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Sample records for automatic target recognizer

  1. A human factors engineering approach to biomedical decision making: A new role for automatic target recognizer technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.L.; Stalker, K.T.; Yee, A.

    1995-01-01

    This report identifies the key features noted as requirements in the diagnostic decision-making process of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) cardiac imaging. The report discusses the critical issues that create the basic system framework for design of an automatic target recognizer (ATR) algorithm prototype to support diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Candidate feature discovery algorithms that may form the basis of future work include Adaptive Resonance Theory and Bayesian Decision Network. A framework for the practitioner-Human-System-Interface would include baseline patient history and demographic data; reference cardiac imagery history; and current overlay imagery to provide complementary information (i.e., coronary angiography, echocardiography, and SPECT images). The goal is to design a prototype that would represent a fused present and historical {open_quotes}whole{close_quotes} functional, structural, and physiologic cardiac patient model. This framework decision-assisting platform would be available to practitioner and student alike, with no {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} consequences.

  2. Unification of automatic target tracking and automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    The subject being addressed is how an automatic target tracker (ATT) and an automatic target recognizer (ATR) can be fused together so tightly and so well that their distinctiveness becomes lost in the merger. This has historically not been the case outside of biology and a few academic papers. The biological model of ATT∪ATR arises from dynamic patterns of activity distributed across many neural circuits and structures (including retina). The information that the brain receives from the eyes is "old news" at the time that it receives it. The eyes and brain forecast a tracked object's future position, rather than relying on received retinal position. Anticipation of the next moment - building up a consistent perception - is accomplished under difficult conditions: motion (eyes, head, body, scene background, target) and processing limitations (neural noise, delays, eye jitter, distractions). Not only does the human vision system surmount these problems, but it has innate mechanisms to exploit motion in support of target detection and classification. Biological vision doesn't normally operate on snapshots. Feature extraction, detection and recognition are spatiotemporal. When vision is viewed as a spatiotemporal process, target detection, recognition, tracking, event detection and activity recognition, do not seem as distinct as they are in current ATT and ATR designs. They appear as similar mechanism taking place at varying time scales. A framework is provided for unifying ATT and ATR.

  3. Digital-Electronic/Optical Apparatus Would Recognize Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed automatic target-recognition apparatus consists mostly of digital-electronic/optical cross-correlator that processes infrared images of targets. Infrared images of unknown targets correlated quickly with images of known targets. Apparatus incorporates some features of correlator described in "Prototype Optical Correlator for Robotic Vision System" (NPO-18451), and some of correlator described in "Compact Optical Correlator" (NPO-18473). Useful in robotic system; to recognize and track infrared-emitting, moving objects as variously shaped hot workpieces on conveyor belt.

  4. Aided versus automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hair, Mark A.; Purvis, Bradley D.; Brown, Jeff

    1997-06-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms have offered the promise of recognizing items of military importance over the past 20 years. It is the experience of the authors that greater ATR success would be possible if the ATR were used to 'aid' the human operator instead of automatically 'direct' the operator. ATRs have failed not due to their probability of detection versus false alarm rate, but to neglect of the human component. ATRs are designed to improve overall throughput by relieving the human operator of the need to perform repetitive tasks like scanning vast quantities of imagery for possible targets. ATRs are typically inserted prior to the operator and provide cues, which are then accepted or rejected. From our experience at three field exercises and a current operational deployment to the Bosnian theater, this is not the best way to get total system performance. The human operator makes decisions based on learning, history of past events, and surrounding contextual information. Loss of these factors by providing imagery, latent with symbolic cues on top of the original imagery, actually increases the workload of the operator. This paper covers the lessons learned from the field demonstrations and the operational deployment. The reconnaissance and intelligence community's primary use of an ATR should be to establish prioritized cues of potential targets for an operator to 'pull' from and to be able to 'send' targets identified by the operator for a 'second opinion.' The Army and Air Force are modifying their exploitation workstations over the next 18 months to use ATRs, which operate in this fashion. This will be the future architecture that ATRs for the reconnaissance and intelligence community should integrate into.

  5. Automatic target recognition employing signal compression.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Pradeep; Mikhael, Wasfy B; Muise, Robert R; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2007-07-20

    Quadratic correlation filters (QCFs) have been used successfully to detect and recognize targets embedded in background clutter. Recently, a QCF called the Rayleigh quotient quadratic correlation filter (RQQCF) was formulated for automatic target recognition (ATR) in IR imagery. Using training images from target and clutter classes, the RQQCF explicitly maximized a class separation metric. What we believe to be a novel approach is presented for ATR that synthesizes the RQQCF using compressed images. The proposed approach considerably reduces the computational complexity and storage requirements while retaining the high recognition accuracy of the original RQQCF technique. The advantages of the proposed scheme are illustrated using sample results obtained from experiments on IR imagery.

  6. Automatic target recognition apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Ciarcia, Christopher A.

    2000-01-01

    An automatic target recognition apparatus (10) is provided, having a video camera/digitizer (12) for producing a digitized image signal (20) representing an image containing therein objects which objects are to be recognized if they meet predefined criteria. The digitized image signal (20) is processed within a video analysis subroutine (22) residing in a computer (14) in a plurality of parallel analysis chains such that the objects are presumed to be lighter in shading than the background in the image in three of the chains and further such that the objects are presumed to be darker than the background in the other three chains. In two of the chains the objects are defined by surface texture analysis using texture filter operations. In another two of the chains the objects are defined by background subtraction operations. In yet another two of the chains the objects are defined by edge enhancement processes. In each of the analysis chains a calculation operation independently determines an error factor relating to the probability that the objects are of the type which should be recognized, and a probability calculation operation combines the results of the analysis chains.

  7. Recognized simulation of space locomotive target based on sky background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Ma, Jianhong

    2017-01-01

    Space moving object recognition and tracking is an important research topic in computer vision. It has broad application prospects in space exploration, detection of traffic flow, military field, automatic control and other fields. This paper aims to propose a new space target recognition algorithm, and use this algorithm to identify the motion trajectory simulation of a certain object in the universe.

  8. Sparsity-motivated automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal M; Nasrabadi, Nasser M; Chellappa, Rama

    2011-04-01

    We present an automatic target recognition algorithm using the recently developed theory of sparse representations and compressive sensing. We show how sparsity can be helpful for efficient utilization of data for target recognition. We verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm in terms of the recognition rate and confusion matrices on the well known Comanche (Boeing-Sikorsky, USA) forward-looking IR data set consisting of ten different military targets at different orientations.

  9. Automatic target recognition via classical detection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Douglas R.

    1995-07-01

    Classical Bayesian detection and decision theory applies to arbitrary problems with underlying probabilistic models. When the models describe uncertainties in target type, pose, geometry, surround, scattering phenomena, sensor behavior, and feature extraction, then classical theory directly yields detailed model-based automatic target recognition (ATR) techniques. This paper reviews options and considerations arising under a general Bayesian framework for model- based ATR, including approaches to the major problems of acquiring probabilistic models and of carrying out the indicated Bayesian computations.

  10. Automatic target identification using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud A.; Samu, Tayib I.; Grissom, William A.

    1995-10-01

    Neural network theories are applied to attain human-like performance in areas such as speech recognition, statistical mapping, and target recognition or identification. In target identification, one of the difficult tasks has been the extraction of features to be used to train the neural network which is subsequently used for the target's identification. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an automatic target identification system using features extracted from a specific class of targets. The extracted features were the graphical representations of the silhouettes of the targets. Image processing techniques and some Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) properties were implemented to extract the features. The FFT eliminates variations in the extracted features due to rotation or scaling. A Neural Network was trained with the extracted features using the Learning Vector Quantization paradigm. An identification system was set up to test the algorithm. The image processing software was interfaced with MATLAB Neural Network Toolbox via a computer program written in C language to automate the target identification process. The system performed well as at classified the objects used to train it irrespective of rotation, scaling, and translation. This automatic target identification system had a classification success rate of about 95%.

  11. Self-assessing target with automatic feedback

    DOEpatents

    Larkin, Stephen W.; Kramer, Robert L.

    2004-03-02

    A self assessing target with four quadrants and a method of use thereof. Each quadrant containing possible causes for why shots are going into that particular quadrant rather than the center mass of the target. Each possible cause is followed by a solution intended to help the marksman correct the problem causing the marksman to shoot in that particular area. In addition, the self assessing target contains possible causes for general shooting errors and solutions to the causes of the general shooting error. The automatic feedback with instant suggestions and corrections enables the shooter to improve their marksmanship.

  12. Automatic target tracking in FLIR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abdullah; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2004-09-01

    Moving target tracking is a challenging task and is increasingly becoming important for various applications. In this paper, we have presented target detection and tracking algorithm based on target intensity feature relative to surrounding background, and shape information of target. Proposed automatic target tracking algorithm includes two techniques: intensity variation function (IVF) and template modeling (TM). The intensity variation function is formulated by using target intensity feature while template modeling is based on target shape information. The IVF technique produces the maximum peak value whereas the reference target intensity variation is similar to the candidate target intensity variation. When IVF technique fails, due to background clutter, non-target object or other artifacts, the second technique, template modeling, is triggered by control module. By evaluating the outputs from the IVF and TM techniques, the tracker determines the real coordinates of the target. Performance of the proposed ATT is tested using real life forward-looking infrared (FLIR) image sequences taken from an airborne, moving platform.

  13. Automatic target recognition on the connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) is a computationally intensive problem that benefits from the abilities of the Connection Machine (CM), a massively parallel computer used for data-level parallel computing. The large computational resources of the CM can efficiently handle an approach to ATR that uses parallel stereo-matching and neural-network algorithms. Such an approach shows promise as an ATR system of satisfactory performance. 13 refs.

  14. Automatic target recognition via sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estabridis, Katia

    2010-04-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) based on the emerging technology of Compressed Sensing (CS) can considerably improve accuracy, speed and cost associated with these types of systems. An image based ATR algorithm has been built upon this new theory, which can perform target detection and recognition in a low dimensional space. Compressed dictionaries (A) are formed to include rotational information for a scale of interest. The algorithm seeks to identify y(test sample) as a linear combination of the dictionary elements : y=Ax, where A ∈ Rnxm(n<target. The algorithm can reject clutter and background, which are part of the input image. The detection and recognition problems are solved by finding the sparse-solution to the undetermined system y=Ax via Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) and l1 minimization techniques. Visible and MWIR imagery collected by the Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) was utilized to test the algorithm. Results show an average detection and recognition rates above 95% for targets at ranges up to 3Km for both image modalities.

  15. Biological models for automatic target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce

    2008-04-01

    Humans are better at detecting targets in literal imagery than any known algorithm. Recent advances in modeling visual processes have resulted from f-MRI brain imaging with humans and the use of more invasive techniques with monkeys. There are four startling new discoveries. 1) The visual cortex does not simply process an incoming image. It constructs a physics based model of the image. 2) Coarse category classification and range-to-target are estimated quickly - possibly through the dorsal pathway of the visual cortex, combining rapid coarse processing of image data with expectations and goals. This data is then fed back to lower levels to resize the target and enhance the recognition process feeding forward through the ventral pathway. 3) Giant photosensitive retinal ganglion cells provide data for maintaining circadian rhythm (time-of-day) and modeling the physics of the light source. 4) Five filter types implemented by the neurons of the primary visual cortex have been determined. A computer model for automatic target detection has been developed based upon these recent discoveries. It uses an artificial neural network architecture with multiple feed-forward and feedback paths. Our implementation's efficiency derives from the observation that any 2-D filter kernel can be approximated by a sum of 2-D box functions. And, a 2-D box function easily decomposes into two 1-D box functions. Further efficiency is obtained by decomposing the largest neural filter into a high pass filter and a more sparsely sampled low pass filter.

  16. A color hierarchy for automatic target selection.

    PubMed

    Tchernikov, Illia; Fallah, Mazyar

    2010-02-24

    Visual processing of color starts at the cones in the retina and continues through ventral stream visual areas, called the parvocellular pathway. Motion processing also starts in the retina but continues through dorsal stream visual areas, called the magnocellular system. Color and motion processing are functionally and anatomically discrete. Previously, motion processing areas MT and MST have been shown to have no color selectivity to a moving stimulus; the neurons were colorblind whenever color was presented along with motion. This occurs when the stimuli are luminance-defined versus the background and is considered achromatic motion processing. Is motion processing independent of color processing? We find that motion processing is intrinsically modulated by color. Color modulated smooth pursuit eye movements produced upon saccading to an aperture containing a surface of coherently moving dots upon a black background. Furthermore, when two surfaces that differed in color were present, one surface was automatically selected based upon a color hierarchy. The strength of that selection depended upon the distance between the two colors in color space. A quantifiable color hierarchy for automatic target selection has wide-ranging implications from sports to advertising to human-computer interfaces.

  17. Automatic target recognition in acoustics: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, John R.

    2002-11-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) constitutes one of the major uses for acoustical signal processing. ATR is employed in manned systems for operator workload reduction and performance improvement, as well as in autonomous applications. An overview of some of the major components involved in the architecture of such systems is provided. Feature extraction is the most critical step of ATR and is necessarily application specific. Generic feature selection and ranking methods are presented, including heuristic search and information-theoretic measures. Basic pattern recognition definitions and techniques are reviewed. Commonly used classification paradigms include classical statistical formulations, both parametric and nonparametric, and neural nets; support vector machines and nonmetric methods such as decision forests are some alternative techniques that have received recent attention. A few practical issues often encountered when constructing recognition systems, including training data requirements, ground truth labeling, and performance evaluation methodologies and metrics, are also addressed.

  18. Fast pattern recognizer for autonomous target recognition and tracking for advanced naval attack missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastbacka, Al

    2001-10-01

    A FPR System under development for the Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA is funded under a SBIR, Phase II contract as an automatic target recognizer and tracker candidate for Navy fast-reaction, subsonic and supersonic, stand-off weapons. The FPR will autonomously detect, identify, correlate, and track complex surface ship and land based targets in hostile, high-clutter environments in real time. The novel FPR system is proven technology that uses an electronic implementation analogous to an optical correlator system, where the Fourier transform of the incoming image is compared against known target images stored as matched filter templates. FPR demonstrations show that unambiguous target identification is achievable in a ninety-five percent fog obscuration for over ninety-percent of target images tested. The FPR technology employs an acoustic dispersive delay line (DDL) to achieve ultra-fast image correlations in 90 microseconds or 11,000 correlations per second. The massively scalable FPR design is capable of achieving processing speeds of an order of magnitude faster using available ASIC technology. Key benefits of the FPR are dramatically reduced power, size, weight, and cost with increased durability, robustness, and performance - which makes the FPR ideal for onboard missile applications.

  19. Automatic speech recognizer based on the Spanish spoken in Valdivia, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Maria L.; Poblete, Victor H.; Sommerhoff, Jorge

    2004-05-01

    The performance of an automatic speech recognizer is affected by training process (dependent on or independent of the speaker) and the size of the vocabulary. The language used in this study was the Spanish spoken in the city of Valdivia, Chile. A representative sample of 14 students and six professionals all natives of Valdivia (ten women and ten men) were used to complete the study. The sample ranged in age between 20 and 30 years old. Two systems were programmed based on the classical principles: digitalizing, end point detection, linear prediction coding, cepstral coefficients, dynamic time warping, and a final decision stage with a previous step of training: (i) one dependent speaker (15 words: five colors and ten numbers), (ii) one independent speaker (30 words: ten verbs, ten nouns, and ten adjectives). A simple didactical application, with options to choose colors, numbers and drawings of the verbs, nouns and adjectives, was designed to be used with a personal computer. In both programs, the tests carried out showed a tendency towards errors in short words with monosyllables like ``flor,'' and ``sol.'' The best results were obtained in words with three syllables like ``disparar'' and ``mojado.'' [Work supported by Proyecto DID UACh N S-200278.

  20. Hybrid ANN-ES architecture for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chungte; Ligomenides, Panos A.

    1992-03-01

    Automatic target recognition can benefit from cooperation of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and expert systems (ESs). Bottom-up training and generalization properties of artificial neural networks, and top-down utilization of accumulated knowledge by expert system processors, can be combined to offer robust performance of the automatic target recognition models. In this paper, we propose a modular, flexible and expandable, hybrid architecture which provides cooperative, functional and operational interfaces between expert system and artificial neural networks facilities. In order to make the problem more specific, we apply this architecture to the Multline Optical Character Reader (MLOCR) system, which is being developed to sort the postal mail pieces automatically.

  1. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  2. Automatic Target Recognition Based on Cross-Plot

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Automatic target recognition that relies on rapid feature extraction of real-time target from photo-realistic imaging will enable efficient identification of target patterns. To achieve this objective, Cross-plots of binary patterns are explored as potential signatures for the observed target by high-speed capture of the crucial spatial features using minimal computational resources. Target recognition was implemented based on the proposed pattern recognition concept and tested rigorously for its precision and recall performance. We conclude that Cross-plotting is able to produce a digital fingerprint of a target that correlates efficiently and effectively to signatures of patterns having its identity in a target repository. PMID:21980508

  3. Automatic target recognition based on cross-plot.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Automatic target recognition that relies on rapid feature extraction of real-time target from photo-realistic imaging will enable efficient identification of target patterns. To achieve this objective, Cross-plots of binary patterns are explored as potential signatures for the observed target by high-speed capture of the crucial spatial features using minimal computational resources. Target recognition was implemented based on the proposed pattern recognition concept and tested rigorously for its precision and recall performance. We conclude that Cross-plotting is able to produce a digital fingerprint of a target that correlates efficiently and effectively to signatures of patterns having its identity in a target repository.

  4. Autonomous learning approach for automatic target recognition processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    JPL is developing a comprehensive Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) system that consists of an innovative anomaly detection preprocessing module and an automatic training target recognition module. The anomaly detection module is trained with an imaging data feature retrieved from an imaging sensor suite that represents the states of the normalcy model. The normalcy model is then trained from a self-organizing learning system over a period of time and fed into the anomaly detection module for scene anomaly monitoring and detection. The "abnormal" event detection will be sent to a human operator for further investigation responses. The target recognition will be continuously updated with the "normal' input sensor data. The combination of the anomaly detection preprocessing module to the re-trainable target recognition processor will result in a dynamic ATR system that is capable of automatic detection of anomaly event and provide an early warning to a human operator for in-time warning and response.

  5. Automatic Target Recognition Classification System Evaluation Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Testing Example (α=0.1) ....................... 2-16 2.9 Binormal 2AFC ROC Curves...2-17 2.10 Target and Non-target Normal pdfs for a 2AFC Task....................................... 2-20 2.11 Sample N-N ROC Curve...2-23 2.13 Operating Curve Derived from 2AFC Task....................................................... 2-28 2.14 Example

  6. Time series modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Time series modeling is proposed for identification of targets whose images are not clearly seen. The model building takes into account air turbulence, precipitation, fog, smoke and other factors obscuring and distorting the image. The complex of library data (of images, etc.) serving as a basis for identification provides the deterministic part of the identification process, while the partial image features, distorted parts, irrelevant pieces and absence of particular features comprise the stochastic part of the target identification. The missing data approach is elaborated that helps the prediction process for the image creation or reconstruction. The results are provided.

  7. Automatic recognition of targets from hyperspectra images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, George A.; Li, Yifeng; Boulter, James F.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of the problem for recognition of targets from hyperspectra images. It is shown that conventional recognition techniques may be extended to hyperspectra images for the distribution process. It is also shown that the recognition process is directly proportional to the number of multispectra frames that represent each target. For the discrimination process we propose a parametric and a nonparametric process in which both are extensions to Fisher and Fukunaga-Mantock methods respectively. Examples that show the composition of hyperspectra features are presented.

  8. Automatic Target Recognition for Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    tanks, T-72 Soviet tanks, and HMMWVs with woodland camouflage . Now that an atmospherically compensated radiance signature exists for each item in the... Symposium , Vol. 5, pp. 3379-..82. Chen, Y., Nasrabadi, N. M., & Tran, T. D. (2011). Sparse Representation for Target Detection in Hyperspectral... Radar , Out-of-Library Identification, and Non-Declarations. PhD Thesis AFIT-DS-ENS-07-04, Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB. Fumera, G., Roli

  9. Integrated approach for automatic target recognition using a network of collaborative sensors.

    PubMed

    Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Van Nevel, Alan

    2006-10-01

    We introduce what is believed to be a novel concept by which several sensors with automatic target recognition (ATR) capability collaborate to recognize objects. Such an approach would be suitable for netted systems in which the sensors and platforms can coordinate to optimize end-to-end performance. We use correlation filtering techniques to facilitate the development of the concept, although other ATR algorithms may be easily substituted. Essentially, a self-configuring geometry of netted platforms is proposed that positions the sensors optimally with respect to each other, and takes into account the interactions among the sensor, the recognition algorithms, and the classes of the objects to be recognized. We show how such a paradigm optimizes overall performance, and illustrate the collaborative ATR scheme for recognizing targets in synthetic aperture radar imagery by using viewing position as a sensor parameter.

  10. Found and Missed: Failing to Recognize a Search Target despite Moving It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solman, Grayden J. F.; Cheyne, J. Allan; Smilek, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present results from five search experiments using a novel "unpacking" paradigm in which participants use a mouse to sort through random heaps of distractors to locate the target. We report that during this task participants often fail to recognize the target despite moving it, and despite having looked at the item. Additionally, the missed…

  11. Complete automatic target cuer/recognition system for tactical forward-looking infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernisse, Brian E.; Rogers, Steven K.; DeSimio, Martin P.; Raines, Richard A.

    1997-09-01

    A complete forward-looking IR (FLIR) automatic target cuer/recognizer (ATC/R) is presented. The data used for development and testing of this ATC/R are first generation FLIR images collected using a F-15E. The database contains thousands of images with various mission profiles and target arrangements. The specific target of interest is a mobile missile launcher, the primary target. The goal is to locate all vehicles (secondary targets) within a scene and identify the primary targets. The system developed and tested includes an image segmenter, region cluster algorithm, feature extractor, and classifier. Conventional image processing algorithms in conjunction with neural network techniques are used to form a complete ATC/R system. The conventional techniques include hit/miss filtering, difference of Gaussian filtering, and region clustering. A neural network (multilayer perceptron) is used for classification. These algorithms are developed, tested and then combined into a functional ATC/R system. Overall primary target detection rate (cuer) is 84% with a 69% primary target identification (recognizer) rate at ranges relevant to munitions release. Furthermore, the false alarm rate (a nontarget cued as a target) in only 2.3 per scene. The research is being completed with a 10 flight test profile using third generation FLIR images.

  12. Advanced automatic target recognition for police helicopter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Christoph; Schoppmann, Paul

    2000-08-01

    The results of a case study about the application of an advanced method for automatic target recognition to infrared imagery taken from police helicopter missions are presented. The method consists of the following steps: preprocessing, classification, fusion, postprocessing and tracking, and combines the three paradigms image pyramids, neural networks and bayesian nets. The technology has been developed using a variety of different scenes typical for military aircraft missions. Infrared cameras have been in use for several years at the Bavarian police helicopter forces and are highly valuable for night missions. Several object classes like 'persons' or 'vehicles' are tested and the possible discrimination between persons and animals is shown. The analysis of complex scenes with hidden objects and clutter shows the potentials and limitations of automatic target recognition for real-world tasks. Several display concepts illustrate the achievable improvement of the situation awareness. The similarities and differences between various mission types concerning object variability, time constraints, consequences of false alarms, etc. are discussed. Typical police actions like searching for missing persons or runaway criminals illustrate the advantages of automatic target recognition. The results demonstrate the possible operational benefits for the helicopter crew. Future work will include performance evaluation issues and a system integration concept for the target platform.

  13. LADAR And FLIR Based Sensor Fusion For Automatic Target Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Fred; Gutfinger, Dan

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to show results of automatic target classification and sensor fusion for forward looking infrared (FLIR) and Laser Radar sensors. The sensor fusion data base was acquired from the Naval Weapon Center and it consists of coregistered Laser RaDAR (range and reflectance image), FLIR (raw and preprocessed image) and TV. Using this data base we have developed techniques to extract relevant object edges from the FLIR and LADAR which are correlated to wireframe models. The resulting correlation coefficients from both the LADAR and FLIR are fused using either the Bayesian or the Dempster-Shafer combination method so as to provide a higher confidence target classifica-tion level output. Finally, to minimize the correlation process the wireframe models are modified to reflect target range (size of target) and target orientation which is extracted from the LADAR reflectance image.

  14. Kernel generalized neighbor discriminant embedding for SAR automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulin; Pei, Jifang; Yang, Jianyu; Wang, Tao; Yang, Haiguang; Wang, Bing

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new supervised feature extraction algorithm in synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR ATR), called generalized neighbor discriminant embedding (GNDE). Based on manifold learning, GNDE integrates class and neighborhood information to enhance discriminative power of extracted feature. Besides, the kernelized counterpart of this algorithm is also proposed, called kernel-GNDE (KGNDE). The experiment in this paper shows that the proposed algorithms have better recognition performance than PCA and KPCA.

  15. Automatic target recognition flight prototype for police helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Christoph; Haisch, Stefan; Wolf, Peter

    2002-07-01

    A cooperation between the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company AG (EADS) and the Bavarian Ministry of the Interior was started at the beginning of 2001 to develop an application for automatic target recognition technology for police helicopter missions. The Bavarian Police Air Support Unit is the main support partner and first user. Bavarian polic helicopters are equipped with a modern infrared system (FLIR) especially for night missions. EADS has extensive knowledge in the area of sensor image exploitation and automatic target recognition (ATR). The technology has been developed for military aircraft reconnaissance missions. The same software kernel is used for a flight prototype which is integrated in a police helicopter. The integration concept presented in this paper is set up so as not to interfere the existing FLIR system in any way. The flight prototype which will be described in detail consists of standard hardware (COTS) components and has the main functionality of detecting pre-selected object classes. With the flight prototype a comprehensive in-flight testing of the automatic target recognition application is enabled. The test procedure and first results of the flight tests are explained with selected examples. The cooperation will go on to further enhance the operational effectiveness of the Bavarian police helicopters.

  16. Automatic target validation based on neuroscientific literature mining for tractography.

    PubMed

    Vasques, Xavier; Richardet, Renaud; Hill, Sean L; Slater, David; Chappelier, Jean-Cedric; Pralong, Etienne; Bloch, Jocelyne; Draganski, Bogdan; Cif, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Target identification for tractography studies requires solid anatomical knowledge validated by an extensive literature review across species for each seed structure to be studied. Manual literature review to identify targets for a given seed region is tedious and potentially subjective. Therefore, complementary approaches would be useful. We propose to use text-mining models to automatically suggest potential targets from the neuroscientific literature, full-text articles and abstracts, so that they can be used for anatomical connection studies and more specifically for tractography. We applied text-mining models to three structures: two well-studied structures, since validated deep brain stimulation targets, the internal globus pallidus and the subthalamic nucleus and, the nucleus accumbens, an exploratory target for treating psychiatric disorders. We performed a systematic review of the literature to document the projections of the three selected structures and compared it with the targets proposed by text-mining models, both in rat and primate (including human). We ran probabilistic tractography on the nucleus accumbens and compared the output with the results of the text-mining models and literature review. Overall, text-mining the literature could find three times as many targets as two man-weeks of curation could. The overall efficiency of the text-mining against literature review in our study was 98% recall (at 36% precision), meaning that over all the targets for the three selected seeds, only one target has been missed by text-mining. We demonstrate that connectivity for a structure of interest can be extracted from a very large amount of publications and abstracts. We believe this tool will be useful in helping the neuroscience community to facilitate connectivity studies of particular brain regions. The text mining tools used for the study are part of the HBP Neuroinformatics Platform, publicly available at http://connectivity-brainer.rhcloud.com/.

  17. Automatic target validation based on neuroscientific literature mining for tractography

    PubMed Central

    Vasques, Xavier; Richardet, Renaud; Hill, Sean L.; Slater, David; Chappelier, Jean-Cedric; Pralong, Etienne; Bloch, Jocelyne; Draganski, Bogdan; Cif, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Target identification for tractography studies requires solid anatomical knowledge validated by an extensive literature review across species for each seed structure to be studied. Manual literature review to identify targets for a given seed region is tedious and potentially subjective. Therefore, complementary approaches would be useful. We propose to use text-mining models to automatically suggest potential targets from the neuroscientific literature, full-text articles and abstracts, so that they can be used for anatomical connection studies and more specifically for tractography. We applied text-mining models to three structures: two well-studied structures, since validated deep brain stimulation targets, the internal globus pallidus and the subthalamic nucleus and, the nucleus accumbens, an exploratory target for treating psychiatric disorders. We performed a systematic review of the literature to document the projections of the three selected structures and compared it with the targets proposed by text-mining models, both in rat and primate (including human). We ran probabilistic tractography on the nucleus accumbens and compared the output with the results of the text-mining models and literature review. Overall, text-mining the literature could find three times as many targets as two man-weeks of curation could. The overall efficiency of the text-mining against literature review in our study was 98% recall (at 36% precision), meaning that over all the targets for the three selected seeds, only one target has been missed by text-mining. We demonstrate that connectivity for a structure of interest can be extracted from a very large amount of publications and abstracts. We believe this tool will be useful in helping the neuroscience community to facilitate connectivity studies of particular brain regions. The text mining tools used for the study are part of the HBP Neuroinformatics Platform, publicly available at http://connectivity-brainer.rhcloud.com/. PMID

  18. Automatic detection of sea-sky horizon line and small targets in maritime infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Yunsheng; Cui, Minjie

    2016-05-01

    It is usually difficult but important to extract distant targets from sea clutters and clouds since the targets are small compared to the pixel field of view. In this paper, an algorithm based on wavelet transformation is proposed for automatic detection of small targets under the maritime background. We recognize that the distant small targets generally appear near the sea-sky horizon line and noises lie along the direction of sea-sky horizon line. So the sea-sky horizon is located firstly by examining the approximate image of a Haar wavelet decomposition of the original image. And the equation of the sea-sky horizon is set up, no matter whether the sea-sky horizon is horizontal or not. Since the sea-sky horizon is located, not only the potential area but also the strip direction of noise is got. Then the modified mutual wavelet energy combination algorithm is applied to extract targets with targets being marked by red windows. Computer simulations are shown to validate the great adaptability of the sea-sky horizon line detection and the accuracy of the small targets detection. The algorithm should be useful to engineers and scientists to design precise guidance or maritime monitoring system.

  19. Deep transfer learning for automatic target classification: MWIR to LWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhengming; Nasrabadi, Nasser; Fu, Yun

    2016-05-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 5/12/2016, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 5/18/2016. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. When dealing with sparse or no labeled data in the target domain, transfer learning shows its appealing performance by borrowing the supervised knowledge from external domains. Recently deep structure learning has been exploited in transfer learning due to its attractive power in extracting effective knowledge through multi-layer strategy, so that deep transfer learning is promising to address the cross-domain mismatch. In general, cross-domain disparity can be resulted from the difference between source and target distributions or different modalities, e.g., Midwave IR (MWIR) and Longwave IR (LWIR). In this paper, we propose a Weighted Deep Transfer Learning framework for automatic target classification through a task-driven fashion. Specifically, deep features and classifier parameters are obtained simultaneously for optimal classification performance. In this way, the proposed deep structures can extract more effective features with the guidance of the classifier performance; on the other hand, the classifier performance is further improved since it is optimized on more discriminative features. Furthermore, we build a weighted scheme to couple source and target output by assigning pseudo labels to target data, therefore we can transfer knowledge from source (i.e., MWIR) to target (i.e., LWIR). Experimental results on real databases demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm by comparing with others.

  20. Restriction endonuclease MvaI is a monomer that recognizes its target sequence asymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Czapinska, Honorata; Sokołowska, Monika; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Urbanke, Claus; Bochtler, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease MvaI recognizes the sequence CC/WGG (W stands for A or T, ‘/’ designates the cleavage site) and generates products with single nucleotide 5′-overhangs. The enzyme has been noted for its tolerance towards DNA modifications. Here, we report a biochemical characterization and crystal structures of MvaI in an apo-form and in a complex with target DNA at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results show that MvaI is a monomer and recognizes its pseudosymmetric target sequence asymmetrically. The enzyme consists of two lobes. The catalytic lobe anchors the active site residues Glu36, Asp50, Glu55 and Lys57 and contacts the bases from the minor grove side. The recognition lobe mediates all major grove interactions with the bases. The enzyme in the crystal is bound to the strand with T at the center of the recognition sequence. The crystal structure with calcium ions and DNA mimics the prereactive state. MvaI shows structural similarities to BcnI, which cleaves the related sequence CC/SGG and to MutH enzyme, which is a component of the DNA repair machinery, and nicks one DNA strand instead of making a double-strand break. PMID:17344322

  1. Evaluation methodology for hyperspectral automatic target cueing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornburg, Ross; Maciejewski, Phil; Claypool, Rifka; Horn, Thomas J.; Jarratt, Mary; Westerkamp, Lori A.

    2002-08-01

    Because of its fine wavelength resolution, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) offers the possibility of detecting and identifying objects of interest by their spectral characteristics. The Automatic Target Cueing, Detection and Recognition (ATC/D/R) community is developing new methods to predict and measure HSI ATC/D/R systems performance. The variation of spectral signatures due to target characteristics, atmospheric effects, and other environmental factors contribute to the challenge of developing and evaluating robust algorithms for HSI ATC/D/R systems. A rigorous method for test and evaluation is necessary to determine system performance and define the most efficient and effective sensor/algorithm solutions for a proposed mission. The AFRL Sensors Directorate Comprehensive Performance Assessment of Sensor Exploitation (COMPASE) Center has developed standardized tools and methods that permit performance comparison of candidate ATC algorithms1,2. This paper defines the methodology employed for an independent evaluation of HSI ATC algorithms. The performance metrics, truthing and scoring techniques, and the importance of understanding the operating conditions (OCs) represented by each data set are discussed. The OC definitions for spectral systems are different from the OCs as defined by radar systems. The environmental considerations drive data collection planning and truthing requirements. Knowledge of performance of an algorithm in different OCs is essential information when considering the transition of an HSI sensor/algorithm system or the design of future HS algorithms.

  2. A simulation-based approach towards automatic target recognition of high resolution space borne radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglberger, H.; Kempf, T.

    2016-10-01

    Specific imaging effects that are caused mainly by the range measurement principle of a radar device, its much lower frequency range as compared to the optical spectrum, the slanted imaging geometry and certainly the limited spatial resolution complicates the interpretation of radar signatures decisively. Especially the coherent image formation which causes unwanted speckle noise aggravates the problem of visually recognizing target objects. Fully automatic approaches with acceptable false alarm rates are therefore an even harder challenge. At the Microwaves and Radar Institute of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) the development of methods to implement a robust overall processing workflow for automatic target recognition (ATR) out of high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data is under progress. The heart of the general approach is to use time series exploitation for the former detection step and simulation-based signature matching for the subsequent recognition. This paper will show the overall ATR chain as a proof of concept for the special case of airplane recognition on image data from the space borne SAR sensor TerraSAR-X.

  3. 3D passive photon counting automatic target recognition using advanced correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we present results for detecting and recognizing 3D objects in photon counting images using integral imaging with maximum average correlation height filters. We show that even under photon starved conditions objects may be automatically recognized in passively sensed 3D images using advanced correlation filters. We show that the proposed filter synthesized with ideal training images can detect and recognize a 3D object in photon counting images, even in the presence of occlusions and obscuration.

  4. Automatic target classification of slow moving ground targets using space-time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, John Alexander

    2002-04-01

    Air-to-ground surveillance radar technologies are increasingly being used by theater commanders to detect, track, and identify ground moving targets. New radar automatic target recognition (ATR) technologies are being developed to aid the pilot in assessing the ground combat picture. Most air-to-ground surveillance radars use Doppler filtering techniques to separate target returns from ground clutter. Unfortunately, Doppler filter techniques fall short on performance when target geometry and ground vehicle speed result in low line of sight velocities. New clutter filter techniques compatible with emerging advancements in wideband radar operation are needed to support surveillance modes of radar operation when targets enter this low velocity regime. In this context, space-time adaptive processing (STAP) in conjunction with other algorithms offers a class of signal processing that provide improved target detection, tracking, and classification in the presence of interference through the adaptive nulling of both ground clutter and/or jamming. Of particular interest is the ability of the radar to filter and process the complex target signature data needed to generate high range resolution (HRR) signature profiles on ground targets. A new approach is proposed which will allow air-to-ground target classification of slow moving vehicles in clutter. A wideband STAP approach for clutter suppression is developed which preserves the amplitude integrity of returns from multiple range bins consistent with the HRR ATR approach. The wideband STAP processor utilizes narrowband STAP principles to generate a series of adaptive sub-band filters. Each sub-band filter output is used to construct the complete filtered response of the ground target. The performance of this new approach is demonstrated and quantified through the implementation of a one dimensional template-based minimum mean squared error classifier. Successful minimum velocity identification is defined in terms of

  5. CdiA Effectors Use Modular Receptor-Binding Domains To Recognize Target Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Zachary C.; Nguyen, Josephine Y.; Xiong, Jing; Koskiniemi, Sanna; Beck, Christina M.; Perkins, Basil R.; Low, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems encode CdiA effectors, which bind to specific receptors on neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains to suppress target cell growth. Two classes of CdiA effectors that bind distinct cell surface receptors have been identified, but the molecular basis of receptor specificity is not understood. Alignment of BamA-specific CdiAEC93 from Escherichia coli EC93 and OmpC-specific CdiAEC536 from E. coli 536 suggests that the receptor-binding domain resides within a central region that varies between the two effectors. In support of this hypothesis, we find that CdiAEC93 fragments containing residues Arg1358 to Phe1646 bind specifically to purified BamA. Moreover, chimeric CdiAEC93 that carries the corresponding sequence from CdiAEC536 is endowed with OmpC-binding activity, demonstrating that this region dictates receptor specificity. A survey of E. coli CdiA proteins reveals two additional effector classes, which presumably recognize distinct receptors. Using a genetic approach, we identify the outer membrane nucleoside transporter Tsx as the receptor for a third class of CdiA effectors. Thus, CDI systems exploit multiple outer membrane proteins to identify and engage target cells. These results underscore the modularity of CdiA proteins and suggest that novel effectors can be constructed through genetic recombination to interchange different receptor-binding domains and toxic payloads. PMID:28351921

  6. Rendezvous terminal phase automatic braking sequencing and targeting. [for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the rendezvous terminal phase braking program is to provide the means of automatically bringing the primary orbiter within desired station keeping boundaries relative to the target satellite. A detailed discussion is presented on the braking program and its navigation, targeting, and guidance functions.

  7. Multi-Stage System for Automatic Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas T.; Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Johnson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feedforward back-propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and to remove false positives. The system parameter optimizations process has been developed to adapt to various targets and datasets. The objective was to design an efficient computer vision system that can learn to detect multiple targets in large images with unknown backgrounds. Because the target size is small relative to the image size in this problem, there are many regions of the image that could potentially contain the target. A cursory analysis of every region can be computationally efficient, but may yield too many false positives. On the other hand, a detailed analysis of every region can yield better results, but may be computationally inefficient. The multi-stage ATR system was designed to achieve an optimal balance between accuracy and computational efficiency by incorporating both models. The detection stage first identifies potential ROIs where the target may be present by performing a fast Fourier domain OT-MACH filter-based correlation. Because threshold for this stage is chosen with the goal of detecting all true positives, a number of false positives are also detected as ROIs. The verification stage then transforms the regions of interest into feature space, and eliminates false positives using an

  8. Recognizing off-target drug effects in the gut and brain: revisiting isotretinoin and depression.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, R; Reisz, C

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians often face complex decisions regarding off-target drug effects, both in diagnosis and treatment. A key component in the formulation of the correct diagnosis is the temporal relationship between drug introduction and adverse effect. The sentinel injury may target the gut and brain. The description of the complaint may vary among providers. Modeling Information visualization for clinicians in real time will require the integration of time-stamped data with organ-specific complaints.

  9. System for Automatic Detection and Analysis of Targets in FMICW Radar Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejfek, Luboš; Mošna, Zbyšek; Urbář, Jaroslav; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the automatic system for the processing of the signals from the frequency modulated interrupted continuous wave (FMICW) radar and describes methods for the primary signal processing. Further, we present methods for the detection of the targets in strong noise. These methods are tested both on the real and simulated signals. The real signals were measured using the developed at the IAP CAS experimental prototype of FMICW radar with operational frequency 35.4 GHz. The measurement campaign took place at the TU Delft, the Netherlands. The obtained results were used for development of the system for the automatic detection and analysis of the targets measured by the FMICW radar.

  10. Pattern-Theoretic Foundations of Automatic Target Recognition in Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-30

    area has continued past the September 2006 end date via discretionary funds provided to Aaron Lanterman through the Demetrius T. Paris Junior...support to continue the work past August 2006 provided by the Demetrius T. Paris Professorship. Pri- mary developer of ATR theory and algorithms for target...Oustanding Junior Teacher Award (2006), as voted on by the senior class. A.D. Lanterman, named the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor beginning in

  11. Opaque-2 is a transcriptional activator that recognizes a specific target site in 22-kD zein genes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Ketudat, M; Aukerman, M J; Hoschek, G

    1992-06-01

    opaque-2 (o2) is a regulatory locus in maize that plays an essential role in controlling the expression of genes encoding the 22-kD zein proteins. Through DNase I footprinting and DNA binding analyses, we have identified the binding site for the O2 protein (O2) in the promoter of 22-kD zein genes. The sequence in the 22-kD zein gene promoter that is recognized by O2 is similar to the target site recognized by other "basic/leucine zipper" (bZIP) proteins in that it contains an ACGT core that is necessary for DNA binding. The site is located in the -300 region relative to the translation start and lies about 20 bp downstream of the highly conserved zein gene sequence motif known as the "prolamin box." Employing gel mobility shift assays, we used O2 antibodies and nuclear extracts from an o2 null mutant to demonstrate that the O2 protein in maize endosperm nuclei recognizes the target site in the zein gene promoter. Mobility shift assays using nuclear proteins from an o2 null mutant indicated that other endosperm proteins in addition to O2 can bind the O2 target site and that O2 may be associated with one of these proteins. We also demonstrated that in yeast cells the O2 protein can activate expression of a lacZ gene containing a multimer of the O2 target sequence as part of its promoter, thus confirming its role as a transcriptional activator. A computer-assisted search indicated that the O2 target site is not present in the promoters of zein genes other than those of the 22-kD class. These data suggest a likely explanation at the molecular level for the differential effect of o2 mutations on expression of certain members of the zein gene family.

  12. Feature Extraction Using Attributed Scattering Center Models for Model-Based Automatic Target Recognition (ATR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    systems employing synthetic aperture radar . This report summarizes the major technical accomplishments that were realized. We developed a set of...automatic target recognition, ATR performance prediction, synthetic aperture radar 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...Std. Z39-18 Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 1 2 ATTRIBUTED SCATTERING MODELS FOR SYNTHETIC APER- TURE RADAR 6 2.1 Introduction

  13. Target azimuth estimation for automatic tracking in range-gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yinan; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan

    2012-11-01

    Target tracking is of great importance in imaging system, which can be applied in surveillance, as well as salvage and rescue where 3D spatial coordinates are used to locate the target. Range-gated imaging system is capable of acquiring range information of targets. However, azimuth is also necessary to provide the spatial coordinates to achieve target tracking. This paper presents a target azimuth estimation method for range-gated imaging system, aiming at obtaining essential information for vision-based automatic tracking. Due to the noise and low contrast of range-gated image, median filter and histogram equalization are used. Then the Otsu method is performed to make the segmentation of target and background. After segmentation, morphologic transformation methods will be taken in order to delete false targets. With pixels of target extracted from the image, the centoid will be derived. Next the pinhole camera model is applied to work out the azimuth coordinate. Since the focus length of camera is needed in the formula, an NC (Numerical Control) zoom module is developed. In this module, a sliding potentiometer is connected to the focus motor in camera, which serves as a feedback of the focus. To read the focus length and control the focus motor, an MCU (with AD converter) is used. Once the target azimuth information is obtained, the pan-tilt control unit can track the target bit by bit automatically.

  14. A chest-shape target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mo; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Automatic weapon platform is one of the important research directions at domestic and overseas, it needs to accomplish fast searching for the object to be shot under complex background. Therefore, fast detection for given target is the foundation of further task. Considering that chest-shape target is common target of shoot practice, this paper treats chestshape target as the target and studies target automatic detection method based on Deformable Part Models. The algorithm computes Histograms of Oriented Gradient(HOG) features of the target and trains a model using Latent variable Support Vector Machine(SVM); In this model, target image is divided into several parts then we can obtain foot filter and part filters; Finally, the algorithm detects the target at the HOG features pyramid with method of sliding window. The running time of extracting HOG pyramid with lookup table can be shorten by 36%. The result indicates that this algorithm can detect the chest-shape target in natural environments indoors or outdoors. The true positive rate of detection reaches 76% with many hard samples, and the false positive rate approaches 0. Running on a PC (Intel(R)Core(TM) i5-4200H CPU) with C++ language, the detection time of images with the resolution of 640 × 480 is 2.093s. According to TI company run library about image pyramid and convolution for DM642 and other hardware, our detection algorithm is expected to be implemented on hardware platform, and it has application prospect in actual system.

  15. Automatic attraction of visual attention by supraletter features of former target strings

    PubMed Central

    Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Van Lommel, Sven; Sørensen, Thomas A.; Bundesen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Observers were trained to search for a particular horizontal string of three capital letters presented among similar strings consisting of exactly the same letters in different orders. The training was followed by a test in which the observers searched for a new target that was identical to one of the former distractors. The new distractor set consisted of the remaining former distractors plus the former target. On each trial, three letter strings were displayed, which included the target string with a probability of 0.5. In Experiment 1, the strings were centered at different locations on the circumference of an imaginary circle around the fixation point. The training phase of Experiment 2 was similar, but in the test phase of the experiment, the strings were located in a vertical array centered on fixation, and in target-present arrays, the target always appeared at fixation. In both experiments, performance (d’) degraded on trials in which former targets were present, suggesting that the former targets automatically drew processing resources away from the current targets. Apparently, the two experiments showed automatic attraction of visual attention by supraletter features of former target strings. PMID:25505892

  16. Automatic target and trajectory identification for deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic surgical target and trajectory identification technique for planning deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures. The probabilistic functional maps, constructed from population-based actual stimulating field information and intra-operative electrophysiological activities, were integrated into a neurosurgical visualization and navigation system to facilitate the surgical planning and guidance. In our preliminary studies, we compared the actual surgical target locations and trajectories established by an experienced stereotactic neurosurgeon with those automatically planned using our probabilistic functional maps on 10 subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS procedures. The average displacement between the surgical target locations in both groups was 1.82mm with a standard deviation of 0.77mm. The difference between the surgical trajectories was 3.1 degrees and 2.3 degrees in the lateral-to-medial and anterior-to-posterior orientations respectively.

  17. Automatism

    PubMed Central

    McCaldon, R. J.

    1964-01-01

    Individuals can carry out complex activity while in a state of impaired consciousness, a condition termed “automatism”. Consciousness must be considered from both an organic and a psychological aspect, because impairment of consciousness may occur in both ways. Automatism may be classified as normal (hypnosis), organic (temporal lobe epilepsy), psychogenic (dissociative fugue) or feigned. Often painstaking clinical investigation is necessary to clarify the diagnosis. There is legal precedent for assuming that all crimes must embody both consciousness and will. Jurists are loath to apply this principle without reservation, as this would necessitate acquittal and release of potentially dangerous individuals. However, with the sole exception of the defence of insanity, there is at present no legislation to prohibit release without further investigation of anyone acquitted of a crime on the grounds of “automatism”. PMID:14199824

  18. Using land to mitigate climate change: hitting the target, recognizing the trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Reilly, John; Melillo, Jerry; Cai, Yongxia; Kicklighter, David; Gurgel, Angelo; Paltsev, Sergey; Cronin, Timothy; Sokolov, Andrei; Schlosser, Adam

    2012-06-05

    Land can be used in several ways to mitigate climate change, but especially under changing environmental conditions there may be implications for food prices. Using an integrated global system model, we explore the roles that these land-use options can play in a global mitigation strategy to stabilize Earth's average temperature within 2 °C of the preindustrial level and their impacts on agriculture. We show that an ambitious global Energy-Only climate policy that includes biofuels would likely not achieve the 2 °C target. A thought-experiment where the world ideally prices land carbon fluxes combined with biofuels (Energy+Land policy) gets the world much closer. Land could become a large net carbon sink of about 178 Pg C over the 21st century with price incentives in the Energy+Land scenario. With land carbon pricing but without biofuels (a No-Biofuel scenario) the carbon sink is nearly identical to the case with biofuels, but emissions from energy are somewhat higher, thereby results in more warming. Absent such incentives, land is either a much smaller net carbon sink (+37 Pg C - Energy-Only policy) or a net source (-21 Pg C - No-Policy). The significant trade-off with this integrated land-use approach is that prices for agricultural products rise substantially because of mitigation costs borne by the sector and higher land prices. Share of income spent on food for wealthier regions continues to fall, but for the poorest regions, higher food prices lead to a rising share of income spent on food.

  19. A fast automatic target detection method for detecting ships in infrared scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özertem, Kemal Arda

    2016-05-01

    Automatic target detection in infrared scenes is a vital task for many application areas like defense, security and border surveillance. For anti-ship missiles, having a fast and robust ship detection algorithm is crucial for overall system performance. In this paper, a straight-forward yet effective ship detection method for infrared scenes is introduced. First, morphological grayscale reconstruction is applied to the input image, followed by an automatic thresholding onto the suppressed image. For the segmentation step, connected component analysis is employed to obtain target candidate regions. At this point, it can be realized that the detection is defenseless to outliers like small objects with relatively high intensity values or the clouds. To deal with this drawback, a post-processing stage is introduced. For the post-processing stage, two different methods are used. First, noisy detection results are rejected with respect to target size. Second, the waterline is detected by using Hough transform and the detection results that are located above the waterline with a small margin are rejected. After post-processing stage, there are still undesired holes remaining, which cause to detect one object as multi objects or not to detect an object as a whole. To improve the detection performance, another automatic thresholding is implemented only to target candidate regions. Finally, two detection results are fused and post-processing stage is repeated to obtain final detection result. The performance of overall methodology is tested with real world infrared test data.

  20. Automatic detection of small moving targets in a five-ocular composite optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, You-Shan; Fan, Xue-Wu; Li, Yan; Li, Ying-cai

    2009-10-01

    It is quite difficult to realize the automatic detection and determination of the small moving targets by the images data captured from a mono-aperture imaging system. Therefore a five-ocular composite optical imaging system is designed. The system is constituted by an infrared imaging system in the center and four visible imaging subsystems around the center subsystem. According to the inner feature of the overlapping field of view in the five-ocular composite optical imaging system, the automatic detection and recognition algorithm of the small moving targets for this system is built up. The algorithm is divided into four steps: the first step is preprocessing to get rid of low frequency background pixels, the second step is detecting the candidates of the small moving targets in the high frequency images remained by preprocessing, the third step is determining the true small moving targets from the candidates, and the last step is combining the detecting results of the visible subsystems into the detecting results of the infrared subsystem to determine the small moving targets are "live" or "dead", because the "dead" targets with lower temperature are not observed in the infrared subsystem. The test result in the experimental system indicated that the designed detection and recognition algorithm increased the detecting probability of the small moving targets, and decreased the probability of false alarms. The detection and recognition method was proved to be feasible and effective.

  1. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  2. Automatic Detection of Military Targets Utilising Neural Networks and Scale Space Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    Detection of Military Targets utilising Neural Networks and Scale Space Analysis A. Khashman Chairman, Department of Computer Engineering Near East...and 3) high computational cost. This required for the employment of neural networks and new approach to edge detection is formalized in the providing...analysis, edge detection and of the Laplacian of the Gaussian (FLoG) edge neural networks . The result is an automatic edge detection operator [1][2], as

  3. CdiA Effectors from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Use Heterotrimeric Osmoporins as Receptors to Recognize Target Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christina M.; Willett, Julia L. E.; Kim, Jeff J.; Low, David A.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens express contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems that promote cell-cell interaction. CDI+ bacteria express surface CdiA effector proteins, which transfer their C-terminal toxin domains into susceptible target cells upon binding to specific receptors. CDI+ cells also produce immunity proteins that neutralize the toxin domains delivered from neighboring siblings. Here, we show that CdiAEC536 from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (EC536) uses OmpC and OmpF as receptors to recognize target bacteria. E. coli mutants lacking either ompF or ompC are resistant to CDIEC536-mediated growth inhibition, and both porins are required for target-cell adhesion to inhibitors that express CdiAEC536. Experiments with single-chain OmpF fusions indicate that the CdiAEC536 receptor is heterotrimeric OmpC-OmpF. Because the OmpC and OmpF porins are under selective pressure from bacteriophages and host immune systems, their surface-exposed loops vary between E. coli isolates. OmpC polymorphism has a significant impact on CDIEC536 mediated competition, with many E. coli isolates expressing alleles that are not recognized by CdiAEC536. Analyses of recombinant OmpC chimeras suggest that extracellular loops L4 and L5 are important recognition epitopes for CdiAEC536. Loops L4 and L5 also account for much of the sequence variability between E. coli OmpC proteins, raising the possibility that CDI contributes to the selective pressure driving OmpC diversification. We find that the most efficient CdiAEC536 receptors are encoded by isolates that carry the same cdi gene cluster as E. coli 536. Thus, it appears that CdiA effectors often bind preferentially to "self" receptors, thereby promoting interactions between sibling cells. As a consequence, these effector proteins cannot recognize nor suppress the growth of many potential competitors. These findings suggest that self-recognition and kin selection are important functions of CDI. PMID:27723824

  4. A hierarchical classifier using new support vector machines for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Casasent, David; Wang, Yu-Chiang

    2005-01-01

    A binary hierarchical classifier is proposed for automatic target recognition. We also require rejection of non-object (non-target) inputs, which are not seen during training or validation, thus producing a very difficult problem. The SVRDM (support vector representation and discrimination machine) classifier is used at each node in the hierarchy, since it offers good generalization and rejection ability. Using this hierarchical SVRDM classifier with magnitude Fourier transform (|FT|) features, which provide shift-invariance, initial test results on infra-red (IR) data are excellent.

  5. Truncated feature representation for automatic target detection using transformed data-based decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasati, Vahid R.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the data covariance matrix is diagonalized to provide an orthogonal bases set using the eigen vectors of the data. The eigen-vector decomposition of the data is transformed and filtered in the transform domain to truncate the data for robust features related to a specified set of targets. These truncated eigen features are then combined and reconstructed to utilize in a composite filter and consequently utilized for the automatic target detection of the same class of targets. The results associated with the testing of the current technique are evaluated using the peak-correlation and peak-correlation energy metrics and are presented in this work. The inverse transformed eigen-bases of the current technique may be thought of as an injected sparsity to minimize data in representing the skeletal data structure information associated with the set of targets under consideration.

  6. Enhanced synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition method based on novel features.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Gong; Yin, Jiejun; Ji, Xiuxia

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a set of uncommonly rich feature representations for automatic target recognition (ATR) in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The proposed novel feature representations capture both the spatial and spectral properties of a target in a unified framework, while simultaneously offering discrimination and robustness to aspect variations. Specifically, the proposed features are mainly derived from the ideas of the monogenic signal and polar mapping. The applicability of the monogenic signal within the field of SAR target recognition is demonstrated by its capability of capturing both the broad spectral information and spatial localization with compact support. Further, to reduce the influence of inevitable variations due to aspect changes in SAR images, the monogenic components are transformed from Cartesian to polar coordinates through polar mapping. Additionally, a new target-shadow feature is also presented to compensate for the important discriminative information about target geometry, which exists in the shadow area. Finally, the proposed features are jointly considered into a unified multiple kernel learning framework for target recognition. Experiments on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition (MSTAR) public dataset demonstrate the strength and applicability of the proposed representations to SAR ATR. Moreover, it is also shown that overall high recognition accuracy can be obtained by the established unified framework.

  7. Automatic Extraction of Closed Pixel Clusters for Target Cueing in Hyperspectral Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Perkins, D E

    2001-06-05

    Traditional algorithms for automatic target cueing (ATC) in hyperspectral images, such as the RX algorithm, treat anomaly detection as a simple hypothesis testing problem. Each decision threshold gives rise to a different set of anomalous pixels. The clustered Rx algorithm generates target cues by grouping anomalous pixels into spatial clusters, and retaining only those clusters that satisfy target specific spatial constraints. It produces one set of target cues for each of several decision thresholds, and conservatively requires {Omicron}(K{sup 2}) operations per pixel, where K is the number of spectral bands (which varies from hundreds to thousands in hyperspectral images). A novel ATC algorithm, known as ''Pixel Cluster Cueing'' (PCC), is discussed. PCC groups pixels into clusters based on spectral similarity and spatial proximity, and then selects only those clusters that satisfy target-specific spatial constraints as target cues. PCC requires only {Omicron}(K) operations per pixel, and it produces only one set of target cues because it is not an anomaly detection algorithm, i.e., it does not use a decision threshold to classify individual pixels as anomalies. PCC is compared both computationally and statistically to the RX algorithm.

  8. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  9. The Development of the Automatic Target Recognition System for the UGV/RSTA LADAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-21

    Vol. 1960, Orlando, FL, 14-16 April 1993, pp. 57-71. 6. J.E. Nettleton and S. Holder, "Active/passive laser radar field test (Fort A.P. Hill, VA...is to develop the automatic target recogni- tion (ATR) system that will process the imagery from the RSTA laser radar (ladar). A real-time...ix 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. IMAGE DATA BASES 5 2.1 Introduction 5 2.2 Tri-Service Laser -Radar (TSLR) Data 5 2.3 Hobby Shop (HBS) Laser -Radar Data 11

  10. Interim results from a neural network 3-D automatic target recognition program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoet, William; Rainey, Timothy G.; Slutz, Lee A.; Weingard, Fred

    1992-09-01

    Recent results from the Artificial Neural VIsion Learning (ANVIL) program are presented. The focus of the ANVIL program is to apply neural network technologies to the air-to-surface 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) problem. The 3D Multiple Object Detection and Location System (MODALS) neural network was developed under the ANVIL program to simultaneously detect, locate, segment, and identify multiple targets. The performance results show a very high identification accuracy, a high detection rate, and low false alarm rate, even for areas with high clutter and shadowing. The results are shown as detection/false alarm curves and identification/false alarm curves. In addition, positional detection accuracy is shown for various scale sizes. To provide data for the program, visible terrain board imagery was collected under a variety of background and lighting conditions. Tests were made on over 500 targets of five types and two classes. These targets varied in scale by up to -25%, varied in azimuth by up to 120 degrees, and varied in elevation by up to 10 degrees. The performance results are shown for targets with resolution ranging from 9 to 700 pixels on target. This work is being performed under contract to Wright Laboratory AAAT-1.

  11. ANVIL neural network program for three-dimensional automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoet, William; Rainey, Timothy G.; Brettle, Dean W.; Slutz, Lee A.; Weingard, Fred

    1992-12-01

    The focus of the artificial neural vision learning (ANVIL) program is to apply neural network technologies to the air-to-surface 3-D automatic target recognition (ATR) problem. The 3-D multiple object detection and location system (MODALS) neural network was developed under the ANVIL program to simultaneously detect, locate, segment, and identify multiple targets. The performance results show a very high identification accuracy, a high detection rate, and a low false alarm rate, even for areas with high clutter and shadowing. The results are shown as detection/false alarm curves and identification/false alarm curves. In addition, positional detection accuracy is shown for various scale sizes. To provide data for the program, visible terrain board imagery was collected under a variety of background and lighting conditions. Tests were made on more than 500 targets of five types and two classes. These targets varied in scale by up to -25%, varied in azimuth by up to 120 deg, and varied in elevation by up to 10 deg. The performance results are shown for targets with resolution ranging from 9 to 700 pixels on target.

  12. Clutter metric based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound on automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Guojing; Zhang, Jianqi; Liu, Delian; Chang, Honghua

    2008-10-10

    This is a performance evaluation on the implementation of the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for background clutter measurement on automatic target recognition (ATR). In essence the background clutter evaluation problem for ATR is consistent with the deterministic parameter estimation problem. Thus, useful concepts and theories of deterministic parameter estimation can be introduced into the investigation of background clutter. In this paper, the CRLB is employed as a metric for clutter measurement. Requirements needed for this application are analyzed, and the approach for obtaining the CRLB of a scene image is produced. The flexibility of the CRLB metric is analyzed. Discussion and comparison are made on the relationship between the CRLB metric and the Sims signal-to-clutter metric. Finally, we illustrate how this metric defines the potential for false alarms by determining the correspondence level between a target and background through the application of the CRLB.

  13. Automatic attraction of attention to former targets in visual displays of letters.

    PubMed

    Kyllingsbaek, S; Schneider, W X; Bundesen, C

    2001-01-01

    Shiffrin and Schneider (1977, Experiment 4d) reported that after consistent training in search for particular alphanumeric characters, presentation of one of these characters (former targets) as a distractor impeded detection of simultaneously presented current targets. Even if presented in an irrelevant display location, the former target appeared to attract attention. Here, we analyze weaknesses in the design of Experiment 4d and report four follow-up experiments ranging from a fairly close replication of the original multiframe experiment to a rather conventional single-frame search study. In each experiment, presentation of former targets consistently impeded detection of simultaneously presented current targets. The results suggest that automatic attention attraction to individual alphanumeric characters develops not only in the special experimental paradigm used by Shiffrin and Schneider, but also in standard visual search tasks. The fact that attention appeared to be attracted by shapes as complex as individual letters supports the assumption that simultaneously presented visual stimuli can be compared in parallel against memory representations of alphanumeric characters.

  14. Automatic geocoding of high-value targets using structural image analysis and GIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, Uwe; Thoennessen, Ulrich

    1999-12-01

    Geocoding based merely on navigation data and sensor model is often not possible or precise enough. In these cases an improvement of the preregistration through image-based approaches is a solution. Due to the large amount of data in remote sensing automatic geocoding methods are necessary. For geocoding purposes appropriate tie points, which are present in image and map, have to be detected and matched. The tie points are base of the transformation function. Assigning the tie points is combinatorial problem depending on the number of tie points. This number can be reduced using structural tie points like corners or crossings of prominent extended targets (e.g. harbors, airfields). Additionally the reliability of the tie points is improved. Our approach extracts structural tie points independently in the image and in the vector map by a model-based image analysis. The vector map is provided by a GIS using ATKIS data base. The model parameters are extracted from maps or collateral information of the scenario. The two sets of tie points are automatically matched with a Geometric Hashing algorithm. The algorithm was successfully applied to VIS, IR and SAR data.

  15. User acceptance of intelligent avionics: A study of automatic-aided target recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Curtis A.; Hayes, Brian C.; Gorman, Patrick C.

    1991-01-01

    User acceptance of new support systems typically was evaluated after the systems were specified, designed, and built. The current study attempts to assess user acceptance of an Automatic-Aided Target Recognition (ATR) system using an emulation of such a proposed system. The detection accuracy and false alarm level of the ATR system were varied systematically, and subjects rated the tactical value of systems exhibiting different performance levels. Both detection accuracy and false alarm level affected the subjects' ratings. The data from two experiments suggest a cut-off point in ATR performance below which the subjects saw little tactical value in the system. An ATR system seems to have obvious tactical value only if it functions at a correct detection rate of 0.7 or better with a false alarm level of 0.167 false alarms per square degree or fewer.

  16. Dynamic Data Driven Applications Systems (DDDAS) modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Seetharaman, Guna; Darema, Frederica

    2013-05-01

    The Dynamic Data Driven Applications System (DDDAS) concept uses applications modeling, mathematical algorithms, and measurement systems to work with dynamic systems. A dynamic systems such as Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) is subject to sensor, target, and the environment variations over space and time. We use the DDDAS concept to develop an ATR methodology for multiscale-multimodal analysis that seeks to integrated sensing, processing, and exploitation. In the analysis, we use computer vision techniques to explore the capabilities and analogies that DDDAS has with information fusion. The key attribute of coordination is the use of sensor management as a data driven techniques to improve performance. In addition, DDDAS supports the need for modeling from which uncertainty and variations are used within the dynamic models for advanced performance. As an example, we use a Wide-Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) application to draw parallels and contrasts between ATR and DDDAS systems that warrants an integrated perspective. This elementary work is aimed at triggering a sequence of deeper insightful research towards exploiting sparsely sampled piecewise dense WAMI measurements - an application where the challenges of big-data with regards to mathematical fusion relationships and high-performance computations remain significant and will persist. Dynamic data-driven adaptive computations are required to effectively handle the challenges with exponentially increasing data volume for advanced information fusion systems solutions such as simultaneous target tracking and ATR.

  17. A distributed automatic target recognition system using multiple low resolution sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhanfeng; Lakshmi Narasimha, Pramod; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-agent system which uses swarming techniques to perform high accuracy Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) in a distributed manner. The proposed system can co-operatively share the information from low-resolution images of different looks and use this information to perform high accuracy ATR. An advanced, multiple-agent Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems-based approach is proposed which integrates the processing capabilities, combines detection reporting with live video exchange, and swarm behavior modalities that dramatically surpass individual sensor system performance levels. We employ real-time block-based motion analysis and compensation scheme for efficient estimation and correction of camera jitter, global motion of the camera/scene and the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Our optimized Partition Weighted Sum (PWS) approach requires only bitshifts and additions, yet achieves a stunning 16X pixel resolution enhancement, which is moreover parallizable. We develop advanced, adaptive particle-filtering based algorithms to robustly track multiple mobile targets by adaptively changing the appearance model of the selected targets. The collaborative ATR system utilizes the homographies between the sensors induced by the ground plane to overlap the local observation with the received images from other UAVs. The motion of the UAVs distorts estimated homography frame to frame. A robust dynamic homography estimation algorithm is proposed to address this, by using the homography decomposition and the ground plane surface estimation.

  18. Experimental evaluation of video preprocessing algorithms for automatic target hand-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIngvale, P. H.; Guyton, R. D.

    It is pointed out that the Automatic Target Hand-Off Correlator (ATHOC) hardware has been modified to permit operation in a nonreal-time mode as a programmable laboratory test unit using video recordings as inputs and allowing several preprocessing algorithms to be software programmable. In parallel with this hardware modification effort, an analysis and simulation effort has been underway to help determine which of the many available preprocessing algorithms should be implemented in the ATHOC software. It is noted that videotapes from a current technology airborne target acquisition system and an imaging infrared missile seeker were recorded and used in the laboratory experiments. These experiments are described and the results are presented. A set of standard parameters is found for each case. Consideration of the background in the target scene is found to be important. Analog filter cutoff frequencies of 2.5 MHz for low pass and 300 kHz for high pass are found to give best results. EPNC = 1 is found to be slightly better than EPNC = 0. It is also shown that trilevel gives better results than bilevel.

  19. General Metropolis-Hastings jump diffusions for automatic target recognition in infrared scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanterman, Aaron D.; Miller, Michael I.; Snyder, Donald L.

    1997-04-01

    To locate and recognize ground-based targets in forward- looking IR (FLIR) images, 3D faceted models with associated pose parameters are formulated to accommodate the variability found in FLIR imagery. Taking a Bayesian approach, scenes are simulated from the emissive characteristics of the CAD models and compared with the collected data by a likelihood function based on sensor statistics. This likelihood is combined with a prior distribution defined over the set of possible scenes to form a posterior distribution. To accommodate scenes with variable numbers of targets, the posterior distribution is defined over parameter vectors of varying dimension. An inference algorithm based on Metropolis-Hastings jump- diffusion processes empirically samples from the posterior distribution, generating configurations of templates and transformations that match the collected sensor data with high probability. The jumps accommodate the addition and deletion of targets and the estimation of target identities; diffusions refine the hypotheses by drifting along the gradient of the posterior distribution with respect to the orientation and position parameters. Previous results on jumps strategies analogous to the Metropolis acceptance/rejection algorithm, with proposals drawn from the prior and accepted based on the likelihood, are extended to encompass general Metropolis-Hastings proposal densities. In particular, the algorithm proposes moves by drawing from the posterior distribution over computationally tractible subsets of the parameter space. The algorithm is illustrated by an implementation on a Silicon Graphics Onyx/Reality Engine.

  20. Localization accuracy from automatic and semi-automatic rigid registration of locally-advanced lung cancer targets during image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate localization accuracy resulting from rigid registration of locally-advanced lung cancer targets using fully automatic and semi-automatic protocols for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: Seventeen lung cancer patients, fourteen also presenting with involved lymph nodes, received computed tomography (CT) scans once per week throughout treatment under active breathing control. A physician contoured both lung and lymph node targets for all weekly scans. Various automatic and semi-automatic rigid registration techniques were then performed for both individual and simultaneous alignments of the primary gross tumor volume (GTV{sub P}) and involved lymph nodes (GTV{sub LN}) to simulate the localization process in image-guided radiation therapy. Techniques included ''standard'' (direct registration of weekly images to a planning CT), ''seeded'' (manual prealignment of targets to guide standard registration), ''transitive-based'' (alignment of pretreatment and planning CTs through one or more intermediate images), and ''rereferenced'' (designation of a new reference image for registration). Localization error (LE) was assessed as the residual centroid and border distances between targets from planning and weekly CTs after registration. Results: Initial bony alignment resulted in centroid LE of 7.3 {+-} 5.4 mm and 5.4 {+-} 3.4 mm for the GTV{sub P} and GTV{sub LN}, respectively. Compared to bony alignment, transitive-based and seeded registrations significantly reduced GTV{sub P} centroid LE to 4.7 {+-} 3.7 mm (p = 0.011) and 4.3 {+-} 2.5 mm (p < 1 x 10{sup -3}), respectively, but the smallest GTV{sub P} LE of 2.4 {+-} 2.1 mm was provided by rereferenced registration (p < 1 x 10{sup -6}). Standard registration significantly reduced GTV{sub LN} centroid LE to 3.2 {+-} 2.5 mm (p < 1 x 10{sup -3}) compared to bony alignment, with little additional gain offered by the other registration techniques. For simultaneous target alignment, centroid LE as low

  1. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy a)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinzhong; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.; Aristophanous, Michalis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm3 (range, 6.6–44.3 cm3), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm3 (range, 2.8–45.1 cm3). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm3 (range, 4.2–38.4 cm3). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was 0

  2. A comparative study of automatic image segmentation algorithms for target tracking in MR-IGRT.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Kawrakow, Iwan; Olsen, Jeff; Parikh, Parag J; Noel, Camille; Wooten, Omar; Du, Dongsu; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2016-03-08

    On-board magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance during radiation therapy offers the potential for more accurate treatment delivery. To utilize the real-time image information, a crucial prerequisite is the ability to successfully segment and track regions of interest (ROI). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of different segmentation algorithms using motion images (4 frames per second) acquired using a MR image-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) system. Manual con-tours of the kidney, bladder, duodenum, and a liver tumor by an experienced radiation oncologist were used as the ground truth for performance evaluation. Besides the manual segmentation, images were automatically segmented using thresholding, fuzzy k-means (FKM), k-harmonic means (KHM), and reaction-diffusion level set evolution (RD-LSE) algorithms, as well as the tissue tracking algorithm provided by the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system (VR-TPDS). The performance of the five algorithms was evaluated quantitatively by comparing with the manual segmentation using the Dice coefficient and target registration error (TRE) measured as the distance between the centroid of the manual ROI and the centroid of the automatically segmented ROI. All methods were able to successfully segment the bladder and the kidney, but only FKM, KHM, and VR-TPDS were able to segment the liver tumor and the duodenum. The performance of the thresholding, FKM, KHM, and RD-LSE algorithms degraded as the local image contrast decreased, whereas the performance of the VP-TPDS method was nearly independent of local image contrast due to the reference registration algorithm. For segmenting high-contrast images (i.e., kidney), the thresholding method provided the best speed (< 1 ms) with a satisfying accuracy (Dice = 0.95). When the image contrast was low, the VR-TPDS method had the best automatic contour. Results suggest an image quality determination procedure before segmentation and a combination of

  3. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities by Improving Their Computer Pointing Efficiency with an Automatic Target Acquisition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Peng, Chin-Ling

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with multiple disabilities would be able to improve their pointing performance through an Automatic Target Acquisition Program (ATAP) and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e. a new mouse driver replaces standard mouse driver, and is able to monitor mouse movement and intercept click action). Initially, both…

  4. A rectangular-fit classifier for synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghri, John A.; Cary, Daniel A.

    2007-09-01

    The utility of a rectangular-fit classifier for Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition (SAR ATR) is examined. The target is fitted with and modeled as a rectangle that can best approximate its boundary. The rectangular fit procedure involves 1) a preprocessing phase to remove the background clutter and noise, 2) a pose detection phase to establish the alignment of the rectangle via a least squares straight line fitting algorithm, and 3) size determination phase via stretching the width and the height dimensions of the rectangle in order to encapsulate a pre-specified, e.g., 90%, of the points in the target. A training set composed of approximately half the total images in the MSTAR public imagery database are used to obtain and record the statistical variations in the width and height of the resulting rectangles for each potential target. The remaining half of the images is then used to assess the performance of this classifier. Preliminary results using minimum Euclidean and Mahalanobis distance classifiers show overall accuracies of 44% and 42%, respectively. Although the classification accuracy is relatively low, this technique can be successfully used in combination with other classifiers such as peaks, edges, corners, and shadow-based classifiers to enhance their performances. A unique feature of the rectangular fit classifier is that it is rotation invariant in its present form. However, observation of the dataset reveals that in general the shapes of the targets in SAR imagery are not fully rotation invariant. Thus, the classification accuracy is expected to improve considerably using multiple training sets, i.e., one training set generated and used for each possible pose. The tradeoff is the increased computation complexity which tends to be offset by ever increasing efficiency and speed of the processing hardware and software. The rectangular fit classifier can also be used as a pose detection routine and/or in conjunction with other ATR

  5. A Compact Methodology to Understand, Evaluate, and Predict the Performance of Automatic Target Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Chen, Yiping; Zhuang, Zhaowen; Cheng, Yongqiang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Liandong; Zeng, Yonghu; Gao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a compacted mechanism to carry out the performance evaluation work for an automatic target recognition (ATR) system: (a) a standard description of the ATR system's output is suggested, a quantity to indicate the operating condition is presented based on the principle of feature extraction in pattern recognition, and a series of indexes to assess the output in different aspects are developed with the application of statistics; (b) performance of the ATR system is interpreted by a quality factor based on knowledge of engineering mathematics; (c) through a novel utility called “context-probability” estimation proposed based on probability, performance prediction for an ATR system is realized. The simulation result shows that the performance of an ATR system can be accounted for and forecasted by the above-mentioned measures. Compared to existing technologies, the novel method can offer more objective performance conclusions for an ATR system. These conclusions may be helpful in knowing the practical capability of the tested ATR system. At the same time, the generalization performance of the proposed method is good. PMID:24967605

  6. Automatic identification of bird targets with radar via patterns produced by wing flapping.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Serge; Saporta, Gilbert; van Loon, Emiel; Schmaljohann, Heiko; Liechti, Felix

    2008-09-06

    Bird identification with radar is important for bird migration research, environmental impact assessments (e.g. wind farms), aircraft security and radar meteorology. In a study on bird migration, radar signals from birds, insects and ground clutter were recorded. Signals from birds show a typical pattern due to wing flapping. The data were labelled by experts into the four classes BIRD, INSECT, CLUTTER and UFO (unidentifiable signals). We present a classification algorithm aimed at automatic recognition of bird targets. Variables related to signal intensity and wing flapping pattern were extracted (via continuous wavelet transform). We used support vector classifiers to build predictive models. We estimated classification performance via cross validation on four datasets. When data from the same dataset were used for training and testing the classifier, the classification performance was extremely to moderately high. When data from one dataset were used for training and the three remaining datasets were used as test sets, the performance was lower but still extremely to moderately high. This shows that the method generalizes well across different locations or times. Our method provides a substantial gain of time when birds must be identified in large collections of radar signals and it represents the first substantial step in developing a real time bird identification radar system. We provide some guidelines and ideas for future research.

  7. A compact methodology to understand, evaluate, and predict the performance of automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Chen, Yiping; Zhuang, Zhaowen; Cheng, Yongqiang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Liandong; Zeng, Yonghu; Gao, Lei

    2014-06-25

    This paper offers a compacted mechanism to carry out the performance evaluation work for an automatic target recognition (ATR) system: (a) a standard description of the ATR system's output is suggested, a quantity to indicate the operating condition is presented based on the principle of feature extraction in pattern recognition, and a series of indexes to assess the output in different aspects are developed with the application of statistics; (b) performance of the ATR system is interpreted by a quality factor based on knowledge of engineering mathematics; (c) through a novel utility called "context-probability" estimation proposed based on probability, performance prediction for an ATR system is realized. The simulation result shows that the performance of an ATR system can be accounted for and forecasted by the above-mentioned measures. Compared to existing technologies, the novel method can offer more objective performance conclusions for an ATR system. These conclusions may be helpful in knowing the practical capability of the tested ATR system. At the same time, the generalization performance of the proposed method is good.

  8. Improved local ternary patterns for automatic target recognition in infrared imagery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaosheng; Sun, Junding; Fan, Guoliang; Wang, Zhiheng

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents an improved local ternary pattern (LTP) for automatic target recognition (ATR) in infrared imagery. Firstly, a robust LTP (RLTP) scheme is proposed to overcome the limitation of the original LTP for achieving the invariance with respect to the illumination transformation. Then, a soft concave-convex partition (SCCP) is introduced to add some flexibility to the original concave-convex partition (CCP) scheme. Referring to the orthogonal combination of local binary patterns (OC_LBP), the orthogonal combination of LTP (OC_LTP) is adopted to reduce the dimensionality of the LTP histogram. Further, a novel operator, called the soft concave-convex orthogonal combination of robust LTP (SCC_OC_RLTP), is proposed by combing RLTP, SCCP and OC_LTP. Finally, the new operator is used for ATR along with a blocking schedule to improve its discriminability and a feature selection technique to enhance its efficiency. Experimental results on infrared imagery show that the proposed features can achieve competitive ATR results compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  9. Investigation of measureable parameters that correlate with automatic target recognition performance in synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazagnaire, Julia; Cobb, J. T.; Isaacs, Jason

    2015-05-01

    There is a desire in the Mine Counter Measure community to develop a systematic method to predict and/or estimate the performance of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms that are detecting and classifying mine-like objects within sonar data. Ideally, parameters exist that can be measured directly from the sonar data that correlate with ATR performance. In this effort, two metrics were analyzed for their predictive potential using high frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images. The first parameter is a measure of contrast. It is essentially the variance in pixel intensity over a fixed partition of relatively small size. An analysis was performed to determine the optimum block size for this contrast calculation. These blocks were then overlapped in the horizontal and vertical direction over the entire image. The second parameter is the one-dimensional K-shape parameter. The K-distribution is commonly used to describe sonar backscatter return from range cells that contain a finite number of scatterers. An Ada-Boosted Decision Tree classifier was used to calculate the probability of classification (Pc) and false alarm rate (FAR) for several types of targets in SAS images from three different data sets. ROC curves as a function of the measured parameters were generated and the correlation between the measured parameters in the vicinity of each of the contacts and the ATR performance was investigated. The contrast and K-shape parameters were considered separately. Additionally, the contrast and K-shape parameter were associated with background texture types using previously labeled high frequency SAS images.

  10. Comparative analysis of different implementations of a parallel algorithm for automatic target detection and classification of hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Abel; Plaza, Antonio; Plaza, Javier

    2009-08-01

    Automatic target detection in hyperspectral images is a task that has attracted a lot of attention recently. In the last few years, several algoritms have been developed for this purpose, including the well-known RX algorithm for anomaly detection, or the automatic target detection and classification algorithm (ATDCA), which uses an orthogonal subspace projection (OSP) approach to extract a set of spectrally distinct targets automatically from the input hyperspectral data. Depending on the complexity and dimensionality of the analyzed image scene, the target/anomaly detection process may be computationally very expensive, a fact that limits the possibility of utilizing this process in time-critical applications. In this paper, we develop computationally efficient parallel versions of both the RX and ATDCA algorithms for near real-time exploitation of these algorithms. In the case of ATGP, we use several distance metrics in addition to the OSP approach. The parallel versions are quantitatively compared in terms of target detection accuracy, using hyperspectral data collected by NASA's Airborne Visible Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over the World Trade Center in New York, five days after the terrorist attack of September 11th, 2001, and also in terms of parallel performance, using a massively Beowulf cluster available at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland.

  11. Functionalization of OEP-based benzochlorins to develop carbohydrate-conjugated photosensitizers. Attempt to target beta-galactoside-recognized proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Pandey, Suresh K; Graham, Andrew; Dobhal, Mahabeer P; Mehta, Ricky; Chen, Yihui; Gryshuk, Amy; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2004-01-09

    meso-(2-Formylvinyl)octaethylporphyrin on reaction with cyanotrimethylsilane in the presence of various catalysts [copper triflate [Cu(OTf)(2)], indium triflate [In(OTf)(3)], or magnesium bromide diethyl etherate (MgBr(2).Et(2)O)] produced a mixture of the intermediate 3-hydroxy-3-cyanopropenoporphyrin, the corresponding trimethylsilyl ether derivative, and the unexpected propenochlorins. The yields of the reaction products were found to depend on the reaction conditions and the catalysts used. The intermediate porphyrins on treatment with concentrated sulfuric acid yielded the free-base cyanobenzochlorins in major quantity along with several other novel benzochlorins as minor products. Reduction of ethyl-3-hydroxy-1-pentenoate-porphyrin with DIBAL-H/NaBH(4) and subsequent acid treatment provided the corresponding free-base 10(3)-(2-hydroxyethyl)benzochlorin, which upon a sequence of reactions gave a free-base benzochlorin bearing a carboxylic acid functionality in good yield. It was then condensed with a variety of carbohydrates (glucosamine, galactosamine, and lactosamine), and the related conjugates were screened using the galectin-binding-ability assay. Among the carbohydrate conjugates investigated, the lactose and galactose analogues displayed the galectin-binding ability with an enhancement of about 300-400-fold compared to lactose. In preliminary studies, all photosensitizers (with or without carbohydrate moieties) were found to be active in vitro [radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor cells]. However, the cells incubated with lactose (known to bind to beta-galactoside-recognized proteins) prior to the addition of the photosensitizers containing the beta-galactose moiety (e.g., galactose and lactose) produced a 100% decrease in their photosensitizing efficacy. Under similar experimental conditions, benzochlorin without a beta-galactoside moiety or the related glucose conjugate did not show any inhibition in its photosensitizing efficacy. These results

  12. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar image segmentation algorithms in the context of automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kefu; Power, Gregory J.; Gregga, Jason B.

    2002-11-01

    Image segmentation is a process to extract and organize information energy in the image pixel space according to a prescribed feature set. It is often a key preprocess in automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms. In many cases, the performance of image segmentation algorithms will have significant impact on the performance of ATR algorithms. Due to the variations in feature set definitions and the innovations in the segmentation processes, there is large number of image segmentation algorithms existing in ATR world. Recently, the authors have investigated a number of measures to evaluate the performance of segmentation algorithms, such as Percentage Pixels Same (pps), Partial Directed Hausdorff (pdh) and Complex Inner Product (cip). In the research, we found that the combination of the three measures shows effectiveness in the evaluation of segmentation algorithms against truth data (human master segmentation). However, we still don't know what are the impact of those measures in the performance of ATR algorithms that are commonly measured by Probability of detection (PDet), Probability of false alarm (PFA), Probability of identification (PID), etc. In all practical situations, ATR boxes are implemented without human observer in the loop. The performance of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation should be evaluated in the context of ATR rather than human observers. This research establishes a segmentation algorithm evaluation suite involving segmentation algorithm performance measures as well as the ATR algorithm performance measures. It provides a practical quantitative evaluation method to judge which SAR image segmentation algorithm is the best for a particular ATR application. The results are tabulated based on some baseline ATR algorithms and a typical image segmentation algorithm used in ATR applications.

  13. Recognizing abuse.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Newman-Giger, J

    1996-01-01

    After years as a taboo topic, abuse has come "out of the closet" and is being talked about openly in society. Yet, while abuse in the workplace is being confronted, abuse within families still often goes unrecognized by outsiders, including by nurses. Failure of nurses to recognize abuse is unfortunate since frequently they are the first point of contact with the victim of abuse in the emergency room, clinic and home. Understanding and insight into the problem of family violence by nurses is critical in addressing this problem. Knowledge is crucial in planning strategies that will have the long-lasting effect of decreasing the cycle of abuse in families.

  14. Robust method for the matching of attributed scattering centers with application to synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Baiyuan; Wen, Gongjian; Zhong, Jinrong; Ma, Conghui; Yang, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust method for the matching of attributed scattering centers (ASCs) with application to synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (ATR). For the testing image to be classified, ASCs are extracted to match with the ones predicted by templates. First, Hungarian algorithm is employed to match those two ASC sets initially. Then, a precise matching is carried out through a threshold method. Point similarity and structure similarity are calculated, which are fused to evaluate the overall similarity of the two ASC sets based on the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence. Finally, the target type is determined by such similarities between the testing image and various types of targets. Experiments on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition data verify the validity of the proposed method.

  15. An active contour-based atlas registration model applied to automatic subthalamic nucleus targeting on MRI: method and validation.

    PubMed

    Duay, Valérie; Bresson, Xavier; Castro, Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new non parametric atlas registration framework, derived from the optical flow model and the active contour theory, applied to automatic subthalamic nucleus (STN) targeting in deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. In a previous work, we demonstrated that the STN position can be predicted based on the position of surrounding visible structures, namely the lateral and third ventricles. A STN targeting process can thus be obtained by registering these structures of interest between a brain atlas and the patient image. Here we aim to improve the results of the state of the art targeting methods and at the same time to reduce the computational time. Our simultaneous segmentation and registration model shows mean STN localization errors statistically similar to the most performing registration algorithms tested so far and to the targeting expert's variability. Moreover, the computational time of our registration method is much lower, which is a worthwhile improvement from a clinical point of view.

  16. An amphiphilic region in the cytoplasmic domain of KdpD is recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the Escherichia coli membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Katja S; Hubich, Stefanie; Liebhart, Helga; Krauss, Susanne; Kuhn, Andreas; Facey, Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    The sensor protein KdpD of Escherichia coli is composed of a large N-terminal hydrophilic region (aa 1–400), four transmembrane regions (aa 401–498) and a large hydrophilic region (aa 499–894) at the C-terminus. KdpD requires the signal recognition particle (SRP) for its targeting to the membrane. Deletions within KdpD show that the first 50 residues are required for SRP-driven membrane insertion. A fusion protein of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) with KdpD is found localized at the membrane only when SRP is present. The membrane targeting of GFP was not observed when the first 50 KdpD residues were deleted. A truncated mutant of KdpD containing only the first 25 amino acids fused to GFP lost its ability to specifically interact with SRP, whereas a specific interaction between SRP and the first 48 amino acids of KdpD fused to GFP was confirmed by pull-down experiments. Conclusively, a small amphiphilic region of 27 residues within the amino-terminal domain of KdpD (aa 22–48) is recognized by SRP and targets the protein to the membrane. This shows that membrane proteins with a large N-terminal region in the cytoplasm can be membrane-targeted early on to allow co-translational membrane insertion of their distant transmembrane regions. PMID:18433452

  17. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  18. Advances in image compression and automatic target recognition; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tescher, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on image compression and automatic target recognition are presented. Individual topics addressed include: target cluster detection in cluttered SAR imagery, model-based target recognition using laser radar imagery, Smart Sensor front-end processor for feature extraction of images, object attitude estimation and tracking from a single video sensor, symmetry detection in human vision, analysis of high resolution aerial images for object detection, obscured object recognition for an ATR application, neural networks for adaptive shape tracking, statistical mechanics and pattern recognition, detection of cylinders in aerial range images, moving object tracking using local windows, new transform method for image data compression, quad-tree product vector quantization of images, predictive trellis encoding of imagery, reduced generalized chain code for contour description, compact architecture for a real-time vision system, use of human visibility functions in segmentation coding, color texture analysis and synthesis using Gibbs random fields.

  19. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  20. Automatic Focusing for a 675 GHz Imaging Radar with Target Standoff Distances from 14 to 34 Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Adrian; Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Siegel, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper dicusses the issue of limited focal depth for high-resolution imaging radar operating over a wide range of standoff distances. We describe a technique for automatically focusing a THz imaging radar system using translational optics combined with range estimation based on a reduced chirp bandwidth setting. The demonstarted focusing algorithm estimates the correct focal depth for desired targets in the field of view at unknown standoffs and in the presence of clutter to provide good imagery at 14 to 30 meters of standoff.

  1. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  2. Automatic Shape-Based Target Extraction for Close-Range Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, C.; Cheng, M.; Wen, C.; Yu, J.

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform precise identification and location of artificial coded targets in natural scenes, a novel design of circle-based coded target and the corresponding coarse-fine extraction algorithm are presented. The designed target separates the target box and coding box totally and owns an advantage of rotation invariance. Based on the original target, templates are prepared by three geometric transformations and are used as the input of shape-based template matching. Finally, region growing and parity check methods are used to extract the coded targets as final results. No human involvement is required except for the preparation of templates and adjustment of thresholds in the beginning, which is conducive to the automation of close-range photogrammetry. The experimental results show that the proposed recognition method for the designed coded target is robust and accurate.

  3. Large-scale automatic extraction of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs from full-text oncological articles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-06-01

    Targeted anticancer drugs such as imatinib, trastuzumab and erlotinib dramatically improved treatment outcomes in cancer patients, however, these innovative agents are often associated with unexpected side effects. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these side effects are not well understood. The availability of a comprehensive knowledge base of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs has the potential to illuminate complex pathways underlying toxicities induced by these innovative drugs. While side effect association knowledge for targeted drugs exists in multiple heterogeneous data sources, published full-text oncological articles represent an important source of pivotal, investigational, and even failed trials in a variety of patient populations. In this study, we present an automatic process to extract targeted anticancer drug-associated side effects (drug-SE pairs) from a large number of high profile full-text oncological articles. We downloaded 13,855 full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) published between 1983 and 2013. We developed text classification, relationship extraction, signaling filtering, and signal prioritization algorithms to extract drug-SE pairs from downloaded articles. We extracted a total of 26,264 drug-SE pairs with an average precision of 0.405, a recall of 0.899, and an F1 score of 0.465. We show that side effect knowledge from JCO articles is largely complementary to that from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug labels. Through integrative correlation analysis, we show that targeted drug-associated side effects positively correlate with their gene targets and disease indications. In conclusion, this unique database that we built from a large number of high-profile oncological articles could facilitate the development of computational models to understand toxic effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs.

  4. Robustness of features for automatic target discrimination in high-resolution polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broek, Albertus C.; Dekker, Rob J.; Steeghs, Phillippe

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the robustness of features against aspect variability for the purpose of target discrimination using polarimetric 35 Ghz ISAR data. Images at a resolution of 10 cm and 30 cm have been used for a complete aspect range of 360 degrees. The data covered four military targets: T72, ZSU23/4, T62, and BMP2. For the study we composed several feature vectors out of individual features extracted from the images. The features are divided into three categories: radiometric, geometric and polarimetric. We found that individual features show a strong variability as a function of aspect angle and cannot be used to discriminate between the targets irrespectively of the aspect angle. Using feature vectors and a maximum likelihood classifier reasonable discrimination (about 80%) between the four targets irrespective of the aspect angle was obtained at 10 cm resolution. At 30 cm resolution less significant discrimination (less than 70%) was found irrespective of the kind of feature vector used. In addition we investigated target discrimination per 30-degree aspect interval. In order to determine the aspect angle of targets we used a technique based on the Radon transformation, which gave an accuracy of about 5 degrees in aspect angle. We found that in this case good discrimination (more than 90%) was obtained at 10 cm resolution and reasonable discrimination (about 80%) at 30 cm resolution. The results are compared with analogous results from MSTAR data (30 cm resolution) of comparable targets.

  5. Real-time automatic target location by template matching on blurred images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Downs, Justin, III; Peterson, Michael L.

    1996-11-01

    High precision manufacturing is dependent on the accurate positioning of the part prior to each processing step. The part is typically held in a transfer fixture which may be used either simply as a part holder or as an alignment reference. A typical application is explored in this work, grinding of slots in a thick ceramic wafer mounted on a part fixture. A 1 micron slot is located with a position tolerance of 10 microns in the nickel-zinc-ferrite wafer. Part location is determined by means of a 50.8 by 1 micron target deposited onto the ceramic during an earlier process. In the current process, the target is magnified by a 250X vision system and the machine operator manually aligns the part using a set of cross hairs overlaid on the image. A high precision x-y stage is used to adjust the pat location. However, the use of a fixed focal distance camera combined with part mounting variation results in an unfocused image for the operator. Manual alignment of the unfocused image leads to target location error during centering of the target in the cross hairs. The misalignment, in turn, results in process variation. The location of the slots varies based on alignment and reduces the process capability. To reduce process variation, an automated target location algorithm has been applied. The algorithm uses template matching to detect the target. This simple algorithm has been shown to locate the target within the required tolerance in spite of image blur. Using low cost processing, the system is able to determine the target location in real-time. For real-time control, the algorithm must determine the x-y coordinate of the target in 10 seconds or less. This effort shows the potential for a simple location algorithm to be implemented in a manner which can significantly decrease process variation in a precision fabrication process.

  6. Real-time automatic target location by template matching on blurred images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Downs, Justin, III; Peterson, Michael L.

    1996-11-01

    High precision manufacturing is dependent on the accurate positioning of the part prior to each processing step. The part is typically held in a transfer fixture which may be used either simply as a part holder or as an alignment reference. A typical application is explored in this work, grinding of slots in a thick ceramic wafer mounted on a part fixture. A 1 micron slot is located with a position tolerance of 10 microns in the nickel-zinc-ferrite wafer. Part location is determined by means of a 50.8 by 1 micron target deposited onto the ceramic during an earlier process. In the current process, the target is magnified by a 250X vision system and the machine operator manually aligns the part using a set of cross hairs overlaid on the image. A high precision x-y stage is used to adjust the part location. However, the use of a fixed focal distance camera combined with part mounting variation results in an unfocused image for the operator. Manual alignment of the unfocused image leads to target location error during centering of the target in the cross hairs. The misalignment, in turn, results in process variation. The location of the slots varies based on alignment and reduces the process capability. To reduce process variation, an automated target location algorithm has been applied. The algorithm uses template matching to detect the target. This simple algorithm has been shown to locate the target within the required tolerance in spite of image blur. Using low cost processing, the system is able to determine the target location in real-time. For real-time control, the algorithm must determine the x-y coordinate of the target in 10 seconds or less. This effort shows the potential for a simple location algorithm to be implemented in a manner which can significantly decrease process variation in a precision fabrication process.

  7. A probability of error-constrained sequential decision algorithm for data-rich automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Irwin O.; DeVore, Michael D.; Beling, Peter A.; Horowitz, Barry M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper illustrates an approach to sequential hypothesis testing designed not to minimize the amount of data collected but to reduce the overall amount of processing required, while still guaranteeing pre-specified conditional probabilities of error. The approach is potentially useful when sensor data are plentiful but time and processing capability are constrained. The approach gradually reduces the number of target hypotheses under consideration as more sensor data are processed, proportionally allocating time and processing resources to the most likely target classes. The approach is demonstrated on a multi-class ladar-based target recognition problem and compared with uniform-computation tests.

  8. M.(phi)BssHII, a novel cytosine-C5-DNA-methyltransferase with target-recognizing domains at separated locations of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Sethmann, S; Ceglowski, P; Willert, J; Iwanicka-Nowicka, R; Trautner, T A; Walter, J

    1999-01-01

    In all cytosine-C5-DNA-methyltransferases (MTases) from prokaryotes and eukaryotes, remarkably conserved amino acid sequence elements responsible for general enzymatic functions are arranged in the same canonical order. In addition, one variable region, which includes the target-recognizing domain(s) (TRDs) characteristic for each enzyme, has been localized in one region between the same blocks of these conserved elements. This conservation in the order of conserved and variable sequences suggests stringent structural constraints in the primary structure to obtain the correct folding of the enzymes. Here we report the characterization of a new type of a multispecific MTase, M.(phiphi)BssHII, which is expressed as two isoforms. Isoform I is an entirely novel type of MTase which has, in addition to the TRDs at the conventional location, one TRD located at a non-canonical position at its N-terminus. Isoform II is represented by the same MTase, but without the N-terminal TRD. The N-terminal TRD provides HaeII methylation specificity to isoform I. The TRD is fully functional when engineered into either the conventional variable region of M.(phiphi)BssHII or the related monospecific M.phi3TII MTase. The implications of this structural plasticity with respect to the evolution of MTases are discussed. PMID:10369689

  9. Optical implementation of a feature-based neural network with application to automatic target recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Stoner, William W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical neural network based on the neocognitron paradigm is introduced. A novel aspect of the architecture design is shift-invariant multichannel Fourier optical correlation within each processing layer. Multilayer processing is achieved by feeding back the ouput of the feature correlator interatively to the input spatial light modulator and by updating the Fourier filters. By training the neural net with characteristic features extracted from the target images, successful pattern recognition with intraclass fault tolerance and interclass discrimination is achieved. A detailed system description is provided. Experimental demonstrations of a two-layer neural network for space-object discrimination is also presented.

  10. Automatic target recognition using a feature-based optical neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1992-01-01

    An optical neural network based upon the Neocognitron paradigm (K. Fukushima et al. 1983) is introduced. A novel aspect of the architectural design is shift-invariant multichannel Fourier optical correlation within each processing layer. Multilayer processing is achieved by iteratively feeding back the output of the feature correlator to the input spatial light modulator and updating the Fourier filters. By training the neural net with characteristic features extracted from the target images, successful pattern recognition with intra-class fault tolerance and inter-class discrimination is achieved. A detailed system description is provided. Experimental demonstration of a two-layer neural network for space objects discrimination is also presented.

  11. Automatic Localization of Target Vertebrae in Spine Surgery: Clinical Evaluation of the LevelCheck Registration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sheng-fu L.; Otake, Yoshito; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Wang, Adam S.; Uneri, Ali; De Silva, Tharindu; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Liauw, Jason A.; Groves, Mari; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Aygun, Nafi; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A 3D-2D image registration algorithm, “LevelCheck,” was used to automatically label vertebrae in intraoperative mobile radiographs obtained during spine surgery. Accuracy, computation time, and potential failure modes were evaluated in a retrospective study of 20 patients. Objective To measurethe performance of the LevelCheck algorithm using clinical images acquired during spine surgery. Summary of Background Data In spine surgery, the potential for wrong level surgery is significant due to the difficulty of localizing target vertebrae based solely on visual impression, palpation, and fluoroscopy. To remedy this difficulty and reduce the risk of wrong-level surgery, our team introduced a program (dubbed LevelCheck) to automatically localize target vertebrae in mobile radiographs using robust 3D-2D image registration to preoperative CT. Methods Twenty consecutive patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery, for whom both a preoperative CT scan and an intraoperative mobile radiograph were available, were retrospectively analyzed. A board-certified neuroradiologist determined the “true” vertebra levels in each radiograph. Registration of the preoperative CT to the intraoperative radiographwere calculated via LevelCheck, and projection distance errors were analyzed. Five hundred random initializations were performed for eachpatient, andalgorithm settings (viz., the number of robust multi-starts, ranging 50 to 200) were varied to evaluate the tradeoff between registration error and computation time. Failure mode analysis was performed by individually analyzing unsuccessful registrations (>5 mm distance error) observed with 50 multi-starts. Results At 200 robust multi-starts (computation time of ∼26 seconds), the registration accuracy was 100% across all 10,000 trials. As the number of multi-starts (and computation time) decreased, the registration remained fairly robust, down to 99.3% registration accuracy at 50 multi-starts (computation time

  12. A multispectral automatic target recognition application for maritime surveillance, search, and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Jon; Reed, Scott; Podobna, Yuliya; Vazquez, Jose; Boucher, Cynthia

    2010-04-01

    Due to increased security concerns, the commitment to monitor and maintain security in the maritime environment is increasingly a priority. A country's coast is the most vulnerable area for the incursion of illegal immigrants, terrorists and contraband. This work illustrates the ability of a low-cost, light-weight, multi-spectral, multi-channel imaging system to handle the environment and see under difficult marine conditions. The system and its implemented detecting and tracking technologies should be organic to the maritime homeland security community for search and rescue, fisheries, defense, and law enforcement. It is tailored for airborne and ship based platforms to detect, track and monitor suspected objects (such as semi-submerged targets like marine mammals, vessels in distress, and drug smugglers). In this system, automated detection and tracking technology is used to detect, classify and localize potential threats or objects of interest within the imagery provided by the multi-spectral system. These algorithms process the sensor data in real time, thereby providing immediate feedback when features of interest have been detected. A supervised detection system based on Haar features and Cascade Classifiers is presented and results are provided on real data. The system is shown to be extendable and reusable for a variety of different applications.

  13. Validating the performance of one-time decomposition for fMRI analysis using ICA with automatic target generation process.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shengnan; Zeng, Weiming; Wang, Nizhuan; Chen, Lei

    2013-07-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been proven to be effective for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis. However, ICA decomposition requires to optimize the unmixing matrix iteratively whose initial values are generated randomly. Thus the randomness of the initialization leads to different ICA decomposition results. Therefore, just one-time decomposition for fMRI data analysis is not usually reliable. Under this circumstance, several methods about repeated decompositions with ICA (RDICA) were proposed to reveal the stability of ICA decomposition. Although utilizing RDICA has achieved satisfying results in validating the performance of ICA decomposition, RDICA cost much computing time. To mitigate the problem, in this paper, we propose a method, named ATGP-ICA, to do the fMRI data analysis. This method generates fixed initial values with automatic target generation process (ATGP) instead of being produced randomly. We performed experimental tests on both hybrid data and fMRI data to indicate the effectiveness of the new method and made a performance comparison of the traditional one-time decomposition with ICA (ODICA), RDICA and ATGP-ICA. The proposed method demonstrated that it not only could eliminate the randomness of ICA decomposition, but also could save much computing time compared to RDICA. Furthermore, the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) power analysis also denoted the better signal reconstruction performance of ATGP-ICA than that of RDICA.

  14. Performance portability study of an automatic target detection and classification algorithm for hyperspectral image analysis using OpenCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabe, Sergio; Igual, Francisco D.; Botella, Guillermo; Garcia, Carlos; Prieto-Matias, Manuel; Plaza, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) have opened new avenues for demanding remote sensing applications. Perhaps one of the most popular algorithm in target detection and identification is the automatic target detection and classification algorithm (ATDCA) widely used in the hyperspectral image analysis community. Previous research has already investigated the mapping of ATDCA on graphics processing units (GPUs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), showing impressive speedup factors that allow its exploitation in time-critical scenarios. Based on these studies, our work explores the performance portability of a tuned OpenCL implementation across a range of processing devices including multicore processors, GPUs and other accelerators. This approach differs from previous papers, which focused on achieving the optimal performance on each platform. Here, we are more interested in the following issues: (1) evaluating if a single code written in OpenCL allows us to achieve acceptable performance across all of them, and (2) assessing the gap between our portable OpenCL code and those hand-tuned versions previously investigated. Our study includes the analysis of different tuning techniques that expose data parallelism as well as enable an efficient exploitation of the complex memory hierarchies found in these new heterogeneous devices. Experiments have been conducted using hyperspectral data sets collected by NASA's Airborne Visible Infra- red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Hyperspectral Digital Imagery Collection Experiment (HYDICE) sensors. To the best of our knowledge, this kind of analysis has not been previously conducted in the hyperspectral imaging processing literature, and in our opinion it is very important in order to really calibrate the possibility of using heterogeneous platforms for efficient hyperspectral imaging processing in real remote sensing missions.

  15. Adenovirally-Induced Polyfunctional T Cells Do Not Necessarily Recognize the Infected Target: Lessons from a Phase I Trial of the AERAS-402 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nyendak, Melissa; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn M.; Duncan, Amanda; Cansler, Meghan; Huff, Ervina Winata; Hokey, David; Evans, Tom; Barker, Lewellys; Blatner, Gretta; Sadoff, Jerald; Douoguih, Macaya; Pau, Maria Grazia; Lewinsohn, Deborah A.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a vaccine for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has been impeded by the absence of correlates of protective immunity. One correlate would be the ability of cells induced by vaccination to recognize the Mtb-infected cell. AERAS-402 is a replication-deficient serotype 35 adenovirus containing DNA expressing a fusion protein of Mtb antigens 85A, 85B and TB10.4. We undertook a phase I double-blind, randomized placebo controlled trial of vaccination with AERAS-402 following BCG. Analysis of the vaccine-induced immune response revealed strong antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. However, analysis of the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells revealed that in many instances these cells did not recognize the Mtb-infected cell. Our findings highlight the measurement of vaccine-induced, polyfunctional T cells may not reflect the extent or degree to which these cells are capable of identifying the Mtb-infected cell and correspondingly, the value of detailed experimental medicine studies early in vaccine development. PMID:27805026

  16. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division.

  17. How Should a Speech Recognizer Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharenborg, Odette; Norris, Dennis; ten Bosch, Louis; McQueen, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Although researchers studying human speech recognition (HSR) and automatic speech recognition (ASR) share a common interest in how information processing systems (human or machine) recognize spoken language, there is little communication between the two disciplines. We suggest that this lack of communication follows largely from the fact that…

  18. Salient Feature Identification and Analysis using Kernel-Based Classification Techniques for Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    combinations of these HRR projections represent the overall measured reflectivity of the target scene, g(s, φ), and can be expressed using the Radon ...collected in phase history and the target scene f (x, y) is desired, the inverse radon transform, or the backprojection operation, is more appropriate for

  19. A cross validation study of deep brain stimulation targeting: from experts to atlas-based, segmentation-based and automatic registration algorithms.

    PubMed

    Castro, F Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Meuli, Reto; Maeder, Philippe; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Validation of image registration algorithms is a difficult task and open-ended problem, usually application-dependent. In this paper, we focus on deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. DBS involves implantation of an electrode deep inside the brain to electrically stimulate specific areas shutting down the disease's symptoms. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has turned out to be the optimal target for this kind of surgery. Unfortunately, the STN is in general not clearly distinguishable in common medical imaging modalities. Usual techniques to infer its location are the use of anatomical atlases and visible surrounding landmarks. Surgeons have to adjust the electrode intraoperatively using electrophysiological recordings and macrostimulation tests. We constructed a ground truth derived from specific patients whose STNs are clearly visible on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted images. A patient is chosen as atlas both for the right and left sides. Then, by registering each patient with the atlas using different methods, several estimations of the STN location are obtained. Two studies are driven using our proposed validation scheme. First, a comparison between different atlas-based and nonrigid registration algorithms with a evaluation of their performance and usability to locate the STN automatically. Second, a study of which visible surrounding structures influence the STN location. The two studies are cross validated between them and against expert's variability. Using this scheme, we evaluated the expert's ability against the estimation error provided by the tested algorithms and we demonstrated that automatic STN targeting is possible and as accurate as the expert-driven techniques currently used. We also show which structures have to be taken into account to accurately estimate the STN location.

  20. Matching Algorithms and Feature Match Quality Measures for Model-Based Object Recognition with Applications to Automatic Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    experiment was repeated 1000=T times using independent MonteCarlo simulations. A. Uniform Target Test Set. For each Nk ,...,2,1= a model kM...correct identification (PID) and probability of false alarm (PFA) over T=1000 MonteCarlo realizations of the experiment data. The false alarm rate is

  1. [Impact of planning CT slice thickness on the accuracy of automatic target registration using the on-board cone-beam CT].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Miura, Hideharu; Nakagawa, Hideo; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Oda, Masahiko; Yasumasa, Katsumi; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2011-01-01

    We have evaluated relationship between planning CT slice thickness and the accuracy of automatic target registration using cone-beam CT (CBCT). Planning CT images were acquired with reconstructed slice thickness of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10mm for three different phantoms: Penta-Guide phantom, acrylic ball phantom, and pelvic phantom. After correctly placing the phantom at the isocenter using an in-room laser, we purposely displaced it by moving the treatment couch and then obtained CBCT images. Registration between the planning CT and the CBCT was performed using automatic target registration software, and the registration errors were recorded for each planning CT data set with different slice thickness. The respective average and standard deviation of errors for 10 mm slice thickness CT in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions (n=15 data sets) were: 0.7 +/- 0.2mm, 0.8 +/- 0.2mm, and 0.2 +/- 0.2mm for the Penta-Guide phantom; 0.5 +/- 0.4 mm, 0.6 +/- 0.3 mm, and 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm for the acrylic ball phantom; and 0.6 +/- 0.2 mm, 0.9 +/- 0.2 mm, and 0.2 +/- 0.2 mm for the pelvic phantom. We found that the mean registration errors were always less than 1 mm regardless of the slice thickness tested. The results suggest that there is no obvious correlation between the planning CT slice thickness and the registration errors.

  2. Automatic Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    "Automatic imitation" is a type of stimulus-response compatibility effect in which the topographical features of task-irrelevant action stimuli facilitate similar, and interfere with dissimilar, responses. This article reviews behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging research on automatic imitation, asking in what sense it is "automatic"…

  3. A Statistical Approach to Automatic Speech Summarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Chiori; Furui, Sadaoki; Malkin, Rob; Yu, Hua; Waibel, Alex

    2003-12-01

    This paper proposes a statistical approach to automatic speech summarization. In our method, a set of words maximizing a summarization score indicating the appropriateness of summarization is extracted from automatically transcribed speech and then concatenated to create a summary. The extraction process is performed using a dynamic programming (DP) technique based on a target compression ratio. In this paper, we demonstrate how an English news broadcast transcribed by a speech recognizer is automatically summarized. We adapted our method, which was originally proposed for Japanese, to English by modifying the model for estimating word concatenation probabilities based on a dependency structure in the original speech given by a stochastic dependency context free grammar (SDCFG). We also propose a method of summarizing multiple utterances using a two-level DP technique. The automatically summarized sentences are evaluated by summarization accuracy based on a comparison with a manual summary of speech that has been correctly transcribed by human subjects. Our experimental results indicate that the method we propose can effectively extract relatively important information and remove redundant and irrelevant information from English news broadcasts.

  4. Developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules with built-in target-recognizing module for prodrug therapy: identification of Enterobacter Cloacae P99 cephalosporinase loops suitable for randomization and phage-display selection.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Girja S; Krag, David N

    2009-01-01

    This study was focused on developing catalytically active beta-lactamase enzyme molecules that have target-recognizing sites built within their scaffold. Using phage-display approach, nine libraries were constructed by inserting the randomized linear or cysteine-constrained heptapeptides in the five different loops on the outer surface of P99 beta-lactamase molecule. The pIII signal peptide of Sec-pathway was employed for a periplasmic translocation of the beta-lactamase fusion protein, which we found more efficient than the DsbA signal peptide of SRP-pathway. The randomized heptapeptide loops replaced native amino acids between positions (34)Y-(37)K, (238)M-(246)A, (275)N-(280)A, (305)A-(311)S, or (329)I-(334)I of the P99 beta-lactamase molecules for generating the loop-1 to -5 libraries, respectively. The diversity of each loop library was judged by counting the primary and beta-lactamase-active clones. The linear peptide inserts in the loop-2 library showed the maximum number of the beta-lactamase-active clones, followed by the loop-5, loop-3, and loop-4. The insertion of the cysteine-constrained loops exhibited a dramatic loss of the enzyme-active beta-lactamase clones. The complexity of the loop-2 linear library, as determined by the frequency and diversity of amino acid distributions in the randomized region, appears consistent with the standards of other types of phage display library systems. The selection of the loop-2 linear library on streptavidin protein as a test target identified several beta-lactamase clones that specifically bound to streptavidin. In conclusion, this study identified the suitability of the loop-2 of P99 beta-lactamase for constructing a phage-display library of the beta-lactamase enzyme-active molecules that can be selected against a target. This is an enabling step in our long-term goal of developing bifunctional beta-lactamase molecules against cancer-specific targets for enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer.

  5. Recognizing complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pawan

    2002-11-01

    How the brain recognizes complex patterns in the environment is a central, but little understood question in neuroscience. The problem is of great significance for a host of applications such as biometric-based access control, autonomous robots and content-based information management. Although some headway in these directions has been made, the current artificial systems do not match the robustness and versatility of their biological counterparts. Here I examine recognition tasks drawn from two different sensory modalities--face recognition and speaker/speech recognition. The goal is to characterize the present state of artificial recognition technologies for these tasks, the influence of neuroscience on the design of these systems and the key challenges they face.

  6. How legumes recognize rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria.

  7. Automatic panoramic thermal integrated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail A.; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga N.

    2005-05-01

    Historically, the US Army has recognized the advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution: increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The novel ViperViewTM high-resolution panoramic thermal imager is the heart of the Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) in support of the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the Intelligent Munitions Systems (IMS). The APTIS is anticipated to operate as an intelligent node in a wireless network of multifunctional nodes that work together to improve situational awareness (SA) in many defense and offensive operations, as well as serve as a sensor node in tactical Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (ISR). The ViperView is as an aberration-corrected omnidirectional imager with small optics designed to match the resolution of a 640x480 pixels IR camera with improved image quality for longer range target detection, classification, and tracking. The same approach is applicable to panoramic cameras working in the visible spectral range. Other components of the ATPIS sensor suite include ancillary sensors, advanced power management, and wakeup capability. This paper describes the development status of the APTIS system.

  8. Neural networks: Alternatives to conventional techniques for automatic docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinz, Bradley L.

    1994-01-01

    Automatic docking of orbiting spacecraft is a crucial operation involving the identification of vehicle orientation as well as complex approach dynamics. The chaser spacecraft must be able to recognize the target spacecraft within a scene and achieve accurate closing maneuvers. In a video-based system, a target scene must be captured and transformed into a pattern of pixels. Successful recognition lies in the interpretation of this pattern. Due to their powerful pattern recognition capabilities, artificial neural networks offer a potential role in interpretation and automatic docking processes. Neural networks can reduce the computational time required by existing image processing and control software. In addition, neural networks are capable of recognizing and adapting to changes in their dynamic environment, enabling enhanced performance, redundancy, and fault tolerance. Most neural networks are robust to failure, capable of continued operation with a slight degradation in performance after minor failures. This paper discusses the particular automatic docking tasks neural networks can perform as viable alternatives to conventional techniques.

  9. Automatic Parallelization Using OpenMP Based on STL Semantics

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D J; Willcock, J J; Panas, T

    2008-06-03

    Automatic parallelization of sequential applications using OpenMP as a target has been attracting significant attention recently because of the popularity of multicore processors and the simplicity of using OpenMP to express parallelism for shared-memory systems. However, most previous research has only focused on C and Fortran applications operating on primitive data types. C++ applications using high level abstractions such as STL containers are largely ignored due to the lack of research compilers that are readily able to recognize high level object-oriented abstractions of STL. In this paper, we use ROSE, a multiple-language source-to-source compiler infrastructure, to build a parallelizer that can recognize such high level semantics and parallelize C++ applications using certain STL containers. The idea of our work is to automatically insert OpenMP constructs using extended conventional dependence analysis and the known domain-specific semantics of high-level abstractions with optional assistance from source code annotations. In addition, the parallelizer is followed by an OpenMP translator to translate the generated OpenMP programs into multi-threaded code targeted to a popular OpenMP runtime library. Our work extends the applicability of automatic parallelization and provides another way to take advantage of multicore processors.

  10. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Aoki, H.

    1988-02-02

    An automatic transmission is described comprising: an automatic transmission mechanism portion comprising a single planetary gear unit and a dual planetary gear unit; carriers of both of the planetary gear units that are integral with one another; an input means for inputting torque to the automatic transmission mechanism, clutches for operatively connecting predetermined ones of planetary gear elements of both of the planetary gear units to the input means and braking means for restricting the rotation of predetermined ones of planetary gear elements of both of the planetary gear units. The clutches are disposed adjacent one another at an end portion of the transmission for defining a clutch portion of the transmission; a first clutch portion which is attachable to the automatic transmission mechanism portion for comprising the clutch portion when attached thereto; a second clutch portion that is attachable to the automatic transmission mechanism portion in place of the first clutch portion for comprising the clutch portion when so attached. The first clutch portion comprising first clutch for operatively connecting the input means to a ring gear of the single planetary gear unit and a second clutch for operatively connecting the input means to a single gear of the automatic transmission mechanism portion. The second clutch portion comprising a the first clutch, the second clutch, and a third clutch for operatively connecting the input member to a ring gear of the dual planetary gear unit.

  11. Automatic Recognition of Deaf Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelhamied, Kadry; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a speech perception system for automatic recognition of deaf speech. Using a 2-step segmentation approach for 468 utterances by 2 hearing-impaired men and 2 normal-hearing men, rates as high as 93.01 percent and 81.81 percent recognition were obtained in recognizing from deaf speech isolated words and connected speech,…

  12. Can a CNN recognize Catalan diet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herruzo, P.; Bolaños, M.; Radeva, P.

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, we can find several diseases related to the unhealthy diet habits of the population, such as diabetes, obesity, anemia, bulimia and anorexia. In many cases, these diseases are related to the food consumption of people. Mediterranean diet is scientifically known as a healthy diet that helps to prevent many metabolic diseases. In particular, our work focuses on the recognition of Mediterranean food and dishes. The development of this methodology would allow to analise the daily habits of users with wearable cameras, within the topic of lifelogging. By using automatic mechanisms we could build an objective tool for the analysis of the patient's behavior, allowing specialists to discover unhealthy food patterns and understand the user's lifestyle. With the aim to automatically recognize a complete diet, we introduce a challenging multi-labeled dataset related to Mediter-ranean diet called FoodCAT. The first type of label provided consists of 115 food classes with an average of 400 images per dish, and the second one consists of 12 food categories with an average of 3800 pictures per class. This dataset will serve as a basis for the development of automatic diet recognition. In this context, deep learning and more specifically, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), currently are state-of-the-art methods for automatic food recognition. In our work, we compare several architectures for image classification, with the purpose of diet recognition. Applying the best model for recognising food categories, we achieve a top-1 accuracy of 72.29%, and top-5 of 97.07%. In a complete diet recognition of dishes from Mediterranean diet, enlarged with the Food-101 dataset for international dishes recognition, we achieve a top-1 accuracy of 68.07%, and top-5 of 89.53%, for a total of 115+101 food classes.

  13. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, Ellen; Schils, George F.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789 between the U.S. Department of Energy and AT&T Technologies, Inc.

  14. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  15. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  16. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  17. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  18. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  19. Using an Extended Automatic Target Acquisition Program with Dual Cursor Technology to Assist People with Developmental Disabilities Improve Their Pointing Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chiu, Hsin-Chin

    2010-01-01

    The latest research adopting software technology to improve pointing performance is through an Extended Automatic Pointing Assistive Program (EAPAP). However, EAPAP has some limitations. This study evaluated whether two children with developmental disabilities would be able to improve their pointing performance through an Extended Dual Cursor…

  20. Recognizing Question Entailment for Medical Question Answering

    PubMed Central

    Abacha, Asma Ben; Dina, Demner-Fushman

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing heterogeneity and specialization of medical texts, automated question answering is becoming more and more challenging. In this context, answering a given medical question by retrieving similar questions that are already answered by human experts seems to be a promising solution. In this paper, we propose a new approach for the detection of similar questions based on Recognizing Question Entailment (RQE). In particular, we consider Frequently Asked Question (FAQs) as a valuable and widespread source of information. Our final goal is to automatically provide an existing answer if FAQ similar to a consumer health question exists. We evaluate our approach using consumer health questions received by the National Library of Medicine and FAQs collected from NIH websites. Our first results are promising and suggest the feasibility of our approach as a valuable complement to classic question answering approaches. PMID:28269825

  1. AUTOMATIC COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, H.P.

    1960-06-01

    An automatic counter of alpha particle tracks recorded by a sensitive emulsion of a photographic plate is described. The counter includes a source of mcdulated dark-field illumination for developing light flashes from the recorded particle tracks as the photographic plate is automatically scanned in narrow strips. Photoelectric means convert the light flashes to proportional current pulses for application to an electronic counting circuit. Photoelectric means are further provided for developing a phase reference signal from the photographic plate in such a manner that signals arising from particle tracks not parallel to the edge of the plate are out of phase with the reference signal. The counting circuit includes provision for rejecting the out-of-phase signals resulting from unoriented tracks as well as signals resulting from spurious marks on the plate such as scratches, dust or grain clumpings, etc. The output of the circuit is hence indicative only of the tracks that would be counted by a human operator.

  2. Targeting Cognitive-Affective Risk Mechanisms in Stress-Precipitated Alcohol Dependence: An Integrated, Biopsychosocial Model of Automaticity, Allostasis, and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Boettiger, Charlotte A.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypothetical model integrating formerly discrete theories of stress appraisal, neurobiological allostasis, automatic cognitive processing, and addictive behavior to elucidate how alcohol misuse and dependence are maintained and re-activated by stress. We outline a risk chain in which psychosocial stress initiates physiological arousal, perseverative cognition, and negative affect that, in turn, triggers automatized schema to compel alcohol consumption. This implicit cognitive process then leads to attentional biases toward alcohol, subjective experiences of craving, paradoxical increases in arousal and alcohol-related cognitions due to urge suppression, and palliative coping through drinking. When palliative coping relieves distress, it results in negative reinforcement conditioning that perpetuates the cycle by further sensitizing the system to future stressful encounters. This model has implications for development and implementation of innovative behavioral interventions (such as mindfulness training) that disrupt cognitive-affective mechanisms underpinning stress-precipitated dependence on alcohol. PMID:21354711

  3. Studies on quantitative analysis and automatic recognition of cell types of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Hu, Kuang-Hu; Li, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shu-Yu; Su, Wan-Fang; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Hu, Ying-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of lung cancer cells is very important to the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. In this paper we present a novel method to extract the structure characteristics of lung cancer cells and automatically recognize their types. Firstly soft mathematical morphology methods are used to enhance the grayscale image, to improve the definition of images, and to eliminate most of disturbance, noise and information of subordinate images, so the contour of target lung cancer cell and biological shape characteristic parameters can be extracted accurately. Then the minimum distance classifier is introduced to realize the automatic recognition of different types of lung cancer cells. A software system named "CANCER.LUNG" is established to demonstrate the efficiency of this method. The clinical experiments show that this method can accurately and objectively recognize the type of lung cancer cells, which can significantly improve the pathology research on the pathological changes of lung cancer and clinical assistant diagnoses.

  4. Recognizing Young Readers' Spoken Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wei; Mostow, Jack; Aist, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Free-form spoken input would be the easiest and most natural way for young children to communicate to an intelligent tutoring system. However, achieving such a capability poses a challenge both to instruction design and to automatic speech recognition. To address the difficulties of accepting such input, we adopt the framework of predictable…

  5. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.

    1988-02-16

    An automatic transmission is described combining a stator reversing type torque converter and speed changer having first and second sun gears comprising: (a) a planetary gear train composed of first and second planetary gears sharing one planetary carrier in common; (b) a clutch and requisite brakes to control the planetary gear train; and (c) a speed-increasing or speed-decreasing mechanism is installed both in between a turbine shaft coupled to a turbine of the stator reversing type torque converter and the first sun gear of the speed changer, and in between a stator shaft coupled to a reversing stator and the second sun gear of the speed changer.

  6. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, N.

    1988-10-11

    This patent describes an automatic transmission including a fluid torque converter, a first gear unit having three forward-speed gears and a single reverse gear, a second gear unit having a low-speed gear and a high-speed gear, and a hydraulic control system, the hydraulic control system comprising: a source of pressurized fluid; a first shift valve for controlling the shifting between the first-speed gear and the second-speed gear of the first gear unit; a second shift valve for controlling the shifting between the second-speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; a third shift valve equipped with a spool having two positions for controlling the shifting between the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit; a manual selector valve having a plurality of shift positions for distributing the pressurized fluid supply from the source of pressurized fluid to the first, second and third shift valves respectively; first, second and third solenoid valves corresponding to the first, second and third shift valves, respectively for independently controlling the operation of the respective shift valves, thereby establishing a six forward-speed automatic transmission by combining the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit with each of the first-speed gear, the second speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; and means to fixedly position the spool of the third shift valve at one of the two positions by supplying the pressurized fluid to the third shift valve when the manual selector valve is shifted to a particular shift position, thereby locking the second gear unit in one of low-speed gear and the high-speed gear, whereby the six forward-speed automatic transmission is converted to a three forward-speed automatic transmission when the manual selector valve is shifted to the particular shift position.

  7. Automatic integration of social information in emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Mumenthaler, Christian; Sander, David

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the automaticity of the influence of social inference on emotion recognition. Participants were asked to recognize dynamic facial expressions of emotion (fear or anger in Experiment 1 and blends of fear and surprise or of anger and disgust in Experiment 2) in a target face presented at the center of a screen while a subliminal contextual face appearing in the periphery expressed an emotion (fear or anger) or not (neutral) and either looked at the target face or not. Results of Experiment 1 revealed that recognition of the target emotion of fear was improved when a subliminal angry contextual face gazed toward-rather than away from-the fearful face. We replicated this effect in Experiment 2, in which facial expression blends of fear and surprise were more often and more rapidly categorized as expressing fear when the subliminal contextual face expressed anger and gazed toward-rather than away from-the target face. With the contextual face appearing for 30 ms in total, including only 10 ms of emotion expression, and being immediately masked, our data provide the first evidence that social influence on emotion recognition can occur automatically.

  8. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, H.

    1989-03-21

    An automatic transmission is described, comprising: a torque converter including an impeller having a connected member, a turbine having an input member and a reactor; and an automatic transmission mechanism having first to third clutches and plural gear units including a single planetary gear unit with a ring gear and a dual planetary gear unit with a ring gear. The single and dual planetary gear units have respective carriers integrally coupled with each other and respective sun gears integrally coupled with each other, the input member of the turbine being coupled with the ring gear of the single planetary gear unit through the first clutch, and being coupled with the sun gear through the second clutch. The connected member of the impeller is coupled with the ring gear of the dual planetary gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be and ring gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be restrained as required, and the carrier is coupled with an output member.

  9. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, E.; Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-09-15

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output plane to determine whether a particular target is present in the field of view. Preferably, a temporal pattern is imaged in the output plane with a optical detector having a plurality of pixels and a correlation coefficient for each pixel is determined by accumulating the intensity and intensity-square of each pixel. The orbiting of the constant response caused by the filter rotation is also preferably eliminated either by the use of two orthogonal mirrors pivoted correspondingly to the rotation of the filter or the attaching of a refracting wedge to the filter to remove the offset angle. Detection is preferably performed of the temporal pattern in the output plane at a plurality of different angles with angular separation sufficient to decorrelate successive frames. 1 fig.

  10. Using automatic programming for simulating reliability network models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Fan T.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Zhang, S. X.; Wolfsberger, John W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an automatic programming system for assisting modelers of reliability networks to define problems and then automatically generate the corresponding code in the target simulation language GPSS/PC.

  11. Automatic programming of simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of automatic programming is to improve the overall environment for describing the program. This improved environment is realized by a reduction in the amount of detail that the programmer needs to know and is exposed to. Furthermore, this improved environment is achieved by a specification language that is more natural to the user's problem domain and to the user's way of thinking and looking at the problem. The goal of this research is to apply the concepts of automatic programming (AP) to modeling discrete event simulation system. Specific emphasis is on the design and development of simulation tools to assist the modeler define or construct a model of the system and to then automatically write the corresponding simulation code in the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. A related goal is to evaluate the feasibility of various languages for constructing automatic programming simulation tools.

  12. Semantic priming from letter-searched primes occurs for low- but not high-frequency targets: automatic semantic access may not be a myth.

    PubMed

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Neely, James H

    2007-11-01

    Letter-search (LS) within a prime often eliminates semantic priming. In 2 lexical decision experiments, the authors found that priming from LS primes occurred for low-frequency (LF) but not high-frequency (HF) targets whether the target's word frequency was manipulated between or within participants and whether the prime-target pairs were associated symmetrically or forward asymmetrically. For the LF targets, LS priming was (a) equivalent for forward asymmetric and symmetric pairs and (b) equal to silent-read (SR) priming for forward asymmetric pairs but less than SR priming for symmetric pairs. The typical finding of greater SR priming for response times for LF than for HF targets occurred for symmetric priming but not for forward asymmetric priming, which showed the interaction for errors. The authors consider their findings' implications for various accounts of how LS affects priming and explain the findings within J. H. Neely and D. E. Keefe's (1989) 3-process model as follows: (a) LS eliminates expectancy and semantic matching but does not reduce semantic activation and (b) expectancy contributes to SR priming for HF targets but not for LF targets, whereas the opposite is so for semantic matching.

  13. Recognizing the adolescent drug abuser.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, R G; Jacobs, E A

    1987-03-01

    Adolescents are at high risk for using and abusing illicit drugs. Guidelines for recognizing drug abusers are presented as well as a staging process for progression of drug use. The family physician is in an ideal position to identify young users/abusers and to assist them and their families in obtaining much needed assistance.

  14. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to…

  15. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hamane, M.; Ohri, H.

    1989-03-21

    This patent describes an automatic transmission connected between a drive shaft and a driven shaft and comprising: a planetary gear mechanism including a first gear driven by the drive shaft, a second gear operatively engaged with the first gear to transmit speed change output to the driven shaft, and a third gear operatively engaged with the second gear to control the operation thereof; centrifugally operated clutch means for driving the first gear and the second gear. It also includes a ratchet type one-way clutch for permitting rotation of the third gear in the same direction as that of the drive shaft but preventing rotation in the reverse direction; the clutch means comprising a ratchet pawl supporting plate coaxially disposed relative to the drive shaft and integrally connected to the third gear, the ratchet pawl supporting plate including outwardly projection radial projections united with one another at base portions thereof.

  16. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Meyman, U.

    1987-03-10

    An automatic transmission is described comprising wheel members each having discs defining an inner space therebetween; turnable blades and vane members located in the inner space between the discs of at least one of the wheel members, the turnable blades being mechanically connected with the vane members. Each of the turnable blades has an inner surface and an outer surface formed by circular cylindrical surfaces having a common axis, each of the turnable blades being turnable about the common axis of the circular cylindrical surfaces forming the inner and outer surfaces of the respective blade; levers turnable about the axes and supporting the blades; the discs having openings extending coaxially with the surfaces which describe the blades. The blades are partially received in the openings of the discs; and a housing accommodating the wheel members and the turnable blades and the vane members.

  17. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to meters." Similar students' mistakes were reported also by AP Chemistry readers "as in previous years, students still had difficulty converting kJ to J." While traditional teaching focuses on memorizing the symbols of prefixes, little attention is given to helping learners recognize a prefix in a given quantity. I noticed in my teaching practice that by making the processes of identifying prefixes more explicit, students make fewer mistakes on unit conversion. Thus, this paper presents an outline of a lesson that focuses on prefix recognition. It is designed for a first-year college physics class; however, its key points can be addressed to any group of physics students.

  18. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, T.

    A measuring system is described for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principle use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse of fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  19. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1982-01-01

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  20. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Inuzuka, T.

    1986-08-26

    1. An automatic transmission with four forward speeds and one reverse position, is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output member; first and second planetary gear sets each having a sun gear, a ring gear and a carrier supporting a pinion in mesh with the sun gear and ring gear; the carrier of the first gear set, the ring gear of the second gear set and the output member all being connected; the ring gear of the first gear set connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a first clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the first gear set, including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a second clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the second gear set a third clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the carrier of the second gear set including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a first drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the ring gear of the first gear set and the carrier of the second gear set in only one direction and, alternatively, in any direction; a second drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the sun gear of the second gear set; and a drum being open to the first planetary gear set, with a cylindrical intermediate wall, an inner peripheral wall and outer peripheral wall and forming the hydraulic servos of the first and third clutch means between the intermediate wall and the inner peripheral wall and between the intermediate wall and the outer peripheral wall respectively.

  1. Integrating the automatic and the controlled: strategies in semantic priming in an attractor network with latching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming has long been recognized to reflect, along with automatic semantic mechanisms, the contribution of controlled strategies. However, previous theories of controlled priming were mostly qualitative, lacking common grounds with modern mathematical models of automatic priming based on neural networks. Recently, we introduced a novel attractor network model of automatic semantic priming with latching dynamics. Here, we extend this work to show how the same model can also account for important findings regarding controlled processes. Assuming the rate of semantic transitions in the network can be adapted using simple reinforcement learning, we show how basic findings attributed to controlled processes in priming can be achieved, including their dependency on stimulus onset asynchrony and relatedness proportion and their unique effect on associative, category-exemplar, mediated and backward prime-target relations. We discuss how our mechanism relates to the classic expectancy theory and how it can be further extended in future developments of the model.

  2. Recognizing new medical knowledge computationally.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S. J.; Cole, W. G.; Tuttle, M. S.; Olson, N. E.; Sherertz, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Can new medical knowledge be recognized computationally? We know knowledge is changing, and our knowledge-based systems will need to accommodate that change in knowledge on a regular basis if they are to stay successful. Computational recognition of these changes seems desirable. It is unlikely that low level objects in the computational universe, bits and characters, will change much over time, higher level objects of language, where meaning begins to emerge, may show change. An analysis of ten arbitrarily selected paragraphs from the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program of the American College of Physicians was used as a test bed for nominal phrase recognition. While there were words not known to Meta-1.2, only 8 of the 32 concepts new to the primary author were pointed to by new words. Use of a barrier word method was successful in identifying 23 of the 32 new concepts. Use of co-occurrence (in sentences) of putative nominal phrases may reduce the amount of human effort involved in recognizing the emergence of new relationships. PMID:8130505

  3. Recognizing and treating secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Walker-Bone, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Osteoporosis, through its association with fragility fracture, is a major public health problem, costing an estimated $34.8 billion worldwide per annum. With projected demographic changes, the burden looks set to grow. Therefore, the prevention of osteoporosis, as well as its identification and treatment once established, are becoming increasingly important. Osteoporosis is secondary when a drug, disease or deficiency is the underlying cause. Glucocorticoids, hypogonadism, alcohol abuse and malnutrition are among the most frequently recognized causes of secondary osteoporosis but the list of implicated diseases and drugs is growing and some of the more recently recognized associations, such as those with haematological conditions and acid-suppressing medications, are less well publicized. In some cases, advancement in treatment of the primary disease has led to people living long enough to develop secondary osteoporosis; for example, successful treatment for breast and prostate malignancies by hormonal manipulation, improved survival in HIV with the advent of anti-retroviral therapies, and improved treatment for cystic fibrosis. This Review emphasizes the importance of secondary osteoporosis, discusses familiar and less well-known causes and what is known of their mechanisms, provides guidance as to the pragmatic identification of secondary osteoporosis and summarizes treatment options, where available.

  4. Group Dynamics in Automatic Imitation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Neil; Reddy, Geetha; Catmur, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Imitation–matching the configural body movements of another individual–plays a crucial part in social interaction. We investigated whether automatic imitation is not only influenced by who we imitate (ingroup vs. outgroup member) but also by the nature of an expected interaction situation (competitive vs. cooperative). In line with assumptions from Social Identity Theory), we predicted that both social group membership and the expected situation impact on the level of automatic imitation. We adopted a 2 (group membership target: ingroup, outgroup) x 2 (situation: cooperative, competitive) design. The dependent variable was the degree to which participants imitated the target in a reaction time automatic imitation task. 99 female students from two British Universities participated. We found a significant two-way interaction on the imitation effect. When interacting in expectation of cooperation, imitation was stronger for an ingroup target compared to an outgroup target. However, this was not the case in the competitive condition where imitation did not differ between ingroup and outgroup target. This demonstrates that the goal structure of an expected interaction will determine the extent to which intergroup relations influence imitation, supporting a social identity approach. PMID:27657926

  5. Automatic TLI recognition system, user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes how to use an automatic target recognition system (version 14). In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a programmer`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide.

  6. Recognizing articulatory gestures from speech for robust speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Vikramjit; Nam, Hosung; Espy-Wilson, Carol; Saltzman, Elliot; Goldstein, Louis

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that supplementary articulatory information can help to improve the recognition rate of automatic speech recognition systems. Unfortunately, articulatory information is not directly observable, necessitating its estimation from the speech signal. This study describes a system that recognizes articulatory gestures from speech, and uses the recognized gestures in a speech recognition system. Recognizing gestures for a given utterance involves recovering the set of underlying gestural activations and their associated dynamic parameters. This paper proposes a neural network architecture for recognizing articulatory gestures from speech and presents ways to incorporate articulatory gestures for a digit recognition task. The lack of natural speech database containing gestural information prompted us to use three stages of evaluation. First, the proposed gestural annotation architecture was tested on a synthetic speech dataset, which showed that the use of estimated tract-variable-time-functions improved gesture recognition performance. In the second stage, gesture-recognition models were applied to natural speech waveforms and word recognition experiments revealed that the recognized gestures can improve the noise-robustness of a word recognition system. In the final stage, a gesture-based Dynamic Bayesian Network was trained and the results indicate that incorporating gestural information can improve word recognition performance compared to acoustic-only systems.

  7. Category Cued Recall Evokes a Generate-Recognize Retrieval Process

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Toth, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The experiments reported here were designed to replicate and extend McCabe, Roediger, and Karpicke’s (2011) finding that retrieval in category cued recall involves both controlled and automatic processes. The extension entailed identifying whether distinctive encoding affected one or both of these two processes. The first experiment successfully replicated McCabe et al., but the second, which added a critical baseline condition, produced data inconsistent with a two independent process model of recall. The third experiment provided evidence that retrieval in category cued recall reflects a generate-recognize strategy, with the effect of distinctive processing being localized to recognition. Overall, the data suggest that category cued recall evokes a generate-recognize retrieval strategy and that the sub-processes underlying this strategy can be dissociated as a function of distinctive versus relational encoding processes. PMID:26280355

  8. Automatic routing module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Janice A.

    1987-01-01

    Automatic Routing Module (ARM) is a tool to partially automate Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) routing. For any accessible launch point or target pair, ARM creates flyable routes that, within the fidelity of the models, are optimal in terms of threat avoidance, clobber avoidance, and adherence to vehicle and planning constraints. Although highly algorithmic, ARM is an expert system. Because of the heuristics applied, ARM generated routes closely resemble manually generated routes in routine cases. In more complex cases, ARM's ability to accumulate and assess threat danger in three dimensions and trade that danger off with the probability of ground clobber results in the safest path around or through difficult areas. The tools available prior to ARM did not provide the planner with enough information or present it in such a way that ensured he would select the safest path.

  9. Recognizing suspicious activities in infrared imagery using appearance-based features and the theory of hidden conditional random fields for outdoor perimeter surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogotis, Savvas; Palaskas, Christos; Ioannidis, Dimosthenis; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Likothanassis, Spiros

    2015-11-01

    This work aims to present an extended framework for automatically recognizing suspicious activities in outdoor perimeter surveilling systems based on infrared video processing. By combining size-, speed-, and appearance-based features, like the local phase quantization and the histograms of oriented gradients, actions of small duration are recognized and used as input, along with spatial information, for modeling target activities using the theory of hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs). HCRFs are used to classify an observation sequence into the most appropriate activity label class, thus discriminating high-risk activities like trespassing from zero risk activities, such as loitering outside the perimeter. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated with experimental results in various scenarios that represent suspicious activities in perimeter surveillance systems.

  10. Recognizing characters of ancient manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Markus; Sablatnig, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Considering printed Latin text, the main issues of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) systems are solved. However, for degraded handwritten document images, basic preprocessing steps such as binarization, gain poor results with state-of-the-art methods. In this paper ancient Slavonic manuscripts from the 11th century are investigated. In order to minimize the consequences of false character segmentation, a binarization-free approach based on local descriptors is proposed. Additionally local information allows the recognition of partially visible or washed out characters. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: character classification and character localization. Initially Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features are extracted which are subsequently classified using Support Vector Machines (SVM). Afterwards, the interest points are clustered according to their spatial information. Thereby, characters are localized and finally recognized based on a weighted voting scheme of pre-classified local descriptors. Preliminary results show that the proposed system can handle highly degraded manuscript images with background clutter (e.g. stains, tears) and faded out characters.

  11. Recognizing chemicals in patents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Maryam; Wiegandt, David Luis; Schmedding, Florian; Leser, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, methods for Chemical Named Entity Recognition (NER) have gained substantial interest, driven by the need for automatically analyzing todays ever growing collections of biomedical text. Chemical NER for patents is particularly essential due to the high economic importance of pharmaceutical findings. However, NER on patents has essentially been neglected by the research community for long, mostly because of the lack of enough annotated corpora. A recent international competition specifically targeted this task, but evaluated tools only on gold standard patent abstracts instead of full patents; furthermore, results from such competitions are often difficult to extrapolate to real-life settings due to the relatively high homogeneity of training and test data. Here, we evaluate the two state-of-the-art chemical NER tools, tmChem and ChemSpot, on four different annotated patent corpora, two of which consist of full texts. We study the overall performance of the tools, compare their results at the instance level, report on high-recall and high-precision ensembles, and perform cross-corpus and intra-corpus evaluations. Our findings indicate that full patents are considerably harder to analyze than patent abstracts and clearly confirm the common wisdom that using the same text genre (patent vs. scientific) and text type (abstract vs. full text) for training and testing is a pre-requisite for achieving high quality text mining results.

  12. Automatic transmission adapter kit

    SciTech Connect

    Stich, R.L.; Neal, W.D.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle apparatus having a power train including an automatic transmission and a transfer case, an automatic transmission adapter kit for installation of a replacement automatic transmission of shorter length than an original automatic transmission in the four-wheel-drive vehicle. The adapter kit comprises: an extension housing interposed between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case; an output shaft, having a first end which engages the replacement automatic transmission and a second end which engages the transfer case; first sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the replacement automatic transmission; second sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the transfer case; and fastening means for connecting the extension housing between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case.

  13. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  14. Automatic TLI recognition system beta prototype testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the beta prototype automatic target recognition system ATR3, and some performance tests done with this system. This is a fully operational system, with a high computational speed. It is useful for findings any kind of target in digitized image data, and as a general purpose image analysis tool.

  15. Automatic identification of species with neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Segura, Luz Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    A new automatic identification system using photographic images has been designed to recognize fish, plant, and butterfly species from Europe and South America. The automatic classification system integrates multiple image processing tools to extract the geometry, morphology, and texture of the images. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used as the pattern recognition method. We tested a data set that included 740 species and 11,198 individuals. Our results show that the system performed with high accuracy, reaching 91.65% of true positive fish identifications, 92.87% of plants and 93.25% of butterflies. Our results highlight how the neural networks are complementary to species identification. PMID:25392749

  16. The effect of object-valence relations on automatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moran, Tal; Bar-Anan, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effect of co-occurrence of a target object with affective stimuli on automatic evaluation of the target when the relation between the target and the affective stimuli suggests that they have opposite valence. Participants learned about targets that ended an unpleasant noise or a pleasant music. The valence of such targets is opposite to the valence of the affective stimuli that co-occur with them. Participants reported preference for targets that ended noise over targets that ended music, but automatic evaluation measures revealed the opposite preference. This suggests that automatic evaluation is sensitive to co-occurrence between stimuli more than to the relation between the stimuli, and that relational information has a stronger influence on deliberate evaluation than on automatic evaluation. These conclusions support the associative-propositional evaluation model (Gawronski & Bodenhausen, 2006), and add evidence regarding the sensitivity of the evaluative-conditioning effect to relational information.

  17. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  18. Arabic word recognizer for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Nitin; Abdollahian, Golnaz; Brame, Ben; Boutin, Mireille; Delp, Edward J.

    2011-03-01

    When traveling in a region where the local language is not written using a "Roman alphabet," translating written text (e.g., documents, road signs, or placards) is a particularly difficult problem since the text cannot be easily entered into a translation device or searched using a dictionary. To address this problem, we are developing the "Rosetta Phone," a handheld device (e.g., PDA or mobile telephone) capable of acquiring an image of the text, locating the region (word) of interest within the image, and producing both an audio and a visual English interpretation of the text. This paper presents a system targeted for interpreting words written in Arabic script. The goal of this work is to develop an autonomous, segmentation-free Arabic phrase recognizer, with computational complexity low enough to deploy on a mobile device. A prototype of the proposed system has been deployed on an iPhone with a suitable user interface. The system was tested on a number of noisy images, in addition to the images acquired from the iPhone's camera. It identifies Arabic words or phrases by extracting appropriate features and assigning "codewords" to each word or phrase. On a dictionary of 5,000 words, the system uniquely mapped (word-image to codeword) 99.9% of the words. The system has a 82% recognition accuracy on images of words captured using the iPhone's built-in camera.

  19. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, G.F.

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  20. Control system for automatic transmission producing shock-free shift

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, S.; Takeda, H.; Isobe, O.

    1989-01-17

    A control system for an automatic transmission is described, comprising: torque sensor means for detecting an output shaft torque of the automatic transmission which varies in a pattern in effecting shifting the automatic transmission; a control unit including means for recognizing the patten of variation of the output shaft torque detected by the torque sensor means, means for evaluating the pattern of variation recognized, and means for determining a variation of fluid pressure to be supplied to a friction element in response to the result of the evaluation of the pattern of variation recognized; and means for regulating a fluid pressure supplied to the friction element in response to the variation of fluid pressure determined, whereby the fluid pressure supplied to the friction element is appropriately adjusted to alleviate substantial shift shock in effecting the same shifting by the friction element subsequently.

  1. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  2. Vitrification: Machines learn to recognize glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of a viscous liquid undergo a dramatic slowdown when it is cooled to form a solid glass. Recognizing the structural changes across such a transition remains a major challenge. Machine-learning methods, similar to those Facebook uses to recognize groups of friends, have now been applied to this problem.

  3. Automatic TLI recognition system, programmer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the software of an automatic target recognition system (version 14), from a programmer`s point of view. The intent is to provide information that will help people who wish to modify the software. In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a user`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide. 2 refs.

  4. Recycling steel automatically -- through resource recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    More than three-fourths of the operating resource recovery plants magnetically separate steel cans and other discarded steel items either pre- or post-combustion. This last year, 121 resource recovery facilities combusted about 14% of the solid waste for communities across the US. Automatic recycling of steel clearly reduces the post-combustion material that is landfilled and heightens the facilities environmental performance through tangible recycling achievement. Even though about one out of every six steel cans is recycled automatically through resource recovery, not many people are aware of automatic recycling of steel cans through resource recovery. How many people know that their local resource recovery plant is insuring that virtually all of their food, beverage and general purpose cans--including paint and aerosol--are being recycled so easily and efficiently? Magnetic separation at resource recovery facilities is a fundamentally simple and desirable method of diverting what would otherwise be relegated as solid waste to the landfill. It should be recognized as an increasingly important and valued part of the resource recovery and steel industries overall recycling efforts. This paper will provide the latest information on steel recycled automatically from resource recovery facilities within the total context of all recycling accomplished annually by the steel industry. Most important, recommendations are provided for building public awareness of the automatic steel recycling contribution made so solidly by resource recovery facilities.

  5. Automatic precision measurement of spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B A; Sansonetti, C J; Andrew, K L

    1978-08-01

    A fully automatic comparator has been designed and implemented to determine precision wavelengths from high-resolution spectrograms. The accuracy attained is superior to that of an experienced operator using a semiautomatic comparator with a photoelectric setting device. The system consists of a comparator, slightly modified for simultaneous data acquisition from two parallel scans of the spectrogram, interfaced to a minicomputer. The software which controls the system embodies three innovations of special interest. (1) Data acquired from two parallel scans are compared and used to separate unknown from standard lines, to eliminate spurious lines, to identify blends of unknown with standard lines, to improve the accuracy of the measured positions, and to flag lines which require special examination. (2) Two classes of lines are automatically recognized and appropriate line finding methods are applied to each. This provides precision measurement for both simple and complex line profiles. (3) Wavelength determination using a least-squares fitted grating equation is supported in addition to polynomial interpolation. This is most useful in spectral regions with sparsely distributed standards. The principles and implementation of these techniques are fully described.

  6. Automatic Versus Manual Indexing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Meulen, W. A.; Janssen, P. J. F. C.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of results in terms of recall and precision from queries submitted to systems with automatic and manual subject indexing. Differences were attributed to query formulation. The effectiveness of automatic indexing was found equivalent to manual indexing. (Author/KP)

  7. Automatic Differentiation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Phipps, Eric; Bratlett, Roscoe

    2007-03-01

    Sacado is an automatic differentiation package for C++ codes using operator overloading and C++ templating. Sacado provide forward, reverse, and Taylor polynomial automatic differentiation classes and utilities for incorporating these classes into C++ codes. Users can compute derivatives of computations arising in engineering and scientific applications, including nonlinear equation solving, time integration, sensitivity analysis, stability analysis, optimization and uncertainity quantification.

  8. Automatic Test Program Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    presents a test description language, NOPAL , in which a user may describe diagnostic tests, and a software system which automatically generates test...programs for an automatic test equipment based on the descriptions of tests. The software system accepts as input the tests specified in NOPAL , performs

  9. Digital automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  10. Recognizing speculative language in biomedical research articles: a linguistically motivated perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Bergler, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the nature of scientific methodology, research articles are rich in speculative and tentative statements, also known as hedges. We explore a linguistically motivated approach to the problem of recognizing such language in biomedical research articles. Our approach draws on prior linguistic work as well as existing lexical resources to create a dictionary of hedging cues and extends it by introducing syntactic patterns. Furthermore, recognizing that hedging cues differ in speculative strength, we assign them weights in two ways: automatically using the information gain (IG) measure and semi-automatically based on their types and centrality to hedging. Weights of hedging cues are used to determine the speculative strength of sentences. Results We test our system on two publicly available hedging datasets. On the fruit-fly dataset, we achieve a precision-recall breakeven point (BEP) of 0.85 using the semi-automatic weighting scheme and a lower BEP of 0.80 with the information gain weighting scheme. These results are competitive with the previously reported best results (BEP of 0.85). On the BMC dataset, using semi-automatic weighting yields a BEP of 0.82, a statistically significant improvement (p <0.01) over the previously reported best result (BEP of 0.76), while information gain weighting yields a BEP of 0.70. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that speculative language can be recognized successfully with a linguistically motivated approach and confirms that selection of hedging devices affects the speculative strength of the sentence, which can be captured reasonably by weighting the hedging cues. The improvement obtained on the BMC dataset with a semi-automatic weighting scheme indicates that our linguistically oriented approach is more portable than the machine-learning based approaches. Lower performance obtained with the information gain weighting scheme suggests that this method may benefit from a larger, manually annotated corpus for

  11. Practical automatic Arabic license plate recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Since 1970's, the need of an automatic license plate recognition system, sometimes referred as Automatic License Plate Recognition system, has been increasing. A license plate recognition system is an automatic system that is able to recognize a license plate number, extracted from image sensors. In specific, Automatic License Plate Recognition systems are being used in conjunction with various transportation systems in application areas such as law enforcement (e.g. speed limit enforcement) and commercial usages such as parking enforcement and automatic toll payment private and public entrances, border control, theft and vandalism control. Vehicle license plate recognition has been intensively studied in many countries. Due to the different types of license plates being used, the requirement of an automatic license plate recognition system is different for each country. [License plate detection using cluster run length smoothing algorithm ].Generally, an automatic license plate localization and recognition system is made up of three modules; license plate localization, character segmentation and optical character recognition modules. This paper presents an Arabic license plate recognition system that is insensitive to character size, font, shape and orientation with extremely high accuracy rate. The proposed system is based on a combination of enhancement, license plate localization, morphological processing, and feature vector extraction using the Haar transform. The performance of the system is fast due to classification of alphabet and numerals based on the license plate organization. Experimental results for license plates of two different Arab countries show an average of 99 % successful license plate localization and recognition in a total of more than 20 different images captured from a complex outdoor environment. The results run times takes less time compared to conventional and many states of art methods.

  12. Using nanoinformatics methods for automatically identifying relevant nanotoxicology entities from the literature.

    PubMed

    García-Remesal, Miguel; García-Ruiz, Alejandro; Pérez-Rey, David; de la Iglesia, Diana; Maojo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Nanoinformatics is an emerging research field that uses informatics techniques to collect, process, store, and retrieve data, information, and knowledge on nanoparticles, nanomaterials, and nanodevices and their potential applications in health care. In this paper, we have focused on the solutions that nanoinformatics can provide to facilitate nanotoxicology research. For this, we have taken a computational approach to automatically recognize and extract nanotoxicology-related entities from the scientific literature. The desired entities belong to four different categories: nanoparticles, routes of exposure, toxic effects, and targets. The entity recognizer was trained using a corpus that we specifically created for this purpose and was validated by two nanomedicine/nanotoxicology experts. We evaluated the performance of our entity recognizer using 10-fold cross-validation. The precisions range from 87.6% (targets) to 93.0% (routes of exposure), while recall values range from 82.6% (routes of exposure) to 87.4% (toxic effects). These results prove the feasibility of using computational approaches to reliably perform different named entity recognition (NER)-dependent tasks, such as for instance augmented reading or semantic searches. This research is a "proof of concept" that can be expanded to stimulate further developments that could assist researchers in managing data, information, and knowledge at the nanolevel, thus accelerating research in nanomedicine.

  13. Using Nanoinformatics Methods for Automatically Identifying Relevant Nanotoxicology Entities from the Literature

    PubMed Central

    García-Remesal, Miguel; García-Ruiz, Alejandro; Pérez-Rey, David; de la Iglesia, Diana; Maojo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Nanoinformatics is an emerging research field that uses informatics techniques to collect, process, store, and retrieve data, information, and knowledge on nanoparticles, nanomaterials, and nanodevices and their potential applications in health care. In this paper, we have focused on the solutions that nanoinformatics can provide to facilitate nanotoxicology research. For this, we have taken a computational approach to automatically recognize and extract nanotoxicology-related entities from the scientific literature. The desired entities belong to four different categories: nanoparticles, routes of exposure, toxic effects, and targets. The entity recognizer was trained using a corpus that we specifically created for this purpose and was validated by two nanomedicine/nanotoxicology experts. We evaluated the performance of our entity recognizer using 10-fold cross-validation. The precisions range from 87.6% (targets) to 93.0% (routes of exposure), while recall values range from 82.6% (routes of exposure) to 87.4% (toxic effects). These results prove the feasibility of using computational approaches to reliably perform different named entity recognition (NER)-dependent tasks, such as for instance augmented reading or semantic searches. This research is a “proof of concept” that can be expanded to stimulate further developments that could assist researchers in managing data, information, and knowledge at the nanolevel, thus accelerating research in nanomedicine. PMID:23509721

  14. Self-Amplified Optical Pattern Recognizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-01-01

    Self-amplified optical pattern recognizers developed for use in recognition of patterns, in optical computing, and in optoelectronic neural networks. In recognizer, photorefractive crystal serves as medium in which one holographically records diffraction-grating filter representing pattern with which recognition sought. Apparatus "self-amplified" because signal amplified within filter to many orders of magnitude greater than in prior optical pattern recognizers. Basic principle of operation applicable to many types of correlation filters, including (but not limited to) Vander Lugt matched filters, joint-transform filters, and phase-only filters.

  15. Laser tracking system with automatic reacquisition capability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R E; Weiss, P F

    1968-06-01

    A laser based tracking system is described that has the capability of automatically performing an acquisition search to locate the target. This work is intended for precision launch phase tracking of the Saturn V launch vehicle. System tracking accuracies limited only by the atmosphere have been demonstrated, as has acquisition over a 1 degrees x 1 degrees field of view.

  16. Automatic recognition and analysis of synapses. [in brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungerleider, J. A.; Ledley, R. S.; Bloom, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic system for recognizing synaptic junctions would allow analysis of large samples of tissue for the possible classification of specific well-defined sets of synapses based upon structural morphometric indices. In this paper the three steps of our system are described: (1) cytochemical tissue preparation to allow easy recognition of the synaptic junctions; (2) transmitting the tissue information to a computer; and (3) analyzing each field to recognize the synapses and make measurements on them.

  17. Social cognition: feeling voices to recognize emotions.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-12-21

    Our understanding of how we simulate other people's actions and feelings to recognize their emotional states is extended by a new study which finds that premotor and somatosensory cortices are required to process the emotional meaning of sounds.

  18. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  19. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein, FMRP, Recognizes G-Quartets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, Jennifer C.; Warren, Stephen T.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation is a disease caused by the loss of function of a single RNA-binding protein, FMRP. Identifying the RNA targets recognized by FMRP is likely to reveal much about its functions in controlling some aspects of memory and behavior. Recent evidence suggests that one of the predominant RNA motifs recognized by the FMRP…

  20. A long-term target detection approach in infrared image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xin; Hu, Chao

    2016-10-01

    An automatic target detection method used in long term infrared (IR) image sequence from a moving platform is proposed. Firstly, based on POME(the principle of maximum entropy), target candidates are iteratively segmented. Then the real target is captured via two different selection approaches. At the beginning of image sequence, the genuine target with litter texture is discriminated from other candidates by using contrast-based confidence measure. On the other hand, when the target becomes larger, we apply online EM method to estimate and update the distributions of target's size and position based on the prior detection results, and then recognize the genuine one which satisfies both the constraints of size and position. Experimental results demonstrate that the presented method is accurate, robust and efficient.

  1. A long-term target detection approach in infrared image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    An automatic target detection method used in long term infrared (IR) image sequence from a moving platform is proposed. Firstly, based on non-linear histogram equalization, target candidates are coarse-to-fine segmented by using two self-adapt thresholds generated in the intensity space. Then the real target is captured via two different selection approaches. At the beginning of image sequence, the genuine target with litter texture is discriminated from other candidates by using contrast-based confidence measure. On the other hand, when the target becomes larger, we apply online EM method to iteratively estimate and update the distributions of target's size and position based on the prior detection results, and then recognize the genuine one which satisfies both the constraints of size and position. Experimental results demonstrate that the presented method is accurate, robust and efficient.

  2. Automatic wire twister.

    PubMed

    Smith, J F; Rodeheaver, G T; Thacker, J G; Morgan, R F; Chang, D E; Fariss, B L; Edlich, R F

    1988-06-01

    This automatic wire twister used in surgery consists of a 6-inch needle holder attached to a twisting mechanism. The major advantage of this device is that it twists wires significantly more rapidly than the conventional manual techniques. Testing has found that the ultimate force required to disrupt the wires twisted by either the automatic wire twister or manual techniques did not differ significantly and was directly related to the number of twists. The automatic wire twister reduces the time needed for wire twisting without altering the security of the twisted wire.

  3. Autoantibodies in Scurfy Mice and IPEX Patients Recognize Keratin 14

    PubMed Central

    Huter, Eva N.; Natarajan, Kannan; Torgerson, Troy R.; Glass, Deborah D.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Scurfy mice have a deletion in the Foxp3 gene, resulting in a failure to generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, and they subsequently develop severe CD4+ T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation. Multiple organs are involved, but the skin is one of the main organs affected. During the course of disease, Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies; however, the targeted antigens are unknown. In this study, we show that Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies directed against skin antigens. Using western blot analysis, we found that Scurfy serum reacted with proteins in total skin lysate, as well as in a keratinocyte lysate. Most of the Scurfy sera tested identified a major band at 50 kDa. Transfer of Scurfy CD4+ T cells into nu/nu mice yielded autoantibodies with similar reactivity. Further analysis using 2D western blots, followed by peptide mass fingerprinting, identified several keratins as targets. To confirm this observation, we chose one of the identified targets, keratin 14, and prepared recombinant proteins encompassing the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal portions of the keratin 14 protein. Scurfy serum predominantly recognized the C-terminal fragment. Sera from patients with immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, the human disease resulting from FOXP3 mutations, also recognized skin antigens, including keratin 14. Thus, the results of our study indicate that autoantibodies in Scurfy mice and patients with IPEX target keratins. PMID:20147963

  4. Autoantibodies in scurfy mice and IPEX patients recognize keratin 14.

    PubMed

    Huter, Eva N; Natarajan, Kannan; Torgerson, Troy R; Glass, Deborah D; Shevach, Ethan M

    2010-05-01

    Scurfy mice have a deletion in the Foxp3 gene, resulting in a failure to generate Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, and they subsequently develop severe CD4(+) T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation. Multiple organs are involved, but the skin is one of the main organs affected. During the course of disease, Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies; however, the targeted antigens are unknown. In this study, we show that Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies directed against skin antigens. Using western blot analysis, we found that Scurfy serum reacted with proteins in total skin lysate, as well as in a keratinocyte lysate. Most of the Scurfy sera tested identified a major band at 50 kDa. Transfer of Scurfy CD4(+) T cells into nu/nu mice yielded autoantibodies with similar reactivity. Further analysis using 2D western blots, followed by peptide mass fingerprinting, identified several keratins as targets. To confirm this observation, we chose one of the identified targets, keratin 14, and prepared recombinant proteins encompassing the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal portions of the keratin 14 protein. Scurfy serum predominantly recognized the C-terminal fragment. Sera from patients with immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, the human disease resulting from FOXP3 mutations, also recognized skin antigens, including keratin 14. Thus, the results of our study indicate that autoantibodies in Scurfy mice and patients with IPEX target keratins.

  5. A knowledge engineering approach to recognizing and extracting sequences of nucleic acids from scientific literature.

    PubMed

    García-Remesal, Miguel; Maojo, Victor; Crespo, José

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a knowledge engineering approach to automatically recognize and extract genetic sequences from scientific articles. To carry out this task, we use a preliminary recognizer based on a finite state machine to extract all candidate DNA/RNA sequences. The latter are then fed into a knowledge-based system that automatically discards false positives and refines noisy and incorrectly merged sequences. We created the knowledge base by manually analyzing different manuscripts containing genetic sequences. Our approach was evaluated using a test set of 211 full-text articles in PDF format containing 3134 genetic sequences. For such set, we achieved 87.76% precision and 97.70% recall respectively. This method can facilitate different research tasks. These include text mining, information extraction, and information retrieval research dealing with large collections of documents containing genetic sequences.

  6. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  7. Automatic TLI recognition system, general description

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report is a general description of an automatic target recognition system developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Department of Energy. A user`s manual is a separate volume, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide, and a programmer`s manual is Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide. This system was designed as an automatic target recognition system for fast screening of large amounts of multi-sensor image data, based on low-cost parallel processors. This system naturally incorporates image data fusion, and it gives uncertainty estimates. It is relatively low cost, compact, and transportable. The software is easily enhanced to expand the system`s capabilities, and the hardware is easily expandable to increase the system`s speed. In addition to its primary function as a trainable target recognition system, this is also a versatile, general-purpose tool for image manipulation and analysis, which can be either keyboard-driven or script-driven. This report includes descriptions of three variants of the computer hardware, a description of the mathematical basis if the training process, and a description with examples of the system capabilities.

  8. Automatic recognition of lactating sow behaviors through depth image processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manual observation and classification of animal behaviors is laborious, time-consuming, and of limited ability to process large amount of data. A computer vision-based system was developed that automatically recognizes sow behaviors (lying, sitting, standing, kneeling, feeding, drinking, and shiftin...

  9. Explicit Pronunciation Training Using Automatic Speech Recognition Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, Jonathan; Kewley-Port, Diane

    1999-01-01

    Describes a system, provisionally named Pronto, that uses automatic speech recognition for training pronunciation of second languages in adult learners. Methods are included for developing training in Pronto, and results are presented from evaluating classes of speech recognizers for use in different aspects of pronunciation training. (Author/VWL)

  10. Recognizing the Presidents: Was Alexander Hamilton President?

    PubMed

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Studies over the past 40 years have shown that Americans can recall about half the U.S. presidents. Do people know the presidents even though they are unable to access them for recall? We investigated this question using the powerful cues of a recognition test. Specifically, we tested the ability of 326 online subjects to recognize U.S. presidents when presented with their full names among various types of lures. The hit rate for presidential recognition was .88, well above the proportion produced in free recall but far from perfect. Presidents Franklin Pierce and Chester Arthur were recognized less than 60% of the time. Interestingly, four nonpresidents were falsely recognized at relatively high rates, and Alexander Hamilton was more frequently identified as president than were several actual presidents. Even on a recognition test, knowledge of American presidents is imperfect and prone to error. The false alarm data support the theory that false fame can arise from contextual familiarity.

  11. Equipping African American Clergy to Recognize Depression.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Jean Spann; Morris, Edith; Collins, Charles W; Watson, Albert; Williams, Jennifer E; Ferguson, Bʼnai; Ruhlman, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Many African Americans (AAs) use clergy as their primary source of help for depression, with few being referred to mental health providers. This study used face-to-face workshops to train AA clergy to recognize the symptoms and levels of severity of depression. A pretest/posttest format was used to test knowledge (N = 42) about depression symptoms. Results showed that the participation improved the clergy's ability to recognize depression symptoms. Faith community nurses can develop workshops for clergy to improve recognition and treatment of depression.

  12. Recognizing and responding to hyperglycaemic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, Maria; Marsons, Lorraine

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are both diabetic emergencies associated with hyperglycaemia and can be fatal if healthcare professionals fail to recognize and intervene appropriately. While many students and qualified nurses may be able to recall common signs and symptoms related to DKA and HHS - for example polyuria, polydipsia and elevated blood sugars - understanding the physiological mechanisms behind abnormal observations and restoring homeostasis through appropriate management is far more complex. Health educators can play a significant role in contextualizing difficult concepts, such as DKA and HHS, so that these complex conditions can be recognized with greater confidence and competence in clinical practice.

  13. Recognizing and treating anxiety disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Maria N

    2005-02-01

    Anxiety disorders are a common group of disorders that must be recognized more frequently by pediatricians. Outcomes can be very successful with prompt recognition and early treatment. For this reason, it is important that pediatricians recognize their central role in integrating sociological, psychological, and biological approaches to treatment. Pediatricians are vital for initial assessment, interventions, management of psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic treatments, and referral to psychiatrists and psychologists when necessary. An improved understanding of anxiety disorders by pediatricians will lead to improved diagnosis and improved quality of life for many undiagnosed pediatric patients suffering from anxiety.

  14. Automatic calibration method for plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Yinsen; He, Xing; Xu, Bing; Yang, Ping; Tang, Guomao

    2016-04-01

    An automatic calibration method is proposed for a microlens-based plenoptic camera. First, all microlens images on the white image are searched and recognized automatically based on digital morphology. Then, the center points of microlens images are rearranged according to their relative position relationships. Consequently, the microlens images are located, i.e., the plenoptic camera is calibrated without the prior knowledge of camera parameters. Furthermore, this method is appropriate for all types of microlens-based plenoptic cameras, even the multifocus plenoptic camera, the plenoptic camera with arbitrarily arranged microlenses, or the plenoptic camera with different sizes of microlenses. Finally, we verify our method by the raw data of Lytro. The experiments show that our method has higher intelligence than the methods published before.

  15. Automatic recognition of malicious intent indicators.

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, D. J.; Yee, Mark L.; Giron, Casey; Fogler, Robert Joseph; Nguyen, Hung D.; Koch, Mark William

    2010-09-01

    A major goal of next-generation physical protection systems is to extend defenses far beyond the usual outer-perimeter-fence boundaries surrounding protected facilities. Mitigation of nuisance alarms is among the highest priorities. A solution to this problem is to create a robust capability to Automatically Recognize Malicious Indicators of intruders. In extended defense applications, it is not enough to distinguish humans from all other potential alarm sources as human activity can be a common occurrence outside perimeter boundaries. Our approach is unique in that it employs a stimulus to determine a malicious intent indicator for the intruder. The intruder's response to the stimulus can be used in an automatic reasoning system to decide the intruder's intent.

  16. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  17. 26 CFR 601.502 - Recognized representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recognized representative. 601.502 Section 601.502 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INTERNAL REVENUE... before the Internal Revenue Service and is in active status pursuant to the requirements of Circular...

  18. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack? Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Attack? Updated:Sep 16,2016 Begin the quiz Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary ... in Women “Can you recognize a heart attack?” Quiz • Understand Your Risks to Prevent a Heart Attack ...

  19. Stent Fracture: How Frequently Is It Recognized?

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Mohammed Khalil; Alqahtani, Awad; Al suwaidi, Jassim

    2013-01-01

    In spite of there being several case reports, coronary stent fracture is not a well-recognized entity and incidence rates are likely to be underestimated. In this article, we review different aspects of stent fracture, including incidence, classification, predictors, outcome, diagnosis, and management. PMID:23983912

  20. Recently recognized chromosomal defects of clinical importance.

    PubMed Central

    Pembrey, M.; Baraitser, M.

    1986-01-01

    We review those conditions which have recently been recognized to be associated with small, sometimes difficult to detect, chromosomal abnormalities. These include the Prader-Willi syndrome and X-linked mental retardation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3540928

  1. Recognizing and Responding to a Suicide Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendin, Herbert; Maltsberger, John T.; Lipschitz, Alan; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Kyle, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Data from therapists who were treating 26 patients when they committed suicide were utilized to identify warning signs. Problems in communication between patient and therapist were identified as factors interfering with crisis recognition. Evaluation of the identified affects and behaviors may help therapists recognize a suicide crisis. (BF)

  2. EPA recognizes Texas AandM Agrilife

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Oct. 13, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized Texas A&M Agrilife Research Extension Center at Dallas during the 2015 WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition in Las Vegas, Nev. The center rec

  3. WOLF; automatic typing program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evenden, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV program for the Hewlett-Packard 1000 series computer provides for automatic typing operations and can, when employed with manufacturer's text editor, provide a system to greatly facilitate preparation of reports, letters and other text. The input text and imbedded control data can perform nearly all of the functions of a typist. A few of the features available are centering, titles, footnotes, indentation, page numbering (including Roman numerals), automatic paragraphing, and two forms of tab operations. This documentation contains both user and technical description of the program.

  4. AUTOMATIC COUNTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Howell, W.D.

    1957-08-20

    An apparatus for automatically recording the results of counting operations on trains of electrical pulses is described. The disadvantages of prior devices utilizing the two common methods of obtaining the count rate are overcome by this apparatus; in the case of time controlled operation, the disclosed system automatically records amy information stored by the scaler but not transferred to the printer at the end of the predetermined time controlled operations and, in the case of count controlled operation, provision is made to prevent a weak sample from occupying the apparatus for an excessively long period of time.

  5. Recognize sex work as legitimate work.

    PubMed

    Reynaga, Elena

    2008-12-01

    It is not sex work per se that makes sex workers vulnerable to HIV, but rather the policies that repress them. In this article, based on her presentation at a plenary session at the conference, Elena Reynaga, who is a sex worker, describes how these policies deprive sex workers of their rights and subject them to physical and sexual violence. The author concludes that at the heart of the problem lies the fact that sex work is not recognized as legitimate work.

  6. Automatic image hanging protocol for chest radiographs in PACS.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Hao, Wei; Foos, David H; Cornelius, Craig W

    2006-04-01

    Chest radiography is one of the most widely used techniques in diagnostic imaging. It comprises at least one-third of all diagnostic radiographic procedures in hospitals. However, in the picture archive and communication system, images are often stored with the projection and orientation unknown or mislabeled, which causes inefficiency for radiologists' interpretation. To address this problem, an automatic hanging protocol for chest radiographs is presented. The method targets the most effective region in a chest radiograph, and extracts a set of size-, rotation-, and translation-invariant features from it. Then, a well-trained classifier is used to recognize the projection. The orientation of the radiograph is later identified by locating the neck, heart, and abdomen positions in the radiographs. Initial experiments are performed on the radiographs collected from daily routine chest exams in hospitals and show promising results. Using the presented protocol, 98.2% of all cases could be hung correctly on projection view (without protocol, 62%), and 96.1% had correct orientation (without protocol, 75%). A workflow study on the protocol also demonstrates a significant improvement in efficiency for image display.

  7. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  8. Recognizing specialized terminology presented through different modes.

    PubMed

    Commons-Miller, Lucas Alexander Hayleigh; Commons, Michael Lamport

    2003-11-01

    In the present study, the authors examined how previous experience and modes of presenting information affect the recognition of terms in new, specialized terminologies. The specialized terminology used was related to orienteering. Orienteering concepts representing features found in the woods may be communicated verbally (as definitions or words) or symbolically. There were 225 participants (101 reported no orienteering experience and 122 reported varying amounts of orienteering experience; 2 did not respond to that question) who tried to identify which of 5 entities was an orienteering definition, word, or symbol. Those with orienteering experience found that recognizing the specialized terminology was significantly easier than for those without experience. Recognizing symbols was significantly more difficult than recognizing definitions or words, particularly for non-orienteers. Performance of the orienteers was similar for the three modes. Within the orienteering group, the number of years of experience and usual course difficulty attempted were significant predictors of overall test success. Applications to training of both low-level specialized terminology (e.g., used in algebra), and higher level terminology (e.g., used in computer science) are discussed.

  9. Recognizing Materials using Perceptually Inspired Features

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Lavanya; Liu, Ce; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Adelson, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Our world consists not only of objects and scenes but also of materials of various kinds. Being able to recognize the materials that surround us (e.g., plastic, glass, concrete) is important for humans as well as for computer vision systems. Unfortunately, materials have received little attention in the visual recognition literature, and very few computer vision systems have been designed specifically to recognize materials. In this paper, we present a system for recognizing material categories from single images. We propose a set of low and mid-level image features that are based on studies of human material recognition, and we combine these features using an SVM classifier. Our system outperforms a state-of-the-art system [Varma and Zisserman, 2009] on a challenging database of real-world material categories [Sharan et al., 2009]. When the performance of our system is compared directly to that of human observers, humans outperform our system quite easily. However, when we account for the local nature of our image features and the surface properties they measure (e.g., color, texture, local shape), our system rivals human performance. We suggest that future progress in material recognition will come from: (1) a deeper understanding of the role of non-local surface properties (e.g., extended highlights, object identity); and (2) efforts to model such non-local surface properties in images. PMID:23914070

  10. Ekofisk automatic GPS subsidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mes, M.J.; Landau, H.; Luttenberger, C.

    1996-10-01

    A fully automatic GPS satellite-based procedure for the reliable measurement of subsidence of several platforms in almost real time is described. Measurements are made continuously on platforms in the North Sea Ekofisk Field area. The procedure also yields rate measurements, which are also essential for confirming platform safety, planning of remedial work, and verification of subsidence models. GPS measurements are more attractive than seabed pressure-gauge-based platform subsidence measurements-they are much cheaper to install and maintain and not subject to gauge drift. GPS measurements were coupled to oceanographic quantities such as the platform deck clearance, which leads to less complex offshore survey procedures. Ekofisk is an oil and gas field in the southern portion of the Norwegian North Sea. Late in 1984, it was noticed that the Ekofisk platform decks were closer to the sea surface than when the platforms were installed-subsidence was the only logical explanation. After the subsidence phenomenon was recognized, an accurate measurement method was needed to measure progression of subsidence and the associated subsidence rate. One available system for which no further development was needed, was the NAVSTAR GPS-measurements started in March 1985.

  11. Autotract: automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets.

  12. Autotract: Automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets. PMID:27065227

  13. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-02-16

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object's conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system.

  14. Automatic Program Synthesis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, A. W.; And Others

    Some of the major results of future goals of an automatic program synthesis project are described in the two papers that comprise this document. The first paper gives a detailed algorithm for synthesizing a computer program from a trace of its behavior. Since the algorithm involves a search, the length of time required to do the synthesis of…

  15. Automatic Language Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    the speech utterance is hypothesized. ter performance for his HMM approach than his static ap- Finally, Thyme -Gobbel et al. [47] have also looked...1998. [47] A.E. Thyme -Gobbel and S.E. Hutchins. On using prosodic cues in automatic language identification. In International Conference on Spoken

  16. Automatic multiple applicator electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Easy-to-use, economical device permits electrophoresis on all known supporting media. System includes automatic multiple-sample applicator, sample holder, and electrophoresis apparatus. System has potential applicability to fields of taxonomy, immunology, and genetics. Apparatus is also used for electrofocusing.

  17. Automatic Transmission Vehicle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Malcolm

    1973-01-01

    Four drivers sustained severe injuries when run down by their own automatic cars while adjusting the carburettor or throttle linkages. The transmission had been left in the “Drive” position and the engine was idling. This accident is easily avoidable. PMID:4695693

  18. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object’s conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system. PMID:26879153

  19. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  20. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition. PMID:28356908

  1. Automatic detection of sweep-meshable volumes

    DOEpatents

    Tautges; Timothy J. , White; David R.

    2006-05-23

    A method of and software for automatically determining whether a mesh can be generated by sweeping for a representation of a geometric solid comprising: classifying surface mesh schemes for surfaces of the representation locally using surface vertex types; grouping mappable and submappable surfaces of the representation into chains; computing volume edge types for the representation; recursively traversing surfaces of the representation and grouping the surfaces into source, target, and linking surface lists; and checking traversal direction when traversing onto linking surfaces.

  2. Culture, attribution and automaticity: a social cognitive neuroscience view

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental challenge facing social perceivers is identifying the cause underlying other people’s behavior. Evidence indicates that East Asian perceivers are more likely than Western perceivers to reference the social context when attributing a cause to a target person’s actions. One outstanding question is whether this reflects a culture’s influence on automatic or on controlled components of causal attribution. After reviewing behavioral evidence that culture can shape automatic mental processes as well as controlled reasoning, we discuss the evidence in favor of cultural differences in automatic and controlled components of causal attribution more specifically. We contend that insights emerging from social cognitive neuroscience research can inform this debate. After introducing an attribution framework popular among social neuroscientists, we consider findings relevant to the automaticity of attribution, before speculating how one could use a social neuroscience approach to clarify whether culture affects automatic, controlled or both types of attribution processes. PMID:20460302

  3. Culture, attribution and automaticity: a social cognitive neuroscience view.

    PubMed

    Mason, Malia F; Morris, Michael W

    2010-06-01

    A fundamental challenge facing social perceivers is identifying the cause underlying other people's behavior. Evidence indicates that East Asian perceivers are more likely than Western perceivers to reference the social context when attributing a cause to a target person's actions. One outstanding question is whether this reflects a culture's influence on automatic or on controlled components of causal attribution. After reviewing behavioral evidence that culture can shape automatic mental processes as well as controlled reasoning, we discuss the evidence in favor of cultural differences in automatic and controlled components of causal attribution more specifically. We contend that insights emerging from social cognitive neuroscience research can inform this debate. After introducing an attribution framework popular among social neuroscientists, we consider findings relevant to the automaticity of attribution, before speculating how one could use a social neuroscience approach to clarify whether culture affects automatic, controlled or both types of attribution processes.

  4. Recognition of voice commands using adaptation of foreign language speech recognizer via selection of phonetic transcriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Rudzionis, Vytautas

    2011-06-01

    In recent years various commercial speech recognizers have become available. These recognizers provide the possibility to develop applications incorporating various speech recognition techniques easily and quickly. All of these commercial recognizers are typically targeted to widely spoken languages having large market potential; however, it may be possible to adapt available commercial recognizers for use in environments where less widely spoken languages are used. Since most commercial recognition engines are closed systems the single avenue for the adaptation is to try set ways for the selection of proper phonetic transcription methods between the two languages. This paper deals with the methods to find the phonetic transcriptions for Lithuanian voice commands to be recognized using English speech engines. The experimental evaluation showed that it is possible to find phonetic transcriptions that will enable the recognition of Lithuanian voice commands with recognition accuracy of over 90%.

  5. Automatic document processing system with learning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuhong; Ng, Peter A.

    2000-08-01

    This automatic document processing system proceeds from scanning a given paper-document into the system, automatic recognizing the document layout structure, classifying it as a particular document type, which is characterized in terms of attributes to form a frame template, and extracting the pertinent information from the document to form its corresponding frame instance, which is an effective digital form of the original document. The key attribute of the system is that it is a general-purpose system, which can be adapted easily to any application domains. A segmentation method based on the 'logical closeness' is proposed. A novel and natural representation of document layout structure -- Labeled Directed Weighted Graph (LDWG) and a methodology of transforming document segmentation into LDWG representation are described. To classify a given document, we compare its layout structure with the sample layout structures of various document types prestored in the knowledge base and then use logical structure to verify the initial matching from the first step. There is a weight associated with each component of the layout structure. During the learning stage, the system can adjust the weights automatically based on the human being's correction. Modified Perceptron Learning Algorithm (PLA) is applied.

  6. Recognizing women in the archaeological record

    SciTech Connect

    Bumsted, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Primary sexual characteristics are usually absent in the archaeological record. The recovered secondary sex markers in bone morphology or mortuary context reflect the lifelong integrated biocultural experience of the individual man or woman. Internal patterns of variability within and between sexes can be recognized but are too frequently masked by traditional descriptive and univariate analyses. Fortunately, a more detailed picture of life experience is gained by analyzing chemical composition (isotopic and elemental) of hard tissues using an analytical anthropology approach and by examining the variation in novel ways. 7 figs.

  7. Recognizing Patterns In Log-Polar Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1992-01-01

    Log-Hough transform is basis of improved method for recognition of patterns - particularly, straight lines - in noisy images. Takes advantage of rotational and scale invariance of mapping from Cartesian to log-polar coordinates, and offers economy of representation and computation. Unification of iconic and Hough domains simplifies computations in recognition and eliminates erroneous quantization of slopes attributable to finite spacing of Cartesian coordinate grid of classical Hough transform. Equally efficient recognizing curves. Log-Hough transform more amenable to massively parallel computing architectures than traditional Cartesian Hough transform. "In-place" nature makes it possible to apply local pixel-neighborhood processing.

  8. Newly Recognized Mendelian Disorders with Rheumatic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Summary A number of novel monogenic diseases that present with innate and/or acquired immune dysregulation reveal novel immune pathways that cause human inflammatory diseases and suggest novel targets for treatment. PMID:26196376

  9. N400 repetition effect in unidentifiable Chinese characters: evidence for automatic process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanhong; Huang, He; Mao, Liting

    2009-05-06

    A new matter of debate is whether N400 is exclusively sensitive to automatic or postlexical processes. Recent studies showing N400 modulation by masked primes support an automatic process account. However, these studies cannot directly prove an automatic process. Event-related brain potentials to blurred targets were recorded to substantiate N400 repetition (priming) effects as an index of pure automatic process during a matching task with Chinese characters. Highly blurred target characters, which were unidentifiable, as well as identifiable target characters were shown to elicit greater N400 when repeated, with N400 peak latency being longer for slightly blurred targets than for highly blurred targets. These results provide evidence that N400 is modulated directly by automatic processes rather than by postlexical processes.

  10. Target recognition of ladar range images using even-order Zernike moments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Jun; Li, Qi; Xia, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Qi

    2012-11-01

    Ladar range images have attracted considerable attention in automatic target recognition fields. In this paper, Zernike moments (ZMs) are applied to classify the target of the range image from an arbitrary azimuth angle. However, ZMs suffer from high computational costs. To improve the performance of target recognition based on small samples, even-order ZMs with serial-parallel backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs) are applied to recognize the target of the range image. It is found that the rotation invariance and classified performance of the even-order ZMs are both better than for odd-order moments and for moments compressed by principal component analysis. The experimental results demonstrate that combining the even-order ZMs with serial-parallel BPNNs can significantly improve the recognition rate for small samples.

  11. Automatic Certification of Kalman Filters for Reliable Code Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd; Schumann, Johann; Richardson, Julian

    2005-01-01

    AUTOFILTER is a tool for automatically deriving Kalman filter code from high-level declarative specifications of state estimation problems. It can generate code with a range of algorithmic characteristics and for several target platforms. The tool has been designed with reliability of the generated code in mind and is able to automatically certify that the code it generates is free from various error classes. Since documentation is an important part of software assurance, AUTOFILTER can also automatically generate various human-readable documents, containing both design and safety related information. We discuss how these features address software assurance standards such as DO-178B.

  12. Automatic transmission control method

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.; Ishiguro, T.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a method of controlling an automatic transmission of an automotive vehicle. The transmission has a gear train which includes a brake for establishing a first lowest speed of the transmission, the brake acting directly on a ring gear which meshes with a pinion, the pinion meshing with a sun gear in a planetary gear train, the ring gear connected with an output member, the sun gear being engageable and disengageable with an input member of the transmission by means of a clutch. The method comprises the steps of: detecting that a shift position of the automatic transmission has been shifted to a neutral range; thereafter introducing hydraulic pressure to the brake if present vehicle velocity is below a predetermined value, whereby the brake is engaged to establish the first lowest speed; and exhausting hydraulic pressure from the brake if present vehicle velocity is higher than a predetermined value, whereby the brake is disengaged.

  13. Automatic Abstraction in Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, abstraction in planning has been accomplished by either state abstraction or operator abstraction, neither of which has been fully automatic. We present a new method, predicate relaxation, for automatically performing state abstraction. PABLO, a nonlinear hierarchical planner, implements predicate relaxation. Theoretical, as well as empirical results are presented which demonstrate the potential advantages of using predicate relaxation in planning. We also present a new definition of hierarchical operators that allows us to guarantee a limited form of completeness. This new definition is shown to be, in some ways, more flexible than previous definitions of hierarchical operators. Finally, a Classical Truth Criterion is presented that is proven to be sound and complete for a planning formalism that is general enough to include most classical planning formalisms that are based on the STRIPS assumption.

  14. Automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the development of automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology over the past thirty years. Most of this effort has been centered around the extension and improvement of Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approaches to ASR. Current commercially-available and industry systems based on HMMs can perform well for certain situational tasks that restrict variability such as phone dialing or limited voice commands. However, the holy grail of ASR systems is performance comparable to humans-in other words, the ability to automatically transcribe unrestricted conversational speech spoken by an infinite number of speakers under varying acoustic environments. This goal is far from being reached. Key to the success of ASR is effective modeling of variability in the speech signal. This tutorial will review the basics of ASR and the various ways in which our current knowledge of speech production, speech perception and prosody can be exploited to improve robustness at every level of the system.

  15. Automatic carrier acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunce, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic carrier acquisition system for a phase locked loop (PLL) receiver is disclosed. It includes a local oscillator, which sweeps the receiver to tune across the carrier frequency uncertainty range until the carrier crosses the receiver IF reference. Such crossing is detected by an automatic acquisition detector. It receives the IF signal from the receiver as well as the IF reference. It includes a pair of multipliers which multiply the IF signal with the IF reference in phase and in quadrature. The outputs of the multipliers are filtered through bandpass filters and power detected. The output of the power detector has a signal dc component which is optimized with respect to the noise dc level by the selection of the time constants of the filters as a function of the sweep rate of the local oscillator.

  16. Automatic vehicle monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravman, J. S.; Durrani, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic vehicle monitoring systems are discussed. In a baseline system for highway applications, each vehicle obtains position information through a Loran-C receiver in rural areas and through a 'signpost' or 'proximity' type sensor in urban areas; the vehicle transmits this information to a central station via a communication link. In an advance system, the vehicle carries a receiver for signals emitted by satellites in the Global Positioning System and uses a satellite-aided communication link to the central station. An advanced railroad car monitoring system uses car-mounted labels and sensors for car identification and cargo status; the information is collected by electronic interrogators mounted along the track and transmitted to a central station. It is concluded that automatic vehicle monitoring systems are technically feasible but not economically feasible unless a large market develops.

  17. Automatic Retinal Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, G. H.; Karlsson, R. A.; Hardarson, S. H.; Mura, M. Dalla; Eysteinsson, T.; Beach, J. M.; Stefansson, E.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automating the evaluation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the retina. This method should prove useful for monitoring ischemic retinal diseases and the effect of treatment. In order to obtain saturation values automatically, spectral images must be registered in pairs, the vessels of the retina located and measurement points must be selected. The registration algorithm is based on a data driven approach that circumvents many of the problems that have plagued previous methods. The vessels are extracted using an algorithm based on morphological profiles and supervised classifiers. Measurement points on retinal arterioles and venules as well as reference points on the adjacent fundus are automatically selected. Oxygen saturation values along vessels are averaged to arrive at a more accurate estimate of the retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The system yields reproducible results as well as being sensitive to changes in oxygen saturation.

  18. How do infants recognize joint attention?

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Erik; Brisson, Julie; Beaulieu, Christelle; Mainville, Marc; Mailloux, Dominique; Sirois, Sylvain

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of joint attention is still a matter of vigorous debate. It involves diverse hypotheses ranging from innate modules dedicated to intention reading to more neuro-constructivist approaches. The aim of this study was to assess whether 12-month-old infants are able to recognize a "joint attention" situation when observing such a social interaction. Using a violation-of-expectation paradigm, we habituated infants to a "joint attention" video and then compared their looking time durations between "divergent attention" videos and "joint attention" ones using a 2 (familiar or novel perceptual component)×2 (familiar or novel conceptual component) factorial design. These results were enriched with measures of pupil dilation, which are considered to be reliable measures of cognitive load. Infants looked longer at test events that involved novel speaker and divergent attention but no changes in infants' pupil dilation were observed in any conditions. Although looking time data suggest that infants may appreciate discrepancies from expectations related to joint attention behavior, in the absence of clear evidence from pupillometry, the results show no demonstration of understanding of joint attention, even at a tacit level. Our results suggest that infants may be sensitive to relevant perceptual variables in joint attention situations, which would help scaffold social cognitive development. This study supports a gradual, learning interpretation of how infants come to recognize, understand, and participate in joint attention.

  19. Automatic Word Alignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    strategy was evalu­ ated in the context of English -to-Pashto (E2P) and Pashto-to- English (P2E), a low-resource language pair. For E2P, the training and...improves the quality of automatic word alignment, for example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT...example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY

  20. Automatic Test Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-28

    Search Terms Automatic Test Equipment Frequency Analyzers Oscilloscopes Pulse Analyzers Signal Generators "Etc." Third Level Search Guided...VAST Building Block Equipment RF Test Point Control Switch Digital Multimeter Frequency and Time Interval Meter Digital Word Generator Delay...Generator RF Amplifier, 95 Hz-2 GHz RF Amplifier, 2-4 GHz RF Amplifier, 4-8 GHz RF Amplifier, 8-12.2 GHz Signal Generator, 0.1 Hz-50 kHz

  1. Automatic Microwave Network Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A program and procedure are developed for the automatic measurement of microwave networks using a Hewlett-Packard network analyzer and programmable calculator . The program and procedure are used in the measurement of a simple microwave two port network. These measurements are evaluated by comparing with measurements on the same network using other techniques. The programs...in the programmable calculator are listed in Appendix 1. The step by step procedure used is listed in Appendix 2. (Author)

  2. Real-time automatic registration in optical surgical navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinyong; Yang, Rongqian; Cai, Ken; Si, Xuan; Chen, Xiuwen; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    An image-guided surgical navigation system requires the improvement of the patient-to-image registration time to enhance the convenience of the registration procedure. A critical step in achieving this aim is performing a fully automatic patient-to-image registration. This study reports on a design of custom fiducial markers and the performance of a real-time automatic patient-to-image registration method using these markers on the basis of an optical tracking system for rigid anatomy. The custom fiducial markers are designed to be automatically localized in both patient and image spaces. An automatic localization method is performed by registering a point cloud sampled from the three dimensional (3D) pedestal model surface of a fiducial marker to each pedestal of fiducial markers searched in image space. A head phantom is constructed to estimate the performance of the real-time automatic registration method under four fiducial configurations. The head phantom experimental results demonstrate that the real-time automatic registration method is more convenient, rapid, and accurate than the manual method. The time required for each registration is approximately 0.1 s. The automatic localization method precisely localizes the fiducial markers in image space. The averaged target registration error for the four configurations is approximately 0.7 mm. The automatic registration performance is independent of the positions relative to the tracking system and the movement of the patient during the operation.

  3. ANPS - AUTOMATIC NETWORK PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Development of some of the space program's large simulation projects -- like the project which involves simulating the countdown sequence prior to spacecraft liftoff -- requires the support of automated tools and techniques. The number of preconditions which must be met for a successful spacecraft launch and the complexity of their interrelationship account for the difficulty of creating an accurate model of the countdown sequence. Researchers developed ANPS for the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center to assist programmers attempting to model the pre-launch countdown sequence. Incorporating the elements of automatic programming as its foundation, ANPS aids the user in defining the problem and then automatically writes the appropriate simulation program in GPSS/PC code. The program's interactive user dialogue interface creates an internal problem specification file from user responses which includes the time line for the countdown sequence, the attributes for the individual activities which are part of a launch, and the dependent relationships between the activities. The program's automatic simulation code generator receives the file as input and selects appropriate macros from the library of software modules to generate the simulation code in the target language GPSS/PC. The user can recall the problem specification file for modification to effect any desired changes in the source code. ANPS is designed to write simulations for problems concerning the pre-launch activities of space vehicles and the operation of ground support equipment and has potential for use in developing network reliability models for hardware systems and subsystems. ANPS was developed in 1988 for use on IBM PC or compatible machines. The program requires at least 640 KB memory and one 360 KB disk drive, PC DOS Version 2.0 or above, and GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The program is written in Turbo Prolog Version 2.0. GPSS/PC is a trademark of Minuteman Software. Turbo Prolog

  4. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (<5%) and is reducing when the size of the landslide increases. The final aim will be to apply this method on-line and for a real-time automatic detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  5. On automatic bioacoustic detection of pests: the cases of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus and Sitophilus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Ilyas; Ganchev, Todor; Kontodimas, Dimitris

    2009-08-01

    The present work reports research efforts toward development and evaluation of a unified framework for automatic bioacoustic recognition of specific insect pests. Our approach is based on capturing and automatically recognizing the acoustic emission resulting from typical behaviors, e.g., locomotion and feeding, of the target pests. After acquisition the signals are amplified, filtered, parameterized, and classified by advanced machine learning methods on a portable computer. Specifically, we investigate an advanced signal parameterization scheme that relies on variable size signal segmentation. The feature vector computed for each segment of the signal is composed of the dominant harmonic, which carry information about the periodicity of the signal, and the cepstral coefficients, which carry information about the relative distribution of energy among the different spectral sub-bands. This parameterization offers a reliable representation of both the acoustic emissions of the pests of interest and the interferences from the environment. We illustrate the practical significance of our methodology on two specific cases: 1) a devastating pest for palm plantations, namely, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier and 2) a pest that attacks warehouse stored rice (Oryza sativa L.), the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (both Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Dryophorinae). These pests are known in many countries around the world and contribute for significant economical loss. The proposed approach led to detection results in real field trials, reaching 99.1% on real-field recordings of R. ferrugineus and 100% for S. oryzae.

  6. Obstacle detection by recognizing binary expansion patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram; Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obstacle detection, based on the expansion of the image-plane projection of a textured object, as its distance from the sensor decreases. Information is conveyed by vectors whose components represent first-order temporal and spatial derivatives of the image intensity, which are related to the time to collision through the local divergence. Such vectors may be characterized as patterns corresponding to 'safe' or 'dangerous' situations. We show that essential information is conveyed by single-bit vector components, representing the signs of the relevant derivatives. We use two recently developed, high capacity classifiers, employing neural learning techniques, to recognize the imminence of collision from such patterns.

  7. Shuttle inspection team recognized for 'eagle eyes.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left) applauds the Space Shuttle ice and debris inspection team who were recognized for their keen safety observations prior to the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing next to Goldin are (left to right) D. Scott Otto, with Lockheed Martin Space Services Company; John B. Blue, Thomas F. Ford and Michael Barber, with United Space Alliance; Gregory N. Katnik and Jorge E. Rivera, with NASA. Katnick and Rivera received the agency's Exceptional Achievement Medal; Barber, Blue, Ford and Otto received the NASA Public Service Medal. While scanning the launch pad before launch, the team found a stray 4-inch pin near the Shuttle's external fuel tank that could have caused damage during launch. Discovery was safely launched the next day, on Oct. 11.

  8. Octopuses (Enteroctopus dofleini) recognize individual humans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Roland C; Mather, Jennifer A; Monette, Mathieu Q; Zimsen, Stephanie R M

    2010-01-01

    This study exposed 8 Enteroctopus dofleini separately to 2 unfamiliar individual humans over a 2-week period under differing circumstances. One person consistently fed the octopuses and the other touched them with a bristly stick. Each human recorded octopus body patterns, behaviors, and respiration rates directly after each treatment. At the end of 2 weeks, a body pattern (a dark Eyebar) and 2 behaviors (reaching arms toward or away from the tester and funnel direction) were significantly different in response to the 2 humans. The respiration rate of the 4 larger octopuses changed significantly in response to the 2 treatments; however, there was no significant difference in the 4 smaller octopuses' respiration. Octopuses' ability to recognize humans enlarges our knowledge of the perceptual ability of this nonhuman animal, which depends heavily on learning in response to visual information. Any training paradigm should take such individual recognition into consideration as it could significantly alter the octopuses' responses.

  9. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  10. Exploring the recognized bio-mimicry materials for gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, T Z; Lo, Y R; Chan, E C

    2001-12-01

    This study was undertaken to synthesize peptides that are partially similar to the binding sites of human olfactory receptor protein. First, a putative 3-D model structure of human olfactory receptor protein (P30953) was modeled using a molecular simulation method. The computer docking simulation was then performed to determine the most plausible binding sites between the model structure and target gases, trimethylamine, ammonia, acetic acid, and o-xylene. According to the simulation result, a series of polypeptide sequences, horp61 for TMA, horp103 for o-xylene, horp109 for ammonia, and horp193 for acetic acid as recognized molecules were designed for gas sensing purposes. Preparing these peptides as corresponding gas sensing probes, the results showed a high relative sensitivity response of 6.7 for TMA (probe horp61), 5.1 for o-xylene (probe horp103), 11 for ammonia (probe horp109), and 28 for acetic acid (probe horp193), respectively. These results indicate that peptide mimicking of binding domain on olfactory receptor opens a new window and offers a novel strategy for the further development of recognized materials for gas sensing.

  11. How can we recognize continuous quality improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Lisa; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Hempel, Susanne; Danz, Margie; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Foy, Robbie; O'Neill, Sean; Dalal, Siddhartha; Shekelle, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective Continuous quality improvement (CQI) methods are foundational approaches to improving healthcare delivery. Publications using the term CQI, however, are methodologically heterogeneous, and labels other than CQI are used to signify relevant approaches. Standards for identifying the use of CQI based on its key methodological features could enable more effective learning across quality improvement (QI) efforts. The objective was to identify essential methodological features for recognizing CQI. Design Previous work with a 12-member international expert panel identified reliably abstracted CQI methodological features. We tested which features met rigorous a priori standards as essential features of CQI using a three-phase online modified-Delphi process. Setting Primarily United States and Canada. Participants 119 QI experts randomly assigned into four on-line panels. Intervention(s) Participants rated CQI features and discussed their answers using online, anonymous and asynchronous discussion boards. We analyzed ratings quantitatively and discussion threads qualitatively. Main outcome measure(s) Panel consensus on definitional CQI features. Results Seventy-nine (66%) panelists completed the process. Thirty-three completers self-identified as QI researchers, 18 as QI practitioners and 28 as both equally. The features ‘systematic data guided activities,’ ‘designing with local conditions in mind’ and ‘iterative development and testing’ met a priori standards as essential CQI features. Qualitative analyses showed cross-cutting themes focused on differences between QI and CQI. Conclusions We found consensus among a broad group of CQI researchers and practitioners on three features as essential for identifying QI work more specifically as ‘CQI.’ All three features are needed as a minimum standard for recognizing CQI methods. PMID:24311732

  12. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  13. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  14. 46 CFR 160.076-19 - Recognized laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratories. 160.076-19 Section 160.076-19... Recognized laboratories. The approval and production oversight functions that this subpart requires to be conducted by a recognized laboratory must be conducted by an independent laboratory recognized by the...

  15. 46 CFR 160.077-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.077-9 Section 160.077-9... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  16. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  17. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  18. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 162.039-5 Section 162.039-5... Recognized laboratory. (a) A recognized laboratory is one which is regularly engaged in the examination... motorboats. The following laboratories are recognized, and the semiportable fire extinguishers bearing...

  19. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  20. 46 CFR 160.077-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.077-9 Section 160.077-9... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  1. 46 CFR 160.076-19 - Recognized laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratories. 160.076-19 Section 160.076-19... Recognized laboratories. The approval and production oversight functions that this subpart requires to be conducted by a recognized laboratory must be conducted by an independent laboratory recognized by the...

  2. 46 CFR 160.049-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.049-8 Section 160.049-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  3. 46 CFR 160.049-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.049-8 Section 160.049-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  4. 46 CFR 160.077-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.077-9 Section 160.077-9... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  5. 46 CFR 160.049-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.049-8 Section 160.049-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  6. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  7. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 162.039-5 Section 162.039-5... Recognized laboratory. (a) A recognized laboratory is one which is regularly engaged in the examination... motorboats. The following laboratories are recognized, and the semiportable fire extinguishers bearing...

  8. 46 CFR 160.077-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.077-9 Section 160.077-9... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  9. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 162.039-5 Section 162.039-5... Recognized laboratory. (a) A recognized laboratory is one which is regularly engaged in the examination... motorboats. The following laboratories are recognized, and the semiportable fire extinguishers bearing...

  10. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 162.039-5 Section 162.039-5... Recognized laboratory. (a) A recognized laboratory is one which is regularly engaged in the examination... motorboats. The following laboratories are recognized, and the semiportable fire extinguishers bearing...

  11. 46 CFR 160.076-19 - Recognized laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratories. 160.076-19 Section 160.076-19... Recognized laboratories. The approval and production oversight functions that this subpart requires to be conducted by a recognized laboratory must be conducted by an independent laboratory recognized by the...

  12. Traceability Through Automatic Program Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Julian; Green, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Program synthesis is a technique for automatically deriving programs from specifications of their behavior. One of the arguments made in favour of program synthesis is that it allows one to trace from the specification to the program. One way in which traceability information can be derived is to augment the program synthesis system so that manipulations and calculations it carries out during the synthesis process are annotated with information on what the manipulations and calculations were and why they were made. This information is then accumulated throughout the synthesis process, at the end of which, every artifact produced by the synthesis is annotated with a complete history relating it to every other artifact (including the source specification) which influenced its construction. This approach requires modification of the entire synthesis system - which is labor-intensive and hard to do without influencing its behavior. In this paper, we introduce a novel, lightweight technique for deriving traceability from a program specification to the corresponding synthesized code. Once a program has been successfully synthesized from a specification, small changes are systematically made to the specification and the effects on the synthesized program observed. We have partially automated the technique and applied it in an experiment to one of our program synthesis systems, AUTOFILTER, and to the GNU C compiler, GCC. The results are promising: 1. Manual inspection of the results indicates that most of the connections derived from the source (a specification in the case of AUTOFILTER, C source code in the case of GCC) to its generated target (C source code in the case of AUTOFILTER, assembly language code in the case of GCC) are correct. 2. Around half of the lines in the target can be traced to at least one line of the source. 3. Small changes in the source often induce only small changes in the target.

  13. Recognizing environments in the deposits of the Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, F.E. )

    1991-03-01

    The paralic sediments of the Agbada Formation are the targets of commercial exploration and exploitation of oil and gas in the Niger delta. Sedimentological and microfossil data from a middle Miocene reservoir in the delta have revealed a succession of deltaic subenvironments of deposition within a prograding offlap sequence. Ten lithofacies, comprising five sandstone, three heterolithic, and two mudstone types, are recognized from grain size, sedimentary structures, and trace fossils in two cored boreholes. Fourteen palynodebris types, including amorphous organic matter, various types of palynomorphs, and wood, were identified in the sediments. These components were subjected to principal component analysis and cluster analysis. The resulting palynofacies are integrated with lithofacies and paleoecological inferences made from the palynomorph and foraminifera contents of the sediments for paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Gamma-ray log correlation of the reservoir in uncored boreholes was carried out, using information from the cores, and this has resulted in a depositional model.

  14. Planktivorous Fish Recognize Temporal Motion Patterns of Suspended Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, J. R.; Tsonis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Small planktivorous fish feed by selective captures of individual zooplankters. We realize that: 1) the predator, as well as the prey is suspended in the water column, which does not provide either with stable reference points; 2) the ambient flow field acts differently on the larger predators than on the much smaller prey; and 3) within the water column there are many suspended particles of lower nutritional value than the zooplankters represent. We investigated in the laboratory whether or not fish can distinguish between small targets moving with different swimming patterns, e.g. particles entrained passively in the ambient water flow versus entrained but actively swimming particles. We created in an aquarium computer-animated stimuli with motion patterns ranging from random to actual swimming motions of live animals. The results show that planktivorous fish can recognize temporal patterns in a visually homogeneous environment. Therefore, blue-water fish must process visual information similar to terrestrial animals processing auditory information.

  15. Infrared small target's detection and identification with moving platform based on motion features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yan; Zou, Xu; Zhong, Sheng; Lu, Hongqiang

    2015-10-01

    The infrared small target's detection and tracking are important parts of the automatic target recognition. When the camera platform equipped with an infrared camera moves, the small target's position change in the imaging plane is affected by the composite motion of the small target and the camera platform. Traditional detection and tracking algorithms may lose the small target and make the follow-up detection and tracking fail because of not considering the camera platform's movement. Moreover, when there exist small targets with different motion features in the camera's view, some detection and tracking algorithms can't recognize different targets based on their motion features because there are no trajectories in a unified coordinate system, which may lead to the true small targets undetected or detected incorrectly . To solve those problems, we present a method under the condition of moving camera platform. Firstly, get the camera platform's motion information from the inertial measurement values, and then decouple to remove the motion of the camera platform itself by means of coordinate transformation. Next, estimate the trajectories of the small targets with different motion features based on their position changes in the same imaging plane coordinate system. Finally, recognize different small targets preliminarily based on their different trajectories. Experimental results show that this method can improve the small target's detection probability. Furthermore, when the camera platform fails to track the small target, it's possible to predict the position of the small target in the next frame based on the fitted motion equation and realize sustained and stable tracking.

  16. Automatic scaling of HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huan; Hu, Yaogai; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a method for automatically scaling HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms, which can be applied to a low-power oblique backscatter sounding system. Based on the information of vertical echo in the ionogram, propagation mode is recognized from the amplitude differences between E layer and F layer echoes. Points on the leading edge are extracted by using minimum group path delay theory. The spurious points are removed by using residual analysis. A multiple linear polynomial was adopted to fit the extracted leading edge points. Smooth fitting curves can then be obtained. Automatic scaling results from 362 ionograms show that the proposed method can efficiently recognize propagation modes and extract leading edge curves by taking full advantages of echo characteristics and echo amplitudes in the ionograms. This novel method can be applied into real-time backscatter ionogram scaling, which facilitates the extensive usage of oblique backscatter soundings.

  17. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  18. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  19. Automatic Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potamianos, Gerasimos; Lamel, Lori; Wölfel, Matthias; Huang, Jing; Marcheret, Etienne; Barras, Claude; Zhu, Xuan; McDonough, John; Hernando, Javier; Macho, Dusan; Nadeu, Climent

    Automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a critical component for CHIL services. For example, it provides the input to higher-level technologies, such as summarization and question answering, as discussed in Chapter 8. In the spirit of ubiquitous computing, the goal of ASR in CHIL is to achieve a high performance using far-field sensors (networks of microphone arrays and distributed far-field microphones). However, close-talking microphones are also of interest, as they are used to benchmark ASR system development by providing a best-case acoustic channel scenario to compare against.

  20. Performance of a 20-target MSE classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Leslie M.; Owirka, Gregory J.; Brower, William S.

    1998-08-01

    MIT Lincoln Laboratory is responsible for developing the ATR system for the DARPA/DARO/NIMA/OSD-sponsored SAIP program; the baseline ATR system recognizes 10 GOB targets; the enhanced version of SAIP requires the ATR system to recognize 20 GOB targets. This paper compares ATR performance results for 10- and 20-target MSE classifiers using high-resolution SAR imagery.

  1. Software for Partly Automated Recognition of Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, David; Blundell, Stuart; Bain, William; Morris, Matthew; Carlson, Ian; Mangrich, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Feature Analyst is a computer program for assisted (partially automated) recognition of targets in images. This program was developed to accelerate the processing of high-resolution satellite image data for incorporation into geographic information systems (GIS). This program creates an advanced user interface that embeds proprietary machine-learning algorithms in commercial image-processing and GIS software. A human analyst provides samples of target features from multiple sets of data, then the software develops a data-fusion model that automatically extracts the remaining features from selected sets of data. The program thus leverages the natural ability of humans to recognize objects in complex scenes, without requiring the user to explain the human visual recognition process by means of lengthy software. Two major subprograms are the reactive agent and the thinking agent. The reactive agent strives to quickly learn the user s tendencies while the user is selecting targets and to increase the user s productivity by immediately suggesting the next set of pixels that the user may wish to select. The thinking agent utilizes all available resources, taking as much time as needed, to produce the most accurate autonomous feature-extraction model possible.

  2. Software for Partly Automated Recognition of Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, David; Blundell, Stuart; Bain, William; Morris, Matthew; Carlson, Ian; Mangrich, Mark; Selinsky, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Feature Analyst is a computer program for assisted (partially automated) recognition of targets in images. This program was developed to accelerate the processing of high-resolution satellite image data for incorporation into geographic information systems (GIS). This program creates an advanced user interface that embeds proprietary machine-learning algorithms in commercial image-processing and GIS software. A human analyst provides samples of target features from multiple sets of data, then the software develops a data-fusion model that automatically extracts the remaining features from selected sets of data. The program thus leverages the natural ability of humans to recognize objects in complex scenes, without requiring the user to explain the human visual recognition process by means of lengthy software. Two major subprograms are the reactive agent and the thinking agent. The reactive agent strives to quickly learn the user's tendencies while the user is selecting targets and to increase the user's productivity by immediately suggesting the next set of pixels that the user may wish to select. The thinking agent utilizes all available resources, taking as much time as needed, to produce the most accurate autonomous feature-extraction model possible.

  3. Multiclassifier fusion of an ultrasonic lip reader in automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennnings, David L.

    1994-12-01

    This thesis investigates the use of two active ultrasonic devices in collecting lip information for performing and enhancing automatic speech recognition. The two devices explored are called the 'Ultrasonic Mike' and the 'Lip Lock Loop.' The devices are tested in a speaker dependent isolated word recognition task with a vocabulary consisting of the spoken digits from zero to nine. Two automatic lip readers are designed and tested based on the output of the ultrasonic devices. The automatic lip readers use template matching and dynamic time warping to determine the best candidate for a given test utterance. The automatic lip readers alone achieve accuracies of 65-89%, depending on the number of reference templates used. Next the automatic lip reader is combined with a conventional automatic speech recognizer. Both classifier level fusion and feature level fusion are investigated. Feature fusion is based on combining the feature vectors prior to dynamic time warping. Classifier fusion is based on a pseudo probability mass function derived from the dynamic time warping distances. The combined systems are tested with various levels of acoustic noise added. In one typical test, at a signal to noise ratio of 0dB, the acoustic recognizer's accuracy alone was 78%, the automatic lip reader's accuracy was 69%, but the combined accuracy was 93%. This experiment demonstrates that a simple ultrasonic lip motion detector, that has an output data rate 12,500 times less than a typical video camera, can significantly improve the accuracy of automatic speech recognition in noise.

  4. EPA Announces 2016 Climate Leadership Awards, Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport Among 17 Awardees Recognized for Climate Action

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March. 9, 2016) Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at the Climate Leadership Awards. The airport, among 17 winners nationwide, was honored for setting a target for reduc

  5. Automatic TLI recognition system. Part 2: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Lassahn, G.D.; Davidson, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes an automatic target recognition system for fast screening of large amounts of multi-sensor image data, based on low-cost parallel processors. This system uses image data fusion and gives uncertainty estimates. It is relatively low cost, compact, and transportable. The software is easily enhanced to expand the system`s capabilities, and the hardware is easily expandable to increase the system`s speed. This volume is a user`s manual for an Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) system. This guide is intended to provide enough information and instruction to allow individuals to the system for their own applications.

  6. Sternocostoclavicular Hyperostosis: An Ill-Recognized Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roed, Bolette; Kristensen, Tatiana; Thorsen, Søren; Poulsen Bloch, Klaus; Afzelius, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is an ill-recognized, rarely diagnosed disease. Today, SCCH is widely considered part of the synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome. SCCH develops over years with intermittent attacks of pain, swelling, and reddening of the sternocostoclavicular region. The disease causes progressive hyperostosis, fusion of the sternocostoclavicular joints, and soft tissue ossification. SCCH is chronic, non-malignant, and occurs predominantly bilaterally in middle-aged women. The incidence of the disease is unknown. We present a case of isolated SCCH, where chest radiographs showed a clear development of bilateral disease over the course of more than a decade. Whole-body bone scintigraphy was performed and was suggestive of SCCH. The diagnosis was established as late as 14 years from the onset of symptoms. During this period, the patient underwent several inconclusive examinations, resulting in a delay of diagnosis and in prolonged and aggravated symptoms. With this case report, we want to draw attention to SCCH and the importance of early diagnosis of the disease. PMID:27527220

  7. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RECOGNIZING COMPLEX PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Hough, P.V.C.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a method and means for recognizing a complex pattern in a picture. The picture is divided into framelets, each framelet being sized so that any segment of the complex pattern therewithin is essentially a straight line. Each framelet is scanned to produce an electrical pulse for each point scanned on the segment therewithin. Each of the electrical pulses of each segment is then transformed into a separate strnight line to form a plane transform in a pictorial display. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is positioned laterally so that a point on the line midway between the top and the bottom of the pictorial display occurs at a distance from the left edge of the pictorial display equal to the distance of the generating point in the segment from the left edge of the framelet. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is inclined in the pictorial display at an angle to the vertical whose tangent is proportional to the vertical displacement of the generating point in the segment from the center of the framelet. The coordinate position of the point of intersection of the lines in the pictorial display for each segment is determined and recorded. The sum total of said recorded coordinate positions being representative of the complex pattern. (AEC)

  8. Perspective: Recognizing and rewarding clinical scholarship.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, R Kevin; Thorndyke, Luanne

    2011-01-01

    Faculty members in medical schools and academic medical centers are in a constant process of generating new knowledge. The cornerstone of academia--and academic medicine--is scholarship. Traditionally, tenure and/or academic promotion in the professorial ranks is awarded to those who meet institutional criteria in the missions of research, teaching, and service, including patient care. In the academic review process, priority is often placed on a record of demonstrated, consistent success in traditional laboratory research, also known as the scholarship of discovery. More recently, there has been greater recognition of other forms of scholarship: education, application, and integration. These forms of scholarship, although less recognized, also result in the generation of new knowledge. In an attempt to understand the breadth and scope of clinical scholarship, the authors searched the extant literature in academic medicine for a definition of clinical scholarship and expanded the search to disciplines outside of medicine. They found that succinct, discrete definitions of clinical scholarship have been published in other disciplines, but not in academic medicine. After reviewing definitions of clinical scholarship from other disciplines, adapting definitions of educational scholarship in academic medicine, and including qualities unique to clinical scholarship, the authors developed a framework for understanding clinical scholarship in academic medicine as a means for opening a dialogue within the academic medical community. This dialogue hopefully will lead to formulating a succinct, discrete definition of clinical scholarship that will allow greater recognition and reward for clinical scholars in the promotion and tenure process.

  9. Overview: recognizing the problem of magnesium deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Seelig, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The magnesium content of the usual American diet is less than the recommended dietary allowance. Excesses of some macro- and micro-nutrients interact with Mg, increasing its requirements. Marginal deficiency of Mg is not associated with hypomagnesemia, is not characterized by typical manifestations, as is thus difficult to diagnose. Serum or plasma Mg levels are held within narrow limits unless tissue levels are very low, or renal function is poor. Vulnerability to Mg deficiency increases during growth and development, pregnancy, when under physical or psychological stress, and during illness or its treatment that interferes with absorption or causes loss of Mg. Evidence of biochemical changes of early Mg deficiency is rarely sought, although the roles of Mg in many enzyme systems are recognized. The effects of Mg deficiency on metabolism, even in disorders caused by vitamin dependencies in which Mg is a co-factor, are largely unexplored. Deficiency of Mg is diagnosed confidently when the laboratory reports hypomagnesemia in patients with convulsions or arrhythmias. Without these signs, Mg levels are not often ordered, even in the presence of neuromuscular irritability such as respond to Mg repletion. Because Mg supplementation or Mg-sparing drugs protect against premature or ectopic heart beats and sudden death, to which diuretic-treated hypertensive patients are at risk, it is increasingly being advised that their Mg status be determined.

  10. RECOGNIZING AND IDENTIFYING PEOPLE: A neuropsychological review

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Jason J S; Corrow, Sherryse L

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing people is a classic example of a cognitive function that involves multiple processing stages and parallel routes of information. Neuropsychological data have provided important evidence for models of this process, particularly from case reports; however, the quality and extent of the data varies widely between studies. In this review we first discuss the requirements and logical basis of the types of neuropsychological evidence to support conclusions about the modules in this process. We then survey the adequacy of the current body of reports to address two key issues. First is the question of which cognitive operation generates a sense of familiarity: the current debate revolves around whether familiarity arises in modality-specific recognition units or later amodal processes. Key evidence on this point comes from the search for dissociations between familiarity for faces, voices and names. The second question is whether lesions can differentially affect the abilities to link diverse sources of person information (e.g. face, voice, name, biographic data). Dissociations of these linkages may favour a distributed-only model of the organization of semantic knowledge, whereas a ‘person-hub’ model would predict uniform impairments of all linkages. While we conclude that there is reasonable evidence for dissociations in name, voice and face familiarity in regards to the first question, the evidence for or against dissociated linkages between information stores in regards to the second is tenuous at best. We identify deficiencies in the current literature that should motivate and inform the design of future studies. PMID:26773237

  11. Artificial Immune System for Recognizing Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    A method of recognizing or classifying patterns is based on an artificial immune system (AIS), which includes an algorithm and a computational model of nonlinear dynamics inspired by the behavior of a biological immune system. The method has been proposed as the theoretical basis of the computational portion of a star-tracking system aboard a spacecraft. In that system, a newly acquired star image would be treated as an antigen that would be matched by an appropriate antibody (an entry in a star catalog). The method would enable rapid convergence, would afford robustness in the face of noise in the star sensors, would enable recognition of star images acquired in any sensor or spacecraft orientation, and would not make an excessive demand on the computational resources of a typical spacecraft. Going beyond the star-tracking application, the AIS-based pattern-recognition method is potentially applicable to pattern- recognition and -classification processes for diverse purposes -- for example, reconnaissance, detecting intruders, and mining data.

  12. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs.

  13. Recognizing hesitation phenomena in continuous, spontaneous speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshaughnessy, Douglas

    Spontaneous speech differs from read speech in speaking rate and hesitation. In natural, spontaneous speech, people often start talking and then think along the way; at times, this causes the speech to have hesitation pauses (both filled and unfilled) and restarts. Results are reported on all types of pauses in a widely-used speech database, for both hesitation pauses and semi-intentional pauses. A distinction is made between grammatical pauses (at major syntactic boundaries) and ungrammatical ones. Different types of unfilled pauses cannot be reliably separated based on silence duration, although grammatical pauses tend to be longer. In the prepausal word before ungrammatical pauses, there were few continuation rises in pitch, whereas 80 percent of the grammatical pauses were accompanied by a prior fundamental frequency rise of 10-40 kHz. Identifying the syntactic function of such hesitation phenomena can improve recognition performance by eliminating from consideration some of the hypotheses proposed by an acoustic recognizer. Results presented allow simple identification of filled pauses (such as uhh, umm) and their syntactic function.

  14. Development of NATO's recognized environmental picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teufert, John F.; Trabelsi, Mourad

    2006-05-01

    An important element for the fielding of a viable, effective NATO Response Force (NRF) is access to meteorological, oceanographic, geospatial data (GEOMETOC) and imagery. Currently, the available GEOMETOC information suffers from being very fragmented. NATO defines the Recognised Environmental Picture as controlled information base for GEOMETOC data. The NATO REP proposes an architecture that is both flexible and open. The focus lies on enabling a network-centric approach. The key into achieving this is relying on using open, well recognized standards that apply to both the data exchange protocols and the data formats. Communication and information exchange based on open standards enables system interoperability. Diverse systems, each with unique, specialized contributions to an increased understanding of the battlespace, can now cooperate to a manageable information sphere. By clearly defining responsibilities in the generation of information, a reduction in data transfer overhead is achieved . REP identifies three main stages in the dissemination of GEOMETOC data. These are Collection, Fusion (and Analysis) and Publication. A REP architecture has been successfully deployed during the NATO Coalition Warrior Interoperability Demonstration (CWID) in Lillehammer, Norway during June 2005. CWID is an annual event to validate and improve the interoperability of NATO and national Consultation and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems. With a test case success rate of 84%, it was able to provide relevant GEOMETOC support to the main NRF component headquarters. In 2006, the REP architecture will be deployed and validated during the NATO NRF Steadfast live exercises.

  15. Automatic sets and Delone sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbé, A.; von Haeseler, F.

    2004-04-01

    Automatic sets D\\subset{\\bb Z}^m are characterized by having a finite number of decimations. They are equivalently generated by fixed points of certain substitution systems, or by certain finite automata. As examples, two-dimensional versions of the Thue-Morse, Baum-Sweet, Rudin-Shapiro and paperfolding sequences are presented. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for an automatic set D\\subset{\\bb Z}^m to be a Delone set in {\\bb R}^m . The result is then extended to automatic sets that are defined as fixed points of certain substitutions. The morphology of automatic sets is discussed by means of examples.

  16. Automatic ionospheric layers detection: Algorithms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, María G.; Zuccheretti, Enrico; Cabrera, Miguel A.; Bianchi, Cesidio; Sciacca, Umberto; Baskaradas, James

    2016-03-01

    Vertical sounding is a widely used technique to obtain ionosphere measurements, such as an estimation of virtual height versus frequency scanning. It is performed by high frequency radar for geophysical applications called ;ionospheric sounder; (or ;ionosonde;). Radar detection depends mainly on targets characteristics. While several targets behavior and correspondent echo detection algorithms have been studied, a survey to address a suitable algorithm for ionospheric sounder has to be carried out. This paper is focused on automatic echo detection algorithms implemented in particular for an ionospheric sounder, target specific characteristics were studied as well. Adaptive threshold detection algorithms are proposed, compared to the current implemented algorithm, and tested using actual data obtained from the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS-INGV) at Rome Ionospheric Observatory. Different cases of study have been selected according typical ionospheric and detection conditions.

  17. Recognizing, naming, and measuring a family intensive care unit syndrome.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Giora; Sullivan, Donald R

    2014-03-01

    Most major decisions in the intensive care unit (ICU) regarding goals of care are shared by clinicians and someone other than the patient. Multicenter clinical trials focusing on improved communication between clinicians and these surrogate decision makers have not reported consistently improved outcomes. We suggest that acquired maladaptive reasoning may contribute importantly to failure of the intervention strategies tested to date. Surrogate decision makers often suffer significant psychological morbidity in the form of stress, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Family members in the ICU also suffer cognitive blunting and sleep deprivation. Their decision-making abilities are eroded by anticipatory grief and cognitive biases, while personal and family conflicts further impact their decision making. We propose recognizing a family ICU syndrome to describe the morbidity and associated decision-making impairment experienced by many family members of patients with acute critical illness (in the ICU) and chronic critical illness (in the long-term, acute care hospital). Research rigorously using models of compromised decision making may help elucidate both mechanisms of impairment and targets for intervention. Better quantifying compromised decision making and its relationship to poor outcomes will allow us to formulate and advance useful techniques. The use of decision aids and improving ICU design may provide benefit now and in the near future. In measuring interventions targeting cognitive barriers, clinically significant outcomes, such as time to decision, should be considered. Statistical approaches, such as survival models and rank statistic testing, will increase our power to detect differences in our interventions.

  18. Recognizing impactor signatures in the planetary record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Gault, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    Crater size reflects the target response to the combined effects of impactor size, density, and velocity. Isolating the effects of each variable in the cratering record is generally considered masked, if not lost, during late stages of crater modification (e.g., floor uplift and rim collapse). Important clues, however, come from the distinctive signatures of the impactor created by oblique impacts. In summary, oblique impacts allow for the identification of distinctive signatures of the impactor created during early penetration. Such signatures may further allow first-order testing of scaling relations for late crater excavation from the planetary surface record. Other aspects of this study are discussed.

  19. Automatic priming of attentional control by relevant colors.

    PubMed

    Ansorge, Ulrich; Becker, Stefanie I

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether color word cues automatically primed attentional control settings during visual search, or whether color words were used in a strategic manner for the control of attention. In Experiment 1, we used color words as cues that were informative or uninformative with respect to the target color. Regardless of the cue's informativeness, distractors similar to the color cue captured more attention. In Experiment 2, the participants either indicated their expectation about the target color or recalled the last target color, which was uncorrelated with the present target color. We observed more attentional capture by distractors that were similar to the participants' predictions and recollections, but no difference between effects of the recollected and predicted colors. In Experiment 3, we used 100%-informative word cues that were congruent with the predicted target color (e.g., the word "red" informed that the target would be red) or incongruent with the predicted target color (e.g., the word "green" informed that the target would be red) and found that informative incongruent word cues primed attention capture by a word-similar distractor. Together, the results suggest that word cues (Exps. 1 and 3) and color representations (Exp. 2) primed attention capture in an automatic manner. This indicates that color cues automatically primed temporary adjustments in attention control settings.

  20. Automatic vehicle location system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic vehicle detection system is disclosed, in which each vehicle whose location is to be detected carries active means which interact with passive elements at each location to be identified. The passive elements comprise a plurality of passive loops arranged in a sequence along the travel direction. Each of the loops is tuned to a chosen frequency so that the sequence of the frequencies defines the location code. As the vehicle traverses the sequence of the loops as it passes over each loop, signals only at the frequency of the loop being passed over are coupled from a vehicle transmitter to a vehicle receiver. The frequencies of the received signals in the receiver produce outputs which together represent a code of the traversed location. The code location is defined by a painted pattern which reflects light to a vehicle carried detector whose output is used to derive the code defined by the pattern.

  1. AUTOMATIC HAND COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Mann J.R.; Wainwright, A.E.

    1963-06-11

    An automatic, personnel-operated, alpha-particle hand monitor is described which functions as a qualitative instrument to indicate to the person using it whether his hands are cold'' or hot.'' The monitor is activated by a push button and includes several capacitor-triggered thyratron tubes. Upon release of the push button, the monitor starts the counting of the radiation present on the hands of the person. If the count of the radiation exceeds a predetermined level within a predetermined time, then a capacitor will trigger a first thyratron tube to light a hot'' lamp. If, however, the count is below such level during this time period, another capacitor will fire a second thyratron to light a safe'' lamp. (AEC)

  2. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  3. Networked Automatic Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2000-05-01

    Many groups around the world are developing automated or robotic optical observatories. The coordinated operation of automated optical telescopes at diverse sites could provide observing prospects which are not otherwise available, e.g., continuous optical photometry without diurnal interruption. Computer control and scheduling also offers the prospect of effective response to transient events such as γ -ray bursts. These telescopes could also serve science education by providing high-quality CCD data for educators and students. The Automatic Telescope Network (ATN) project has been undertaken to promote networking of automated telescopes. A web site is maintained at http://gamma.bu.edu/atn/. The development of such networks will be facilitated by the existence of standards. A set of standard commands for instrument and telescope control systems will allow for the creation of software for an ``observatory control system'' which can be used at any facility which complies with the TCS and ICS standards. Also, there is a strong need for standards for the specification of observations to be done, and reports on the results and status of observations. A proposed standard for this is the Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML), which is expected to be described in another poster in this session. It may thus be feasible for amateur-astronomers to soon buy all necessary equipment and software to field an automatic telescope. The owner/operator could make otherwise unused telescope time available to the network in exchange for the utilization of other telescopes in the network --- including occasional utilization of meter-class telescopes with research-grade CCD detectors at good sites.

  4. Bangladesh: recognizing adolescents as a great resource.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    This article presents the initiatives undertaken by the government and other organizations to improve adolescent reproductive health in Bangladesh. The Health and Population Sector Programme under the 5-year Health and Population Sector Strategy (HPSS) of Bangladesh targeted married youth and soon-to-be-married adolescents. It has provided training of field workers so they can provide health services in an adolescent-friendly atmosphere. The Government has also collaborated with nongovernmental organizations and agencies that could help in the formulation of well-planned policy for adolescent health. These agencies include the UN International Children's Emergency Fund, UN Population Fund and WHO. In addition, on-going multisectoral coordination of various sectors, such as education, labor law and justice, youth and social affairs, has been developed and has contributed to the success of the Programme.

  5. Recognizing and managing concussion in school sport.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vicki

    2014-08-01

    Every country around the world enjoys some sort of sport. The Olympics sees countries from all over the globe participate in elite sport, in both winter and summer competitions. Australia is widely known for cricket and rugby; America is known for baseball and gridiron football (among others). These sports are played at an elite level as well as beginners from early ages as young as 4 years in the backyard. Yet, it is also these sports that can deliver a ball at the speed of 100 km/h (football), 105 km/h (baseball), 112 km/h (rugby), 150 km/h (cricket), and 211 km/h (soccer). This is the same force that a car collision can produce. That force eventually finds a target, and in some cases, unfortunately, it is a head. Damage to the brain is not only from the impact of the ball hitting its target but rather also the shearing forces of acceleration-deceleration injury that can cause extensive injuries. There has been much discussion of late regarding concussion in sport and the accumulative effects of head blows resulting in varying degrees of memory loss and dementia later in life. The media have been saturated with heightened awareness of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This, however, is still being researched. It is true that each concussion compounds the one before, but rather than focus on the injury, managers/coaches and sporting codes should be focusing on the identification and proper management of a suspected concussion and the return-to-play protocols. This is especially important in our schools where growing brains need nurturing. Neuroscience nurses are at the forefront of educating school children, teachers, and coaches through partnering with local schools. This article will focus on concussion recognition and management in school sport.

  6. Recycling steel automatically - through resource recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, W.J.

    1997-12-01

    Last year, more than 55 percent of all steel cans were recycled. But no matter how effective the local recycling programs may be, some steel cans and other steel products are overlooked and appear in MSW. This missed steel fraction is automatically recycled by resource recovery facilities through magnetic separation. More than three-fourths of the operating resource recovery plants magnetically separate steel cans and other discarded steel items either pre- or post-combustion. Recovering ferrous scrap clearly reduces the post-combustion material that is landfilled and heightens the facilities` environmental performance. Both the resource recovery and steel industries must heighten public awareness of the benefits of automatic steel recycling. Magnetic separation at resource recovery facilities is a simple method of diverting what would otherwise be relegated as solid waste to the landfill. It should be recognized as an increasingly important and valued part of the resource recovery and steel industries` overall recycling efforts. This paper will discuss the status of steel can recycling in the United States, describe how recovered ferrous is beneficiated before recycling by the steel industry, and make recommendations for heightening awareness of the steel recycling contribution made by resource recovery facilities.

  7. Automatic Coal-Mining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Coal cutting and removal done with minimal hazard to people. Automatic coal mine cutting, transport and roof-support movement all done by automatic machinery. Exposure of people to hazardous conditions reduced to inspection tours, maintenance, repair, and possibly entry mining.

  8. Automatic Generation of Partitioned Matrix Expressions for Matrix Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    We target the automatic generation of formally correct algorithms and routines for linear algebra operations. Given the broad variety of architectures and configurations with which scientists deal, there does not exist one algorithmic variant that is suitable for all scenarios. Therefore, we aim to generate a family of algorithmic variants to attain high-performance for a broad set of scenarios. One of the authors has previously demonstrated that automatic derivation of a family of algorithms is possible when the Partitioned Matrix Expression (PME) of the target operation is available. The PME is a recursive definition that states the relations between submatrices in the input and the output operands. In this paper we describe all the steps involved in the automatic derivation of PMEs, thus making progress towards a fully automated system.

  9. 46 CFR 164.019-17 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.019-17 Section 164.019-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-17 Recognized laboratory. (a) General. A laboratory may be designated as a recognized laboratory under this subpart if it is—...

  10. 46 CFR 160.047-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.047-7 Section 160.047-7... and Child § 160.047-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  11. 46 CFR 160.047-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.047-7 Section 160.047-7... and Child § 160.047-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  12. 46 CFR 164.012-12 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.012-12 Section 164.012-12...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Interior Finishes for Merchant Vessels § 164.012-12 Recognized laboratory. A recognized laboratory is one which is operated as a nonprofit public service and is...

  13. 46 CFR 164.019-17 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.019-17 Section 164.019-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-17 Recognized laboratory. (a) General. A laboratory may be designated as a recognized laboratory under this subpart if it is—...

  14. 46 CFR 160.047-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.047-7 Section 160.047-7... and Child § 160.047-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  15. 46 CFR 164.019-17 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.019-17 Section 164.019-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-17 Recognized laboratory. (a) General. A laboratory may be designated as a recognized laboratory under this subpart if it is—...

  16. 46 CFR 160.047-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.047-7 Section 160.047-7... and Child § 160.047-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  17. 46 CFR 164.012-12 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.012-12 Section 164.012-12...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Interior Finishes for Merchant Vessels § 164.012-12 Recognized laboratory. A recognized laboratory is one which is operated as a nonprofit public service and is...

  18. 46 CFR 164.012-12 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.012-12 Section 164.012-12...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Interior Finishes for Merchant Vessels § 164.012-12 Recognized laboratory. A recognized laboratory is one which is operated as a nonprofit public service and is...

  19. 46 CFR 160.052-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.052-9 Section 160.052-9..., Adult and Child § 160.052-9 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  20. 46 CFR 160.052-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.052-9 Section 160.052-9..., Adult and Child § 160.052-9 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  1. 46 CFR 160.064-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.064-7 Section 160.064-7...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Marine Buoyant Devices § 160.064-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A... laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-7 of this part, to perform testing...

  2. 46 CFR 160.064-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.064-7 Section 160.064-7...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Marine Buoyant Devices § 160.064-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A... laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-7 of this part, to perform testing...

  3. 46 CFR 160.064-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.064-7 Section 160.064-7...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Marine Buoyant Devices § 160.064-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A... laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-7 of this part, to perform testing...

  4. 46 CFR 160.064-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.064-7 Section 160.064-7...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Marine Buoyant Devices § 160.064-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A... laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-7 of this part, to perform testing...

  5. 46 CFR 164.012-12 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.012-12 Section 164.012-12...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Interior Finishes for Merchant Vessels § 164.012-12 Recognized laboratory. A recognized laboratory is one which is operated as a nonprofit public service and is...

  6. 46 CFR 160.052-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.052-9 Section 160.052-9..., Adult and Child § 160.052-9 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  7. 46 CFR 160.052-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.052-9 Section 160.052-9..., Adult and Child § 160.052-9 Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a... shall apply for approval directly to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories...

  8. 46 CFR 160.064-7 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.064-7 Section 160.064-7...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Marine Buoyant Devices § 160.064-7 Recognized laboratory. (a) A... laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-7 of this part, to perform testing...

  9. 46 CFR 164.012-12 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.012-12 Section 164.012-12...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Interior Finishes for Merchant Vessels § 164.012-12 Recognized laboratory. A recognized laboratory is one which is operated as a nonprofit public service and is...

  10. 46 CFR 164.019-17 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.019-17 Section 164.019-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-17 Recognized laboratory. (a) General. A laboratory may be designated as a recognized laboratory under this subpart if it is—...

  11. 46 CFR 160.076-19 - Recognized laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratories. 160.076-19 Section 160.076-19... Recognized laboratories. (a) PFDs. The following laboratories are recognized under § 159.010-9 of this... Laboratories, Inc., 12 Laboratory Drive, P.O. Box 13995, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3995, (919)...

  12. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  13. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  14. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  15. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  16. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  17. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  18. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  19. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  20. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  1. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  2. Automatic visual inspection of a missing split pin in the China railway high-speed.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengfang; Liu, Zhen

    2016-10-20

    The split pin (SP) on the caliper brake is a vital component of the brake system of a bogie traveling along the China railway high-speed (CRH), and the absence of the SP could cause serious train accidents. A new automatic visual inspection method is proposed for the quick and accurate detection of SP faults of the CRH. The proposed approach is based on the histogram of gradient (HOG) combined with the complete local binary pattern (CLBP). First, a fast pyramid template matching technique is presented for localizing the region of interest to reduce the searching scope. Under the multiresolution pyramid model for target localization, a coarse-to-fine strategy is employed to ensure that the recognizing speed of the SP for the entire image is increased significantly. Second, a hierarchical framework is adopted at the localizing and inspecting stages of the SP to automatically implement the inspection tasks. To increase the robustness to the outside complex illumination, the HOG feature for localizing the target and the CLBP feature for examining the state of the SP (i.e., missing or not-missing) are extracted in the Sobel gradient domain. The localization and recognition stages are both fulfilled through the use of their respective intersection kernel support vector machine classifiers and corresponding features. In conclusion, experimental results indicate that the inspection system achieves a high accuracy rate of more than 99.0% and a real-time speed, thus proving that the proposed method is effective for the fault inspection of the SP and can satisfy the requirements of CRH's actual application.

  3. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  4. Automatic Correction of Hand Pointing in Stereoscopic Depth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yalin; Sun, Yaoru; Zeng, Jinhua; Wang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    In order to examine whether stereoscopic depth information could drive fast automatic correction of hand pointing, an experiment was designed in a 3D visual environment in which participants were asked to point to a target at different stereoscopic depths as quickly and accurately as possible within a limited time window (≤300 ms). The experiment consisted of two tasks: “depthGO” in which participants were asked to point to the new target position if the target jumped, and “depthSTOP” in which participants were instructed to abort their ongoing movements after the target jumped. The depth jump was designed to occur in 20% of the trials in both tasks. Results showed that fast automatic correction of hand movements could be driven by stereoscopic depth to occur in as early as 190 ms. PMID:25501878

  5. Automatic Annotation Method on Learners' Opinions in Case Method Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Masaki; Hisakane, Daichi; Komoda, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to annotate an attribute of a problem, a solution or no annotation on learners' opinions automatically for supporting the learners' discussion without a facilitator. The case method aims at discussing problems and solutions in a target case. However, the learners miss discussing some of problems and solutions.…

  6. Automatic Contextual Facilitation in Readers of Three Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Richard F.; Stanovich, Keith E.

    1978-01-01

    Fourth and sixth graders and adults read words preceded by either a congruous, incongruous, or no-sentence context, and then completed another task where they named the color of the target word. Results suggested that context effects are mediated by automatic processes which decrease in importance with age and reading ability. (Author/JMB)

  7. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  8. Automatic Speech Recognition Based on Electromyographic Biosignals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Szu-Chen Stan; Schultz, Tanja

    This paper presents our studies of automatic speech recognition based on electromyographic biosignals captured from the articulatory muscles in the face using surface electrodes. We develop a phone-based speech recognizer and describe how the performance of this recognizer improves by carefully designing and tailoring the extraction of relevant speech feature toward electromyographic signals. Our experimental design includes the collection of audibly spoken speech simultaneously recorded as acoustic data using a close-speaking microphone and as electromyographic signals using electrodes. Our experiments indicate that electromyographic signals precede the acoustic signal by about 0.05-0.06 seconds. Furthermore, we introduce articulatory feature classifiers, which had recently shown to improved classical speech recognition significantly. We describe that the classification accuracy of articulatory features clearly benefits from the tailored feature extraction. Finally, these classifiers are integrated into the overall decoding framework applying a stream architecture. Our final system achieves a word error rate of 29.9% on a 100-word recognition task.

  9. Hidden Markov models in automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzoskowicz, Adam

    1993-11-01

    This article describes a method for constructing an automatic speech recognition system based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The author discusses the basic concepts of HMM theory and the application of these models to the analysis and recognition of speech signals. The author provides algorithms which make it possible to train the ASR system and recognize signals on the basis of distinct stochastic models of selected speech sound classes. The author describes the specific components of the system and the procedures used to model and recognize speech. The author discusses problems associated with the choice of optimal signal detection and parameterization characteristics and their effect on the performance of the system. The author presents different options for the choice of speech signal segments and their consequences for the ASR process. The author gives special attention to the use of lexical, syntactic, and semantic information for the purpose of improving the quality and efficiency of the system. The author also describes an ASR system developed by the Speech Acoustics Laboratory of the IBPT PAS. The author discusses the results of experiments on the effect of noise on the performance of the ASR system and describes methods of constructing HMM's designed to operate in a noisy environment. The author also describes a language for human-robot communications which was defined as a complex multilevel network from an HMM model of speech sounds geared towards Polish inflections. The author also added mandatory lexical and syntactic rules to the system for its communications vocabulary.

  10. Recognizing the real threat of biological terror.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Weapons of mass destruction can be used to harm and terrorize populations. Such weapons include those with chemical, nuclear or biological properties. Obviously computer viruses can add additional barriers to a quick response. The most effective, least costly and greatest threats are biologicals. Biological terror is not new, and biological weapons have been used for centuries. However, as a result of modern technology, the risks are greater now and the outcomes more terrible. Today they include live pathogens, various toxins, and theoretically "bioregulators"--biochemicals affecting cell signaling. Altered cell signaling could be used to induce apoptosis-cell death, or a heightened outpouring of cytokines mimicking overwhelming sepsis, or even an intracellular, biochemical "strike" causing cellular paralysis. Biological weaponeers now have the frightening ability to alter the genetic makeup of pathogens, rendering them resistant not only to available antibiotic therapy but also to currently effective vaccines. In dark corners of some fringe groups, bioweaponeers are searching for the capability of designing pathogens that target specific races, by virtue of discriminating ligands (1). The resulting morbidity and mortality from use of any biological weapons will be accompanied by chaos, governmental and social instability, panic, an extraordinary utilization of available resources, and an ongoing epidemic of sleepless nights (2,3). Herein I will review some of the issues and some of the currently available biological weapons. The major goal is to highlight the clinical presentations of patients with infections that could be used as biological weapons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:12053717

  11. Adaptive infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Jonah C.; Stevens, Mark R.; Eaton, Ross S.; Snorrason, Magnus S.

    2004-09-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are extremely sensitive to differences between the operating conditions under which they are trained and the extended operating conditions (EOCs) in which the fielded algorithms are tested. These extended operating conditions can cause a target's signature to be drastically different from training exemplars/models. For example, a target's signature can be influenced by: the time of day, the time of year, the weather, atmospheric conditions, position of the sun or other illumination sources, the target surface and material properties, the target composition, the target geometry, sensor characteristics, sensor viewing angle and range, the target surroundings and environment, and the target and scene temperature. Recognition rates degrade if an ATR is not trained for a particular EOC. Most infrared target detection techniques are based on a very simple probabilistic theory. This theory states that a pixel should be assigned the label of "target" if a set of measurements (features) is more likely to have come from an assumed (or learned) distribution of target features than from the distribution of background features. However, most detection systems treat these learned distributions as static and they are not adapted to changing EOCs. In this paper, we present an algorithm for assigning a pixel the label of target or background based on a statistical comparison of the distributions of measurements surrounding that pixel in the image. This method provides a feature-level adaptation to changing EOCs. Results are demonstrated on infrared imagery containing several military vehicles.

  12. Identifying Targets from Filtering Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    Introduction Considering a radar (or sonar) target as more than a simple point scatterer brings up the possibility of identifying the target based on the...2000. [8] M. Vespe, C. J. Baker, and H. D. Griffiths , "Automatic target regognition using multi-diversity radar," Radar, Sonar \\& Navigation, IET, vol...A. Taflove and S. C. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics : The Finite Difference Time Domain Method. Norwood, MA: Artech House, 2005.

  13. Automatic transmission structure

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Y.; Morisawa, K.

    1987-03-24

    An automatic transmission is described comprising: an output shaft of the transmission including a stepped portion; a parking gear spline-connected with the output shaft on a first side of the stepped portion; a plurality of governor values mounted on a rear side of the parking gear and radially disposed around the output shaft on the first side of the stepped portion; a speed meter drive gear spline-connected with the output shaft on a second side of the stepped portion and on a rear side of the governor valves; and an annular spacer fitted on the output shaft on the second side of the stepped portion between the governor valves and the speed meter drive gear to abut on each of the governor valves and the speed meter drive gear. The annular member is constructed separately from the speed meter drive gear and has an outer diameter larger than an outer diameter of the speed meter drive gear thereby resulting in a contact area between the annular space and the speed meter drive gear which is smaller than a contact area between the annular spacer and the rear side of the governor valves; the drive gear being axially secured relative to the output shaft by a bearing thereby enabling a fixed axial positioning of the annular spacer on the output shaft.

  14. Electronically controlled automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Shiba, H.; Nakamura, K.

    1989-03-28

    This patent describes an electronically controlled automatic transmission having a manual valve working in connection with a manual shift lever, shift valves operated by solenoid valves which are driven by an electronic control circuit previously memorizing shift patterns, and a hydraulic circuit controlled by these manual valve and shift valves for driving brakes and a clutch in order to change speed. Shift patterns of 2-range and L-range, in addition to a shift pattern of D-range, are memorized previously in the electronic control circuit, an operation switch is provided which changes the shift pattern of the electronic control circuit to any shift pattern among those of D-range, 2-range and L-range at time of the manual shift lever being in a D-range position, a releasable lock mechanism is provided which prevents the manual shift lever from entering 2-range and L-range positions, and the hydraulic circuit is set to a third speed mode when the manual shift lever is in the D-range position. The circuit is set to a second speed mode when it is in the 2-range position, and the circuit is set to a first speed mode when it is in the L-range position, respectively, in case where the shift valves are not working.

  15. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  16. Automatic imitation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    After preliminary training to open a sliding door using their head and their paw, dogs were given a discrimination task in which they were rewarded with food for opening the door using the same method (head or paw) as demonstrated by their owner (compatible group), or for opening the door using the alternative method (incompatible group). The incompatible group, which had to counterimitate to receive food reward, required more trials to reach a fixed criterion of discrimination performance (85% correct) than the compatible group. This suggests that, like humans, dogs are subject to ‘automatic imitation’; they cannot inhibit online the tendency to imitate head use and/or paw use. In a subsequent transfer test, where all dogs were required to imitate their owners' head and paw use for food reward, the incompatible group made a greater proportion of incorrect, counterimitative responses than the compatible group. These results are consistent with the associative sequence learning model, which suggests that the development of imitation depends on sensorimotor experience and phylogenetically general mechanisms of associative learning. More specifically, they suggest that the imitative behaviour of dogs is shaped more by their developmental interactions with humans than by their evolutionary history of domestication. PMID:20667875

  17. Automatic aircraft recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  18. Vaccination with peptide mimotopes produces antibodies recognizing bacterial capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zhang, Qibo; Sales, Debra; Bianco, Albert Edward; Craig, Alister

    2010-09-07

    A phage display peptide library was screened using a panel of antibodies to the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus agalactiae and Neisseria meningitidis. Mimotopes NPDHPRVPTFMA (2-8), LIPFHKHPHHRG (3-2) and EQEIFTNITDRV (G3) showing the highest binding capacity and strongest ELISA reaction were selected for immunization experiments. These mimotopes were either synthesised as oligodeoxynucleotides for DNA immunization or MAP (multiple antigen peptide) for peptide immunization. Mimotope-DNA vaccination, particularly for G3, induced antibodies recognizing a number of target bacteria. This response was seen after the second boost injection and was significantly enhanced by the 3rd boost injection with a Th1-associated profile, which was dominated by IgG2a, followed by IgG1. Mimotope-MAP immunization also produced strong humoral immune responses to the bacteria. Antibodies from G3 DNA immunization reacted with the surface molecules of S. agalactiae, N. meningitidis and Escherichia coli K5 shown by indirect immunofluorescence staining, indicating a possible localization to the bacterial capsule. Antibodies produced both from DNA/MAP immunization reacted with purified bacterial capsular polysaccharides by ELISA and were of high avidity. We have further characterized peptide G3 by a 'tiling path' study to examine the effect of changing individual residues in the peptide in raising antibodies, which showed that the EIFTN motif in G3 was important in generating antibodies to several capsulated bacteria. We conclude that mimotope immunization with DNA or MAP potentially induces strong antibody responses against encapsulated bacteria. It is suggested that the antibody targets are polysaccharides, and these antibodies may cross react at least among closely related species of bacteria.

  19. Automatic anatomy recognition via fuzzy object models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Miranda, Paulo A. V.; Matsumoto, Monica; Grevera, George J.; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A.

    2012-02-01

    To make Quantitative Radiology a reality in routine radiological practice, computerized automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) during radiological image reading becomes essential. As part of this larger goal, last year at this conference we presented a fuzzy strategy for building body-wide group-wise anatomic models. In the present paper, we describe the further advances made in fuzzy modeling and the algorithms and results achieved for AAR by using the fuzzy models. The proposed AAR approach consists of three distinct steps: (a) Building fuzzy object models (FOMs) for each population group G. (b) By using the FOMs to recognize the individual objects in any given patient image I under group G. (c) To delineate the recognized objects in I. This paper will focus mostly on (b). FOMs are built hierarchically, the smaller sub-objects forming the offspring of larger parent objects. The hierarchical pose relationships from the parent to offspring are codified in the FOMs. Several approaches are being explored currently, grouped under two strategies, both being hierarchical: (ra1) those using search strategies; (ra2) those strategizing a one-shot approach by which the model pose is directly estimated without searching. Based on 32 patient CT data sets each from the thorax and abdomen and 25 objects modeled, our analysis indicates that objects do not all scale uniformly with patient size. Even the simplest among the (ra2) strategies of recognizing the root object and then placing all other descendants as per the learned parent-to-offspring pose relationship bring the models on an average within about 18 mm of the true locations.

  20. AMPS/PC - AUTOMATIC MANUFACTURING PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The AMPS/PC system is a simulation tool designed to aid the user in defining the specifications of a manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. The domain of problems that AMPS/PC can simulate are manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. The user defines the problem domain by responding to the questions from the interface program. Based on the responses, the interface program creates an internal problem specification file. This file includes the manufacturing process network flow and the attributes for all stations, cells, and stock points. AMPS then uses the problem specification file as input for the automatic code generator program to produce a simulation program in the target language GPSS. The output of the generator program is the source code of the corresponding GPSS/PC simulation program. The system runs entirely on an IBM PC running PC DOS Version 2.0 or higher and is written in Turbo Pascal Version 4 requiring 640K memory and one 360K disk drive. To execute the GPSS program, the PC must have resident the GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The AMPS/PC program was developed in 1988.

  1. Automatic semantic feedback during visual word recognition.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jason F; Lorsbach, Thomas C; Bleakney, Dana M

    2008-04-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine whether semantic feedback spreads to orthographic and/or phonological representations during visual word recognition and whether such feedback occurs automatically. Three types of prime-target word pairs were used within the mediated-priming paradigm: (1) homophonically mediated (e.g.,frog-[toad]-towed), (2) orthographically mediated (e.g.,frog-[toad]-told), and (3) associatively related (e.g.,frog-toad). Using both brief (53 msec; Experiment 1) and long (413 msec; Experiment 3) prime exposure durations, significant facilitatory-priming effects were found in the response time data with orthographically, but not homophonically, mediated prime-target word pairs. When the prime exposure duration was shortened to 33 msec in Experiment 4, however, facilitatory priming was absent with both orthographically and homophonically mediated word pairs. In addition, with a brief (53-msec) prime exposure duration, direct-priming effects were found with associatively (e.g.,frog-toad), orthographically (e.g., toad-told), and homophonically (e.g., toad-towed) related word pairs in Experiment 2. Taken together, these results indicate that following the initial activation of semantic representations, activation automatically feeds back to orthographic, but not phonological, representations during the early stages of word processing. These findings were discussed in the context of current accounts of visual word recognition.

  2. Development of Antithrombotic Aptamers: From Recognizing Elements to Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zavyalova, Elena; Golovin, Andrey; Pavlova, Galina; Kopylov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Blood hemostasis is attained with two sophisticated interconnected network systems, a coagulation cascade and a platelet activation system. Multiple inhibitors were developed to various components of both systems to prevent thrombosis-related morbid events that are of extremely high frequency in the human population. Antithrombotic inhibitors possess both positive and negative aspects. One of the essential modern requirements is a controllable mode of action for both anticoagulants and antiplatelets that could be achieved due to the high affinity and specificity of the inhibitor, as well as a possibility to apply an antidote, which quickly annihilates activity of the inhibitor and restores the proper hemostasis. Aptamers are DNA or RNA oligonucleotides with particular tertiary structure, such as DNA guanine quadruplex. Besides antibodies and other peptides/proteins, aptamers are one more example of the molecular recognizing elements that specifically bind to the target. Therefore, aptamers could be developed into a promising novel class of the drugs with high affinity, specificity, innate low toxicity, and rational antidote. Several aptamers with prospective antithrombotic activity have been reviewed; some of them are in preclinical and clinical trials.

  3. Automated target recognition and tracking using an optical pattern recognition neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1991-01-01

    The on-going development of an automatic target recognition and tracking system at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is presented. This system is an optical pattern recognition neural network (OPRNN) that is an integration of an innovative optical parallel processor and a feature extraction based neural net training algorithm. The parallel optical processor provides high speed and vast parallelism as well as full shift invariance. The neural network algorithm enables simultaneous discrimination of multiple noisy targets in spite of their scales, rotations, perspectives, and various deformations. This fully developed OPRNN system can be effectively utilized for the automated spacecraft recognition and tracking that will lead to success in the Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) of the unmanned Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV). One of the most powerful optical parallel processors for automatic target recognition is the multichannel correlator. With the inherent advantages of parallel processing capability and shift invariance, multiple objects can be simultaneously recognized and tracked using this multichannel correlator. This target tracking capability can be greatly enhanced by utilizing a powerful feature extraction based neural network training algorithm such as the neocognitron. The OPRNN, currently under investigation at JPL, is constructed with an optical multichannel correlator where holographic filters have been prepared using the neocognitron training algorithm. The computation speed of the neocognitron-type OPRNN is up to 10(exp 14) analog connections/sec that enabling the OPRNN to outperform its state-of-the-art electronics counterpart by at least two orders of magnitude.

  4. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  5. Automatic pump for deep wells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1981-11-24

    An automatic pump for deep wells comprises a long stroke reciprocating pump having its piston normally in its bottom position and an automatic control dependent upon the collection of a predetermined amount of liquid in the pump cylinder above the piston for actuating the piston to pump the liquid into a production line. The automatic control includes an electric motor driven hydraulic pump and a reservoir of hydraulic fluid which is actuated upon filling of the reciprocating pump chamber to supply hydraulic fluid to a closed chamber below the piston and force the piston upwardly to discharge liquid from the pump cylinder. Gas collected in the top of the pump cylinder results in low starting current and a saving of energy. The hydraulic pump is reversed automatically upon completion of the pumping stroke of the piston.

  6. Statistical Approaches to Automatic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, Stephen P.

    1978-01-01

    Views automatic indexing as a two-tiered word frequency analysis that involves selection of a technical vocabulary and identification of document keywords. Assumptions, criteria, evaluation, and relevance are discussed. (JD)

  7. Automatic Classification in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijsbergen, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Addresses the application of automatic classification methods to the problems associated with computerized document retrieval. Different kinds of classifications are described, and both document and term clustering methods are discussed. References and notes are provided. (Author/JD)

  8. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  9. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  10. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  11. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-31

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  12. AROMA-AIRWICK: a CHLOE/CDC-3600 system for the automatic identification of spark images and their association into tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R K

    1980-06-26

    The AROMA-AIRWICK System for CHLOE, an automatic film scanning equipment built at Argonne by Donald Hodges, and the CDC-3600 computer is a system for the automatic identification of spark images and their association into tracks. AROMA-AIRWICK has been an outgrowth of the generally recognized need for the automatic processing of high energy physics data and the fact that the Argonne National Laboratory has been a center of serious spark chamber development in recent years.

  13. The advanced linked extended reconnaissance and targeting technology demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, James; de Villers, Yves; Maheux, Jean; Edwards, Mark; Gains, David; Rea, Terry; Banbury, Simon; Gauthier, Michelle

    2007-06-01

    The Advanced Linked Extended Reconnaissance & Targeting (ALERT) Technology Demonstration (TD) project is addressing key operational needs of the future Canadian Army's Surveillance and Reconnaissance forces by fusing multi-sensor and tactical data, developing automated processes, and integrating beyond line-of-sight sensing. We discuss concepts for displaying and fusing multi-sensor and tactical data within an Enhanced Operator Control Station (EOCS). The sensor data can originate from the Coyote's own visible-band and IR cameras, laser rangefinder, and ground-surveillance radar, as well as beyond line-of-sight systems such as a mini-UAV and unattended ground sensors. The authors address technical issues associated with the use of fully digital IR and day video cameras and discuss video-rate image processing developed to assist the operator to recognize poorly visible targets. Automatic target detection and recognition algorithms processing both IR and visible-band images have been investigated to draw the operator's attention to possible targets. The machine generated information display requirements are presented with the human factors engineering aspects of the user interface in this complex environment, with a view to establishing user trust in the automation. The paper concludes with a summary of achievements to date and steps to project completion.

  14. An approach of crater automatic recognition based on contour digital elevation model from Chang'E Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, W.; Li, C.; Zhang, Z.; Li, H.; Feng, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide fundamental information for exploration and related scientific research on the Moon and other planets, we propose a new automatic method to recognize craters on the lunar surface based on contour data extracted from a digital elevation model (DEM). First, we mapped 16-bits DEM to 256 gray scales for data compression, then for the purposes of better visualization, the grayscale is converted into RGB image. After that, a median filter is applied twice to DEM for data optimization, which produced smooth, continuous outlines for subsequent construction of contour plane. Considering the fact that the morphology of crater on contour plane can be approximately expressed as an ellipse or circle, we extract the outer boundaries of contour plane with the same color(gray value) as targets for further identification though a 8- neighborhood counterclockwise searching method. Then, A library of training samples is constructed based on above targets calculated from some sample DEM data, from which real crater targets are labeled as positive samples manually, and non-crater objects are labeled as negative ones. Some morphological feathers are calculated for all these samples, which are major axis (L), circumference(C), area inside the boundary(S), and radius of the largest inscribed circle(R). We use R/L, R/S, C/L, C/S, R/C, S/L as the key factors for identifying craters, and apply Fisher discrimination method on the sample library to calculate the weight of each factor and determine the discrimination formula, which is then applied to DEM data for identifying lunar craters. The method has been tested and verified with DEM data from CE-1 and CE-2, showing strong recognition ability and robustness and is applicable for the recognition of craters with various diameters and significant morphological differences, making fast and accurate automatic crater recognition possible.

  15. 12 CFR 925.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic membership. 925.4 Section 925.4 Banks... MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Membership Application Process § 925.4 Automatic membership. (a) Automatic membership... between the member and the Bank at the time of such conversion may continue. (b) Automatic membership...

  16. Automatic Threshold Detector Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-15

    TECHNIQUES Contract No. DAAH01-76-C-0363 ER76-4208 15 July 1976 Prepared for: HEADQUA RTERS U.S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35809 j...rain cross section each FFT filter) a MUT, MUCL , KCL, MUN, MUCLF (2 ), MUl, MUWI= MUW2 where MUT = Target cross section (M2), MUCL = total ground...variable is currently not used by the program. Since there is yet no point clutter model, MUCL represents the fluctuating component. Until a point plus

  17. Polarimetric laser radar target classification.

    PubMed

    Chun, Cornell S L; Sadjadi, Firooz A

    2005-07-15

    Imaging laser radar (ladar) systems have been developed for automatic target identification in surveillance systems. Ladar uses the range value at the target pixels to estimate the target's 3-D shape and identify the target. For targets in clutter and partially hidden targets, there are ambiguities in determining which pixels are on target that lead to uncertainties in determining the target's 3-D shape. An improvement is to use the polarization components of the reflected light. We describe the operation and preliminary evaluation of a polarization diverse imaging ladar system. Using a combination of intensity, range, and degree of polarization, we are better able to identify and distinguish the target from other objects of the same class.

  18. Research on tracking approach to weak small targets under sky background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinling; Miao, Dong; Zhou, Wensheng; Shen, Jiarui; Chen, Nao; Kang, Bo

    2014-09-01

    The infrared (IR) target recognizing and tracking technique is widely applied to many fields such as industries, navigation, weapon controlling and guiding and so on. Its application in military field has become the research hotspot. The stability of target tracking is the most important in military applications. However, it is difficult to track the aerial target because of the complex background and noise interference, especially from long distance, which make tracking targets even harder. In this paper, a novel image tracking system is designed, which uses template matching algorithm combined with Kalman filter. Because of the noise in image, the presence of occlusion, and the deformation of tracked target, some tracking algorithms may fail. So it is the main idea in this paper to merge the advantages from the tracking algorithms, and track the target real time. The algorithm for weak small targets from the image is based on template matching algorithm. In order to overcome the problems related to the changes of unpredictable circumstance, Kalman filter tracking algorithm is used. For the disadvantage of template matching algorithm towards occasions in target tracking, such as target occlusion, drastic change of image intensity, the relevant solutions are proposed. In cases when the target is occluded or moves more than the operational limits of the tracking module, Kalman filter is used to predict the object location. Thus, automatic detection and tracking of target in real-time is achieved and the proposed method is more robust in target tracking. The results show that the algorithm can realize target tracking under complicated scenes. It also improves the tracking stability, capacity of anti-interfering and running efficiency.

  19. Using suggestion to model different types of automatic writing.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Mehta, M A; Oakley, D A; Guilmette, D N; Gabay, A; Halligan, P W; Deeley, Q

    2014-05-01

    Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as "automatic writing" whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed suggestion in highly hypnotically suggestible participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional suggestion, was associated with a small but significant reduction of control, ownership, and awareness for writing. Targeted suggestions produced a double dissociation between thought and movement components of writing, for both feelings of control and ownership, and additionally, reduced awareness of writing. Overall, suggestion produced selective alterations in the control, ownership, and awareness of thought and motor components of writing, thus enabling key aspects of automatic writing, observed across different clinical and cultural settings, to be modelled.

  20. Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease Updated:Sep 29,2016 Would you recognize the ... Options • Recovery and Healthy Living Goals • Personal Stories Heart Valve Disease Symptoms Dr. Robert Bonow describes the symptoms that ...

  1. Prospective Teacher Learning: Recognizing Evidence of Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Tonya Gau; Webel, Corey; Bowen, Brian; Dyson, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined prospective teachers' (PSTs) ability to recognize evidence of children's conceptual understanding of mathematics in three content areas before and after an instructional intervention designed to support this ability. It also investigates the role PSTs' content knowledge plays in their ability to recognize children's…

  2. 46 CFR 164.019-17 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 164.019-17 Section 164.019-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-17 Recognized laboratory....

  3. When Do Infants Begin Recognizing Familiar Words in Sentences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaolis, Rory A.; Vihman, Marilyn M.; Keren-Portnoy, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that by 11 but not by 10 months infants recognize words that have become familiar from everyday life independently of the experimental setting. This study explored the ability of 10-, 11-, and 12- month-old infants to recognize familiar words in sentential context, without experimental training. The headturn preference…

  4. Mental Imagery Affects Subsequent Automatic Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Muriel A.; Mesbah, Rahele; Cremers, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Automatic defense responses promote survival and appropriate action under threat. They have also been associated with the development of threat-related psychiatric syndromes. Targeting such automatic responses during threat may be useful in populations with frequent threat exposure. Here, two experiments explored whether mental imagery as a pre-trauma manipulation could influence fear bradycardia (a core characteristic of freezing) during subsequent analog trauma (affective picture viewing). Image-based interventions have proven successful in the treatment of threat-related disorders and are easily applicable. In Experiment 1, 43 healthy participants were randomly assigned to an imagery script condition. Participants executed a passive viewing task with blocks of neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant pictures after listening to an auditory script that was either related (with a positive or a negative outcome) or unrelated to the unpleasant pictures from the passive viewing task. Heart rate was assessed during script listening and during passive viewing. Imagining negative related scripts resulted in greater bradycardia (neutral-unpleasant contrast) than imagining positive scripts, especially unrelated. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (n = 51), again in the neutral-unpleasant contrast. An extra no-script condition showed that bradycardia was not induced by the negative-related script, but rather that a positive script attenuated bradycardia. These preliminary results might indicate reduced vigilance after unrelated positive events. Future research should replicate these findings using a larger sample. Either way, the findings show that highly automatic defense behavior can be influenced by relatively simple mental imagery manipulations. PMID:26089801

  5. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  6. ACE: Automatic Centroid Extractor for real time target tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, K.; Whitaker, S.; Canaris, J.

    1990-01-01

    A high performance video image processor has been implemented which is capable of grouping contiguous pixels from a raster scan image into groups and then calculating centroid information for each object in a frame. The algorithm employed to group pixels is very efficient and is guaranteed to work properly for all convex shapes as well as most concave shapes. Processing speeds are adequate for real time processing of video images having a pixel rate of up to 20 million pixels per second. Pixels may be up to 8 bits wide. The processor is designed to interface directly to a transputer serial link communications channel with no additional hardware. The full custom VLSI processor was implemented in a 1.6 mu m CMOS process and measures 7200 mu m on a side.

  7. Automatic Target Recognition Using Nonlinear Autoregressive Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    units, and feedback connections can be incorporated into the network architecture (Duda, Hart, & Stork , 2001). Training a network can be described as...Informatics, 35, 352-359. Duda, R. O., Hart, P. E., & Stork , D. G. (2001). Pattern Classification. New York: Wiley. Friesen, K. D., Bihl, T. J

  8. Automatic Target Recognition, Executive Summary and Annotated Brief (PR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    development and the staring sensor called the “ Gotcha ” radar. The Advanced Recognition Capability (ARC) Lab is a critical node for the assessment...enthusiastically Innovative new concepts being addressed Creative mix of physics, phenomenology and M&S 3D Ladar development and GOTCHA staring radar...the UAV can autonomously taxi, take off, fly, remain on station capturing imagery, return and land. Gotcha Radar is a persistent radar with temporal

  9. Automatic programming of simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

    1990-01-01

    The concepts of software engineering were used to improve the simulation modeling environment. Emphasis was placed on the application of an element of rapid prototyping, or automatic programming, to assist the modeler define the problem specification. Then, once the problem specification has been defined, an automatic code generator is used to write the simulation code. The following two domains were selected for evaluating the concepts of software engineering for discrete event simulation: manufacturing domain and a spacecraft countdown network sequence. The specific tasks were to: (1) define the software requirements for a graphical user interface to the Automatic Manufacturing Programming System (AMPS) system; (2) develop a graphical user interface for AMPS; and (3) compare the AMPS graphical interface with the AMPS interactive user interface.

  10. Automatic rapid attachable warhead section

    DOEpatents

    Trennel, Anthony J.

    1994-05-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for (1) automatically selecting warheads or reentry vehicles from a storage area containing a plurality of types of warheads or reentry vehicles, (2) automatically selecting weapon carriers from a storage area containing at least one type of weapon carrier, (3) manipulating and aligning the selected warheads or reentry vehicles and weapon carriers, and (4) automatically coupling the warheads or reentry vehicles with the weapon carriers such that coupling of improperly selected warheads or reentry vehicles with weapon carriers is inhibited. Such inhibition enhances safety of operations and is achieved by a number of means including computer control of the process of selection and coupling and use of connectorless interfaces capable of assuring that improperly selected items will be rejected or rendered inoperable prior to coupling. Also disclosed are a method and apparatus wherein the stated principles pertaining to selection, coupling and inhibition are extended to apply to any item-to-be-carried and any carrying assembly.

  11. Automatic rapid attachable warhead section

    DOEpatents

    Trennel, A.J.

    1994-05-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for automatically selecting warheads or reentry vehicles from a storage area containing a plurality of types of warheads or reentry vehicles, automatically selecting weapon carriers from a storage area containing at least one type of weapon carrier, manipulating and aligning the selected warheads or reentry vehicles and weapon carriers, and automatically coupling the warheads or reentry vehicles with the weapon carriers such that coupling of improperly selected warheads or reentry vehicles with weapon carriers is inhibited. Such inhibition enhances safety of operations and is achieved by a number of means including computer control of the process of selection and coupling and use of connectorless interfaces capable of assuring that improperly selected items will be rejected or rendered inoperable prior to coupling. Also disclosed are a method and apparatus wherein the stated principles pertaining to selection, coupling and inhibition are extended to apply to any item-to-be-carried and any carrying assembly. 10 figures.

  12. Separating Automatic and Intentional Inhibitory Mechanisms of Attention in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Walter; Fillmore, Mark T.; Milich, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Researchers in the cognitive sciences recognize a fundamental distinction between automatic and intentional mechanisms of inhibitory control. The use of eye-tracking tasks to assess selective attention has led to a better understanding of this distinction in specific populations such as children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study examined automatic and intentional inhibitory control mechanisms in adults with ADHD using a saccadic interference (SI) task and a delayed ocular response (DOR) task. Thirty adults with ADHD were compared to 27 comparison adults on measures of inhibitory control. The DOR task showed that adults with ADHD were less able than comparison adults to inhibit a reflexive saccade towards the sudden appearance of a stimulus in the periphery. However, SI task performance showed that the ADHD group did not differ significantly from the comparison group on a measure of automatic inhibitory control. These findings suggest a dissociation between automatic and intentional inhibitory deficits in adults with ADHD. PMID:21058752

  13. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  14. Algorithms for skiascopy measurement automatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomins, Sergejs; Trukša, Renārs; KrūmiĆa, Gunta

    2014-10-01

    Automatic dynamic infrared retinoscope was developed, which allows to run procedure at a much higher rate. Our system uses a USB image sensor with up to 180 Hz refresh rate equipped with a long focus objective and 850 nm infrared light emitting diode as light source. Two servo motors driven by microprocessor control the rotation of semitransparent mirror and motion of retinoscope chassis. Image of eye pupil reflex is captured via software and analyzed along the horizontal plane. Algorithm for automatic accommodative state analysis is developed based on the intensity changes of the fundus reflex.

  15. Automatic interpretation of Schlumberger soundings

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, K.

    1980-09-01

    The automatic interpretation of apparent resistivity curves from horizontally layered earth models is carried out by the curve-fitting method in three steps: (1) the observed VES data are interpolated at equidistant points of electrode separations on the logarithmic scale by using the cubic spline function, (2) the layer parameters which are resistivities and depths are predicted from the sampled apparent resistivity values by SALS system program and (3) the theoretical VES curves from the models are calculated by Ghosh's linear filter method using the Zhody's computer program. Two soundings taken over Takenoyu geothermal area were chosen to test the procedures of the automatic interpretation.

  16. Automatic diluter for bacteriological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Bleuze, P; Leroy, G; Moschetto, Y; Leclerc, H

    1983-01-01

    The described apparatus, carrying 190 tubes, allows automatic and aseptic dilution of liquid or suspended-solid samples. Serial 10-fold dilutions are programmable from 10(-1) to 10(-9) and are carried out in glass tubes with screw caps and split silicone septa. Dilution assays performed with strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus permitted efficient conditions for sterilization of the needle to be defined and showed that the automatic dilutions were as accurate and as reproducible as the most rigorous conventional dilutions. Images PMID:6338826

  17. Traduction automatique et terminologie automatique (Automatic Translation and Automatic Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansereau, Jules

    1978-01-01

    An exposition of reasons why a system of automatic translation could not use a terminology bank except as a source of information. The fundamental difference between the two tools is explained and examples of translation and mistranslation are given as evidence of the limits and possibilities of each process. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  18. Automatic Focus Adjustment of a Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    AUTOFOCUS is a computer program for use in a control system that automatically adjusts the position of an instrument arm that carries a microscope equipped with an electronic camera. In the original intended application of AUTOFOCUS, the imaging microscope would be carried by an exploratory robotic vehicle on a remote planet, but AUTOFOCUS could also be adapted to similar applications on Earth. Initially control software other than AUTOFOCUS brings the microscope to a position above a target to be imaged. Then the instrument arm is moved to lower the microscope toward the target: nominally, the target is approached from a starting distance of 3 cm in 10 steps of 3 mm each. After each step, the image in the camera is subjected to a wavelet transform, which is used to evaluate the texture in the image at multiple scales to determine whether and by how much the microscope is approaching focus. A focus measure is derived from the transform and used to guide the arm to bring the microscope to the focal height. When the analysis reveals that the microscope is in focus, image data are recorded and transmitted.

  19. Automatic detection and classification of EOL-concrete and resulting recovered products by hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of materials from Demolition Waste (DW) represents one of the main target of the recycling industry and the its characterization is important in order to set up efficient sorting and/or quality control systems. End-Of-Life (EOL) concrete materials identification is necessary to maximize DW conversion into useful secondary raw materials, so it is fundamental to develop strategies for the implementation of an automatic recognition system of the recovered products. In this paper, HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) technique was applied in order to detect DW composition. Hyperspectral images were acquired by a laboratory device equipped with a HSI sensing device working in the near infrared range (1000-1700 nm): NIR Spectral Camera™, embedding an ImSpector™ N17E (SPECIM Ltd, Finland). Acquired spectral data were analyzed adopting the PLS_Toolbox (Version 7.5, Eigenvector Research, Inc.) under Matlab® environment (Version 7.11.1, The Mathworks, Inc.), applying different chemometric methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for exploratory data approach and Partial Least Square- Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to build classification models. Results showed that it is possible to recognize DW materials, distinguishing recycled aggregates from contaminants (e.g. bricks, gypsum, plastics, wood, foam, etc.). The developed procedure is cheap, fast and non-destructive: it could be used to make some steps of the recycling process more efficient and less expensive.

  20. Automatic recognition of harmonic bird sounds using a frequency track extraction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Heller, Jason R; Pinezich, John D

    2008-09-01

    This paper demonstrates automatic recognition of vocalizations of four common bird species (herring gull [Larus argentatus], blue jay [Cyanocitta cristata], Canada goose [Branta canadensis], and American crow [Corvus brachyrhynchos]) using an algorithm that extracts frequency track sets using track properties of importance and harmonic correlation. The main result is that a complex harmonic vocalization is rendered into a set of related tracks that is easily applied to statistical models of the actual bird vocalizations. For each vocalization type, a statistical model of the vocalization was created by transforming the training set frequency tracks into feature vectors. The extraction algorithm extracts sets of frequency tracks from test recordings that closely approximate harmonic sounds in the file being processed. Each extracted set in its final form is then compared with the statistical models generated during the training phase using Mahalanobis distance functions. If it matches one of the models closely, the recognizer declares the set an occurrence of the corresponding vocalization. The method was evaluated against a test set containing vocalizations of both the 4 target species and 16 additional species as well as background noise containing planes, cars, and various natural sounds.

  1. EPA Recognizes Comcast-Spectacor for Environmental Achievements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (February 18, 2015) - Before the Philadelphia Flyers-Columbus Blue Jackets game Tuesday night, EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin recognized Comcast-Spectacor, owners and operators of the Wells Fargo Center and Philadelphia Flye

  2. 3-minute diagnosis: Researchers develop new method to recognize pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Reg

    2014-01-06

    Imagine knowing precisely why you feel sick ... before the doctor's exam is over. Lawrence Livermore researcher Reg Beer and his engineering colleagues have developed a new method to recognize disease-causing pathogens quicker than ever before.

  3. Connecticut Organizations and Residents Recognized by EPA for Environmental Achievements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Three winners in Connecticut were recognized today at EPA's 2015 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. The environmental leaders were among 27 recipients across New England honored for helping to improve New England's environment.

  4. EPA recognizes WaterSense 2015 Partners of the Year

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the 2015 WaterSense award winners for creating, rebating, communicating and educating consumers about WaterSense-labeled products, homes and programs. These 17 winners

  5. EPA Recognizes Charleston County School District for Reducing Food Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the Charleston County School District for the District's achievements in reducing food waste. The District cultivated one of the state's first student-driven commercial compostin

  6. Massachusetts Organizations and Residents Recognized by EPA for Environmental Achievements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Eleven winners in Massachusetts were recognized today at EPA's 2015 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. The environmental leaders were among 27 recipients across New England honored for helping to improve New England's environment.

  7. EPA Recognizes Bowdoin College for Energy Efficiency Efforts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine is being recognized by EPA with a 2015 Energy Star Combined Heat and Power (CHP) award. CHP technology produces electricity and useful heat simultaneously from a single energy source, such as natural gas,

  8. EPA Recognizes Dallas Stars for Reducing Food Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 29, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized the Dallas Stars of the National Hockey League for the team's achievements in reducing food waste. The Stars participated in EPA's Food Recovery Challenge, w

  9. ORNL, partners officially recognized for discovery of elements 115, 117

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, Jim

    2016-01-05

    The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry has announced formal verification of four new chemical elements, recognizing the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its collaborators for the discovery of elements 115 and 117.

  10. 3-minute diagnosis: Researchers develop new method to recognize pathogens

    ScienceCinema

    Beer, Reg

    2016-07-12

    Imagine knowing precisely why you feel sick ... before the doctor's exam is over. Lawrence Livermore researcher Reg Beer and his engineering colleagues have developed a new method to recognize disease-causing pathogens quicker than ever before.

  11. EPA Recognizes Three Communities for Smart Growth Achievement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today recognized projects in three communities as winners of the 2015 National Award for Smart Growth Achievement. Winners include a new public park on a formerly contaminated site along th

  12. Vermont Organizations and Residents Recognized by EPA for Environmental Achievements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Four winners in Vermont were recognized today at EPA’s 2015 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. The environmental leaders were among 27 recipients across New England honored for helping to improve New England’s environment.

  13. 38 CFR 17.199 - Inspection of recognized State homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Aid to States for Care of Veterans in State Homes § 17.199 Inspection of recognized State... are deemed necessary. Such inspections shall be concerned with the physical plant; records relating...

  14. Two Maine Organizations Recognized by EPA for Environmental Achievements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two winners in Maine were recognized today at EPA’s 2015 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. The environmental leaders were among 27 recipients across New England honored for helping to improve New England’s environment.

  15. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-07

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding – a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  16. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  17. Automatic calculation in quarkonium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, an automatic calculating package based on REDUCE and RLISP, FDC, is introduced, especially its one-loop calculation part and its special treatment for quarkonium physics. With FDC, many works have been completed, most of them are very important in solve/clarify current puzzles in quarkonium physics.

  18. Automatic Identification of Metaphoric Utterances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jonathan Edwin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the problem of metaphor identification in linguistic and computational semantics, considering both manual and automatic approaches. It describes a manual approach to metaphor identification, the Metaphoricity Measurement Procedure (MMP), and compares this approach with other manual approaches. The dissertation then…

  19. Category Cued Recall Evokes a Generate-Recognize Retrieval Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Toth, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    The experiments reported here were designed to replicate and extend McCabe, Roediger, and Karpicke's (2011) finding that retrieval in category cued recall involves both controlled and automatic processes. The extension entailed identifying whether distinctive encoding affected 1 or both of these 2 processes. The first experiment successfully…

  20. Automatically Set Fuze and Communication Link during Muzzle Exit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    returns of low-trajectory projectiles. This is especially true when encountering targets over water . Many methods have been used, with varying degrees of...electronic countermeasure. 3. BACKGROUND OF THE MUZZLESCHMIDT TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION TO AUTOMATIC FUZE SETIING Iln order to couple data into a...a 2.54-cm hole in the length of the projectile, with the 10- MHz amplifier mouned on a disc at the front of the digital board (Figure 5). The entire

  1. Automatic TLI recognition system. Part 1: System description

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Lassahn, G.D.; Davidson, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes an automatic target recognition system for fast screening of large amounts of multi-sensor image data, based on low-cost parallel processors. This system uses image data fusion and gives uncertainty estimates. It is relatively low cost, compact, and transportable. The software is easily enhanced to expand the system`s capabilities, and the hardware is easily expandable to increase the system`s speed. This volume gives a general description of the ATR system.

  2. Automatic boundary modification of warped basal ganglia template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Enmin; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Ezekiel, Frank; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-07-01

    Accurate segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the brain is of increasing interest in the study of many brain disorders. This paper reports our approach to obtain the segmentation by warping our segmented template to a target and then automatically modifying the boundary of each structure. Test results show that our approach can increase the overlap between the warped template of the lenticular nucleus and the manually delineated lenticular nucleus by 10% compared the approach with only warping. 17

  3. Automatic Processing and the Unitization of Two Features.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    experiment, LaBerge (1973) showed that with practice two features could be automatically unitized to form a novel character. We wish to address a...different from a search for a target which requires identification of one of the features alone. Page 2 Indeed, LaBerge (1973) used a similar implicit...perception? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 1978, 26, 498-507. LaBerge , D. Attention and the measurement of perceptual learning. Memory and

  4. Delineating subtypes of self-injurious behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Louis P; Rooker, Griffin W; Zarcone, Jennifer R

    2015-09-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is maintained by automatic reinforcement in roughly 25% of cases. Automatically reinforced SIB typically has been considered a single functional category, and is less understood than socially reinforced SIB. Subtyping automatically reinforced SIB into functional categories has the potential to guide the development of more targeted interventions and increase our understanding of its biological underpinnings. The current study involved an analysis of 39 individuals with automatically reinforced SIB and a comparison group of 13 individuals with socially reinforced SIB. Automatically reinforced SIB was categorized into 3 subtypes based on patterns of responding in the functional analysis and the presence of self-restraint. These response features were selected as the basis for subtyping on the premise that they could reflect functional properties of SIB unique to each subtype. Analysis of treatment data revealed important differences across subtypes and provides preliminary support to warrant additional research on this proposed subtyping model.

  5. DELINEATING SUBTYPES OF SELF-INJURIOUS BEHAVIOR MAINTAINED BY AUTOMATIC REINFORCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Louis P.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Zarcone, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is maintained by automatic reinforcement in roughly 25% of cases. Automatically reinforced SIB typically has been considered a single functional category, and is less understood than socially reinforced SIB. Subtyping automatically reinforced SIB into functional categories has the potential to guide the development of more targeted interventions and increase our understanding of its biological underpinnings. The current study involved an analysis of 39 individuals with automatically reinforced SIB and a comparison group of 13 individuals with socially reinforced SIB. Automatically reinforced SIB was categorized into 3 subtypes based on patterns of responding in the functional analysis and the presence of self-restraint. These response features were selected as the basis for subtyping on the premise that they could reflect functional properties of SIB unique to each subtype. Analysis of treatment data revealed important differences across subtypes and provides preliminary support to warrant additional research on this proposed subtyping model. PMID:26223959

  6. Manual and Automatic Lineament Mapping: Comparing Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, D. A.; di Achille, G.; Barata, M. T.; Alves, E. I.

    2008-03-01

    A method for automatic lineament extraction using topographic data is applied on the Thaumasia plateau. A comparison is made between the results that are obtained from the automatic mapping approach and from a traditional tectonic lineament mapping.

  7. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-02-10

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications.

  8. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications. PMID:26860260

  9. Image-based air target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glais, Thierry; Ayoun, Andre

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the main results obtained through a study on aircraft identification and attitude estimation conducted by Thomson TRT Defense for the French Ministry of Defense/Direction Generale de l'Armement/Direction des Constructions Aeronautiques. The purpose of this study was automatic assistance to aircraft identification. Indeed, modern fight airplanes are equipped with optronic systems capable of detecting and tracking enemy aircraft. In order to react quickly, the pilot must know at least the target type and possibly its identity. Recognition of the target type and attitude is obtained by matching the observed image with patterns belonging to a database. Two matching algorithms, which have been tested, are presented. The first one, based on the contour Fourier transform, needs the complete target silhouette extraction. The second one, belonging to the class of prediction and verification algorithms, compares the individual parts of the target to the database and is able to recognize the target, even when it is partially occluded or ill-segmented due to the lack of contrast between the target and its environment. An original feature of the algorithm stays in a validation process which increases the reliability of transmitted answers. In case of low confidence, no answer is provided. In addition, successive answers are consolidated. This strategy is interesting especially for image sequences where the tracked airplane achieves attitude evolution or even simply flies over various backgrounds. The main output of this study is the parametric analysis of various factors which influence performance such as contrast, background complexity, distance, attitude and type. The evaluation method, largely based on image synthesis (including image sequences), allows fine interpretation of statistical results. Misclassification errors occur when resolution is not sufficient or when complex backgrounds cause erroneous segmentation. Best results are obtained when the

  10. Automatic detection and recognition of signs from natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Waibel, Alex

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to automatic detection and recognition of signs from natural scenes, and its application to a sign translation task. The proposed approach embeds multiresolution and multiscale edge detection, adaptive searching, color analysis, and affine rectification in a hierarchical framework for sign detection, with different emphases at each phase to handle the text in different sizes, orientations, color distributions and backgrounds. We use affine rectification to recover deformation of the text regions caused by an inappropriate camera view angle. The procedure can significantly improve text detection rate and optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy. Instead of using binary information for OCR, we extract features from an intensity image directly. We propose a local intensity normalization method to effectively handle lighting variations, followed by a Gabor transform to obtain local features, and finally a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method for feature selection. We have applied the approach in developing a Chinese sign translation system, which can automatically detect and recognize Chinese signs as input from a camera, and translate the recognized text into English.

  11. Automatic lip reading by using multimodal visual features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Shohei; Ohya, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Since long time ago, speech recognition has been researched, though it does not work well in noisy places such as in the car or in the train. In addition, people with hearing-impaired or difficulties in hearing cannot receive benefits from speech recognition. To recognize the speech automatically, visual information is also important. People understand speeches from not only audio information, but also visual information such as temporal changes in the lip shape. A vision based speech recognition method could work well in noisy places, and could be useful also for people with hearing disabilities. In this paper, we propose an automatic lip-reading method for recognizing the speech by using multimodal visual information without using any audio information such as speech recognition. First, the ASM (Active Shape Model) is used to track and detect the face and lip in a video sequence. Second, the shape, optical flow and spatial frequencies of the lip features are extracted from the lip detected by ASM. Next, the extracted multimodal features are ordered chronologically so that Support Vector Machine is performed in order to learn and classify the spoken words. Experiments for classifying several words show promising results of this proposed method.

  12. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects. PMID:23959240

  13. Automatic Speech Recognition from Neural Signals: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Herff, Christian; Schultz, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Speech interfaces have become widely accepted and are nowadays integrated in various real-life applications and devices. They have become a part of our daily life. However, speech interfaces presume the ability to produce intelligible speech, which might be impossible due to either loud environments, bothering bystanders or incapabilities to produce speech (i.e., patients suffering from locked-in syndrome). For these reasons it would be highly desirable to not speak but to simply envision oneself to say words or sentences. Interfaces based on imagined speech would enable fast and natural communication without the need for audible speech and would give a voice to otherwise mute people. This focused review analyzes the potential of different brain imaging techniques to recognize speech from neural signals by applying Automatic Speech Recognition technology. We argue that modalities based on metabolic processes, such as functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, are less suited for Automatic Speech Recognition from neural signals due to low temporal resolution but are very useful for the investigation of the underlying neural mechanisms involved in speech processes. In contrast, electrophysiologic activity is fast enough to capture speech processes and is therefor better suited for ASR. Our experimental results indicate the potential of these signals for speech recognition from neural data with a focus on invasively measured brain activity (electrocorticography). As a first example of Automatic Speech Recognition techniques used from neural signals, we discuss the Brain-to-text system. PMID:27729844

  14. Automatic Speech Recognition from Neural Signals: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Herff, Christian; Schultz, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Speech interfaces have become widely accepted and are nowadays integrated in various real-life applications and devices. They have become a part of our daily life. However, speech interfaces presume the ability to produce intelligible speech, which might be impossible due to either loud environments, bothering bystanders or incapabilities to produce speech (i.e., patients suffering from locked-in syndrome). For these reasons it would be highly desirable to not speak but to simply envision oneself to say words or sentences. Interfaces based on imagined speech would enable fast and natural communication without the need for audible speech and would give a voice to otherwise mute people. This focused review analyzes the potential of different brain imaging techniques to recognize speech from neural signals by applying Automatic Speech Recognition technology. We argue that modalities based on metabolic processes, such as functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, are less suited for Automatic Speech Recognition from neural signals due to low temporal resolution but are very useful for the investigation of the underlying neural mechanisms involved in speech processes. In contrast, electrophysiologic activity is fast enough to capture speech processes and is therefor better suited for ASR. Our experimental results indicate the potential of these signals for speech recognition from neural data with a focus on invasively measured brain activity (electrocorticography). As a first example of Automatic Speech Recognition techniques used from neural signals, we discuss the Brain-to-text system.

  15. Self-Compassion and Automatic Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the relationships between self-compassion and automatic thoughts. Participants were 299 university students. In this study, the Self-compassion Scale and the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire were used. The relationships between self-compassion and automatic thoughts were examined using correlation analysis…

  16. 8 CFR 1205.1 - Automatic revocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic revocation. 1205.1 Section 1205.1... REGULATIONS REVOCATION OF APPROVAL OF PETITIONS § 1205.1 Automatic revocation. (a) Reasons for automatic revocation. The approval of a petition or self-petition made under section 204 of the Act and in...

  17. 8 CFR 205.1 - Automatic revocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic revocation. 205.1 Section 205.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS REVOCATION OF APPROVAL OF PETITIONS § 205.1 Automatic revocation. (a) Reasons for automatic revocation. The approval of a petition...

  18. 12 CFR 1263.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic membership. 1263.4 Section 1263.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Membership Application Process § 1263.4 Automatic membership. (a) Automatic membership for certain charter...

  19. 12 CFR 1263.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic membership. 1263.4 Section 1263.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Membership Application Process § 1263.4 Automatic membership. (a) Automatic membership for certain charter...

  20. 12 CFR 1263.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic membership. 1263.4 Section 1263.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Membership Application Process § 1263.4 Automatic membership. (a) Automatic membership for certain charter...

  1. 12 CFR 1263.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automatic membership. 1263.4 Section 1263.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Membership Application Process § 1263.4 Automatic membership. (a) Automatic membership for certain charter...

  2. Adding Automatic Evaluation to Interactive Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farias, Gonzalo; Muñoz de la Peña, David; Gómez-Estern, Fabio; De la Torre, Luis; Sánchez, Carlos; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    Automatic evaluation is a challenging field that has been addressed by the academic community in order to reduce the assessment workload. In this work we present a new element for the authoring tool Easy Java Simulations (EJS). This element, which is named automatic evaluation element (AEE), provides automatic evaluation to virtual and remote…

  3. Targeting ion transport in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, E; Gillies, R J

    2014-03-19

    The metabolism of cancer cells differs substantially from normal cells, including ion transport. Although this phenomenon has been long recognized, ion transporters have not been viewed as suitable therapeutic targets. However, the acidic pH values present in tumours which are well outside of normal limits are now becoming recognized as an important therapeutic target. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is fundamental to tumour pH regulation. CAIX is commonly expressed in cancer, but lowly expressed in normal tissues and that presents an attractive target. Here, we discuss the possibilities of exploiting the acidic, hypoxic tumour environment as possible target for therapy. Additionally, clinical experience with CAIX targeting in cancer patients is discussed.

  4. Should the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change recognize climate migrants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Christine; Ford, James

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to increase migration flows, especially from socially and environmentally vulnerable populations. These ‘climate migrants’ do not have any official protection under international law, which has implications for the human security of migrants. This work argues that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) can and should recognize climate migrants, and is the most relevant international framework for doing so. While not legally binding, the acknowledgment of climate displacement, migration and planned relocation issues in the UNFCCC’s Cancun Adaptation Framework indicates a willingness to address the issue through an adaptation lens. Herein, the paper proposes a framework for setting the institutional groundwork for recognizing climate migrants, focusing on the most vulnerable, promoting targeted research and policy agendas, and situating policies within a comprehensive strategy.

  5. A Method for Recognizing Noisy Romanized Japanese Words in Learner English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Ryo; Kakegawa, Jun-Ichi; Sugimoto, Hiromi; Yabuta, Yukiko

    This paper describes a method for recognizing romanized Japanese words in learner English. They become noise and problematic in a variety of systems and tools for language learning and teaching including text analysis, spell checking, and grammatical error detection because they are Japanese words and thus mostly unknown to such systems and tools. A problem one encounters when recognizing romanized Japanese words in learner English is that the spelling rules of romanized Japanese words are often violated. To address this problem, the described method uses a clustering algorithm reinforced by a small set of rules. Experiments show that it achieves an F-measure of 0.879 and outperforms other methods. They also show that it only requires the target text and an English word list of reasonable size.

  6. Automatic registration of satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonseca, Leila M. G.; Costa, Max H. M.; Manjunath, B. S.; Kenney, C.

    1997-01-01

    Image registration is one of the basic image processing operations in remote sensing. With the increase in the number of images collected every day from different sensors, automated registration of multi-sensor/multi-spectral images has become an important issue. A wide range of registration techniques has been developed for many different types of applications and data. The objective of this paper is to present an automatic registration algorithm which uses a multiresolution analysis procedure based upon the wavelet transform. The procedure is completely automatic and relies on the grey level information content of the images and their local wavelet transform modulus maxima. The registration algorithm is very simple and easy to apply because it needs basically one parameter. We have obtained very encouraging results on test data sets from the TM and SPOT sensor images of forest, urban and agricultural areas.

  7. Automatic design of magazine covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanian, Ali; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel R.; Lin, Qian; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Lee, Seungyon; Fan, Jian; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a system for automatic design of magazine covers that quantifies a number of concepts from art and aesthetics. Our solution to automatic design of this type of media has been shaped by input from professional designers, magazine art directors and editorial boards, and journalists. Consequently, a number of principles in design and rules in designing magazine covers are delineated. Several techniques are derived and employed in order to quantify and implement these principles and rules in the format of a software framework. At this stage, our framework divides the task of design into three main modules: layout of magazine cover elements, choice of color for masthead and cover lines, and typography of cover lines. Feedback from professional designers on our designs suggests that our results are congruent with their intuition.

  8. Automatically scramming nuclear reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2004-10-12

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  9. Advances in automatic electro-optical tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Anthony J. E.; Hughes, Andrew D.

    1992-11-01

    British Aerospace (Systems & Equipment) Ltd (BASE) has been working in the field of automatic electro-optical tracking (Autotrack) systems for more than 12 years. BASE Autotrack systems carry out the automatic detection, tracking and classification of missiles and targets using image processing techniques operating on data received from electro-optical sensors. Typical systems also produce control data to move the sensor platform, enabling moving targets to be tracked accurately over a wide range of conditions. BASE Autotrack systems have been well proven in land, sea and air applications. This paper discusses the relevance of Autotrack systems to modern high-technology warfare and charts the progress of their development within BASE, both with respect to current products and active research programs. Two third generation BASE Autotrack systems are described, one of which provided a sophisticated air-to-ground tracking capability in the recent Gulf War. The latest Autotrack product is also described; this uses ASIC and Transputer technology to provide a high-performance, compact, missile and target tracker. Reference is also made to BASE's research work. Topics include an ASIC correlator, point target detection and, in particular, the use of neural networks for real-time target classification.

  10. Advances in automatic electro-optical tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew D.; Moy, Anthony J. E.

    1992-11-01

    British Aerospace (Systems & Equipment) Ltd (BASE) has been working in the field of automatic electro-optical tracking (Autotrack) systems for more than 12 years. BASE Autotrack systems carry out the automatic detection, tracking and classification of missiles and targets using image processing techniques operating on data received from electro-optical sensors. Typical systems also produce control data to move the sensor platform, enabling moving targets to be tracked accurately over a wide range of conditions. BASE Autotrack systems have been well proven in land, sea and air applications. This paper discusses the relevance of Autotrack systems to modern high-technology warfare and charts the progress of their development with BASE, both with respect to current products and active research programs. Two third generation BASE Autotrack systems are described, one of which provided a sophisticated air-to-ground tracking capability in the recent Gulf War. The latest Autotrack product is also described; this uses ASIC and Transputer technology to provide a high-performance, compact, missile and target tracker. Reference is also made to BASE's research work. Topics include an ASIC correlator, point target detection and, in particular, the use of neural networks for real-time target classification.

  11. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John J.; Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; Feng, Wenfeng; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the acoustic environment enhance perceptual processing of subsequent visual stimuli that appear in close spatial proximity. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms by which salient sounds affect visual processing. In particular, it is unclear whether such sounds automatically activate visual cortex. To shed light on this issue, the present study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) that were triggered either by peripheral sounds that preceded task-relevant visual targets (Experiment 1) or were presented during purely auditory tasks (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). In all experiments the sounds elicited a contralateral ERP over the occipital scalp that was localized to neural generators in extrastriate visual cortex of the ventral occipital lobe. The amplitude of this cross-modal ERP was predictive of perceptual judgments about the contrast of co-localized visual targets. These findings demonstrate that sudden, intrusive sounds reflexively activate human visual cortex in a spatially specific manner, even during purely auditory tasks when the sounds are not relevant to the ongoing task. PMID:23699530

  12. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-02-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  13. How CBO Estimates Automatic Stabilizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Pamela Green , Kurt Seibert, Joshua Shakin, and Robert Stewart for technical assistance. The authors also thank Leah Loversky for outstanding research...ANSI Std Z39-18 Abstract Federal receipts and outlays regularly respond to cyclical movements in the economy. When the economy is operating...Those “automatic stabilizers” thus tend to dampen the size of cyclical movements in the economy, by supporting or restraining private spending. (The

  14. Automatically-Programed Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, L.; Clerman, N.

    1985-01-01

    Software produces cutter location files for numerically-controlled machine tools. APT, acronym for Automatically Programed Tools, is among most widely used software systems for computerized machine tools. APT developed for explicit purpose of providing effective software system for programing NC machine tools. APT system includes specification of APT programing language and language processor, which executes APT statements and generates NC machine-tool motions specified by APT statements.

  15. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  16. Attention, Automaticity and Priority Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    paradiams is taken to indicate that processing remains under attentional control. This paper proposes a priority learning mechanism to model the...effects of practice and the development of automaticity, in visual search tasks. A connectionist simulation model implements this learning algorithm. Five...reliable finding from varied mapping studies is proposes a priority learning mechanism to model the effects of that reaction time increases roughly

  17. Automatic Home Nursing Activity Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Tang, Chunqiang

    2009-01-01

    The rapid deployment of Web-based, consumer-centric electronic medical records (CEMRs) is an important trend in healthcare. In this paper, we incorporate nursing knowledge into CEMR so that it can automatically recommend home nursing activities (HNAs). Those more complex HNAs are made clickable for users to find detailed implementation procedures. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our techniques using USMLE medical exam cases. PMID:20351888

  18. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  19. Automatic noise limiter-blanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A blanker system that may be used with audio noise limiters or automatic noise limiters was described. The system employs a pair of silicon diodes and two RC filters connected across the feedback impedance of an operational amplifier so as to counteract impulse noise interference caused by local spherics activity or 60 Hz harmonics radiated from ac motor control systems. The following information is given: circuit diagram and description, operating details, evaluation, discussion of other noise blanking methods.

  20. Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) recognize when they are being imitated.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Annika; Anderson, James R; Borelli, Eleonora; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Pier F

    2005-06-22

    This study investigated whether monkeys recognize when a human experimenter imitates their actions towards an object. Two experimenters faced 10 pigtailed macaques, who were given access to an interesting object. One experimenter imitated the monkeys' object-directed actions, the other performed temporally contingent but structurally different object-directed actions. Results show a significant visual preference for the imitator during manual object manipulations, but not mouthing actions. We argue that the ability to match actions could be based on both visual-visual and kinaesthetic-visual matching skills, and that mirror neurons, which have both visual and motor properties, could serve as a neural basis for recognizing imitation. However, imitation recognition as assessed by visual preference does not necessarily imply the capacity to attribute imitative intentionality to the imitator. The monkeys might implicitly recognize when they are being imitated without deeper insight into the mental processes of others.

  1. You look familiar: how Malaysian Chinese recognize faces.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chrystalle B Y; Stephen, Ian D; Whitehead, Ross; Sheppard, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    East Asian and white Western observers employ different eye movement strategies for a variety of visual processing tasks, including face processing. Recent eye tracking studies on face recognition found that East Asians tend to integrate information holistically by focusing on the nose while white Westerners perceive faces featurally by moving between the eyes and mouth. The current study examines the eye movement strategy that Malaysian Chinese participants employ when recognizing East Asian, white Western, and African faces. Rather than adopting the Eastern or Western fixation pattern, Malaysian Chinese participants use a mixed strategy by focusing on the eyes and nose more than the mouth. The combination of Eastern and Western strategies proved advantageous in participants' ability to recognize East Asian and white Western faces, suggesting that individuals learn to use fixation patterns that are optimized for recognizing the faces with which they are more familiar.

  2. When do infants begin recognizing familiar words in sentences?

    PubMed

    Depaolis, Rory A; Vihman, Marilyn M; Keren-Portnoy, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that by 11 but not by 10 months infants recognize words that have become familiar from everyday life independently of the experimental setting. This study explored the ability of 10-, 11-, and 12-month-old infants to recognize familiar words in sentential context, without experimental training. The headturn preference procedure was used to contrast passages containing words likely to be familiar to the infants with passages containing words unlikely to have been previously heard. Two stimulus words were inserted near the beginning and end of each of a set of simple sentence frames. The ability to recognize the familiar words within sentences emerged only at 12 months of age. The contrast between segmentation abilities as they emerge as a result of everyday exposure to language, as assessed here, and those abilities as measured in studies in which words are experimentally trained is discussed in terms of memory-based mechanisms.

  3. Automatic Synthesis Imaging with Difmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, T. J.; Shepherd, M. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Myers, S. T.

    1994-12-01

    Difmap is a new interactive program for synthesis imaging. It includes data display, data editing, self-calibration, imaging, deconvolution, and model-fitting. The program can handle continuum, spectral-line, and polarization data from connected-element and very-long-baseline interferometer arrays. The program is written in ANSI C and runs on UNIX workstations. We describe the operation of the program with example data sets from the Very Large Array, the global VLBI network, and the Owens Valley Millimeter Array. We have developed Difmap scripts for automatic mapping and self-calibration of both VLA and VLBI data. We describe the strategies adopted for choosing the imaging, deconvolution, and self-calibration parameters, and show how these automatic scripts have made possible the rapid imaging of several hundred sources in the Caltech--Jodrell Bank VLBI surveys (CJ1 and CJ2) and several thousand sources in a VLA search for gravitational lenses (CLASS). Other images made with automatic mapping in Difmap are presented at this meeting by Fassnacht et al., Myers et al., and Taylor et al.

  4. Automatic tracking sensor camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takao; Kato, Daiichiro; Ishikawa, Akio; Inoue, Seiki

    2001-04-01

    We are developing a sensor camera system for automatically tracking and determining the positions of subjects moving in three-dimensions. The system is intended to operate even within areas as large as soccer fields. The system measures the 3D coordinates of the object while driving the pan and tilt movements of camera heads, and the degree of zoom of the lenses. Its principal feature is that it automatically zooms in as the object moves farther away and out as the object moves closer. This maintains the area of the object as a fixed position of the image. This feature makes stable detection by the image processing possible. We are planning to use the system to detect the position of a soccer ball during a soccer game. In this paper, we describe the configuration of the developing automatic tracking sensor camera system. We then give an analysis of the movements of the ball within images of games, the results of experiments on method of image processing used to detect the ball, and the results of other experiments to verify the accuracy of an experimental system. These results show that the system is sufficiently accurate in terms of obtaining positions in three-dimensions.

  5. Automatic cloud tracking applied to GOES and Meteosat observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endlich, R. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    An improved automatic processing method for the tracking of cloud motions as revealed by satellite imagery is presented and applications of the method to GOES observations of Hurricane Eloise and Meteosat water vapor and infrared data are presented. The method is shown to involve steps of picture smoothing, target selection and the calculation of cloud motion vectors by the matching of a group at a given time with its best likeness at a later time, or by a cross-correlation computation. Cloud motion computations can be made in as many as four separate layers simultaneously. For data of 4 and 8 km resolution in the eye of Hurricane Eloise, the automatic system is found to provide results comparable in accuracy and coverage to those obtained by NASA analysts using the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System, with results obtained by the pattern recognition and cross correlation computations differing by only fractions of a pixel. For Meteosat water vapor data from the tropics and midlatitudes, the automatic motion computations are found to be reliable only in areas where the water vapor fields contained small-scale structure, although excellent results are obtained using Meteosat IR data in the same regions. The automatic method thus appears to be competitive in accuracy and coverage with motion determination by human analysts.

  6. 26 CFR 1.1374-2 - Net recognized built-in gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Net recognized built-in gain. 1.1374-2 Section... Net recognized built-in gain. (a) In general. An S corporation's net recognized built-in gain for any... corporations and considering only its recognized built-in gain, recognized built-in loss, and recognized...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1374-2 - Net recognized built-in gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net recognized built-in gain. 1.1374-2 Section... Net recognized built-in gain. (a) In general. An S corporation's net recognized built-in gain for any... corporations and considering only its recognized built-in gain, recognized built-in loss, and recognized...

  8. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cell autoantigens recognized by anti-dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed the occurrence of autoimmune responses in dengue virus (DV) infection, which has potential implications for the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome. In the present study, we have used a proteomic analysis to identify several candidate proteins on HMEC-1 endothelial cells recognized by anti-DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antibodies. The target proteins, including ATP synthase beta chain, protein disulfide isomerase, vimentin, and heat shock protein 60, co-localize with anti-NS1 binding sites on nonfixed HMEC-1 cells using immunohistochemical double staining and confocal microscopy. The cross-reactivity of anti-target protein antibodies with HMEC-1 cells was inhibited by NS1 protein pre-absorption. Furthermore, a cross-reactive epitope on NS1 amino acid residues 311-330 (P311-330) was predicted using homologous sequence alignment. The reactivity of dengue hemorrhagic patient sera with HMEC-1 cells was blocked by synthetic peptide P311-330 pre-absorption. Taken together, our results identify putative targets on endothelial cells recognized by anti-DV NS1 antibodies, where NS1 P311-330 possesses the shared epitope.

  9. Posthypnotic suggestion alters conscious color perception in an automatic manner.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Sakari; Koivisto, Mika

    2013-01-01

    The authors studied whether a posthypnotic suggestion to see a brief, masked target as gray can change the color experience of a hypnotic virtuoso. The visibility of the target was manipulated by varying the delay between the target and the mask that followed it. The virtuoso's subjective reports indicated that her conscious color experience was altered already at short delays between the target and the subsequent mask. The virtuoso's objectively measured pattern of responding under posthypnotic suggestion could not be mimicked either by control participants nor the virtuoso herself. Due to posthypnotic amnesia, the virtuoso was unaware of suggestions given during hypnosis. Importantly, the virtuoso could not alter her color perception without a hypnotic suggestion. These results suggest that hypnosis can affect even a highly automatic process such as color perception.

  10. Scanner OPC signatures: automatic vendor-to-vendor OPE matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2009-03-01

    As 193nm lithography continues to be stretched and the k1 factor decreases, optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a vital part of the lithographer's tool kit. Unfortunately, as is now well known, the design variations of lithographic scanners from different vendors cause them to have slightly different optical-proximity effect (OPE) behavior, meaning that they print features through pitch in distinct ways. This in turn means that their response to OPC is not the same, and that an OPC solution designed for a scanner from Company 1 may or may not work properly on a scanner from Company 2. Since OPC is not inexpensive, that causes trouble for chipmakers using more than one brand of scanner. Clearly a scanner-matching procedure is needed to meet this challenge. Previously, automatic matching has only been reported for scanners of different tool generations from the same manufacturer. In contrast, scanners from different companies have been matched using expert tuning and adjustment techniques, frequently requiring laborious test exposures. Automatic matching between scanners from Company 1 and Company 2 has remained an unsettled problem. We have recently solved this problem and introduce a novel method to perform the automatic matching. The success in meeting this challenge required three enabling factors. First, we recognized the strongest drivers of OPE mismatch and are thereby able to reduce the information needed about a tool from another supplier to that information readily available from all modern scanners. Second, we developed a means of reliably identifying the scanners' optical signatures, minimizing dependence on process parameters that can cloud the issue. Third, we carefully employed standard statistical techniques, checking for robustness of the algorithms used and maximizing efficiency. The result is an automatic software system that can predict an OPC matching solution for scanners from different suppliers without requiring expert intervention.

  11. Recognizing Risk-of-Failure in Communication Design Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Joyce; Lievesley, Matthew; Taylor, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The pace of commercial graphic design practice presents very few opportunities to conduct user research after a project's launch. This makes the design team's ability to anticipate and address risks during the design development phase even more important, recognized in the astute observation from Tim Brown, CEO of leading international design…

  12. 76 FR 33419 - Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...In accordance with the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the ``Dodd-Frank Act'') and to enhance oversight, the Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission'') is proposing amendments to existing rules and new rules that would apply to credit rating agencies registered with the Commission as nationally recognized statistical rating organizations (``NRSROs''). In......

  13. 46 CFR 160.060-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.060-9 Section 160.060-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for a Buoyant Vest, Unicellular Polyethylene...

  14. 46 CFR 160.060-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.060-9 Section 160.060-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for a Buoyant Vest, Unicellular Polyethylene...

  15. 46 CFR 160.060-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.060-9 Section 160.060-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for a Buoyant Vest, Unicellular Polyethylene...

  16. 46 CFR 160.060-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.060-9 Section 160.060-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for a Buoyant Vest, Unicellular Polyethylene...

  17. 46 CFR 160.060-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.060-9 Section 160.060-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for a Buoyant Vest, Unicellular Polyethylene...

  18. Vulvodynia: a case series of a poorly recognized entity.

    PubMed

    Patsatsi, A; Vavilis, D; Theodoridis, T D; Kellartzis, D; Sotiriadis, D; Tarlatzis, B C

    2012-01-01

    Vulvodynia remains a poorly recognized entity with unclear pathogenesis. In a case series of six patients with vulvodynia over a five-year period in a tertiary university hospital, we describe the clinical features, the diagnostic procedures, the impact on each patient's emotional status and discuss the necessity and efficacy of the chosen treatment options in accordance with the current therapeutic guidelines.

  19. Computer Program Recognizes Patterns in Time-Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Charles

    2003-01-01

    A computer program recognizes selected patterns in time-series data like digitized samples of seismic or electrophysiological signals. The program implements an artificial neural network (ANN) and a set of N clocks for the purpose of determining whether N or more instances of a certain waveform, W, occur within a given time interval, T. The ANN must be trained to recognize W in the incoming stream of data. The first time the ANN recognizes W, it sets clock 1 to count down from T to zero; the second time it recognizes W, it sets clock 2 to count down from T to zero, and so forth through the Nth instance. On the N + 1st instance, the cycle is repeated, starting with clock 1. If any clock has not reached zero when it is reset, then N instances of W have been detected within time T, and the program so indicates. The program can readily be encoded in a field-programmable gate array or an application-specific integrated circuit that could be used, for example, to detect electroencephalographic or electrocardiographic waveforms indicative of epileptic seizures or heart attacks, respectively.

  20. 76 FR 10500 - Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is adjusting the approach it uses for calculating the fees... prepayment of these fees. This adjustment increases the fees; OSHA is phasing in the fee increase over...