroxide from cells could be determined. Coupled with the reaction between active membrane cholesterol and cholesterol oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide, active membrane cholesterol at cells on the electrode was analyzed at single-cell level. The luminescence intensity was correlated with the amount of active membrane cholesterol, validating our system for single-cell cholesterol analysis. The relative high standard deviation on the luminescence suggested high cellular heterogeneities on hydrogen peroxide efflux and active membrane cholesterol, which exhibited the significance of single-cell analysis. This success in ECL imaging for single-cell analysis opens a new field in the parallel measurement of surface molecules at single cells.

  16. A microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric platform with double cell lysis nano-electrodes for automated single cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangtang; Zhao, Shulin; Hu, Hankun; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2016-06-17

    Capillary electrophoresis-based single cell analysis has become an essential approach in researches at the cellular level. However, automation of single cell analysis has been a challenge due to the difficulty to control the number of cells injected and the irreproducibility associated with cell aggregation. Herein we report the development of a new microfluidic platform deploying the double nano-electrode cell lysis technique for automated analysis of single cells with mass spectrometric detection. The proposed microfluidic chip features integration of a cell-sized high voltage zone for quick single cell lysis, a microfluidic channel for electrophoretic separation, and a nanoelectrospray emitter for ionization in MS detection. Built upon this platform, a microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric method (MCE-MS) has been developed for automated single cell analysis. In the method, cell introduction, cell lysis, and MCE-MS separation are computer controlled and integrated as a cycle into consecutive assays. Analysis of large numbers of individual PC-12 neuronal cells (both intact and exposed to 25mM KCl) was carried out to determine intracellular levels of dopamine (DA) and glutamic acid (Glu). It was found that DA content in PC-12 cells was higher than Glu content, and both varied from cell to cell. The ratio of intracellular DA to Glu was 4.20±0.8 (n=150). Interestingly, the ratio drastically decreased to 0.38±0.20 (n=150) after the cells are exposed to 25mM KCl for 8min, suggesting the cells released DA promptly and heavily while they released Glu at a much slower pace in response to KCl-induced depolarization. These results indicate that the proposed MCE-MS analytical platform may have a great potential in researches at the cellular level. PMID:27207575

  17. CalQuo: automated, simultaneous single-cell and population-level quantification of global intracellular Ca2+ responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Colin-York, Huw; Santos, Ana M.; Lee, Steven F.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Detecting intracellular calcium signaling with fluorescent calcium indicator dyes is often coupled with microscopy techniques to follow the activation state of non-excitable cells, including lymphocytes. However, the analysis of global intracellular calcium responses both at the single-cell level and in large ensembles simultaneously has yet to be automated. Here, we present a new software package, CalQuo (Calcium Quantification), which allows the automated analysis and simultaneous monitoring of global fluorescent calcium reporter-based signaling responses in up to 1000 single cells per experiment, at temporal resolutions of sub-seconds to seconds. CalQuo quantifies the number and fraction of responding cells, the temporal dependence of calcium signaling and provides global and individual calcium-reporter fluorescence intensity profiles. We demonstrate the utility of the new method by comparing the calcium-based signaling responses of genetically manipulated human lymphocytic cell lines.

  18. A microfluidic systems biology approach for live single-cell mitochondrial ROS imaging.

    PubMed

    Kniss, Ariel; Lu, Hang; Jones, Dean P; Kemp, Melissa L

    2013-01-01

    Most current studies of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production report globally averaged measurements within the cell; however, ROS can be produced in distinct subcellular locations and have local effects in their immediate vicinity. A microfluidic platform for high-throughput single-cell imaging allows mitochondrial ROS production to be monitored as varying in both space and time. Using this systems biology approach, single-cell variability can be viewed within a population. We discuss single-cell monitoring of contributors to mitochondrial redox state-mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide or superoxide-through the use of a small molecule probe or targeted fluorescent reporter protein. Jurkat T lymphoma cells were stimulated with antimycin A and imaged in an arrayed microfluidic device over time. Differences in single-cell responses were observed as a function of both inhibitor concentration and type of ROS measurement used.

  19. Automated ship image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  20. 3D subcellular SIMS imaging in cryogenically prepared single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    The analysis of a cell with dynamic SIMS ion microscopy depends on the gradual erosion (sputtering) of the cell surface for obtaining spatially resolved chemical information in the X-, Y-, and Z-dimensions. This ideal feature of ion microscopy is rarely explored in probing microfeatures hidden beneath the cell surface. In this study, this capability is explored for the analysis of cells undergoing cell division. The mitotic cells required 3D SIMS imaging in order to study the chemical composition of specialized subcellular regions, like the mitotic spindle, hidden beneath the cell surface. Human glioblastoma T98G cells were grown on silicon chips and cryogenically prepared with a sandwich freeze-fracture method. The fractured freeze-dried cells were used for SIMS analysis with the microscope mode of the CAMECA IMS-3f, which is capable of producing 500 nm lateral image resolution. SIMS analysis of calcium in the spindle region of metaphase cells required sequential recording of as many as 10 images. The T98G human glioblastoma tumor cells revealed an unusual depletion/lack of calcium store in the metaphase spindle, which is in contrast to the accumulation of calcium stores generally observed in normal cells. This study shows the feasibility of the microscope mode imaging in resolving subcellular microfeatures in 3D and opens new avenues of research in spatially resolved chemical analysis of dividing cells.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: single cell live imaging inside infected tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Bianca Lima; Orikaza, Cristina Mary; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although imaging the live Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is a routine technique in most laboratories, identification of the parasite in infected tissues and organs has been hindered by their intrinsic opaque nature. We describe a simple method for in vivo observation of live single‐cell Trypanosoma cruzi parasites inside mammalian host tissues. BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice infected with DsRed‐CL or GFP‐G trypomastigotes had their organs removed and sectioned with surgical blades. Ex vivo organ sections were observed under confocal microscopy. For the first time, this procedure enabled imaging of individual amastigotes, intermediate forms and motile trypomastigotes within infected tissues of mammalian hosts. PMID:26639617

  2. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Yang, Katy S; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body, but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors and model drug behaviour under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of the PARP-1 inhibitor distribution in real time, showing that PARP-1 inhibitors reach their cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modelling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumour cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARP-1 inhibitor concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA-repair inhibition. This suggests that single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modelling improve our understanding of drug action at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  3. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Yang, Katy S.; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H.; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors (PARPi) and model drug behavior under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of PARPi distribution in real time, showing that PARPi reaches its cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modeling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumor cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARPi concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA repair inhibition. This suggests that single cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modeling improves our understanding of drug action at single cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  4. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  5. High-throughput de novo screening of receptor agonists with an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Iijima, Masumi; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Fujii, Ikuo; Kondo, Akihiko; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2014-01-01

    Reconstitution of signaling pathways involving single mammalian transmembrane receptors has not been accomplished in yeast cells. In this study, intact EGF receptor (EGFR) and a cell wall-anchored form of EGF were co-expressed on the yeast cell surface, which led to autophosphorylation of the EGFR in an EGF-dependent autocrine manner. After changing from EGF to a conformationally constrained peptide library, cells were fluorescently labeled with an anti-phospho-EGFR antibody. Each cell was subjected to an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system that analyzed the fluorescent intensity of each cell and automatically retrieved each cell with the highest fluorescence. In ~3.2 × 10(6) peptide library, we isolated six novel peptides with agonistic activity of the EGFR in human squamous carcinoma A431 cells. The combination of yeast cells expressing mammalian receptors, a cell wall-anchored peptide library, and an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system might facilitate a rational approach for de novo drug screening. PMID:24577528

  6. High-throughput de novo screening of receptor agonists with an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Iijima, Masumi; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Fujii, Ikuo; Kondo, Akihiko; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2014-01-01

    Reconstitution of signaling pathways involving single mammalian transmembrane receptors has not been accomplished in yeast cells. In this study, intact EGF receptor (EGFR) and a cell wall-anchored form of EGF were co-expressed on the yeast cell surface, which led to autophosphorylation of the EGFR in an EGF-dependent autocrine manner. After changing from EGF to a conformationally constrained peptide library, cells were fluorescently labeled with an anti-phospho-EGFR antibody. Each cell was subjected to an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system that analyzed the fluorescent intensity of each cell and automatically retrieved each cell with the highest fluorescence. In ~3.2 × 10(6) peptide library, we isolated six novel peptides with agonistic activity of the EGFR in human squamous carcinoma A431 cells. The combination of yeast cells expressing mammalian receptors, a cell wall-anchored peptide library, and an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system might facilitate a rational approach for de novo drug screening.

  7. Noninvasive Pigment Identification in Single Cells from Living Phototrophic Biofilms by Confocal Imaging Spectrofluorometry

    PubMed Central

    Roldán, M.; Thomas, F.; Castel, S.; Quesada, A.; Hernández-Mariné, M.

    2004-01-01

    A new imaging technique for the analysis of fluorescent pigments from a single cell is reported. It is based on confocal scanning laser microscopy coupled with spectrofluorometric methods. The setup allows simultaneous establishment of the relationships among pigment analysis in vivo, morphology, and three-dimensional localization inside thick intact microbial assemblages. PMID:15184183

  8. Live Imaging, Identifying, and Tracking Single Cells in Complex Populations In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minjung; Xenopoulos, Panagiotis; Muñoz-Descalzo, Silvia; Lou, Xinghua; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Advances in optical imaging technologies combined with the use of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have enabled the visualization of stem cells over extensive periods of time in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of genetically encoded fluorescent protein reporters that are fused with subcellularly localized proteins, such as human histone H2B, has made it possible to direct fluorescent protein reporters to specific subcellular structures and identify single cells in complex populations. This facilitates the visualization of cellular behaviors such as division, movement, and apoptosis at a single-cell resolution and, in principle, allows the prospective and retrospective tracking towards determining the lineage of each cell. PMID:23640250

  9. Single-cell-based image analysis of high-throughput cell array screens for quantification of viral infection.

    PubMed

    Matula, Petr; Kumar, Anil; Wörz, Ilka; Erfle, Holger; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2009-04-01

    The identification of eukaryotic genes involved in virus entry and replication is important for understanding viral infection. Our goal is to develop a siRNA-based screening system using cell arrays and high-throughput (HT) fluorescence microscopy. A central issue is efficient, robust, and automated single-cell-based analysis of massive image datasets. We have developed an image analysis approach that comprises (i) a novel, gradient-based thresholding scheme for cell nuclei segmentation which does not require subsequent postprocessing steps for separation of clustered nuclei, (ii) quantification of the virus signal in the neighborhood of cell nuclei, (iii) localization of regions with transfected cells by combining model-based circle fitting and grid fitting, (iv) cell classification as infected or noninfected, and (v) image quality control (e.g., identification of out-of-focus images). We compared the results of our nucleus segmentation approach with a previously developed scheme of adaptive thresholding with subsequent separation of nuclear clusters. Our approach, which does not require a postprocessing step for the separation of nuclear clusters, correctly segmented 97.1% of the nuclei, whereas the previous scheme achieved 95.8%. Using our algorithm for the detection of out-of-focus images, we obtained a high discrimination power of 99.4%. Our overall approach has been applied to more than 55,000 images of cells infected by either hepatitis C or dengue virus. Reduced infection rates were correctly detected in positive siRNA controls, as well as for siRNAs targeting, for example, cellular genes involved in viral infection. Our image analysis approach allows for the automatic and accurate determination of changes in viral infection based on high-throughput single-cell-based siRNA cell array imaging experiments.

  10. Single-cell Western blotting after whole-cell imaging to assess cancer chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Xu, Zhuchen; Kumar, Sanjay; Herr, Amy E

    2014-10-21

    Intratumor heterogeneity remains a major obstacle to effective cancer therapy and personalized medicine. Current understanding points to differential therapeutic response among subpopulations of tumor cells as a key challenge to successful treatment. To advance our understanding of how this heterogeneity is reflected in cell-to-cell variations in chemosensitivity and expression of drug-resistance proteins, we optimize and apply a new targeted proteomics modality, single-cell western blotting (scWestern), to a human glioblastoma cell line. To acquire both phenotypic and proteomic data on the same, single glioblastoma cells, we integrate high-content imaging prior to the scWestern assays. The scWestern technique supports thousands of concurrent single-cell western blots, with each assay comprised of chemical lysis of single cells seated in microwells, protein electrophoresis from those microwells into a supporting polyacrylamide (PA) gel layer, and in-gel antibody probing. We systematically optimize chemical lysis and subsequent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the single-cell lysate. The scWestern slides are stored for months then reprobed, thus allowing archiving and later analysis as relevant to sparingly limited, longitudinal cell specimens. Imaging and scWestern analysis of single glioblastoma cells dosed with the chemotherapeutic daunomycin showed both apoptotic (cleaved caspase 8- and annexin V-positive) and living cells. Intriguingly, living glioblastoma subpopulations show up-regulation of a multidrug resistant protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), suggesting an active drug efflux pump as a potential mechanism of drug resistance. Accordingly, linking of phenotype with targeted protein analysis with single-cell resolution may advance our understanding of drug response in inherently heterogeneous cell populations, such as those anticipated in tumors.

  11. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-12-22

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the interparticle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from nonspecifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  12. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  13. Single-cell imaging detection of nanobarcoded nanoparticle biodistributions in tissues for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2011-03-01

    In nanomedicine, biodistribution studies are critical to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nanoparticles. Currently, extensive biodistribution studies are hampered by the limitations of bulk tissue and single-cell imaging techniques. To ameliorate these limitations, we have developed a novel method for single nanoparticle detection that incorporates a conjugated oligonucleotide as a "nanobarcode" for detection via in situ PCR. This strategy magnifies the detection signal from single nanoparticles, facilitating rapid evaluation of nanoparticle uptake by cell type over larger areas. The nanobarcoding method can enable precise analysis of nanoparticle biodistributions and expedite translation of these nanoparticles to the clinic.

  14. Long-Term In Vivo Imaging of Multiple Organs at the Single Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Albert Y.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Deoliveira, Divino; Drago, Nicholas; Ye, Tong; Liu, Chen; Chao, Nelson J.

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has enabled the study of individual cell behavior in live animals. Many organs and tissues cannot be studied, especially longitudinally, because they are located too deep, behind bony structures or too close to the lung and heart. Here we report a novel mouse model that allows long-term single cell imaging of many organs. A wide variety of live tissues were successfully engrafted in the pinna of the mouse ear. Many of these engrafted tissues maintained the normal tissue histology. Using the heart and thymus as models, we further demonstrated that the engrafted tissues functioned as would be expected. Combining two-photon microscopy with fluorescent tracers, we successfully visualized the engrafted tissues at the single cell level in live mice over several months. Four dimensional (three-dimensional (3D) plus time) information of individual cells was obtained from this imaging. This model makes long-term high resolution 4D imaging of multiple organs possible. PMID:23300962

  15. Optical Clearing Delivers Ultrasensitive Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging for Single-Cell Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Wang, Xiaolei; Ren, Wen; Liu, Jing; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-03-22

    A single-cell optical clearing methodology is developed and demonstrated in hyperspectral dark-field microscopy (HSDFM) and imaging of plasmonic nanoprobes. Our strategy relies on a combination of delipidation and refractive index (RI) matching with highly biocompatible and affordable agents. Before applying the RI-matching solution, the delipidation step by using a mild solvent effectively eliminates those high-density, lipid-enriched granular structures which emit strong scattering. Upon treatment, the background scattering from cellular organelles could be repressed to a negligible level while the scattering signals from plasmonic nanomaterials increase, leading to a significant improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). With this method established, the versatility and applicability of HSDFM are greatly enhanced. In our demonstration, quantitative mapping of the dimerization-activated receptor kinase HER2 is achieved in a single cancer cell by a nonfluorescent approach. High-resolution imaging for oncogenic mRNAs, namely ER, PR, and HER2, is performed with single labeling. More importantly, in situ multiplex detection of mRNA and protein is made possible by HSDFM since it overcomes the difficulties of complex staining and signal imbalance suffered by the conventional optical imaging. Last, we show that with optical clearing, characterization of intracellularly grown gold particulates is accomplished at an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Taken together, the uniqueness of optical clearing and HSDFM is expected to open ample avenues for single-cell studies and biomedical engineering. PMID:26895095

  16. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level. PMID:25053815

  17. Simultaneous photoacoustic and optical attenuation imaging of single cells using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic images as well as images based on the optical attenuation of single cells in a human blood smear was developed. An ultra-high frequency photoacoustic microscope equipped with a 1 GHz transducer and a pulsed 532 nm laser was used to generate the images. The transducer and 20X optical objective used for laser focusing were aligned coaxially on opposing sides of the sample. Absorption of laser photons by the sample yielded conventional photoacoustic (PA) signals, while incident photons which were not attenuated by the sample were absorbed by the transducer, resulting in the formation of a photoacoustic signal (tPA) within the transducer itself. Both PA and tPA signals, which are separated in time, were recorded by the system in a single RF-line. Areas of strong signal in the PA images corresponded to dark regions in the tPA images. Additional details, including the clear delineation of the cell cytoplasm and features in red blood cells, were visible in the tPA image but not the corresponding PA image. This imaging method has applications in probing the optical absorption and attenuation characteristics of biological cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  18. Highly multiplexed imaging of single cells using a high-throughput cyclic immunofluorescence method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ren; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Sorger, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell analysis reveals aspects of cellular physiology not evident from population-based studies, particularly in the case of highly multiplexed methods such as mass cytometry (CyTOF) able to correlate the levels of multiple signalling, differentiation and cell fate markers. Immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy adds information on cell morphology and the microenvironment that are not obtained using flow-based techniques, but the multiplicity of conventional IF is limited. This has motivated development of imaging methods that require specialized instrumentation, exotic reagents or proprietary protocols that are difficult to reproduce in most laboratories. Here we report a public-domain method for achieving high multiplicity single-cell IF using cyclic immunofluorescence (CycIF), a simple and versatile procedure in which four-colour staining alternates with chemical inactivation of fluorophores to progressively build a multichannel image. Because CycIF uses standard reagents and instrumentation and is no more expensive than conventional IF, it is suitable for high-throughput assays and screening applications. PMID:26399630

  19. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body. PMID:24058151

  20. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  1. In Vivo X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomographic Imaging of Elements in Single-Celled Fern Spores

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yasuharu; Yoneyama, Akio; Hisada, Akiko; Uchida, Kenko

    2007-01-19

    We have observed in vivo three-dimensional distributions of constituent elements of single-celled spores of the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris using an X-ray fluorescence computed microtomography method. The images of these distributions are generated from a series of slice data, each of which is acquired by a sample translation-rotation method. An incident X-ray microbeam irradiates the sample with a spot size of 1 {mu}m. The high Ca concentration in the testa and the localized and overlapping Fe and Zn concentrations inside the spore are shown in three-dimensional images. The K concentration is high throughout the cell, and there are localized regions of higher density. The atomic number densities of these elements in the testa and inside the cell in a tomographic slice are estimated with a resolution of about 1 {mu}m.

  2. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong Local Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle, and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the inter-particle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from non-specifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  3. Radiologist and automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    1999-07-01

    Significant advances are being made in the area of automated medical image analysis. Part of the progress is due to the general advances being made in the types of algorithms used to process images and perform various detection and recognition tasks. A more important reason for this growth in medical image analysis processes, may be due however to a very different reason. The use of computer workstations, digital image acquisition technologies and the use of CRT monitors for display of medical images for primary diagnostic reading is becoming more prevalent in radiology departments around the world. With the advance in computer- based displays, however, has come the realization that displaying images on a CRT monitor is not the same as displaying film on a viewbox. There are perceptual, cognitive and ergonomic issues that must be considered if radiologists are to accept this change in technology and display. The bottom line is that radiologists' performance must be evaluated with these new technologies and image analysis techniques in order to verify that diagnostic performance is at least as good with these new technologies and image analysis procedures as with film-based displays. The goal of this paper is to address some of the perceptual, cognitive and ergonomic issues associated with reading radiographic images from digital displays.

  4. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  5. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  6. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  7. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Zhao, Richard Y

    2011-09-16

    In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells. PMID:21867692

  8. Applications of the Single-probe: Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Single Cell Analysis under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Wei; Pan, Ning; Yang, Zhibo

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and in-situ single cell mass spectrometry (SCMS) analysis under ambient conditions are two emerging fields with great potential for the detailed mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of biomolecules from biological samples. The single-probe, a miniaturized device with integrated sampling and ionization capabilities, is capable of performing both ambient MSI and in-situ SCMS analysis. For ambient MSI, the single-probe uses surface micro-extraction to continually conduct MS analysis of the sample, and this technique allows the creation of MS images with high spatial resolution (8.5 µm) from biological samples such as mouse brain and kidney sections. Ambient MSI has the advantage that little to no sample preparation is needed before the analysis, which reduces the amount of potential artifacts present in data acquisition and allows a more representative analysis of the sample to be acquired. For in-situ SCMS, the single-probe tip can be directly inserted into live eukaryotic cells such as HeLa cells, due to the small sampling tip size (< 10 µm), and this technique is capable of detecting a wide range of metabolites inside individual cells at near real-time. SCMS enables a greater sensitivity and accuracy of chemical information to be acquired at the single cell level, which could improve our understanding of biological processes at a more fundamental level than previously possible. The single-probe device can be potentially coupled with a variety of mass spectrometers for broad ranges of MSI and SCMS studies. PMID:27341402

  9. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Novel metal nanoshell as fluorescence imaging agent. {yields} Fluorescent mAb-metal complex with enhanced intensity and shortened lifetime. {yields} Immuno-interactions of mAb-metal complexes with CK19 molecules on CNCAP and HeLa cell surfaces. {yields} Isolation of conjugated mAb-metal complexes from cellular autofluorescence on cell image. -- Abstract: In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10 nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells.

  10. Large heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA transcription and initiation of replication exposed by single-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription are crucial for cell function, but these processes are poorly understood at the single-cell level. We describe a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol, called mTRIP (mitochondrial transcription and replication imaging protocol), that reveals simultaneously mtDNA and RNA, and that can also be coupled to immunofluorescence for in situ protein examination. mTRIP reveals mitochondrial structures engaged in initiation of DNA replication by identification of a specific sequence in the regulatory D-loop, as well as unique transcription profiles in single human cells. We observe and quantify at least three classes of mitochondrial structures: (i) replication initiation active and transcript-positive (Ia-Tp); (ii) replication initiation silent and transcript-positive (Is-Tp); and (iii) replication initiation silent and transcript-negative (Is-Tn). Thus, individual mitochondria are dramatically heterogeneous within the same cell. Moreover, mTRIP exposes a mosaic of distinct nucleic acid patterns in the D-loop, including H-strand versus L-strand transcripts, and uncoupled rRNA transcription and mtDNA initiation of replication, which might have functional consequences in the regulation of the mtDNA. Finally, mTRIP identifies altered mtDNA processing in cells with unbalanced mtDNA content and function, including in human mitochondrial disorders. Thus, mTRIP reveals qualitative and quantitative alterations that provide additional tools for elucidating the dynamics of mtDNA processing in single cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.

  11. Single-cell in vivo imaging of adult neural stem cells in the zebrafish telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana S; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Götz, Magdalena; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2016-08-01

    Adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in zebrafish produce mature neurons throughout their entire life span in both the intact and regenerating brain. An understanding of the behavior of aNSCs in their intact niche and during regeneration in vivo should facilitate the identification of the molecular mechanisms controlling regeneration-specific cellular events. A greater understanding of the process in regeneration-competent species may enable regeneration to be achieved in regeneration-incompetent species, including humans. Here we describe a protocol for labeling and repetitive imaging of aNSCs in vivo. We label single aNSCs, allowing nonambiguous re-identification of single cells in repetitive imaging sessions using electroporation of a red-reporter plasmid in Tg(gfap:GFP)mi2001 transgenic fish expressing GFP in aNSCs. We image using two-photon microscopy through the thinned skull of anesthetized and immobilized fish. Our protocol allows imaging every 2 d for a period of up to 1 month. This methodology allowed the visualization of aNSC behavior in vivo in their natural niche, in contrast to previously available technologies, which rely on the imaging of either dissociated cells or tissue slices. We used this protocol to follow the mode of aNSC division, fate changes and cell death in both the intact and injured zebrafish telencephalon. This experimental setup can be widely used, with minimal prior experience, to assess key factors for processes that modulate aNSC behavior. A typical experiment with data analysis takes up to 1.5 months. PMID:27362338

  12. A Label-free Technique for the Spatio-temporal Imaging of Single Cell Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Deepa; Christodoulides, Joseph A.; Delehanty, James B.; Byers, Jeff M.; Raphael, Marc P.

    2015-01-01

    Inter-cellular communication is an integral part of a complex system that helps in maintaining basic cellular activities. As a result, the malfunctioning of such signaling can lead to many disorders. To understand cell-to-cell signaling, it is essential to study the spatial and temporal nature of the secreted molecules from the cell without disturbing the local environment. Various assays have been developed to study protein secretion, however, these methods are typically based on fluorescent probes which disrupt the relevant signaling pathways. To overcome this limitation, a label-free technique is required. In this paper, we describe the fabrication and application of a label-free localized surface plasmon resonance imaging (LSPRi) technology capable of detecting protein secretions from a single cell. The plasmonic nanostructures are lithographically patterned onto a standard glass coverslip and can be excited using visible light on commercially available light microscopes. Only a small fraction of the coverslip is covered by the nanostructures and hence this technique is well suited for combining common techniques such as fluorescence and bright-field imaging. A multidisciplinary approach is used in this protocol which incorporates sensor nanofabrication and subsequent biofunctionalization, binding kinetics characterization of ligand and analyte, the integration of the chip and live cells, and the analysis of the measured signal. As a whole, this technology enables a general label-free approach towards mapping cellular secretions and correlating them with the responses of nearby cells. PMID:26650542

  13. Cell-specific localization of alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus stem tissue measured with Imaging MS and Single-cell MS

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kotaro; Takahashi, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Hajime; Anegawa, Aya; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Ohnishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Mami; Masujima, Tsutomu; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don is a medicinal plant well known for producing antitumor drugs such as vinblastine and vincristine, which are classified as terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). The TIA metabolic pathway in C. roseus has been extensively studied. However, the localization of TIA intermediates at the cellular level has not been demonstrated directly. In the present study, the metabolic pathway of TIA in C. roseus was studied with two forefront metabolomic techniques, that is, Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) and live Single-cell MS, to elucidate cell-specific TIA localization in the stem tissue. Imaging MS indicated that most TIAs localize in the idioblast and laticifer cells, which emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Single-cell MS was applied to four different kinds of cells [idioblast (specialized parenchyma cell), laticifer, parenchyma, and epidermal cells] in the stem longitudinal section. Principal component analysis of Imaging MS and Single-cell MS spectra of these cells showed that similar alkaloids accumulate in both idioblast cell and laticifer cell. From MS/MS analysis of Single-cell MS spectra, catharanthine, ajmalicine, and strictosidine were found in both cell types in C. roseus stem tissue, where serpentine was also accumulated. Based on these data, we discuss the significance of TIA synthesis and accumulation in the idioblast and laticifer cells of C. roseus stem tissue. PMID:27001858

  14. An Automated Imaging System for Radiation Biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Garty, Guy; Bigelow, Alan W.; Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C.; Bian, Dakai; Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Lyulko, Oleksandra V.; Taveras, Maria; Yao, Y. Lawrence; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here an automated imaging system developed at the Center for High Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry. The imaging system is built around a fast, sensitive sCMOS camera and rapid switchable LED light source. It features complete automation of all the steps of the imaging process and contains built-in feedback loops to ensure proper operation. The imaging system is intended as a back end to the RABiT – a robotic platform for radiation biodosimetry. It is intended to automate image acquisition and analysis for four biodosimetry assays for which we have developed automated protocols: The Cytokinesis Blocked Micronucleus assay, the γ-H2AX assay, the Dicentric assay (using PNA or FISH probes) and the RABiT-BAND assay. PMID:25939519

  15. Binary System for MicroRNA-Targeted Imaging in Single Cells and Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ruo-Can; Cao, Yue; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is often associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and progression. Among them, miRNA-21 is found to be overexpressed in most of the cancer cells. Here, a binary system is designed for miRNA-21 targeted imaging and photothermal treatment in single cells. The binary system is composed by a pair of probes (probe-1 and probe-2), which are encapsulated in liposomes for cell delivery. Both of the two probes adopt gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the core material, and the AuNPs are functionalized with Cy5-marked molecular beacon (MB-1/MB-2 for probe-1/probe-2, respectively). The loop part of MBs are designed to be complementary with miRNA-21. Therefore, after the binary system enters into the cytoplasm, MBs can be opened upon miRNA-21 triggered hybridization, which turns "on" the fluorescence of Cy5 for the localization of miRNA-21. At the same time, a cross-linking between the probes occurs since the far ends of MB-1 and MB-2 are designed to be complementary with each other. The miRNA-induced aggregation shifts the absorption of AuNPs to near-infrared, which can be observed under dark-field microscopy (DFM) and used for the following photothermal therapy. Under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation, MCF-7 breast cancer cells are successfully killed. The proposed system can be further applied in tumor-bearing mice and shows significant therapeutic effect. This work provides a new tool for intracellular miRNA analysis and targeted treatment against cancer. PMID:27482754

  16. Binary System for MicroRNA-Targeted Imaging in Single Cells and Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ruo-Can; Cao, Yue; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is often associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and progression. Among them, miRNA-21 is found to be overexpressed in most of the cancer cells. Here, a binary system is designed for miRNA-21 targeted imaging and photothermal treatment in single cells. The binary system is composed by a pair of probes (probe-1 and probe-2), which are encapsulated in liposomes for cell delivery. Both of the two probes adopt gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the core material, and the AuNPs are functionalized with Cy5-marked molecular beacon (MB-1/MB-2 for probe-1/probe-2, respectively). The loop part of MBs are designed to be complementary with miRNA-21. Therefore, after the binary system enters into the cytoplasm, MBs can be opened upon miRNA-21 triggered hybridization, which turns "on" the fluorescence of Cy5 for the localization of miRNA-21. At the same time, a cross-linking between the probes occurs since the far ends of MB-1 and MB-2 are designed to be complementary with each other. The miRNA-induced aggregation shifts the absorption of AuNPs to near-infrared, which can be observed under dark-field microscopy (DFM) and used for the following photothermal therapy. Under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation, MCF-7 breast cancer cells are successfully killed. The proposed system can be further applied in tumor-bearing mice and shows significant therapeutic effect. This work provides a new tool for intracellular miRNA analysis and targeted treatment against cancer.

  17. Fast Vibrational Imaging of Single Cells and Tissues by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Traditionally, molecules are analyzed in a test tube. Taking biochemistry as an example, the majority of our knowledge about cellular content comes from analysis of fixed cells or tissue homogenates using tools such as immunoblotting and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. These tools can indicate the presence of molecules but do not provide information on their location or interaction with each other in real time, restricting our understanding of the functions of the molecule under study. For real-time imaging of labeled molecules in live cells, fluorescence microscopy is the tool of choice. Fluorescent labels, however, are too bulky for small molecules such as fatty acids, amino acids, and cholesterol. These challenges highlight a critical need for development of chemical imaging platforms that allow in situ or in vivo analysis of molecules. Vibrational spectroscopy based on spontaneous Raman scattering is widely used for label-free analysis of chemical content in cells and tissues. However, the Raman process is a weak effect, limiting its application for fast chemical imaging of a living system. With high imaging speed and 3D spatial resolution, coherent Raman scattering microscopy is enabling a new approach for real-time vibrational imaging of single cells in a living system. In most experiments, coherent Raman processes involve two excitation fields denoted as pump at ωp and Stokes at ωs. When the beating frequency between the pump and Stokes fields (ωp – ωs) is resonant with a Raman-active molecular vibration, four major coherent Raman scattering processes occur simultaneously, namely, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at (ωp – ωs) + ωp, coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) at ωs – (ωp – ωs), stimulated Raman gain (SRG) at ωs, and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) at ωp. In SRG, the Stokes beam experiences a gain in intensity, whereas in SRL, the pump beam experiences a loss. Both SRG and SRL belong to

  18. Fast vibrational imaging of single cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Delong; Wang, Ping; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-08-19

    Traditionally, molecules are analyzed in a test tube. Taking biochemistry as an example, the majority of our knowledge about cellular content comes from analysis of fixed cells or tissue homogenates using tools such as immunoblotting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. These tools can indicate the presence of molecules but do not provide information on their location or interaction with each other in real time, restricting our understanding of the functions of the molecule under study. For real-time imaging of labeled molecules in live cells, fluorescence microscopy is the tool of choice. Fluorescent labels, however, are too bulky for small molecules such as fatty acids, amino acids, and cholesterol. These challenges highlight a critical need for development of chemical imaging platforms that allow in situ or in vivo analysis of molecules. Vibrational spectroscopy based on spontaneous Raman scattering is widely used for label-free analysis of chemical content in cells and tissues. However, the Raman process is a weak effect, limiting its application for fast chemical imaging of a living system. With high imaging speed and 3D spatial resolution, coherent Raman scattering microscopy is enabling a new approach for real-time vibrational imaging of single cells in a living system. In most experiments, coherent Raman processes involve two excitation fields denoted as pump at ωp and Stokes at ωs. When the beating frequency between the pump and Stokes fields (ωp - ωs) is resonant with a Raman-active molecular vibration, four major coherent Raman scattering processes occur simultaneously, namely, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at (ωp - ωs) + ωp, coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) at ωs - (ωp - ωs), stimulated Raman gain (SRG) at ωs, and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) at ωp. In SRG, the Stokes beam experiences a gain in intensity, whereas in SRL, the pump beam experiences a loss. Both SRG and SRL belong to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS

  19. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  20. Automated Image Registration for the Future (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W. J.

    2008-08-01

    A primary problem facing all surveys or archives of astronomical images remains the automated registration of the images. Images often have pointing errors not accounted for in their headers or metadata, errors which need to be removed in order to successfully combine them into a single, deeper, more scientifically valuable product. The primary techniques rely on either matching catalogs of positions or performing cross-correlation on images. Each of these techniques can only be applied successfully to limited sets of astronomical data. This talk will review the primary techniques currently used for image registration and identify their most obvious limitations for use in automated registration. A new algorithm merging the best of these techniques with a proven technique developed outside of astronomy will be explored as an example of a new paradigm for solving the problem of automated and robust image registration.

  1. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  2. Yeast Replicator: A High-Throughput Multiplexed Microfluidics Platform for Automated Measurements of Single-Cell Aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Young, Thomas Z; Acar, Murat

    2015-10-20

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism for replicative aging studies; however, conventional lifespan measurement platforms have several limitations. Here, we present a microfluidics platform that facilitates simultaneous lifespan and gene expression measurements of aging yeast cells. Our multiplexed high-throughput platform offers the capability to perform independent lifespan experiments using different yeast strains or growth media. Using this platform in minimal media environments containing glucose, we measured the full lifespan of individual yeast cells in wild-type and canonical gene deletion backgrounds. Compared to glucose, in galactose we observed a 16.8% decrease in replicative lifespan accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in single-cell oxidative stress levels reported by PSOD1-mCherry. Using PGAL1-YFP to measure the activity of the bistable galactose network, we saw that OFF and ON cells are similar in their lifespan. Our work shows that aging cells are committed to a single phenotypic state throughout their lifespan.

  3. Investigating IL-1β Secretion Using Real-Time Single-Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Catherine; Bagnall, James; Spiller, David G; White, Michael R; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Paszek, Pawel; Brough, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β is an important mediator of the inflammatory response. In order to perform its role in the inflammatory cascade, IL-1β must be secreted from the cell, yet it lacks a signal peptide that is required for conventional secretion, and the exact mechanism of release remains undefined. Conventional biochemical methods have limited the investigation into the processes involved in IL-1β secretion to population dynamics, yet heterogeneity between cells has been observed at a single-cell level. Here, greater sensitivity is achieved with the use of a newly developed vector that codes for a fluorescently labelled version of IL-1β. Combining this with real-time single-cell confocal microscopy using the methods described here, we have developed an effective protocol for investigating the mechanisms of IL-1β secretion and the testing of the hypothesis that IL-1β secretion requires membrane permeabilisation. PMID:27221482

  4. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R.

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells.

  5. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells. PMID:21974603

  6. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Automating Shallow 3D Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don; Tsoflias, George

    2009-01-15

    Our efforts since 1997 have been directed toward developing ultra-shallow seismic imaging as a cost-effective method applicable to DOE facilities. This report covers the final year of grant-funded research to refine 3D shallow seismic imaging, which built on a previous 7-year grant (FG07-97ER14826) that refined and demonstrated the use of an automated method of conducting shallow seismic surveys; this represents a significant departure from conventional seismic-survey field procedures. The primary objective of this final project was to develop an automated three-dimensional (3D) shallow-seismic reflection imaging capability. This is a natural progression from our previous published work and is conceptually parallel to the innovative imaging methods used in the petroleum industry.

  8. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  9. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  10. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; de Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability.

  11. Software for Automated Image-to-Image Co-registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkelman, Cody A.; Hughes, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    The project objectives are: a) Develop software to fine-tune image-to-image co-registration, presuming images are orthorectified prior to input; b) Create a reusable software development kit (SDK) to enable incorporation of these tools into other software; d) provide automated testing for quantitative analysis; and e) Develop software that applies multiple techniques to achieve subpixel precision in the co-registration of image pairs.

  12. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine.

  13. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine. PMID:26155309

  14. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine. PMID:26155309

  15. Automated Image Data Exploitation Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Poland, D; Sengupta, S K; Futterman, J H

    2004-01-26

    The automated production of maps of human settlement from recent satellite images is essential to detailed studies of urbanization, population movement, and the like. Commercial satellite imagery is becoming available with sufficient spectral and spatial resolution to apply computer vision techniques previously considered only for laboratory (high resolution, low noise) images. In this project, we extracted the boundaries of human settlements from IKONOS 4-band and panchromatic images using spectral segmentation together with a form of generalized second-order statistics and detection of edges and corners.

  16. Plenoptic Imager for Automated Surface Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollar, Byron; Milder, Andrew; Milder, Andrew; Mayo, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An electro-optical imaging device is capable of autonomously determining the range to objects in a scene without the use of active emitters or multiple apertures. The novel, automated, low-power imaging system is based on a plenoptic camera design that was constructed as a breadboard system. Nanohmics proved feasibility of the concept by designing an optical system for a prototype plenoptic camera, developing simulated plenoptic images and range-calculation algorithms, constructing a breadboard prototype plenoptic camera, and processing images (including range calculations) from the prototype system. The breadboard demonstration included an optical subsystem comprised of a main aperture lens, a mechanical structure that holds an array of micro lenses at the focal distance from the main lens, and a structure that mates a CMOS imaging sensor the correct distance from the micro lenses. The demonstrator also featured embedded electronics for camera readout, and a post-processor executing image-processing algorithms to provide ranging information.

  17. HaloJ: an ImageJ program for semiautomatic quantification of DNA damage at single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although Halo assay is a fast and more economic technique, it is not popular compared to comet assay for the measurement of DNA damage. One of the reasons behind this was nonavailability of suitable user-friendly program. Currently, most of the researchers were analyzing halo images manually using image analysis software (Scion Image or ImageJ). To address this problem, I have developed a semiautomatic halo analysis ImageJ program, HaloJ, and applied in the assessment of DNA damage at the single-cell level. In this article, we have shown that data obtained from the HaloJ program have a very good correlation with the data obtained using comet assay analysis program such as Comet Assay Software Project. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first program to quantify DNA damage of halo images. This program will be of great use for researchers working on the DNA damage and repair, radiation biology, toxicology, cancer biology, and so on.

  18. Diversity in ATP concentrations in a single bacterial cell population revealed by quantitative single-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaginuma, Hideyuki; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Tomiyama, Keisuke; Kakizuka, Akira; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Noji, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in quantitative single-cell analysis revealed large diversity in gene expression levels between individual cells, which could affect the physiology and/or fate of each cell. In contrast, for most metabolites, the concentrations were only measureable as ensemble averages of many cells. In living cells, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a critically important metabolite that powers many intracellular reactions. Quantitative measurement of the absolute ATP concentration in individual cells has not been achieved because of the lack of reliable methods. In this study, we developed a new genetically-encoded ratiometric fluorescent ATP indicator “QUEEN”, which is composed of a single circularly-permuted fluorescent protein and a bacterial ATP binding protein. Unlike previous FRET-based indicators, QUEEN was apparently insensitive to bacteria growth rate changes. Importantly, intracellular ATP concentrations of numbers of bacterial cells calculated from QUEEN fluorescence were almost equal to those from firefly luciferase assay. Thus, QUEEN is suitable for quantifying the absolute ATP concentration inside bacteria cells. Finally, we found that, even for a genetically-identical Escherichia coli cell population, absolute concentrations of intracellular ATP were significantly diverse between individual cells from the same culture, by imaging QUEEN signals from single cells. PMID:25283467

  19. Automated spectral imaging for clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, John; Heffelfinger, David M.; Pettipiece, Ken; Tsai, Chris; Eden, Peter; Greene, Richard A.; Sorensen, Karen J.; Stubblebine, Will; Witney, Frank

    1998-04-01

    Bio-Rad Laboratories supplies imaging equipment for many applications in the life sciences. As part of our effort to offer more flexibility to the investigator, we are developing a microscope-based imaging spectrometer for the automated detection and analysis of either conventionally or fluorescently labeled samples. Immediate applications will include the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology. The field of cytogenetics has benefited greatly from the increased sensitivity of FISH producing simplified analysis of complex chromosomal rearrangements. FISH methods for identification lends itself to automation more easily than the current cytogenetics industry standard of G- banding, however, the methods are complementary. Several technologies have been demonstrated successfully for analyzing the signals from labeled samples, including filter exchanging and interferometry. The detection system lends itself to other fluorescent applications including the display of labeled tissue sections, DNA chips, capillary electrophoresis or any other system using color as an event marker. Enhanced displays of conventionally stained specimens will also be possible.

  20. Automated zone correction in bitmapped document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Susan E.; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    1999-12-01

    The optical character recognition system (OCR) selected by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) as part of its system for automating the production of MEDLINER records frequently segments the scanned page images into zones which are inappropriate for NLM's application. Software has been created in-house to correct the zones using character coordinate and character attribute information provided as part of the OCR output data. The software correctly delineates over 97% of the zones of interest tested to date.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of water volume and pH in single cells using BCECF and fluorescence imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Leefmans, Francisco J; Herrera-Pérez, José J; Márquez, Martín S; Blanco, Víctor M

    2006-01-15

    Regulation and maintenance of cell water volume and intracellular pH (pHi) are vital functions that are interdependent; cell volume regulation affects, and is in turn affected by, changes in pHi. Disruption of either function underlies various pathologies. To study the interaction and kinetics of these two mechanisms, we developed and validated a quantitative fluorescence imaging microscopy method to measure simultaneous changes in pHi and volume in single cells loaded with the fluorescent probe BCECF. CWV is measured at the excitation isosbestic wavelength, whereas pHi is determined ratiometrically. The method has a time resolution of <1 s and sensitivity to osmotic changes of approximately 1%. It can be applied in real time to virtually any cell type attached to a coverslip, independently of cellular shape and geometry. Calibration procedures and algorithms developed to transform fluorescence signals into changes in cell water volume (CWV) and examples of applications are presented. PMID:16258035

  2. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  3. Direct Imaging of Single Cells and Tissue at Subcellular Spatial Resolution Using Transmission Geometry MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Todd, Erik M.; Rawhouser, Patrick D.; Yang, Junhai; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The need of cellular and sub-cellular spatial resolution in LDI / MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) necessitates micron and sub-micron laser spot sizes at biologically relevant sensitivities, introducing significant challenges for MS technology. To this end we have developed a transmission geometry vacuum ion source that allows the laser beam to irradiate the back side of the sample. This arrangement obviates the mechanical / ion optic complications in the source by completely separating the optical lens and ion optic structures. We have experimentally demonstrated the viability of transmission geometry MALDI MS for imaging biological tissues and cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in conjunction with new sample preparation protocols, the sensitivity of this instrument is sufficient to obtain molecular images at sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23147833

  4. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy for imaging apoptotic DNA fragmentation at the single-cell level in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Gubory, Kais H. . E-mail: kais.algubory@jouy.inra.fr

    2005-11-01

    The major characteristic of cell death by apoptosis is the loss of nuclear DNA integrity by endonucleases, resulting in the formation of small DNA fragments. The application of confocal imaging to in vivo monitoring of dynamic cellular events, like apoptosis, within internal organs and tissues has been limited by the accessibility to these sites. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) to image in situ apoptotic DNA fragmentation in surgically exteriorized sheep corpus luteum in the living animal. Following intra-luteal administration of a fluorescent DNA-staining dye, YO-PRO-1, DNA cleavage within nuclei of apoptotic cells was serially imaged at the single-cell level by FCFM. This imaging technology is sufficiently simple and rapid to allow time series in situ detection and visualization of cells undergoing apoptosis in the intact animal. Combined with endoscope, this approach can be used for minimally invasive detection of fluorescent signals and visualization of cellular events within internal organs and tissues and thereby provides the opportunity to study biological processes in the natural physiological environment of the cell in living animals.

  5. Bioimaging TOF-SIMS: High resolution 3D imaging of single cells.

    PubMed

    Nygren, Håkan; Hagenhoff, Birgit; Malmberg, Per; Nilsson, Mikael; Richter, Katrin

    2007-11-01

    The distribution of phosphocholine ions (m/z 184, m/z 86), sodium ions, and potassium ions in thyroid tumor cells was analyzed by imaging TOF-SIMS. Repeated sputtering with a C(60) (+) source and subsequent analysis with a Bi(3) (+) gun produced a series of 138 images that were stacked to make a 3D display of the chemistry of cells. Phosphocholine was seen in the plasma membrane (m/z 184) and intracellular membranes (m/z 86). The different fragmentation of the phospholipid probably reflects the chemical composition of membranes at these sites. High intensity of secondary ion signals of potassium was seen in membrane-encompassed cellular compartments. The data indicate that potassium ions are compartmentalized in thyroid tumor cells.

  6. Estimation of single cell volume from 3D confocal images using automatic data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, A.; Cagalinec, M.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac cells are highly structured with a non-uniform morphology. Although precise estimation of their volume is essential for correct evaluation of hypertrophic changes of the heart, simple and unified techniques that allow determination of the single cardiomyocyte volume with sufficient precision are still limited. Here, we describe a novel approach to assess the cell volume from confocal microscopy 3D images of living cardiac myocytes. We propose a fast procedure based on segementation using active deformable contours. This technique is independent on laser gain and/or pinhole settings and it is also applicable on images of cells stained with low fluorescence markers. Presented approach is a promising new tool to investigate changes in the cell volume during normal, as well as pathological growth, as we demonstrate in the case of cell enlargement during hypertension in rats.

  7. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-02-11

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential.

  8. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential. PMID:25669616

  9. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Hantke, Max; Deponte, Daniel P.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Westphal, Daniel; Almeida, F. Nunes; Odic, Dusko; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H.; Larsson, Daniel S. D.; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V.; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Duane Loh, Ne-Te; Chapman, Henry N.; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2015-02-01

    There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential.

  10. Myogenic progenitors and imaging single-cell flow analysis: a model to study commitment of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trapecar, Martin; Kelc, Robi; Gradisnik, Lidija; Vogrin, Matjaz; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2014-12-01

    Research on skeletal muscles suffers from a lack of appropriate human models to study muscle formation and regeneration on the regulatory level of single cells. This hampers both basic understanding and the development of new therapeutic approaches. The use of imaging multicolour flow cytometry and myogenic stem cells can help fill this void by allowing researchers to visualize and quantify the reaction of individual cultured cells to bioactives or other physiological impulses. As proof of concept, we subjected human CD56+ satellite cells to reference bioactives follistatin and Malva sylvestris extracts and then used imaging multicolor flow cytometry to visualize the stepwise activation of myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin in individual cells. This approach enabled us to evaluate the potency of these bioactives to stimulate muscle commitment. To validate this method, we used multi-photon confocal microscopy to confirm the potential of bioactives to stimulate muscle differentiation and expression of desmin. Imaging multicolor flow cytometry revealed statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups of myogenic progenitors and we propose the utilization of this concept as an integral part of future muscle research strategies.

  11. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  12. Single-cell resolution fluorescence imaging of circadian rhythms detected with a Nipkow spinning disk confocal system.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Ono, Daisuke; Hasan, Mazahir T; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2012-05-30

    Single-point laser scanning confocal imaging produces signals with high spatial resolution in living organisms. However, photo-induced toxicity, bleaching, and focus drift remain challenges, especially when recording over several days for monitoring circadian rhythms. Bioluminescence imaging is a tool widely used for this purpose, and does not cause photo-induced difficulties. However, bioluminescence signals are dimmer than fluorescence signals, and are potentially affected by levels of cofactors, including ATP, O(2), and the substrate, luciferin. Here we describe a novel time-lapse confocal imaging technique to monitor circadian rhythms in living tissues. The imaging system comprises a multipoint scanning Nipkow spinning disk confocal unit and a high-sensitivity EM-CCD camera mounted on an inverted microscope with auto-focusing function. Brain slices of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian clock, were prepared from transgenic mice expressing a clock gene, Period 1 (Per1), and fluorescence reporter protein (Per1::d2EGFP). The SCN slices were cut out together with membrane, flipped over, and transferred to the collagen-coated glass dishes to obtain signals with a high signal-to-noise ratio and to minimize focus drift. The imaging technique and improved culture method enabled us to monitor the circadian rhythm of Per1::d2EGFP from optically confirmed single SCN neurons without noticeable photo-induced effects or focus drift. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we also monitored calcium circadian rhythms at a single-cell level in a large population of SCN neurons. Thus, the Nipkow spinning disk confocal imaging system developed here facilitates long-term visualization of circadian rhythms in living cells. PMID:22480987

  13. In Situ Probing of Cholesterol in Astrocytes at the Single Cell Level using Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.C.; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-18

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level.

  14. Single-cell imaging tools for brain energy metabolism: a review.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Alejandro; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Ceballo, Sebastian; Valdebenito, Rocío; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Romero-Gómez, Ignacio; Barros, L Felipe

    2014-07-01

    Neurophotonics comes to light at a time in which advances in microscopy and improved calcium reporters are paving the way toward high-resolution functional mapping of the brain. This review relates to a parallel revolution in metabolism. We argue that metabolism needs to be approached both in vitro and in vivo, and that it does not just exist as a low-level platform but is also a relevant player in information processing. In recent years, genetically encoded fluorescent nanosensors have been introduced to measure glucose, glutamate, ATP, NADH, lactate, and pyruvate in mammalian cells. Reporting relative metabolite levels, absolute concentrations, and metabolic fluxes, these sensors are instrumental for the discovery of new molecular mechanisms. Sensors continue to be developed, which together with a continued improvement in protein expression strategies and new imaging technologies, herald an exciting era of high-resolution characterization of metabolism in the brain and other organs. PMID:26157964

  15. Mechanical behavior study of single cell contraction by digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianyong; Wu, Jia; Qin, Lei; Zhu, Tao; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhang, Youyi; Fang, Jing

    2008-11-01

    Precise determination of cellular traction forces has important significance in assessing cellular mechanical characteristic on micro/nano scale. Elastic substrate method is a useful way to study cellular traction forces, in which the cells are cultured on elastic gel substrate marked by randomly embedding fluorescent microbeads and they exert mechanical forces on the film to cause deformation of the substrate material. In this paper, we investigate the acquisition of deformation field induced by single cardiac myocyte by using digital image correlation (DIC) technique. In view of the fact that cellular force restoration is essentially an ill-posed inverse problem, which implies that the force reconstruction is susceptible to the input displacement noise, we develop a novel optimal filtering scheme in two-dimensional Fourier space to restrain displacement noise amplification. Experiments of traction force recovery for a real cardiac myocyte indicate the optimal scheme in combination with the DIC method enables us to reconstruct cellular traction fields with high accuracy.

  16. Single-cell imaging tools for brain energy metabolism: a review

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Alejandro; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Ceballo, Sebastian; Valdebenito, Rocío; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Romero-Gómez, Ignacio; Barros, L. Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Neurophotonics comes to light at a time in which advances in microscopy and improved calcium reporters are paving the way toward high-resolution functional mapping of the brain. This review relates to a parallel revolution in metabolism. We argue that metabolism needs to be approached both in vitro and in vivo, and that it does not just exist as a low-level platform but is also a relevant player in information processing. In recent years, genetically encoded fluorescent nanosensors have been introduced to measure glucose, glutamate, ATP, NADH, lactate, and pyruvate in mammalian cells. Reporting relative metabolite levels, absolute concentrations, and metabolic fluxes, these sensors are instrumental for the discovery of new molecular mechanisms. Sensors continue to be developed, which together with a continued improvement in protein expression strategies and new imaging technologies, herald an exciting era of high-resolution characterization of metabolism in the brain and other organs. PMID:26157964

  17. Assurance of monoclonality in one round of cloning through cell sorting for single cell deposition coupled with high resolution cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albanetti, Thomas; Venkat, Raghavan; Schoner, Ronald; Savery, James; Miro‐Quesada, Guillermo; Rajan, Bhargavi; Groves, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory authorities require that cell lines used in commercial production of recombinant proteins must be derived from a single cell progenitor or clone. The limiting dilution method of cell cloning required multiple rounds of low‐density cell plating and microscopic observation of a single cell in order to provide evidence of monoclonality. Other cloning methods rely on calculating statistical probability of monoclonality rather than visual microscopic observation of cells. We have combined the single cell deposition capability of the Becton Dickinson Influx™ cell sorter with the microscopic imaging capability of the SynenTec Cellavista to create a system for producing clonal production cell lines. The efficiency of single cell deposition by the Influx™ was determined to be 98% using fluorescently labeled cells. The centrifugal force required to settle the deposited cells to the bottom of the microplate well was established to be 1,126g providing a 98.1% probability that all cells will be in the focal plane of the Cellavista imaging system. The probability that a single cell was deposited by the cell sorter combined with the probability of every cell settling into the focal plane of the imager yield a combined >99% probability of documented monoclonality. © 2015 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:1172–1178, 2015 PMID:26195345

  18. Single cell super-resolution imaging of E. coli OmpR during environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Foo, Yong Hwee; Spahn, Christoph; Zhang, Hongfang; Heilemann, Mike; Kenney, Linda J

    2015-10-01

    Two-component signaling systems are a major strategy employed by bacteria, and to some extent, yeast and plants, to respond to environmental stress. The EnvZ/OmpR system in E. coli responds to osmotic and acid stress and is responsible for regulating the protein composition of the outer membrane. EnvZ is a histidine kinase located in the inner membrane. Upon activation, it is autophosphorylated by ATP and subsequently, it activates OmpR. Phosphorylated OmpR binds with high affinity to the regulatory regions of the ompF and ompC porin genes to regulate their transcription. We set out to visualize these two-components in single bacterial cells during different environmental stress conditions and to examine the subsequent modifications to the bacterial nucleoid as a result. We created a chromosomally-encoded, active, fluorescent OmpR-PAmCherry fusion protein and compared its expression levels with RNA polymerase. Quantitative western blotting had indicated that these two proteins were expressed at similar levels. From our images, it is evident that OmpR is significantly less abundant compared to RNA polymerase. In cross-sectional axial images, we observed OmpR molecules closely juxtaposed near the inner membrane during acidic and hyposomotic growth. In acidic conditions, the chromosome was compacted. Surprisingly, under acidic conditions, we also observed evidence of a spatial correlation between the DNA and the inner membrane, suggesting a mechanical link through an active DNA-OmpR-EnvZ complex. This work represents the first direct visualization of a response regulator with respect to the bacterial chromosome.

  19. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  20. Automated tissue characterization in MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Juergen; Bernarding, Johannes; Koennecke, Hans-Christian; Wolf, Karl J.; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    A histogram-based segmentation technique was extended to exploit information acquired by manifold MRI techniques. An automated method was used to combine T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and derived maps of the quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DWI allows the early detection of cerebral ischemia, and the calculated ADC value may provide information on pathophysiologic changes. Different optionally shaped clusters were characterized as separate local density maxima in the resultant 3D histogram. Cluster borders were determined by detecting density minima. Distinct but related clusters could be merged in the histogram using the Euclidian distance and a score describing the spatial neighborhood of pixels in the image. In healthy volunteers, gray matter, white matter, muscle, skin, adipose tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid were clearly identified by the automated analysis. In stroke patients, ischemic regions were reliably segmented irrespective of shape, size, and location. The time course of relative ADC changes in ischemic lesions was determined. Results were confirmed by a radiologist. The proposed automatic segmentation algorithm can be used without restrictions for the fast analysis of any multidimensional dataset. The method has proved to be reliable for determining quantities containing information on the physiologic state of tissue, such as the ADC.

  1. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency. PMID:25479095

  2. Non-invasive single-cell biomechanical analysis using live-imaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Yanthe E; Lund, Amanda W; Lin, Alex W H; Ng, Chee P; Alsuwaidi, Aysha; Azzeh, Sara; Gater, Deborah L; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-09-01

    The physiological state of a cell is governed by a multitude of processes and can be described by a combination of mechanical, spatial and temporal properties. Quantifying cell dynamics at multiple scales is essential for comprehensive studies of cellular function, and remains a challenge for traditional end-point assays. We introduce an efficient, non-invasive computational tool that takes time-lapse images as input to automatically detect, segment and analyze unlabeled live cells; the program then outputs kinematic cellular shape and migration parameters, while simultaneously measuring cellular stiffness and viscosity. We demonstrate the capabilities of the program by testing it on human mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) induced to differentiate towards the osteoblastic (huOB) lineage, and T-lymphocyte cells (T cells) of naïve and stimulated phenotypes. The program detected relative cellular stiffness differences in huMSCs and huOBs that were comparable to those obtained with studies that utilize atomic force microscopy; it further distinguished naïve from stimulated T cells, based on characteristics necessary to invoke an immune response. In summary, we introduce an integrated tool to decipher spatiotemporal and intracellular dynamics of cells, providing a new and alternative approach for cell characterization. PMID:27422102

  3. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  4. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Balchik, Sara M.; Fridrickson, Jim; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant ΔmtrC or mutant ΔomcA > double mutant (ΔomcA-ΔmtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes. PMID:23249294

  5. Live cell imaging analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the human endothelial cell migration at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Yu, Zhilong; Zhou, Ying; Tao, Louis; Pang, Yuhong; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiannian; Qiu, Haiwei; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Zitian; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in cell migration. Although many methods have been developed to measure the motility of mammalian cells, accurate quantitative assessments of the migration speed of individual cells remain a major challenge. It is difficult for conventional scratch assays to differentiate proliferation from migration during the so-called wound-healing processes because of the long experimental time required. In addition, it is also challenging to create identical conditions for evaluating cell migration by conventional methods. We developed a microfluidic device with precisely created blanks allowing for robust and reproducible cell migration inside accurately-controlled microenvironments to study the regulatory effect of the epigenetic regulator histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) on cell migration. Through analyzing time-lapse imaging of the cells migrating into individual blank regions, we can measure the migration speed parameter for human primary cells within a few hours, eliminating the confounding effect of cell proliferation. We also developed an automatic image analysis and a numeric model-based data fitting to set up an integrated cell migration analysis system at single-cell resolution. Using this system, we measured the motility of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the migration speed reduction due to the silencing of HDAC7 and various other genes. We showed that the migration behaviour of these human primary cells are clearly regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, demonstrating the great potential of this accurate and robust assay in the fields of quantitatively migration studies and high-throughput screening.

  6. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limtedmore » number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X

  7. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  8. The Comet Assay: Automated Imaging Methods for Improved Analysis and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Braafladt, Signe; Reipa, Vytas; Atha, Donald H

    2016-01-01

    Sources of variability in the comet assay include variations in the protocol used to process the cells, the microscope imaging system and the software used in the computerized analysis of the images. Here we focus on the effect of variations in the microscope imaging system and software analysis using fixed preparations of cells and a single cell processing protocol. To determine the effect of the microscope imaging and analysis on the measured percentage of damaged DNA (% DNA in tail), we used preparations of mammalian cells treated with etoposide or electrochemically induced DNA damage conditions and varied the settings of the automated microscope, camera, and commercial image analysis software. Manual image analysis revealed measurement variations in percent DNA in tail as high as 40% due to microscope focus, camera exposure time and the software image intensity threshold level. Automated image analysis reduced these variations as much as three-fold, but only within a narrow range of focus and exposure settings. The magnitude of variation, observed using both analysis methods, was highly dependent on the overall extent of DNA damage in the particular sample. Mitigating these sources of variability with optimal instrument settings facilitates an accurate evaluation of cell biological variability. PMID:27581626

  9. The Comet Assay: Automated Imaging Methods for Improved Analysis and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Braafladt, Signe; Reipa, Vytas; Atha, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Sources of variability in the comet assay include variations in the protocol used to process the cells, the microscope imaging system and the software used in the computerized analysis of the images. Here we focus on the effect of variations in the microscope imaging system and software analysis using fixed preparations of cells and a single cell processing protocol. To determine the effect of the microscope imaging and analysis on the measured percentage of damaged DNA (% DNA in tail), we used preparations of mammalian cells treated with etoposide or electrochemically induced DNA damage conditions and varied the settings of the automated microscope, camera, and commercial image analysis software. Manual image analysis revealed measurement variations in percent DNA in tail as high as 40% due to microscope focus, camera exposure time and the software image intensity threshold level. Automated image analysis reduced these variations as much as three-fold, but only within a narrow range of focus and exposure settings. The magnitude of variation, observed using both analysis methods, was highly dependent on the overall extent of DNA damage in the particular sample. Mitigating these sources of variability with optimal instrument settings facilitates an accurate evaluation of cell biological variability.

  10. The Comet Assay: Automated Imaging Methods for Improved Analysis and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Braafladt, Signe; Reipa, Vytas; Atha, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Sources of variability in the comet assay include variations in the protocol used to process the cells, the microscope imaging system and the software used in the computerized analysis of the images. Here we focus on the effect of variations in the microscope imaging system and software analysis using fixed preparations of cells and a single cell processing protocol. To determine the effect of the microscope imaging and analysis on the measured percentage of damaged DNA (% DNA in tail), we used preparations of mammalian cells treated with etoposide or electrochemically induced DNA damage conditions and varied the settings of the automated microscope, camera, and commercial image analysis software. Manual image analysis revealed measurement variations in percent DNA in tail as high as 40% due to microscope focus, camera exposure time and the software image intensity threshold level. Automated image analysis reduced these variations as much as three-fold, but only within a narrow range of focus and exposure settings. The magnitude of variation, observed using both analysis methods, was highly dependent on the overall extent of DNA damage in the particular sample. Mitigating these sources of variability with optimal instrument settings facilitates an accurate evaluation of cell biological variability. PMID:27581626

  11. A High-Throughput Automated Microfluidic Platform for Calcium Imaging of Taste Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    The human enteroendocrine L cell line NCI-H716, expressing taste receptors and taste signaling elements, constitutes a unique model for the studies of cellular responses to glucose, appetite regulation, gastrointestinal motility, and insulin secretion. Targeting these gut taste receptors may provide novel treatments for diabetes and obesity. However, NCI-H716 cells are cultured in suspension and tend to form multicellular aggregates, preventing high-throughput calcium imaging due to interferences caused by laborious immobilization and stimulus delivery procedures. Here, we have developed an automated microfluidic platform that is capable of trapping more than 500 single cells into microwells with a loading efficiency of 77% within two minutes, delivering multiple chemical stimuli and performing calcium imaging with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions when compared to bath perfusion systems. Results revealed the presence of heterogeneity in cellular responses to the type, concentration, and order of applied sweet and bitter stimuli. Sucralose and denatonium benzoate elicited robust increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, glucose evoked a rapid elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) followed by reduced responses to subsequent glucose stimulation. Using Gymnema sylvestre as a blocking agent for the sweet taste receptor confirmed that different taste receptors were utilized for sweet and bitter tastes. This automated microfluidic platform is cost-effective, easy to fabricate and operate, and may be generally applicable for high-throughput and high-content single-cell analysis and drug screening. PMID:27399663

  12. High-resolution single-cell imaging for functional studies in the whole brain and spinal cord and thick tissue blocks using light-emitting diode illumination

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Boris V.; Pinto, Vitor; Derkach, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    Functional studies of neuronal networks require recordings from visually identified neurons in their natural environment, preservation of which may demand experimenting with a tissue of a significant depth or the entire brain. Here we describe a new technique of single-cell imaging and visually controlled patch-clamp recordings in both brain slices of unlimited thickness and the whole brain or spinal cord preparations with a cut upper surface. It utilizes an upright microscope and ultra bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a source of oblique illumination. This technique provided high quality images of superficial cells regardless of slice thickness or the presence of opaque structures, like metal plate or bone, below the tissue, when conventional differential interference contrast (DIC) optics became powerless. The technique opens broad possibilities for a single-cell imaging and visually guided recordings from intact neuronal networks in the entire brain or spinal cord. PMID:17586052

  13. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging for quantification of TH-1 and TH-2 cytokines at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekkar, Hakim; Benbernou, N.; Esnault, S.; Shin, H. C.; Guenounou, Moncef

    1998-04-01

    Immune responses are strongly influenced by the cytokines following antigenic stimulation. Distinct cytokine-producing T cell subsets are well known to play a major role in immune responses and to be differentially regulated during immunological disorders, although the characterization and quantification of the TH-1/TH-2 cytokine pattern in T cells remained not clearly defined. Expression of cytokines by T lymphocytes is a highly balanced process, involving stimulatory and inhibitory intracellular signaling pathways. The aim of this study was (1) to quantify the cytokine expression in T cells at the single cell level using optical imaging, (2) and to analyze the influence of cyclic AMP- dependent signal transduction pathway in the balance between the TH-1 and TH-2 cytokine profile. We attempted to study several cytokines (IL-2, IFN-(gamma) , IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cells were prestimulated in vitro using phytohemagglutinin and phorbol ester for 36h, and then further cultured for 8h in the presence of monensin. Cells were permeabilized and then simple-, double- or triple-labeled with the corresponding specific fluorescent monoclonal antibodies. The cell phenotype was also determined by analyzing the expression of each of CD4, CD8, CD45RO and CD45RA with the cytokine expression. Conventional images of cells were recorded with a Peltier- cooled CCD camera (B/W C5985, Hamamatsu photonics) through an inverted microscope equipped with epi-fluorescence (Diaphot 300, Nikon). Images were digitalized using an acquisition video interface (Oculus TCX Coreco) in 762 by 570 pixels coded in 8 bits (256 gray levels), and analyzed thereafter in an IBM PC computer based on an intel pentium processor with an adequate software (Visilog 4, Noesis). The first image processing step is the extraction of cell areas using an edge detection and a binary thresholding method. In order to reduce the background noise of fluorescence, we performed an opening

  14. Imaging and Mapping of Tissue Constituents at the Single-Cell Level Using MALDI MSI and Quantitative Laser Scanning Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Catherine M; Salisbury, Joseph P; Feldman, Daniel R; Isim, Sinan; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Luther, Ed; Agar, Jeffery N

    2015-01-01

    For nearly a century, histopathology involved the laborious morphological analyses of tissues stained with broad-spectrum dyes (i.e., eosin to label proteins). With the advent of antibody-labeling, immunostaining (fluorescein and rhodamine for fluorescent labeling) and immunohistochemistry (DAB and hematoxylin), it became possible to identify specific immunological targets in cells and tissue preparations. Technical advances, including the development of monoclonal antibody technology, led to an ever-increasing palate of dyes, both fluorescent and chromatic. This provides an incredibly rich menu of molecular entities that can be visualized and quantified in cells-giving rise to the new discipline of Molecular Pathology. We describe the evolution of two analytical techniques, cytometry and mass spectrometry, which complement histopathological visual analysis by providing automated, cellular-resolution constituent maps. For the first time, laser scanning cytometry (LSC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) are combined for the analysis of tissue sections. The utility of the marriage of these techniques is demonstrated by analyzing mouse brains with neuron-specific, genetically encoded, fluorescent proteins. We present a workflow that: (1) can be used with or without expensive matrix deposition methods, (2) uses LSC images to reveal the diverse landscape of neural tissue as well as the matrix, and (3) uses a tissue fixation method compatible with a DNA stain. The proposed workflow can be adapted for a variety of sample preparation and matrix deposition methods. PMID:26542720

  15. A novel luciferase fusion protein for highly sensitive optical imaging: from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, Laura; Blankevoort, Vicky; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have different advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Bioluminescence imaging is now the most sensitive optical technique for tracking cells, promoter activity studies, or for longitudinal in vivo preclinical studies. Far-red and near-infrared fluorescence imaging have the advantage of being suitable for both ex vivo and in vivo analysis and have translational potential, thanks to the availability of very sensitive imaging instrumentation. Here, we report the development and validation of a new luciferase fusion reporter generated by the fusion of the firefly luciferase Luc2 to the far-red fluorescent protein TurboFP635 by a 14-amino acid linker peptide. Expression of the fusion protein, named TurboLuc, was analyzed in human embryonic kidney cells, (HEK)-293 cells, via Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo optical imaging. The created fusion protein maintained the characteristics of the original bioluminescent and fluorescent protein and showed no toxicity when expressed in living cells. To assess the sensitivity of the reporter for in vivo imaging, transfected cells were subcutaneously injected in animals. Detection limits of cells were 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells for bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging, respectively. In addition, hydrodynamics-based in vivo gene delivery using a minicircle vector expressing TurboLuc allowed for the analysis of luminescent signals over time in deep tissue. Bioluminescence could be monitored for over 30 days in the liver of animals. In conclusion, TurboLuc combines the advantages of both bioluminescence and fluorescence and allows for highly sensitive optical imaging ranging from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

  16. Automated image segmentation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephanie; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2007-03-01

    Neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases demonstrate problems associated with brain maturation and aging. Automated methods to delineate brain structures of interest are required to analyze large amounts of imaging data like that being collected in several on going multi-center studies. We have previously reported on using artificial neural networks (ANN) to define subcortical brain structures including the thalamus (0.88), caudate (0.85) and the putamen (0.81). In this work, apriori probability information was generated using Thirion's demons registration algorithm. The input vector consisted of apriori probability, spherical coordinates, and an iris of surrounding signal intensity values. We have applied the support vector machine (SVM) machine learning algorithm to automatically segment subcortical and cerebellar regions using the same input vector information. SVM architecture was derived from the ANN framework. Training was completed using a radial-basis function kernel with gamma equal to 5.5. Training was performed using 15,000 vectors collected from 15 training images in approximately 10 minutes. The resulting support vectors were applied to delineate 10 images not part of the training set. Relative overlap calculated for the subcortical structures was 0.87 for the thalamus, 0.84 for the caudate, 0.84 for the putamen, and 0.72 for the hippocampus. Relative overlap for the cerebellar lobes ranged from 0.76 to 0.86. The reliability of the SVM based algorithm was similar to the inter-rater reliability between manual raters and can be achieved without rater intervention.

  17. Automated segmentation of MR images of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaus, M R; Warfield, S K; Nabavi, A; Black, P M; Jolesz, F A; Kikinis, R

    2001-02-01

    An automated brain tumor segmentation method was developed and validated against manual segmentation with three-dimensional magnetic resonance images in 20 patients with meningiomas and low-grade gliomas. The automated method (operator time, 5-10 minutes) allowed rapid identification of brain and tumor tissue with an accuracy and reproducibility comparable to those of manual segmentation (operator time, 3-5 hours), making automated segmentation practical for low-grade gliomas and meningiomas. PMID:11161183

  18. OpenComet: an automated tool for comet assay image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gyori, Benjamin M; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Thiagarajan, P S; Hsu, David; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time. PMID:24624335

  19. OpenComet: an automated tool for comet assay image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gyori, Benjamin M; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Thiagarajan, P S; Hsu, David; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time.

  20. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  1. Automated feature extraction and classification from image sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Unisys Corporation have completed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to explore automated feature extraction and classification from image sources. The CRADA helped the USGS define the spectral and spatial resolution characteristics of airborne and satellite imaging sensors necessary to meet base cartographic and land use and land cover feature classification requirements and help develop future automated geographic and cartographic data production capabilities. The USGS is seeking a new commercial partner to continue automated feature extraction and classification research and development.

  2. Image segmentation for automated dental identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj Said, Eyad; Nassar, Diaa Eldin M.; Ammar, Hany H.

    2006-02-01

    Dental features are one of few biometric identifiers that qualify for postmortem identification; therefore, creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS) with goals and objectives similar to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) has received increased attention. As a part of ADIS, teeth segmentation from dental radiographs films is an essential step in the identification process. In this paper, we introduce a fully automated approach for teeth segmentation with goal to extract at least one tooth from the dental radiograph film. We evaluate our approach based on theoretical and empirical basis, and we compare its performance with the performance of other approaches introduced in the literature. The results show that our approach exhibits the lowest failure rate and the highest optimality among all full automated approaches introduced in the literature.

  3. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation

    PubMed Central

    Beijbom, Oscar; Edmunds, Peter J.; Roelfsema, Chris; Smith, Jennifer; Kline, David I.; Neal, Benjamin P.; Dunlap, Matthew J.; Moriarty, Vincent; Fan, Tung-Yung; Tan, Chih-Jui; Chan, Stephen; Treibitz, Tali; Gamst, Anthony; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images captured at four Pacific coral reefs. Inter- and intra- annotator variability among six human experts was quantified and compared to semi- and fully- automated annotation methods, which are made available at coralnet.ucsd.edu. Our results indicate high expert agreement for identification of coral genera, but lower agreement for algal functional groups, in particular between turf algae and crustose coralline algae. This indicates the need for unequivocal definitions of algal groups, careful training of multiple annotators, and enhanced imaging technology. Semi-automated annotation, where 50% of the annotation decisions were performed automatically, yielded cover estimate errors comparable to those of the human experts. Furthermore, fully-automated annotation yielded rapid, unbiased cover estimates but with increased variance. These results show that automated annotation can increase spatial coverage and decrease time and financial outlay for image-based reef surveys. PMID:26154157

  4. Procedures for the quantification of whole-tissue immunofluorescence images obtained at single-cell resolution during murine tubular organ development.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-01-01

    Whole-tissue quantification at single-cell resolution has become an inevitable approach for further quantitative understanding of morphogenesis in organ development. The feasibility of the approach has been dramatically increased by recent technological improvements in optical tissue clearing and microscopy. However, the series of procedures required for this approach to lead to successful whole-tissue quantification is far from developed. To provide the appropriate procedure, we here show tips for each critical step of the entire process, including fixation for immunofluorescence, optical clearing, and digital image processing, using developing murine internal organs such as epididymis, kidney, and lung as an example. Through comparison of fixative solutions and of clearing methods, we found optimal conditions to achieve clearer deep-tissue imaging of specific immunolabeled targets and explain what methods result in vivid volume imaging. In addition, we demonstrated that three-dimensional digital image processing after optical clearing produces objective quantitative data for the whole-tissue analysis, focusing on the spatial distribution of mitotic cells in the epididymal tubule. The procedure for the whole-tissue quantification shown in this article should contribute to systematic measurements of cellular processes in developing organs, accelerating the further understanding of morphogenesis at the single cell level. PMID:26258587

  5. Quantitative Imaging of Chemical Composition in Single Cells by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Cisplatin Affects Calcium Stores in Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for quantitative single cell mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) analysis is described in this chapter with examples of the treatment of cells with anticancer drug, cisplatin. Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum (ii) (CDDP), is widely used for the treatment of many malignancies, including testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, head and neck, and small cell and non-small cell lung cancers. The possibility of renal injury by cisplatin treatment is a major dose-limiting factor in this cancer therapy. At present, the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal cytotoxicity are poorly understood. In this work, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used for investigating cisplatin-induced alterations in intracellular chemical composition in a well established model (LLC-PK1 cell line) for studying renal injury. The cells were cryogenically prepared by the sandwich freeze-fracture method for subcellular imaging analysis of chemical composition (total concentrations of K+, Na+ and Ca2+) in individual cells. The single cell analysis of these diffusible ions necessitates the use of reliable cryogenic sample preparations for SIMS. The sandwich freeze-fracture method offers a simple approach for cryogenically preserving diffusible ions and molecules inside the cells for SIMS analysis. A CAMECA IMS 3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing chemical images of single cells with 500 nm spatial resolution was used in the study. In cisplatin treated cells, SIMS imaging showed the presence of detectable amount of platinum at mass 195, as 195Pt+ secondary ions in individual cells. SIMS observations also revealed that individual cells differed in their response to cisplatin. While the chemical composition of some cells was unaffected by cisplatin, others showed a reduction in cytoplasmic calcium stores that was not associated with changes in their intracellular K or Na concentrations. Another population of cells displayed an increased in cytoplasmic

  6. Automated Registration Of Images From Multiple Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Kwok, Ronald; Curlander, John C.; Pang, Shirley S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Images of terrain scanned in common by multiple Earth-orbiting remote sensors registered automatically with each other and, where possible, on geographic coordinate grid. Simulated image of terrain viewed by sensor computed from ancillary data, viewing geometry, and mathematical model of physics of imaging. In proposed registration algorithm, simulated and actual sensor images matched by area-correlation technique.

  7. Automating proliferation rate estimation from Ki-67 histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Lahham, Heba Z.; Alomari, Raja S.; Hiary, Hazem; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause of women death and the most diagnosed female cancer in the US. Proliferation rate estimation (PRE) is one of the prognostic indicators that guide the treatment protocols and it is clinically performed from Ki-67 histopathology images. Automating PRE substantially increases the efficiency of the pathologists. Moreover, presenting a deterministic and reproducible proliferation rate value is crucial to reduce inter-observer variability. To that end, we propose a fully automated CAD system for PRE from the Ki-67 histopathology images. This CAD system is based on a model of three steps: image pre-processing, image clustering, and nuclei segmentation and counting that are finally followed by PRE. The first step is based on customized color modification and color-space transformation. Then, image pixels are clustered by K-Means depending on the features extracted from the images derived from the first step. Finally, nuclei are segmented and counted using global thresholding, mathematical morphology and connected component analysis. Our experimental results on fifty Ki-67-stained histopathology images show a significant agreement between our CAD's automated PRE and the gold standard's one, where the latter is an average between two observers' estimates. The Paired T-Test, for the automated and manual estimates, shows ρ = 0.86, 0.45, 0.8 for the brown nuclei count, blue nuclei count, and proliferation rate, respectively. Thus, our proposed CAD system is as reliable as the pathologist estimating the proliferation rate. Yet, its estimate is reproducible.

  8. On-Chip Single-Cell-Shape Control Technology for Understanding Contractile Motion of Cardiomyocytes Measured Using Optical Image Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Takizawa, Eikei; Nomura, Fumimasa; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative evaluation of mechanophysiological responses of cardiomyocytes has become more important for more precise prediction of cardiotoxicity. For the accurate detection of cardiomyocyte contraction, we have developed an on-chip single-cell-shape control technology on the basis of an agarose microchamber system and an on-chip optical image analysis system that records the contractile motions of cardiomyocytes with noninvasive/nondestructive measurement for long-term experiments. Using this on-chip single-cell-shape control technology, the shape of single cardiomyocytes was controlled by seeding the cells in 21-µm-radius (circular) or 20×70 µm2 (rectangular) agarose microchambers. To detect the contractility of cardiomyocytes, the cells were labeled with microbeads attached onto the surface of target cells and the motion of beads was acquired and analyzed using a newly developed wider-depth-of-field optics equipped with a 1/100 s high-speed digital camera. Mechanophysiological properties such as displacement and direction of movement were obtained using a real-time processing system module at spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.15 µm and 10 ms, respectively. Comparisons of displacement and direction of contraction between circular and rectangular cardiomyocytes indicated that the rectangular cardiomyocytes tended to contract along the longitudinal direction as in a real heart. This result suggests that the shape of cells affected the function of cells. The on-chip single-cell-shape control technology and optical image analysis system enable the detection of the motion of contraction of single-shape-controlled cardiomyocytes, and are expected to be applicable to the more precise prediction of cardiotoxicity.

  9. Comparison of automated and manual segmentation of hippocampus MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Christensen, Gary E.; Miller, Michael I.; Joshi, Sarang C.; Gado, Mokhtar; Csernansky, John G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    The precision and accuracy of area estimates from magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and using manual and automated segmentation methods are determined. Areas of the human hippocampus were measured to compare a new automatic method of segmentation with regions of interest drawn by an expert. MR images of nine normal subjects and nine schizophrenic patients were acquired with a 1.5-T unit (Siemens Medical Systems, Inc., Iselin, New Jersey). From each individual MPRAGE 3D volume image a single comparable 2-D slice (matrix equals 256 X 256) was chosen which corresponds to the same coronal slice of the hippocampus. The hippocampus was first manually segmented, then segmented using high dimensional transformations of a digital brain atlas to individual brain MR images. The repeatability of a trained rater was assessed by comparing two measurements from each individual subject. Variability was also compared within and between subject groups of schizophrenics and normal subjects. Finally, the precision and accuracy of automated segmentation of hippocampal areas were determined by comparing automated measurements to manual segmentation measurements made by the trained rater on MR and brain slice images. The results demonstrate the high repeatability of area measurement from MR images of the human hippocampus. Automated segmentation using high dimensional transformations from a digital brain atlas provides repeatability superior to that of manual segmentation. Furthermore, the validity of automated measurements was demonstrated by a high correlation with manual segmentation measurements made by a trained rater. Quantitative morphometry of brain substructures (e.g. hippocampus) is feasible by use of a high dimensional transformation of a digital brain atlas to an individual MR image. This method automates the search for neuromorphological correlates of schizophrenia by a new mathematically robust method with unprecedented sensitivity to small local and regional differences.

  10. CMEIAS color segmentation: an improved computing technology to process color images for quantitative microbial ecology studies at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Gross, Colin A; Reddy, Chandan K; Dazzo, Frank B

    2010-02-01

    Quantitative microscopy and digital image analysis are underutilized in microbial ecology largely because of the laborious task to segment foreground object pixels from background, especially in complex color micrographs of environmental samples. In this paper, we describe an improved computing technology developed to alleviate this limitation. The system's uniqueness is its ability to edit digital images accurately when presented with the difficult yet commonplace challenge of removing background pixels whose three-dimensional color space overlaps the range that defines foreground objects. Image segmentation is accomplished by utilizing algorithms that address color and spatial relationships of user-selected foreground object pixels. Performance of the color segmentation algorithm evaluated on 26 complex micrographs at single pixel resolution had an overall pixel classification accuracy of 99+%. Several applications illustrate how this improved computing technology can successfully resolve numerous challenges of complex color segmentation in order to produce images from which quantitative information can be accurately extracted, thereby gain new perspectives on the in situ ecology of microorganisms. Examples include improvements in the quantitative analysis of (1) microbial abundance and phylotype diversity of single cells classified by their discriminating color within heterogeneous communities, (2) cell viability, (3) spatial relationships and intensity of bacterial gene expression involved in cellular communication between individual cells within rhizoplane biofilms, and (4) biofilm ecophysiology based on ribotype-differentiated radioactive substrate utilization. The stand-alone executable file plus user manual and tutorial images for this color segmentation computing application are freely available at http://cme.msu.edu/cmeias/ . This improved computing technology opens new opportunities of imaging applications where discriminating colors really matter most

  11. Automation of Cassini Support Imaging Uplink Command Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly-Hollins, Lisa; Breneman, Herbert H.; Brooks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    "Support imaging" is imagery requested by other Cassini science teams to aid in the interpretation of their data. The generation of the spacecraft command sequences for these images is performed by the Cassini Instrument Operations Team. The process initially established for doing this was very labor-intensive, tedious and prone to human error. Team management recognized this process as one that could easily benefit from automation. Team members were tasked to document the existing manual process, develop a plan and strategy to automate the process, implement the plan and strategy, test and validate the new automated process, and deliver the new software tools and documentation to Flight Operations for use during the Cassini extended mission. In addition to the goals of higher efficiency and lower risk in the processing of support imaging requests, an effort was made to maximize adaptability of the process to accommodate uplink procedure changes and the potential addition of new capabilities outside the scope of the initial effort.

  12. Phytoplankton community structure in the North Sea: coupling between remote sensing and automated in situ analysis at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyssen, M.; Alvain, S.; Lefèbvre, A.; Dessailly, D.; Rijkeboer, M.; Guiselin, N.; Creach, V.; Artigas, L.-F.

    2014-11-01

    Phytoplankton observation in the ocean can be a challenge in oceanography. Accurate estimations of their biomass and dynamics will help to understand ocean ecosystems and refine global climate models. This requires relevant datasets of phytoplankton at a functional level and on a daily and sub meso scale. In order to achieve this, an automated, high frequency, dedicated scanning flow cytometer (SFC, Cytobuoy, NL), has been developed to cover the entire size range of phytoplankton cells whilst simultaneously taking pictures of the largest of them. This cytometer was directly connected to the water inlet of a~pocket Ferry Box during a cruise in the North Sea, 8-12 May 2011 (DYMAPHY project, INTERREG IV A "2 Seas"), in order to identify the phytoplankton community structure of near surface waters (6 m) with a high resolution spacial basis (2.2 ± 1.8 km). Ten groups of cells, distinguished on the basis of their optical pulse shapes, were described (abundance, size estimate, red fluorescence per unit volume). Abundances varied depending on the hydrological status of the traversed waters, reflecting different stages of the North Sea blooming period. Comparisons between several techniques analyzing chlorophyll a and the scanning flow cytometer, using the integrated red fluorescence emitted by each counted cell, showed significant correlations. The community structure observed from the automated flow cytometry was compared with the PHYSAT reflectance anomalies over a daily scale. The number of matchups observed between the SFC automated high frequency in situ sampling and the remote sensing was found to be two to three times better than when using traditional water sampling strategies. Significant differences in the phytoplankton community structure within the two days for which matchups were available, suggest that it is possible to label PHYSAT anomalies not only with dominant groups, but at the level of the community structure.

  13. Research relative to automated multisensor image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanal, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    The basic aproaches to image registration are surveyed. Three image models are presented as models of the subpixel problem. A variety of approaches to the analysis of subpixel analysis are presented using these models.

  14. Quantitative chemical imaging of the intracellular spatial distribution of fundamental elements and light metals in single cells.

    PubMed

    Malucelli, Emil; Iotti, Stefano; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Fratini, Michela; Merolle, Lucia; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Marraccini, Chiara; Sargenti, Azzurra; Cappadone, Concettina; Farruggia, Giovanna; Bukreeva, Inna; Lombardo, Marco; Trombini, Claudio; Maier, Jeanette A; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2014-05-20

    We report a method that allows a complete quantitative characterization of whole single cells, assessing the total amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, and magnesium and providing submicrometer maps of element molar concentration, cell density, mass, and volume. This approach allows quantifying elements down to 10(6) atoms/μm(3). This result was obtained by applying a multimodal fusion approach that combines synchrotron radiation microscopy techniques with off-line atomic force microscopy. The method proposed permits us to find the element concentration in addition to the mass fraction and provides a deeper and more complete knowledge of cell composition. We performed measurements on LoVo human colon cancer cells sensitive (LoVo-S) and resistant (LoVo-R) to doxorubicin. The comparison of LoVo-S and LoVo-R revealed different patterns in the maps of Mg concentration with higher values within the nucleus in LoVo-R and in the perinuclear region in LoVo-S cells. This feature was not so evident for the other elements, suggesting that Mg compartmentalization could be a significant trait of the drug-resistant cells.

  15. Quantification of Dynamic Morphological Drug Responses in 3D Organotypic Cell Cultures by Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, Ville; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Happonen, Antti; Ahonen, Ilmari; Virtanen, Johannes; Siitari, Harri; Åkerfelt, Malin; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Nees, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Glandular epithelial cells differentiate into complex multicellular or acinar structures, when embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix. The spectrum of different multicellular morphologies formed in 3D is a sensitive indicator for the differentiation potential of normal, non-transformed cells compared to different stages of malignant progression. In addition, single cells or cell aggregates may actively invade the matrix, utilizing epithelial, mesenchymal or mixed modes of motility. Dynamic phenotypic changes involved in 3D tumor cell invasion are sensitive to specific small-molecule inhibitors that target the actin cytoskeleton. We have used a panel of inhibitors to demonstrate the power of automated image analysis as a phenotypic or morphometric readout in cell-based assays. We introduce a streamlined stand-alone software solution that supports large-scale high-content screens, based on complex and organotypic cultures. AMIDA (Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) allows quantitative measurements of large numbers of images and structures, with a multitude of different spheroid shapes, sizes, and textures. AMIDA supports an automated workflow, and can be combined with quality control and statistical tools for data interpretation and visualization. We have used a representative panel of 12 prostate and breast cancer lines that display a broad spectrum of different spheroid morphologies and modes of invasion, challenged by a library of 19 direct or indirect modulators of the actin cytoskeleton which induce systematic changes in spheroid morphology and differentiation versus invasion. These results were independently validated by 2D proliferation, apoptosis and cell motility assays. We identified three drugs that primarily attenuated the invasion and formation of invasive processes in 3D, without affecting proliferation or apoptosis. Two of these compounds block Rac signalling, one affects cellular cAMP/cGMP accumulation. Our approach supports

  16. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  17. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 26)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  18. Automated medical image library creation for education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark; Feied, Craig; Gillam, Michael; Handler, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a method to create a medical teaching library that is automatically maintained, contains tens of thousands of radiologic images and is built using existing, internal, hospital dictations, radiologic images, and an off-the-shelf commercial search engine product (Google Inc.).

  19. Perspective automated inkless fingerprinting imaging software for fingerprint research.

    PubMed

    Nanakorn, Somsong; Poosankam, Pongsakorn; Mongconthawornchai, Paiboon

    2008-01-01

    Fingerprint collection using ink-and-paper image is a conventional method i.e. an ink-print, transparent-adhesive tape techniques which are slower and cumbersome. This is a pilot research for software development aimed at imaging an automated, inkless fingerprint using a fingerprint sensor, a development kit of the IT WORKS Company Limited, PC camera, and printer The development of software was performed to connect with the fingerprint sensor for collection of fingerprint images and recorded into a hard disk. It was also developed to connect with the PC camera for recording a face image of persons' fingerprints or identification card images. These images had been appropriately arranged in a PDF file prior to printing. This software is able to scan ten fingerprints and store high-quality electronics fingertip images with rapid, large, and clear images without dirt of ink or carbon. This fingerprint technology is helpful in a potential application in public health and clinical medicine research.

  20. Automated quality assessment in three-dimensional breast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, Julia; Diez, Yago; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; van Zelst, Jan; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Mourri, Ahmed Bensouda; Gregori, Johannes; Günther, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a valuable adjunct to x-ray mammography for breast cancer screening of women with dense breasts. High image quality is essential for proper diagnostics and computer-aided detection. We propose an automated image quality assessment system for ABUS images that detects artifacts at the time of acquisition. Therefore, we study three aspects that can corrupt ABUS images: the nipple position relative to the rest of the breast, the shadow caused by the nipple, and the shape of the breast contour on the image. Image processing and machine learning algorithms are combined to detect these artifacts based on 368 clinical ABUS images that have been rated manually by two experienced clinicians. At a specificity of 0.99, 55% of the images that were rated as low quality are detected by the proposed algorithms. The areas under the ROC curves of the single classifiers are 0.99 for the nipple position, 0.84 for the nipple shadow, and 0.89 for the breast contour shape. The proposed algorithms work fast and reliably, which makes them adequate for online evaluation of image quality during acquisition. The presented concept may be extended to further image modalities and quality aspects. PMID:27158633

  1. Quantitative Automated Image Analysis System with Automated Debris Filtering for the Detection of Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David T.; Sandoval, Sergio; Ta, Casey N.; Ruidiaz, Manuel E.; Cortes-Mateos, Maria Jose; Messmer, Davorka; Kummel, Andrew C.; Blair, Sarah L.; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an intraoperative method for margin status evaluation during breast conservation therapy (BCT) using an automated analysis of imprint cytology specimens. Study Design Imprint cytology samples were prospectively taken from 47 patients undergoing either BCT or breast reduction surgery. Touch preparations from BCT patients were taken on cut sections through the tumor to generate positive margin controls. For breast reduction patients, slide imprints were taken at cuts through the center of excised tissue. Analysis results from the presented technique were compared against standard pathologic diagnosis. Slides were stained with cytokeratin and Hoechst, imaged with an automated fluorescent microscope, and analyzed with a fast algorithm to automate discrimination between epithelial cells and noncellular debris. Results The accuracy of the automated analysis was 95% for identifying invasive cancers compared against final pathologic diagnosis. The overall sensitivity was 87% while specificity was 100% (no false positives). This is comparable to the best reported results from manual examination of intraoperative imprint cytology slides while reducing the need for direct input from a cytopathologist. Conclusion This work demonstrates a proof of concept for developing a highly accurate and automated system for the intraoperative evaluation of margin status to guide surgical decisions and lower positive margin rates. PMID:21525740

  2. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  3. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  4. Analyzing the effect of absorption and refractive index on image formation in high numerical aperture transmission microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Ryan L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    Transmission bright-field microscopy is the clinical mainstay for disease diagnosis where image contrast is provided by absorptive and refractive index differences between tissue and the surrounding media. Different microscopy techniques often assume one of the two contrast mechanisms is negligible as a means to better understand the tissue scattering processes. This particular work provides better understanding of the role of refractive index and absorption within Optical Projection Tomographic Microscopy (OPTM) through the development of a generalized computational model based upon the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The model mimics OPTM by simulating axial scanning of the objective focal plane through the cell to produce projection images. These projection images, acquired from circumferential positions around the cell, are reconstructed into isometric three-dimensional images using the filtered backprojection normally employed in Computed Tomography (CT). The model provides a platform to analyze all aspects of bright-field microscopes, such as the degree of refractive index matching and the numerical aperture, which can be varied from air-immersion to high NA oil-immersion. In this preliminary work, the model is used to understand the effects of absorption and refraction on image formation using micro-shells and idealized nuclei. Analysis of absorption and refractive index separately provides the opportunity to better assess their role together as a complex refractive index for improved interpretation of bright-field scattering, essential for OPTM image reconstruction. This simulation, as well as ones in the future looking at other effects, will be used to optimize OPTM imaging parameters and triage efforts to further improve the overall system design.

  5. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  6. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  7. Automated image-based tracking and its application in ecology.

    PubMed

    Dell, Anthony I; Bender, John A; Branson, Kristin; Couzin, Iain D; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G; Noldus, Lucas P J J; Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Perona, Pietro; Straw, Andrew D; Wikelski, Martin; Brose, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The behavior of individuals determines the strength and outcome of ecological interactions, which drive population, community, and ecosystem organization. Bio-logging, such as telemetry and animal-borne imaging, provides essential individual viewpoints, tracks, and life histories, but requires capture of individuals and is often impractical to scale. Recent developments in automated image-based tracking offers opportunities to remotely quantify and understand individual behavior at scales and resolutions not previously possible, providing an essential supplement to other tracking methodologies in ecology. Automated image-based tracking should continue to advance the field of ecology by enabling better understanding of the linkages between individual and higher-level ecological processes, via high-throughput quantitative analysis of complex ecological patterns and processes across scales, including analysis of environmental drivers.

  8. Automated vasculature extraction from placenta images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoussa, Nizar; Dutra, Brittany; Lampe, Bryce; Getreuer, Pascal; Wittman, Todd; Salafia, Carolyn; Vese, Luminita

    2011-03-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental blood vessels, which supply a fetus with all of its oxygen and nutrition. An essential step in the analysis of the vascular network pattern is the extraction of the blood vessels, which has only been done manually through a costly and time-consuming process. There is no existing method to automatically detect placental blood vessels; in addition, the large variation in the shape, color, and texture of the placenta makes it difficult to apply standard edge-detection algorithms. We describe a method to automatically detect and extract blood vessels from a given image by using image processing techniques and neural networks. We evaluate several local features for every pixel, in addition to a novel modification to an existing road detector. Pixels belonging to blood vessel regions have recognizable responses; hence, we use an artificial neural network to identify the pattern of blood vessels. A set of images where blood vessels are manually highlighted is used to train the network. We then apply the neural network to recognize blood vessels in new images. The network is effective in capturing the most prominent vascular structures of the placenta.

  9. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  10. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control.

  11. Automated Analysis of Mammography Phantom Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kenneth Wesley

    The present work stems from the hypothesis that humans are inconsistent when making subjective analyses of images and that human decisions for moderately complex images may be performed by a computer with complete objectivity, once a human acceptance level has been established. The following goals were established to test the hypothesis: (1) investigate observer variability within the standard mammographic phantom evaluation process; (2) evaluate options for high-resolution image digitization and utilize the most appropriate technology for standard mammographic phantom film digitization; (3) develop a machine-based vision system for evaluating standard mammographic phantom images to eliminate effects of human variabilities; and (4) demonstrate the completed system's performance against human observers for accreditation and for manufacturing quality control of standard mammographic phantom images. The following methods and procedures were followed to achieve the goals of the research: (1) human variabilities in the American College of Radiology accreditation process were simulated by observer studies involving 30 medical physicists and these were compared to the same number of diagnostic radiologists and untrained control group of observers; (2) current digitization technologies were presented and performance test procedures were developed; three devices were tested which represented commercially available high, intermediate and low-end contrast and spatial resolution capabilities; (3) optimal image processing schemes were applied and tested which performed low, intermediate and high-level computer vision tasks; and (4) the completed system's performance was tested against human observers for accreditation and for manufacturing quality control of standard mammographic phantom images. The results from application of the procedures were as follows: (1) the simulated American College of Radiology mammography accreditation program phantom evaluation process demonstrated

  12. Automated Image Registration Using Morphological Region of Interest Feature Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Netanyahu, Nathan S.

    2005-01-01

    With the recent explosion in the amount of remotely sensed imagery and the corresponding interest in temporal change detection and modeling, image registration has become increasingly important as a necessary first step in the integration of multi-temporal and multi-sensor data for applications such as the analysis of seasonal and annual global climate changes, as well as land use/cover changes. The task of image registration can be divided into two major components: (1) the extraction of control points or features from images; and (2) the search among the extracted features for the matching pairs that represent the same feature in the images to be matched. Manual control feature extraction can be subjective and extremely time consuming, and often results in few usable points. Automated feature extraction is a solution to this problem, where desired target features are invariant, and represent evenly distributed landmarks such as edges, corners and line intersections. In this paper, we develop a novel automated registration approach based on the following steps. First, a mathematical morphology (MM)-based method is used to obtain a scale-orientation morphological profile at each image pixel. Next, a spectral dissimilarity metric such as the spectral information divergence is applied for automated extraction of landmark chips, followed by an initial approximate matching. This initial condition is then refined using a hierarchical robust feature matching (RFM) procedure. Experimental results reveal that the proposed registration technique offers a robust solution in the presence of seasonal changes and other interfering factors. Keywords-Automated image registration, multi-temporal imagery, mathematical morphology, robust feature matching.

  13. Development of automated imaging and analysis for zebrafish chemical screens.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Andreas; Codore, Hiba; Day, Billy W.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Tsang, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of image-based high-content screening (HCS) methodology to identify small molecules that can modulate the FGF/RAS/MAPK pathway in zebrafish embryos. The zebrafish embryo is an ideal system for in vivo high-content chemical screens. The 1-day old embryo is approximately 1mm in diameter and can be easily arrayed into 96-well plates, a standard format for high throughput screening. During the first day of development, embryos are transparent with most of the major organs present, thus enabling visualization of tissue formation during embryogenesis. The complete automation of zebrafish chemical screens is still a challenge, however, particularly in the development of automated image acquisition and analysis. We previously generated a transgenic reporter line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of FGF activity and demonstrated their utility in chemical screens 1. To establish methodology for high throughput whole organism screens, we developed a system for automated imaging and analysis of zebrafish embryos at 24-48 hours post fertilization (hpf) in 96-well plates 2. In this video we highlight the procedures for arraying transgenic embryos into multiwell plates at 24hpf and the addition of a small molecule (BCI) that hyperactivates FGF signaling 3. The plates are incubated for 6 hours followed by the addition of tricaine to anesthetize larvae prior to automated imaging on a Molecular Devices ImageXpress Ultra laser scanning confocal HCS reader. Images are processed by Definiens Developer software using a Cognition Network Technology algorithm that we developed to detect and quantify expression of GFP in the heads of transgenic embryos. In this example we highlight the ability of the algorithm to measure dose-dependent effects of BCI on GFP reporter gene expression in treated embryos. PMID:20613708

  14. Automated identification of circulating tumor cells by image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Tycho M; Schreuder, Frederik; Ligthart, Sjoerd T; Swennenhuis, Joost F; Greve, Jan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2012-02-01

    Presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC), as detected by the CellSearch System, in patients with metastatic carcinomas is associated with poor survival prospects. CellTracks TDI, a dedicated image cytometer, was developed to improve the enumeration of these rare CTC. The CellSearch System was used to enumerate CTC in 7.5 mL blood of 68 patients with cancer and 9 healthy controls. Cartridges containing the fluorescently labeled CTC from this system were reanalyzed using the image cytometer, which acquires images with a TDI camera using a 40×/0.6 NA objective and lasers as light source. Automated classification of events was performed by the Random Forest method using Matlab. An automated classifier was developed to classify events into CTC, apoptotic CTC, CTC debris, leukocytes, and debris not related to CTC. A high agreement in classification was obtained between the automated classifier and five expert reviewers. Comparison of images from the same events in CellTracks TDI and CellTracks Analyzer II shows improved resolution in fluorescence images and improved classification by adding bright-field images. Improved detection efficiency for CD45-APC avoids the classification of leukocytes nonspecifically binding to cytokeratin as CTC. The correlation between number of CTC detected in CellTracks TDI and CellTracks Analyzer II is good with a slope of 1.88 and a correlation coefficient of 0.87. Automated classification of events by CellTracks TDI eliminates the operator error in classification of events as CTC and permits quantitative assessment of parameters. The clinical relevance of various CTC definitions can now be investigated.

  15. SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

  16. SINGLE CELL GENOME SEQUENCING

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing of single cells has become a powerful approach for studying uncultivated microorganisms that represent 90–99 % of all environmental microbes. Single cell sequencing enables not only the identification of microbes but also linking of functions to species, a feat not achievable by metagenomic techniques. Moreover, it allows the analysis of low abundance species that may be missed in community-based analyses. It has also proved very useful in complementing metagenomics in the assembly and binning of single genomes. With the advent of drastically cheaper and higher throughput sequencing technologies, it is expected that single cell sequencing will become a standard tool in studying the genome and transcriptome of microbial communities. PMID:22154471

  17. Single Cell Oncogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin

    It is believed that cancer originates from a single cell that has gone through generations of evolution of genetic and epigenetic changes that associate with the hallmarks of cancer. In some cancers such as various types of leukemia, cancer is clonal. Yet in other cancers like glioblastoma (GBM), there is tremendous tumor heterogeneity that is likely to be caused by simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones within the same tissue. It is obvious that understanding how a single cell develops into a clonal tumor upon genetic alterations, at molecular and cellular levels, holds the key to the real appreciation of tumor etiology and ultimate solution for therapeutics. Surprisingly very little is known about the process of spontaneous tumorigenesis from single cells in human or vertebrate animal models. The main reason is the lack of technology to track the natural process of single cell changes from a homeostatic state to a progressively cancerous state. Recently, we developed a patented compound, photoactivatable (''caged'') tamoxifen analogue 4-OHC and associated technique called optochemogenetic switch (OCG switch), which we believe opens the opportunity to address this urgent biological as well as clinical question about cancer. We propose to combine OCG switch with genetically engineered mouse models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma (including GBM) to study how single cells, when transformed through acute loss of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and TP53 and gain of oncogenic KRAS, can develop into tumor colonies with cellular and molecular heterogeneity in these tissues. The abstract is for my invited talk in session ``Beyond Darwin: Evolution in Single Cells'' 3/18/2016 11:15 AM.

  18. Automated Imaging Techniques for Biosignature Detection in Geologic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Robust biosignature detection in geologic samples typically requires the integration of morphological/textural data with biogeochemical data across a variety of scales. We present new automated imaging and coordinated biogeochemical analysis techniques developed at the JPL Astrobiogeochemistry Laboratory (abcLab) in support of biosignature detection in terrestrial samples as well as those that may eventually be returned from Mars. Automated gigapixel mosaic imaging of petrographic thin sections in transmitted and incident light (including UV epifluorescence) is supported by a microscopy platform with a digital XYZ stage. Images are acquired, processed, and co-registered using multiple software platforms at JPL and can be displayed and shared using Gigapan, a freely available, web-based toolset (e.g. . Automated large area (cm-scale) elemental mapping at sub-micrometer spatial resolution is enabled by a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a large (150 mm2) silicon drift energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detector system. The abcLab light and electron microscopy techniques are augmented by additional elemental chemistry, mineralogy and organic detection/classification using laboratory Micro-XRF and UV Raman/fluorescence systems, precursors to the PIXL and SHERLOC instrument platforms selected for flight on the NASA Mars 2020 rover mission. A workflow including careful sample preparation followed by iterative gigapixel imaging, SEM/EDS, Micro-XRF and UV fluorescence/Raman in support of organic, mineralogic, and elemental biosignature target identification and follow up analysis with other techniques including secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) will be discussed.

  19. Whole-body and Whole-Organ Clearing and Imaging Techniques with Single-Cell Resolution: Toward Organism-Level Systems Biology in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Susaki, Etsuo A; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-01-21

    Organism-level systems biology aims to identify, analyze, control and design cellular circuits in organisms. Many experimental and computational approaches have been developed over the years to allow us to conduct these studies. Some of the most powerful methods are based on using optical imaging in combination with fluorescent labeling, and for those one of the long-standing stumbling blocks has been tissue opacity. Recently, the solutions to this problem have started to emerge based on whole-body and whole-organ clearing techniques that employ innovative tissue-clearing chemistry. Here, we review these advancements and discuss how combining new clearing techniques with high-performing fluorescent proteins or small molecule tags, rapid volume imaging and efficient image informatics is resulting in comprehensive and quantitative organ-wide, single-cell resolution experimental data. These technologies are starting to yield information on connectivity and dynamics in cellular circuits at unprecedented resolution, and bring us closer to system-level understanding of physiology and diseases of complex mammalian systems. PMID:26933741

  20. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed. PMID:26389890

  1. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-09-15

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed.

  2. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  3. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 27)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

  4. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  5. Automated techniques for quality assurance of radiological image modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, David J.; Atkins, Frank B.; Dyer, Stephen M.

    1991-05-01

    This paper will attempt to identify many of the important issues for quality assurance (QA) of radiological modalities. It is of course to be realized that QA can span many aspects of the diagnostic decision making process. These issues range from physical image performance levels to and through the diagnostic decision of the radiologist. We will use as a model for automated approaches a program we have developed to work with computed tomography (CT) images. In an attempt to unburden the user, and in an effort to facilitate the performance of QA, we have been studying automated approaches. The ultimate utility of the system is its ability to render in a safe and efficacious manner, decisions that are accurate, sensitive, specific and which are possible within the economic constraints of modern health care delivery.

  6. Endocytic Sorting of CFTR variants Monitored by Single Cell Fluorescence Ratio Image Analysis (FRIA) in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barriere, H.; Apaja, P.; Okiyoneda, T.; Lukacs, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The wild-type CFTR channel undergoes constitutive internalization and recycling at the plasma membrane. This process is initiated by the recognition of the Tyr- and di-Leu-based endocytic motifs of CFTR by the AP-2 adaptor complex, leading to the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles and the channel delivery to sorting/recycling endosomes. Accumulating evidence suggests that conformationally defective mutant CFTRs (e.g. rescued ΔF508 and glycosylation-deficient channel) are unstable at the plasma membrane and undergo augmented ubiquitination in post-Golgi compartments. Ubiquitination conceivably accounts for the metabolic instability at cell surface by provoking accelerated internalization, as well as rerouting the channel from recycling towards lysosomal degradation. We developed an in vivo fluorescence ratio imaging assay (FRIA) that in concert with genetic manipulation can be utilized to establish the post-endocytic fate and sorting determinants of mutant CFTRs. PMID:21594793

  7. Automated profiling of individual cell–cell interactions from high-throughput time-lapse imaging microscopy in nanowell grids (TIMING)

    PubMed Central

    Merouane, Amine; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Lu, Yanbin; Liadi, Ivan; Romain, Gabrielle; Lu, Jennifer; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Varadarajan, Navin; Roysam, Badrinath

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: There is a need for effective automated methods for profiling dynamic cell–cell interactions with single-cell resolution from high-throughput time-lapse imaging data, especially, the interactions between immune effector cells and tumor cells in adoptive immunotherapy. Results: Fluorescently labeled human T cells, natural killer cells (NK), and various target cells (NALM6, K562, EL4) were co-incubated on polydimethylsiloxane arrays of sub-nanoliter wells (nanowells), and imaged using multi-channel time-lapse microscopy. The proposed cell segmentation and tracking algorithms account for cell variability and exploit the nanowell confinement property to increase the yield of correctly analyzed nanowells from 45% (existing algorithms) to 98% for wells containing one effector and a single target, enabling automated quantification of cell locations, morphologies, movements, interactions, and deaths without the need for manual proofreading. Automated analysis of recordings from 12 different experiments demonstrated automated nanowell delineation accuracy >99%, automated cell segmentation accuracy >95%, and automated cell tracking accuracy of 90%, with default parameters, despite variations in illumination, staining, imaging noise, cell morphology, and cell clustering. An example analysis revealed that NK cells efficiently discriminate between live and dead targets by altering the duration of conjugation. The data also demonstrated that cytotoxic cells display higher motility than non-killers, both before and during contact. Contact: broysam@central.uh.edu or nvaradar@central.uh.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26059718

  8. Image pre-processing for optimizing automated photogrammetry performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, G.; Gonizzi, S.; Micoli, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how optical pre-processing with polarizing filters and digital pre-processing with HDR imaging, may improve the automated 3D modeling pipeline based on SFM and Image Matching, with special emphasis on optically non-cooperative surfaces of shiny or dark materials. Because of the automatic detection of homologous points, the presence of highlights due to shiny materials, or nearly uniform dark patches produced by low reflectance materials, may produce erroneous matching involving wrong 3D point estimations, and consequently holes and topological errors on the mesh originated by the associated dense 3D cloud. This is due to the limited dynamic range of the 8 bit digital images that are matched each other for generating 3D data. The same 256 levels can be more usefully employed if the actual dynamic range is compressed, avoiding luminance clipping on the darker and lighter image areas. Such approach is here considered both using optical filtering and HDR processing with tone mapping, with experimental evaluation on different Cultural Heritage objects characterized by non-cooperative optical behavior. Three test images of each object have been captured from different positions, changing the shooting conditions (filter/no-filter) and the image processing (no processing/HDR processing), in order to have the same 3 camera orientations with different optical and digital pre-processing, and applying the same automated process to each photo set.

  9. Image mosaicing for automated pipe scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Summan, Rahul Dobie, Gordon Guarato, Francesco MacLeod, Charles Marshall, Stephen Pierce, Gareth; Forrester, Cailean; Bolton, Gary

    2015-03-31

    Remote visual inspection (RVI) is critical for the inspection of the interior condition of pipelines particularly in the nuclear and oil and gas industries. Conventional RVI equipment produces a video which is analysed online by a trained inspector employing expert knowledge. Due to the potentially disorientating nature of the footage, this is a time intensive and difficult activity. In this paper a new probe for such visual inspections is presented. The device employs a catadioptric lens coupled with feature based structure from motion to create a 3D model of the interior surface of a pipeline. Reliance upon the availability of image features is mitigated through orientation and distance estimates from an inertial measurement unit and encoder respectively. Such a model affords a global view of the data thus permitting a greater appreciation of the nature and extent of defects. Furthermore, the technique estimates the 3D position and orientation of the probe thus providing information to direct remedial action. Results are presented for both synthetic and real pipe sections. The former enables the accuracy of the generated model to be assessed while the latter demonstrates the efficacy of the technique in a practice.

  10. Image mosaicing for automated pipe scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Dobie, Gordon; Guarato, Francesco; MacLeod, Charles; Marshall, Stephen; Forrester, Cailean; Pierce, Gareth; Bolton, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Remote visual inspection (RVI) is critical for the inspection of the interior condition of pipelines particularly in the nuclear and oil and gas industries. Conventional RVI equipment produces a video which is analysed online by a trained inspector employing expert knowledge. Due to the potentially disorientating nature of the footage, this is a time intensive and difficult activity. In this paper a new probe for such visual inspections is presented. The device employs a catadioptric lens coupled with feature based structure from motion to create a 3D model of the interior surface of a pipeline. Reliance upon the availability of image features is mitigated through orientation and distance estimates from an inertial measurement unit and encoder respectively. Such a model affords a global view of the data thus permitting a greater appreciation of the nature and extent of defects. Furthermore, the technique estimates the 3D position and orientation of the probe thus providing information to direct remedial action. Results are presented for both synthetic and real pipe sections. The former enables the accuracy of the generated model to be assessed while the latter demonstrates the efficacy of the technique in a practice.

  11. An automated image processing routine for segmentation of cell cytoplasms in high-resolution autofluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-02-01

    The heterogeneity of genotypes and phenotypes within cancers is correlated with disease progression and drug-resistant cellular sub-populations. Therefore, robust techniques capable of probing majority and minority cell populations are important both for cancer diagnostics and therapy monitoring. Herein, we present a modified CellProfiler routine to isolate cytoplasmic fluorescence signal on a single cell level from high resolution auto-fluorescence microscopic images.

  12. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion.

  13. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion. PMID:26724085

  14. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10{sup {minus}8} M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  15. Automated Reduction of Data from Images and Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. (Editor); Trolinger, James D. (Editor); Yu, Y. H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques are widely used for the diagnostics of aerodynamic flow and particle fields. The storage capability of holograms has made this technique an even more powerful. Over 60 researchers in the field of holography, particle sizing and image processing convened to discuss these topics. The research program of ten government laboratories, several universities, industry and foreign countries were presented. A number of papers on holographic interferometry with applications to fluid mechanics were given. Several papers on combustion and particle sizing, speckle velocimetry and speckle interferometry were given. A session on image processing and automated fringe data reduction techniques and the type of facilities for fringe reduction was held.

  16. A novel method for assessing adherent single-cell stiffness in tension: design and testing of a substrate-based live cell functional imaging device.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, Guido; Grieder, Reto; Sharma, Ram I; Zambelli, Tomaso; Muff, Roman; Snedeker, Jess G

    2011-04-01

    Various micro-devices have been used to assess single cell mechanical properties. Here, we designed and implemented a novel, mechanically actuated, two dimensional cell culture system that enables a measure of cell stiffness based on quantitative functional imaging of cell-substrate interaction. Based on parametric finite element design analysis, we fabricated a soft (5 kPa) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cell substrate coated with collagen-I and fluorescent micro-beads, thus providing a favorable terrain for cell adhesion and for substrate deformation quantification, respectively. We employed a real-time tracking system that analyzes high magnification images of living cells under stretch, and compensates for gross substrate motions by dynamic adjustment of the microscope stage. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to quantify substrate deformation beneath and surrounding the cell, leading to an estimate of cell stiffness based upon the ability of the cell to resist the applied substrate deformation. Sensitivity of the system was tested using chemical treatments to both "soften" and "stiffen" the cell cytoskeleton with either 0.5 μg/ml Cytochalasin-D or 3% Glutaraldehyde, respectively. Results indicate that untreated osteosarcoma cells (SAOS-2) exhibit a 1.5 ± 0.7% difference in strain from an applied target substrate strain of 8%. Compared to untreated cells, those treated with Cyochalasin-D passively followed the substrate (0.5 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001), whereas Glutaraldehyde enhanced cellular stiffness and the ability to resist the substrate deformation (2.9 ± 1.6%, p < 0.001). Nano-indentation testing showed differences in cell stiffness based on culture treatment, consistent with DIC findings. Our results indicate that mechanics and image analysis approaches do hold promise as a method to quantitatively assess tensile cell constitutive properties. PMID:21120698

  17. Automated Brain Extraction from T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop and implement an automated and robust technique to extract brain from T2-weighted images. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 75 adult volunteers to acquire dual fast spin echo (FSE) images with fat-saturation technique on a 3T Philips scanner. Histogram-derived thresholds were derived directly from the original images followed by the application of regional labeling, regional connectivity, and mathematical morphological operations to extract brain from axial late-echo FSE (T2-weighted) images. The proposed technique was evaluated subjectively by an expert and quantitatively using Bland-Altman plot and Jaccard and Dice similarity measures. Results Excellent agreement between the extracted brain volumes with the proposed technique and manual stripping by an expert was observed based on Bland-Altman plot and also as assessed by high similarity indices (Jaccard: 0.9825± 0.0045; Dice: 0.9912 ±0.0023). Conclusion Brain extraction using proposed automated methodology is robust and the results are reproducible. PMID:21448946

  18. Discriminating enumeration of subseafloor life using automated fluorescent image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Masui, N.; Inagaki, F.

    2008-12-01

    Enumeration of microbial cells in marine subsurface sediments has provided fundamental information for understanding the extent of life and deep-biosphere on Earth. The microbial population has been manually evaluated by direct cell count under the microscopy because the recognition of cell-derived fluorescent signals has been extremely difficult. Here, we improved the conventional method by removing the non- specific fluorescent backgrounds and enumerated the cell population in sediments using a newly developed automated microscopic imaging system. Although SYBR Green I is known to specifically bind to the double strand DNA (Lunau et al., 2005), we still observed some SYBR-stainable particulate matters (SYBR-SPAMs) in the heat-sterilized control sediments (450°C, 6h), which assumed to be silicates or mineralized organic matters. Newly developed acid-wash treatments with hydrofluoric acid (HF) followed by image analysis successfully removed these background objects and yielded artifact-free microscopic images. To obtain statistically meaningful fluorescent images, we constructed a computer-assisted automated cell counting system. Given the comparative data set of cell abundance in acid-washed marine sediments evaluated by SYBR Green I- and acridine orange (AO)-stain with and without the image analysis, our protocol could provide the statistically meaningful absolute numbers of discriminating cell-derived fluorescent signals.

  19. Single cell analysis: the new frontier in 'Omics'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Bodovitz, Steven

    2010-01-14

    Cellular heterogeneity arising from stochastic expression of genes, proteins, and metabolites is a fundamental principle of cell biology, but single cell analysis has been beyond the capabilities of 'Omics' technologies. This is rapidly changing with the recent examples of single cell genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The rate of change is expected to accelerate owing to emerging technologies that range from micro/nanofluidics to microfabricated interfaces for mass spectrometry to third- and fourth-generation automated DNA sequencers. As described in this review, single cell analysis is the new frontier in Omics, and single cell Omics has the potential to transform systems biology through new discoveries derived from cellular heterogeneity.

  20. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells. PMID:26554882

  1. Glaucoma risk index: automated glaucoma detection from color fundus images.

    PubMed

    Bock, Rüdiger; Meier, Jörg; Nyúl, László G; Hornegger, Joachim; Michelson, Georg

    2010-06-01

    Glaucoma as a neurodegeneration of the optic nerve is one of the most common causes of blindness. Because revitalization of the degenerated nerve fibers of the optic nerve is impossible early detection of the disease is essential. This can be supported by a robust and automated mass-screening. We propose a novel automated glaucoma detection system that operates on inexpensive to acquire and widely used digital color fundus images. After a glaucoma specific preprocessing, different generic feature types are compressed by an appearance-based dimension reduction technique. Subsequently, a probabilistic two-stage classification scheme combines these features types to extract the novel Glaucoma Risk Index (GRI) that shows a reasonable glaucoma detection performance. On a sample set of 575 fundus images a classification accuracy of 80% has been achieved in a 5-fold cross-validation setup. The GRI gains a competitive area under ROC (AUC) of 88% compared to the established topography-based glaucoma probability score of scanning laser tomography with AUC of 87%. The proposed color fundus image-based GRI achieves a competitive and reliable detection performance on a low-priced modality by the statistical analysis of entire images of the optic nerve head.

  2. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-10-01

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks.

  3. Automated 3D renal segmentation based on image partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazaryan, Varduhi; Voiculescu, Irina D.

    2016-03-01

    Despite several decades of research into segmentation techniques, automated medical image segmentation is barely usable in a clinical context, and still at vast user time expense. This paper illustrates unsupervised organ segmentation through the use of a novel automated labelling approximation algorithm followed by a hypersurface front propagation method. The approximation stage relies on a pre-computed image partition forest obtained directly from CT scan data. We have implemented all procedures to operate directly on 3D volumes, rather than slice-by-slice, because our algorithms are dimensionality-independent. The results picture segmentations which identify kidneys, but can easily be extrapolated to other body parts. Quantitative analysis of our automated segmentation compared against hand-segmented gold standards indicates an average Dice similarity coefficient of 90%. Results were obtained over volumes of CT data with 9 kidneys, computing both volume-based similarity measures (such as the Dice and Jaccard coefficients, true positive volume fraction) and size-based measures (such as the relative volume difference). The analysis considered both healthy and diseased kidneys, although extreme pathological cases were excluded from the overall count. Such cases are difficult to segment both manually and automatically due to the large amplitude of Hounsfield unit distribution in the scan, and the wide spread of the tumorous tissue inside the abdomen. In the case of kidneys that have maintained their shape, the similarity range lies around the values obtained for inter-operator variability. Whilst the procedure is fully automated, our tools also provide a light level of manual editing.

  4. Quantitative Determination and Subcellular Imaging of Cu in Single Cells via Laser Ablation-ICP-Mass Spectrometry Using High-Density Microarray Gelatin Standards.

    PubMed

    Van Malderen, Stijn J M; Vergucht, Eva; De Rijcke, Maarten; Janssen, Colin; Vincze, Laszlo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript describes the development and characterization of a high-density microarray calibration standard, manufactured in-house and designed to overcome the limitations in precision, accuracy, and throughput of current calibration approaches for the quantification of elemental concentrations on the cellular level using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). As a case study, the accumulation of Cu in the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea resulting from transition metal exposure (ranging from 0.5 to 100 μg/L) was evaluated. After the Cu exposure, cells of this photosynthetic dinoflagellate were treated with a critical point drying protocol, transferred to a carbon stub, and sputter-coated with a Au layer for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. In subsequent LA-ICPMS analysis, approximately 100 cells of each population were individually ablated. This approach permitted the evaluation of the mean concentration of Cu in the cell population across different exposure levels and also allowed the examination of the cellular distribution of Cu within the populations. In a cross-validation exercise, subcellular LA-ICPMS imaging was demonstrated to corroborate synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microimaging of single cells investigated under in vivo conditions. PMID:27149342

  5. Ligand Binding Shifts Highly Mobile Retinoid X Receptor to the Chromatin-Bound State in a Coactivator-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by Single-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brazda, Peter; Krieger, Jan; Daniel, Bence; Jonas, David; Szekeres, Tibor; Langowski, Jörg; Tóth, Katalin; Vámosi, György

    2014-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) is a promiscuous nuclear receptor forming heterodimers with several other receptors, which activate different sets of genes. Upon agonist treatment, the occupancy of its genomic binding regions increased, but only a modest change in the number of sites was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing, suggesting a rather static behavior. However, such genome-wide and biochemical approaches do not take into account the dynamic behavior of a transcription factor. Therefore, we characterized the nuclear dynamics of RXR during activation in single cells on the subsecond scale using live-cell imaging. By applying fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), techniques with different temporal and spatial resolutions, a highly dynamic behavior could be uncovered which is best described by a two-state model (slow and fast) of receptor mobility. In the unliganded state, most RXRs belonged to the fast population, leaving ∼15% for the slow, chromatin-bound fraction. Upon agonist treatment, this ratio increased to ∼43% as a result of an immediate and reversible redistribution. Coactivator binding appears to be indispensable for redistribution and has a major contribution to chromatin association. A nuclear mobility map recorded by light sheet microscopy-FCS shows that the ligand-induced transition from the fast to the slow population occurs throughout the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RXR has a distinct, highly dynamic nuclear behavior and follows hit-and-run kinetics upon activation. PMID:24449763

  6. Automated Dsm Extraction from Uav Images and Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, S.; Kim, T.

    2015-08-01

    As technology evolves, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) imagery is being used from simple applications such as image acquisition to complicated applications such as 3D spatial information extraction. Spatial information is usually provided in the form of a DSM or point cloud. It is important to generate very dense tie points automatically from stereo images. In this paper, we tried to apply stereo image-based matching technique developed for satellite/aerial images to UAV images, propose processing steps for automated DSM generation and to analyse the possibility of DSM generation. For DSM generation from UAV images, firstly, exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) for each dataset were adjusted. Secondly, optimum matching pairs were determined. Thirdly, stereo image matching was performed with each pair. Developed matching algorithm is based on grey-level correlation on pixels applied along epipolar lines. Finally, the extracted match results were united with one result and the final DSM was made. Generated DSM was compared with a reference DSM from Lidar. Overall accuracy was 1.5 m in NMAD. However, several problems have to be solved in future, including obtaining precise EOPs, handling occlusion and image blurring problems. More effective interpolation technique needs to be developed in the future.

  7. Automated Processing of Zebrafish Imaging Data: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dickmeis, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang; Geurts, Pierre; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Kausler, Bernhard X.; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Marée, Raphaël; Mikula, Karol; Pantazis, Periklis; Ronneberger, Olaf; Santos, Andres; Stotzka, Rainer; Strähle, Uwe; Peyriéras, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Due to the relative transparency of its embryos and larvae, the zebrafish is an ideal model organism for bioimaging approaches in vertebrates. Novel microscope technologies allow the imaging of developmental processes in unprecedented detail, and they enable the use of complex image-based read-outs for high-throughput/high-content screening. Such applications can easily generate Terabytes of image data, the handling and analysis of which becomes a major bottleneck in extracting the targeted information. Here, we describe the current state of the art in computational image analysis in the zebrafish system. We discuss the challenges encountered when handling high-content image data, especially with regard to data quality, annotation, and storage. We survey methods for preprocessing image data for further analysis, and describe selected examples of automated image analysis, including the tracking of cells during embryogenesis, heartbeat detection, identification of dead embryos, recognition of tissues and anatomical landmarks, and quantification of behavioral patterns of adult fish. We review recent examples for applications using such methods, such as the comprehensive analysis of cell lineages during early development, the generation of a three-dimensional brain atlas of zebrafish larvae, and high-throughput drug screens based on movement patterns. Finally, we identify future challenges for the zebrafish image analysis community, notably those concerning the compatibility of algorithms and data formats for the assembly of modular analysis pipelines. PMID:23758125

  8. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  9. Automated rice leaf disease detection using color image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugoy, Reinald Adrian D. L.; Mariano, Vladimir Y.

    2011-06-01

    In rice-related institutions such as the International Rice Research Institute, assessing the health condition of a rice plant through its leaves, which is usually done as a manual eyeball exercise, is important to come up with good nutrient and disease management strategies. In this paper, an automated system that can detect diseases present in a rice leaf using color image analysis is presented. In the system, the outlier region is first obtained from a rice leaf image to be tested using histogram intersection between the test and healthy rice leaf images. Upon obtaining the outlier, it is then subjected to a threshold-based K-means clustering algorithm to group related regions into clusters. Then, these clusters are subjected to further analysis to finally determine the suspected diseases of the rice leaf.

  10. Automated blood vessel extraction using local features on retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Samo, Kazuki; Tajima, Mikiya; Ogohara, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    An automated blood vessel extraction using high-order local autocorrelation (HLAC) on retinal images is presented. Although many blood vessel extraction methods based on contrast have been proposed, a technique based on the relation of neighbor pixels has not been published. HLAC features are shift-invariant; therefore, we applied HLAC features to retinal images. However, HLAC features are weak to turned image, thus a method was improved by the addition of HLAC features to a polar transformed image. The blood vessels were classified using an artificial neural network (ANN) with HLAC features using 105 mask patterns as input. To improve performance, the second ANN (ANN2) was constructed by using the green component of the color retinal image and the four output values of ANN, Gabor filter, double-ring filter and black-top-hat transformation. The retinal images used in this study were obtained from the "Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction" (DRIVE) database. The ANN using HLAC output apparent white values in the blood vessel regions and could also extract blood vessels with low contrast. The outputs were evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The AUC of ANN2 was 0.960 as a result of our study. The result can be used for the quantitative analysis of the blood vessels.

  11. Single cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Batoul Y; Horne, Steven D; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ying, Andrew Y; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Krawetz, Stephen A; Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry HQ

    2013-01-01

    Multi-level heterogeneity is a fundamental but underappreciated feature of cancer. Most technical and analytical methods either completely ignore heterogeneity or do not fully account for it, as heterogeneity has been considered noise that needs to be eliminated. We have used single-cell and population-based assays to describe an instability-mediated mechanism where genome heterogeneity drastically affects cell growth and cannot be accurately measured using conventional averages. First, we show that most unstable cancer cell populations exhibit high levels of karyotype heterogeneity, where it is difficult, if not impossible, to karyotypically clone cells. Second, by comparing stable and unstable cell populations, we show that instability-mediated karyotype heterogeneity leads to growth heterogeneity, where outliers dominantly contribute to population growth and exhibit shorter cell cycles. Predictability of population growth is more difficult for heterogeneous cell populations than for homogenous cell populations. Since “outliers” play an important role in cancer evolution, where genome instability is the key feature, averaging methods used to characterize cell populations are misleading. Variances quantify heterogeneity; means (averages) smooth heterogeneity, invariably hiding it. Cell populations of pathological conditions with high genome instability, like cancer, behave differently than karyotypically homogeneous cell populations. Single-cell analysis is thus needed when cells are not genomically identical. Despite increased attention given to single-cell variation mediated heterogeneity of cancer cells, continued use of average-based methods is not only inaccurate but deceptive, as the “average” cancer cell clearly does not exist. Genome-level heterogeneity also may explain population heterogeneity, drug resistance, and cancer evolution. PMID:24091732

  12. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  13. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  14. Magnetic levitation of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10−4 g⋅mL−1. We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  15. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O’Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method’s discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  16. Granulometric profiling of aeolian dust deposits by automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Determination of granulometric parameters is of growing interest in the Earth sciences. Particle size data of sedimentary deposits provide insights into the physicochemical environment of transport, accumulation and post-depositional alterations of sedimentary particles, and are important proxies applied in paleoclimatic reconstructions. It is especially true for aeolian dust deposits with a fairly narrow grain size range as a consequence of the extremely selective nature of wind sediment transport. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. As terrestrial wind-blown deposits are among the most important archives of past environmental changes, proper explanation of the proxy data is a mandatory issue. Automated imaging provides a unique technique to gather direct information on granulometric characteristics of sedimentary particles. Granulometric data obtained from automatic image analysis of Malvern Morphologi G3-ID is a rarely applied new technique for particle size and shape analyses in sedimentary geology. Size and shape data of several hundred thousand (or even million) individual particles were automatically recorded in this study from 15 loess and paleosoil samples from the captured high-resolution images. Several size (e.g. circle-equivalent diameter, major axis, length, width, area) and shape parameters (e.g. elongation, circularity, convexity) were calculated by the instrument software. At the same time, the mean light intensity after transmission through each particle is automatically collected by the system as a proxy of optical properties of the material. Intensity values are dependent on chemical composition and/or thickness of the particles. The results of the automated imaging were compared to particle size data determined by three different laser diffraction instruments

  17. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  18. Automated subject-specific, hexahedral mesh generation via image registration

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Ford, James C.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Flashman, Laura A.; McAllister, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Generating subject-specific, all-hexahedral meshes for finite element analysis continues to be of significant interest in biomechanical research communities. To date, most automated methods “morph” an existing atlas mesh to match with a subject anatomy, which usually result in degradation in mesh quality because of mesh distortion. We present an automated meshing technique that produces satisfactory mesh quality and accuracy without mesh repair. An atlas mesh is first developed using a script. A subject-specific mesh is generated with the same script after transforming the geometry into the atlas space following rigid image registration, and is transformed back into the subject space. By meshing the brain in 11 subjects, we demonstrate that the technique’s performance is satisfactory in terms of both mesh quality (99.5% of elements had a scaled Jacobian >0.6 while <0.01% were between 0 and 0.2) and accuracy (average distance between mesh boundary and geometrical surface was 0.07 mm while <1% greater than 0.5mm). The combined computational cost for image registration and meshing was <4 min. Our results suggest that the technique is effective for generating subject-specific, all-hexahedral meshes and that it may be useful for meshing a variety of anatomical structures across different biomechanical research fields. PMID:21731153

  19. Automated classification of colon polyps in endoscopic image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sebastian; Palm, Stephan; Tischendorf, Jens J. W.; Behrens, Alexander; Trautwein, Christian; Aach, Til

    2012-03-01

    Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the US. In recent years, however, early diagnosis and treatment have caused a significant rise in the five year survival rate. Preventive screening is often performed by colonoscopy (endoscopic inspection of the colon mucosa). Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is a novel diagnostic approach highlighting blood vessel structures on polyps which are an indicator for future cancer risk. In this paper, we review our automated inter- and intra-observer independent system for the automated classification of polyps into hyperplasias and adenomas based on vessel structures to further improve the classification performance. To surpass the performance limitations we derive a novel vessel segmentation approach, extract 22 features to describe complex vessel topologies, and apply three feature selection strategies. Tests are conducted on 286 NBI images with diagnostically important and challenging polyps (10mm or smaller) taken from our representative polyp database. Evaluations are based on ground truth data determined by histopathological analysis. Feature selection by Simulated Annealing yields the best result with a prediction accuracy of 96.2% (sensitivity: 97.6%, specificity: 94.2%) using eight features. Future development aims at implementing a demonstrator platform to begin clinical trials at University Hospital Aachen.

  20. Automated segmentation of three-dimensional MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jonggeun; Baek, Byungjun; Ahn, Choong-Il; Ku, Kyo Bum; Jeong, Dong Kyun; Lee, Chulhee

    2006-03-01

    Brain segmentation is a challenging problem due to the complexity of the brain. In this paper, we propose an automated brain segmentation method for 3D magnetic resonance (MR) brain images which are represented as a sequence of 2D brain images. The proposed method consists of three steps: pre-processing, removal of non-brain regions (e.g., the skull, meninges, other organs, etc), and spinal cord restoration. In pre-processing, we perform adaptive thresholding which takes into account variable intensities of MR brain images corresponding to various image acquisition conditions. In segmentation process, we iteratively apply 2D morphological operations and masking for the sequences of 2D sagittal, coronal, and axial planes in order to remove non-brain tissues. Next, final 3D brain regions are obtained by applying OR operation for segmentation results of three planes. Finally we reconstruct the spinal cord truncated during the previous processes. Experiments are performed with fifteen 3D MR brain image sets with 8-bit gray-scale. Experiment results show the proposed algorithm is fast, and provides robust and satisfactory results.

  1. An automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Neil; Chen, Josephine; Kim, Hojin; Morin, Olivier; Nie, Ke; Pouliot, Jean

    2016-04-21

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a powerful tool for radiation oncology, but it can produce errors. Beyond this, DIR accuracy is not a fixed quantity and varies on a case-by-case basis. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of an automated program to create a patient- and voxel-specific evaluation of DIR accuracy. AUTODIRECT is a software tool that was developed to perform this evaluation for the application of a clinical DIR algorithm to a set of patient images. In brief, AUTODIRECT uses algorithms to generate deformations and applies them to these images (along with processing) to generate sets of test images, with known deformations that are similar to the actual ones and with realistic noise properties. The clinical DIR algorithm is applied to these test image sets (currently 4). From these tests, AUTODIRECT generates spatial and dose uncertainty estimates for each image voxel based on a Student's t distribution. In this study, four commercially available DIR algorithms were used to deform a dose distribution associated with a virtual pelvic phantom image set, and AUTODIRECT was used to generate dose uncertainty estimates for each deformation. The virtual phantom image set has a known ground-truth deformation, so the true dose-warping errors of the DIR algorithms were also known. AUTODIRECT predicted error patterns that closely matched the actual error spatial distribution. On average AUTODIRECT overestimated the magnitude of the dose errors, but tuning the AUTODIRECT algorithms should improve agreement. This proof-of-principle test demonstrates the potential for the AUTODIRECT algorithm as an empirical method to predict DIR errors. PMID:27025957

  2. An automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Neil; Chen, Josephine; Kim, Hojin; Morin, Olivier; Nie, Ke; Pouliot, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a powerful tool for radiation oncology, but it can produce errors. Beyond this, DIR accuracy is not a fixed quantity and varies on a case-by-case basis. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of an automated program to create a patient- and voxel-specific evaluation of DIR accuracy. AUTODIRECT is a software tool that was developed to perform this evaluation for the application of a clinical DIR algorithm to a set of patient images. In brief, AUTODIRECT uses algorithms to generate deformations and applies them to these images (along with processing) to generate sets of test images, with known deformations that are similar to the actual ones and with realistic noise properties. The clinical DIR algorithm is applied to these test image sets (currently 4). From these tests, AUTODIRECT generates spatial and dose uncertainty estimates for each image voxel based on a Student’s t distribution. In this study, four commercially available DIR algorithms were used to deform a dose distribution associated with a virtual pelvic phantom image set, and AUTODIRECT was used to generate dose uncertainty estimates for each deformation. The virtual phantom image set has a known ground-truth deformation, so the true dose-warping errors of the DIR algorithms were also known. AUTODIRECT predicted error patterns that closely matched the actual error spatial distribution. On average AUTODIRECT overestimated the magnitude of the dose errors, but tuning the AUTODIRECT algorithms should improve agreement. This proof-of-principle test demonstrates the potential for the AUTODIRECT algorithm as an empirical method to predict DIR errors.

  3. Single Cell Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  4. Single cell optical transfection.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David J; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Campbell, Paul; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-06-01

    The plasma membrane of a eukaryotic cell is impermeable to most hydrophilic substances, yet the insertion of these materials into cells is an extremely important and universal requirement for the cell biologist. To address this need, many transfection techniques have been developed including viral, lipoplex, polyplex, capillary microinjection, gene gun and electroporation. The current discussion explores a procedure called optical injection, where a laser field transiently increases the membrane permeability to allow species to be internalized. If the internalized substance is a nucleic acid, such as DNA, RNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA), then the process is called optical transfection. This contactless, aseptic, single cell transfection method provides a key nanosurgical tool to the microscopist-the intracellular delivery of reagents and single nanoscopic objects. The experimental possibilities enabled by this technology are only beginning to be realized. A review of optical transfection is presented, along with a forecast of future applications of this rapidly developing and exciting technology. PMID:20064901

  5. Scanning probe image wizard: a toolbox for automated scanning probe microscopy data analysis.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Julian; Woolley, Richard A J; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-11-01

    We describe SPIW (scanning probe image wizard), a new image processing toolbox for SPM (scanning probe microscope) images. SPIW can be used to automate many aspects of SPM data analysis, even for images with surface contamination and step edges present. Specialised routines are available for images with atomic or molecular resolution to improve image visualisation and generate statistical data on surface structure.

  6. Scanning probe image wizard: A toolbox for automated scanning probe microscopy data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, Julian; Woolley, Richard A. J.; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-11-01

    We describe SPIW (scanning probe image wizard), a new image processing toolbox for SPM (scanning probe microscope) images. SPIW can be used to automate many aspects of SPM data analysis, even for images with surface contamination and step edges present. Specialised routines are available for images with atomic or molecular resolution to improve image visualisation and generate statistical data on surface structure.

  7. Automated pollen identification using microscopic imaging and texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Marcos, J Víctor; Nava, Rodrigo; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Redondo, Rafael; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Bueno, Gloria; Déniz, Óscar; González-Porto, Amelia; Pardo, Cristina; Chung, François; Rodríguez, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Pollen identification is required in different scenarios such as prevention of allergic reactions, climate analysis or apiculture. However, it is a time-consuming task since experts are required to recognize each pollen grain through the microscope. In this study, we performed an exhaustive assessment on the utility of texture analysis for automated characterisation of pollen samples. A database composed of 1800 brightfield microscopy images of pollen grains from 15 different taxa was used for this purpose. A pattern recognition-based methodology was adopted to perform pollen classification. Four different methods were evaluated for texture feature extraction from the pollen image: Haralick's gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), log-Gabor filters (LGF), local binary patterns (LBP) and discrete Tchebichef moments (DTM). Fisher's discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour were subsequently applied to perform dimensionality reduction and multivariate classification, respectively. Our results reveal that LGF and DTM, which are based on the spectral properties of the image, outperformed GLCM and LBP in the proposed classification problem. Furthermore, we found that the combination of all the texture features resulted in the highest performance, yielding an accuracy of 95%. Therefore, thorough texture characterisation could be considered in further implementations of automatic pollen recognition systems based on image processing techniques.

  8. Texture-Based Automated Lithological Classification Using Aeromagenetic Anomaly Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shankar, Vivek

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a thesis submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2004 Aeromagnetic anomaly images are geophysical prospecting tools frequently used in the exploration of metalliferous minerals and hydrocarbons. The amplitude and texture content of these images provide a wealth of information to geophysicists who attempt to delineate the nature of the Earth's upper crust. These images prove to be extremely useful in remote areas and locations where the minerals of interest are concealed by basin fill. Typically, geophysicists compile a suite of aeromagnetic anomaly images, derived from amplitude and texture measurement operations, in order to obtain a qualitative interpretation of the lithological (rock) structure. Texture measures have proven to be especially capable of capturing the magnetic anomaly signature of unique lithological units. We performed a quantitative study to explore the possibility of using texture measures as input to a machine vision system in order to achieve automated classification of lithological units. This work demonstrated a significant improvement in classification accuracy over random guessing based on a priori probabilities. Additionally, a quantitative comparison between the performances of five classes of texture measures in their ability to discriminate lithological units was achieved.

  9. Automated in situ brain imaging for mapping the Drosophila connectome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Lin, Hsuan-Wen; Chiu, Mei-Tzu; Shih, Yung-Hsin; Wang, Ting-Yuan; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the connectome, a wiring diagram of the entire brain, requires large-scale imaging of numerous single neurons with diverse morphology. It is a formidable challenge to reassemble these neurons into a virtual brain and correlate their structural networks with neuronal activities, which are measured in different experiments to analyze the informational flow in the brain. Here, we report an in situ brain imaging technique called Fly Head Array Slice Tomography (FHAST), which permits the reconstruction of structural and functional data to generate an integrative connectome in Drosophila. Using FHAST, the head capsules of an array of flies can be opened with a single vibratome sectioning to expose the brains, replacing the painstaking and inconsistent brain dissection process. FHAST can reveal in situ brain neuroanatomy with minimal distortion to neuronal morphology and maintain intact neuronal connections to peripheral sensory organs. Most importantly, it enables the automated 3D imaging of 100 intact fly brains in each experiment. The established head model with in situ brain neuroanatomy allows functional data to be accurately registered and associated with 3D images of single neurons. These integrative data can then be shared, searched, visualized, and analyzed for understanding how brain-wide activities in different neurons within the same circuit function together to control complex behaviors.

  10. An investigation of image compression on NIIRS rating degradation through automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Mei; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh; Wang, Zhonghai; Chen, Genshe

    2016-05-01

    The National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale (NIIRS) is a subjective quantification of static image widely adopted by the Geographic Information System (GIS) community. Efforts have been made to relate NIIRS image quality to sensor parameters using the general image quality equations (GIQE), which make it possible to automatically predict the NIIRS rating of an image through automated image analysis. In this paper, we present an automated procedure to extract line edge profile based on which the NIIRS rating of a given image can be estimated through the GIQEs if the ground sampling distance (GSD) is known. Steps involved include straight edge detection, edge stripes determination, and edge intensity determination, among others. Next, we show how to employ GIQEs to estimate NIIRS degradation without knowing the ground truth GSD and investigate the effects of image compression on the degradation of an image's NIIRS rating. Specifically, we consider JPEG and JPEG2000 image compression standards. The extensive experimental results demonstrate the effect of image compression on the ground sampling distance and relative edge response, which are the major factors effecting NIIRS rating.

  11. Automated image analysis for space debris identification and astrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piattoni, Jacopo; Ceruti, Alessandro; Piergentili, Fabrizio

    2014-10-01

    The space debris is a challenging problem for the human activity in the space. Observation campaigns are conducted around the globe to detect and track uncontrolled space objects. One of the main problems in optical observation is obtaining useful information about the debris dynamical state by the images collected. For orbit determination, the most relevant information embedded in optical observation is the precise angular position, which can be evaluated by astrometry procedures, comparing the stars inside the image with star catalogs. This is typically a time consuming process, if done by a human operator, which makes this task impractical when dealing with large amounts of data, in the order of thousands images per night, generated by routinely conducted observations. An automated procedure is investigated in this paper that is capable to recognize the debris track inside a picture, calculate the celestial coordinates of the image's center and use these information to compute the debris angular position in the sky. This procedure has been implemented in a software code, that does not require human interaction and works without any supplemental information besides the image itself, detecting space objects and solving for their angular position without a priori information. The algorithm for object detection was developed inside the research team. For the star field computation, the software code astrometry.net was used and released under GPL v2 license. The complete procedure was validated by an extensive testing, using the images obtained in the observation campaign performed in a joint project between the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and the University of Bologna at the Broglio Space center, Kenya.

  12. Digital microfluidic immunocytochemistry in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Alphonsus H. C.; Dean Chamberlain, M.; Situ, Haozhong; Lee, Victor; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new technique called Digital microfluidic Immunocytochemistry in Single Cells (DISC). DISC automates protocols for cell culture, stimulation and immunocytochemistry, enabling the interrogation of protein phosphorylation on pulsing with stimulus for as little as 3 s. DISC was used to probe the phosphorylation states of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the downstream signalling protein, Akt, to evaluate concentration- and time-dependent effects of stimulation. The high time resolution of the technique allowed for surprising new observations—for example, a 10 s pulse stimulus of a low concentration of PDGF is sufficient to cause >30% of adherent fibroblasts to commit to Akt activation. With the ability to quantitatively probe signalling events with high time resolution at the single-cell level, we propose that DISC may be an important new technique for a wide range of applications, especially for screening signalling responses of a heterogeneous cell population. PMID:26104298

  13. Automated Recognition of 3D Features in GPIR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Stough, Timothy; Fijany, Amir

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated recognition of three-dimensional (3D) features in images generated by ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is undergoing development. GPIR 3D images can be analyzed to detect and identify such subsurface features as pipes and other utility conduits. Until now, much of the analysis of GPIR images has been performed manually by expert operators who must visually identify and track each feature. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for more efficient and accurate analysis by means of algorithms that can automatically identify and track subsurface features, with minimal supervision by human operators. In this method, data from multiple sources (for example, data on different features extracted by different algorithms) are fused together for identifying subsurface objects. The algorithms of this method can be classified in several different ways. In one classification, the algorithms fall into three classes: (1) image-processing algorithms, (2) feature- extraction algorithms, and (3) a multiaxis data-fusion/pattern-recognition algorithm that includes a combination of machine-learning, pattern-recognition, and object-linking algorithms. The image-processing class includes preprocessing algorithms for reducing noise and enhancing target features for pattern recognition. The feature-extraction algorithms operate on preprocessed data to extract such specific features in images as two-dimensional (2D) slices of a pipe. Then the multiaxis data-fusion/ pattern-recognition algorithm identifies, classifies, and reconstructs 3D objects from the extracted features. In this process, multiple 2D features extracted by use of different algorithms and representing views along different directions are used to identify and reconstruct 3D objects. In object linking, which is an essential part of this process, features identified in successive 2D slices and located within a threshold radius of identical features in adjacent slices are linked in a

  14. Automated detection of open magnetic field regions in EUV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krista, Larisza Diana; Reinard, Alysha

    2016-05-01

    Open magnetic regions on the Sun are either long-lived (coronal holes) or transient (dimmings) in nature, but both appear as dark regions in EUV images. For this reason their detection can be done in a similar way. As coronal holes are often large and long-lived in comparison to dimmings, their detection is more straightforward. The Coronal Hole Automated Recognition and Monitoring (CHARM) algorithm detects coronal holes using EUV images and a magnetogram. The EUV images are used to identify dark regions, and the magnetogam allows us to determine if the dark region is unipolar - a characteristic of coronal holes. There is no temporal sensitivity in this process, since coronal hole lifetimes span days to months. Dimming regions, however, emerge and disappear within hours. Hence, the time and location of a dimming emergence need to be known to successfully identify them and distinguish them from regular coronal holes. Currently, the Coronal Dimming Tracker (CoDiT) algorithm is semi-automated - it requires the dimming emergence time and location as an input. With those inputs we can identify the dimming and track it through its lifetime. CoDIT has also been developed to allow the tracking of dimmings that split or merge - a typical feature of dimmings.The advantage of these particular algorithms is their ability to adapt to detecting different types of open field regions. For coronal hole detection, each full-disk solar image is processed individually to determine a threshold for the image, hence, we are not limited to a single pre-determined threshold. For dimming regions we also allow individual thresholds for each dimming, as they can differ substantially. This flexibility is necessary for a subjective analysis of the studied regions. These algorithms were developed with the goal to allow us better understand the processes that give rise to eruptive and non-eruptive open field regions. We aim to study how these regions evolve over time and what environmental

  15. Automated image analysis in the study of collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Kristensson, Martin; Engel, Ulla; Munck, Lars Kristian; Holck, Susanne; Engel, Peter Johan Heiberg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis software to measure the thickness of the subepithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with collagenous colitis (CC) and incomplete CC (CCi). The software measures the thickness of the collagenous band on microscopic slides stained with Van Gieson (VG). Patients and methods A training set consisting of ten biopsies diagnosed as CC, CCi, and normal colon mucosa was used to develop the automated image analysis (VG app) to match the assessment by a pathologist. The study set consisted of biopsies from 75 patients. Twenty-five cases were primarily diagnosed as CC, 25 as CCi, and 25 as normal or near-normal colonic mucosa. Four pathologists individually reassessed the biopsies and categorized all into one of the abovementioned three categories. The result of the VG app was correlated with the diagnosis provided by the four pathologists. Results The interobserver agreement for each pair of pathologists ranged from κ-values of 0.56–0.81, while the κ-value for the VG app vs each of the pathologists varied from 0.63 to 0.79. The overall agreement between the four pathologists was κ=0.69, while the overall agreement between the four pathologists and the VG app was κ=0.71. Conclusion In conclusion, the Visiopharm VG app is able to measure the thickness of a sub-epithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with an accuracy comparable to the performance of a pathologist and thereby provides a promising supplementary tool for the diagnosis of CC and CCi and in particular for research. PMID:27114713

  16. Automated Imaging and Analysis of the Hemagglutination Inhibition Assay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Fries, Katherine; Khoury, Rawia; Zheng, Lingyi; Hu, Branda; Hildreth, Stephen W; Parkhill, Robert; Warren, William

    2016-04-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay quantifies the level of strain-specific influenza virus antibody present in serum and is the standard by which influenza vaccine immunogenicity is measured. The HAI assay endpoint requires real-time monitoring of rapidly evolving red blood cell (RBC) patterns for signs of agglutination at a rate of potentially thousands of patterns per day to meet the throughput needs for clinical testing. This analysis is typically performed manually through visual inspection by highly trained individuals. However, concordant HAI results across different labs are challenging to demonstrate due to analyst bias and variability in analysis methods. To address these issues, we have developed a bench-top, standalone, high-throughput imaging solution that automatically determines the agglutination states of up to 9600 HAI assay wells per hour and assigns HAI titers to 400 samples in a single unattended 30-min run. Images of the tilted plates are acquired as a function of time and analyzed using algorithms that were developed through comprehensive examination of manual classifications. Concordance testing of the imaging system with eight different influenza antigens demonstrates 100% agreement between automated and manual titer determination with a percent difference of ≤3.4% for all cases.

  17. Automated transient detection in the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke; Scott, Chris; Owens, Mat; Lockwood, Mike; Tucker-Hood, Kim; Davies, Jackie

    2014-05-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites, the heliospheric imagers (HI) have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out far into the heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an automated algorithm for the detection and tracking of the transient features observed in HI data. This is to some extent previously covered ground, as similar problems have been encountered in the analysis of coronagraph data and have led to the development of products such as CACtus etc. We present the results of our investigation into the automated detection of solar transients observed in J-maps formed from HI data. We use edge and line detection methods to identify transients in the J-maps, and then use kinematic models of the solar transient propagation (such as the fixed-phi and harmonic mean geometric models) to estimate the solar transients properties, such as transient speed and propagation direction, from the time-elongation profile. The effectiveness of this process is assessed by comparison of our results with a set of manually identified CMEs, extracted and analysed by the Solar Storm Watch Project. Solar Storm Watch is a citizen science project in which solar transients are identified in J-maps formed from HI data and tracked multiple times by different users. This allows the calculation of a consensus time-elongation profile for each event, and therefore does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of an individual researcher tracking an

  18. Automated determination of spinal centerline in CT and MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2009-02-01

    The spinal curvature is one of the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal deformities. The spinal centerline, represented by the curve that passes through the centers of the vertebral bodies in three-dimensions (3D), allows valid quantitative measurements of the spinal curvature at any location along the spine. We propose a novel automated method for the determination of the spinal centerline in 3D spine images. Our method exploits the anatomical property that the vertebral body walls are cylindrically-shaped and therefore the lines normal to the edges of the vertebral body walls most often intersect in the middle of the vertebral bodies, i.e. at the location of spinal centerline. These points of intersection are first obtained by a novel algorithm that performs a selective search in the directions normal to the edges of the structures and then connected with a parametric curve that represents the spinal centerline in 3D. As the method is based on anatomical properties of the 3D spine anatomy, it is modality-independent, i.e. applicable to images obtained by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The proposed method was evaluated on six CT and four MR images (T1- and T2-weighted) of normal spines and on one scoliotic CT spine image. The qualitative and quantitative results for the normal spines show that the spinal centerline can be successfully determined in both CT and MR spine images, while the results for the scoliotic spine indicate that the method may also be used to evaluate pathological curvatures.

  19. Automating sky object classification in astronomical survey images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fayyad, Usama M.; Doyle, Richard J.; Weir, Nicholas; Djorgovski, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the application of machine classification techniques to the development of an automated tool for the reduction of a large scientific data set. The 2nd Palomer Observatory Sky Survey is nearly completed. This survey provides comprehensive coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere in the form of photographic plates. The plates are being transformed into digitized images whose quality will probably not be surpassed in the next ten to twenty years. The images are expected to contain on the order of 10(exp 7) galaxies and 10(exp 8) stars. Astronomers wish to determine which of these sky objects belong to various classes of galaxies and stars. The size of this data set precludes manual analysis. Our approach is to develop a software system which integrates the functions of independently developed techniques for image processing and data classification. Digitized sky images are passed through image processing routines to identify sky objects and to extract a set of features for each object. These routines are used to help select a useful set of attributes for classifying sky objects. Then GID3* and O-BTree, two inductive learning techniques, learn classification decision trees from examples. These classifiers will be used to process the rest of the data. This paper gives an overview of the machine learning techniques used, describes the details of our specific application, and reports the initial encouraging results. The results indicate that our approach is well-suited to the problem. The primary benefits of the approach are increased data reduction throughput and consistency of classification. The classification rules which are the product of the inductive learning techniques will form an object, examinable basis for classifying sky objects. A final, not to be underestimated benefit is that astronomers will be freed from the tedium of an intensely visual task to pursue more challenging analysis and interpretation problems based on automatically cataloged

  20. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  1. Automation of Cn2 profile extraction from weather radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Lee R.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Buchanan, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    A novel method for measuring the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on an arbitrary path has recently been demonstrated by the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT). This method provides a unique ability to remotely measure the intensity of turbulence, which is important for predicting beam spread, wander, and scintillation effects on High Energy Laser (HEL) propagation. Because this is a new technique, estimating A novel method for measuring the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on an arbitrary path has recently been demonstrated by the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT). This method provides a unique ability to remotely measure the intensity of turbulence, which is important for predicting beam spread, wander, and scintillation effects on High Energy Laser (HEL) propagation. Because this is a new technique, estimating Cn2 using radar is a complicated and time consuming process. This paper presents a new software program which is being developed to automate the calculation of Cn2 over an arbitrary path. The program takes regional National Weather Service NEXRAD radar reflectivity measurements and extracts data for the path of interest. These reflectivity measurements are then used to estimate Cn2 over the path. The program uses the Radar Software Library (RSL) produced by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) at the NASA/Goddard Flight Center. RSL provides support for nearly all formats of weather radar data. The particular challenge to extracting data is in determining which data bins the path passes through. Due to variations in radar systems and measurement conditions, the RSL produces data grids that are not consistent in geometry or completeness. The Cn2 program adapts to the varying geometries of each radar image. Automation of the process allows for fast estimation of Cn2 and supports a goal of real-time remote turbulence measurement. Recently, this software was used to create comparison data for RF

  2. A novel automated image analysis method for accurate adipocyte quantification

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Osman S; Selway, Joanne L; Kępczyńska, Małgorzata A; Stocker, Claire J; O’Dowd, Jacqueline F; Cawthorne, Michael A; Arch, Jonathan RS; Jassim, Sabah; Langlands, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased adipocyte size and number are associated with many of the adverse effects observed in metabolic disease states. While methods to quantify such changes in the adipocyte are of scientific and clinical interest, manual methods to determine adipocyte size are both laborious and intractable to large scale investigations. Moreover, existing computational methods are not fully automated. We, therefore, developed a novel automatic method to provide accurate measurements of the cross-sectional area of adipocytes in histological sections, allowing rapid high-throughput quantification of fat cell size and number. Photomicrographs of H&E-stained paraffin sections of murine gonadal adipose were transformed using standard image processing/analysis algorithms to reduce background and enhance edge-detection. This allowed the isolation of individual adipocytes from which their area could be calculated. Performance was compared with manual measurements made from the same images, in which adipocyte area was calculated from estimates of the major and minor axes of individual adipocytes. Both methods identified an increase in mean adipocyte size in a murine model of obesity, with good concordance, although the calculation used to identify cell area from manual measurements was found to consistently over-estimate cell size. Here we report an accurate method to determine adipocyte area in histological sections that provides a considerable time saving over manual methods. PMID:23991362

  3. Chemical Analysis of Single Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, Laura M.; Kottegoda, Sumith; Phillips, K. Scott; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-07-01

    Chemical analysis of single cells requires methods for quickly and quantitatively detecting a diverse array of analytes from extremely small volumes (femtoliters to nanoliters) with very high sensitivity and selectivity. Microelectrophoretic separations, using both traditional capillary electrophoresis and emerging microfluidic methods, are well suited for handling the unique size of single cells and limited numbers of intracellular molecules. Numerous analytes, ranging from small molecules such as amino acids and neurotransmitters to large proteins and subcellular organelles, have been quantified in single cells using microelectrophoretic separation techniques. Microseparation techniques, coupled to varying detection schemes including absorbance and fluorescence detection, electrochemical detection, and mass spectrometry, have allowed researchers to examine a number of processes inside single cells. This review also touches on a promising direction in single cell cytometry: the development of microfluidics for integrated cellular manipulation, chemical processing, and separation of cellular contents.

  4. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Katherin; Chiu, Chi-Li; Engeln, Mark; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype tracking, and data filtering to remove erroneous cell tracks using the novel Tracking Aberration Measure (TrAM). Our workflow is broadly applicable across imaging platforms and analysis software. By applying this workflow to cancer cell assays, we reduced aberrant cell track prevalence from 17% to 2%. The cost of this improvement was removing 15% of the well-tracked cells. This enabled detection of significant motility differences between cell lines. Similarly, we avoided detecting a false change in translocation kinetics by eliminating the true cause: varied proportions of unresponsive cells. Finally, by systematically seeking heterogeneous behaviors, we detected subpopulations that otherwise could have been missed, including early apoptotic events and pre-mitotic cells. We provide optimized protocols for specific applications and step-by-step guidelines for adapting them to a variety of biological systems. PMID:27708391

  5. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image.

    PubMed

    Grega, Michał; Matiolański, Andrzej; Guzik, Piotr; Leszczuk, Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Closed circuit television systems (CCTV) are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims.

  6. Automated detection of oscillations in extreme ultraviolet imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, J.; Marsh, M. S.; Kucera, T. A.; Young, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    The corona is now known to support many different types of oscillation. Initial detection of these oscillations currently relied on manual labor. With the advent of much higher cadence EUV (extreme ultraviolet) data at better spatial resolution, sifting through the data manually to look for oscillatory material becomes an onerous task. Further, different observers tend to see different behavior in the data. To overcome these problems, we introduce a Bayesian probability-based automated method to detect areas in EUV images that support oscillations. The method is fast and can handle time series data with even or uneven cadences. Interestingly, the Bayesian approach allows us to generate a probability that a given frequency is present without the need for an estimate of the noise in the data. We also generate simple and intuitive "quality measures" for each detected oscillation. This will allow users to select the "best" examples in a given dataset automatically. The method is demonstrated on existing datasets (EIT, TRACE, STEREO). Its application to Solar Dynamics Observatory data is also discussed. We also discuss some of the problems in detecting oscillations in the presence of a significant background trend which can pollute the frequency spectrum.

  7. Exploiting Image Registration for Automated Resonance Assignment in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stephens, Thomas; Liu, Jian; Tjandra, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of protein NMR data involves the assignment of resonance peaks in a number of multidimensional data sets. To establish resonance assignment a three-dimensional search is used to match a pair of common variables, such as chemical shifts of the same spin system, in different NMR spectra. We show that by displaying the variables to be compared in two-dimensional plots the process can be simplified. Moreover, by utilizing a fast Fourier transform (FFT) cross-correlation algorithm, more common to the field of image registration or pattern matching, we can automate this process. Here, we use sequential NMR backbone assignment as an example to show that the combination of correlation plots and segmented pattern matching establishes fast backbone assignment in fifteen proteins of varying sizes. For example, the 265-residue RalBP1 protein was 95.4% correctly assigned in 10 seconds. The same concept can be applied to any multidimensional NMR data set where analysis comprises the comparison of two variables. This modular and robust approach offers high efficiency with excellent computational scalability and could be easily incorporated into existing assignment software. PMID:25828257

  8. Automated diagnosis of dry eye using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Koh, Joel E. W.; Sudarshan, Vidya K.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Chua, Chua Kuang; Ng, E. Y. K.; Tong, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Dry Eye (DE) is a condition of either decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Prolonged DE damages the cornea causing the corneal scarring, thinning and perforation. There is no single uniform diagnosis test available to date; combinations of diagnostic tests are to be performed to diagnose DE. The current diagnostic methods available are subjective, uncomfortable and invasive. Hence in this paper, we have developed an efficient, fast and non-invasive technique for the automated identification of normal and DE classes using infrared thermography images. The features are extracted from nonlinear method called Higher Order Spectra (HOS). Features are ranked using t-test ranking strategy. These ranked features are fed to various classifiers namely, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Nave Bayesian Classifier (NBC), Decision Tree (DT), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to select the best classifier using minimum number of features. Our proposed system is able to identify the DE and normal classes automatically with classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.8%, and specificity if 99.8% for left eye using PNN and KNN classifiers. And we have reported classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.9%, and specificity if 99.4% for right eye using SVM classifier with polynomial order 2 kernel.

  9. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image.

    PubMed

    Grega, Michał; Matiolański, Andrzej; Guzik, Piotr; Leszczuk, Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Closed circuit television systems (CCTV) are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims. PMID:26729128

  10. Automated counting of bacterial colonies by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Ju; Tseng, Min-Jen; He, Zong-Sian; Li, Chia-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Research on microorganisms often involves culturing as a means to determine the survival and proliferation of bacteria. The number of colonies in a culture is counted to calculate the concentration of bacteria in the original broth; however, manual counting can be time-consuming and imprecise. To save time and prevent inconsistencies, this study proposes a fully automated counting system using image processing methods. To accurately estimate the number of viable bacteria in a known volume of suspension, colonies distributing over the whole surface area of a plate, including the central and rim areas of a Petri dish are taken into account. The performance of the proposed system is compared with verified manual counts, as well as with two freely available counting software programs. Comparisons show that the proposed system is an effective method with excellent accuracy with mean value of absolute percentage error of 3.37%. A user-friendly graphical user interface is also developed and freely available for download, providing researchers in biomedicine with a more convenient instrument for the enumeration of bacterial colonies. PMID:25451456

  11. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image

    PubMed Central

    Grega, Michał; Matiolański, Andrzej; Guzik, Piotr; Leszczuk, Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Closed circuit television systems (CCTV) are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims. PMID:26729128

  12. Advances in Image Pre-Processing to Improve Automated 3d Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabeni, A.; Apollonio, F. I.; Gaiani, M.; Remondino, F.

    2015-02-01

    Tools and algorithms for automated image processing and 3D reconstruction purposes have become more and more available, giving the possibility to process any dataset of unoriented and markerless images. Typically, dense 3D point clouds (or texture 3D polygonal models) are produced at reasonable processing time. In this paper, we evaluate how the radiometric pre-processing of image datasets (particularly in RAW format) can help in improving the performances of state-of-the-art automated image processing tools. Beside a review of common pre-processing methods, an efficient pipeline based on color enhancement, image denoising, RGB to Gray conversion and image content enrichment is presented. The performed tests, partly reported for sake of space, demonstrate how an effective image pre-processing, which considers the entire dataset in analysis, can improve the automated orientation procedure and dense 3D point cloud reconstruction, even in case of poor texture scenarios.

  13. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell's electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell's electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  14. Application of automated image analysis to coal petrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Thompson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The coal petrologist seeks to determine the petrographic characteristics of organic and inorganic coal constituents and their lateral and vertical variations within a single coal bed or different coal beds of a particular coal field. Definitive descriptions of coal characteristics and coal facies provide the basis for interpretation of depositional environments, diagenetic changes, and burial history and determination of the degree of coalification or metamorphism. Numerous coal core or columnar samples must be studied in detail in order to adequately describe and define coal microlithotypes, lithotypes, and lithologic facies and their variations. The large amount of petrographic information required can be obtained rapidly and quantitatively by use of an automated image-analysis system (AIAS). An AIAS can be used to generate quantitative megascopic and microscopic modal analyses for the lithologic units of an entire columnar section of a coal bed. In our scheme for megascopic analysis, distinctive bands 2 mm or more thick are first demarcated by visual inspection. These bands consist of either nearly pure microlithotypes or lithotypes such as vitrite/vitrain or fusite/fusain, or assemblages of microlithotypes. Megascopic analysis with the aid of the AIAS is next performed to determine volume percentages of vitrite, inertite, minerals, and microlithotype mixtures in bands 0.5 to 2 mm thick. The microlithotype mixtures are analyzed microscopically by use of the AIAS to determine their modal composition in terms of maceral and optically observable mineral components. Megascopic and microscopic data are combined to describe the coal unit quantitatively in terms of (V) for vitrite, (E) for liptite, (I) for inertite or fusite, (M) for mineral components other than iron sulfide, (S) for iron sulfide, and (VEIM) for the composition of the mixed phases (Xi) i = 1,2, etc. in terms of the maceral groups vitrinite V, exinite E, inertinite I, and optically observable mineral

  15. Measuring single-cell gene expression dynamics in bacteria using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan W; Locke, James C W; Altinok, Alphan; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Bacarian, Tigran; Swain, Peter S; Mjolsness, Eric; Elowitz, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative single-cell time-lapse microscopy is a powerful method for analyzing gene circuit dynamics and heterogeneous cell behavior. We describe the application of this method to imaging bacteria by using an automated microscopy system. This protocol has been used to analyze sporulation and competence differentiation in Bacillus subtilis, and to quantify gene regulation and its fluctuations in individual Escherichia coli cells. The protocol involves seeding and growing bacteria on small agarose pads and imaging the resulting microcolonies. Images are then reviewed and analyzed using our laboratory's custom MATLAB analysis code, which segments and tracks cells in a frame-to-frame method. This process yields quantitative expression data on cell lineages, which can illustrate dynamic expression profiles and facilitate mathematical models of gene circuits. With fast-growing bacteria, such as E. coli or B. subtilis, image acquisition can be completed in 1 d, with an additional 1–2 d for progressing through the analysis procedure. PMID:22179594

  16. Evaluation of automated target detection using image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, John M.; Abramson, Susan; Mossing, John

    2003-09-01

    Reliance on Automated Target Recognition (ATR) technology is essential to the future success of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions. Although benefits may be realized through ATR processing of a single data source, fusion of information across multiple images and multiple sensors promises significant performance gains. A major challenge, as ATR fusion technologies mature, is the establishment of sound methods for evaluating ATR performance in the context of data fusion. The Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology (DUSD/S&T), as part of their ongoing ATR Program, has sponsored an effort to develop and demonstrate methods for evaluating ATR algorithms that utilize multiple data source, i.e., fusion-based ATR. This paper presents results from this program, focusing on the target detection and cueing aspect of the problem. The first step in assessing target detection performance is to relate the ground truth to the ATR decisions. Once the ATR decisions have been mapped to ground truth, the second step in the evaluation is to characterize ATR performance. A common approach is to vary the confidence threshold of the ATR and compute the Probability of Detection (PD) and the False Alarm Rate (FAR) associated with each threshold. Varying the threshold, therefore, produces an empirical performance curve relating detection performance to false alarms. Various statistical methods have been developed, largely in the medical imaging literature, to model this curve so that statistical inferences are possible. One approach, based on signal detection theory, generalizes the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve. Under this approach, the Free Response Operating Characteristic (FROC) curve models performance for search problems. The FROC model is appropriate when multiple detections are possible and the number of false alarms is unconstrained. The parameterization of the FROC model provides a natural method for characterizing both

  17. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants.

  18. Automated segmentation of the canine corpus callosum for the measurement of diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Peterson, David E; Chen, Steven D; Calabrese, Evan; White, Leonard E; Provenzale, James M

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to apply image registration-based automated segmentation methods to measure diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics within the canine brain. Specifically, we hypothesized that this method could measure DTI metrics within the canine brain with greater reproducibility than with hand-drawn region of interest (ROI) methods. We performed high-resolution post-mortem DTI imaging on two canine brains on a 7 T MR scanner. We designated the two brains as brain 1 and brain 2. We measured DTI metrics within the corpus callosum of brain 1 using a hand-drawn ROI method and an automated segmentation method in which ROIs from brain 2 were transformed into the space of brain 1. We repeated both methods in order to measure their reliability. Mean differences between the two sets of hand-drawn ROIs ranged from 4% to 10%. Mean differences between the hand-drawn ROIs and the automated ROIs were less than 3%. The mean differences between the first and second automated ROIs were all less than 0.25%. Our findings indicate that the image registration-based automated segmentation method was clearly the more reproducible method. These results provide the groundwork for using image registration-based automated segmentation methods to measure DTI metrics within the canine brain. Such methods will facilitate the study of white matter pathology in canine models of neurologic disease. PMID:26577603

  19. Single-cell western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alex J.; Spelke, Dawn P.; Xu, Zhuchen; Kang, Chi-Chih; Schaffer, David V.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    To measure cell-to-cell variation in protein-mediated functions — a hallmark of biological processes — we developed an approach to conduct ~103 concurrent single-cell western blots (scWesterns) in ~4 hours. A microscope slide supporting a 30 µm-thick photoactive polyacrylamide gel enables western blotting comprised of: settling of single cells into microwells, lysis in situ, gel electrophoresis, photoinitiated blotting to immobilize proteins, and antibody probing. We apply this scWestern to monitor single rat neural stem cell differentiation and responses to mitogen stimulation. The scWestern quantifies target proteins even with off-target antibody binding, multiplexes to 11 protein targets per single cell with detection thresholds of <30,000 molecules, and supports analyses of low starting cell numbers (~200) when integrated with fluorescence activated cell sorting. The scWestern thus overcomes limitations in single-cell protein analysis (i.e., antibody fidelity, sensitivity, and starting cell number) and constitutes a versatile tool for the study of complex cell populations at single-cell resolution. PMID:24880876

  20. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Venkatraman, S.; Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction.more » Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors.« less

  1. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell’s electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell’s electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  2. Endoscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of aortic plaque: an automated classification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Hatami, Nisa; Fishbein, Michael C.; Rajaram, Amit; Saroufeem, Ramez; Marcu, Laura

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an automated algorithm which uses fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of human aortic atherosclerotic plaque to provide quantitative and spatial information regarding compositional features related to plaque vulnerability such as collagen degradation, lipid accumulation, and macrophage infiltration. Images were acquired through a flexible fiber imaging bundle with intravascular potential at two wavelength bands optimal to recognizing markers of vulnerability: F377: 377/55 nm and F460: 460/50 nm (center wavelength/bandwidth). A classification method implementing principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis to correlate FLIM data sets with histopathology was validated on a training set and then used to classify a validation set of FLIM images. The output of this algorithm was a false-color image with each pixel color coded to represent the chemical composition of the sample. Surface areas occupied by elastin, collagen, and lipid components were then calculated and used to define the vulnerability of each imaged location. Four groups were defined: early lesion, stable, mildly vulnerable and extremely vulnerable. Each imaged location was categorized in one of the groups based on histopathology and classification results; sensitivities (SE) and specificities (SP) were calculated (SE %/SP %): early lesion: 95/96, stable: 71/97, mildly vulnerable: 75/94, and extremely vulnerable: 100/93. The capability of this algorithm to use FLIM images to quickly determine the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque, particularly related to vulnerability, further enhances the potential of this system for implementation as an intravascular diagnostic modality.

  3. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Floris T G; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2011-11-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed. First, we report single-cell trapping in a fast (2-5  min) and reproducible manner with a single-cell capture yield of 85% using two cell lines (P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7), employing a protocol which is scalable and easily amenable to automation. Following this, a mixed population of P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7 cells is stained in situ using the nucleic acid probe (Hoechst) and a phycoerythrin-labeled monoclonal antibody directed at EpCAM present on the surface of the breast cancer cells MCF-7 and absent on the myeloma cells P3x63Ag8 to illustrate the potential of the device to analyze cell population heterogeneity. Next, cells are porated in situ using chemicals in a reversible (digitonin) or irreversible way (lithium dodecyl sulfate). This is visualized by the transportation of fluorescent dyes through the membrane (propidium iodide and calcein). Finally, an electrical protocol is developed for combined cell permeabilization and electroosmotic flow (EOF)-based extraction of the cell content. It is validated here using calcein-loaded cells and visualized through the progressive recovery of calcein in the side channels, indicating successful retrieval of individual cell content. PMID:22025223

  4. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  5. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G. Tayhas R.

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  6. Automated detection of a prostate Ni-Ti stent in electronic portal images

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Henning; Nielsen, Jane; Lund, Bente; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer

    2006-12-15

    Planning target volumes (PTV) in fractionated radiotherapy still have to be outlined with wide margins to the clinical target volume due to uncertainties arising from daily shift of the prostate position. A recently proposed new method of visualization of the prostate is based on insertion of a thermo-expandable Ni-Ti stent. The current study proposes a new detection algorithm for automated detection of the Ni-Ti stent in electronic portal images. The algorithm is based on the Ni-Ti stent having a cylindrical shape with a fixed diameter, which was used as the basis for an automated detection algorithm. The automated method uses enhancement of lines combined with a grayscale morphology operation that looks for enhanced pixels separated with a distance similar to the diameter of the stent. The images in this study are all from prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy in a previous study. Images of a stent inserted in a humanoid phantom demonstrated a localization accuracy of 0.4-0.7 mm which equals the pixel size in the image. The automated detection of the stent was compared to manual detection in 71 pairs of orthogonal images taken in nine patients. The algorithm was successful in 67 of 71 pairs of images. The method is fast, has a high success rate, good accuracy, and has a potential for unsupervised localization of the prostate before radiotherapy, which would enable automated repositioning before treatment and allow for the use of very tight PTV margins.

  7. Quantization of polyphenolic compounds in histological sections of grape berries by automated color image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Alain; Vigouroux, Bertnand

    2003-04-01

    We present new results in applied color image analysis that put in evidence the significant influence of soil on localization and appearance of polyphenols in grapes. These results have been obtained with a new unsupervised classification algorithm founded on hierarchical analysis of color histograms. The process is automated thanks to a software platform we developed specifically for color image analysis and it's applications.

  8. Knowledge Acquisition, Validation, and Maintenance in a Planning System for Automated Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.

    1996-01-01

    A key obstacle hampering fielding of AI planning applications is the considerable expense of developing, verifying, updating, and maintainting the planning knowledge base (KB). Planning systems must be able to compare favorably in terms of software lifecycle costs to other means of automation such as scripts or rule-based expert systems. This paper describes a planning application of automated imaging processing and our overall approach to knowledge acquisition for this application.

  9. Validation of Supervised Automated Algorithm for Fast Quantitative Evaluation of Organ Motion on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Varuna; Stainsby, Jeffrey A.; Satkunasingham, Janakan; Craig, Tim; Catton, Charles; Chan, Philip; Dawson, Laura; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Sussman, Marshall S.; Lockwood, Gina; Menard, Cynthia

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To validate a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm applied to the supervised automated quantification of abdominal-pelvic organ motion captured on time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images of 21 patients across four anatomic sites were analyzed. Representative anatomic points of interest were chosen as surrogates for organ motion. The point of interest displacements across each image frame relative to baseline were quantified manually and through the use of a template-matching software tool, termed 'Motiontrack.' Automated and manually acquired displacement measures, as well as the standard deviation of intrafraction motion, were compared for each image frame and for each patient. Results: Discrepancies between the automated and manual displacements of {>=}2 mm were uncommon, ranging in frequency of 0-9.7% (liver and prostate, respectively). The standard deviations of intrafraction motion measured with each method correlated highly (r = 0.99). Considerable interpatient variability in organ motion was demonstrated by a wide range of standard deviations in the liver (1.4-7.5 mm), uterus (1.1-8.4 mm), and prostate gland (0.8-2.7 mm). The automated algorithm performed successfully in all patients but 1 and substantially improved efficiency compared with manual quantification techniques (5 min vs. 60-90 min). Conclusion: Supervised automated quantification of organ motion captured on magnetic resonance imaging using a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm was efficient, accurate, and may play an important role in off-line adaptive approaches to intrafraction motion management.

  10. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers.

  11. Performance evaluation of an automated image registration algorithm using an integrated kilovoltage imaging and guidance system.

    PubMed

    Fox, Timothy; Huntzinger, Calvin; Johnstone, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Elder, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy delivery may be used to assess the position of the tumor and anatomical structures within the body as opposed to relying on external marks. The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate the performance of the image registration software for automatically detecting and repositioning a 3D offset of a phantom using a kilovoltage onboard imaging system. Verification tests were performed on both a geometric rigid phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom containing a humanoid skeleton to assess the precision and accuracy of the automated positioning system. From the translation only studies, the average deviation between the detected and known offset was less than 0.75 mm for each of the three principal directions, and the shifts did not show any directional sensitivity. The results are given as the measurement with standard deviation in parentheses. The combined translations and rotations had the greatest average deviation in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions. For all dimensions, the magnitude of the deviation does not appear to be correlated with the magnitude of the actual translation introduced. The On-Board Imager (OBI) system has been successfully integrated into a feasible online radiotherapy treatment guidance procedure. Evaluation of each patient's resulting automatch should be performed by therapists before each treatment session for adequate clinical oversight.

  12. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mohendra; Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Sangwoo; Chae, Yeonghun; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al.), we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells lines. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings. PMID:27164146

  13. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mohendra; Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Sangwoo; Chae, Yeonghun; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al.), we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, and HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings. PMID:27164146

  14. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mohendra; Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Sangwoo; Chae, Yeonghun; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2016-05-05

    Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al.), we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, and HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings.

  15. A semi-automated image analysis procedure for in situ plankton imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongsheng; Guo, Zhenhua; Benfield, Mark C; Fan, Chunlei; Ford, Michael; Shahrestani, Suzan; Sieracki, Jeffery M

    2015-01-01

    Plankton imaging systems are capable of providing fine-scale observations that enhance our understanding of key physical and biological processes. However, processing the large volumes of data collected by imaging systems remains a major obstacle for their employment, and existing approaches are designed either for images acquired under laboratory controlled conditions or within clear waters. In the present study, we developed a semi-automated approach to analyze plankton taxa from images acquired by the ZOOplankton VISualization (ZOOVIS) system within turbid estuarine waters, in Chesapeake Bay. When compared to images under laboratory controlled conditions or clear waters, images from highly turbid waters are often of relatively low quality and more variable, due to the large amount of objects and nonlinear illumination within each image. We first customized a segmentation procedure to locate objects within each image and extracted them for classification. A maximally stable extremal regions algorithm was applied to segment large gelatinous zooplankton and an adaptive threshold approach was developed to segment small organisms, such as copepods. Unlike the existing approaches for images acquired from laboratory, controlled conditions or clear waters, the target objects are often the majority class, and the classification can be treated as a multi-class classification problem. We customized a two-level hierarchical classification procedure using support vector machines to classify the target objects (< 5%), and remove the non-target objects (> 95%). First, histograms of oriented gradients feature descriptors were constructed for the segmented objects. In the first step all non-target and target objects were classified into different groups: arrow-like, copepod-like, and gelatinous zooplankton. Each object was passed to a group-specific classifier to remove most non-target objects. After the object was classified, an expert or non-expert then manually removed the

  16. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  17. Digital Transplantation Pathology: Combining Whole Slide Imaging, Multiplex Staining, and Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Isse, Kumiko; Lesniak, Andrew; Grama, Kedar; Roysam, Badrinath; Minervini, Martha I.; Demetris, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Conventional histopathology is the gold standard for allograft monitoring, but its value proposition is increasingly questioned. “-Omics” analysis of tissues, peripheral blood and fluids and targeted serologic studies provide mechanistic insights into allograft injury not currently provided by conventional histology. Microscopic biopsy analysis, however, provides valuable and unique information: a) spatial-temporal relationships; b) rare events/cells; c) complex structural context; and d) integration into a “systems” model. Nevertheless, except for immunostaining, no transformative advancements have “modernized” routine microscopy in over 100 years. Pathologists now team with hardware and software engineers to exploit remarkable developments in digital imaging, nanoparticle multiplex staining, and computational image analysis software to bridge the traditional histology - global “–omic” analyses gap. Included are side-by-side comparisons, objective biopsy finding quantification, multiplexing, automated image analysis, and electronic data and resource sharing. Current utilization for teaching, quality assurance, conferencing, consultations, research and clinical trials is evolving toward implementation for low-volume, high-complexity clinical services like transplantation pathology. Cost, complexities of implementation, fluid/evolving standards, and unsettled medical/legal and regulatory issues remain as challenges. Regardless, challenges will be overcome and these technologies will enable transplant pathologists to increase information extraction from tissue specimens and contribute to cross-platform biomarker discovery for improved outcomes. PMID:22053785

  18. Automated Photogrammetric Image Matching with Sift Algorithm and Delaunay Triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Antón Castro, Francesc; Mioc, Darka

    2016-06-01

    An algorithm for image matching of multi-sensor and multi-temporal satellite images is developed. The method is based on the SIFT feature detector proposed by Lowe in (Lowe, 1999). First, SIFT feature points are detected independently in two images (reference and sensed image). The features detected are invariant to image rotations, translations, scaling and also to changes in illumination, brightness and 3-dimensional viewpoint. Afterwards, each feature of the reference image is matched with one in the sensed image if, and only if, the distance between them multiplied by a threshold is shorter than the distances between the point and all the other points in the sensed image. Then, the matched features are used to compute the parameters of the homography that transforms the coordinate system of the sensed image to the coordinate system of the reference image. The Delaunay triangulations of each feature set for each image are computed. The isomorphism of the Delaunay triangulations is determined to guarantee the quality of the image matching. The algorithm is implemented in Matlab and tested on World-View 2, SPOT6 and TerraSAR-X image patches.

  19. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck. PMID:27021133

  20. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I.; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck.

  1. Improving Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images Using Wide-band Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Beijbom, Oscar; Treibitz, Tali; Kline, David I; Eyal, Gal; Khen, Adi; Neal, Benjamin; Loya, Yossi; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale imaging techniques are used increasingly for ecological surveys. However, manual analysis can be prohibitively expensive, creating a bottleneck between collected images and desired data-products. This bottleneck is particularly severe for benthic surveys, where millions of images are obtained each year. Recent automated annotation methods may provide a solution, but reflectance images do not always contain sufficient information for adequate classification accuracy. In this work, the FluorIS, a low-cost modified consumer camera, was used to capture wide-band wide-field-of-view fluorescence images during a field deployment in Eilat, Israel. The fluorescence images were registered with standard reflectance images, and an automated annotation method based on convolutional neural networks was developed. Our results demonstrate a 22% reduction of classification error-rate when using both images types compared to only using reflectance images. The improvements were large, in particular, for coral reef genera Platygyra, Acropora and Millepora, where classification recall improved by 38%, 33%, and 41%, respectively. We conclude that convolutional neural networks can be used to combine reflectance and fluorescence imagery in order to significantly improve automated annotation accuracy and reduce the manual annotation bottleneck.

  2. Microscopic images dataset for automation of RBCs counting.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sherif

    2015-12-01

    A method for Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) counting has been developed using RBCs light microscopic images and Matlab algorithm. The Dataset consists of Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) images and there RBCs segmented images. A detailed description using flow chart is given in order to show how to produce RBCs mask. The RBCs mask was used to count the number of RBCs in the blood smear image.

  3. Spatiotemporally controlled single cell sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhenzhen; Liu, Haiyan; Mayer, Michael; Deng, Cheri X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents unique approaches to enable control and quantification of ultrasound-mediated cell membrane disruption, or sonoporation, at the single-cell level. Ultrasound excitation of microbubbles that were targeted to the plasma membrane of HEK-293 cells generated spatially and temporally controlled membrane disruption with high repeatability. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording combined with fluorescence microscopy, we obtained time-resolved measurements of single-cell sonoporation and quantified the size and resealing rate of pores. We measured the intracellular diffusion coefficient of cytoplasmic RNA/DNA from sonoporation-induced transport of an intercalating fluorescent dye into and within single cells. We achieved spatiotemporally controlled delivery with subcellular precision and calcium signaling in targeted cells by selective excitation of microbubbles. Finally, we utilized sonoporation to deliver calcein, a membrane-impermeant substrate of multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1), into HEK-MRP1 cells, which overexpress MRP1, and monitored the calcein efflux by MRP1. This approach made it possible to measure the efflux rate in individual cells and to compare it directly to the efflux rate in parental control cells that do not express MRP1. PMID:23012425

  4. ImagePlane: An Automated Image Analysis Pipeline for High-Throughput Screens Using the Planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Flygare, Steven; Campbell, Michael; Ross, Robert Mars; Moore, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract ImagePlane is a modular pipeline for automated, high-throughput image analysis and information extraction. Designed to support planarian research, ImagePlane offers a self-parameterizing adaptive thresholding algorithm; an algorithm that can automatically segment animals into anterior–posterior/left–right quadrants for automated identification of region-specific differences in gene and protein expression; and a novel algorithm for quantification of morphology of animals, independent of their orientations and sizes. ImagePlane also provides methods for automatic report generation, and its outputs can be easily imported into third-party tools such as R and Excel. Here we demonstrate the pipeline's utility for identification of genes involved in stem cell proliferation in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Although designed to support planarian studies, ImagePlane will prove useful for cell-based studies as well. PMID:23822514

  5. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    DOEpatents

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  6. A review of automated image understanding within 3D baggage computed tomography security screening.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Andre; Breckon, Toby P

    2015-01-01

    Baggage inspection is the principal safeguard against the transportation of prohibited and potentially dangerous materials at airport security checkpoints. Although traditionally performed by 2D X-ray based scanning, increasingly stringent security regulations have led to a growing demand for more advanced imaging technologies. The role of X-ray Computed Tomography is thus rapidly expanding beyond the traditional materials-based detection of explosives. The development of computer vision and image processing techniques for the automated understanding of 3D baggage-CT imagery is however, complicated by poor image resolutions, image clutter and high levels of noise and artefacts. We discuss the recent and most pertinent advancements and identify topics for future research within the challenging domain of automated image understanding for baggage security screening CT. PMID:26409422

  7. A review of automated image understanding within 3D baggage computed tomography security screening.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Andre; Breckon, Toby P

    2015-01-01

    Baggage inspection is the principal safeguard against the transportation of prohibited and potentially dangerous materials at airport security checkpoints. Although traditionally performed by 2D X-ray based scanning, increasingly stringent security regulations have led to a growing demand for more advanced imaging technologies. The role of X-ray Computed Tomography is thus rapidly expanding beyond the traditional materials-based detection of explosives. The development of computer vision and image processing techniques for the automated understanding of 3D baggage-CT imagery is however, complicated by poor image resolutions, image clutter and high levels of noise and artefacts. We discuss the recent and most pertinent advancements and identify topics for future research within the challenging domain of automated image understanding for baggage security screening CT.

  8. A New Approach for Measuring Single-Cell Oxygen Consumption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Dragavon, Joseph M.; Anderson, Judith B.; Young, A. Cody; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel system that has enabled the measurement of single-cell oxygen consumption rates is presented. The experimental apparatus includes a temperature controlled environmental chamber, an array of microwells etched in glass, and a lid actuator used to seal cells in the microwells. Each microwell contains an oxygen sensitive platinum phosphor sensor used to monitor the cellular metabolic rates. Custom automation software controls the digital image data collection for oxygen sensor measurements, which are analyzed using an image-processing program to yield the oxygen concentration within each microwell versus time. Two proof-of-concept experiments produced oxygen consumption rate measurements for A549 human epithelial lung cancer cells of 5.39 and 5.27 fmol/min/cell, closely matching published oxygen consumption rates for bulk A549 populations. PMID:21057593

  9. Automated quantification of budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel image cytometry method.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Daniel J; Kury, Alexandria L; Kuksin, Dmitry; Pirani, Alnoor; Flanagan, Kevin; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The measurements of concentration, viability, and budding percentages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are performed on a routine basis in the brewing and biofuel industries. Generation of these parameters is of great importance in a manufacturing setting, where they can aid in the estimation of product quality, quantity, and fermentation time of the manufacturing process. Specifically, budding percentages can be used to estimate the reproduction rate of yeast populations, which directly correlates with metabolism of polysaccharides and bioethanol production, and can be monitored to maximize production of bioethanol during fermentation. The traditional method involves manual counting using a hemacytometer, but this is time-consuming and prone to human error. In this study, we developed a novel automated method for the quantification of yeast budding percentages using Cellometer image cytometry. The automated method utilizes a dual-fluorescent nucleic acid dye to specifically stain live cells for imaging analysis of unique morphological characteristics of budding yeast. In addition, cell cycle analysis is performed as an alternative method for budding analysis. We were able to show comparable yeast budding percentages between manual and automated counting, as well as cell cycle analysis. The automated image cytometry method is used to analyze and characterize corn mash samples directly from fermenters during standard fermentation. Since concentration, viability, and budding percentages can be obtained simultaneously, the automated method can be integrated into the fermentation quality assurance protocol, which may improve the quality and efficiency of beer and bioethanol production processes.

  10. Automated Robust Image Segmentation: Level Set Method Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization with Application to Brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Dera, Dimah; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2016-07-01

    We address the problem of fully automated region discovery and robust image segmentation by devising a new deformable model based on the level set method (LSM) and the probabilistic nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We describe the use of NMF to calculate the number of distinct regions in the image and to derive the local distribution of the regions, which is incorporated into the energy functional of the LSM. The results demonstrate that our NMF-LSM method is superior to other approaches when applied to synthetic binary and gray-scale images and to clinical magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain with and without a malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme. In particular, the NMF-LSM method is fully automated, highly accurate, less sensitive to the initial selection of the contour(s) or initial conditions, more robust to noise and model parameters, and able to detect as small distinct regions as desired. These advantages stem from the fact that the proposed method relies on histogram information instead of intensity values and does not introduce nuisance model parameters. These properties provide a general approach for automated robust region discovery and segmentation in heterogeneous images. Compared with the retrospective radiological diagnoses of two patients with non-enhancing grade 2 and 3 oligodendroglioma, the NMF-LSM detects earlier progression times and appears suitable for monitoring tumor response. The NMF-LSM method fills an important need of automated segmentation of clinical MRI. PMID:27417984

  11. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  12. Long-term single cell analysis of S. pombe on a microfluidic microchemostat array.

    PubMed

    Nobs, Jean-Bernard; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2014-01-01

    Although Schyzosaccharomyces pombe is one of the principal model organisms for studying the cell cycle, surprisingly few methods have characterized S. pombe growth on the single cell level, and no methods exist capable of analyzing thousands of cells and tens of thousands of cell division events. We developed an automated microfluidic platform permitting S. pombe to be grown on-chip for several days under defined and changeable conditions. We developed an image processing pipeline to extract and quantitate several physiological parameters including cell length, time to division, and elongation rate without requiring synchronization of the culture. Over a period of 50 hours our platform analyzed over 100000 cell division events and reconstructed single cell lineages up to 10 generations in length. We characterized cell lengths and division times in a temperature shift experiment in which cells were initially grown at 30°C and transitioned to 25°C. Although cell length was identical at both temperatures at steady-state, we observed transient changes in cell length if the temperature shift took place during a critical phase of the cell cycle. We further show that cells born with normal length do divide over a wide range of cell lengths and that cell length appears to be controlled in the second generation, were large newly born cells have a tendency to divide more rapidly and thus at a normalized cell size. The platform is thus applicable to measure fine-details in cell cycle dynamics, should be a useful tool to decipher the molecular mechanism underlying size homeostasis, and will be generally applicable to study processes on the single cell level that require large numbers of precision measurements and single cell lineages.

  13. Automated Image Processing : An Efficient Pipeline Data-Flow Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreault, G.; Rivoire, A.; Jourlin, M.; Laboure, M. J.; Ramon, S.; Zeboudj, R.; Pinoli, J. C.

    1987-10-01

    In the context of Expert-Systems there is a pressing need of efficient Image Processing algorithms to fit the various applications. This paper presents a new electronic card that performs Image Acquisition, Processing and Display, with an IBM-PC/XT or AT as a host computer. This card features a Pipeline data flow architecture, an efficient and cost effective solution to most of the Image Processing problems.

  14. Automated thematic mapping and change detection of ERTS-1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramenopoulos, N. (Principal Investigator); Alpaugh, H.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ERTS-1 image was compared to aircraft photography and maps of an area near Brownsville, Texas. In the coastal region of Cameron County, natural and cultural detail were identified in the ERTS-1 image. In Hidalgo County, ground truth was located on the ERTS-1 image. Haze and 50% cloud cover over Hidalgo County reduced the usefulness of multispectral techniques for recognizing crops.

  15. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  16. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  17. Automated image mosaics by non-automated light microscopes: the MicroMos software tool.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, F; Bevilacqua, A; Lucarelli, E

    2013-12-01

    Light widefield microscopes and digital imaging are the basis for most of the analyses performed in every biological laboratory. In particular, the microscope's user is typically interested in acquiring high-detailed images for analysing observed cells and tissues, meanwhile being representative of a wide area to have reliable statistics. The microscopist has to choose between higher magnification factor and extension of the observed area, due to the finite size of the camera's field of view. To overcome the need of arrangement, mosaicing techniques have been developed in the past decades for increasing the camera's field of view by stitching together more images. Nevertheless, these approaches typically work in batch mode and rely on motorized microscopes. Or alternatively, the methods are conceived just to provide visually pleasant mosaics not suitable for quantitative analyses. This work presents a tool for building mosaics of images acquired with nonautomated light microscopes. The method proposed is based on visual information only and the mosaics are built by incrementally stitching couples of images, making the approach available also for online applications. Seams in the stitching regions as well as tonal inhomogeneities are corrected by compensating the vignetting effect. In the experiments performed, we tested different registration approaches, confirming that the translation model is not always the best, despite the fact that the motion of the sample holder of the microscope is apparently translational and typically considered as such. The method's implementation is freely distributed as an open source tool called MicroMos. Its usability makes building mosaics of microscope images at subpixel accuracy easier. Furthermore, optional parameters for building mosaics according to different strategies make MicroMos an easy and reliable tool to compare different registration approaches, warping models and tonal corrections.

  18. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O’Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods—Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets. PMID:27649496

  19. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods-Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets. PMID:27649496

  20. Automating Image Import for Google Sky using Virtual Observatory Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Jared H.; DuPlain, R.; Radziwill, N. M.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a prototype web service that brings the wealth of Virtual Observatory image data to the Google Sky desktop client. The web service, "KML Now!," presents the user with a simple web interface and requires no specialized knowledge of image conversion, coordinate system conversion, or Google Sky's KML metadata format. KML Now! makes use of Virtual Observatory Simple Image Access Services to acquire images based on user-input search coordinates. Once images are acquired, open source conversion software is used to generate Sky-compatible image and metadata files; the files are cached on the server for reuse. A "launcher" KML file pointing to all applicable server-side data is returned to the user, and when opened in Google Sky, all images are automatically placed within the desktop client. KML Now! can also operate directly on a user-specified image, without the need for Virtual Observatory interaction. A KML Now! query is coded in URL arguments, which allows it to be easily called from within Google Sky, a feature to be added in future developments. Funding for this project is provided by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and the National Virtual Observatory, both supported by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods-Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets.

  2. Submicron mass spectrometry imaging of single cells by combined use of mega electron volt time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning transmission ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Bogdanović Radović, Ivančica; Jakšić, Milko; Popović Hadžija, Marijana; Hadžija, Mirko

    2015-08-31

    In order to better understand biochemical processes inside an individual cell, it is important to measure the molecular composition at the submicron level. One of the promising mass spectrometry imaging techniques that may be used to accomplish this is Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using MeV energy heavy ions for excitation. MeV ions have the ability to desorb large intact molecules with a yield that is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional SIMS using keV ions. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the MeV TOF-SIMS system, we propose an independent TOF trigger using a STIM (scanning transmission ion microscopy) detector that is placed just behind the thin transmission target. This arrangement is suitable for biological samples in which the STIM detector simultaneously measures the mass distribution in scanned samples. The capability of the MeV TOF-SIMS setup was demonstrated by imaging the chemical composition of CaCo-2 cells.

  3. To the development of an automated system of assessment of radiological images of joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechikhin, A. I.; Grunina, E. A.; Karetnikova, I. R.

    2008-03-01

    An algorithm developed for the adaptive automated computer processing of radiological images of hands and feet in order to assess the degree of bone and cartilage destruction in rheumatoid arthritis is described. A set of new numeral signs was proposed in order to assess a degree of arthritis radiological progression.

  4. Fully automated 3D prostate central gland segmentation in MR images: a LOGISMOS based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Fotin, Sergei V.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2012-02-01

    One widely accepted classification of a prostate is by a central gland (CG) and a peripheral zone (PZ). In some clinical applications, separating CG and PZ from the whole prostate is useful. For instance, in prostate cancer detection, radiologist wants to know in which zone the cancer occurs. Another application is for multiparametric MR tissue characterization. In prostate T2 MR images, due to the high intensity variation between CG and PZ, automated differentiation of CG and PZ is difficult. Previously, we developed an automated prostate boundary segmentation system, which tested on large datasets and showed good performance. Using the results of the pre-segmented prostate boundary, in this paper, we proposed an automated CG segmentation algorithm based on Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation of Multiple Objects and Surfaces (LOGISMOS). The designed LOGISMOS model contained both shape and topology information during deformation. We generated graph cost by training classifiers and used coarse-to-fine search. The LOGISMOS framework guarantees optimal solution regarding to cost and shape constraint. A five-fold cross-validation approach was applied to training dataset containing 261 images to optimize the system performance and compare with a voxel classification based reference approach. After the best parameter settings were found, the system was tested on a dataset containing another 261 images. The mean DSC of 0.81 for the test set indicates that our approach is promising for automated CG segmentation. Running time for the system is about 15 seconds.

  5. Automated spatial drift correction for EFTEM image series.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Bernhard; Grogger, Werner; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2004-12-01

    Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) is a widely used technique in many areas of scientific research. Image contrast in energy-filtered images arises from specific scattering events such as the ionization of atoms. By combining a set of two or more images, relative sample thickness maps or elemental distribution maps can be easily created. It is also possible to acquire a whole series of energy-filtered images to do more complex data analysis. However, whenever several images are combined to extract certain information, problems are introduced due to sample drift between the exposures. In order to obtain artifact-free information, this spatial drift has to be taken care of. Manual alignment by overlaying and shifting the images to find the best overlap is usually very accurate but extremely time consuming for larger data sets. When large amounts of images are recorded in an EFTEM series, manual correction is no longer a reasonable option. Hence, automatic routines have been developed that are mostly based on the cross-correlation algorithm. Existing routines, however, sometimes fail and again make time consuming manual adjustments necessary. In this paper we describe a new approach to the drift correction problem by incorporating a statistical treatment of the data and we present our statistically determined spatial drift (SDSD) correction program. We show its improved performance by applying it to a typical EFTEM series data block. PMID:15556698

  6. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  7. Integration of image analysis and robotics into a fully automated colony picking and plate handling system.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Watson, A; Davies, M; Stubbings, S

    1992-01-01

    We describe here the integration of image analysis and robotics to produce a fully automated colony picking/plate handling system. Biological tests were performed to verify its performance in terms of sterilisation and accuracy of picking. The machine was then used by a single operative to pick a 36,000 clone cDNA library in approximately 42 hrs over 5 days. Images PMID:1408762

  8. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Klooster, R. van 't; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der; Klein, S.; Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  9. An image-processing program for automated counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, D.J.; Anderson, W.H.; Anthony, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    An image-processing program developed by the National Institute of Health, IMAGE, was modified in a cooperative project between remote sensing specialists at the Ohio State University Center for Mapping and scientists at the Alaska Science Center to facilitate estimating numbers of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) in flocks at Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The modified program, DUCK HUNT, runs on Apple computers. Modifications provide users with a pull down menu that optimizes image quality; identifies objects of interest (e.g., brant) by spectral, morphometric, and spatial parameters defined interactively by users; counts and labels objects of interest; and produces summary tables. Images from digitized photography, videography, and high- resolution digital photography have been used with this program to count various species of waterfowl.

  10. ASTRiDE: Automated Streak Detection for Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Won

    2016-05-01

    ASTRiDE detects streaks in astronomical images using a "border" of each object (i.e. "boundary-tracing" or "contour-tracing") and their morphological parameters. Fast moving objects such as meteors, satellites, near-Earth objects (NEOs), or even cosmic rays can leave streak-like traces in the images; ASTRiDE can detect not only long streaks but also relatively short or curved streaks.

  11. Automated reassembly of file fragmented images using greedy algorithms.

    PubMed

    Memon, Nasir; Pal, Anandabrata

    2006-02-01

    The problem of restoring deleted files from a scattered set of fragments arises often in digital forensics. File fragmentation is a regular occurrence in hard disks, memory cards, and other storage media. As a result, a forensic analyst examining a disk may encounter many fragments of deleted digital files, but is unable to determine the proper sequence of fragments to rebuild the files. In this paper, we investigate the specific case where digital images are heavily fragmented and there is no file table information by which a forensic analyst can ascertain the correct fragment order to reconstruct each image. The image reassembly problem is formulated as a k-vertex disjoint graph problem and reassembly is then done by finding an optimal ordering of fragments. We provide techniques for comparing fragments and describe several algorithms for image reconstruction based on greedy heuristics. Finally, we provide experimental results showing that images can be reconstructed with high accuracy even when there are thousands of fragments and multiple images involved.

  12. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mallard, François; Le Bourlot, Vincent; Tully, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia) to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms. PMID:23734199

  13. Monitoring UVR induced damage in single cells and isolated nuclei using SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and 3D confocal Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R; Heraud, Philip; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; McNaughton, Don; Tobin, Mark J; Vogel, Christian; Wood, Bayden R

    2014-09-01

    SR-FTIR in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to investigate macromolecular changes in a population of melanocytes and their extracted nuclei induced by environmentally relevant fluxes of UVR (Ultraviolet Radiation). Living cells and isolated cellular nuclei were investigated post-irradiation for three different irradiation dosages (130, 1505, 15,052 Jm(-2) UVR, weighted) after either 24 or 48 hours of incubation. DNA conformational changes were observed in cells exposed to an artificial UVR solar-simulator source as evidenced by a shift in the DNA asymmetric phosphodiester vibration from 1236 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) in the case of the exposed cells and from 1225 cm(-1) to 1242 cm(-1) for irradiated nuclei. PCA Scores plots revealed distinct clustering of spectra from irradiated cells and nuclei from non-irradiated controls in response to the range of applied UVR radiation doses. 3D Raman confocal imaging in combination with k-means cluster analysis was applied to study the effect of the UVR radiation exposure on cellular nuclei. Chemical changes associated with apoptosis were detected and included intra-nuclear lipid deposition along with chromatin condensation. The results reported here demonstrate the utility of SR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to probe in situ DNA damage in cell nuclei resulting from UVR exposure. These results are in agreement with the increasing body of evidence that lipid accumulation is a characteristic of aggressive cancer cells, and are involved in the production of membranes for rapid cell proliferation.

  14. Multispectral Image Road Extraction Based Upon Automated Map Conflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin

    Road network extraction from remotely sensed imagery enables many important and diverse applications such as vehicle tracking, drone navigation, and intelligent transportation studies. There are, however, a number of challenges to road detection from an image. Road pavement material, width, direction, and topology vary across a scene. Complete or partial occlusions caused by nearby buildings, trees, and the shadows cast by them, make maintaining road connectivity difficult. The problems posed by occlusions are exacerbated with the increasing use of oblique imagery from aerial and satellite platforms. Further, common objects such as rooftops and parking lots are made of materials similar or identical to road pavements. This problem of common materials is a classic case of a single land cover material existing for different land use scenarios. This work addresses these problems in road extraction from geo-referenced imagery by leveraging the OpenStreetMap digital road map to guide image-based road extraction. The crowd-sourced cartography has the advantages of worldwide coverage that is constantly updated. The derived road vectors follow only roads and so can serve to guide image-based road extraction with minimal confusion from occlusions and changes in road material. On the other hand, the vector road map has no information on road widths and misalignments between the vector map and the geo-referenced image are small but nonsystematic. Properly correcting misalignment between two geospatial datasets, also known as map conflation, is an essential step. A generic framework requiring minimal human intervention is described for multispectral image road extraction and automatic road map conflation. The approach relies on the road feature generation of a binary mask and a corresponding curvilinear image. A method for generating the binary road mask from the image by applying a spectral measure is presented. The spectral measure, called anisotropy-tunable distance (ATD

  15. Single Cell Chromatography, LDRD Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Bailey, C G

    2007-02-22

    A limitation in the mass spectrometry of biological materials is the reduced ion formation caused by sample complexity. We proposed to develop an enabling technology, single cell planar chromatography, which will greatly increase the amount of chemical information that can be obtained from single biological cells when using imaging mass spectrometry or other surface analysis methods. The sample preparation methods were developed for the time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometer (ToF-SIMS) at LLNL. This instrument has a measured zeptomole (10{sup -21} mole, 600 atoms) limit-of-detection for a molecule with a mass to charge ratio of 225[1]. Our goal was to use planar chromatographic separation to approach similar low limits of detection even with the chemically complex contents of a single cell. The process was proposed to reduce ion suppression and at the same time expose more of the cell contents to the ion beam. The method of work was to deposit biological cells on a silicon chip with suitable chromatographic and electrical properties, dissolve the cell with a droplet of solvent, allow the solvent to evaporate, and then allow the movement of cell contents laterally by immersing an edge of the chip in to a chromatographic solvent, that then moves through the chromatographic matrix allowing the components to interact with, and be separated by, the chromatographic substrate. This process is a miniaturized version of thin layer chromatography with detection by surface mass spectrometry.

  16. Automated, Computerized, Feature-Based Phenotype Analysis of Slit Lamp Images of the Mouse Lens

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Jenny; Li, Yi; Shapiro, Linda G.; Clark, John I.; Arnett, Ernest; Sage, E. Helene; Brinkley, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of a variety of transgenic mouse models for lens development can create substantial challenges in database management and analysis. We report a novel, automated, feature-based informatics approach to screening lens phenotypes in a large database of slit lamp images. Digital slit lamp images of normal and abnormal lenses in eyes of wild type (wt), SC1 null and SPARC null transgenic mice were recorded for quantitative evaluation of their structural phenotype. The images were processed to improve the contrast of structural features that corresponded to rings of opacity and fluctuations in scattering intensity in the lenses. Measurable attributes were assigned to the features in the lens images and given as an output vector of 46 dimensions. Characteristic patterns correlated with the structural phenotype of each mutant and wt lens and a statistical fit for each phenotype was defined. The genotype was identified correctly in nearly 85% of the slit lamp images on the basis of an automated computer analysis of the lens structural phenotype. The automated computer algorithm has the potential to evaluate a large database of slit lamp images and distinguish mouse genotypes on the basis of lens phenotypes objectively using a neural network analysis of the structural features observed in the slit lamp images. The neural network approach is a promising technology for objective evaluation of genotype/phenotype relationships based on structural features and light scattering in lenses. Further improvements in the automated method can be expected to simplify and increase the accuracy and efficiency of the feature based analysis of structural phenotypes linked to genetic variation. PMID:18304532

  17. Automated analysis of image mammogram for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhasanah, Sampurno, Joko; Faryuni, Irfana Diah; Ivansyah, Okto

    2016-03-01

    Medical imaging help doctors in diagnosing and detecting diseases that attack the inside of the body without surgery. Mammogram image is a medical image of the inner breast imaging. Diagnosis of breast cancer needs to be done in detail and as soon as possible for determination of next medical treatment. The aim of this work is to increase the objectivity of clinical diagnostic by using fractal analysis. This study applies fractal method based on 2D Fourier analysis to determine the density of normal and abnormal and applying the segmentation technique based on K-Means clustering algorithm to image abnormal for determine the boundary of the organ and calculate the area of organ segmentation results. The results show fractal method based on 2D Fourier analysis can be used to distinguish between the normal and abnormal breast and segmentation techniques with K-Means Clustering algorithm is able to generate the boundaries of normal and abnormal tissue organs, so area of the abnormal tissue can be determined.

  18. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  19. Kinetics and comparison of δ-aminolevulinic-acid-induced endogenous protoporphyrin-IX in single cell by steady state and multiphoton fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic Therapy has emerged as a new modality in the treatment of various nonmalignant and malignant diseases. It involves the systemic administration of tumor specific photo-sensitizers with the subsequent application of visible light. This combination causes the generation of cytotoxic species, which damage sensitive targets, producing cell injury and tumor destruction. Although, photofrin is the only photosensitizer currently approved for PDT and tumor detection, its concomitant cutaneous photosensitization poses a significant problem. Hence, δ-aminoleuvulinic acid (δ-ALA) a precursor for the endogenous production of Protoporphyrin IX, through heme biosynthesis pathway, has gained significant importance in the Photodynamic Therapy. Though δ-ALA is present naturally in the cells, exogenous δ-ALA helps to synthesis more of PpIX in the tumor cells, as the fast growing tumor cells take up the administered δ-ALA more than the normal cells. Based on these facts, many invasive studies have been reported on the kinetics of δ-ALA at cellular level by chemical extraction of PpIX from the cells. In the present study we have studied the kinetics of δ-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence from Hela cells by perchloric/Methanol extraction method. However, the amount of PpIX synthesized in the cells at different point of incubation time by noninvasive methods has not been reported. Hence we have also used a noninvasive technique of measuring the kinetics δ-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence from Hela, an epithelial cell derived from human cervical cancer by both single photon (steady state) and multi photon excitation. From the studies it is observed that the δ-ALA induced PpIX is more at 2 hours incubation time for 2 mM of δ-ALA concentration. Further, it is observed that with steady state fluorescence imaging method, the excitation light itself cause the Photodynamic damage, due to the prolonged exposure of the cells than in multi photon excitation, leading to the rounding

  20. System and method for automated object detection in an image

    DOEpatents

    Kenyon, Garrett T.; Brumby, Steven P.; George, John S.; Paiton, Dylan M.; Schultz, Peter F.

    2015-10-06

    A contour/shape detection model may use relatively simple and efficient kernels to detect target edges in an object within an image or video. A co-occurrence probability may be calculated for two or more edge features in an image or video using an object definition. Edge features may be differentiated between in response to measured contextual support, and prominent edge features may be extracted based on the measured contextual support. The object may then be identified based on the extracted prominent edge features.

  1. Automated detection of meteors in observed image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimberová, Stanislava; Suk, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new detection technique based on statistical characteristics of images in the video sequence. These characteristics displayed in time enable to catch any bright track during the whole sequence. We applied our method to the image datacubes that are created from camera pictures of the night sky. Meteor flying through the Earth's atmosphere leaves a light trail lasting a few seconds on the sky background. We developed a special technique to recognize this event automatically in the complete observed video sequence. For further analysis leading to the precise recognition of object we suggest to apply Fourier and Hough transformations.

  2. Automated parasite faecal egg counting using fluorescence labelling, smartphone image capture and computational image analysis.

    PubMed

    Slusarewicz, Paul; Pagano, Stefanie; Mills, Christopher; Popa, Gabriel; Chow, K Martin; Mendenhall, Michael; Rodgers, David W; Nielsen, Martin K

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal parasites are a concern in veterinary medicine worldwide and for human health in the developing world. Infections are identified by microscopic visualisation of parasite eggs in faeces, which is time-consuming, requires technical expertise and is impractical for use on-site. For these reasons, recommendations for parasite surveillance are not widely adopted and parasite control is based on administration of rote prophylactic treatments with anthelmintic drugs. This approach is known to promote anthelmintic resistance, so there is a pronounced need for a convenient egg counting assay to promote good clinical practice. Using a fluorescent chitin-binding protein, we show that this structural carbohydrate is present and accessible in shells of ova of strongyle, ascarid, trichurid and coccidian parasites. Furthermore, we show that a cellular smartphone can be used as an inexpensive device to image fluorescent eggs and, by harnessing the computational power of the phone, to perform image analysis to count the eggs. Strongyle egg counts generated by the smartphone system had a significant linear correlation with manual McMaster counts (R(2)=0.98), but with a significantly lower coefficient of variation (P=0.0177). Furthermore, the system was capable of differentiating equine strongyle and ascarid eggs similar to the McMaster method, but with significantly lower coefficients of variation (P<0.0001). This demonstrates the feasibility of a simple, automated on-site test to detect and/or enumerate parasite eggs in mammalian faeces without the need for a laboratory microscope, and highlights the potential of smartphones as relatively sophisticated, inexpensive and portable medical diagnostic devices. PMID:27025771

  3. Automated cell colony counting and analysis using the circular Hough image transform algorithm (CHiTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewes, J. M.; Suchowerska, N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    We present an automated cell colony counting method that is flexible, robust and capable of providing more in-depth clonogenic analysis than existing manual and automated approaches. The full form of the Hough transform without approximation has been implemented, for the first time. Improvements in computing speed have facilitated this approach. Colony identification was achieved by pre-processing the raw images of the colonies in situ in the flask, including images of the flask edges, by erosion, dilation and Gaussian smoothing processes. Colony edges were then identified by intensity gradient field discrimination. Our technique eliminates the need for specialized hardware for image capture and enables the use of a standard desktop scanner for distortion-free image acquisition. Additional parameters evaluated included regional colony counts, average colony area, nearest neighbour distances and radial distribution. This spatial and qualitative information extends the utility of the clonogenic assay, allowing analysis of spatially-variant cytotoxic effects. To test the automated system, two flask types and three cell lines with different morphology, cell size and plating density were examined. A novel Monte Carlo method of simulating cell colony images, as well as manual counting, were used to quantify algorithm accuracy. The method was able to identify colonies with unusual morphology, to successfully resolve merged colonies and to correctly count colonies adjacent to flask edges.

  4. Automated segmentation of the melanocytes in skin histopathological images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Mahmood, Muhammad; Jha, Naresh; Mandal, Mrinal

    2013-03-01

    In the diagnosis of skin melanoma by analyzing histopathological images, the detection of the melanocytes in the epidermis area is an important step. However, the detection of melanocytes in the epidermis area is dicult because other keratinocytes that are very similar to the melanocytes are also present. This paper proposes a novel computer-aided technique for segmentation of the melanocytes in the skin histopathological images. In order to reduce the local intensity variant, a mean-shift algorithm is applied for the initial segmentation of the image. A local region recursive segmentation algorithm is then proposed to filter out the candidate nuclei regions based on the domain prior knowledge. To distinguish the melanocytes from other keratinocytes in the epidermis area, a novel descriptor, named local double ellipse descriptor (LDED), is proposed to measure the local features of the candidate regions. The LDED uses two parameters: region ellipticity and local pattern characteristics to distinguish the melanocytes from the candidate nuclei regions. Experimental results on 28 dierent histopathological images of skin tissue with dierent zooming factors show that the proposed technique provides a superior performance.

  5. Automated Bulk Uploading of Images and Metadata to Flickr

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Jason Paul; Tzoc, Elias

    2010-01-01

    The Digital Initiatives department at Miami University, like most digital initiatives and special collections departments, has a large number of rich digital image collections, stored primarily in a third-party database. Typically, these databases are not findable to the average Web user. From a desire to expose these collections to the wider Web…

  6. Automated design of image operators that detect interest points.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Olague, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    This work describes how evolutionary computation can be used to synthesize low-level image operators that detect interesting points on digital images. Interest point detection is an essential part of many modern computer vision systems that solve tasks such as object recognition, stereo correspondence, and image indexing, to name but a few. The design of the specialized operators is posed as an optimization/search problem that is solved with genetic programming (GP), a strategy still mostly unexplored by the computer vision community. The proposed approach automatically synthesizes operators that are competitive with state-of-the-art designs, taking into account an operator's geometric stability and the global separability of detected points during fitness evaluation. The GP search space is defined using simple primitive operations that are commonly found in point detectors proposed by the vision community. The experiments described in this paper extend previous results (Trujillo and Olague, 2006a,b) by presenting 15 new operators that were synthesized through the GP-based search. Some of the synthesized operators can be regarded as improved manmade designs because they employ well-known image processing techniques and achieve highly competitive performance. On the other hand, since the GP search also generates what can be considered as unconventional operators for point detection, these results provide a new perspective to feature extraction research.

  7. Automated identification of retained surgical items in radiological images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, Gady; Gan, Lin; Moric, Mario; Gluncic, Vicko

    2015-03-01

    Retained surgical items (RSIs) in patients is a major operating room (OR) patient safety concern. An RSI is any surgical tool, sponge, needle or other item inadvertently left in a patients body during the course of surgery. If left undetected, RSIs may lead to serious negative health consequences such as sepsis, internal bleeding, and even death. To help physicians efficiently and effectively detect RSIs, we are developing computer-aided detection (CADe) software for X-ray (XR) image analysis, utilizing large amounts of currently available image data to produce a clinically effective RSI detection system. Physician analysis of XRs for the purpose of RSI detection is a relatively lengthy process that may take up to 45 minutes to complete. It is also error prone due to the relatively low acuity of the human eye for RSIs in XR images. The system we are developing is based on computer vision and machine learning algorithms. We address the problem of low incidence by proposing synthesis algorithms. The CADe software we are developing may be integrated into a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), be implemented as a stand-alone software application, or be integrated into portable XR machine software through application programming interfaces. Preliminary experimental results on actual XR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Automated design of image operators that detect interest points.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Olague, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    This work describes how evolutionary computation can be used to synthesize low-level image operators that detect interesting points on digital images. Interest point detection is an essential part of many modern computer vision systems that solve tasks such as object recognition, stereo correspondence, and image indexing, to name but a few. The design of the specialized operators is posed as an optimization/search problem that is solved with genetic programming (GP), a strategy still mostly unexplored by the computer vision community. The proposed approach automatically synthesizes operators that are competitive with state-of-the-art designs, taking into account an operator's geometric stability and the global separability of detected points during fitness evaluation. The GP search space is defined using simple primitive operations that are commonly found in point detectors proposed by the vision community. The experiments described in this paper extend previous results (Trujillo and Olague, 2006a,b) by presenting 15 new operators that were synthesized through the GP-based search. Some of the synthesized operators can be regarded as improved manmade designs because they employ well-known image processing techniques and achieve highly competitive performance. On the other hand, since the GP search also generates what can be considered as unconventional operators for point detection, these results provide a new perspective to feature extraction research. PMID:19053496

  9. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  10. Automated Drusen Segmentation and Quantification in SD-OCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Leng, Theodore; Zheng, Luoluo; Kutzscher, Lauren; Ma, Jeffrey; de Sisternes, Luis; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a useful tool for the visualization of drusen, a retinal abnormality seen in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, objective assessment of drusen is thwarted by the lack of a method to robustly quantify these lesions on serial OCT images. Here, we describe an automatic drusen segmentation method for SD-OCT retinal images, which leverages a priori knowledge of normal retinal morphology and anatomical features. The highly reflective and locally connected pixels located below the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) are used to generate a segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer. The observed and expected contours of the RPE layer are obtained by interpolating and fitting the shape of the segmented RPE layer, respectively. The areas located between the interpolated and fitted RPE shapes (which have nonzero area when drusen occurs) are marked as drusen. To enhance drusen quantification, we also developed a novel method of retinal projection to generate an en face retinal image based on the RPE extraction, which improves the quality of drusen visualization over the current approach to producing retinal projections from SD-OCT images based on a summed-voxel projection (SVP), and it provides a means of obtaining quantitative features of drusen in the en face projection. Visualization of the segmented drusen is refined through several post-processing steps, drusen detection to eliminate false positive detections on consecutive slices, drusen refinement on a projection view of drusen, and drusen smoothing. Experimental evaluation results demonstrate that our method is effective for drusen segmentation. In a preliminary analysis of the potential clinical utility of our methods, quantitative drusen measurements, such as area and volume, can be correlated with the drusen progression in non-exudative AMD, suggesting that our approach may produce useful quantitative imaging biomarkers

  11. An Imaging System for Automated Characteristic Length Measurement of Debrisat Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moraguez, Mathew; Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, Marlon; Cowardin, Heather; Opiela, John; Krisko, Paula H.

    2015-01-01

    The debris fragments generated by DebriSat's hypervelocity impact test are currently being processed and characterized through an effort of NASA and USAF. The debris characteristics will be used to update satellite breakup models. In particular, the physical dimensions of the debris fragments must be measured to provide characteristic lengths for use in these models. Calipers and commercial 3D scanners were considered as measurement options, but an automated imaging system was ultimately developed to measure debris fragments. By automating the entire process, the measurement results are made repeatable and the human factor associated with calipers and 3D scanning is eliminated. Unlike using calipers to measure, the imaging system obtains non-contact measurements to avoid damaging delicate fragments. Furthermore, this fully automated measurement system minimizes fragment handling, which reduces the potential for fragment damage during the characterization process. In addition, the imaging system reduces the time required to determine the characteristic length of the debris fragment. In this way, the imaging system can measure the tens of thousands of DebriSat fragments at a rate of about six minutes per fragment, compared to hours per fragment in NASA's current 3D scanning measurement approach. The imaging system utilizes a space carving algorithm to generate a 3D point cloud of the article being measured and a custom developed algorithm then extracts the characteristic length from the point cloud. This paper describes the measurement process, results, challenges, and future work of the imaging system used for automated characteristic length measurement of DebriSat fragments.

  12. Automated Segmentation and Object Classification of CT Images: Application to In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Avian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jana; Zimmermann, Johannes; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although chick embryogenesis has been studied extensively, there has been growing interest in the investigation of skeletogenesis. In addition to improved poultry health and minimized economic loss, a greater understanding of skeletal abnormalities can also have implications for human medicine. True in vivo studies require noninvasive imaging techniques such as high-resolution microCT. However, the manual analysis of acquired images is both time consuming and subjective. Methods. We have developed a system for automated image segmentation that entails object-based image analysis followed by the classification of the extracted image objects. For image segmentation, a rule set was developed using Definiens image analysis software. The classification engine was implemented using the WEKA machine learning tool. Results. Our system reduces analysis time and observer bias while maintaining high accuracy. Applying the system to the quantification of long bone growth has allowed us to present the first true in ovo data for bone length growth recorded in the same chick embryos. Conclusions. The procedures developed represent an innovative approach for the automated segmentation, classification, quantification, and visualization of microCT images. MicroCT offers the possibility of performing longitudinal studies and thereby provides unique insights into the morpho- and embryogenesis of live chick embryos. PMID:23997760

  13. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, E; Fast, M F; Oelfke, U; Nill, S

    2015-06-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76 ± 6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images.

  14. Automated Dermoscopy Image Analysis of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Alfonso; Quartulli, Marco; Murace, Raffaele; Dragonetti, Emanuele; Manganaro, Mario; Guerra, Oscar; Bizzi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy, epiluminescence microscopy) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique for the in vivo observation of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs), allowing a better visualization of surface and subsurface structures (from the epidermis to the papillary dermis). This diagnostic tool permits the recognition of morphologic structures not visible by the naked eye, thus opening a new dimension in the analysis of the clinical morphologic features of PSLs. In order to reduce the learning-curve of non-expert clinicians and to mitigate problems inherent in the reliability and reproducibility of the diagnostic criteria used in pattern analysis, several indicative methods based on diagnostic algorithms have been introduced in the last few years. Recently, numerous systems designed to provide computer-aided analysis of digital images obtained by dermoscopy have been reported in the literature. The goal of this article is to review these systems, focusing on the most recent approaches based on content-based image retrieval systems (CBIR). PMID:24281070

  15. Automated 3D whole-breast ultrasound imaging: results of a clinical pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leproux, Anaïs; van Beek, Michiel; de Vries, Ute; Wasser, Martin; Bakker, Leon; Cuisenaire, Olivier; van der Mark, Martin; Entrekin, Rob

    2010-03-01

    We present the first clinical results of a novel fully automated 3D breast ultrasound system. This system was designed to match a Philips diffuse optical mammography system to enable straightforward coregistration of optical and ultrasound images. During a measurement, three 3D transducers scan the breast at 4 different views. The resulting 12 datasets are registered together into a single volume using spatial compounding. In a pilot study, benign and malignant masses could be identified in the 3D images, however lesion visibility is less compared to conventional breast ultrasound. Clear breast shape visualization suggests that ultrasound could support the reconstruction and interpretation of diffuse optical tomography images.

  16. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  17. Toward omnidirectional and automated imaging system for measuring oceanic whitecap coverage.

    PubMed

    Al-Lashi, Raied S

    2016-08-01

    Accurate measurements of oceanic whitecap coverage from whitecap images are required for better understanding air-gas transfer and aerosol production processes. However, this is a challenging task because whitecap patches are formed immediately after a wave breaks and are spread over a wide area. The main challenges in designing whitecaps imaging instrument are the small field of view of the camera lens, processing huge numbers of images, recording data over long time periods, and deployment difficulties in stormy conditions. This paper describes the hardware design of a novel high-resolution optical instrument for imaging oceanic whitecaps and the automated algorithm processing the collected images. The instrument was successfully deployed in 2013 as part of the HiWINGS campaign in the North Atlantic Ocean. The instrument uses a fish-eye camera lens to image the whitecaps in a wide angle of view (180°). PMID:27505657

  18. Automation of disbond detection in aircraft fuselage through thermal image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for interpreting thermal images obtained during the nondestructive evaluation of aircraft bonded joints is presented. The procedure operates on time-derivative thermal images and resulted in a disbond image with disbonds highlighted. The size of the 'black clusters' in the output disbond image is a quantitative measure of disbond size. The procedure is illustrated using simulation data as well as data obtained through experimental testing of fabricated samples and aircraft panels. Good results are obtained, and, except in pathological cases, 'false calls' in the cases studied appeared only as noise in the output disbond image which was easily filtered out. The thermal detection technique coupled with an automated image interpretation capability will be a very fast and effective method for inspecting bonded joints in an aircraft structure.

  19. Automated Cell Detection and Morphometry on Growth Plate Images of Mouse Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Du, Xia; Harding, James I; Beylerian, Emily N; de Silva, Brian M; Gross, Ben J; Kastein, Hannah K; Wang, Weiguang; Lyons, Karen M; Schaeffer, Hayden

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy imaging of mouse growth plates is extensively used in biology to understand the effect of specific molecules on various stages of normal bone development and on bone disease. Until now, such image analysis has been conducted by manual detection. In fact, when existing automated detection techniques were applied, morphological variations across the growth plate and heterogeneity of image background color, including the faint presence of cells (chondrocytes) located deeper in tissue away from the image’s plane of focus, and lack of cell-specific features, interfered with identification of cell. We propose the first method of automated detection and morphometry applicable to images of cells in the growth plate of long bone. Through ad hoc sequential application of the Retinex method, anisotropic diffusion and thresholding, our new cell detection algorithm (CDA) addresses these challenges on bright-field microscopy images of mouse growth plates. Five parameters, chosen by the user in respect of image characteristics, regulate our CDA. Our results demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed numerical method relative to manual methods. Our CDA confirms previously established results regarding chondrocytes’ number, area, orientation, height and shape of normal growth plates. Our CDA also confirms differences previously found between the genetic mutated mouse Smad1/5CKO and its control mouse on fluorescence images. The CDA aims to aid biomedical research by increasing efficiency and consistency of data collection regarding arrangement and characteristics of chondrocytes. Our results suggest that automated extraction of data from microscopy imaging of growth plates can assist in unlocking information on normal and pathological development, key to the underlying biological mechanisms of bone growth. PMID:25525552

  20. Automated tissue characterization of in vivo atherosclerotic plaques by intravascular optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Ughi, Giovanni Jacopo; Adriaenssens, Tom; Sinnaeve, Peter; Desmet, Walter; D’hooge, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for the in vivo investigation of coronary artery disease. While IVOCT visualizes atherosclerotic plaques with a resolution <20µm, image analysis in terms of tissue composition is currently performed by a time-consuming manual procedure based on the qualitative interpretation of image features. We illustrate an algorithm for the automated and systematic characterization of IVOCT atherosclerotic tissue. The proposed method consists in a supervised classification of image pixels according to textural features combined with the estimated value of the optical attenuation coefficient. IVOCT images of 64 plaques, from 49 in vivo IVOCT data sets, constituted the algorithm’s training and testing data sets. Validation was obtained by comparing automated analysis results to the manual assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. An overall pixel-wise accuracy of 81.5% with a classification feasibility of 76.5% and per-class accuracy of 89.5%, 72.1% and 79.5% for fibrotic, calcified and lipid-rich tissue respectively, was found. Moreover, measured optical properties were in agreement with previous results reported in literature. As such, an algorithm for automated tissue characterization was developed and validated using in vivo human data, suggesting that it can be applied to clinical IVOCT data. This might be an important step towards the integration of IVOCT in cardiovascular research and routine clinical practice. PMID:23847728

  1. Development of automated image co-registration techniques: Part II - multisensor imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, T.F.; Andrews, A.K.; Perry, E.M.; Whyatt, M.V.; Steinmaus, K.L.

    1996-10-01

    This is the second in a series of PNNL Multispectral Imagery (ST474D) reports on automated co-registration and rectification of multisensor imagery. In the first report, a semi-automated registration procedure was introduced based on methods proposed by Chen and Lee which emphasized registration of same sensor imagery. The Chen and Lee approach is outlined in Figure 1, and is described in detail in the first report. PNNL made several enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach; these modifications are outlined in Figure 2 and are also described in detail in the first report. The PNNL enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach introduced in the first phase have been named Multisensor Image Registration Automation (MIRA). These improvements increased computational efficiency and offered additional algorithms for coarse matching of disparate image types. In the MIRA approach, one set of optimum GCP locations are determined based on a Delaunay triangulation technique using an initial set of GCPs provided by the user, rather than repeating this step for each added control point as is proposed by Chen and Lee. The Chen and Lee approach uses an adjacent pixel difference algorithm for coarse matching patches of the reference image with the source image, while the MIRA approach adds other algorithms. Also the MIRA approach checks to determine if the a newly determined GCP fits the existing warping equation.

  2. Imaging System for the Automated Determination of Microscopical Properties in Hardened Portland Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Cave, S.P.; Linder, K.E.

    2000-03-08

    During this CRADA, Honeywell FM and T and MoDOT personnel designed a unique scanning system (including both hardware and software) that can be used to perform an automated scan and evaluation of a concrete sample. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) Develop a combined system integration, image acquisition, and image analysis approach to mimic the manual scanning and evaluation process. Produce a prototype system which can: (a) automate the scanning process to improve its speed and efficiency; (b) reduce operator fatigue; and (c) improve the consistency of the evaluation process. (2) Capture and preserve the baseline knowledge used by the MoDOT experts in performing the evaluation process. At the present time, the evaluation expertise resides in two MoDOT personnel. Automation of the evaluation process will allow that knowledge to be captured, preserved, and used for training purposes. (3) Develop an approach for the image analysis which is flexible and extensible in order to accommodate the inevitable pathologies that arise in the evaluation process. Such pathologies include features such as cracks and fissures, voids filled with paste or debris, and multiple, overlapping voids. FM and T personnel used image processing, pattern recognition, and system integration skills developed for other Department of Energy applications to develop and test a prototype of an automated scanning system for concrete evaluation. MoDOT personnel provided all the basic hardware (microscope, camera, computer-controlled stage, etc.) for the prototype, supported FM and T in the acquisition of image data for software development, and provided their critical expert knowledge of the process of concrete evaluation. This combination of expertise was vital to the successful development of the prototype system.

  3. Automated diagnosis of Age-related Macular Degeneration using greyscale features from digital fundus images.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel E W; Chandran, Vinod; Chua, Chua Kuang; Tan, Jen Hong; Lim, Choo Min; Ng, E Y K; Noronha, Kevin; Tong, Louis; Laude, Augustinus

    2014-10-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of vision loss and blindness in ageing population. Currently, there is no cure for AMD, however early detection and subsequent treatment may prevent the severe vision loss or slow the progression of the disease. AMD can be classified into two types: dry and wet AMDs. The people with macular degeneration are mostly affected by dry AMD. Early symptoms of AMD are formation of drusen and yellow pigmentation. These lesions are identified by manual inspection of fundus images by the ophthalmologists. It is a time consuming, tiresome process, and hence an automated diagnosis of AMD screening tool can aid clinicians in their diagnosis significantly. This study proposes an automated dry AMD detection system using various entropies (Shannon, Kapur, Renyi and Yager), Higher Order Spectra (HOS) bispectra features, Fractional Dimension (FD), and Gabor wavelet features extracted from greyscale fundus images. The features are ranked using t-test, Kullback-Lieber Divergence (KLD), Chernoff Bound and Bhattacharyya Distance (CBBD), Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve-based and Wilcoxon ranking methods in order to select optimum features and classified into normal and AMD classes using Naive Bayes (NB), k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), Decision Tree (DT) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using private (Kasturba Medical Hospital, Manipal, India), Automated Retinal Image Analysis (ARIA) and STructured Analysis of the Retina (STARE) datasets. The proposed system yielded the highest average classification accuracies of 90.19%, 95.07% and 95% with 42, 54 and 38 optimal ranked features using SVM classifier for private, ARIA and STARE datasets respectively. This automated AMD detection system can be used for mass fundus image screening and aid clinicians by making better use of their expertise on selected images that

  4. An automated system for numerically rating document image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, M.; Kelly, P.; Iyengar, S.S.; Brener, N.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy document declassification program, the authors have developed a numerical rating system to predict the OCR error rate that they expect to encounter when processing a particular document. The rating algorithm produces a vector containing scores for different document image attributes such as speckle and touching characters. The OCR error rate for a document is computed from a weighted sum of the elements of the corresponding quality vector. The predicted OCR error rate will be used to screen documents that would not be handled properly with existing document processing products.

  5. Automation of image data processing. (Polish Title: Automatyzacja proces u przetwarzania danych obrazowych)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, R.

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the current capabilities of automate processing of the image data on the example of using PhotoScan software by Agisoft. At present, image data obtained by various registration systems (metric and non - metric cameras) placed on airplanes, satellites, or more often on UAVs is used to create photogrammetric products. Multiple registrations of object or land area (large groups of photos are captured) are usually performed in order to eliminate obscured area as well as to raise the final accuracy of the photogrammetric product. Because of such a situation t he geometry of the resulting image blocks is far from the typical configuration of images. For fast images georeferencing automatic image matching algorithms are currently applied. They can create a model of a block in the local coordinate system or using initial exterior orientation and measured control points can provide image georeference in an external reference frame. In the case of non - metric image application, it is also possible to carry out self - calibration process at this stage. Image matching algorithm is also used in generation of dense point clouds reconstructing spatial shape of the object (area). In subsequent processing steps it is possible to obtain typical photogrammetric products such as orthomosaic, DSM or DTM and a photorealistic solid model of an object . All aforementioned processing steps are implemented in a single program in contrary to standard commercial software dividing all steps into dedicated modules. Image processing leading to final geo referenced products can be fully automated including sequential implementation of the processing steps at predetermined control parameters. The paper presents the practical results of the application fully automatic generation of othomosaic for both images obtained by a metric Vexell camera and a block of images acquired by a non - metric UAV system

  6. A Semi-Automated Single Day Image Differencing Technique to Identify Animals in Aerial Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Terletzky, Pat; Ramsey, Robert Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Our research presents a proof-of-concept that explores a new and innovative method to identify large animals in aerial imagery with single day image differencing. We acquired two aerial images of eight fenced pastures and conducted a principal component analysis of each image. We then subtracted the first principal component of the two pasture images followed by heuristic thresholding to generate polygons. The number of polygons represented the number of potential cattle (Bos taurus) and horses (Equus caballus) in the pasture. The process was considered semi-automated because we were not able to automate the identification of spatial or spectral thresholding values. Imagery was acquired concurrently with ground counts of animal numbers. Across the eight pastures, 82% of the animals were correctly identified, mean percent commission was 53%, and mean percent omission was 18%. The high commission error was due to small mis-alignments generated from image-to-image registration, misidentified shadows, and grouping behavior of animals. The high probability of correctly identifying animals suggests short time interval image differencing could provide a new technique to enumerate wild ungulates occupying grassland ecosystems, especially in isolated or difficult to access areas. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to use standard change detection techniques to identify and enumerate large ungulates. PMID:24454827

  7. Semi-automated measurement of motility of human subgingival microflora by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, M; Tamagawa, H; Hayashi, N; Hanioka, T; Shizukuishi, S

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to quantitatively estimate bacterial motility by image analysis, and to apply this method for the measurement of motility of human subgingival microflora. We developed a semi-automated method for the quantification of bacterial motility using video microscopy, digitization and image processing. Moving images of both authentic bacterial samples and clinical samples were recorded using a phase contrast microscope with a high speed (1/100 s) shutter camera. The motility was evaluated by measuring the total number of pixels remaining after the subtraction of 2 serial video images. The total number of pixels was significantly correlated with both the sum of the velocity of each bacterial cell and the number of motile bacteria on the same original images. Motility of subgingival microflora from 140 clinical samples tested was measured at 0 pixels to 3600 pixels, whereas the effect of Brownian movement was less than 150 pixels. The motility of subgingival microflora estimated with this image analysis system did not differ much from objective judgments by the naked eyes of experts. These results suggest that a semi-automated image analysis system may be useful in the evaluation of the motility of human subgingival microflora.

  8. Automated Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Semiautomated Image Processing for Analysis of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Martin; Hausner, Martina; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim; Wagner, Michael; Wilderer, Peter A.; Wuertz, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a quantitative optical method suitable for routine measurements of biofilm structures under in situ conditions. A computer program was designed to perform automated investigations of biofilms by using image acquisition and image analysis techniques. To obtain a representative profile of a growing biofilm, a nondestructive procedure was created to study and quantify undisturbed microbial populations within the physical environment of a glass flow cell. Key components of the computer-controlled processing described in this paper are the on-line collection of confocal two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images from a preset 3D domain of interest followed by the off-line analysis of these 2D images. With the quantitative extraction of information contained in each image, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the principal biological events can be achieved. The program is convenient to handle and was generated to determine biovolumes and thus facilitate the examination of dynamic processes within biofilms. In the present study, Pseudomonas fluorescens or a green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli strain, EC12, was inoculated into glass flow cells and the respective monoculture biofilms were analyzed in three dimensions. In this paper we describe a method for the routine measurements of biofilms by using automated image acquisition and semiautomated image analysis. PMID:9797255

  9. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Flaberg, Emilie; Sabelström, Per; Strandh, Christer; Szekely, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Methods Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). Results We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. Conclusion The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes. PMID:18627634

  10. Towards A Fully Automated High-Throughput Phototransfection System

    PubMed Central

    Cappelleri, David J.; Halasz, Adam; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Tae Kyung; Eberwine, James; Kumar, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a framework for creating a fully automated high-throughput phototransfection system. Integrated image processing, laser target position calculation, and stage movements show a throughput increase of > 23X over the current manual phototransfection method while the potential for even greater throughput improvements (> 110X) is described. A software tool for automated off-line single cell morphological measurements, as well as real-time image segmentation analysis, has also been constructed and shown to be able quantify changes in the cell before and after the process, successfully characterizing them, using metrics such as cell perimeter, area, major and minor axis length, and eccentricity values. PMID:20706617

  11. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images.

  12. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  13. Automated Tumor Volumetry Using Computer-Aided Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, Michel; Sadaghiani, Mohammed Salehi; Akbari, Hamed; Atthiah, Mark A.; Ali, Zarina S.; Da, Xiao; Zhan, Yiqang; O'Rourke, Donald; Grady, Sean M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accurate segmentation of brain tumors, and quantification of tumor volume, is important for diagnosis, monitoring, and planning therapeutic intervention. Manual segmentation is not widely used because of time constraints. Previous efforts have mainly produced methods that are tailored to a particular type of tumor or acquisition protocol and have mostly failed to produce a method that functions on different tumor types and is robust to changes in scanning parameters, resolution, and image quality, thereby limiting their clinical value. Herein, we present a semiautomatic method for tumor segmentation that is fast, accurate, and robust to a wide variation in image quality and resolution. Materials and Methods A semiautomatic segmentation method based on the geodesic distance transform was developed and validated by using it to segment 54 brain tumors. Glioblastomas, meningiomas, and brain metastases were segmented. Qualitative validation was based on physician ratings provided by three clinical experts. Quantitative validation was based on comparing semiautomatic and manual segmentations. Results Tumor segmentations obtained using manual and automatic methods were compared quantitatively using the Dice measure of overlap. Subjective evaluation was performed by having human experts rate the computerized segmentations on a 0–5 rating scale where 5 indicated perfect segmentation. Conclusions The proposed method addresses a significant, unmet need in the field of neuro-oncology. Specifically, this method enables clinicians to obtain accurate and reproducible tumor volumes without the need for manual segmentation. PMID:25770633

  14. Automated image analysis method to detect and quantify macrovesicular steatosis in human liver hematoxylin and eosin-stained histology images

    PubMed Central

    Nativ, Nir I.; Chen, Alvin I.; Yarmush, Gabriel; Henry, Scot D.; Lefkowitch, Jay H.; Klein, Kenneth M.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Schloss, Rene; Guarrera, James V.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Large-droplet macrovesicular steatosis (ld-MaS) in over 30% of the liver graft hepatocytes is a major risk factor in liver transplantation. An accurate assessment of ld-MaS percentage is crucial to determine liver graft transplantability, which is currently based on pathologists’ evaluations of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained liver histology specimens, with the predominant criteria being the lipid droplets’ (LDs) relative size and their propensity to displace the hepatocyte’s nucleus to the cell periphery. Automated image analysis systems aimed at objectively and reproducibly quantifying ld-MaS do not accurately differentiate large LDs from small-droplet macrovesicular steatosis (sd-MaS) and do not take into account LD-mediated nuclear displacement, leading to poor correlation with pathologists’ assessment. Here we present an improved image analysis method that incorporates nuclear displacement as a key image feature to segment and classify ld-MaS from H&E stained liver histology slides. More than 52,000 LDs in 54 digital images from 9 patients were analyzed, and the performance of the proposed method was compared against that of current image analysis methods and the ld-MaS percentage evaluations of two trained pathologists from different centers. We show that combining nuclear displacement and LD size information significantly improves the separation between large and small macrovesicular LDs (specificity=93.7%, sensitivity=99.3%) and the correlation with the pathologists’ ld-MaS percentage assessment (R2=0.97). This performance vastly exceeds that of other automated image analyzers, which typically underestimate or overestimate the pathologists’ ld-MaS score. This work demonstrates the potential of automated ld-MaS analysis in monitoring the steatotic state of livers. The image analysis principles demonstrated here may help standardize ld-MaS scores among centers and ultimately help in the process of determining liver graft transplantability

  15. Automated classification of female facial beauty by image analysis and supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunes, Hatice; Piccardi, Massimo; Jan, Tony

    2004-01-01

    The fact that perception of facial beauty may be a universal concept has long been debated amongst psychologists and anthropologists. In this paper, we performed experiments to evaluate the extent of beauty universality by asking a number of diverse human referees to grade a same collection of female facial images. Results obtained show that the different individuals gave similar votes, thus well supporting the concept of beauty universality. We then trained an automated classifier using the human votes as the ground truth and used it to classify an independent test set of facial images. The high accuracy achieved proves that this classifier can be used as a general, automated tool for objective classification of female facial beauty. Potential applications exist in the entertainment industry and plastic surgery.

  16. Single cell measurements of vacuolar rupture caused by intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Keller, Charlotte; Mellouk, Nora; Danckaert, Anne; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost; Bobard, Alexandre

    2013-06-12

    Shigella flexneri are pathogenic bacteria that invade host cells entering into an endocytic vacuole. Subsequently, the rupture of this membrane-enclosed compartment allows bacteria to move within the cytosol, proliferate and further invade neighboring cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is phagocytosed by immune cells, and has recently been shown to rupture phagosomal membrane in macrophages. We developed a robust assay for tracking phagosomal membrane disruption after host cell entry of Shigella flexneri or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach makes use of CCF4, a FRET reporter sensitive to β-lactamase that equilibrates in the cytosol of host cells. Upon invasion of host cells by bacterial pathogens, the probe remains intact as long as the bacteria reside in membrane-enclosed compartments. After disruption of the vacuole, β-lactamase activity on the surface of the intracellular pathogen cleaves CCF4 instantly leading to a loss of FRET signal and switching its emission spectrum. This robust ratiometric assay yields accurate information about the timing of vacuolar rupture induced by the invading bacteria, and it can be coupled to automated microscopy and image processing by specialized algorithms for the detection of the emission signals of the FRET donor and acceptor. Further, it allows investigating the dynamics of vacuolar disruption elicited by intracellular bacteria in real time in single cells. Finally, it is perfectly suited for high-throughput analysis with a spatio-temporal resolution exceeding previous methods. Here, we provide the experimental details of exemplary protocols for the CCF4 vacuolar rupture assay on HeLa cells and THP-1 macrophages for time-lapse experiments or end points experiments using Shigella flexneri as well as multiple mycobacterial strains such as Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium bovis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  17. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  18. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  19. [Automated imaging of the optic nerve and optic nerve fibers is essential to daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2004-06-01

    Chronic open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optical neuropathy. Automated imaging of the optic disc and optic nerve fibers provides reliable analysis of the optic nerve as well as long-term follow-up of neuropathy patients. HRT, GDX-VCC, and OCT, which analyze the optic disc and optical fibers, provide indisputable assistance in improving screening techniques and the follow-up of progressive glaucoma. PMID:15319758

  20. Automated semantic indexing of imaging reports to support retrieval of medical images in the multimedia electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A; Mailhot, M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes preliminary work evaluating automated semantic indexing of radiology imaging reports to represent images stored in the Image Engine multimedia medical record system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The authors used the SAPHIRE indexing system to automatically identify important biomedical concepts within radiology reports and represent these concepts with terms from the 1998 edition of the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. This automated UMLS indexing was then compared with manual UMLS indexing of the same reports. Human indexing identified appropriate UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 81% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. SAPHIRE automatically identified UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 64% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. The overall conclusions of this pilot study were that the UMLS metathesaurus provided adequate coverage of the majority of the important concepts contained within the radiology report test set and that SAPHIRE could automatically identify and translate almost two thirds of these concepts into appropriate UMLS descriptors. Further work is required to improve both the recall and precision of this automated concept extraction process. PMID:10805018

  1. Automated semantic indexing of imaging reports to support retrieval of medical images in the multimedia electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A; Mailhot, M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes preliminary work evaluating automated semantic indexing of radiology imaging reports to represent images stored in the Image Engine multimedia medical record system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The authors used the SAPHIRE indexing system to automatically identify important biomedical concepts within radiology reports and represent these concepts with terms from the 1998 edition of the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. This automated UMLS indexing was then compared with manual UMLS indexing of the same reports. Human indexing identified appropriate UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 81% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. SAPHIRE automatically identified UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 64% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. The overall conclusions of this pilot study were that the UMLS metathesaurus provided adequate coverage of the majority of the important concepts contained within the radiology report test set and that SAPHIRE could automatically identify and translate almost two thirds of these concepts into appropriate UMLS descriptors. Further work is required to improve both the recall and precision of this automated concept extraction process.

  2. A New Toolbox for Assessing Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsioris, Konstantinos; Torres, Alexis J.; Douce, Thomas B.; Love, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented access to the biology of single cells is now feasible, enabled by recent technological advancements that allow us to manipulate and measure sparse samples and achieve a new level of resolution in space and time. This review focuses on advances in tools to study single cells for specific areas of biology. We examine both mature and nascent techniques to study single cells at the genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics level. In addition, we provide an overview of tools that are well suited for following biological responses to defined perturbations with single-cell resolution. Techniques to analyze and manipulate single cells through soluble and chemical ligands, the microenvironment, and cell-cell interactions are provided. For each of these topics, we highlight the biological motivation, applications, methods, recent advances, and opportunities for improvement. The toolbox presented in this review can function as a starting point for the design of single-cell experiments. PMID:24910919

  3. A new toolbox for assessing single cells.

    PubMed

    Tsioris, Konstantinos; Torres, Alexis J; Douce, Thomas B; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented access to the biology of single cells is now feasible, enabled by recent technological advancements that allow us to manipulate and measure sparse samples and achieve a new level of resolution in space and time. This review focuses on advances in tools to study single cells for specific areas of biology. We examine both mature and nascent techniques to study single cells at the genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics level. In addition, we provide an overview of tools that are well suited for following biological responses to defined perturbations with single-cell resolution. Techniques to analyze and manipulate single cells through soluble and chemical ligands, the microenvironment, and cell-cell interactions are provided. For each of these topics, we highlight the biological motivation, applications, methods, recent advances, and opportunities for improvement. The toolbox presented in this review can function as a starting point for the design of single-cell experiments.

  4. A new toolbox for assessing single cells.

    PubMed

    Tsioris, Konstantinos; Torres, Alexis J; Douce, Thomas B; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented access to the biology of single cells is now feasible, enabled by recent technological advancements that allow us to manipulate and measure sparse samples and achieve a new level of resolution in space and time. This review focuses on advances in tools to study single cells for specific areas of biology. We examine both mature and nascent techniques to study single cells at the genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics level. In addition, we provide an overview of tools that are well suited for following biological responses to defined perturbations with single-cell resolution. Techniques to analyze and manipulate single cells through soluble and chemical ligands, the microenvironment, and cell-cell interactions are provided. For each of these topics, we highlight the biological motivation, applications, methods, recent advances, and opportunities for improvement. The toolbox presented in this review can function as a starting point for the design of single-cell experiments. PMID:24910919

  5. Investigation of automated feature extraction techniques for applications in cancer detection from multispectral histopathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Neal R.; Levenson, Richard M.; Rimm, David L.

    2003-05-01

    Recent developments in imaging technology mean that it is now possible to obtain high-resolution histological image data at multiple wavelengths. This allows pathologists to image specimens over a full spectrum, thereby revealing (often subtle) distinctions between different types of tissue. With this type of data, the spectral content of the specimens, combined with quantitative spatial feature characterization may make it possible not only to identify the presence of an abnormality, but also to classify it accurately. However, such are the quantities and complexities of these data, that without new automated techniques to assist in the data analysis, the information contained in the data will remain inaccessible to those who need it. We investigate the application of a recently developed system for the automated analysis of multi-/hyper-spectral satellite image data to the problem of cancer detection from multispectral histopathology image data. The system provides a means for a human expert to provide training data simply by highlighting regions in an image using a computer mouse. Application of these feature extraction techniques to examples of both training and out-of-training-sample data demonstrate that these, as yet unoptimized, techniques already show promise in the discrimination between benign and malignant cells from a variety of samples.

  6. Automated image analysis in histopathology: a valuable tool in medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mulrane, Laoighse; Rexhepaj, Elton; Penney, Steve; Callanan, John J; Gallagher, William M

    2008-11-01

    Virtual pathology, the process of assessing digital images of histological slides, is gaining momentum in today's laboratory environment. Indeed, digital image acquisition systems are becoming commonplace, and associated image analysis solutions are viewed by most as the next critical step in automated histological analysis. Here, we document the advances in the technology, with reference to past and current techniques in histological assessment. In addition, the demand for these technologies is analyzed with major players profiled. As there are several image analysis software programs focusing on the quantification of immunohistochemical staining, particular attention is paid to this application in this review. Oncology has been a primary target area for these approaches, with example studies in this therapeutic area being covered here. Toxicology-based image analysis solutions are also profiled as these are steadily increasing in popularity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry. Reinforced by the phenomenal growth of the virtual pathology field, it is envisioned that the market for automated image analysis tools will greatly expand over the next 10 years.

  7. Automated Formosat Image Processing System for Rapid Response to International Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M. C.; Chou, S. C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chen, B.; Liu, C.; Yu, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    FORMOSAT-2, Taiwan's first remote sensing satellite, was successfully launched in May of 2004 into the Sun-synchronous orbit at 891 kilometers of altitude. With the daily revisit feature, the 2-m panchromatic, 8-m multi-spectral resolution images captured have been used for researches and operations in various societal benefit areas. This paper details the orchestration of various tasks conducted in different institutions in Taiwan in the efforts responding to international disasters. The institutes involved including its space agency-National Space Organization (NSPO), Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Research of National Central University, GIS Center of Feng-Chia University, and the National Center for High-performance Computing. Since each institution has its own mandate, the coordinated tasks ranged from receiving emergency observation requests, scheduling and tasking of satellite operation, downlink to ground stations, images processing including data injection, ortho-rectification, to delivery of image products. With the lessons learned from working with international partners, the FORMOSAT Image Processing System has been extensively automated and streamlined with a goal to shorten the time between request and delivery in an efficient manner. The integrated team has developed an Application Interface to its system platform that provides functions of search in archive catalogue, request of data services, mission planning, inquiry of services status, and image download. This automated system enables timely image acquisition and substantially increases the value of data product. Example outcome of these efforts in recent response to support Sentinel Asia in Nepal Earthquake is demonstrated herein.

  8. Automating PACS quality control with the Vanderbilt image processing enterprise resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esparza, Michael L.; Welch, E. Brian; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption; for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure. Yet, substantial delays may be incurred if a problematic scan is not noticed until a radiologist reads the scans or an automated algorithm fails. Given scores of slices in typical three-dimensional scans and widevariety of potential use cases, a technologist cannot practically be expected inspect all images. In large-scale research, automated pipeline systems have had great success in achieving high throughput. However, clinical and institutional workflows are largely based on DICOM and PACS technologies; these systems are not readily compatible with research systems due to security and privacy restrictions. Hence, quantitative quality control has been relegated to individual investigators and too often neglected. Herein, we propose a scalable system, the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource (VIPER) to integrate modular quality control and image analysis routines with a standard PACS configuration. This server unifies image processing routines across an institutional level and provides a simple interface so that investigators can collaborate to deploy new analysis technologies. VIPER integrates with high performance computing environments has successfully analyzed all standard scans from our institutional research center over the course of the last 18 months.

  9. Automated cell viability assessment using a microfluidics based portable imaging flow analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Adhikari, Jayesh Vasudeva; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report a system-level integration of portable microscopy and microfluidics for the realization of optofluidic imaging flow analyzer with a throughput of 450 cells/s. With the use of a cellphone augmented with off-the-shelf optical components and custom designed microfluidics, we demonstrate a portable optofluidic imaging flow analyzer. A multiple microfluidic channel geometry was employed to demonstrate the enhancement of throughput in the context of low frame-rate imaging systems. Using the cell-phone based digital imaging flow analyzer, we have imaged yeast cells present in a suspension. By digitally processing the recorded videos of the flow stream on the cellphone, we demonstrated an automated cell viability assessment of the yeast cell population. In addition, we also demonstrate the suitability of the system for blood cell counting. PMID:26015835

  10. Automated cell viability assessment using a microfluidics based portable imaging flow analyzer.

    PubMed

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Adhikari, Jayesh Vasudeva; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we report a system-level integration of portable microscopy and microfluidics for the realization of optofluidic imaging flow analyzer with a throughput of 450 cells/s. With the use of a cellphone augmented with off-the-shelf optical components and custom designed microfluidics, we demonstrate a portable optofluidic imaging flow analyzer. A multiple microfluidic channel geometry was employed to demonstrate the enhancement of throughput in the context of low frame-rate imaging systems. Using the cell-phone based digital imaging flow analyzer, we have imaged yeast cells present in a suspension. By digitally processing the recorded videos of the flow stream on the cellphone, we demonstrated an automated cell viability assessment of the yeast cell population. In addition, we also demonstrate the suitability of the system for blood cell counting. PMID:26015835

  11. Semi-automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jurrus, Elizabeth; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R. C.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes. PMID:22644867

  12. RootGraph: a graphic optimization tool for automated image analysis of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinhai; Zeng, Zhanghui; Connor, Jason N; Huang, Chun Yuan; Melino, Vanessa; Kumar, Pankaj; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2015-11-01

    This paper outlines a numerical scheme for accurate, detailed, and high-throughput image analysis of plant roots. In contrast to existing root image analysis tools that focus on root system-average traits, a novel, fully automated and robust approach for the detailed characterization of root traits, based on a graph optimization process is presented. The scheme, firstly, distinguishes primary roots from lateral roots and, secondly, quantifies a broad spectrum of root traits for each identified primary and lateral root. Thirdly, it associates lateral roots and their properties with the specific primary root from which the laterals emerge. The performance of this approach was evaluated through comparisons with other automated and semi-automated software solutions as well as against results based on manual measurements. The comparisons and subsequent application of the algorithm to an array of experimental data demonstrate that this method outperforms existing methods in terms of accuracy, robustness, and the ability to process root images under high-throughput conditions.

  13. Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraona-Puy, Marta; Ghita, Adrian; Zoladek, Alina; Perkins, William; Varma, Sandeep; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel; Notingher, Ioan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a ``generalization'' of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

  14. Semi-Automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images

    SciTech Connect

    Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes.

  15. RootGraph: a graphic optimization tool for automated image analysis of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jinhai; Zeng, Zhanghui; Connor, Jason N.; Huang, Chun Yuan; Melino, Vanessa; Kumar, Pankaj; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a numerical scheme for accurate, detailed, and high-throughput image analysis of plant roots. In contrast to existing root image analysis tools that focus on root system-average traits, a novel, fully automated and robust approach for the detailed characterization of root traits, based on a graph optimization process is presented. The scheme, firstly, distinguishes primary roots from lateral roots and, secondly, quantifies a broad spectrum of root traits for each identified primary and lateral root. Thirdly, it associates lateral roots and their properties with the specific primary root from which the laterals emerge. The performance of this approach was evaluated through comparisons with other automated and semi-automated software solutions as well as against results based on manual measurements. The comparisons and subsequent application of the algorithm to an array of experimental data demonstrate that this method outperforms existing methods in terms of accuracy, robustness, and the ability to process root images under high-throughput conditions. PMID:26224880

  16. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    PubMed

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system.

  17. Redefining Signaling Pathways with an Expanding Single-Cell Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    Genetically identical cells respond heterogeneously to uniform environmental stimuli. Consequently, investigating the signaling networks that control these cell responses using 'average' bulk cell measurements can obscure underlying mechanisms and misses information emerging from cell-to-cell variability. Here we review recent technological advances including live-cell fluorescence imaging-based approaches and microfluidic devices that enable measurements of signaling networks, dynamics, and responses in single cells. We discuss how these single-cell tools have uncovered novel mechanistic insights for canonical signaling pathways that control cell proliferation (ERK), DNA-damage responses (p53), and innate immune and stress responses (NF-κB). Future improvements in throughput and multiplexing, analytical pipelines, and in vivo applicability will all significantly expand the biological information gained from single-cell measurements of signaling pathways. PMID:26968612

  18. Redefining Signaling Pathways with an Expanding Single-Cell Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    Genetically identical cells respond heterogeneously to uniform environmental stimuli. Consequently, investigating the signaling networks that control these cell responses using 'average' bulk cell measurements can obscure underlying mechanisms and misses information emerging from cell-to-cell variability. Here we review recent technological advances including live-cell fluorescence imaging-based approaches and microfluidic devices that enable measurements of signaling networks, dynamics, and responses in single cells. We discuss how these single-cell tools have uncovered novel mechanistic insights for canonical signaling pathways that control cell proliferation (ERK), DNA-damage responses (p53), and innate immune and stress responses (NF-κB). Future improvements in throughput and multiplexing, analytical pipelines, and in vivo applicability will all significantly expand the biological information gained from single-cell measurements of signaling pathways.

  19. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  20. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  1. Scanner-based image quality measurement system for automated analysis of EP output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipman, Yair; Mehta, Prashant; Johnson, Kate

    2003-12-01

    Inspection of electrophotographic print cartridge quality and compatibility requires analysis of hundreds of pages on a wide population of printers and copiers. Although print quality inspection is often achieved through the use of anchor prints and densitometry, more comprehensive analysis and quantitative data is desired for performance tracking, benchmarking and failure mode analysis. Image quality measurement systems range in price and performance, image capture paths and levels of automation. In order to address the requirements of a specific application, careful consideration was made to print volume, budgetary limits, and the scope of the desired image quality measurements. A flatbed scanner-based image quality measurement system was selected to support high throughput, maximal automation, and sufficient flexibility for both measurement methods and image sampling rates. Using an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sample management, a half ream of prints can be measured automatically without operator intervention. The system includes optical character recognition (OCR) for automatic determination of target type for measurement suite selection. This capability also enables measurement of mixed stacks of targets since each sample is identified prior to measurement. In addition, OCR is used to read toner ID, machine ID, print count, and other pertinent information regarding the printing conditions and environment. This data is saved to a data file along with the measurement results for complete test documentation. Measurement methods were developed to replace current methods of visual inspection and densitometry. The features that were being analyzed visually could be addressed via standard measurement algorithms. Measurement of density proved to be less simple since the scanner is not a densitometer and anything short of an excellent estimation would be meaningless. In order to address the measurement of density, a transfer curve was built to translate the

  2. Automated measurement of parameters related to the deformities of lower limbs based on x-rays images.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Wadim; Molka, Adrian; Tabor, Zbisław

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of the deformation of the lower limbs in the current standard full-limb X-rays images presents significant challenges to radiologists and orthopedists. The precision of these measurements is deteriorated because of inexact positioning of the leg during image acquisition, problems with selecting reliable anatomical landmarks in projective X-ray images, and inevitable errors of manual measurements. The influence of the random errors resulting from the last two factors on the precision of the measurement can be reduced if an automated measurement method is used instead of a manual one. In the paper a framework for an automated measurement of various metric and angular quantities used in the description of the lower extremity deformation in full-limb frontal X-ray images is described. The results of automated measurements are compared with manual measurements. These results demonstrate that an automated method can be a valuable alternative to the manual measurements.

  3. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  4. Automated recognition and characterization of solar active regions based on the SOHO/MDI images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Turmon, M.; Mukhtar, S.; Bogart, R.; Ulrich, R.; Froehlich, C.; Wehrli, C.

    1997-01-01

    The first results of a new method to identify and characterize the various surface structures on the sun, which may contribute to the changes in solar total and spectral irradiance, are shown. The full disk magnetograms (1024 x 1024 pixels) of the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) experiment onboard SOHO are analyzed. Use of a Bayesian inference scheme allows objective, uniform, automated processing of a long sequence of images. The main goal is to identify the solar magnetic features causing irradiance changes. The results presented are based on a pilot time interval of August 1996.

  5. Semi-automated Digital Imaging and Processing System for Measuring Lake Ice Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Preetpal

    Canada is home to thousands of freshwater lakes and rivers. Apart from being sources of infinite natural beauty, rivers and lakes are an important source of water, food and transportation. The northern hemisphere of Canada experiences extreme cold temperatures in the winter resulting in a freeze up of regional lakes and rivers. Frozen lakes and rivers tend to offer unique opportunities in terms of wildlife harvesting and winter transportation. Ice roads built on frozen rivers and lakes are vital supply lines for industrial operations in the remote north. Monitoring the ice freeze-up and break-up dates annually can help predict regional climatic changes. Lake ice impacts a variety of physical, ecological and economic processes. The construction and maintenance of a winter road can cost millions of dollars annually. A good understanding of ice mechanics is required to build and deem an ice road safe. A crucial factor in calculating load bearing capacity of ice sheets is the thickness of ice. Construction costs are mainly attributed to producing and maintaining a specific thickness and density of ice that can support different loads. Climate change is leading to warmer temperatures causing the ice to thin faster. At a certain point, a winter road may not be thick enough to support travel and transportation. There is considerable interest in monitoring winter road conditions given the high construction and maintenance costs involved. Remote sensing technologies such as Synthetic Aperture Radar have been successfully utilized to study the extent of ice covers and record freeze-up and break-up dates of ice on lakes and rivers across the north. Ice road builders often used Ultrasound equipment to measure ice thickness. However, an automated monitoring system, based on machine vision and image processing technology, which can measure ice thickness on lakes has not been thought of. Machine vision and image processing techniques have successfully been used in manufacturing

  6. Automation of Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis Using Digital Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Philip Wing Ping

    The Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis - Profile (ADSA-P) technique, as initiated by Rotenberg, is a user -oriented scheme to determine liquid-fluid interfacial tensions and contact angles from the shape of axisymmetric menisci, i.e., from sessile as well as pendant drops. The ADSA -P program requires as input several coordinate points along the drop profile, the value of the density difference between the bulk phases, and gravity. The solution yields interfacial tension and contact angle. Although the ADSA-P technique was in principle complete, it was found that it was of very limited practical use. The major difficulty with the method is the need for very precise coordinate points along the drop profile, which, up to now, could not be obtained readily. In the past, the coordinate points along the drop profile were obtained by manual digitization of photographs or negatives. From manual digitization data, the surface tension values obtained had an average error of +/-5% when compared with literature values. Another problem with the ADSA-P technique was that the computer program failed to converge for the case of very elongated pendant drops. To acquire the drop profile coordinates automatically, a technique which utilizes recent developments in digital image acquisition and analysis was developed. In order to determine the drop profile coordinates as precisely as possible, the errors due to optical distortions were eliminated. In addition, determination of drop profile coordinates to pixel and sub-pixel resolution was developed. It was found that high precision could be obtained through the use of sub-pixel resolution and a spline fitting method. The results obtained using the automatic digitization technique in conjunction with ADSA-P not only compared well with the conventional methods, but also outstripped the precision of conventional methods considerably. To solve the convergence problem of very elongated pendant drops, it was found that the reason for the

  7. Microfluidic Picoliter Bioreactor for Microbial Single-cell Analysis: Fabrication, System Setup, and Operation

    PubMed Central

    Gruenberger, Alexander; Probst, Christopher; Heyer, Antonia; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Frunzke, Julia; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    In this protocol the fabrication, experimental setup and basic operation of the recently introduced microfluidic picoliter bioreactor (PLBR) is described in detail. The PLBR can be utilized for the analysis of single bacteria and microcolonies to investigate biotechnological and microbiological related questions concerning, e.g. cell growth, morphology, stress response, and metabolite or protein production on single-cell level. The device features continuous media flow enabling constant environmental conditions for perturbation studies, but in addition allows fast medium changes as well as oscillating conditions to mimic any desired environmental situation. To fabricate the single use devices, a silicon wafer containing sub micrometer sized SU-8 structures served as the replication mold for rapid polydimethylsiloxane casting. Chips were cut, assembled, connected, and set up onto a high resolution and fully automated microscope suited for time-lapse imaging, a powerful tool for spatio-temporal cell analysis. Here, the biotechnological platform organism Corynebacterium glutamicum was seeded into the PLBR and cell growth and intracellular fluorescence were followed over several hours unraveling time dependent population heterogeneity on single-cell level, not possible with conventional analysis methods such as flow cytometry. Besides insights into device fabrication, furthermore, the preparation of the preculture, loading, trapping of bacteria, and the PLBR cultivation of single cells and colonies is demonstrated. These devices will add a new dimension in microbiological research to analyze time dependent phenomena of single bacteria under tight environmental control. Due to the simple and relatively short fabrication process the technology can be easily adapted at any microfluidics lab and simply tailored towards specific needs. PMID:24336165

  8. Microfluidic picoliter bioreactor for microbial single-cell analysis: fabrication, system setup, and operation.

    PubMed

    Gruenberger, Alexander; Probst, Christopher; Heyer, Antonia; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Frunzke, Julia; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2013-12-06

    In this protocol the fabrication, experimental setup and basic operation of the recently introduced microfluidic picoliter bioreactor (PLBR) is described in detail. The PLBR can be utilized for the analysis of single bacteria and microcolonies to investigate biotechnological and microbiological related questions concerning, e.g. cell growth, morphology, stress response, and metabolite or protein production on single-cell level. The device features continuous media flow enabling constant environmental conditions for perturbation studies, but in addition allows fast medium changes as well as oscillating conditions to mimic any desired environmental situation. To fabricate the single use devices, a silicon wafer containing sub micrometer sized SU-8 structures served as the replication mold for rapid polydimethylsiloxane casting. Chips were cut, assembled, connected, and set up onto a high resolution and fully automated microscope suited for time-lapse imaging, a powerful tool for spatio-temporal cell analysis. Here, the biotechnological platform organism Corynebacterium glutamicum was seeded into the PLBR and cell growth and intracellular fluorescence were followed over several hours unraveling time dependent population heterogeneity on single-cell level, not possible with conventional analysis methods such as flow cytometry. Besides insights into device fabrication, furthermore, the preparation of the preculture, loading, trapping of bacteria, and the PLBR cultivation of single cells and colonies is demonstrated. These devices will add a new dimension in microbiological research to analyze time dependent phenomena of single bacteria under tight environmental control. Due to the simple and relatively short fabrication process the technology can be easily adapted at any microfluidics lab and simply tailored towards specific needs.

  9. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  10. Automated reconstruction of standing posture panoramas from multi-sector long limb x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Linzey; Trier, Caroline; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the digital X-ray imaging system's limited field of view, several individual sector images are required to capture the posture of an individual in standing position. These images are then "stitched together" to reconstruct the standing posture. We have created an image processing application that automates the stitching, therefore minimizing user input, optimizing workflow, and reducing human error. The application begins with pre-processing the input images by removing artifacts, filtering out isolated noisy regions, and amplifying a seamless bone edge. The resulting binary images are then registered together using a rigid-body intensity based registration algorithm. The identified registration transformations are then used to map the original sector images into the panorama image. Our method focuses primarily on the use of the anatomical content of the images to generate the panoramas as opposed to using external markers employed to aid with the alignment process. Currently, results show robust edge detection prior to registration and we have tested our approach by comparing the resulting automatically-stitched panoramas to the manually stitched panoramas in terms of registration parameters, target registration error of homologous markers, and the homogeneity of the digitally subtracted automatically- and manually-stitched images using 26 patient datasets.

  11. Automated collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous systems: trials and tribulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P.; Young, K.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. Over the past two decades both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging have undergone a rapid growth, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of medical images can provide an essential resource for research and training. Traditionally, the systematic collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous sites has not been commonplace within the NHS and is fraught with challenges including; data acquisition, storage, secure transfer and correct anonymisation. Here, we describe a semi-automated system, which comprehensively oversees the collection of both unprocessed and processed medical images from acquisition to a centralised database. The provision of unprocessed images within our repository enables a multitude of potential research possibilities that utilise the images. Furthermore, we have developed systems and software to integrate these data with their associated clinical data and annotations providing a centralised dataset for research. Currently we regularly collect digital mammography images from two sites and partially collect from a further three, with efforts to expand into other modalities and sites currently ongoing. At present we have collected 34,014 2D images from 2623 individuals. In this paper we describe our medical image collection system for research and discuss the wide spectrum of challenges faced during the design and implementation of such systems.

  12. Evaluation of automated threshold selection methods for accurately sizing microscopic fluorescent cells by image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sieracki, M E; Reichenbach, S E; Webb, K L

    1989-01-01

    The accurate measurement of bacterial and protistan cell biomass is necessary for understanding their population and trophic dynamics in nature. Direct measurement of fluorescently stained cells is often the method of choice. The tedium of making such measurements visually on the large numbers of cells required has prompted the use of automatic image analysis for this purpose. Accurate measurements by image analysis require an accurate, reliable method of segmenting the image, that is, distinguishing the brightly fluorescing cells from a dark background. This is commonly done by visually choosing a threshold intensity value which most closely coincides with the outline of the cells as perceived by the operator. Ideally, an automated method based on the cell image characteristics should be used. Since the optical nature of edges in images of light-emitting, microscopic fluorescent objects is different from that of images generated by transmitted or reflected light, it seemed that automatic segmentation of such images may require special considerations. We tested nine automated threshold selection methods using standard fluorescent microspheres ranging in size and fluorescence intensity and fluorochrome-stained samples of cells from cultures of cyanobacteria, flagellates, and ciliates. The methods included several variations based on the maximum intensity gradient of the sphere profile (first derivative), the minimum in the second derivative of the sphere profile, the minimum of the image histogram, and the midpoint intensity. Our results indicated that thresholds determined visually and by first-derivative methods tended to overestimate the threshold, causing an underestimation of microsphere size. The method based on the minimum of the second derivative of the profile yielded the most accurate area estimates for spheres of different sizes and brightnesses and for four of the five cell types tested. A simple model of the optical properties of fluorescing objects and

  13. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C.; Kuru, Timur H.; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B.; Agterhuis, Erik; Edler, Christopher; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hadaschik, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. Methods A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences). The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI) that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies. Results In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4–95.0), a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0–95.7) and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8–93.8) for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature. Conclusion The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction. PMID:27454770

  14. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  15. Real-time image processing system for automated visual inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Fernando D.; Pais, Cassiano P.; Freitas, Jose C. A.; Rodrigues, Fernando C.

    1993-01-01

    In many potential machine vision applications, the biggest constraint to its industrial use is the cost of the image processing hardware. In fact, there are many visual tasks performed by human operators that could be easily automated. However, it is very difficult to find in the market a vision system with the adequate relation between cost and performance. Most of the image processing systems need too much time to process one image, or have a very high cost. We present an architecture that was developed for surveillance purposes and that we are applying to several applications, namely to the semi-conductor industry and to flexible manufacture. The hardware was conceived in a modular approach with real time performance in each module. Cascading of several modules can produce different image processing functions with an image or data, being generated in every frame of video. The low cost of the hardware together with its very high performance, allow many different industrial applications in particular in the field of industrial automation. The results obtained with the industrial prototypes are presented in two applications and other possible applications are in progress.

  16. Automated cellular annotation for high-resolution images of adult Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Batzoglou, Serafim

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Advances in high-resolution microscopy have recently made possible the analysis of gene expression at the level of individual cells. The fixed lineage of cells in the adult worm Caenorhabditis elegans makes this organism an ideal model for studying complex biological processes like development and aging. However, annotating individual cells in images of adult C.elegans typically requires expertise and significant manual effort. Automation of this task is therefore critical to enabling high-resolution studies of a large number of genes. Results: In this article, we describe an automated method for annotating a subset of 154 cells (including various muscle, intestinal and hypodermal cells) in high-resolution images of adult C.elegans. We formulate the task of labeling cells within an image as a combinatorial optimization problem, where the goal is to minimize a scoring function that compares cells in a test input image with cells from a training atlas of manually annotated worms according to various spatial and morphological characteristics. We propose an approach for solving this problem based on reduction to minimum-cost maximum-flow and apply a cross-entropy–based learning algorithm to tune the weights of our scoring function. We achieve 84% median accuracy across a set of 154 cell labels in this highly variable system. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the automatic annotation of microscopy-based images in adult C.elegans. Contact: saerni@cs.stanford.edu PMID:23812982

  17. Towards Automated Three-Dimensional Tracking of Nephrons through Stacked Histological Image Sets.

    PubMed

    Bhikha, Charita; Andreasen, Arne; Christensen, Erik I; Letts, Robyn F R; Pantanowitz, Adam; Rubin, David M; Thomsen, Jesper S; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    An automated approach for tracking individual nephrons through three-dimensional histological image sets of mouse and rat kidneys is presented. In a previous study, the available images were tracked manually through the image sets in order to explore renal microarchitecture. The purpose of the current research is to reduce the time and effort required to manually trace nephrons by creating an automated, intelligent system as a standard tool for such datasets. The algorithm is robust enough to isolate closely packed nephrons and track their convoluted paths despite a number of nonideal, interfering conditions such as local image distortions, artefacts, and interstitial tissue interference. The system comprises image preprocessing, feature extraction, and a custom graph-based tracking algorithm, which is validated by a rule base and a machine learning algorithm. A study of a selection of automatically tracked nephrons, when compared with manual tracking, yields a 95% tracking accuracy for structures in the cortex, while those in the medulla have lower accuracy due to narrower diameter and higher density. Limited manual intervention is introduced to improve tracking, enabling full nephron paths to be obtained with an average of 17 manual corrections per mouse nephron and 58 manual corrections per rat nephron.

  18. Bioimage informatics approach to automated meibomian gland analysis in infrared images of meibography

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Turgay; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Petznick, Andrea; Tong, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Background Infrared (IR) meibography is an imaging technique to capture the Meibomian glands in the eyelids. These ocular surface structures are responsible for producing the lipid layer of the tear film which helps to reduce tear evaporation. In a normal healthy eye, the glands have similar morphological features in terms of spatial width, in-plane elongation, length. On the other hand, eyes with Meibomian gland dysfunction show visible structural irregularities that help in the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. However, currently there is no universally accepted algorithm for detection of these image features which will be clinically useful. We aim to develop a method of automated gland segmentation which allows images to be classified. Methods A set of 131 meibography images were acquired from patients from the Singapore National Eye Center. We used a method of automated gland segmentation using Gabor wavelets. Features of the imaged glands including orientation, width, length and curvature were extracted and the IR images enhanced. The images were classified as ‘healthy’, ‘intermediate’ or ‘unhealthy’, through the use of a support vector machine classifier (SVM). Half the images were used for training the SVM and the other half for validation. Independently of this procedure, the meibographs were classified by an expert clinician into the same 3 grades. Results The algorithm correctly detected 94% and 98% of mid-line pixels of gland and inter-gland regions, respectively, on healthy images. On intermediate images, correct detection rates of 92% and 97% of mid-line pixels of gland and inter-gland regions were achieved respectively. The true positive rate of detecting healthy images was 86%, and for intermediate images, 74%. The corresponding false positive rates were 15% and 31% respectively. Using the SVM, the proposed method has 88% accuracy in classifying images into the 3 classes. The classification of images into healthy and unhealthy

  19. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  20. High resolution FTIR imaging provides automated discrimination and detection of single malaria parasite infected erythrocytes on glass.

    PubMed

    Perez-Guaita, David; Andrew, Dean; Heraud, Philip; Beeson, James; Anderson, David; Richards, Jack; Wood, Bayden R

    2016-06-23

    New highly sensitive tools for malaria diagnostics are urgently needed to enable the detection of infection in asymptomatic carriers and patients with low parasitemia. In pursuit of a highly sensitive diagnostic tool that can identify parasite infections at the single cell level, we have been exploring Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy using a Focal Plane Array (FPA) imaging detector. Here we report for the first time the application of a new optic configuration developed by Agilent that incorporates 25× condenser and objective Cassegrain optics with a high numerical aperture (NA = 0.81) along with additional high magnification optics within the microscope to provide 0.66 micron pixel resolution (total IR system magnification of 61×) to diagnose malaria parasites at the single cell level on a conventional glass microscope slide. The high quality images clearly resolve the parasite's digestive vacuole demonstrating sub-cellular resolution using this approach. Moreover, we have developed an algorithm that first detects the cells in the infrared image, and secondly extracts the average spectrum. The average spectrum is then run through a model based on Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), which diagnoses unequivocally the infected from normal cells. The high quality images, and the fact this measurement can be achieved without a synchrotron source on a conventional glass slide, shows promise as a potential gold standard for malaria detection at the single cell level. PMID:27071693

  1. A systematic review of automated melanoma detection in dermatoscopic images and its ground truth data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Abder-Rahman A.; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2012-02-01

    Malignant melanoma is the third most frequent type of skin cancer and one of the most malignant tumors, accounting for 79% of skin cancer deaths. Melanoma is highly curable if diagnosed early and treated properly as survival rate varies between 15% and 65% from early to terminal stages, respectively. So far, melanoma diagnosis is depending subjectively on the dermatologist's expertise. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems based on epiluminescense light microscopy can provide an objective second opinion on pigmented skin lesions (PSL). This work systematically analyzes the evidence of the effectiveness of automated melanoma detection in images from a dermatoscopic device. Automated CAD applications were analyzed to estimate their diagnostic outcome. Searching online databases for publication dates between 1985 and 2011, a total of 182 studies on dermatoscopic CAD were found. With respect to the systematic selection criterions, 9 studies were included, published between 2002 and 2011. Those studies formed databases of 14,421 dermatoscopic images including both malignant "melanoma" and benign "nevus", with 8,110 images being available ranging in resolution from 150 x 150 to 1568 x 1045 pixels. Maximum and minimum of sensitivity and specificity are 100.0% and 80.0% as well as 98.14% and 61.6%, respectively. Area under the receiver operator characteristics (AUC) and pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostics odds ratio are respectively 0.87, 0.90, 0.81, and 15.89. So, although that automated melanoma detection showed good accuracy in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and AUC, but diagnostic performance in terms of DOR was found to be poor. This might be due to the lack of dermatoscopic image resources (ground truth) that are needed for comprehensive assessment of diagnostic performance. In future work, we aim at testing this hypothesis by joining dermatoscopic images into a unified database that serves as a standard reference for dermatology related research in

  2. Automated thematic mapping and change detection of ERTS-1 images. [Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramenopoulos, N.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an automated thematic mapping investigation using ERTS-1 MSS images are presented. A diffraction pattern analysis of MSS images led to the development of spatial signatures for farm land, urban areas, and mountains. Four spatial features are employed to describe the spatial characteristics of image cells in the digital data. Three spectral features are combined with the spatial features to form a seven dimensional vector describing each cell. Then, the classification of the feature vectors is accomplished by using the maximum likelihood criterion. Three ERTS-1 images from the Phoenix, Arizona area were processed, and recognition rates between 85% and 100% were obtained for the terrain classes of desert, farms, mountains and urban areas. To eliminate the need for training data, a new clustering algorithm has also been developed.

  3. An automated method for comparing motion artifacts in cine four-dimensional computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Jew, Brian; Hong, Julian C; Johnston, Eric W; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2012-11-08

    The aim of this study is to develop an automated method to objectively compare motion artifacts in two four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) image sets, and identify the one that would appear to human observers with fewer or smaller artifacts. Our proposed method is based on the difference of the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at couch transitions, which we hypothesize may be a suitable metric to identify motion artifacts. We evaluated our method using ten pairs of 4D CT image sets that showed subtle differences in artifacts between images in a pair, which were identifiable by human observers. One set of 4D CT images was sorted using breathing traces in which our clinically implemented 4D CT sorting software miscalculated the respiratory phase, which expectedly led to artifacts in the images. The other set of images consisted of the same images; however, these were sorted using the same breathing traces but with corrected phases. Next we calculated the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at all couch transitions for all respiratory phases in both image sets to evaluate for motion artifacts. For nine image set pairs, our method identified the 4D CT sets sorted using the breathing traces with the corrected respiratory phase to result in images with fewer or smaller artifacts, whereas for one image pair, no difference was noted. Two observers independently assessed the accuracy of our method. Both observers identified 9 image sets that were sorted using the breathing traces with corrected respiratory phase as having fewer or smaller artifacts. In summary, using the 4D CT data of ten pairs of 4D CT image sets, we have demonstrated proof of principle that our method is able to replicate the results of two human observers in identifying the image set with fewer or smaller artifacts.

  4. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  5. Automated wavelet denoising of photoacoustic signals for circulating melanoma cell detection and burn image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Holan, Scott H; Viator, John A

    2008-06-21

    Photoacoustic image reconstruction may involve hundreds of point measurements, each of which contributes unique information about the subsurface absorbing structures under study. For backprojection imaging, two or more point measurements of photoacoustic waves induced by irradiating a biological sample with laser light are used to produce an image of the acoustic source. Each of these measurements must undergo some signal processing, such as denoising or system deconvolution. In order to process the numerous signals, we have developed an automated wavelet algorithm for denoising signals. We appeal to the discrete wavelet transform for denoising photoacoustic signals generated in a dilute melanoma cell suspension and in thermally coagulated blood. We used 5, 9, 45 and 270 melanoma cells in the laser beam path as test concentrations. For the burn phantom, we used coagulated blood in 1.6 mm silicon tube submerged in Intralipid. Although these two targets were chosen as typical applications for photoacoustic detection and imaging, they are of independent interest. The denoising employs level-independent universal thresholding. In order to accommodate nonradix-2 signals, we considered a maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT). For the lower melanoma cell concentrations, as the signal-to-noise ratio approached 1, denoising allowed better peak finding. For coagulated blood, the signals were denoised to yield a clean photoacoustic resulting in an improvement of 22% in the reconstructed image. The entire signal processing technique was automated so that minimal user intervention was needed to reconstruct the images. Such an algorithm may be used for image reconstruction and signal extraction for applications such as burn depth imaging, depth profiling of vascular lesions in skin and the detection of single cancer cells in blood samples. PMID:18495977

  6. NOTE: Automated wavelet denoising of photoacoustic signals for circulating melanoma cell detection and burn image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holan, Scott H.; Viator, John A.

    2008-06-01

    Photoacoustic image reconstruction may involve hundreds of point measurements, each of which contributes unique information about the subsurface absorbing structures under study. For backprojection imaging, two or more point measurements of photoacoustic waves induced by irradiating a biological sample with laser light are used to produce an image of the acoustic source. Each of these measurements must undergo some signal processing, such as denoising or system deconvolution. In order to process the numerous signals, we have developed an automated wavelet algorithm for denoising signals. We appeal to the discrete wavelet transform for denoising photoacoustic signals generated in a dilute melanoma cell suspension and in thermally coagulated blood. We used 5, 9, 45 and 270 melanoma cells in the laser beam path as test concentrations. For the burn phantom, we used coagulated blood in 1.6 mm silicon tube submerged in Intralipid. Although these two targets were chosen as typical applications for photoacoustic detection and imaging, they are of independent interest. The denoising employs level-independent universal thresholding. In order to accommodate nonradix-2 signals, we considered a maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT). For the lower melanoma cell concentrations, as the signal-to-noise ratio approached 1, denoising allowed better peak finding. For coagulated blood, the signals were denoised to yield a clean photoacoustic resulting in an improvement of 22% in the reconstructed image. The entire signal processing technique was automated so that minimal user intervention was needed to reconstruct the images. Such an algorithm may be used for image reconstruction and signal extraction for applications such as burn depth imaging, depth profiling of vascular lesions in skin and the detection of single cancer cells in blood samples.

  7. Can Automated Imaging for Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis Aid Glaucoma Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Katie; Boachie, Charles; Bourne, Rupert; Cook, Jonathan; Burr, Jennifer M.; Ramsay, Craig; Garway-Heath, David; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Hernández, Rodolfo; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of automated imaging for glaucoma. Design Prospective, direct comparison study. Participants Adults with suspected glaucoma or ocular hypertension referred to hospital eye services in the United Kingdom. Methods We evaluated 4 automated imaging test algorithms: the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) glaucoma probability score (GPS), the HRT Moorfields regression analysis (MRA), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx enhanced corneal compensation; Glaucoma Diagnostics (GDx), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) nerve fiber indicator (NFI), and Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) classification. We defined abnormal tests as an automated classification of outside normal limits for HRT and OCT or NFI ≥ 56 (GDx). We conducted a sensitivity analysis, using borderline abnormal image classifications. The reference standard was clinical diagnosis by a masked glaucoma expert including standardized clinical assessment and automated perimetry. We analyzed 1 eye per patient (the one with more advanced disease). We also evaluated the performance according to severity and using a combination of 2 technologies. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios, diagnostic, odds ratio, and proportion of indeterminate tests. Results We recruited 955 participants, and 943 were included in the analysis. The average age was 60.5 years (standard deviation, 13.8 years); 51.1% were women. Glaucoma was diagnosed in at least 1 eye in 16.8%; 32% of participants had no glaucoma-related findings. The HRT MRA had the highest sensitivity (87.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.2%–92.1%), but lowest specificity (63.9%; 95% CI, 60.2%–67.4%); GDx had the lowest sensitivity (35.1%; 95% CI, 27.0%–43.8%), but the highest specificity (97.2%; 95% CI, 95.6%–98.3%). The HRT GPS sensitivity was 81.5% (95% CI, 73.9%–87.6%), and

  8. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Shekaramiz, Elaheh; Varadarajalu, Ganeshkumar; Day, Philip J.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays. PMID:27374766

  9. Electrochemical synthesis on single cells as templates.

    PubMed

    Tam, Jasper; Salgado, Shehan; Miltenburg, Mark; Maheshwari, Vivek

    2013-10-01

    The cell surface is made electrochemically active by interfacing with graphene sheets. The electrical and thermal properties of graphene allow the control of cell surface potential for electrochemical synthesis. Using this approach radially projecting ZnO nanorods are templated on the surface of single cells. This reported single cell photosensor has superior performance than similar devices made on planar surfaces.

  10. Automating the Processing Steps for Obtaining Bone Tissue-Engineered Substitutes: From Imaging Tools to Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro F.; Martins, Albino; Neves, Nuno M.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2014-01-01

    Bone diseases and injuries are highly incapacitating and result in a high demand for tissue substitutes with specific biomechanical and structural features. Tissue engineering has already proven to be effective in regenerating bone tissue, but has not yet been able to become an economically viable solution due to the complexity of the tissue, which is very difficult to be replicated, eventually requiring the utilization of highly labor-intensive processes. Process automation is seen as the solution for mass production of cellularized bone tissue substitutes at an affordable cost by being able to reduce human intervention as well as reducing product variability. The combination of tools such as medical imaging, computer-aided fabrication, and bioreactor technologies, which are currently used in tissue engineering, shows the potential to generate automated production ecosystems, which will, in turn, enable the generation of commercially available products with widespread clinical application. PMID:24673688

  11. A method for the automated detection phishing websites through both site characteristics and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joshua S.; Matthews, Jeanna N.; Stacy, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Phishing website analysis is largely still a time-consuming manual process of discovering potential phishing sites, verifying if suspicious sites truly are malicious spoofs and if so, distributing their URLs to the appropriate blacklisting services. Attackers increasingly use sophisticated systems for bringing phishing sites up and down rapidly at new locations, making automated response essential. In this paper, we present a method for rapid, automated detection and analysis of phishing websites. Our method relies on near real-time gathering and analysis of URLs posted on social media sites. We fetch the pages pointed to by each URL and characterize each page with a set of easily computed values such as number of images and links. We also capture a screen-shot of the rendered page image, compute a hash of the image and use the Hamming distance between these image hashes as a form of visual comparison. We provide initial results demonstrate the feasibility of our techniques by comparing legitimate sites to known fraudulent versions from Phishtank.com, by actively introducing a series of minor changes to a phishing toolkit captured in a local honeypot and by performing some initial analysis on a set of over 2.8 million URLs posted to Twitter over a 4 days in August 2011. We discuss the issues encountered during our testing such as resolvability and legitimacy of URL's posted on Twitter, the data sets used, the characteristics of the phishing sites we discovered, and our plans for future work.

  12. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  13. Automated segmentation of retinal pigment epithelium cells in fluorescence adaptive optics images.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Fonseca, Piero; Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel; Wilson, Mario C; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) imaging methods allow the histological characteristics of retinal cell mosaics, such as photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, to be studied in vivo. The high-resolution images obtained with ophthalmic AO imaging devices are rich with information that is difficult and/or tedious to quantify using manual methods. Thus, robust, automated analysis tools that can provide reproducible quantitative information about the cellular mosaics under examination are required. Automated algorithms have been developed to detect the position of individual photoreceptor cells; however, most of these methods are not well suited for characterizing the RPE mosaic. We have developed an algorithm for RPE cell segmentation and show its performance here on simulated and real fluorescence AO images of the RPE mosaic. Algorithm performance was compared to manual cell identification and yielded better than 91% correspondence. This method can be used to segment RPE cells for morphometric analysis of the RPE mosaic and speed the analysis of both healthy and diseased RPE mosaics.

  14. Automated multilayer segmentation and characterization in 3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaodong; Hariri, Amirhossein; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2013-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a 3-D imaging technique, allowing direct visualization of retinal morphology and architecture. The various layers of the retina may be affected differentially by various diseases. In this study, an automated graph-based multilayer approach was developed to sequentially segment eleven retinal surfaces including the inner retinal bands to the outer retinal bands in normal SD-OCT volume scans at three different stages. For stage 1, the four most detectable and/or distinct surfaces were identified in the four-times-downsampled images and were used as a priori positional information to limit the graph search for other surfaces at stage 2. Eleven surfaces were then detected in the two-times-downsampled images at stage 2, and refined in the original image space at stage 3 using the graph search integrating the estimated morphological shape models. Twenty macular SD-OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis) volume scans from 20 normal subjects (one eye per subject) were used in this study. The overall mean and absolute mean differences in border positions between the automated and manual segmentation for all 11 segmented surfaces were -0.20 +/- 0.53 voxels (-0.76 +/- 2.06 μm) and 0.82 +/- 0.64 voxels (3.19 +/- 2.46 μm). Intensity and thickness properties in the resultant retinal layers were investigated. This investigation in normal subjects may provide a comparative reference for subsequent investigations in eyes with disease.

  15. An automated images-to-graphs framework for high resolution connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Gray Roncal, William R.; Kleissas, Dean M.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Manavalan, Priya; Lillaney, Kunal; Pekala, Michael; Burns, Randal; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Priebe, Carey E.; Chevillet, Mark A.; Hager, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing a map of neuronal connectivity is a critical challenge in contemporary neuroscience. Recent advances in high-throughput serial section electron microscopy (EM) have produced massive 3D image volumes of nanoscale brain tissue for the first time. The resolution of EM allows for individual neurons and their synaptic connections to be directly observed. Recovering neuronal networks by manually tracing each neuronal process at this scale is unmanageable, and therefore researchers are developing automated image processing modules. Thus far, state-of-the-art algorithms focus only on the solution to a particular task (e.g., neuron segmentation or synapse identification). In this manuscript we present the first fully-automated images-to-graphs pipeline (i.e., a pipeline that begins with an imaged volume of neural tissue and produces a brain graph without any human interaction). To evaluate overall performance and select the best parameters and methods, we also develop a metric to assess the quality of the output graphs. We evaluate a set of algorithms and parameters, searching possible operating points to identify the best available brain graph for our assessment metric. Finally, we deploy a reference end-to-end version of the pipeline on a large, publicly available data set. This provides a baseline result and framework for community analysis and future algorithm development and testing. All code and data derivatives have been made publicly available in support of eventually unlocking new biofidelic computational primitives and understanding of neuropathologies. PMID:26321942

  16. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR FULLY AUTOMATED BRACHYTHERAPY SEED PLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bagga, Herman; Kavoussi, Louis; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To introduce the development of the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robotic system capable of automated brachytherapy seed placement. Methods An MRI-compatible robotic system was conceptualized and manufactured. The entire robot was built of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials. The key technology of the system is a unique pneumatic motor that was specifically developed for this application. Various preclinical experiments were performed to test the robot for precision and imager compatibility. Results The robot was fully operational within all closed-bore MRI scanners. Compatibility tests in scanners of up to 7 Tesla field intensity showed no interference of the robot with the imager. Precision tests in tissue mockups yielded a mean seed placement error of 0.72 ± 0.36 mm. Conclusions The robotic system is fully MRI compatible. The new technology allows for automated and highly accurate operation within MRI scanners and does not deteriorate the MRI quality. We believe that this robot may become a useful instrument for image-guided prostate interventions. PMID:17169653

  17. Automated Detection of Oil Depots from High Resolution Images: a New Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, A. O.; Başeski, E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an original approach to identify oil depots from single high resolution aerial/satellite images in an automated manner. The new approach considers the symmetric nature of circular oil depots, and it computes the radial symmetry in a unique way. An automated thresholding method to focus on circular regions and a new measure to verify circles are proposed. Experiments are performed on six GeoEye-1 test images. Besides, we perform tests on 16 Google Earth images of an industrial test site acquired in a time series manner (between the years 1995 and 2012). The results reveal that our approach is capable of detecting circle objects in very different/difficult images. We computed an overall performance of 95.8% for the GeoEye-1 dataset. The time series investigation reveals that our approach is robust enough to locate oil depots in industrial environments under varying illumination and environmental conditions. The overall performance is computed as 89.4% for the Google Earth dataset, and this result secures the success of our approach compared to a state-of-the-art approach.

  18. Automated Adaptive Brightness in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Using Image Segmentation and Sigmoid Function.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Ravi; Mohammed, Shahed K; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Zhang, Xuechao; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) plays an important role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases by capturing images of human small intestine. Accurate diagnosis of endoscopic images depends heavily on the quality of captured images. Along with image and frame rate, brightness of the image is an important parameter that influences the image quality which leads to the design of an efficient illumination system. Such design involves the choice and placement of proper light source and its ability to illuminate GI surface with proper brightness. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are normally used as sources where modulated pulses are used to control LED's brightness. In practice, instances like under- and over-illumination are very common in WCE, where the former provides dark images and the later provides bright images with high power consumption. In this paper, we propose a low-power and efficient illumination system that is based on an automated brightness algorithm. The scheme is adaptive in nature, i.e., the brightness level is controlled automatically in real-time while the images are being captured. The captured images are segmented into four equal regions and the brightness level of each region is calculated. Then an adaptive sigmoid function is used to find the optimized brightness level and accordingly a new value of duty cycle of the modulated pulse is generated to capture future images. The algorithm is fully implemented in a capsule prototype and tested with endoscopic images. Commercial capsules like Pillcam and Mirocam were also used in the experiment. The results show that the proposed algorithm works well in controlling the brightness level accordingly to the environmental condition, and as a result, good quality images are captured with an average of 40% brightness level that saves power consumption of the capsule. PMID:27333609

  19. Automated identification of copepods using digital image processing and artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Copepods are planktonic organisms that play a major role in the marine food chain. Studying the community structure and abundance of copepods in relation to the environment is essential to evaluate their contribution to mangrove trophodynamics and coastal fisheries. The routine identification of copepods can be very technical, requiring taxonomic expertise, experience and much effort which can be very time-consuming. Hence, there is an urgent need to introduce novel methods and approaches to automate identification and classification of copepod specimens. This study aims to apply digital image processing and machine learning methods to build an automated identification and classification technique. Results We developed an automated technique to extract morphological features of copepods' specimen from captured images using digital image processing techniques. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was used to classify the copepod specimens from species Acartia spinicauda, Bestiolina similis, Oithona aruensis, Oithona dissimilis, Oithona simplex, Parvocalanus crassirostris, Tortanus barbatus and Tortanus forcipatus based on the extracted features. 60% of the dataset was used for a two-layer feed-forward network training and the remaining 40% was used as testing dataset for system evaluation. Our approach demonstrated an overall classification accuracy of 93.13% (100% for A. spinicauda, B. similis and O. aruensis, 95% for T. barbatus, 90% for O. dissimilis and P. crassirostris, 85% for O. similis and T. forcipatus). Conclusions The methods presented in this study enable fast classification of copepods to the species level. Future studies should include more classes in the model, improving the selection of features, and reducing the time to capture the copepod images. PMID:26678287

  20. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  1. Computer-assisted scheme for automated determination of imaging planes in cervical spinal cord MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumaki, Masaki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Sekiya, Masaru; Kazama, Kiyoko

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a computerized scheme to assist MRI operators in accurate and rapid determination of sagittal sections for MRI exam of cervical spinal cord. The algorithm of the proposed scheme consisted of 6 steps: (1) extraction of a cervical vertebra containing spinal cord from an axial localizer image; (2) extraction of spinal cord with sagittal image from the extracted vertebra; (3) selection of a series of coronal localizer images corresponding to various, involved portions of the extracted spinal cord with sagittal image; (4) generation of a composite coronal-plane image from the obtained coronal images; (5) extraction of spinal cord from the obtained composite image; (6) determination of oblique sagittal sections from the detected location and gradient of the extracted spinal cord. Cervical spine images obtained from 25 healthy volunteers were used for the study. A perceptual evaluation was performed by five experienced MRI operators. Good agreement between the automated and manual determinations was achieved. By use of the proposed scheme, average execution time was reduced from 39 seconds/case to 1 second/case. The results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can assist MRI operators in performing cervical spinal cord MRI exam accurately and rapidly.

  2. Single-cell transcriptome analysis of endometrial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, K.; Katayama, S.; Saare, M.; Vera-Rodriguez, M.; Lubenets, D.; Samuel, K.; Laisk-Podar, T.; Teder, H.; Einarsdottir, E.; Salumets, A.; Kere, J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How can we study the full transcriptome of endometrial stromal and epithelial cells at the single-cell level? SUMMARY ANSWER By compiling and developing novel analytical tools for biopsy, tissue cryopreservation and disaggregation, single-cell sorting, library preparation, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and statistical data analysis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although single-cell transcriptome analyses from various biopsied tissues have been published recently, corresponding protocols for human endometrium have not been described. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The frozen-thawed endometrial biopsies were fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) to distinguish CD13-positive stromal and CD9-positive epithelial cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis performed from biopsied tissues without culturing the cells. We studied gene transcription, applying a modern and efficient RNA-seq protocol. In parallel, endometrial stromal cells were cultured and global expression profiles were compared with uncultured cells. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS For method validation, we used two endometrial biopsies, one from mid-secretory phase (Day 21, LH+8) and another from late-secretory phase (Day 25). The samples underwent single-cell FACS sorting, single-cell RNA-seq library preparation and Illumina sequencing. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Here we present a complete pipeline for single-cell gene-expression studies, from clinical sampling to statistical data analysis. Tissue manipulation, starting from disaggregation and cell-type-specific labelling and ending with single-cell automated sorting, is managed within 90 min at low temperature to minimize changes in the gene expression profile. The single living stromal and epithelial cells were sorted using CD13- and CD9-specific antibodies, respectively. Of the 8622 detected genes, 2661 were more active in cultured stromal cells than in biopsy cells. In the comparison of biopsy versus cultured cells, 5603

  3. Highly multiplexed single-cell analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Michael J.; Sevinsky, Christopher J.; Sood, Anup; Adak, Sudeshna; Bello, Musodiq O.; Bordwell, Alexander; Can, Ali; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean; Filkins, Robert J.; Hollman, Denise; Kamath, Vidya; Kaanumalle, Sireesha; Kenny, Kevin; Larsen, Melinda; Lazare, Michael; Lowes, Christina; McCulloch, Colin C.; McDonough, Elizabeth; Pang, Zhengyu; Rittscher, Jens; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Sarachan, Brion D.; Seel, Maximilian L.; Seppo, Antti; Shaikh, Kashan; Sui, Yunxia; Zhang, Jingyu; Ginty, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Limitations on the number of unique protein and DNA molecules that can be characterized microscopically in a single tissue specimen impede advances in understanding the biological basis of health and disease. Here we present a multiplexed fluorescence microscopy method (MxIF) for quantitative, single-cell, and subcellular characterization of multiple analytes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Chemical inactivation of fluorescent dyes after each image acquisition round allows reuse of common dyes in iterative staining and imaging cycles. The mild inactivation chemistry is compatible with total and phosphoprotein detection, as well as DNA FISH. Accurate computational registration of sequential images is achieved by aligning nuclear counterstain-derived fiducial points. Individual cells, plasma membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, tumor, and stromal regions are segmented to achieve cellular and subcellular quantification of multiplexed targets. In a comparison of pathologist scoring of diaminobenzidine staining of serial sections and automated MxIF scoring of a single section, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, p53, and androgen receptor staining by diaminobenzidine and MxIF methods yielded similar results. Single-cell staining patterns of 61 protein antigens by MxIF in 747 colorectal cancer subjects reveals extensive tumor heterogeneity, and cluster analysis of divergent signaling through ERK1/2, S6 kinase 1, and 4E binding protein 1 provides insights into the spatial organization of mechanistic target of rapamycin and MAPK signal transduction. Our results suggest MxIF should be broadly applicable to problems in the fields of basic biological research, drug discovery and development, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23818604

  4. Automation And Recording Of The Image Interpreter's Mensuration Tasks For Man-Made Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, N. J.; Gustafson, Glen C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is written for presentation at the 27th Annual International Technical Symposium and Instrument Display of the International Society for Optical Engineering, held August 21 to 26, 1983, in San Diego, California. The importance of saving of time in the image exploitation element of tactical reconnaissance is discussed, and a device that can be used for the "Automation and recording of the image interpreter's mensuration task for man-made objects" is described. Results of the application of the software are shown, and the critical aspects of accuracy and reliability are addressed for panoramic, oblique, and vertical photo imagery. Testing has demonstrated the ability to reduce task time by an order of magnitude comparable to manual methods. The image exploitation quality can be maintained and mensuration accuracy greatly improved.

  5. Automated system for acquisition and image processing for the control and monitoring boned nopal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luevano, E.; de Posada, E.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a system for acquisition and image processing to control the removal of thorns nopal vegetable (Opuntia ficus indica) in an automated machine that uses pulses of a laser of Nd: YAG. The areolas, areas where thorns grow on the bark of the Nopal, are located applying segmentation algorithms to the images obtained by a CCD. Once the position of the areolas is known, coordinates are sent to a motors system that controls the laser to interact with all areolas and remove the thorns of the nopal. The electronic system comprises a video decoder, memory for image and software storage, and digital signal processor for system control. The firmware programmed tasks on acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, recognition and interpretation of the areolas. This system achievement identifying areolas and generating table of coordinates of them, which will be send the motor galvo system that controls the laser for removal

  6. Intelligent speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion algorithm for automated 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Xinling; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Yue; Pang, Yun

    2015-02-01

    A novel 3-D filtering method is presented for speckle reduction and detail preservation in automated 3-D ultrasound images. First, texture features of an image are analyzed by using the improved quadtree (QT) decomposition. Then, the optimal homogeneous and the obvious heterogeneous regions are selected from QT decomposition results. Finally, diffusion parameters and diffusion process are automatically decided based on the properties of these two selected regions. The computing time needed for 2-D speckle reduction is very short. However, the computing time required for 3-D speckle reduction is often hundreds of times longer than 2-D speckle reduction. This may limit its potential application in practice. Because this new filter can adaptively adjust the time step of iteration, the computation time is reduced effectively. Both synthetic and real 3-D ultrasound images are used to evaluate the proposed filter. It is shown that this filter is superior to other methods in both practicality and efficiency. PMID:26366596

  7. Automated segmentation of CBCT image using spiral CT atlases and convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ken Chung; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Steve G F; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K M; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X; Xia, James J; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. CBCT scans have relatively low cost and low radiation dose in comparison to conventional spiral CT scans. However, a major limitation of CBCT scans is the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening and inhomogeneity, causing great difficulties for accurate segmentation of bony structures from soft tissues, as well as separating mandible from maxilla. In this paper, we presented a novel fully automated method for CBCT image segmentation. In this method, we first estimated a patient-specific atlas using a sparse label fusion strategy from predefined spiral CT atlases. This patient-specific atlas was then integrated into a convex segmentation framework based on maximum a posteriori probability for accurate segmentation. Finally, the performance of our method was validated via comparisons with manual ground-truth segmentations. PMID:24505768

  8. Automated lung field segmentation in CT images using mean shift clustering and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chama, Chanukya Krishna; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Biswas, Prabir Kumar; Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Madaiah, Mahendra Kasuvinahally; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    Lung field segmentation is a prerequisite for development of automated computer aided diagnosis system from chest computed tomography (CT) scans. Intensity based algorithm such as mean shift (MS) segmentation on CT images for delineation of lung field is reported as the best technique in terms of accuracy and speed in the literature. However, in presence of high dense abnormalities, accurate and automated delineation of lung field becomes difficult. So an improved lung field segmentation using mean shift clustering followed by geometric property based techniques such as lung region of interest (ROI) created from symmetric centroid map of two normal subjects, false positives (FP) reduction module (using eccentricity, solidity, area, centroid features) and false negatives (FN) reduction module (using overlap feature between clusters from MS label map and convex hull of costal lung) is proposed. The performance of the proposed algorithm is validated on images obtained from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) - Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) public database of 17 subjects containing nodular patterns and from local database of 26 subjects containing interstitial lung disease (ILD) patterns. The proposed algorithm has achieved mean Modified Hausdorff Distance (MHD) in mm of 1.47 +/- 4.31, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.9854 +/- 0.0288, sensitivity of 0.9771 +/- 0.0433, specificity of 0.9991 +/- 0.0014 for 133 normal images from 32 subjects and MHD in mm of 6.23 +/- 9.00, DSC of 0.8954 +/- 0.1498, sensitivity of 0.8468 +/- 0.1908, specificity of 0.9969 +/- 0.0061 for 296 abnormal images from 43 subjects.

  9. Automated characterization of blood vessels as arteries and veins in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Mirsharif, Qazaleh; Tajeripour, Farshad; Pourreza, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    In recent years researchers have found that alternations in arterial or venular tree of the retinal vasculature are associated with several public health problems such as diabetic retinopathy which is also the leading cause of blindness in the world. A prerequisite for automated assessment of subtle changes in arteries and veins, is to accurately separate those vessels from each other. This is a difficult task due to high similarity between arteries and veins in addition to variation of color and non-uniform illumination inter and intra retinal images. In this paper a novel structural and automated method is presented for artery/vein classification of blood vessels in retinal images. The proposed method consists of three main steps. In the first step, several image enhancement techniques are employed to improve the images. Then a specific feature extraction process is applied to separate major arteries from veins. Indeed, vessels are divided to smaller segments and feature extraction and vessel classification are applied to each small vessel segment instead of each vessel point. Finally, a post processing step is added to improve the results obtained from the previous step using structural characteristics of the retinal vascular network. In the last stage, vessel features at intersection and bifurcation points are processed for detection of arterial and venular sub trees. Ultimately vessel labels are revised by publishing the dominant label through each identified connected tree of arteries or veins. Evaluation of the proposed approach against two different datasets of retinal images including DRIVE database demonstrates the good performance and robustness of the method. The proposed method may be used for determination of arteriolar to venular diameter ratio in retinal images. Also the proposed method potentially allows for further investigation of labels of thinner arteries and veins which might be found by tracing them back to the major vessels.

  10. Difference Tracker: ImageJ plugins for fully automated analysis of multiple axonal transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Simon; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P

    2010-11-30

    Studies of axonal transport are critical, not only to understand its normal regulation, but also to determine the roles of transport impairment in disease. Exciting new resources have recently become available allowing live imaging of axonal transport in physiologically relevant settings, such as mammalian nerves. Thus the effects of disease, ageing and therapies can now be assessed directly in nervous system tissue. However, these imaging studies present new challenges. Manual or semi-automated analysis of the range of transport parameters required for a suitably complete evaluation is very time-consuming and can be subjective due to the complexity of the particle movements in axons in ex vivo explants or in vivo. We have developed Difference Tracker, a program combining two new plugins for the ImageJ image-analysis freeware, to provide fast, fully automated and objective analysis of a number of relevant measures of trafficking of fluorescently labeled particles so that axonal transport in different situations can be easily compared. We confirm that Difference Tracker can accurately track moving particles in highly simplified, artificial simulations. It can also identify and track multiple motile fluorescently labeled mitochondria simultaneously in time-lapse image stacks from live imaging of tibial nerve axons, reporting values for a number of parameters that are comparable to those obtained through manual analysis of the same axons. Difference Tracker therefore represents a useful free resource for the comparative analysis of axonal transport under different conditions, and could potentially be used and developed further in many other studies requiring quantification of particle movements.

  11. Automating PACS Quality Control with the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Michael L; Welch, E Brian; Landman, Bennett A

    2012-02-12

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption-for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure. Yet, substantial delays may be incurred if a problematic scan is not noticed until a radiologist reads the scans or an automated algorithm fails. Given scores of slices in typical three-dimensional scans and wide-variety of potential use cases, a technologist cannot practically be expected inspect all images. In large-scale research, automated pipeline systems have had great success in achieving high throughput. However, clinical and institutional workflows are largely based on DICOM and PACS technologies; these systems are not readily compatible with research systems due to security and privacy restrictions. Hence, quantitative quality control has been relegated to individual investigators and too often neglected. Herein, we propose a scalable system, the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource-VIPER, to integrate modular quality control and image analysis routines with a standard PACS configuration. This server unifies image processing routines across an institutional level and provides a simple interface so that investigators can collaborate to deploy new analysis technologies. VIPER integrates with high performance computing environments has successfully analyzed all standard scans from our institutional research center over the course of the last 18 months.

  12. Automated generation of curved planar reformations from MR images of the spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Ourselin, Sébastien; Gomes, Lavier; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for automated curved planar reformation (CPR) of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spine is presented. The CPR images, generated by a transformation from image-based to spine-based coordinate system, follow the structural shape of the spine and allow the whole course of the curved anatomy to be viewed in individual cross-sections. The three-dimensional (3D) spine curve and the axial vertebral rotation, which determine the transformation, are described by polynomial functions. The 3D spine curve passes through the centres of vertebral bodies, while the axial vertebral rotation determines the rotation of vertebrae around the axis of the spinal column. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained by a robust refinement of the initial estimates of the centres of vertebral bodies and axial vertebral rotation. The optimization framework is based on the automatic image analysis of MR spine images that exploits some basic anatomical properties of the spine. The method was evaluated on 21 MR images from 12 patients and the results provided a good description of spine anatomy, with mean errors of 2.5 mm and 1.7° for the position of the 3D spine curve and axial rotation of vertebrae, respectively. The generated CPR images are independent of the position of the patient in the scanner while comprising both anatomical and geometrical properties of the spine.

  13. Automated model-based calibration of short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrographs.

    PubMed

    Kosec, Matjaž; Bürmen, Miran; Tomaževič, Dejan; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-10-01

    Among the variety of available hyperspectral imaging systems, the line-scan technique stands out for its short acquisition time and good signal-to-noise ratio. However, due to imperfections in the camera lens and, in particular, optical components of the imaging spectrograph, the acquired images are spatially and spectrally distorted, which can significantly degrade the accuracy of the subsequent hyperspectral image analysis. In this work, we propose and evaluate an automated method for correction of spatial and spectral distortions introduced by a line-scan hyperspectral imaging system operating in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectral range from 1000 nm to 2500 nm. The proposed method is based on non-rigid registration of the distorted and reference images corresponding to two passive calibration objects. The results of the validation show that the proposed method is accurate, efficient, and applicable for calibration of line-scan hyperspectral imaging systems. Moreover, the design of the method and of the calibration objects allows integration with systems operating in diffuse reflectance or transmittance modes. PMID:23031695

  14. The use of the Kalman filter in the automated segmentation of EIT lung images.

    PubMed

    Zifan, A; Liatsis, P; Chapman, B E

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new pipeline for the fast and accurate segmentation of impedance images of the lungs using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). EIT is an emerging, promising, non-invasive imaging modality that produces real-time, low spatial but high temporal resolution images of impedance inside a body. Recovering impedance itself constitutes a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, therefore the problem is usually linearized, which produces impedance-change images, rather than static impedance ones. Such images are highly blurry and fuzzy along object boundaries. We provide a mathematical reasoning behind the high suitability of the Kalman filter when it comes to segmenting and tracking conductivity changes in EIT lung images. Next, we use a two-fold approach to tackle the segmentation problem. First, we construct a global lung shape to restrict the search region of the Kalman filter. Next, we proceed with augmenting the Kalman filter by incorporating an adaptive foreground detection system to provide the boundary contours for the Kalman filter to carry out the tracking of the conductivity changes as the lungs undergo deformation in a respiratory cycle. The proposed method has been validated by using performance statistics such as misclassified area, and false positive rate, and compared to previous approaches. The results show that the proposed automated method can be a fast and reliable segmentation tool for EIT imaging.

  15. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  16. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system’s unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  17. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  18. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  19. Automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue: linking imaging mass spectrometry to curated atlases.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Yang, Junhai; De Moor, Bart; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Van de Plas, Raf

    2014-09-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments.

  20. Fully automated quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk in DCE-MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Hu, Xiaoxin; Gu, Yajia; Li, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) images are two important indices for breast cancer risk assessment in the clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for quantitative analysis of FGT and BPE in DCE-MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three steps, i.e., segmentation of whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues. Based on the volume of interest extracted automatically, dynamic programming method was applied in each 2-D slice of a 3-D MR scan to delineate the chest wall and breast skin line for segmenting the whole breast. This step took advantages of the continuity of chest wall and breast skin line across adjacent slices. We then further used fuzzy c-means clustering method with automatic selection of cluster number for segmenting the fibroglandular tissues within the segmented whole breast area. Finally, a statistical method was used to set a threshold based on the estimated noise level for segmenting the enhanced fibroglandular tissues in the subtraction images of pre- and post-contrast MR scans. Based on the segmented whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues, FGT and BPE were automatically computed. Preliminary results of technical evaluation and clinical validation showed that our fully automated scheme could obtain good segmentation of the whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues to achieve accurate assessment of FGT and BPE for quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk.

  1. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  2. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Minsoo; Choi, Young Hun; Hyo Kim, Jong

    2015-12-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine.

  3. Automatic nipple detection on 3D images of an automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanshir Moghaddam, Mandana; Tan, Tao; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that applying Automated Breast Ultrasound in addition to mammography in women with dense breasts can lead to additional detection of small, early stage breast cancers which are occult in corresponding mammograms. In this paper, we proposed a fully automatic method for detecting the nipple location in 3D ultrasound breast images acquired from Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems. The nipple location is a valuable landmark to report the position of possible abnormalities in a breast or to guide image registration. To detect the nipple location, all images were normalized. Subsequently, features have been extracted in a multi scale approach and classification experiments were performed using a gentle boost classifier to identify the nipple location. The method was applied on a dataset of 100 patients with 294 different 3D ultrasound views from Siemens and U-systems acquisition systems. Our database is a representative sample of cases obtained in clinical practice by four medical centers. The automatic method could accurately locate the nipple in 90% of AP (Anterior-Posterior) views and in 79% of the other views.

  4. Automated segmentation of oral mucosa from wide-field OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, Ryan N.; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can discriminate morphological tissue features important for oral cancer detection such as the presence or absence of basement membrane and epithelial thickness. We previously reported an OCT system employing a rotary-pullback catheter capable of in vivo, rapid, wide-field (up to 90 x 2.5mm2) imaging in the oral cavity. Due to the size and complexity of these OCT data sets, rapid automated image processing software that immediately displays important tissue features is required to facilitate prompt bed-side clinical decisions. We present an automated segmentation algorithm capable of detecting the epithelial surface and basement membrane in 3D OCT images of the oral cavity. The algorithm was trained using volumetric OCT data acquired in vivo from a variety of tissue types and histology-confirmed pathologies spanning normal through cancer (8 sites, 21 patients). The algorithm was validated using a second dataset of similar size and tissue diversity. We demonstrate application of the algorithm to an entire OCT volume to map epithelial thickness, and detection of the basement membrane, over the tissue surface. These maps may be clinically useful for delineating pre-surgical tumor margins, or for biopsy site guidance.

  5. Comparison of manually produced and automated cross country movement maps using digital image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynn, L. K.

    1985-01-01

    The Image-Based Information System (IBIS) was used to automate the cross country movement (CCM) mapping model developed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). Existing terrain factor overlays and a CCM map, produced by DMA for the Fort Lewis, Washington area, were digitized and reformatted into geometrically registered images. Terrain factor data from Slope, Soils, and Vegetation overlays were entered into IBIS, and were then combined utilizing IBIS-programmed equations to implement the DMA CCM model. The resulting IBIS-generated CCM map was then compared with the digitized manually produced map to test similarity. The numbers of pixels comprising each CCM region were compared between the two map images, and percent agreement between each two regional counts was computed. The mean percent agreement equalled 86.21%, with an areally weighted standard deviation of 11.11%. Calculation of Pearson's correlation coefficient yielded +9.997. In some cases, the IBIS-calculated map code differed from the DMA codes: analysis revealed that IBIS had calculated the codes correctly. These highly positive results demonstrate the power and accuracy of IBIS in automating models which synthesize a variety of thematic geographic data.

  6. Fast Image Analysis for the Micronucleus Assay in a Fully Automated High-Throughput Biodosimetry System

    PubMed Central

    Lyulko, Oleksandra V.; Garty, Guy; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C.; Szolc, Barbara; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of, and results from an image analysis system are presented for automated detection and scoring of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The system is part of the Rapid Automated Biodosimetry Tool, which was developed at the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry for rapid radiation dose assessment of many individuals based on single fingerstick samples of blood. Blood lymphocytes were subjected to the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the images of cell cytoplasm and nuclei are analyzed to estimate the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated cells. We describe an algorithm that is based on dual fluorescent labeling of lymphocytes with separate analysis of images of cytoplasm and nuclei. To evaluate the performance of the system, blood samples of seven healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with doses from 0–10 Gy and dose-response curves of micronuclei frequencies were generated. To establish the applicability of the system to the detection of high doses, the ratios of mononucleated cells to binucleated cells were determined for three of the donors. All of the dose-response curves generated automatically showed clear dose dependence and good correlation (R2 from 0.914–0.998) with the results of manual scoring. PMID:24502354

  7. Automated Detection of Brain Abnormalities in Neonatal Hypoxia Ischemic Injury from MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sun, Yu; Bhanu, Bir; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of three automated brain injury detection methods, namely symmetry-integrated region growing (SIRG), hierarchical region splitting (HRS) and modified watershed segmentation (MWS) in human and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets for the detection of hypoxic ischemic injuries (HII). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, 1.5T) data from neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, as well as T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, 11.7T, 4.7T) at seven different time-points (1, 4, 7, 10, 17, 24 and 31 days post HII) in rat-pup model of hypoxic ischemic injury were used to check the temporal efficacy of our computational approaches. Sensitivity, specificity, similarity were used as performance metrics based on manual (‘gold standard’) injury detection to quantify comparisons. When compared to the manual gold standard, automated injury location results from SIRG performed the best in 62% of the data, while 29% for HRS and 9% for MWS. Injury severity detection revealed that SIRG performed the best in 67% cases while HRS for 33% data. Prior information is required by HRS and MWS, but not by SIRG. However, SIRG is sensitive to parameter-tuning, while HRS and MWS are not. Among these methods, SIRG performs the best in detecting lesion volumes; HRS is the most robust, while MWS lags behind in both respects. PMID:25000294

  8. Automated Coronal Seismology: Curvelet Characterization of Probability Maps of Image Data with Oscillatory Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C.; Ireland, J.

    2010-12-01

    Automated coronal seismology will require measurements of the structure that supports an oscillatory signal; for example, a measurement of the loop length of a transversely oscillating loop can be used to estimate the coronal magnetic field (Nakariakov& Ofman 2001). One of the results from the recently published Bayesian probability based automated oscillation detection algorithm (Ireland et al., 2010) is a probability map. This is an image of the probability that each pixel from a set of images contains an oscillatory signal. A map from a significant detection contains one or more clusters of high probability pixels dispersed amongst mostly pixels of low probability. These low probability pixels amount to noise while the clusters of high probability are the desired signal. A visual inspection of the probability maps that contain significant signal reveal that the clusters of pixels contain structure that corresponds to physical regions in the original images i.e. oscillating loops. A necessary step for using these oscillation probability maps is to extract and characterize these high probability regions. A natural choice for an appropriate representation of these structures especially given their corresponds to real extended features such as loops is the curvelet transform (Candes and Donoho, 1999 and Candes et al., 2005). In this work we present a preliminary analysis of these probability maps using curvelets to isolate and characterize regions of high probability. The suitability of this technique for the pipeline processing of Solar Dynamics Observatory data is also discussed.

  9. Live single-cell laser tag

    PubMed Central

    Binan, Loïc; Mazzaferri, Javier; Choquet, Karine; Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Wang, Yu Chang; Affar, El Bachir; De Koninck, Yves; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Kleinman, Claudia L.; Costantino, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The ability to conduct image-based, non-invasive cell tagging, independent of genetic engineering, is key to cell biology applications. Here we introduce cell labelling via photobleaching (CLaP), a method that enables instant, specific tagging of individual cells based on a wide array of criteria such as shape, behaviour or positional information. CLaP uses laser illumination to crosslink biotin onto the plasma membrane, coupled with streptavidin conjugates to label individual cells for genomic, cell-tracking, flow cytometry or ultra-microscopy applications. We show that the incorporated mark is stable, non-toxic, retained for several days, and transferred by cell division but not to adjacent cells in culture. To demonstrate the potential of CLaP for genomic applications, we combine CLaP with microfluidics-based single-cell capture followed by transcriptome-wide next-generation sequencing. Finally, we show that CLaP can also be exploited for inducing transient cell adhesion to substrates for microengineering cultures with spatially patterned cell types. PMID:27198043

  10. A new automated method of image analysis: comparison of ciliary and flagellar beats.

    PubMed

    Schoevaert, D; Marano, F; Serres, C; Berrebah, H

    1990-01-01

    A new automated method of image analysis of sperm flagellar (human) and cilia (Dunaliella) bends is developed. This method permits an automatic determination of the line characterizing the flagellum. Two dynamic parameters are measured: the wave propagation velocity and the wave curvature radius. The data reveal similar patterns in the propagation of the principal and reverse waves between flagelated and ciliated cells. Conversely, differences are seen in principal wave curvature due perhaps to the presence of periaxonemal structures in the flagellum, absent in cilium. The identical patterns of reverse wave curvaturei in both systems may be linked to axonemal limitations.

  11. An automated method for segmentation of epithelial cervical cells in images of ThinPrep.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Negar M; Sadri, Saeed; Moghaddam, Noushin A; Amirfattahi, Rassul

    2010-12-01

    We present an automated method for segmentation of epithelial cells in images taken from ThinPrep scenes by a digital camera in a cytology lab. The method covers both steps of localization of cell objects in low resolution and detection of cytoplasm and nucleus boundary in high resolution. The underlying method makes use of geometric active contours as a powerful tool of segmentation. We also provide the analysis of the connected cells. For this purpose an automatic circular decomposition method is incorporated and adapted to the application by changing its segmentation condition. The results are evaluated numerically and compared with those of previous work in literature. PMID:20703603

  12. Single Cell Transcriptome Amplification with MALBAC

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Longzhi; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Multiple Annealing and Looping-Based Amplification Cycles (MALBAC) has been developed for whole genome amplification of an individual cell, relying on quasilinear instead of exponential amplification to achieve high coverage. Here we adapt MALBAC for single-cell transcriptome amplification, which gives consistently high detection efficiency, accuracy and reproducibility. With this newly developed technique, we successfully amplified and sequenced single cells from 3 germ layers from mouse embryos in the early gastrulation stage, and examined the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program among cells in the mesoderm layer on a single-cell level. PMID:25822772

  13. Electrochemical Visualization of Intracellular Hydrogen Peroxide at Single Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Ruiqin; Tang, Huifen; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2016-02-16

    In this Letter, the electrochemical visualization of hydrogen peroxide inside one cell was achieved first using a comprehensive Au-luminol-microelectrode and electrochemiluminescence. The capillary with a tip opening of 1-2 μm was filled with the mixture of chitosan and luminol, which was coated with the thin layers of polyvinyl chloride/nitrophenyloctyl ether (PVC/NPOE) and gold as the microelectrode. Upon contact with the aqueous hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and luminol in contact with the gold layer were oxidized under the positive potential resulting in luminescence for the imaging. Due to the small diameter of the electrode, the microelectrode tip was inserted into one cell and the bright luminescence observed at the tip confirmed the visualization of intracellular hydrogen peroxide. The further coupling of oxidase on the electrode surface could open the field in the electrochemical imaging of intracellular biomolecules at single cells, which benefited the single cell electrochemical detection. PMID:26879364

  14. Electrochemical Visualization of Intracellular Hydrogen Peroxide at Single Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Ruiqin; Tang, Huifen; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2016-02-16

    In this Letter, the electrochemical visualization of hydrogen peroxide inside one cell was achieved first using a comprehensive Au-luminol-microelectrode and electrochemiluminescence. The capillary with a tip opening of 1-2 μm was filled with the mixture of chitosan and luminol, which was coated with the thin layers of polyvinyl chloride/nitrophenyloctyl ether (PVC/NPOE) and gold as the microelectrode. Upon contact with the aqueous hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and luminol in contact with the gold layer were oxidized under the positive potential resulting in luminescence for the imaging. Due to the small diameter of the electrode, the microelectrode tip was inserted into one cell and the bright luminescence observed at the tip confirmed the visualization of intracellular hydrogen peroxide. The further coupling of oxidase on the electrode surface could open the field in the electrochemical imaging of intracellular biomolecules at single cells, which benefited the single cell electrochemical detection.

  15. Drop-on-Demand Single Cell Isolation and Total RNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sangjun; Kim, Yun-Gon; Dong, Lingsheng; Lombardi, Michael; Haeggstrom, Edward; Jensen, Roderick V.; Hsiao, Li-Li; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Technologies that rapidly isolate viable single cells from heterogeneous solutions have significantly contributed to the field of medical genomics. Challenges remain both to enable efficient extraction, isolation and patterning of single cells from heterogeneous solutions as well as to keep them alive during the process due to a limited degree of control over single cell manipulation. Here, we present a microdroplet based method to isolate and pattern single cells from heterogeneous cell suspensions (10% target cell mixture), preserve viability of the extracted cells (97.0±0.8%), and obtain genomic information from isolated cells compared to the non-patterned controls. The cell encapsulation process is both experimentally and theoretically analyzed. Using the isolated cells, we identified 11 stem cell markers among 1000 genes and compare to the controls. This automated platform enabling high-throughput cell manipulation for subsequent genomic analysis employs fewer handling steps compared to existing methods. PMID:21412416

  16. Semi-automated discrimination of retinal pigmented epithelial cells in two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retinas

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Nathan S.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Automated image segmentation is a critical step toward achieving a quantitative evaluation of disease states with imaging techniques. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) has been employed to visualize the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and provide images indicating the health of the retina. However, segmentation of RPE cells within TPM images is difficult due to small differences in fluorescence intensity between cell borders and cell bodies. Here we present a semi-automated method for segmenting RPE cells that relies upon multiple weak features that differentiate cell borders from the remaining image. These features were scored by a search optimization procedure that built up the cell border in segments around a nucleus of interest. With six images used as a test, our method correctly identified cell borders for 69% of nuclei on average. Performance was strongly dependent upon increasing retinosome content in the RPE. TPM image analysis has the potential of providing improved early quantitative assessments of diseases affecting the RPE. PMID:26309765

  17. Automation of PCXMC and ImPACT for NASA Astronaut Medical Imaging Dose and Risk Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Picco, Charles; Flores-McLaughlin, John; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To automate astronaut organ and effective dose calculations from occupational X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations incorporating PCXMC and ImPACT tools and to estimate the associated lifetime cancer risk per the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) using MATLAB(R). Methods: NASA follows guidance from the NCRP on its operational radiation safety program for astronauts. NCRP Report 142 recommends that astronauts be informed of the cancer risks from reported exposures to ionizing radiation from medical imaging. MATLAB(R) code was written to retrieve exam parameters for medical imaging procedures from a NASA database, calculate associated dose and risk, and return results to the database, using the Microsoft .NET Framework. This code interfaces with the PCXMC executable and emulates the ImPACT Excel spreadsheet to calculate organ doses from X-rays and CTs, respectively, eliminating the need to utilize the PCXMC graphical user interface (except for a few special cases) and the ImPACT spreadsheet. Results: Using MATLAB(R) code to interface with PCXMC and replicate ImPACT dose calculation allowed for rapid evaluation of multiple medical imaging exams. The user inputs the exam parameter data into the database and runs the code. Based on the imaging modality and input parameters, the organ doses are calculated. Output files are created for record, and organ doses, effective dose, and cancer risks associated with each exam are written to the database. Annual and post-flight exposure reports, which are used by the flight surgeon to brief the astronaut, are generated from the database. Conclusions: Automating PCXMC and ImPACT for evaluation of NASA astronaut medical imaging radiation procedures allowed for a traceable and rapid method for tracking projected cancer risks associated with over 12,000 exposures. This code will be used to evaluate future medical radiation exposures, and can easily be modified to accommodate changes to the risk

  18. HWT - hybrid watershed transform: optimal combination of hierarchical interactive and automated image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Horst K.; Wenzel, Markus T.; Drexl, Johann; Zentis, Susanne; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2007-03-01

    In quantitative medical imaging and therapy planning, the optimal combination of automated and interactively defined information is crucial for image segmentation methods to be both efficient and effective. We propose to combine an efficient hierarchical region merging scheme that collects per-region statistics across hierarchy levels with a trainable classification engine that facilitates automated region labeling based on an arbitrary number of reference segmentations. When applying the classification engine, we propose to use a corridor of non-classified regions resulting in a sparse labeling with extremely low false-classification rate, and to attribute labels to the remaining basins through successive merging with ready-labeled basins. The proposed hierarchical region merging scheme also permits to efficiently include interactively defined labels. We denominate this general approach as Hybrid Hierarchical Interactive Image Segmentation Scheme (HIS2). More specifically, we present an extension of the Interactive Watershed Transform, which we combine with a trainable two-class Support Vector Machine based on Gaussian radial basis functions. Finally, we present a novel asymmetric marker scheme, which provides a powerful means of regionally correcting remaining inaccuracies while preserving full detail of the automatic labeling procedure. We denominate the complete algorithm as Hybrid Watershed Transform (HWT), which we apply to one challenging segmentation problem in clinical imaging, namely efficient bone removal in large computed tomography angiographic data sets. Efficiency and accuracy of the proposed methodology is evaluated on multi-slice images from nine different sites. As a result, its ability to rapidly and automatically generate robust and precise segmentation results in combination with a versatile manual correction mechanism could be proven without requiring specific anatomical or geometrical models.

  19. Automated Variability Selection in Time-domain Imaging Surveys Using Sparse Representations with Learned Dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.; Moody, D. I.; Ji, Z.; Brumby, S. P.; Brink, H.; Richards, J.; Bloom, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Exponential growth in data streams and discovery power delivered by modern time-domain imaging surveys creates a pressing need for variability extraction algorithms that are both fully automated and highly reliable. The current state of the art methods based on image differencing are limited by the fact that for every real variable source the algorithm returns a large number of bogus "detections" caused by atmospheric effects and instrumental signatures coupled with imperfect image processing. Here we present a new approach to this problem inspired by recent advances in computer vision and train the machine directly on pixel data. The training data set comes from the Palomar Transient Factory survey and consists of small images centered around transient candidates with known real/bogus classification. This set of 441-dimensional vectors (21x21 pixel images) is then transformed to a linear representation using the so called dictionary, an overcomplete basis constructed separately for each class. The learning algorithm captures the fact that the intrinsic dimensionality of the input images is typically much lower than the size of the dictionary, and therefore the data vectors are well approximated with a small number of dictionary elements. This sparse representation can be used to construct informative features for any suitable machine learning classifier. In our preliminary analysis automatically extracted features approach the performance of features constructed by humans using subject domain knowledge.

  20. Automated classification of multi-spectral MR images using Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Geng-Cheng; Wang, Wen-June; Wang, Chuin-Mu; Sun, Sheng-Yih

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable instrument in medical science owing to its capabilities in soft tissue characterization and 3D visualization. A potential application of MRI in clinical practice is brain parenchyma classification. This work proposes a novel approach called "Unsupervised Linear Discriminant Analysis (ULDA)" to classify and segment the three major tissues, i.e. gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), from a multi-spectral MR image of the human brain. The ULDA comprises two processes, namely Target Generation Process (TGP) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classification. TGP is a fuzzy-set process that generates a set of potential targets from unknown information, and applies these targets to train the optimal division boundary by LDA, such that three tissues GM, WM and CSF are separated. Finally, two sets of images, namely computer-generated phantom images and real MR images are used in the experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of ULDA. Experiment results reveal that UDLA segments a multi-spectral MR image much more effectively than either FMRIB's Automated Segmentation Tool (FAST) or Fuzzy C-means (FC). PMID:20044236

  1. Knee X-ray image analysis method for automated detection of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Lior; Ling, Shari M.; Scott, William W.; Bos, Angelo; Orlov, Nikita; Macura, Tomasz; Eckley, D. Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for automated detection of radiographic Osteoarthritis (OA) in knee X-ray images. The detection is based on the Kellgren-Lawrence classification grades, which correspond to the different stages of OA severity. The classifier was built using manually classified X-rays, representing the first four KL grades (normal, doubtful, minimal and moderate). Image analysis is performed by first identifying a set of image content descriptors and image transforms that are informative for the detection of OA in the X-rays, and assigning weights to these image features using Fisher scores. Then, a simple weighted nearest neighbor rule is used in order to predict the KL grade to which a given test X-ray sample belongs. The dataset used in the experiment contained 350 X-ray images classified manually by their KL grades. Experimental results show that moderate OA (KL grade 3) and minimal OA (KL grade 2) can be differentiated from normal cases with accuracy of 91.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Doubtful OA (KL grade 1) was detected automatically with a much lower accuracy of 57%. The source code developed and used in this study is available for free download at www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:19342330

  2. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results.

  3. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results. PMID:25986589

  4. Single-Cell Analysis in Cancer Genomics.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  5. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  6. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi, Narjes S.; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  7. Image patch-based method for automated classification and detection of focal liver lesions on CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Mustafa; Pasari, Raghav; Rubin, Daniel; Greenspan, Hayit

    2013-03-01

    We developed a method for automated classification and detection of liver lesions in CT images based on image patch representation and bag-of-visual-words (BoVW). BoVW analysis has been extensively used in the computer vision domain to analyze scenery images. In the current work we discuss how it can be used for liver lesion classification and detection. The methodology includes building a dictionary for a training set using local descriptors and representing a region in the image using a visual word histogram. Two tasks are described: a classification task, for lesion characterization, and a detection task in which a scan window moves across the image and is determined to be normal liver tissue or a lesion. Data: In the classification task 73 CT images of liver lesions were used, 25 images having cysts, 24 having metastasis and 24 having hemangiomas. A radiologist circumscribed the lesions, creating a region of interest (ROI), in each of the images. He then provided the diagnosis, which was established either by biopsy or clinical follow-up. Thus our data set comprises 73 images and 73 ROIs. In the detection task, a radiologist drew ROIs around each liver lesion and two regions of normal liver, for a total of 159 liver lesion ROIs and 146 normal liver ROIs. The radiologist also demarcated the liver boundary. Results: Classification results of more than 95% were obtained. In the detection task, F1 results obtained is 0.76. Recall is 84%, with precision of 73%. Results show the ability to detect lesions, regardless of shape.

  8. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  9. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  10. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-21

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  11. Automated segmentation of outer retinal layers in macular OCT images of patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Reisman, Charles A.; Chan, Kinpui; Ramachandran, Rithambara; Raza, Ali; Hood, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    To provide a tool for quantifying the effects of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) seen on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images, an automated layer segmentation algorithm was developed. This algorithm, based on dual-gradient information and a shortest path search strategy, delineates the inner limiting membrane and three outer r